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Sample records for additional protein bands

  1. Effect of additives on protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiroyuki; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2009-06-01

    This paper overviews solution additives that affect protein stability and aggregation during refolding, heating, and freezing processes. Solution additives are mainly grouped into two classes, i.e., protein denaturants and stabilizers. The former includes guanidine, urea, strong ionic detergents, and certain chaotropic salts; the latter includes certain amino acids, sugars, polyhydric alcohols, osmolytes, and kosmotropic salts. However, there are solution additives that are not unambiguously placed into these two classes, including arginine, certain divalent cation salts (e.g., MgCl(2)) and certain polyhydric alcohols (e.g., ethylene glycol). Certain non-ionic or non-detergent surfactants, ionic liquids, amino acid derivatives, polyamines, and certain amphiphilic polymers may belong to this class. They have marginal effects on protein structure and stability, but are able to disrupt protein interactions. Information on additives that do not catalyze chemical reactions nor affect protein functions helps us to design protein solutions for increased stability or reduced aggregation. PMID:19519415

  2. A marginal band-associated protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The marginal band of nucleated erythrocytes is a microtubule organelle under rigorous quantitative and spatial control, with properties quite different from those of the microtubule organelles of cultured cells. Previous results suggest that proteins other than tubulin may participate in organizing the marginal band, and may interact with elements of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton in addition to microtubules. To identify such species, we raised mAbs against the proteins that assemble from chicken brain homogenates with tubulin. One such antibody binds to a single protein in chicken erythrocytes, and produces an immunofluorescence pattern colocalizing with marginal band microtubules. Several properties of this protein are identical to those of ezrin, a protein isolated from brush border and localized to motile elements of cultured cells. A significant proportion of the antigen is not soluble in erythrocytes, as determined by extraction with nonionic detergent. This cytoskeleton-associated fraction is unaffected by treatments that solubilize the marginal band microtubules. The protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins. In the accompanying manuscript (Goslin, K., E. Birgbauer, G. Banker, and F. Solomon. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:1621-1631), we show that the same antibody recognizes a component of growth cones with a similar dual nature. In early embryonic red blood cells, the antigen is dispersed throughout the cell and does not colocalize with assembled tubulin. Its confinement to the marginal band during development follows rather than precedes that of microtubules. These results, along with previous work, suggest models for the formation of the marginal band. PMID:2677023

  3. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  4. Compactional deformation bands in Wingate Sandstone; additional evidence of an impact origin for Upheaval Dome, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Chris H.; Schultz, Richard A.

    2007-04-01

    Field and microstructural observations from Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, show that inelastic strain of the Wingate Sandstone is localized along compactional deformation bands. These bands are tabular discontinuities (< 0.5 cm thick) that accommodate inelastic shear and compaction of inter-granular volume. Measurements of porosity and grain size from non-deformed samples are used to define a set of capped strength envelopes for the Wingate Sandstone. These strength envelopes reveal that compactional deformation bands require at least ca. 0.7 GPa (and potentially more than 2.3 GPa) of effective mean stress in order to nucleate within this sandstone. We find that the most plausible geologic process capable of generating these required magnitudes of mean stress is a meteoritic impact. Therefore the compactional deformation bands observed within the Wingate Sandstone are additional evidence of an impact event at Upheaval Dome and support a post-Wingate (post-Early Jurassic) age for this impact.

  5. Tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 protein in Ca2+/A23187-treated human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, G; Piccinini, G; Balduini, C; Seppi, C; Brovelli, A

    1996-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were induced to release membrane vesicles by treatment with Ca2+ and ionophore A23187. In addition to the biochemical changes already known to accompany loading of human erythrocytes with Ca2+, the present study reveals that tyrosine phosphorylation of the anion exchanger band 3 protein also occurs. The relationship between tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 and membrane vesiculation was analysed using quinine (a non-specific inhibitor of the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel, and the only known inhibitor of Ca(2+)-induced vesiculation) and charybdotoxin, a specific inhibitor of the apamin-insensitive K(+)-channel. Both inhibitors suppressed tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3. In the presence of quinine, membrane vesiculation was also suppressed. In contrast, at the concentration of charybdotoxin required to suppress tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3, membrane vesiculation was only mildly inhibited (16-23% inhibition), suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 is not necessary for membrane vesiculation. Phosphorylation of band 3 was in fact observed when erythrocytes were induced to shrink in a Ca(2+)-independent manner, e.g. by treatment with the K+ ionophore valinomycin or with hypertonic solutions. These observations suggest that band 3 tyrosine phosphorylation occurs when cell volume regulation is required. PMID:8973551

  6. Assembly and bundling of marginal band microtubule protein: role of tau.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, I; Cohen, W D

    1994-01-01

    Microtubule protein extracted from dogfish erythrocyte cytoskeletons by disassembly of marginal bands at low temperature formed linear microtubule (MT) bundles upon reassembly at 22 degrees C. The bundles, which were readily visible by video-enhanced phase contrast or DIC microscopy, increased in length and thickness with time. At steady state after 1 hour, most bundles were 6-11 microns in length and 2-5 MTs in thickness. No inter-MT cross-bridges were visible by negative staining. The bundles exhibited mechanical stability in flow as well as flexibility, in this respect resembling native marginal bands. As analyzed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting, our standard extraction conditions yielded MT protein preparations and bundles containing tau protein but not high molecular weight MAPs such as MAP-2 or syncolin. In addition, late fractions of MT protein obtained by gel filtration were devoid of high molecular weight proteins but still produced MT bundles. The marginal band tau was salt-extractable and heat-stable, bound antibodies to mammalian brain tau, and formed aggregates upon desalting. Antibodies to tau blocked MT assembly, but both assembly and bundling occurred in the presence of antibodies to actin or syncolin. The MTs were "unbundled" by subtilisin or by high salt (0.5-1 M KCl or NaCl), consistent with tau involvement in bundling. High salt extracts retained bundling activity, and salt-induced unbundling was reversible with desalting. However, reversibility was observed only after salt-induced MT disassembly had occurred. Reconstitution experiments showed that addition of marginal band tau to preassembled MTs did not produce bundles, whereas tau presence during MT reassembly did yield bundles. Thus, in this system, tau appears to play a role in both MT assembly and bundling, serving in the latter function as a coassembly factor. PMID:7820858

  7. A band 3-based macrocomplex of integral and peripheral proteins in the RBC membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, Lesley J.; Beckmann, Roland; Ribeiro, M. Leticia; Peters, Luanne L.; Chasis, Joel A.; Delaunay, Jean; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Tanner, Michael J.A.

    2003-06-18

    We have studied the membrane proteins of band 3 anion exchanger (AE1)-deficient mouse and human red blood cells. It has been shown previously that proteins of the band 3 complex are reduced or absent in these cells. In this study we show that proteins of the Rh complex are also greatly reduced (Rh-associated glycoprotein, Rh polypeptides, CD47, glycophorin B) or absent (LW). These observations suggest that the Rh complex is associated with the band 3 complex in healthy RBCs. Mouse band 3 RBCs differed from the human band 3-deficient RBCs in that they retained CD47. Aquaporin 1 was reduced, and its glycosylation was altered in mouse and human band 3-deficient RBCs. Proteins of the glycophorin complex, and other proteins with independent cytoskeletal interactions, were present in normal or increased amounts. To obtain direct evidence for the association of the band 3 and the Rh protein complexes in the RBC, we examined whether Rh complex proteins were coimmunoprecipitated with band 3 from membranes. RhAG and Rh were found to be efficiently coimmunoprecipitated with band 3 from deoxycholate-solubilized membranes. Results suggest that band 3 forms the core of a macrocomplex of integral and peripheral RBC membrane proteins. The presence of these proteins in a single structural Macrocomplex makes it likely that they have linked functional or regulatory roles. We speculate that this macrocomplex may function as an integrated CO2/O2 gas exchange unit (metabolon) in the erythrocyte.

  8. Assessing Spectral Simulation Protocols for the Amide I Band of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Ana V; Bondarenko, Anna S; Jansen, Thomas L C

    2016-08-01

    We present a benchmark study of spectral simulation protocols for the amide I band of proteins. The amide I band is widely used in infrared spectroscopy of proteins due to the large signal intensity, high sensitivity to hydrogen bonding, and secondary structural motifs. This band has, thus, proven valuable in many studies of protein structure-function relationships. We benchmark spectral simulation protocols using two common force fields in combination with several electrostatic mappings and coupling models. The results are validated against experimental linear absorption and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy for three well-studied proteins. We find two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to be much more sensitive to the simulation protocol than linear absorption and report on the best simulation protocols. The findings demonstrate that there is still room for ideas to improve the existing models for the amide I band of proteins. PMID:27348022

  9. Additional comments on the assumption of homogenous survival rates in modern bird banding estimation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Stokes, S.L.; Hines, J.E.; Conroy, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    We examined the problem of heterogeneous survival and recovery rates in bird banding estimation models. We suggest that positively correlated subgroup survival and recovery probabilities may result from winter banding operations and that this situation will produce positively biased survival rate estimates. The magnitude of the survival estimate bias depends on the proportion of the population in each subgroup. Power of the suggested goodness-of-fit test to reject the inappropriate model for heterogeneous data sets was low for all situations examined and was poorest for positively related subgroup survival and recovery rates. Despite the magnitude of some of the biases reported and the relative inability to detect heterogeneity, we suggest that levels of heterogeneity normally encountered in real data sets will produce relatively small biases of average survival rates.

  10. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Steffen; Gerwert, Klaus; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound “water wires” is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded (“dangling”) O–H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  11. Oxygen additions in serial femtosecond crystallographic protein structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin

    2016-10-01

    In principle, serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) could yield data sets that are completely free of the effects caused by slow, radiation-induced chemical reactions, for example, oxygen additions, responsible for radiation damage. However, experimental evidence is presented here that SFX data sets obtained by techniques that expose different parts of the same specimen to single pulses of radiation do not have this property, even if the specimen in question is frozen. The diffraction image of each such crystal obtained with the first pulse of radiation is certain to represent the structure of a protein that has not been modified chemically, but all of the images obtained subsequently from the same crystal will represent structures that have been modified to a lesser or greater extent by oxygen additions because of the rapid diffusion of oxygenic free radicals through the specimen. The higher the level of oxygen additions a crystal suffers during data collection, the poorer the statistical quality of data set obtained from it will, and the higher the free R-factors of the resulting structural model. PMID:27438534

  12. Hypobaric hypoxia-reoxygenation diminishes band 3 protein functions in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    González, Gustavo; Celedón, Gloria; Sandoval, Mario; González, Gabriela E; Ferrer, Verónica; Astete, Rodrigo; Behn, Claus

    2002-12-01

    We have previously shown that subjects exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia display an erythrocyte membrane protein band 3 with an increased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation. We suggested it was due to an oxidative damage of band 3. We now report that exposure to hypobaric hypoxia followed by reoxygenation affects protein band 3 functions such as anion transport and binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase. Transport capacity was assessed with the fluorescent probe 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] ethanesulfonate (NBD-taurine). Binding capacity was evaluated from the activity of the membrane-associated enzyme. Healthy young men were exposed for 20 min to hypobaric hypoxia, simulating an altitude of 4,500 m above sea level and after recompression band 3 function was assessed. An inhibition of band 3 anion transport function and a decrease in the binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase to band 3 were observed. Evidence is given supporting the hypothesis that functional alteration of band 3 is due to its oxidative modification originated as a consequence of the exposure to hypobaric hypoxia and further reoxygenation. PMID:12466935

  13. Hypobaric hypoxia-reoxygenation diminishes band 3 protein functions in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    González, Gustavo; Celedón, Gloria; Sandoval, Mario; González, Gabriela E; Ferrer, Verónica; Astete, Rodrigo; Behn, Claus

    2002-12-01

    We have previously shown that subjects exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia display an erythrocyte membrane protein band 3 with an increased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation. We suggested it was due to an oxidative damage of band 3. We now report that exposure to hypobaric hypoxia followed by reoxygenation affects protein band 3 functions such as anion transport and binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase. Transport capacity was assessed with the fluorescent probe 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] ethanesulfonate (NBD-taurine). Binding capacity was evaluated from the activity of the membrane-associated enzyme. Healthy young men were exposed for 20 min to hypobaric hypoxia, simulating an altitude of 4,500 m above sea level and after recompression band 3 function was assessed. An inhibition of band 3 anion transport function and a decrease in the binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase to band 3 were observed. Evidence is given supporting the hypothesis that functional alteration of band 3 is due to its oxidative modification originated as a consequence of the exposure to hypobaric hypoxia and further reoxygenation.

  14. Tuning protein-protein interactions using cosolvents: specific effects of ionic and non-ionic additives on protein phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jan; Platten, Florian; Wagner, Dana; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2016-04-21

    Cosolvents are routinely used to modulate the (thermal) stability of proteins and, hence, their interactions with proteins have been studied intensely. However, less is known about their specific effects on protein-protein interactions, which we characterize in terms of the protein phase behavior. We analyze the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl), guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl), glycerol, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We experimentally determined the crystallization boundary (XB) and, in combination with data on the cloud-point temperatures (CPTs), the crystallization gap. In agreement with other studies, our data indicate that the additives might affect the protein phase behavior through electrostatic screening and additive-specific contributions. At high salt concentrations, where electrostatic interactions are screened, both the CPT and the XB are found to be linear functions of the additive concentration. Their slopes quantify the additive-specific changes of the phase behavior and thus of the protein-protein interactions. While the specific effect of NaCl is to induce attractions between proteins, DMSO, glycerol and GuHCl (with increasing strength) weaken attractions and/or induce repulsions. Except for DMSO, changes of the CPT are stronger than those of the XB. Furthermore, the crystallization gap widens in the case of GuHCl and glycerol and narrows in the case of NaCl. We relate these changes to colloidal interaction models, namely square-well and patchy interactions. PMID:27020538

  15. Laser-activated protein bands for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Malik, Richard; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1996-01-01

    A 100 micrometer core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the protein based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 plus or minus 5 min. (n equals 24) compared to 23 plus or minus 9 min (n equals 13) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 plus or minus 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 plus or minus 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study, with a total of fifty-seven adult male wistar rats, compared laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. Twenty-four laser soldered nerves and thirteen sutured nerves were characterized at three months and showed successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of 2.4 plus or minus 0.7 mV and 2.7 plus or minus 0.8 mV respectively. Histopathology of the in vivo study, confirmed the comparable regeneration of axons in laser and suture operated nerves. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  16. Colloidal graphenes as heterogeneous additives to enhance protein crystal yield.

    PubMed

    Gully, Benjamin S; Zou, Jianli; Cadby, Gemma; Passon, Daniel M; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Bond, Charles S

    2012-09-01

    In the structural analysis of proteins via X-ray diffraction, a rate-limiting step is in favourable nucleation, a problematic obstacle in successful generation of protein crystals. Here graphene and graphene oxide were applied to protein crystallisation trials, offering improvements in crystalline output and nucleation.

  17. Distinct oligoclonal band antibodies in multiple sclerosis recognize ubiquitous self-proteins.

    PubMed

    Brändle, Simone M; Obermeier, Birgit; Senel, Makbule; Bruder, Jessica; Mentele, Reinhard; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Kristoferitsch, Wolfgang; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Wekerle, Hartmut; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus

    2016-07-12

    Oligoclonal Ig bands (OCBs) of the cerebrospinal fluid are a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), a disabling inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). OCBs are locally produced by clonally expanded antigen-experienced B cells and therefore are believed to hold an important clue to the pathogenesis. However, their target antigens have remained unknown, mainly because it was thus far not possible to isolate distinct OCBs against a background of polyclonal antibodies. To overcome this obstacle, we copurified disulfide-linked Ig heavy and light chains from distinct OCBs for concurrent analysis by mass spectrometry and aligned patient-specific peptides to corresponding transcriptome databases. This method revealed the full-length sequences of matching chains from distinct OCBs, allowing for antigen searches using recombinant OCB antibodies. As validation, we demonstrate that an OCB antibody from a patient with an infectious CNS disorder, neuroborreliosis, recognized a Borrelia protein. Next, we produced six recombinant antibodies from four MS patients and identified three different autoantigens. All of them are conformational epitopes of ubiquitous intracellular proteins not specific to brain tissue. Our findings indicate that the B-cell response in MS is heterogeneous and partly directed against intracellular autoantigens released during tissue destruction. In addition to helping elucidate the role of B cells in MS, our approach allows the identification of target antigens of OCB antibodies in other neuroinflammatory diseases and the production of therapeutic antibodies in infectious CNS diseases. PMID:27325759

  18. Differentiation of Campylobacter species by protein banding patterns in polyacrylamide slab gels.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, D A; Lambe, D W

    1984-09-01

    Soluble protein extracts of 37 catalase-positive strains of Campylobacter species were examined by polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Electrophoretic banding patterns showed good correlation with biochemical tests and with available DNA homology data in distinguishing species of Campylobacter but did not differentiate subspecies or biotypes. PAGE patterns indicated that Campylobacter coli is a distinct species. Furthermore, the PAGE patterns indicated that C. jejuni and nalidixic acid-resistant thermophilic Campylobacter species (C. laridis) are each distinct species. The protein banding patterns of C. fetus subsp. venerealis and C. fetus subsp. fetus strains were distinctly different from those of the three thermophilic species. PMID:6490829

  19. Studies of proteinograms in dermatophytes by disc electrophoresis. 1. Protein bands in relation to growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danev, P.; Friedrich, E.; Balabanov, V.

    1983-01-01

    Homogenates were prepared from various growth phases of Microsporum gypseum grown on different amino acids as the nitrogen source. When analyzed on 7.5% polyacrylamide disc gels, the water-soluble proteins in these homogenates gave essentially identical banding patterns.

  20. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  1. EKylation: Addition of an Alternating-Charge Peptide Stabilizes Proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Erik J; Sinclair, Andrew; Keefe, Andrew J; Nannenga, Brent L; Coyle, Brandon L; Baneyx, François; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-10-12

    For nearly 40 years, therapeutic proteins have been stabilized by chemical conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG), but recently zwitterionic materials have proved to be a more effective substitute. In this work, we demonstrate that genetic fusion of alternating-charge extensions consisting of anionic glutamic acid (E) and cationic lysine (K) is an effective strategy for protein stabilization. This bioinspired "EKylation" method not only confers the stabilizing benefits of poly(zwitterions) but also allows for rapid biosynthesis of target constructs. Poly(EK) peptides of different predetermined lengths were appended to the C-terminus of a native β-lactamase and its destabilized TEM-19 mutant. The EK-modified enzymes retained biological activity and exhibited increased stability to environmental stressors such as high temperature and high-salt solutions. This one-step strategy provides a broadly applicable alternative to synthetic polymer conjugation that is biocompatible and degradable. PMID:26407134

  2. Intraperitoneal administration of activated protein C prevents postsurgical adhesion band formation.

    PubMed

    Dinarvand, Peyman; Hassanian, Seyed Mahdi; Weiler, Hartmut; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2015-02-19

    Postsurgical peritoneal adhesion bands are the most important causes of intestinal obstruction, pelvic pain, and female infertility. In this study, we used a mouse model of adhesion and compared the protective effect of activated protein C (APC) to that of the Food and Drug Administration-approved antiadhesion agent, sodium hyaluronate/carboxymethylcellulose (Seprafilm) by intraperitoneal administration of either APC or Seprafilm to experimental animals. Pathological adhesion bands were graded on day 7, and peritoneal fluid concentrations of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), d-dimer, thrombin-antithrombin complex, and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β1) were evaluated. Inflammation scores were also measured based on histologic data obtained from peritoneal tissues. Relative to Seprafilm, intraperitoneal administration of human APC led to significantly higher reduction of postsurgical adhesion bands. Moreover, a markedly lower inflammation score was obtained in the adhesive tissues of the APC-treated group, which correlated with significantly reduced peritoneal concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and an elevated tPA level. Further studies using variants of human APC with or without protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signaling function and mutant mice deficient for either endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) or PAR1 revealed that the EPCR-dependent signaling activity of APC is primarily responsible for its protective activity in this model. These results suggest APC has therapeutic potential for preventing postsurgical adhesion bands. PMID:25575539

  3. Direct measurement of additional Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling bands in the millimeter-submillimeter range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luyao; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Three new weak bands of the Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling spectrum have been measured in the millimeter wavelength range. These bands were predicted from combination differences based on previously measured bands in the submillimeter region. Two previously reported submillimeter bands were also remeasured with higher frequency resolution. These new measurements allow us to obtain accurate information on the Coriolis interaction between the 101 and 110 states. Here we report these results and the associated improved molecular constants.

  4. Quality assessment of recombinant proteins by infrared spectroscopy. Characterisation of a protein aggregation related band of the Ca²⁺-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenge; Kumar, Saroj; Montigny, Cédric; le Maire, Marc; Barth, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to characterise recombinant sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1a). In the amide I region, its spectrum differed from that of Ca(2+)-ATPase prepared from rabbit fast twitch muscle below 1650 cm(-1). A band at 1642 cm(-1) is reduced in the spectrum of the recombinant protein and a band at 1631 cm(-1) is more prominent. By comparison of amide I band areas with the known secondary structure content of the protein, we assigned the 1642 cm(-1) band to β-sheet structure. Further investigation revealed that the 1642 cm(-1) band decreased and the 1631 cm(-1) band increased upon storage at room temperature and upon repeated washing of a protein film with water. Also protein aggregates obtained after solubilisation of the rabbit muscle enzyme showed a prominent band at 1631 cm(-1), whereas the spectrum of solubilised ATPase resembled that of the membrane bound protein. The spectral position of the 1631 cm(-1) band is similar to that of a band observed for inclusion bodies of other proteins. The findings show that the absence of the 1642 cm(-1) band and the presence of a prominent band at 1631 cm(-1) indicate protein aggregation and can be used as a quality marker for the optimisation of recombinant protein production. We conclude that recombinant production of SERCA1a, storage at room temperature, repeated washing and aggregation after solubilisation all modify existing β-sheets in the cytosolic domains so that they become similar to those found in inclusion bodies of other proteins.

  5. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C.; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-05-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of –54 cal/mol/Mcompares quite favorably with –43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally.

  6. The state of association of band 3 protein of the human erythrocyte membrane in solutions of nonionic detergents.

    PubMed

    Pappert, G; Schubert, D

    1983-04-21

    Band 3 protein, the anion transport protein of the human erythrocyte membrane, was solubilized and purified in aqueous solutions of two nonionic detergents: Ammonyx-LO (dimethyl laurylamine oxide) and C12E9 (nonaethylene glycol lauryl ether). The state of association of the purified protein was studied by analytical ultracentrifugation. Band 3 protein solubilized and studied in solutions of Ammonyx-LO was found to be in a monomer/dimer/tetramer association equilibrium. Band 3 protein freshly prepared in C12 E9 showed the same behaviour; however, during aging the protein was converted into stable noncovalent dimers. The conversion was retarded by the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol or by treatment of the samples with iodoacetamide; it seems to be due to oxidation of the protein by degradation products of the detergent. It is concluded that a monomer/dimer/tetramer association equilibrium is the native state of association of band 3 protein solubilized by nonionic detergents. Since nonionic detergents are assumed not to interfere with protein-protein interactions among membrane proteins, the results strongly support the claim that, in the erythrocyte membrane, band 3 is in a monomer/dimer/tetramer association equilibrium (Dorst, H.-J. and Schubert, D. (1979) Hoppe-Seyler's Z. Physiol. Chem. 360, 1605-1618).

  7. Identification of adducin-binding residues on the cytoplasmic domain of erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3.

    PubMed

    Franco, Taina; Chu, Haiyan; Low, Philip S

    2016-10-01

    Two major complexes form structural bridges that connect the erythrocyte membrane to its underlying spectrin-based cytoskeleton. Although the band 3-ankyrin bridge may account for most of the membrane-to-cytoskeleton interactions, the linkage between the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 (cdb3) and adducin has also been shown to be critical to membrane integrity. In the present paper, we demonstrate that adducin, a major component of the spectrin-actin junctional complex, binds primarily to residues 246-264 of cdb3, and mutation of two exposed glutamic acid residues within this sequence completely abrogates both α- and β-adducin binding. Because these residues are located next to the ankyrin-binding site on cdb3, it seems unlikely that band 3 can bind ankyrin and adducin concurrently, reducing the chances of an association between the ankyrin and junctional complexes that would significantly compromise erythrocyte membrane integrity. We also demonstrate that adducin binds the kidney isoform of cdb3, a spliceoform that lacks the first 65 amino acids of erythrocyte cdb3, including the central strand of a large β-pleated sheet. Because kidney cdb3 is not known to bind any of the common peripheral protein partners of erythrocyte cdb3, including ankyrin, protein 4.1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, and phosphofructokinase, retention of this affinity for adducin was unexpected.

  8. An experimental and theoretical study of the amino acid side chain Raman bands in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Béatrice; Foley, Sarah; Cardey, Bruno; Enescu, Mironel

    2014-07-01

    The Raman spectra of a series of tripeptides with the basic formula GlyAAGly where the central amino acid (AA) was tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine, glycine, methionine, histidine, lysine and leucine were measured in H2O. The theoretical Raman spectra obtained using density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2pd) level of theory allows a precise attribution of the vibrational bands. The experimental results show that there is a blue shift in the frequencies of several bands of the amino acid side chains in tripeptides compared to free amino acids, especially in the case of AAs containing aromatic rings. On the other hand, a very good agreement was found between the Raman bands of AA residues in tripeptides and those measured on three model proteins: bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme. The present analysis contributes to an unambiguous interpretation of the protein Raman spectra that is useful in monitoring the biological reactions involving AA side chains alteration.

  9. Buffer additives other than the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate for protein separations by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Corradini, D

    1997-10-10

    The different compounds utilized as additives to the electrolyte solutions employed in protein capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) for minimizing protein-capillary wall interactions, for improving selectivity and resolution and for controlling the electroosmotic flow are reviewed. The dependence of the electroosmotic flow on the different variables that can be affected by the incorporation of an additive into the electrolytic solution is discussed. A list of the most effective additives employed for protein separations by CZE is reported in Appendix A.

  10. Band 3 Erythrocyte Membrane Protein Acts as Redox Stress Sensor Leading to Its Phosphorylation by p72 Syk

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleo, Antonella; Ferru, Emanuela; Pau, Maria Carmina; Khadjavi, Amina; Mandili, Giorgia; Mattè, Alessandro; Spano, Alessandra; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pippia, Proto; Turrini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In erythrocytes, the regulation of the redox sensitive Tyr phosphorylation of band 3 and its functions are still partially defined. A role of band 3 oxidation in regulating its own phosphorylation has been previously suggested. The current study provides evidences to support this hypothesis: (i) in intact erythrocytes, at 2 mM concentration of GSH, band 3 oxidation, and phosphorylation, Syk translocation to the membrane and Syk phosphorylation responded to the same micromolar concentrations of oxidants showing identical temporal variations; (ii) the Cys residues located in the band 3 cytoplasmic domain are 20-fold more reactive than GSH; (iii) disulfide linked band 3 cytoplasmic domain docks Syk kinase; (iv) protein Tyr phosphatases are poorly inhibited at oxidant concentrations leading to massive band 3 oxidation and phosphorylation. We also observed that hemichromes binding to band 3 determined its irreversible oxidation and phosphorylation, progressive hemolysis, and serine hyperphosphorylation of different cytoskeleton proteins. Syk inhibitor suppressed the phosphorylation of band 3 also preventing serine phosphorylation changes and hemolysis. Our data suggest that band 3 acts as redox sensor regulating its own phosphorylation and that hemichromes leading to the protracted phosphorylation of band 3 may trigger a cascade of events finally leading to hemolysis. PMID:27034738

  11. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  12. The nebulin repeat protein Lasp regulates I-band architecture and filament spacing in myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Isabelle; Schöck, Frieder

    2014-08-18

    Mutations in nebulin, a giant muscle protein with 185 actin-binding nebulin repeats, are the major cause of nemaline myopathy in humans. Nebulin sets actin thin filament length in sarcomeres, potentially by stabilizing thin filaments in the I-band, where nebulin and thin filaments coalign. However, the precise role of nebulin in setting thin filament length and its other functions in regulating power output are unknown. Here, we show that Lasp, the only member of the nebulin family in Drosophila melanogaster, acts at two distinct sites in the sarcomere and controls thin filament length with just two nebulin repeats. We found that Lasp localizes to the Z-disc edges to control I-band architecture and also localizes at the A-band, where it interacts with both actin and myosin to set proper filament spacing. Furthermore, introducing a single amino acid change into the two nebulin repeats of Lasp demonstrated different roles for each domain and established Lasp as a suitable system for studying nebulin repeat function. PMID:25113030

  13. Rational design of solution additives for the prevention of protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Brian M; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2004-09-01

    We have developed a statistical-mechanical model of the effect of solution additives on protein association reactions. This model incorporates solvent radial distribution functions obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of particular proteins into simple models of protein interactions. In this way, the effects of additives can be computed along the entire association/dissociation reaction coordinate. We used the model to test our hypothesis that a class of large solution additives, which we term "neutral crowders," can slow protein association and dissociation by being preferentially excluded from protein-protein encounter complexes, in a manner analogous to osmotic stress. The magnitude of this proposed "gap effect" was probed for two simple model systems: the association of two spheres and the association of two planes. Our results suggest that for a protein of 20 A radius, an 8 A additive can increase the free energy barrier for association and dissociation by as much as 3-6 kcal/mol. Because the proposed gap effect is present only for reactions involving multiple molecules, it can be exploited to develop novel additives that affect protein association reactions although having little or no effect on unimolecular reactions such as protein folding. This idea has many potential applications in areas such as the stabilization of proteins against aggregation during folding and in pharmaceutical formulations.

  14. Pathogenesis-Related Proteins Limit the Retention of Condensed Tannin Additions to Red Wines.

    PubMed

    Springer, Lindsay F; Sherwood, Robert W; Sacks, Gavin L

    2016-02-17

    Exogenous additions of condensed tannin (CT) to must or wine are a common winemaking practice, but many studies have reported inexplicably low and variable retention of added CT. We observed that additions of purified CT to red wines can result in the formation of an insoluble precipitate with high nitrogen content. Proteomic analysis of the precipitant identified several classes of pathogenesis-related proteins. Proteins in juices and red wines were quantitated by SDS-PAGE and were highest in native Vitis spp., followed by interspecific hybrids and Vitis vinifera. Wine protein was positively correlated with the ratio of juice protein to the quantity of tannin derived from fruit. The binding of added CT by wine protein could be well modeled by the Freundlich equation. These observations may explain the poor CT retention in previous studies, particularly for interspecific hybrids, and also indicate that protein removal during winemaking may improve exogenous CT retention.

  15. Temperature dependence of Q-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of nitrosyl heme proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Flores, M; Wajnberg, E; Bemski, G

    1997-01-01

    The Q-band (35 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO) and nitrosyl myoglobin (MbNO) were studied as a function of temperature between 19 K and 200 K. The spectra of both heme proteins show two classes of variations as a function of temperature. The first one has previously been associated with the existence of two paramagnetic species, one with rhombic and the other with axial symmetry. The second one manifests itself in changes in the g-factors and linewidths of each species. These changes are correlated with the conformational substates model and associate the variations of g-values with changes in the angle of the N(his)-Fe-N(NO) bond in the rhombic species and with changes in the distance between Fe and N of the proximal (F8) histidine in the axial species. PMID:9414233

  16. Additional Protein Fortification Is Necessary in Extremely Low-Birth-Weight Infants Fed Human Milk.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Jean-Charles; Houeto, Nellie; Buffin, Rachel; Loys, Claire-Marie; Godbert, Isabelle; Haÿs, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, approximately one in three (49/152, 32.2%) extremely low-birth-weight infants were demonstrated to require additional protein intake to supplement the standard fortification to achieve satisfactory weight gain. This additional protein fortification also resulted in a rapid increase in length-for-age (P < 0.001) and head circumference-for-age (P = 0.02) z scores.

  17. Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis Highlights Additional Loci of Interest for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ragnedda, Giammario; Disanto, Giulio; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ebers, George C.; Sotgiu, Stefano; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in determining the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). The strongest genetic association in MS is located within the major histocompatibility complex class II region (MHC), but more than 50 MS loci of modest effect located outside the MHC have now been identified. However, the relative candidate genes that underlie these associations and their functions are largely unknown. We conducted a protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis of gene products coded in loci recently reported to be MS associated at the genome-wide significance level and in loci suggestive of MS association. Our aim was to identify which suggestive regions are more likely to be truly associated, which genes are mostly implicated in the PPI network and their expression profile. From three recent independent association studies, SNPs were considered and divided into significant and suggestive depending on the strength of the statistical association. Using the Disease Association Protein-Protein Link Evaluator tool we found that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected by chance when considering both significant regions alone (p<0.0002) and significant plus suggestive (p<0.007). The number of genes involved in the network was 43. Of these, 23 were located within suggestive regions and many of them directly interacted with proteins coded within significant regions. These included genes such as SYK, IL-6, CSF2RB, FCLR3, EIF4EBP2 and CHST12. Using the gene portal BioGPS, we tested the expression of these genes in 24 different tissues and found the highest values among immune-related cells as compared to non-immune tissues (p<0.001). A gene ontology analysis confirmed the immune-related functions of these genes. In conclusion, loci currently suggestive of MS association interact with and have similar expression profiles and function as those significantly associated, highlighting the fact that more common variants remain to be

  18. Effect of cleaning agents and additives on Protein A ligand degradation and chromatography performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Harding, Jason D; Ivanov, Alexander V; Ramasubramanyan, Natarajan; Dong, Diane D

    2015-03-13

    Protein A chromatography, employing the recombinant Protein A ligand, is widely used as a capture step for antibody and Fc-fusion proteins manufacture. Protein A ligands in these matrices are susceptible to degradation/loss when exposed to cleaning agents such as sodium hydroxide, resulting in loss of capacity on reuse. In this study, MabSelect Protein A ligand and MabSelect SuRe Protein A ligand were chosen to evaluate the impact of alkaline cleaning solutions on the ligands and the packed columns. The Protein A ligands alone and the Protein A columns were incubated or cycled in different concentrations of sodium hydroxide solutions with and without additives, respectively. Ligand integrity (degradation) and ligand function (binding affinity) were studied using SDS-PAGE and customized Biacore technology, surface plasma resonance (SPR) and were successfully correlated with column performance measurement in terms of static binding capacity (SBC), dynamic binding capacity (DBC) and recovery as a function of exposure to cleaning agents with and without additives. The findings and the methodology presented in this study are not only able to determine appropriate cleaning conditions for Protein A chromatography, but also provided tools to enable systematic and rapid study of the cleaning solutions and conditions. PMID:25680549

  19. The Allosteric Mechanism Induced by Protein Kinase A (PKA) Phosphorylation of Dematin (Band 4.9)*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Brown, Jeffrey W.; Mok, Yee-Foong; Hatters, Danny M.; McKnight, C. James

    2013-01-01

    Dematin (band 4.9) is an F-actin binding and bundling protein best known for its role within red blood cells, where it both stabilizes as well as attaches the spectrin/actin cytoskeleton to the erythrocytic membrane. Here, we investigate the structural consequences of phosphorylating serine 381, a covalent modification that turns off F-actin bundling activity. In contrast to the canonical doctrine, in which phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered region/protein confers affinity for another domain/protein, we found the converse to be true of dematin: phosphorylation of the well folded C-terminal villin-type headpiece confers affinity for its intrinsically disordered N-terminal core domain. We employed analytical ultracentrifugation to demonstrate that dematin is monomeric, in contrast to the prevailing view that it is trimeric. Next, using a series of truncation mutants, we verified that dematin has two F-actin binding sites, one in the core domain and the other in the headpiece domain. Although the phosphorylation-mimicking mutant, S381E, was incapable of bundling microfilaments, it retains the ability to bind F-actin. We found that a phosphorylation-mimicking mutant, S381E, eliminated the ability to bundle, but not bind F-actin filaments. Lastly, we show that the S381E point mutant caused the headpiece domain to associate with the core domain, leading us to the mechanism for cAMP-dependent kinase control of dematin's F-actin bundling activity: when unphosphorylated, dematin's two F-actin binding domains move independent of one another permitting them to bind different F-actin filaments. Phosphorylation causes these two domains to associate, forming a compact structure, and sterically eliminating one of these F-actin binding sites. PMID:23355471

  20. Effects of buffer additives and thermal processing methods on the solubility of shrimp (Penaeus monodon) proteins and the immunoreactivity of its major allergen.

    PubMed

    Lasekan, Adeseye O; Nayak, Balunkeswar

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the potential of two buffer additives (Tween 20 and DTT) to improve the solubility of proteins from shrimp subjected to different heat treatments and the allergenicity of tropomyosin in the extracts. The concentration of soluble proteins extracted by all the buffers from processed shrimp was significantly reduced compared with untreated samples. The concentration of total soluble proteins from heat treated shrimp increased significantly when phosphate buffer containing both surfactant and reducing agent was used as the extraction buffer. However, the concentrations of heat-stable proteins in the buffers were mostly similar. The electrophoretic profile of extracted proteins showed that tropomyosin is very stable under the different heat treatment methods used in this study except for high pressure steaming where the intensity of tropomyosin band was reduced. Competitive inhibition ELISA showed that high pressure steaming reduced the allergenicity of tropomyosin compared with other heat treatments methods.

  1. Application of mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to amide bands for dissociation of aggregate structure of protein.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Yaji, Toyonari; Ohta, Toshiaki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a linearly polarized, high-peak powered pulse laser with tunable wavelength within the mid-infrared absorption region. It was recently found that pathogenic amyloid fibrils could be partially dissociated to the monomer form by the irradiation of the FEL targeting the amide I band (C=O stretching vibration), amide II band (N-H bending vibration) and amide III band (C-N stretching vibration). In this study, the irradiation effect of the FEL on keratin aggregate was tested as another model to demonstrate an applicability of the FEL for dissociation of protein aggregates. Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopy analysis showed that the α-helix content in the aggregate structure decreased to almost the same level as that in the monomer state after FEL irradiation tuned to 6.06 µm (amide I band). Both irradiations at 6.51 µm (amide II band) and 8.06 µm (amide III band) also decreased the content of the aggregate but to a lesser extent than for the irradiation at the amide I band. On the contrary, the irradiation tuned to 5.6 µm (non-absorbance region) changed little the secondary structure of the aggregate. Scanning-electron microscopy observation at the submicrometer order showed that the angular solid of the aggregate was converted to non-ordered fragments by the irradiation at each amide band, while the aggregate was hardly deformed by the irradiation at 5.6 µm. These results demonstrate that the amide-specific irradiation by the FEL was effective for dissociation of the protein aggregate to the monomer form. PMID:26698057

  2. Effect of the addition of CMC on the aggregation behaviour of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Sabato, S. F.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2004-09-01

    The effect of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the aggregation of formulation based on calcium caseinate, commercial whey protein (WPC), and a 1:1 mixture of soy protein isolate (SPI) and whey protein isolate (WPI) was investigated. Protein aggregation could be observed upon addition of CMC, as demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. This aggregation behaviour was enhanced by means of physical treatments, such as heating at 90°C for 30 min or gamma-irradiation at 32 kGy. A synergy resulted from the combination of CMC to gamma-irradiation in Caseinate/CMC and SPI/WPI/CMC formulations. Furthermore, CMC prevented precipitation in irradiated protein solutions for a period of more than 3 months at 4°C.

  3. Precipitation of sword bean proteins by heating and addition of magnesium chloride in a crude extract.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Kaho; Masuda, Tetsuya; Takenaka, Yasuyuki; Masui, Hironori; Tani, Fumito; Arii, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Sword bean (Canavalia gladiata) seeds are a traditional food in Asian countries. In this study, we aimed to determine the optimal methods for the precipitation of sword bean proteins useful for the food development. The soaking time for sword beans was determined by comparing it with that for soybeans. Sword bean proteins were extracted from dried seeds in distilled water using novel methods. We found that most proteins could be precipitated by heating the extract at more than 90 °C. Interestingly, adding magnesium chloride to the extract at lower temperatures induced specific precipitation of a single protein with a molecular weight of approximately 48 kDa. The molecular weight and N-terminal sequence of the precipitated protein was identical to that of canavalin. These data suggested that canavalin was precipitated by the addition of magnesium chloride to the extract. Our results provide important insights into the production of processed foods from sword bean.

  4. Nutritional and Protein Deficiencies in the Short Term following Both Gastric Bypass and Gastric Banding

    PubMed Central

    Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Verger, Eric O; Bounaix, Carine; Dao, Maria Carlota; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Chevallier, Jean-Marc; Clément, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery (BS) has increased dramatically in recent years. Therefore, monitoring food intake and its consequences in terms of nutritional status is necessary to prevent nutritional deficiencies. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of food restriction on nutritional parameters in the short-term (≤3 months) period after BS in morbid obesity. Method In a prospective study, we followed 22 obese women who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) or adjustable gastric banding (AGB) at baseline (T0) and 1 (T1) and 3 (T3) months after surgery. We evaluated food intake, nutrient adequacy and serum concentrations of vitamins and minerals known to be at risk for deficiency following BS. Results Before surgery, we observed suboptimal food intakes, leading to a risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Serum analysis confirmed nutritional deficiencies for iron and thiamine for 27 and 23% of the patients, respectively. The drastic energy and food reduction seen in the short term led to very low probabilities of adequacy for nutrients equivalent across both surgeries. Serum analysis demonstrated a continuous decrease in prealbumin during the follow-up, indicating mild protein depletion in 21 and 57% of GBP patients and 50 and 63% of AGB patients, respectively, at T1 and T3. Regarding vitamins and minerals, systematic supplementation after GBP prevented most nutritional deficiencies. By contrast, AGB patients, for whom there is no systematic supplementation, developed such deficiencies. Conclusions Our results suggest that cautious monitoring of protein intake after BS is mandatory. Furthermore, AGB patients might also benefit from systematic multivitamin and mineral supplementation at least in the short term. PMID:26891123

  5. Partial purification and characterization of an actin-bundling protein, band 4.9, from human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D L; Branton, D

    1985-03-01

    Band 4.9 (a 48,000-mol-wt polypeptide) has been partially purified from human erythrocyte membranes. In solution, band 4.9 polypeptides exist as trimers with an apparent molecular weight of 145,000 and a Stokes radius of 50 A. Electron microscopy shows that the protein is a three-lobed structure with a radius slightly greater than 50 A. When gel-filtered rabbit muscle actin is polymerized in the presence of band 4.9, actin bundles are generated that are similar in appearance to those induced by "vinculin" or fimbrin. The bundles appear brittle and when they are centrifuged small pieces of filaments break off and remain in the supernatant. At low band 4.9 to actin molar ratios (1:30), band 4.9 lowers the apparent steady-state low-shear falling ball viscosity by sequestering filaments into thin bundles; at higher ratios, the bundles become thicker and obstruct the ball's movement leading to an apparent increase in steady-state viscosity. Band 4.9 increases the length of the lag phase and decreases the rate of elongation during actin polymerization as measured by high-shear Ostwald viscometry or by the increase in the fluorescence of pyrene-labeled actin. Band 4.9 does not alter the critical actin monomer concentration. We hypothesize that band 4.9, together with actin, erythrocyte tropomyosin, and spectrin, forms structures in erythroid precursor cells analogous to those formed by fimbrin, actin, tropomyosin, and TW 260/240 in epithelial brush borders. During erythroid development and enucleation, the actin filaments may depolymerize up to the membrane, leaving a membrane skeleton with short stubs of actin bundled by band 4.9 and cross-linked by spectrin. PMID:3882722

  6. Shrimp laminin receptor binds with capsid proteins of two additional shrimp RNA viruses YHV and IMNV.

    PubMed

    Busayarat, Nattaphon; Senapin, Saengchan; Tonganunt, Moltira; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Meemetta, Watcharachai; Unajak, Sasimanas; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Lo, Chu-Fang; Phongdara, Amornrat

    2011-07-01

    Laminin receptor (Lamr) in shrimp was previously proposed to be a potential receptor protein for Taura syndrome virus (TSV) based on yeast two-hybrid assays. Since shrimp Lamr bound to the VP1 capsid protein of TSV, we were interested to know whether capsid/envelope proteins from other shrimp viruses would also bind to Lamr. Thus, capsid/envelope encoding genes from 5 additional shrimp viruses were examined. These were Penaeus stylirostris densovirus (PstDNV), white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV), Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV), and yellow head virus (YHV). Protein interaction analysis using yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that Lamr specifically interacted with capsid/envelope proteins of RNA viruses IMNV and YHV but not MrNV and not with the capsid/envelope proteins of DNA viruses PstDNV and WSSV. In vitro pull-down assay also confirmed the interaction between Lamr and YHV gp116 envelope protein, and injection of recombinant Lamr (rLamr) protein produced in yeast cells protected shrimp against YHV in laboratory challenge tests. PMID:21414409

  7. Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics.

    PubMed

    Newson, William R; Kuktaite, Ramune; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Johansson, Eva

    2014-07-16

    Ten chemical additives were selected from the literature for their proposed modifying activity in protein-protein interactions. These consisted of acids, bases, reducing agents, and denaturants and were added to residual deoiled meals of Crambe abyssinica (crambe) and Brassica carinata (carinata) to modify the properties of plastics produced through hot compression molding at 130 °C. The films produced were examined for tensile properties, protein solubility, molecular weight distribution, and water absorption. Of the additives tested, NaOH had the greatest positive effect on tensile properties, with increases of 105% in maximum stress and 200% in strain at maximum stress for crambe and a 70% increase in strain at maximum stress for carinata. Stiffness was not increased by any of the applied additives. Changes in tensile strength and elongation for crambe and elongation for carinata were related to changes in protein solubility. Increased pH was the most successful in improving the protein aggregation and mechanical properties within the complex chemistry of residual oilseed meals.

  8. Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics.

    PubMed

    Newson, William R; Kuktaite, Ramune; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Johansson, Eva

    2014-07-16

    Ten chemical additives were selected from the literature for their proposed modifying activity in protein-protein interactions. These consisted of acids, bases, reducing agents, and denaturants and were added to residual deoiled meals of Crambe abyssinica (crambe) and Brassica carinata (carinata) to modify the properties of plastics produced through hot compression molding at 130 °C. The films produced were examined for tensile properties, protein solubility, molecular weight distribution, and water absorption. Of the additives tested, NaOH had the greatest positive effect on tensile properties, with increases of 105% in maximum stress and 200% in strain at maximum stress for crambe and a 70% increase in strain at maximum stress for carinata. Stiffness was not increased by any of the applied additives. Changes in tensile strength and elongation for crambe and elongation for carinata were related to changes in protein solubility. Increased pH was the most successful in improving the protein aggregation and mechanical properties within the complex chemistry of residual oilseed meals. PMID:24971658

  9. On the impact of additional spectral bands usage on RST-ASH performance in volcanic ash plume detected from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Marchese, Francesco; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    RST-ASH is an algorithm developed for detecting and tracking volcanic ash clouds from space based on the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) multi-temporal approach. For the identification of ash affected areas RST-ASH uses two local variation indexes in combination. They analyse the Brightness Temperature Differences (BTD) of the signal measured at 11 μm and 12 μm and at around 3.5 and 11 μm wavelengths to detect ash in both nighttime and daytime conditions. RST-ASH was tested on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) records and was then implemented on Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) for studying and monitoring eruptions of different volcanoes. In this study, some experimental configurations of RST-ASH, analyzing signal also in other spectral bands (e.g. VIS, SO2) will be tested and assessed, studying recent ash plumes (e.g. Etna, Eyjafjallajökull, Grímsvötn) affecting different geographic areas. Results achieved using both polar and geostationary satellite data will be evaluated even for comparison with other state of the art methods. The work shows that when the extended spectral capabilities offered by high temporal resolution satellites are exploited an improvement of RST-ASH performance in some observational and plume conditions is achievable, making RST-ASH still more suited for identifying and monitoring ash clouds in the framework of possible operational scenarios.

  10. C-reactive protein serum level in patients with psoriasis before and after treatment with narrow-band ultraviolet B*

    PubMed Central

    Farshchian, Mahmoud; Ansar, Akram; Sobhan, Mohammadreza; Hoseinpoor, Valiollah

    2016-01-01

    Background C-reactive protein is an inflammatory biomarker and its level increases in the serum of psoriatic patients. Its level is also associated with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score. Objective The aim of this study was to assess the decrement of serum C-reactive protein level with narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) therapy. Methods C-reactive protein serum levels in psoriasis patients were measured before and after treatment with NB-UVB and the data were analyzed in relation to the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score improvement. Results Baseline C-reactive protein levels among psoriatic patients were higher than normal. These levels decreased significantly after treatment (P<0.001). At the beginning of the study, patients with higher levels of C-reactive protein also had more extensive and severe skin involvement. The highest decrease in C-reactive protein was observed in patients who responded better to the treatment and achieved a higher Psoriasis Area and Severity Index 75%. There was an association between baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index scores and C-reactive protein levels. Conclusion Patients with moderate to severe plaque-type psoriasis had active systemic inflammation, which was demonstrated by increased levels of C-reactive protein. Furthermore, skin disease severity was correlated with C-reactive protein levels. Phototherapy healed the psoriatic skin lesions and reduced inflammation, while decreasing C-reactive protein levels.

  11. Nonlinearly Additive Forces in Multivalent Ligand Binding to a Single Protein Revealed with Force Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T V; Rudd, R E; Langry, K C; Balhorn, R L; McElfresh, M W

    2005-07-15

    We present evidence of multivalent interactions between a single protein molecule and multiple carbohydrates at a pH where the protein can bind four ligands. The evidence is based not only on measurements of the force required to rupture the bonds formed between ConcanavalinA (ConA) and {alpha}-D-mannose, but also on an analysis of the polymer-extension force curves to infer the polymer architecture that binds the protein to the cantilever and the ligands to the substrate. We find that although the rupture forces for multiple carbohydrate connections to a single protein are larger than the rupture force for a single connection, they do not scale additively with increasing number. Specifically, the most common rupture forces are approximately 46, 66, and 85 pN, which we argue corresponds to 1, 2, and 3 ligands being pulled simultaneously from a single protein as corroborated by an analysis of the linkage architecture. As in our previous work polymer tethers allow us to discriminate between specific and non-specific binding. We analyze the binding configuration (i.e. serial versus parallel connections) through fitting the polymer stretching data with modified Worm-Like Chain (WLC) models that predict how the effective stiffness of the tethers is affected by multiple connections. This analysis establishes that the forces we measure are due to single proteins interacting with multiple ligands, the first force spectroscopy study that establishes single-molecule multivalent binding unambiguously.

  12. Development of wide band gap p- a-SiOxCy:H using additional trimethylboron as carbon source gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Won; Sichanugrist, Porponth; Janthong, Bancha; Khan, Muhammad Ajmal; Niikura, Chisato; Konagai, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    We report p-type a-SiOxCy:H thin films which were fabricated by introducing additional Trimethylboron (TMB, B(CH3)3) doping gas into conventional standard p-type a-SiOx:H films. The TMB addition into the condition of p-a-SiOx:H improved optical bandgap from 2.14 to 2.20 eV without deterioration of electrical conductivity, which is promising for p-type window layer of thin film solar cells. The suggested p-a-SiOxCy:H films were applied in amorphous silicon solar cells and we found an increase of quantum efficiency at short wavelength regions due to wide bandgap of the new p-layer, and thus efficiency improvement from 10.4 to 10.7% was demonstrated in a-Si:H solar cell by employing the p-a-SiOxCy:H film. In case of a-SiOx:H cell, high open circuit voltage of 1.01 V was confirmed by using the suggested the p-a-SiOxCy:H film as a window layer. This new p-layer can be highly promising as a wide bandgap window layer to improve the performance of thin film silicon solar cells. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Effect of salt addition on the thermal behavior of proteins of bovine meat from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Pighin, D G; Sancho, A M; Gonzalez, C B

    2008-07-01

    Research was undertaken to investigate how the addition of sodium chloride (NaCl) and/or sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) to sous vide cooked meat pieces produces an increase in water holding capacity (WHC). Semitendinosus muscles were injected to obtain tissue final concentrations of 0.70% NaCl, 0.25% TPP, 0.70% NaCl+0.25% TPP, and 1.20% NaCl+0.25% TPP. SDS-PAGE analysis showed increased protein solubilization in those treatments which included NaCl. Thermal analysis of whole muscles and isolated myofibrils showed the destabilizing effect of NaCl and a global stabilizing effect of TPP. Both salts together induced a destabilizing global effect, where TPP assisted NaCl in breaking the meat structure. It is suggested that the WHC increments are related to conformational changes in myofibrillar proteins and to the weakening of myofibrillar structure by the removal of myofibrillar proteins. PMID:22062916

  14. Effect of salts and organic additives on the solubility of proteins in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Shulgin, Ivan L

    2006-11-16

    The goal of this review is to examine the effect of salts and organic additives on the solubility of proteins in aqueous mixed solvents. The focus is on the correlation between the aqueous protein solubility and the osmotic second virial coefficient or the preferential binding parameter. First, several approaches which connect the solubility and the osmotic second virial coefficient are presented. Most of the experimental and theoretical results correlate the solubility and the osmotic second virial coefficient in the presence of salts. The correlation of the aqueous protein solubility with the osmotic second virial coefficient when the cosolvent is an organic component requires additional research. Second, the aqueous protein solubility is correlated with the preferential binding parameter on the basis of a theory developed by the authors of the present review. This theory can predict (i) the salting-in or -out effect of a cosolvent and (ii) the initial slope of the solubility curve. Good agreement was obtained between theoretical predictions and experimental results.

  15. Effect of stabilizing additives on the structure and hydration of proteins: a study involving monoclinic lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Saraswathi, N T; Sankaranarayanan, R; Vijayan, M

    2002-07-01

    In pursuance of a long-range programme on the hydration, mobility and action of proteins, the structural basis of the stabilizing effect of sugars and polyols is being investigated. With two crystallographically independent molecules with slightly different packing environments in the crystal, monoclinic lysozyme constitutes an ideal system for exploring the problem. The differences in the structure and hydration of the two molecules provide a framework for examining the changes caused by stabilizing additives. Monoclinic crystals were grown under native conditions and also in the presence of 10% sucrose, 15% trehalose, 10% trehalose, 10% sorbitol and 5% glycerol. The crystal structures were refined at resolutions ranging from 1.8 to 2.1 A. The average B values, and hence the mobility of the structure, are lower in the presence of additives than in the native crystals. However, a comparison of the structures indicates that the effect of the additives on the structure and the hydration shell around the protein molecule is considerably less than that caused by differences in packing. It is also less than that caused by the replacement of NaNO(3) by NaCl as the precipitant in the crystallization experiments. This result is not in conformity with the commonly held belief that additives exert their stabilizing effect through the reorganization of the hydration shell, at least as far as the ordered water molecules are concerned.

  16. Nitrogen balancing and xylose addition enhances growth capacity and protein content in Chlorella minutissima cultures.

    PubMed

    Freitas, B C B; Esquível, M G; Matos, R G; Arraiano, C M; Morais, M G; Costa, J A V

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the metabolic changes in Chlorella minutissima cells grown under nitrogen-deficient conditions and with the addition of xylose. The cell density, maximum photochemical efficiency, and chlorophyll and lipid levels were measured. The expression of two photosynthetic proteins, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the beta subunit (AtpB) of adenosine triphosphate synthase, were measured. Comparison of cells grown in medium with a 50% reduction in the nitrogen concentration versus the traditional medium solution revealed that the cells grown under nitrogen-deficient conditions exhibited an increased growth rate, higher maximum cell density (12.7×10(6)cellsmL(-1)), optimal PSII efficiency (0.69) and decreased lipid level (25.08%). This study has taken the first steps toward protein detection in Chlorella minutissima, and the results can be used to optimize the culturing of other microalgae. PMID:27359061

  17. Application of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to benchmark models for the amide I band of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Anna S.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel benchmarking method for validating the modelling of vibrational spectra for the amide I region of proteins. We use the linear absorption spectra and two-dimensional infrared spectra of four experimentally well-studied proteins as a reference and test nine combinations of molecular dynamics force fields, vibrational frequency mappings, and coupling models. We find that two-dimensional infrared spectra provide a much stronger test of the models than linear absorption does. The best modelling approach in the present study still leaves significant room for future improvement. The presented benchmarking scheme, thus, provides a way of validating future protocols for modelling the amide I band in proteins.

  18. Modeling protein density of states: additive hydrophobic effects are insufficient for calorimetric two-state cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Chan, H S

    2000-09-01

    A well-established experimental criterion for two-state thermodynamic cooperativity in protein folding is that the van't Hoff enthalpy DeltaH(vH) around the transition midpoint is equal, or very nearly so, to the calorimetric enthalpy DeltaH(cal) of the entire transition. This condition is satisfied by many small proteins. We use simple lattice models to provide a statistical mechanical framework to elucidate how this calorimetric two-state picture may be reconciled with the hierarchical multistate scenario emerging from recent hydrogen exchange experiments. We investigate the feasibility of using inverse Laplace transforms to recover the underlying density of states (i.e., enthalpy distribution) from calorimetric data. We find that the constraint imposed by DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) approximately 1 on densities of states of proteins is often more stringent than other "two-state" criteria proposed in recent theoretical studies. In conjunction with reasonable assumptions, the calorimetric two-state condition implies a narrow distribution of denatured-state enthalpies relative to the overall enthalpy difference between the native and the denatured conformations. This requirement does not always correlate with simple definitions of "sharpness" of a transition and has important ramifications for theoretical modeling. We find that protein models that assume capillarity cooperativity can exhibit overall calorimetric two-state-like behaviors. However, common heteropolymer models based on additive hydrophobic-like interactions, including highly specific two-dimensional Gō models, fail to produce proteinlike DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) approximately 1. A simple model is constructed to illustrate a proposed scenario in which physically plausible local and nonlocal cooperative terms, which mimic helical cooperativity and environment-dependent hydrogen bonding strength, can lead to thermodynamic behaviors closer to experiment. Our results suggest that proteinlike thermodynamic

  19. Continuous wave W- and D-Band EPR spectroscopy offer “sweet-spots” for characterizing conformational changes and dynamics in intrinsically disordered proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Thomas M.; Liu, Zhanglong; Esquiaqui, Jackie M.; Pirman, Natasha L.; Milshteyn, Eugene; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • W- and D-Band line shapes are sensitive to motions in the 0.1–2 ns time regime. • These frequencies effectively report on conformational dynamics of IDPs. • W-band spectra reflecting helical formation in IA{sub 3} is experimentally demonstrated. - Abstract: Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for characterizing conformational sampling and dynamics in biological macromolecules. Here we demonstrate that nitroxide spectra collected at frequencies higher than X-band (∼9.5 GHz) have sensitivity to the timescale of motion sampled by highly dynamic intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). The 68 amino acid protein IA{sub 3}, was spin-labeled at two distinct sites and a comparison of X-band, Q-band (35 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) spectra are shown for this protein as it undergoes the helical transition chemically induced by tri-fluoroethanol. Experimental spectra at W-band showed pronounced line shape dispersion corresponding to a change in correlation time from ∼0.3 ns (unstructured) to ∼0.6 ns (α-helical) as indicated by comparison with simulations. Experimental and simulated spectra at X- and Q-bands showed minimal dispersion over this range, illustrating the utility of SDSL EPR at higher frequencies for characterizing structural transitions and dynamics in IDPs.

  20. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  1. Titration of the bacteriorhodopsin Schiff base involves titration of an additional protein residue.

    PubMed

    Zadok, Uri; Asato, Alfred E; Sheves, Mordechai

    2005-06-14

    The retinal protein protonated Schiff base linkage plays a key role in the function of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a light-driven proton pump. In the unphotolyzed pigment, the Schiff base (SB) is titrated with a pK(a) of approximately 13, but following light absorption, it experiences a decrease in the pK(a) and undergoes several alterations, including a deprotonation process. We have studied the SB titration using retinal analogues which have intrinsically lower pK(a)'s which allow for SB titrations over a much lower pH range. We found that above pH 9 the channel for the SB titration is perturbed, and the titration rate is considerably reduced. On the basis of studies with several mutants, it is suggested that the protonation state of residue Glu204 is responsible for the channel perturbation. We suggest that above pH 12 a channel for the SB titration is restored probably due to titration of an additional protein residue. The observations may imply that during the bR photocycle and M photointermediate formation the rate of Schiff base protonation from the bulk is decreased. This rate decrease may be due to the deprotonation process of the "proton-releasing complex" which includes Glu204. In contrast, during the lifetime of the O intermediate, the protonated SB is exposed to the bulk. Possible implications for the switch mechanism, and the directionality of the proton movement, are discussed.

  2. Medium modification with bone morphogenetic protein 2 addition for odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Atalayin, Cigdem; Tezel, Huseyin; Dagci, Taner; Yavasoglu, Nefise Ulku Karabay; Oktem, Gulperi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether medium modification improves the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in vitro and in vivo. DPSC isolated from human impacted third molar teeth were analysed for clusters of differentiation with flow cytometry. Odontogenic differentiation was stimulated by medium modification with the addition of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). The expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, enamelysin/matrix metalloproteinase 20 and the phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome of the cells were analysed with RT-PCR at 7, 14 and 21 days. Then, DPSC were transplanted on the back of immunocompromised mice via a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold, and the structure of the formed tissue was investigated. The cells were identified as mesenchymal stem cells with a 98.3% CD73 and CD90 double-positive cell rate. The increase in mineralization capacity and expression of human enamel-dentin specific transcripts proportional to the culture period were determined after differentiation. Six weeks after transplantation, an osteo-dentin matrix was formed in the group in which odontogenic differentiation was stimulated, and the odontogenic characteristics of the matrix were confirmed by histological examination and RT-PCR analysis. Odontogenic differentiation of the isolated and characterized human DPSC was improved with medium modification by the addition of BMP2 in vitro and in vivo. The defined medium and applied technique have a potential use for forming reparative dentin in the future, but the effects of the method should be investigated in long-term studies. PMID:26981753

  3. Effect of salt additives on protein partition in polyethylene glycol-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luisa; Madeira, Pedro P; Mikheeva, Larissa; Uversky, Vladimir N; Zaslavsky, Boris

    2013-12-01

    Partitioning of 15 proteins in polyethylene glycol (PEG)-sodium sulfate aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) formed by PEG of two different molecular weights, PEG-600 and PEG-8000 in the presence of different buffers at pH7.4 was studied. The effect of two salt additives (NaCl and NaSCN) on the protein partition behavior was examined. The salt effects on protein partitioning were analyzed by using the Collander solvent regression relationship between the proteins partition coefficients in ATPS with and without salt additives. The results obtained show that the concentration of buffer as well as the presence and concentration of salt additives affects the protein partition behavior. Analysis of ATPS in terms of the differences between the relative hydrophobicity and electrostatic properties of the phases does not explain the protein partition behavior. The differences between protein partitioning in PEG-600-salt and PEG-8000-salt ATPS cannot be explained by the protein size or polymer excluded volume effect. It is suggested that the protein-ion and protein-solvent interactions in the phases of ATPS are primarily important for protein partitioning.

  4. sup 14,15 N, sup 13 C, sup 57 Fe, and sup 1,2 H Q-band ENDOR study of Fe-S proteins with clusters that have endogenous sulfur ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Houseman, A.L.P.; Chaoliang Fan; Werst, M.M.; Hoffman, B.M. ); Byungha Oh; Markley, J.L. ); Kennedy, M.C.; Beinert, H. )

    1992-02-25

    The benefits of performing ENDOR experiments at higher microwave frequency are demonstrated in a Q-band (35 GHz) ENDOR investigation of a number of proteins with (nFe-mS) clusters, n = 2,3,4. Each protein displays several resonances in the frequency range of 0-20 MHz. In all instances, features are seen near {nu} {approx} 13 and 8 MHz that can be assigned, respectively, to distant ENDOR from {sup 13}C in natural-abundance (1.1%) and from {sup 14}N. In addition, a number of proteins show local {sup 13}C ENDOR signals with resolved hyperfine interactions; these are assigned to the {beta} carbons of cysteines bound to the cluster. Quadrupole coupling constants are derived for both local and distant {sup 14}N signals. The interpretation of the data is supported by studies on {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-enriched ferredoxin (Fd) from Anabaena 7120, where the {sup 15}N signals can be clearly correlated with the corresponding {sup 14}N signals and where the {sup 13}C signals are strongly enhanced. Thus, the observation of {sup 14}N {Delta}m{sub I} = {plus minus} 2 signals at Q-band provides a new technique for examining weak interactions with a cluster. Six proteins show an additional pattern near {nu} {approx} 18 MHz that arises from {sup 57}Fe in natural abundance (2.2%) with A({sup 57}Fe) {approx} 36 MHz, which opens the possibility of studying proteins for which enrichment is impractical. Q-band ENDOR studies also have been carried out on four {sup 2}H-exchanged Fe-S proteins, and ENDOR detects exchangeable protons in each. The importance of these findings for the interpretation of X- and Q-band ENDOR at low radiofrequencies is discussed.

  5. Pre-steady state transport by erythrocyte band 3 protein: uphill countertransport induced by the impermeant inhibitor H2DIDS.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M L; Whitlock, J; Shinde, A

    1998-01-01

    Pre-steady state Cl- efflux experiments have been performed to test directly the idea that the transport inhibitor H2DIDS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatodihydrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate) binds preferentially to the outward-facing state of the transporter. Cells were equilibrated with a medium consisting of 150 mM sodium phosphate, pH 6.2, N2 atmosphere, and 80-250 microM 36Cl-. Addition of H2DIDS (10-fold molar excess compared with band 3) induces a transient efflux of Cl-, as expected if H2DIDS binds more tightly to outward-facing than to inward-facing states. The size of the H2DIDS-induced efflux depends on the Cl- concentration and is about 700,000 ions per cell at the highest concentrations tested. The size of the transient efflux is larger than would be expected if the catalytic cycle for anion exchange involved one pair of exchanging anions per band 3 dimer. These results are completely consistent with a ping-pong mechanism of anion exchange in which the catalytic cycle consists of one pair of exchanging anions per subunit of the band 3 dimer.

  6. Monitoring Wnt Protein Acylation Using an In Vitro Cyclo-Addition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Yarravarapu, Nageswari; Lum, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a technique for visualizing the lipidation status of Wnt proteins using azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry (click chemistry) and SDS-PAGE. This protocol incorporates in vivo labeling of a Wnt-IgG Fc fusion protein using an alkynylated palmitate probe but departs from a traditional approach by incorporating a secondary cycloaddition reaction performed on single-step purified Wnt protein immobilized on protein A resin. This approach mitigates experimental noise by decreasing the contribution of labeling from other palmitoylated proteins and by providing a robust method for normalizing labeling efficiency based on protein abundance. PMID:27590147

  7. Monitoring Wnt Protein Acylation Using an In Vitro Cyclo-Addition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Yarravarapu, Nageswari; Lum, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a technique for visualizing the lipidation status of Wnt proteins using azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry (click chemistry) and SDS-PAGE. This protocol incorporates in vivo labeling of a Wnt-IgG Fc fusion protein using an alkynylated palmitate probe but departs from a traditional approach by incorporating a secondary cycloaddition reaction performed on single-step purified Wnt protein immobilized on protein A resin. This approach mitigates experimental noise by decreasing the contribution of labeling from other palmitoylated proteins and by providing a robust method for normalizing labeling efficiency based on protein abundance. PMID:27590147

  8. Use of additives to enhance the properties of cottonseed protein as wood adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein is currently being used commercially as a “green” wood adhesive. Previous work in this laboratory has shown that cottonseed protein isolate, tested on maple wood veneer, produced higher adhesive strength and hot water resistance relative to soy protein. In the present study, cottonseed...

  9. Soy Protein Isolate As Fluid Loss Additive in Bentonite-Water-Based Drilling Fluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Chun; Wu, Qinglin; Song, Kunlin; Lee, Sunyoung; Jin, Chunde; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou

    2015-11-11

    Wellbore instability and formation collapse caused by lost circulation are vital issues during well excavation in the oil industry. This study reports the novel utilization of soy protein isolate (SPI) as fluid loss additive in bentonite-water based drilling fluids (BT-WDFs) and describes how its particle size and concentration influence on the filtration property of SPI/BT-WDFs. It was found that high pressure homogenization (HPH)-treated SPI had superior filtration property over that of native SPI due to the improved ability for the plugging pore throat. HPH treatment also caused a significant change in the surface characteristic of SPI, leading to a considerable surface interaction with BT in aqueous solution. The concentration of SPI had a significant impact on the dispersion state of SPI/BT mixtures in aquesous solution. At low SPI concentrations, strong aggregations were created, resulting in the formation of thick, loose, high-porosity and high-permeability filter cakes and high fluid loss. At high SPI concentrations, intercatlated/exfoliated structures were generated, resulting in the formation of thin, compact, low-porosity and low-permeability filter cakes and low fluid loss. The SPI/BT-WDFs exhibited superior filtration property than pure BT-WDFs at the same solid concentraion, demonstrating the potential utilization of SPI as an effective, renewable, and biodegradable fluid loss reducer in well excavation applications. PMID:26492498

  10. Soy Protein Isolate As Fluid Loss Additive in Bentonite-Water-Based Drilling Fluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Chun; Wu, Qinglin; Song, Kunlin; Lee, Sunyoung; Jin, Chunde; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou

    2015-11-11

    Wellbore instability and formation collapse caused by lost circulation are vital issues during well excavation in the oil industry. This study reports the novel utilization of soy protein isolate (SPI) as fluid loss additive in bentonite-water based drilling fluids (BT-WDFs) and describes how its particle size and concentration influence on the filtration property of SPI/BT-WDFs. It was found that high pressure homogenization (HPH)-treated SPI had superior filtration property over that of native SPI due to the improved ability for the plugging pore throat. HPH treatment also caused a significant change in the surface characteristic of SPI, leading to a considerable surface interaction with BT in aqueous solution. The concentration of SPI had a significant impact on the dispersion state of SPI/BT mixtures in aquesous solution. At low SPI concentrations, strong aggregations were created, resulting in the formation of thick, loose, high-porosity and high-permeability filter cakes and high fluid loss. At high SPI concentrations, intercatlated/exfoliated structures were generated, resulting in the formation of thin, compact, low-porosity and low-permeability filter cakes and low fluid loss. The SPI/BT-WDFs exhibited superior filtration property than pure BT-WDFs at the same solid concentraion, demonstrating the potential utilization of SPI as an effective, renewable, and biodegradable fluid loss reducer in well excavation applications.

  11. Absence of Dystrophin Related Protein-2 disrupts Cajal bands in a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Kathryn M.; Bai, Yunhong; Pisciotta, Chiara; Wang, Suola; Feely, Shawna M.E.; Hoegger, Mark; Gutmann, Laurie; Moore, Steven A.; Gonzalez, Michael; Sherman, Diane L.; Brophy, Peter J.; Züchner, Stephan; Shy, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Using exome sequencing in an individual with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) we have identified a mutation in the X-linked dystrophin-related protein 2 (DRP2) gene. A 60-year-old gentleman presented to our clinic and underwent clinical, electrophysiological and skin biopsy studies. The patient had clinical features of a length dependent sensorimotor neuropathy with an age of onset of 50 years. Neurophysiology revealed prolonged latencies with intermediate conduction velocities but no conduction block or temporal dispersion. A panel of 23 disease causing genes was sequenced and ultimately was uninformative. Whole exome sequencing revealed a stop mutation in DRP2, c.805C>T (Q269*). DRP2 interacts with periaxin and dystroglycan to form the periaxin-DRP2-dystroglycan complex which plays a role in the maintenance of the well-characterized Cajal bands of myelinating Schwann cells. Skin biopsies from our patient revealed a lack of DRP2 in myelinated dermal nerves by immunofluorescence. Furthermore electron microscopy failed to identify Cajal bands in the patient's dermal myelinated axons in keeping with ultrastructural pathology seen in the Drp2 knockout mouse. Both the electrophysiologic and dermal nerve twig pathology support the interpretation that this patient's DRP2 mutation causes characteristic morphological abnormalities recapitulating the Drp2 knockout model and potentially represents a novel genetic cause of CMT. PMID:26227883

  12. Absence of Dystrophin Related Protein-2 disrupts Cajal bands in a patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Kathryn M; Bai, Yunhong; Pisciotta, Chiara; Wang, Suola; Feely, Shawna M E; Hoegger, Mark; Gutmann, Laurie; Moore, Steven A; Gonzalez, Michael; Sherman, Diane L; Brophy, Peter J; Züchner, Stephan; Shy, Michael E

    2015-10-01

    Using exome sequencing in an individual with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) we have identified a mutation in the X-linked dystrophin-related protein 2 (DRP2) gene. A 60-year-old gentleman presented to our clinic and underwent clinical, electrophysiological and skin biopsy studies. The patient had clinical features of a length dependent sensorimotor neuropathy with an age of onset of 50 years. Neurophysiology revealed prolonged latencies with intermediate conduction velocities but no conduction block or temporal dispersion. A panel of 23 disease causing genes was sequenced and ultimately was uninformative. Whole exome sequencing revealed a stop mutation in DRP2, c.805C>T (Q269*). DRP2 interacts with periaxin and dystroglycan to form the periaxin-DRP2-dystroglycan complex which plays a role in the maintenance of the well-characterized Cajal bands of myelinating Schwann cells. Skin biopsies from our patient revealed a lack of DRP2 in myelinated dermal nerves by immunofluorescence. Furthermore electron microscopy failed to identify Cajal bands in the patient's dermal myelinated axons in keeping with ultrastructural pathology seen in the Drp2 knockout mouse. Both the electrophysiologic and dermal nerve twig pathology support the interpretation that this patient's DRP2 mutation causes characteristic morphological abnormalities recapitulating the Drp2 knockout model and potentially represents a novel genetic cause of CMT.

  13. Development and molecular characterization of wheat--Aegilops kotschyi addition and substitution lines with high grain protein, iron, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Nidhi; Neelam, Kumari; Tiwari, Vijay K; Randhawa, Gursharn S; Friebe, Bernd; Gill, Bikram S; Dhaliwal, Harcharan S

    2011-11-01

    Over two billion people, depending largely on staple foods, suffer from deficiencies in protein and some micronutrients such as iron and zinc. Among various approaches to overcome protein and micronutrient deficiencies, biofortification through a combination of conventional and molecular breeding methods is the most feasible, cheapest, and sustainable approach. An interspecific cross was made between the wheat cultivar 'Chinese Spring' and Aegilops kotschyi Boiss. accession 396, which has a threefold higher grain iron and zinc concentrations and about 33% higher protein concentration than wheat cultivars. Recurrent backcrossing and selection for the micronutrient content was performed at each generation. Thirteen derivatives with high grain iron and zinc concentrations and contents, ash and ash micronutrients, and protein were analyzed for alien introgression. Morphological markers, high molecular weight glutenin subunit profiles, anchored wheat microsatellite markers, and GISH showed that addition and substitution of homoeologous groups 1, 2, and 7 chromosomes of Ae. kotschyi possess gene(s) for high grain micronutrients. The addition of 1U/1S had high molecular weight glutenin subunits with higher molecular weight than those of wheat, and the addition of 2S in most of the derivatives also enhanced grain protein content by over 20%. Low grain protein content in a derivative with a 2S-wheat translocation, waxy leaves, and absence of the gdm148 marker strongly suggests that the gene for higher grain protein content on chromosome 2S is orthologous to the grain protein QTL on the short arm of group 2 chromosomes.

  14. Profenofos induced modulation in physiological indices, genomic template stability and protein banding patterns of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Balkrishna; Chakraborty, Sindhunath; Singh, Savita; Mishra, Arun K

    2016-11-01

    To understand the mechanism underlying organophosphate pesticide toxicity, cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120 was subjected to varied concentrations (0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 mg L(-1)) of profenofos and the effects were investigated in terms of changes in cellular physiology, genomic template stability and protein expression pattern. The supplementation of profenofos reduced the growth, total pigment content and photosynthetic efficiency of the test organism in a dose dependent manner with maximum toxic effect at 30 mg L(-1). The high fluorescence intensity of 2', 7' -dichlorofluorescin diacetate and increased production of malondialdehyde confirmed the prevalence of acute oxidative stress condition inside the cells of the cyanobacterium. Rapid amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting and SDS-PAGE analyses showed a significant alteration in the banding patterns of DNA and proteins respectively. A marked increase in superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase activity and a concomitant reduction in glutathione content indicated their possible role in supporting the growth of Anabaena 7120 up to 20 mg L(-1). These findings suggest that the uncontrolled use of profenofos in the agricultural fields may not only lead to the destruction of the cyanobacterial population, but it would also disturb the nutrient dynamics and energy flow. PMID:27428931

  15. Parallel β-sheet vibration band increases with proteins dipole moment under exposure to 1765 MHz microwaves.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2016-02-01

    Effects of exposure of 4 h to mobile phones microwaves at 1765 MHz at a power density around 940 mW/m(2) on four typical proteins (hemoglobin in H2 O solution, and myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme in D2 O solution) were studied by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and Fourier self-deconvolution analysis. Increase in intensity of parallel β-sheet component around 1635 cm(-1) was observed after exposure of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin, showing that a mechanism of unfolding occurred after exposure, whereas no appreciable change in the amide I region occurred after lysozyme exposure. In addition, a relationship between protein dipole moment and protein unfolding rate was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient r = 0.973 and 95% confidence interval.

  16. Bacillus licheniformis Contains Two More PerR-Like Proteins in Addition to PerR, Fur, and Zur Orthologues

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Shin-Yeong; Yang, Yoon-Mo; Ryu, Su-Hyun; Kwon, Yumi; Won, Young-Bin; Lee, Yeh-Eun; Youn, Hwan; Lee, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family proteins include sensors of Fe (Fur), Zn (Zur), and peroxide (PerR). Among Fur family proteins, Fur and Zur are ubiquitous in most prokaryotic organisms, whereas PerR exists mainly in Gram positive bacteria as a functional homologue of OxyR. Gram positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus encode three Fur family proteins: Fur, Zur, and PerR. In this study, we identified five Fur family proteins from B. licheniformis: two novel PerR-like proteins (BL00690 and BL00950) in addition to Fur (BL05249), Zur (BL03703), and PerR (BL00075) homologues. Our data indicate that all of the five B. licheniformis Fur homologues contain a structural Zn2+ site composed of four cysteine residues like many other Fur family proteins. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the PerR-like proteins (BL00690 and BL00950) as well as PerRBL (BL00075), but not FurBL (BL05249) and ZurBL (BL03703), can sense H2O2 by histidine oxidation with different sensitivity. We also show that PerR2 (BL00690) has a PerR-like repressor activity for PerR-regulated genes in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that B. licheniformis contains three PerR subfamily proteins which can sense H2O2 by histidine oxidation not by cysteine oxidation, in addition to Fur and Zur. PMID:27176811

  17. Bacillus licheniformis Contains Two More PerR-Like Proteins in Addition to PerR, Fur, and Zur Orthologues.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hoon; Ji, Chang-Jun; Ju, Shin-Yeong; Yang, Yoon-Mo; Ryu, Su-Hyun; Kwon, Yumi; Won, Young-Bin; Lee, Yeh-Eun; Youn, Hwan; Lee, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family proteins include sensors of Fe (Fur), Zn (Zur), and peroxide (PerR). Among Fur family proteins, Fur and Zur are ubiquitous in most prokaryotic organisms, whereas PerR exists mainly in Gram positive bacteria as a functional homologue of OxyR. Gram positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus encode three Fur family proteins: Fur, Zur, and PerR. In this study, we identified five Fur family proteins from B. licheniformis: two novel PerR-like proteins (BL00690 and BL00950) in addition to Fur (BL05249), Zur (BL03703), and PerR (BL00075) homologues. Our data indicate that all of the five B. licheniformis Fur homologues contain a structural Zn2+ site composed of four cysteine residues like many other Fur family proteins. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the PerR-like proteins (BL00690 and BL00950) as well as PerRBL (BL00075), but not FurBL (BL05249) and ZurBL (BL03703), can sense H2O2 by histidine oxidation with different sensitivity. We also show that PerR2 (BL00690) has a PerR-like repressor activity for PerR-regulated genes in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that B. licheniformis contains three PerR subfamily proteins which can sense H2O2 by histidine oxidation not by cysteine oxidation, in addition to Fur and Zur.

  18. A myofibrillar protein of insect muscle related to vertebrate titin connects Z band and A band: purification and molecular characterization of invertebrate mini-titin.

    PubMed

    Nave, R; Weber, K

    1990-04-01

    We show that myofibrils of insect flight and leg muscle contain a doublet of polypeptides with apparent molecular weights of 700K (K = 10(3) Mr) (Hmp I) and 600K (Hmp II), respectively. In Locusta migratoria high ionic strength extraction solubilizes only Hmp II, which is readily purified in native form. It probably reflects a proteolytic derivative of the non-extractable Hmp I. On the basis of its viscosity radius and sedimentation coefficient, Hmp II has a molecular weight of 600K and seems to consist of a single polypeptide chain. The highly asymmetric structure of the molecule is confirmed by rotary shadowing. The flexible rods have a uniform diameter of 3-4 nm and an average length of 260 nm. Polyclonal antibodies show cross-reactivity between Hmp II and its putative precursor Hmp I. We discuss the similarities and differences between the larger titin I/titin II of vertebrate sarcomeric muscle and the smaller Hmp I/Hmp II of invertebrate muscle and conclude that the latter may reflect a mini-titin. In line with the smaller length, immunoelectron microscopy locates the insect mini-titin to the I band and a very short portion of the A band only, while vertebrate titin is known to connect the Z band to the M band. Mini-titin has also been purified from several other insects including Drosophila. Immunofluorescence microscopy on frozen sections shows that mini-titin is present in the sarcomeric muscles of various species from different invertebrate phyla. These include Annelida, Nematomorpha, Plathelmintha, Nemertea and Nematoda like Ascaris lumbricoides and Caenorhabditis elegans. This wide-spread occurrence of invertebrate mini-titin is confirmed by immunoblotting experiments.

  19. Effect of the addition of conventional additives and whey proteins concentrates on technological parameters, physicochemical properties, microstructure and sensory attributes of sous vide cooked beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2012-03-01

    Beef muscles submitted to four enhancement treatments (1.88% whey protein concentrate (WPC)+1.25% sodium chloride (NaCl); 1.88% modified whey protein concentrate (MWPC)+1.25%NaCl; 0.25% sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP)+1.25%NaCl; 1.25%NaCl) and a control treatment (non-injected muscles) were sous vide cooked. Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented a significantly higher total yield (106.5%) in comparison to those with WPC/MWPC+NaCl (94.7% and 92.9%, respectively), NaCl alone (84.8%) or controls (72.1%). Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented significantly lower shear force values than control ones; also, WPC/MWPC+NaCl added muscles presented similar values than those from the other treatments. After cooking, muscles with STPP+NaCl or WPC/MWPC+NaCl depicted compacted and uniform microstructures. Muscles with STPP+NaCl showed a pink colour, meanwhile other treatment muscles presented colours between pinkish-grey and grey-brown. STPP+NaCl added samples presented the highest values of global tenderness and juiciness. The addition of STPP+NaCl had a better performance than WPC/MWPC+NaCl. However, the addition of WPC/MWPC+NaCl improved total yield in comparison to NaCl added or control ones. PMID:22112522

  20. Effect of the addition of conventional additives and whey proteins concentrates on technological parameters, physicochemical properties, microstructure and sensory attributes of sous vide cooked beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2012-03-01

    Beef muscles submitted to four enhancement treatments (1.88% whey protein concentrate (WPC)+1.25% sodium chloride (NaCl); 1.88% modified whey protein concentrate (MWPC)+1.25%NaCl; 0.25% sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP)+1.25%NaCl; 1.25%NaCl) and a control treatment (non-injected muscles) were sous vide cooked. Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented a significantly higher total yield (106.5%) in comparison to those with WPC/MWPC+NaCl (94.7% and 92.9%, respectively), NaCl alone (84.8%) or controls (72.1%). Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented significantly lower shear force values than control ones; also, WPC/MWPC+NaCl added muscles presented similar values than those from the other treatments. After cooking, muscles with STPP+NaCl or WPC/MWPC+NaCl depicted compacted and uniform microstructures. Muscles with STPP+NaCl showed a pink colour, meanwhile other treatment muscles presented colours between pinkish-grey and grey-brown. STPP+NaCl added samples presented the highest values of global tenderness and juiciness. The addition of STPP+NaCl had a better performance than WPC/MWPC+NaCl. However, the addition of WPC/MWPC+NaCl improved total yield in comparison to NaCl added or control ones.

  1. The sequential addition of ribosomal proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Todorov, I T; Noll, F; Hadjiolov, A A

    1983-03-15

    Nucleolar '80-S' and '40-S' preribosomes (containing 45-S and 21-S pre-rRNA, respectively), as well as cytoplasmic ribosomes, were isolated from Friend erythroleukemia cells. The presence of structural ribosomal proteins in the isolated particles was studied by using antisera against individual rat liver small ribosomal subunit proteins. The analysis is based on the established crossreactivity between rat and mouse ribosomes [F. Noll and H. Bielka (1970) Mol. Gen. Genet. 106, 106-113]. The identification of the proteins was achieved by two independent immunological techniques: the passive haemagglutination test and the enzyme immunoassay of electrophoretically fractionated proteins, blotted on nitrocellulose. All 17 proteins tested are present in cytoplasmic ribosomes. A large number of proteins (S3a, S6, S7, S8, S11, S14, S18, S20, S23/24 and S25) are present in the '80-S' preribosome. Only two proteins (S3 and S21) are added during the formation of the '40-S' preribosome in the nucleolus. Four proteins (S2, S19, S26 and S29) are added at later, possibly extranucleolar, stages of ribosome formation. The results obtained provide evidence for the sequential addition of proteins during the formation of the small ribosomal subunit in Friend erythroleukemia cells.

  2. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  3. ProFold: Protein Fold Classification with Additional Structural Features and a Novel Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein fold classification plays an important role in both protein functional analysis and drug design. The number of proteins in PDB is very large, but only a very small part is categorized and stored in the SCOPe database. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient method for protein fold classification. In recent years, a variety of classification methods have been used in many protein fold classification studies. In this study, we propose a novel classification method called proFold. We import protein tertiary structure in the period of feature extraction and employ a novel ensemble strategy in the period of classifier training. Compared with existing similar ensemble classifiers using the same widely used dataset (DD-dataset), proFold achieves 76.2% overall accuracy. Another two commonly used datasets, EDD-dataset and TG-dataset, are also tested, of which the accuracies are 93.2% and 94.3%, higher than the existing methods. ProFold is available to the public as a web-server.

  4. ProFold: Protein Fold Classification with Additional Structural Features and a Novel Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein fold classification plays an important role in both protein functional analysis and drug design. The number of proteins in PDB is very large, but only a very small part is categorized and stored in the SCOPe database. Therefore, it is necessary to develop an efficient method for protein fold classification. In recent years, a variety of classification methods have been used in many protein fold classification studies. In this study, we propose a novel classification method called proFold. We import protein tertiary structure in the period of feature extraction and employ a novel ensemble strategy in the period of classifier training. Compared with existing similar ensemble classifiers using the same widely used dataset (DD-dataset), proFold achieves 76.2% overall accuracy. Another two commonly used datasets, EDD-dataset and TG-dataset, are also tested, of which the accuracies are 93.2% and 94.3%, higher than the existing methods. ProFold is available to the public as a web-server. PMID:27660761

  5. Definition of a physiologic aging autoantigen by using synthetic peptides of membrane protein band 3: localization of the active antigenic sites.

    PubMed

    Kay, M M; Marchalonis, J J; Hughes, J; Watanabe, K; Schluter, S F

    1990-08-01

    Senescent cell antigen (SCA), an aging antigen, is a protein that appears on old cells and marks them for removal by the immune system in mammals. It is derived from band 3, a ubiquitous membrane transport protein found in diverse cell types and tissues. We have used synthetic peptides to identify aging antigenic sites on band 3, using a competitive inhibition assay and immunoblotting with IgG directed against the aging antigen on old cells. Results indicate that: (i) the active antigenic sites of the aging antigen reside on membrane protein band 3 residues that are extracellular regions implicated in anion transport (residues 538-554 and 788-827); (ii) a putative ankyrin-binding-region peptide is not involved in SCA activity; and (iii) carbohydrate moieties are not required for the antigenicity or recognition of SCA because synthetic peptides alone abolish binding of senescent cell IgG to erythrocytes. One of the putative transport sites that contributes to the aging antigen is located toward the carboxyl terminus. A model of band 3 is presented. Localization of the active antigenic site on the band 3 molecule facilitates definition of the molecular changes occurring during aging that initiate molecular as well as cellular degeneration. PMID:1696010

  6. Assignment of IR bands of isolated and protein-bound Peridinin in its fundamental and triplet state by static FTIR, time-resolved step-scan FTIR and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzetti, Alberto; Kish, Elizabeth; Robert, Bruno; Spezia, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    The vibrational properties of Peridinin in its fundamental state and in the excited triplet state have been investigated by DFT calculations and static and time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. The infrared spectrum of Peridinin in its fundamental state has been explored in the whole 2000-600 cm-1 range, and interpreted in term of molecular vibrations. In particular, new infrared bands have been identified and assigned to specific molecular vibrations. 3Peridinin molecular vibrations have also been investigated by DFT calculations. In addition, putative IR bands belonging to Peridinin and 3Peridinin have been identified in the step-scan FTIR difference spectrum of the Peridinin-Chlorophyll a-Protein from Amphidinium carterae, where light induce formation of a triplet state localized on one or more Peridinins. The exact nature of the triplet state formed in Peridinin-Chlorophyll a-Protein from dinoflagellates, in particular the possible involvement in this triplet state of 3Chlorophyll a, has been largely debated in the last few years (see Carbonera et al., 2014 [3]); time-resolved differential FTIR experiments have played a key role in this debate. Identification of IR marker bands for the main molecule (Peridinin) implicated in this photophysical process is therefore particularly important and makes this study a significant step towards the full understanding of Peridinin-Chlorophyll-a-Proteins photophysics.

  7. A Narrow Amide I Vibrational Band Observed by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Reveals Highly Ordered Structures of a Biofilm Protein at the Air/Water Interface†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuguang; Morales-Acosta, M. Daniela; Li, Shanghao; Liu, Wei; Kanai, Tapan; Liu, Yuting; Chen, Ya-Na; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.; Leblanc, Roger M.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized BslA, a bacterial biofilm protein, at the air/water interface using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and observed one of the sharpest amide I band ever reported. Combining methods of surface pressure measurements, thin film X-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy, we showed extremely ordered BslA at the interface. PMID:26779572

  8. Towards the synthesis of hydroxyapatite/protein scaffolds with controlled porosities: bulk and interfacial shear rheology of a hydroxyapatite suspension with protein additives.

    PubMed

    Maas, Michael; Bodnar, Pedro Marcus; Hess, Ulrike; Treccani, Laura; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds is essential for biomedical applications such as bone tissue engineering and replacement. One way to induce macroporosity, which is needed to support bone in-growth, is to use protein additives as foaming agents. Another reason to use protein additives is the potential to introduce a specific biofunctionality to the synthesized scaffolds. In this work, we study the rheological properties of a hydroxyapatite suspension system with additions of the proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LSZ) and fibrinogen (FIB). Both the rheology of the bulk phase as well as the interfacial shear rheology are studied. The bulk rheological data provides important information on the setting behavior of the thixotropic suspension, which we find to be faster with the addition of FIB and LSZ and much slower with BSA. Foam bubble stabilization mechanisms can be rationalized via interfacial shear rheology and we show that it depends on the growth of interfacial films at the suspension/air interface. These interfacial films support the stabilization of bubbles within the ceramic matrix and thereby introduce macropores. Due to the weak interaction of the protein molecules with the hydroxyapatite particles of the suspension, we find that BSA forms the most stable interfacial films, followed by FIB. LSZ strongly interacts with the hydroxyapatite particles and thus only forms thin films with very low elastic moduli. In summary, our study provides fundamental rheological insights which are essential for tailoring hydroxyapatite/protein suspensions in order to synthesize scaffolds with controlled porosities.

  9. Addition of magnesium chloride to enhance mono-dispersity of a coiled-coil recombinant mouse macrophage protein.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Parveen; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Puri, Munish

    2014-04-01

    X-ray crystallography for the determination of three-dimensional structures of protein macromolecules represents an important tool in function assignment of uncharacterized proteins. However, crystallisation is often difficult to achieve. A protein sample fully characterized in terms of dispersity may increase the likelihood of successful crystallisation by improving the predictability of the crystallisation process. To maximize the probability of crystallisation of a novel mouse macrophage protein (rMMP), target molecule was characterized and refined to improve monodispersity. Addition of MgCl2 at low concentrations resolves the rMMP into a monodisperse solution, and finally successful crystallization of rMMP was achieved. The effect of MgCl2 was studied using gel filtration chromatography and dynamic light scattering.

  10. Addition of missing loops and domains to protein models by x-ray solution scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Petoukhov, Maxim V; Eady, Nigel A J; Brown, Katherine A; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2002-01-01

    Inherent flexibility and conformational heterogeneity in proteins can often result in the absence of loops and even entire domains in structures determined by x-ray crystallographic or NMR methods. X-ray solution scattering offers the possibility of obtaining complementary information regarding the structures of these disordered protein regions. Methods are presented for adding missing loops or domains by fixing a known structure and building the unknown regions to fit the experimental scattering data obtained from the entire particle. Simulated annealing was used to minimize a scoring function containing the discrepancy between the experimental and calculated patterns and the relevant penalty terms. In low-resolution models where interface location between known and unknown parts is not available, a gas of dummy residues represents the missing domain. In high-resolution models where the interface is known, loops or domains are represented as interconnected chains (or ensembles of residues with spring forces between the C(alpha) atoms), attached to known position(s) in the available structure. Native-like folds of missing fragments can be obtained by imposing residue-specific constraints. After validation in simulated examples, the methods have been applied to add missing loops or domains to several proteins where partial structures were available. PMID:12496082

  11. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  12. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications.

  13. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  14. Cloning and characterization of additional members of the G protein-coupled receptor family.

    PubMed

    Lee, D K; Lynch, K R; Nguyen, T; Im, D S; Cheng, R; Saldivia, V R; Liu, Y; Liu, I S; Heng, H H; Seeman, P; George, S R; O'Dowd, B F; Marchese, A

    2000-02-29

    A search of the expressed sequence tag (EST) database retrieved a human cDNA sequence which partially encoded a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) GPR26. A human genomic DNA fragment encoding a partial open reading frame (ORF) and a rat cDNA encoding the full length ORF of GPR26 were obtained by library screening. The rat GPR26 cDNA encoded a protein of 317 amino acids, most similar (albeit distantly related) to the serotonin 5-HT(5A) and gastrin releasing hormone BB2 receptors. GPR26 mRNA expression analysis revealed signals in the striatum, pons, cerebellum and cortex. HEK293 and Rh7777 cells transfected with GPR26 cDNA displayed high basal cAMP levels, slow growth rate of clonal populations and derangements of normal cell shape. We also used a sequence reported only in the patent literature encoding GPR57 (a.k.a. HNHCI32) to PCR amplify a DNA fragment which was used to screen a human genomic library. This resulted in the cloning of a genomic fragment containing a pseudogene, psiGPR57, with a 99.6% nucleotide identity to GPR57. Based on shared sequence identities, the receptor encoded by GPR57 was predicted to belong to a novel subfamily of GPCRs together with GPR58 (a.k.a. phBL5, reported only in the patent literature), putative neurotransmitter receptor (PNR) and a 5-HT(4) pseudogene. Analysis of this subfamily revealed greatest identities (approximately 56%) between the receptors encoded by GPR57 and GPR58, each with shared identities of approximately 40% with PNR. Furthermore, psiGPR57, GPR58, PNR and the 5-HT(4) pseudogene were mapped in a cluster localized to chromosome 6q22-24. PNR and GPR58 were expressed in COS cells, however no specific binding was observed for various serotonin receptor-specific ligands.

  15. Impact of bentonite additions during vinification on protein stability and volatile compounds of Albariño wines.

    PubMed

    Lira, Eugenio; Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Salazar, Fernando N; Orriols, Ignacio; Fornos, Daniel; López, Francisco

    2015-03-25

    Today, bentonite continues to be one of the most used products to remove proteins in white wines in order to avoid their precipitation in bottles. However, excessive use of bentonite has negative effects on the aroma of final wine, so the optimization of the dose and the time of its application are important for winemakers. This paper analyzes how applying an equal dose of bentonite at different stages (must clarification; beginning, middle, and end of fermentation) affects the macromolecular profile, protein stability, physical-chemical characteristics and aromatic profile of the wine obtained. The results showed the addition during fermentation (especially in the middle and at the end) reduced the total dose required for protein stabilization of Albariño wines and maintained the sensory characteristics of this variety. PMID:25751284

  16. Simultaneous separation of acidic and basic proteins using gemini pyrrolidinium surfactants and hexafluoroisopropanol as dynamic coating additives in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Li, Yunfang; Mei, Jie; Cai, Bo; Dong, Jinfeng; Shi, Zhiguo; Xiao, Yuxiu

    2015-09-18

    The separation of acidic and basic proteins using CE has been limited in part due to the adsorption of proteins onto the capillary wall. In this work, the efficient control of EOF and the simultaneous separation of acidic and basic proteins are achieved by use of C18-4-C18PB as a dynamic coating additive, which is a representative surfactant for 1,1'-(butane-1,s-alkyl)bis(1-alkylpyrrolidinium) bromide (Cn-4-CnPB, n=10, 12, 14, 16 and 18). C18-4-C18PB exhibits a powerful capability in the reversal of EOF, and a low concentration even less than 0.001 mM is sufficient to reverse EOF at the tested pH values (3.0-9.0). Baseline separation of eight proteins with sharp peaks and high efficiencies (54,000-297,000 plates/m) is obtained with 30 mM NaH2PO4 buffer (pH 5.0) containing 4 mM C18-4-C18PB. At the same buffer condition, the Cn-4-CnPB with shorter alkyl chain (n=10, 12, 14, 16) cannot achieve the same effective protein separation as C18-4-C18PB. However, the combined use of small amounts (≤0.5%, v/v) of hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and Cn-4-CnPB (n=10, 12, 14, 16) as additives can completely separate all eight proteins with high efficiencies of 81,000-318,000 plates/m. The RSDs of migration time are less than 0.80% and 5.84% for run-to-run and day-to-day assays (n=5), respectively, and the protein recoveries are larger than 90.15%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the simultaneous separation of acidic and basic proteins using Cn-4-CnPB surfactants or Cn-4-CnPB surfactants combined with HFIP as dynamic coating additives.

  17. Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, Noor Amiza; Abdullah, Aminah

    2015-09-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the effect of chicken feed additives (antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic) on protein and fat content of chicken meat. Chicken fed with control diet (corn-soy based diet) served as a control. The treated diets were added with zinc bacitracin (antibiotic), different amount of Lacto-lase® (a mixture of probiotic and enzyme) and probiotic. Chicken were slaughtered at the age of 43-48 days. Each chicken was divided into thigh, breast, drumstick, drumette and wing. Protein content in chicken meat was determined by using macro-Kjeldahl method meanwhile Soxhlet method was used to analyse fat content. The result of the study showed that the protein content of chicken breast was significantly higher (p≤0.05) while thigh had the lowest protein content (p≤0.05). Antibiotic fed chicken was found to have the highest protein content among the treated chickens but there was no significant different with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® fed chicken (p>0.05). All thighs were significantly higher (p≤0.05) in fat content except for drumette of control chicken while breast contained the lowest fat content compared to other chicken parts studied. The control chicken meat contained significantly higher (p≤0.05) amount of fat compared to the other treated chickens. Chicken fed with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® had the lowest (p≤0.05) fat content. The result of this study indicated that the addition of Lacto-lase® as a replacement of antibiotic in chicken feed will not affect the content of protein and fat of chicken meat.

  18. Probing of some compounds as anti-aggregatory additives in the protein refolding process from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Zilinskas, Albinas; Sereikaite, Jolanta

    2011-01-01

    Five compounds of different chemical structure were tested for aggregation suppression during the refolding of porcine and mink growth hormones as model proteins from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies by the dilution method. Of all compounds tested in this work, 3-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA) containing a guanidinium group was the most effective additive for aggregation suppression. Anti-aggregatory properties of GPA were compared with the ones of l-arginine.

  19. Additive and Synergistic Bactericidal Activity of Antibodies Directed against Minor Outer Membrane Proteins of Neisseria meningitidis▿

    PubMed Central

    Weynants, Vincent E.; Feron, Christiane M.; Goraj, Karine K.; Bos, Martine P.; Denoël, Philippe A.; Verlant, Vincent G.; Tommassen, Jan; Peak, Ian R. A.; Judd, Ralph C.; Jennings, Michael P.; Poolman, Jan T.

    2007-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B is a major cause of bacterial meningitis in younger populations. The available vaccines are based on outer membrane vesicles obtained from wild-type strains. In children less than 2 years old they confer protection only against strains expressing homologous PorA, a major, variable outer membrane protein (OMP). We genetically modified a strain in order to eliminate PorA and to overproduce one or several minor and conserved OMPs. Using a mouse model mimicking children's PorA-specific bactericidal activity, it was demonstrated that overproduction of more than one minor OMP is required to elicit antibodies able to induce complement-mediated killing of strains expressing heterologous PorA. It is concluded that a critical density of bactericidal antibodies needs to be reached at the surface of meningococci to induce complement-mediated killing. With minor OMPs, this threshold is reached when more than one antigen is targeted, and this allows cross-protection. PMID:17664268

  20. Vitellogenin-RNAi and ovariectomy each increase lifespan, increase protein storage, and decrease feeding, but are not additive in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Tetlak, Alicia G; Burnett, Jacob B; Hahn, Daniel A; Hatle, John D

    2015-12-01

    Reduced reproduction has been shown to increase lifespan in many animals, yet the mechanisms behind this trade-off are unclear. We addressed this question by combining two distinct, direct means of life-extension via reduced reproduction, to test whether they were additive. In the lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera, ovariectomized (OVX) individuals had a ~20% increase in lifespan and a doubling of storage relative to controls (Sham operated). Similarly, young female grasshoppers treated with RNAi against vitellogenin (the precursor to egg yolk protein) had increased fat body mass and halted ovarian growth. In this study, we compared VgRNAi to two control groups that do not reduce reproduction, namely buffer injection (Buffer) and injection with RNAi against a hexameric storage protein (Hex90RNAi). Each injection treatment was tested with and without ovariectomy. Hence, we tested feeding, storage, and lifespans in six groups: OVX and Buffer, OVX and Hex90RNAi, OVX and VgRNAi, Sham and Buffer, Sham and Hex90RNAi, and Sham and VgRNAi. Ovariectomized grasshoppers and VgRNAi grasshoppers each had similar reductions in feeding (~40%), increases in protein storage in the hemolymph (150-300%), and extensions in lifespan (13-21%). Ovariectomized grasshoppers had higher vitellogenin protein levels than did VgRNAi grasshoppers. Last but not least, when ovariectomy and VgRNAi were applied together, there was no greater effect on feeding, protein storage, or longevity. Hence, feeding regulation, and protein storage in insects, may be conserved components of life-extension via reduced reproduction. PMID:26298568

  1. CHARMM additive all-atom force field for carbohydrate derivatives and its utility in polysaccharide and carbohydrate-protein modeling

    PubMed Central

    Guvench, Olgun; Mallajosyula, Sairam S.; Raman, E. Prabhu; Hatcher, Elizabeth; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Foster, Theresa J.; Jamison, Francis W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    Monosaccharide derivatives such as xylose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GlaNAc), glucuronic acid, iduronic acid, and N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) are important components of eukaryotic glycans. The present work details development of force-field parameters for these monosaccharides and their covalent connections to proteins via O-linkages to serine or threonine sidechains and via N-linkages to asparagine sidechains. The force field development protocol was designed to explicitly yield parameters that are compatible with the existing CHARMM additive force field for proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, and small molecules. Therefore, when combined with previously developed parameters for pyranose and furanose monosaccharides, for glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and for proteins, the present set of parameters enables the molecular simulation of a wide variety of biologically-important molecules such as complex carbohydrates and glycoproteins. Parametrization included fitting to quantum mechanical (QM) geometries and conformational energies of model compounds, as well as to QM pair interaction energies and distances of model compounds with water. Parameters were validated in the context of crystals of relevant monosaccharides, as well NMR and/or x-ray crystallographic data on larger systems including oligomeric hyaluronan, sialyl Lewis X, O- and N-linked glycopeptides, and a lectin:sucrose complex. As the validated parameters are an extension of the CHARMM all-atom additive biomolecular force field, they further broaden the types of heterogeneous systems accessible with a consistently-developed force-field model. PMID:22125473

  2. Hepatitis C Virus E1 and E2 Proteins Used as Separate Immunogens Induce Neutralizing Antibodies with Additive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Elodie; Roch, Emmanuelle; Chopin, Lucie; Roingeard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Various strategies involving the use of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins as immunogens have been developed for prophylactic vaccination against HCV. However, the ideal mode of processing and presenting these immunogens for effective vaccination has yet to be determined. We used our recently described vaccine candidate based on full-length HCV E1 or E2 glycoproteins fused to the heterologous hepatitis B virus S envelope protein to compare the use of the E1 and E2 proteins as separate immunogens with their use as the E1E2 heterodimer, in terms of immunogenetic potential and the capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. The specific anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibody responses induced in animals immunized with vaccine particles harboring the heterodimer were profoundly impaired with respect to those in animals immunized with particles harboring E1 and E2 separately. Moreover, the anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies had additive neutralizing properties that increase the cross-neutralization of heterologous strains of various HCV genotypes, highlighting the importance of including both E1 and E2 in the vaccine for an effective vaccination strategy. Our study has important implications for the optimization of HCV vaccination strategies based on HCV envelope proteins, regardless of the platform used to present these proteins to the immune system. PMID:26966906

  3. Hepatitis C Virus E1 and E2 Proteins Used as Separate Immunogens Induce Neutralizing Antibodies with Additive Properties.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Elodie; Roch, Emmanuelle; Chopin, Lucie; Roingeard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Various strategies involving the use of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins as immunogens have been developed for prophylactic vaccination against HCV. However, the ideal mode of processing and presenting these immunogens for effective vaccination has yet to be determined. We used our recently described vaccine candidate based on full-length HCV E1 or E2 glycoproteins fused to the heterologous hepatitis B virus S envelope protein to compare the use of the E1 and E2 proteins as separate immunogens with their use as the E1E2 heterodimer, in terms of immunogenetic potential and the capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. The specific anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibody responses induced in animals immunized with vaccine particles harboring the heterodimer were profoundly impaired with respect to those in animals immunized with particles harboring E1 and E2 separately. Moreover, the anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies had additive neutralizing properties that increase the cross-neutralization of heterologous strains of various HCV genotypes, highlighting the importance of including both E1 and E2 in the vaccine for an effective vaccination strategy. Our study has important implications for the optimization of HCV vaccination strategies based on HCV envelope proteins, regardless of the platform used to present these proteins to the immune system.

  4. Influence of boron addition to Ti-13Zr-13Nb alloy on MG63 osteoblast cell viability and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, P; Singh, S B; Dhara, S; Chakraborty, M

    2015-01-01

    Cell proliferation, cell morphology and protein adsorption on near β-type Ti-13Zr-13Nb (TZN) alloy and Ti-13Zr-13Nb-0.5B (TZNB) composite have been investigated and compared to evaluate the effect of boron addition which has been added to the Ti alloy to improve their poor tribological properties by forming in situ TiB precipitates. MG63 cell proliferation on substrates with different chemistry but the same topography was compared. The MTT assay test showed that the cell viability on the TZN alloy was higher than the boron containing TZNB composite after 36 h of incubation and the difference was pronounced after 7 days. However, both the materials showed substantially higher cell attachment than the control (polystyrene). For the same period of incubation in fetal bovine serum (FBS), the amount of protein adsorbed on the surface of boron free TZN samples was higher than that in the case of boron containing TZNB composite. The presence of boron in the TZN alloy influenced protein adsorption and cell response and they are lower in TZNB than in TZN as a result of the associated difference in chemical characteristics.

  5. A single amino acid mutation alters the capsid protein electrophoretic double-band phenotype of the Plum pox virus strain PPV-Rec.

    PubMed

    Subr, Z W; Kamencayová, M; Nováková, S; Nagyová, A; Nosek, J; Glasa, M

    2010-07-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates differ by their capsid protein (CP) mobility in SDS-PAGE. These electrophoretic phenotypes are likely to result from post-translational modifications of the CP. We demonstrated that the CP mobility was solely determined by the CP N-terminal region. Sequence comparison pinpointed a possible role of mutations at position 66 in determining the CP phenotype of PPV-Rec isolates. Site-directed mutagenesis of a chimeric clone demonstrated that Gly(66) in the CP resulted in the double-band phenotype, while Arg(66) led to a single-band CP pattern, possibly by preventing the phosphorylation of a nearby Ser residue by steric hindrance.

  6. Pig performance increases with the addition of DL-methionine and L-lysine to ensiled cassava leaf protein diets.

    PubMed

    Ly, Nguyen Thi Hoa; Ngoan, Le Duc; Verstegen, Martin Wilhelmus Antonius; Hendriks, Wouter Hendrikus

    2012-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to determine the impact of supplementation of diets containing ensiled cassava leaves as the main protein source with synthetic amino acids, DL-methionine alone or with L-lysine. In study 1, a total of 40 pigs in five units, all cross-breds between Large White and Mong Cai, with an average initial body weight of 20.5 kg were randomly assigned to four treatments consisting of a basal diet containing 45% of dry matter (DM) from ensiled cassava leaves (ECL) and ensiled cassava root supplemented with 0%, 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.15% DL-methionine (as DM). Results showed a significantly improved performance and protein gain by extra methionine. This reduced the feed cost by 2.6%, 7.2% and 7.5%, respectively. In study 2, there were three units and in each unit eight cross-bred (Large White × Mong Cai) pigs with an initial body weight of 20.1 kg were randomly assigned to the four treatments. The four diets were as follows: a basal diet containing 15% ECL (as DM) supplemented with different amounts of amino acids L-lysine and DL-methionine to the control diet. The results showed that diets with 15% of DM as ECL with supplementation of 0.2% lysine +0.1% DL-methionine and 0.1% lysine +0.05% DL-methionine at the 20-50 kg and above 50 kg, respectively, resulted in the best performance, protein gain and lowest costs for cross-bred (Large White × Mong Cai) pigs. Ensiled cassava leaves can be used as a protein supplement for feeding pigs provided the diets contain additional amounts of synthetic lysine and methionine.

  7. Analysis of saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of a spin-labeled integral membrane protein, band 3, in terms of the uniaxial rotational diffusion model.

    PubMed Central

    Hustedt, E J; Beth, A H

    1995-01-01

    Algorithms have been developed for the calculation of saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance (ST-EPR) spectra of a nitroxide spin-label assuming uniaxial rotational diffusion, a model that is frequently used to describe the global rotational dynamics of large integral membrane proteins. One algorithm explicitly includes terms describing Zeeman overmodulation effects, whereas the second more rapid algorithm treats these effects approximately using modified electron spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times. Simulations are presented to demonstrate the sensitivity of X-band ST-EPR spectra to the rate of uniaxial rotational diffusion and the orientation of the nitroxide probe with respect to the diffusion axis. Results obtained by using the algorithms presented, which are based on the transition-rate formalism, are in close agreement with those obtained by using an eigenfunction expansion approach. The effects of various approximations used in the simulation algorithms are considered in detail. Optimizing the transition-rate formalism to model uniaxial rotational diffusion results in over an order of magnitude reduction in computation time while allowing treatment of nonaxial A- and g-tensors. The algorithms presented here are used to perform nonlinear least-squares analyses of ST-EPR spectra of the anion exchange protein of the human erythrocyte membrane, band 3, which has been affinity spin-labeled with a recently developed dihydrostilbene disulfonate derivative, [15N,2H13]-SL-H2DADS-MAL. These results suggest that all copies of band 3 present in intact erythrocytes undergo rotational diffusion about the membrane normal axis at a rate consistent with a band 3 dimer. PMID:8534811

  8. Evidence for protein kinase C-dependent and -independent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in T cells: potential role of additional diacylglycerol binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Puente, L G; Stone, J C; Ostergaard, H L

    2000-12-15

    Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) is a critical signal transduction event for CTL activation, but the signaling mechanisms responsible are not fully characterized. Protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to contribute to MAPK activation following TCR stimulation. We have found that dependence on PKC varies with the method used to stimulate the T cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation in CTL stimulated with soluble cross-linked anti-CD3 is completely inhibited by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM). In contrast, only the later time points in the course of ERK activation are sensitive to BIM when CTL are stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3, a condition that stimulates CTL degranulation. Surprisingly, MAPK activation in response to immobilized anti-CD3 is strongly inhibited at all time points by the diacylglycerol (DAG)-binding domain inhibitor calphostin C implicating the contribution of a DAG-dependent but PKC-independent pathway in the activation of ERK in CTL clones. Chronic exposure to phorbol ester down-regulates the expression of DAG-responsive PKC isoforms; however, this treatment of CTL clones does not inhibit anti-CD3-induced activation of MAPK. Phorbol ester-treated cells have reduced expression of several isoforms of PKC but still express the recently described DAG-binding Ras guanylnucleotide-releasing protein. These results indicate that the late phase of MAPK activation in CTL clones in response to immobilized anti-CD3 stimulation requires PKC while the early phase requires a DAG-dependent, BIM-resistant component.

  9. Template-dependent nucleotide addition in the reverse (3'-5') direction by Thg1-like protein.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shoko; Suzuki, Tateki; Chen, Meirong; Kato, Koji; Yu, Jian; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2016-03-01

    Thg1-like protein (TLP) catalyzes the addition of a nucleotide to the 5'-end of truncated transfer RNA (tRNA) species in a Watson-Crick template-dependent manner. The reaction proceeds in two steps: the activation of the 5'-end by adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP)/guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), followed by nucleotide addition. Structural analyses of the TLP and its reaction intermediates have revealed the atomic detail of the template-dependent elongation reaction in the 3'-5' direction. The enzyme creates two substrate binding sites for the first- and second-step reactions in the vicinity of one reaction center consisting of two Mg(2+) ions, and the two reactions are executed at the same reaction center in a stepwise fashion. When the incoming nucleotide is bound to the second binding site with Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, the 3'-OH of the incoming nucleotide and the 5'-triphosphate of the tRNA are moved to the reaction center where the first reaction has occurred. That the 3'-5' elongation enzyme performs this elaborate two-step reaction in one catalytic center suggests that these two reactions have been inseparable throughout the process of protein evolution. Although TLP and Thg1 have similar tetrameric organization, the tRNA binding mode of TLP is different from that of Thg1, a tRNA(His)-specific G-1 addition enzyme. Each tRNA(His) binds to three of the four Thg1 tetramer subunits, whereas in TLP, tRNA only binds to a dimer interface and the elongation reaction is terminated by measuring the accepter stem length through the flexible β-hairpin. Furthermore, mutational analyses show that tRNA(His) is bound to TLP in a similar manner as Thg1, thus indicating that TLP has a dual binding mode.

  10. Template-dependent nucleotide addition in the reverse (3′-5′) direction by Thg1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Shoko; Suzuki, Tateki; Chen, Meirong; Kato, Koji; Yu, Jian; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Thg1-like protein (TLP) catalyzes the addition of a nucleotide to the 5′-end of truncated transfer RNA (tRNA) species in a Watson-Crick template–dependent manner. The reaction proceeds in two steps: the activation of the 5′-end by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)/guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), followed by nucleotide addition. Structural analyses of the TLP and its reaction intermediates have revealed the atomic detail of the template-dependent elongation reaction in the 3′-5′ direction. The enzyme creates two substrate binding sites for the first- and second-step reactions in the vicinity of one reaction center consisting of two Mg2+ ions, and the two reactions are executed at the same reaction center in a stepwise fashion. When the incoming nucleotide is bound to the second binding site with Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, the 3′-OH of the incoming nucleotide and the 5′-triphosphate of the tRNA are moved to the reaction center where the first reaction has occurred. That the 3′-5′ elongation enzyme performs this elaborate two-step reaction in one catalytic center suggests that these two reactions have been inseparable throughout the process of protein evolution. Although TLP and Thg1 have similar tetrameric organization, the tRNA binding mode of TLP is different from that of Thg1, a tRNAHis-specific G−1 addition enzyme. Each tRNAHis binds to three of the four Thg1 tetramer subunits, whereas in TLP, tRNA only binds to a dimer interface and the elongation reaction is terminated by measuring the accepter stem length through the flexible β-hairpin. Furthermore, mutational analyses show that tRNAHis is bound to TLP in a similar manner as Thg1, thus indicating that TLP has a dual binding mode. PMID:27051866

  11. Long-Observation-Window Band-Selective Homonuclear Decoupling: Increased Sensitivity and Resolution in Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Struppe, Jochem O.; Yang, Chen; Wang, Yachong; Hernandez, Roy V.; Shamansky, Lisa M.; Mueller, Leonard J.

    2013-01-01

    Sensitivity and resolution are the two fundamental obstacles to extending solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance to even larger protein systems. Here, a novel long-observation-window band-selective homonuclear decoupling (LOW BASHD) scheme is introduced that increases resolution up to a factor of 3 and sensitivity up to 1.8 by decoupling backbone alpha-carbon (Cα) and carbonyl (C′) nuclei in U-13C-labeled proteins during direct 13C acquisition. This approach introduces short (<200 μs) pulse breaks into much longer (~8 ms) sampling windows to efficiently refocus the J-coupling interaction during detection while avoiding the deleterious effects on sensitivity inherent in rapid stroboscopic band-selective homonuclear decoupling techniques. A significant advantage of LOW BASHD detection is that it can be directly incorporated into existing correlation methods, as illustrated here for 2D CACO, NCO, and NCA correlation spectroscopy applied to the β1 immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G and 3D CBCACO correlation spectroscopy applied to the α-subunit of tryptophan synthase. PMID:24095840

  12. The gene for human erythrocyte membrane protein band 7. 2 (EPB72) maps to 9q33-q34 centromeric to the Philadelphia chromosome translocation breakpoint region

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.G.; Upender, M.; Ward, D.C.; Forget, B.G. )

    1993-10-01

    Erthrocyte band 7.2b is a 31-kDa integral phosphoprotein absent from the erythrocytes of many patients with hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt). HSt is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by mouth-shaped erythrocyte morphology on peripheral blood smears. The clinical severity of HSt is variable; some patients experience hemolysis and anemia while others are asymptomatic. The red cell membranes of these patients usually exhibit abnormal permeability to sodium and potassium with resultant modification of intracellular water content. The band 7.2b protein has been purified and the cDNA cloned. The approved gene name and symbol are erythrocyte membrane protein band 7.2 and EPB72, respectively, as assigned by the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee. Using a human reticulocyte cDNA library as template, a 491-bp fragment corresponding to the 3' end of the coding region of the EPB72 cDNA was amplified. Three overlapping phase DNA clones were isolated using this probe. Four genomic DNA fragments of 2.0, 2.5, 4.5, and 5.0 kb, respectively, were isolated from these clones. To localize the EPB72 gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization, these genomic DNA fragments were labeled with biotin-11-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes as described. Probes were preannealed to C[sub 0]t1-fractionated DNA to block repetitive sequences. Experiments were analyzed and digitally imaged using a cooled CCD camera. The probes, in combination, gave specific hybridization signals only in chromosome 9q. The gene for erythrocyte membrane protein 7.2 localized to 9q33-q34.

  13. Mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to the amide I band for converting insoluble amyloid-like protein fibrils into the soluble monomeric form.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Fujioka, Jun; Imai, Takayuki; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is operated as a pulsed and linearly polarized laser with tunable wavelengths within infrared region. Although the FEL can ablate soft tissues with minimum collateral damage in surgery, the potential of FEL for dissecting protein aggregates is not fully understood. Protein aggregates such as amyloid fibrils are in some cases involved in serious diseases. In our previous study, we showed that amyloid-like lysozyme fibrils could be disaggregated into the native form with FEL irradiation specifically tuned to the amide I band (1,620 cm(-1)). Here, we show further evidence for the FEL-mediated disaggregation of amyloid-like fibrils using insulin fibrils. Insulin fibrils were prepared in acidic solution and irradiated by the FEL, which was tuned to either 1,620 or 2,000 cm(-1) prior to the experiment. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) spectrum after irradiation with the FEL at 1,620 cm(-1) indicated that the broad peak (1,630-1,660 cm(-1)) became almost a single peak (1,652 cm(-1)), and the β-sheet content was reduced to 25 from 40% in the fibrils, while that following the irradiation at 2,000 cm(-1) remained at 38%. The Congo Red assay as well as transmission electron microscopy observation confirmed that the number of fibrils was reduced by FEL irradiation at the amide I band. Size-exclusion chromatography analysis indicated that the disaggregated form of fibrils was the monomeric form. These results confirm that FEL irradiation at the amide I band can dissect amyloid-like protein fibrils into the monomeric form in vitro.

  14. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Relationship between the additional penicillin-binding protein and an attachment transpeptidase.

    PubMed

    Gaisford, W C; Reynolds, P E

    1989-10-20

    The penicillin-binding proteins (PBP) of a methicillin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis, 100,604 p+m+ and a non-isogenic sensitive strain, p-m- were characterised. The presence of a novel PBP, produced by the methicillin-resistant strain of S. epidermidis, with an Mr identical to that of PBP2' in Staphylococcus aureus 13,136 p-m+, was revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent fluorography of solubilised membrane proteins isolated from cells labelled with [3H]benzylpenicillin. This novel PBP was only detected in cells which had been grown at 30 degrees C, in media containing beta-lactam antibiotic and 5% NaCl. The sensitivity of an attachment transpeptidation reaction measured under non-growing conditions in the sensitive and resistant strains indicated that the novel PBP catalysed this reaction. The similarity of radiolabelled peptides resulting from partial proteolytic digestion of the novel PBP in S. epidermidis 100,604 p+m+ and from PBP2' in S. aureus 13,136 p+m+ lends support to the theory that the additional DNA encoding PBP2' in S. aureus and the same protein in S. epidermidis has been passed to both species from an unknown source. Studies of the development and loss of resistance of attachment transpeptidase activity, and the appearance and disappearance of the novel protein when cultures of the resistant strain were transferred from conditions allowing the expression of resistance to those not allowing such expression and vice-versa, indicated that there was a strong correlation between the presence of PBP2' and the degree of resistance of the attachment transpeptidation reaction and that the production of this protein was affected by temperature at a regulatory or genetic level. Studies on the induction and loss of beta-lactamase activity and of the novel PBP when the resistant strain was grown in the presence or absence of beta-lactam antibiotics at either 40 degrees C or 30 degrees C suggests that

  15. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus epidermidis. Relationship between the additional penicillin-binding protein and an attachment transpeptidase.

    PubMed

    Gaisford, W C; Reynolds, P E

    1989-10-20

    The penicillin-binding proteins (PBP) of a methicillin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis, 100,604 p+m+ and a non-isogenic sensitive strain, p-m- were characterised. The presence of a novel PBP, produced by the methicillin-resistant strain of S. epidermidis, with an Mr identical to that of PBP2' in Staphylococcus aureus 13,136 p-m+, was revealed by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subsequent fluorography of solubilised membrane proteins isolated from cells labelled with [3H]benzylpenicillin. This novel PBP was only detected in cells which had been grown at 30 degrees C, in media containing beta-lactam antibiotic and 5% NaCl. The sensitivity of an attachment transpeptidation reaction measured under non-growing conditions in the sensitive and resistant strains indicated that the novel PBP catalysed this reaction. The similarity of radiolabelled peptides resulting from partial proteolytic digestion of the novel PBP in S. epidermidis 100,604 p+m+ and from PBP2' in S. aureus 13,136 p+m+ lends support to the theory that the additional DNA encoding PBP2' in S. aureus and the same protein in S. epidermidis has been passed to both species from an unknown source. Studies of the development and loss of resistance of attachment transpeptidase activity, and the appearance and disappearance of the novel protein when cultures of the resistant strain were transferred from conditions allowing the expression of resistance to those not allowing such expression and vice-versa, indicated that there was a strong correlation between the presence of PBP2' and the degree of resistance of the attachment transpeptidation reaction and that the production of this protein was affected by temperature at a regulatory or genetic level. Studies on the induction and loss of beta-lactamase activity and of the novel PBP when the resistant strain was grown in the presence or absence of beta-lactam antibiotics at either 40 degrees C or 30 degrees C suggests that

  16. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities.

  17. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  18. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  19. Sulfate influx on band 3 protein of equine erythrocyte membrane (Equus caballus) using different experimental temperatures and buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Casella, S; Piccione, D; Ielati, S; Bocchino, E G; Piccione, G

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the anion transport in equine erythrocytes through the measurement of the sulfate uptake operating from band 3 using different experimental temperatures and buffer solutions. Blood samples of six clinically healthy horses were collected via jugular vein puncture, and an emochrome-citometric examination was performed. The blood was divided into four aliquots and by centrifugation and aspiration the plasma and buffy coat were carefully discarded. The red blood cells were washed with an isosmotic medium and centrifuged. The obtained cell suspensions were incubated with two different experimental buffer solutions (buffer A: 115 mM Na2SO4, 10 mM NaCl, 20 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 30 mM glucose; and buffer B: 115 mM Na2SO4, 10 mM NaCl, 20 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 30 mM MgCl2) in a water bath for 1 h at 25 °C and 37 °C. Normal erythrocytes, suspended at 3% hematocrit, were used to measure the SO4= influx by absorption spectrophotometry at 425 nm wavelength. Unpaired Student's t-test showed a statistically significant decrease (P < 0.01) of rate constants in equine erythrocytes at 25 °C versus 37 °C using both experimental buffer solutions. Comparing the buffer A with buffer B unpaired Student's t-test showed statistically lower values (P < 0.0001) for A solution versus B solution both at 25 °C and at 37 °C. The greater inhibition of SO4 (=) influx measured in equine erythrocytes indicates the increased formation of the sulfydryl bonds in band 3 and the modulation of the sulfydryl groups, culminating in the conformational changes in band 3.

  20. Sulfate influx on band 3 protein of equine erythrocyte membrane (Equus caballus) using different experimental temperatures and buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Casella, S; Piccione, D; Ielati, S; Bocchino, E G; Piccione, G

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the anion transport in equine erythrocytes through the measurement of the sulfate uptake operating from band 3 using different experimental temperatures and buffer solutions. Blood samples of six clinically healthy horses were collected via jugular vein puncture, and an emochrome-citometric examination was performed. The blood was divided into four aliquots and by centrifugation and aspiration the plasma and buffy coat were carefully discarded. The red blood cells were washed with an isosmotic medium and centrifuged. The obtained cell suspensions were incubated with two different experimental buffer solutions (buffer A: 115 mM Na2SO4, 10 mM NaCl, 20 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 30 mM glucose; and buffer B: 115 mM Na2SO4, 10 mM NaCl, 20 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 30 mM MgCl2) in a water bath for 1 h at 25 °C and 37 °C. Normal erythrocytes, suspended at 3% hematocrit, were used to measure the SO4= influx by absorption spectrophotometry at 425 nm wavelength. Unpaired Student's t-test showed a statistically significant decrease (P < 0.01) of rate constants in equine erythrocytes at 25 °C versus 37 °C using both experimental buffer solutions. Comparing the buffer A with buffer B unpaired Student's t-test showed statistically lower values (P < 0.0001) for A solution versus B solution both at 25 °C and at 37 °C. The greater inhibition of SO4 (=) influx measured in equine erythrocytes indicates the increased formation of the sulfydryl bonds in band 3 and the modulation of the sulfydryl groups, culminating in the conformational changes in band 3. PMID:23015199

  1. Novel ATPase activity of the polyprotein intermediate, Viral Protein genome-linked-Nuclear Inclusion-a protease, of Pepper vein banding potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Chhavi; Savithri, Handanahal S

    2012-10-12

    Potyviruses temporally regulate their protein function by polyprotein processing. Previous studies have shown that VPg (Viral Protein genome-linked) of Pepper vein banding virus interacts with the NIa-Pro (Nuclear Inclusion-a protease) domain, and modulates the kinetics of the protease. In the present study, we report for the first time that VPg harbors the Walker motifs A and B, and the presence of NIa-Pro, especially in cis (cleavage site (E191A) VPg-Pro mutant), is essential for manifestation of the ATPase activity. Mutation of Lys47 (Walker motif A) and Asp88:Glu89 (Walker motif B) to alanine in E191A VPg-Pro lead to reduced ATPase activity, confirming that this activity was inherent to VPg. We propose that potyviral VPg, established as an intrinsically disordered domain, undergoes plausible structural alterations upon interaction with globular NIa-Pro which induces the ATPase activity.

  2. Novel ATPase activity of the polyprotein intermediate, Viral Protein genome-linked-Nuclear Inclusion-a protease, of Pepper vein banding potyvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Chhavi; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pepper vein banding potyvirus VPg harbors Walker motifs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VPg exhibits ATPase activity in the presence of NIa-Pro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plausible structural and functional interplay between VPg and NIa-Pro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional relevance of prolonged presence of VPg-Pro during infection. -- Abstract: Potyviruses temporally regulate their protein function by polyprotein processing. Previous studies have shown that VPg (Viral Protein genome-linked) of Pepper vein banding virus interacts with the NIa-Pro (Nuclear Inclusion-a protease) domain, and modulates the kinetics of the protease. In the present study, we report for the first time that VPg harbors the Walker motifs A and B, and the presence of NIa-Pro, especially in cis (cleavage site (E191A) VPg-Pro mutant), is essential for manifestation of the ATPase activity. Mutation of Lys47 (Walker motif A) and Asp88:Glu89 (Walker motif B) to alanine in E191A VPg-Pro lead to reduced ATPase activity, confirming that this activity was inherent to VPg. We propose that potyviral VPg, established as an intrinsically disordered domain, undergoes plausible structural alterations upon interaction with globular NIa-Pro which induces the ATPase activity.

  3. Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru; Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Jae-won, Chang; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku; Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Yagi, Naoto

    2013-10-15

    Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10–20 keV (△E/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

  4. Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray.

    PubMed

    Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Chang, Jae-won; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku; Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru; Yagi, Naoto; Sasaki, Yuji C

    2013-10-01

    Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10-20 keV (ΔE/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

  5. High levels of acute phase proteins and soluble 70 kDa heat shock proteins are independent and additive risk factors for mortality in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kocsis, Judit; Mészáros, Tamás; Madaras, Balázs; Tóth, Éva Katalin; Kamondi, Szilárd; Gál, Péter; Varga, Lilian; Prohászka, Zoltán

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we reported that high soluble Hsp70 (sHsp70) level was a significant predictor of mortality during an almost 3-year-long follow-up period in patients with colorectal cancer. This association was the strongest in the group of <70-year-old female patients as well as in those who were in a less advanced stage of the disease at baseline. According to these observations, measurement of the serum level of sHsp70 is a useful, stage-independent prognostic marker in colorectal cancer, especially in patients without distant metastasis. Since many literature data indicated that measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other acute phase proteins (APPs) may also be suitable for predicting the mortality of patients with colorectal cancer, it seemed reasonable to study whether the effect of sHsp70 and other APPs are related or independent. In order to answer this question, we measured the concentrations of CRP as well as of other complement-related APPs (C1 inhibitor, C3, and C9) along with that of the MASP-2 complement component in the sera of 175 patients with colorectal cancer and known levels of sHsp70, which have been used in our previous study. High (above median) levels of CRP, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), and sHsp70 were found to be independently associated with poor patient survival, whereas no such association was observed with the other proteins tested. According to the adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis, the additive effect of high sHsp70, CRP, and C1-INH levels on the survival of patients exceeded that of high sHsp70 alone, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.83 (1.13–70.9). In some subgroups of patients, such as in females [HR 4.80 (1.07–21.60)] or in ≤70-year-old patients [HR 11.53 (2.78–47.70)], even greater differences were obtained. These findings indicate that the clinical mortality–prediction value of combined measurements of sHsp70, CRP, and C1-INH with inexpensive methods can be very high, especially in specific subgroups of

  6. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-01-01

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  7. Janus kinases and focal adhesion kinases play in the 4.1 band: a superfamily of band 4.1 domains important for cell structure and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Girault, J. A.; Labesse, G.; Mornon, J. P.; Callebaut, I.

    1998-01-01

    The band 4.1 domain was first identified in the red blood cell protein band 4.1, and subsequently in ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM proteins) and other proteins, including tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin, talin, unconventional myosins VIIa and X, and protein tyrosine phosphatases. Recently, the presence of a structurally related domain has been demonstrated in the N-terminal region of two groups of tyrosine kinases: the focal adhesion kinases (FAK) and the Janus kinases (JAK). Additional proteins containing the 4.1/JEF (JAK, ERM, FAK) domain include plant kinesin-like calmodulin-binding proteins (KCBP) and a number of uncharacterized open reading frames identified by systematic DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences suggests that band 4.1/JEF domains can be grouped in several families that have probably diverged early during evolution. Hydrophobic cluster analysis indicates that the band 4.1/JEF domains might consist of a duplicated module of approximately 140 residues and a central hinge region. A conserved property of the domain is its capacity to bind to the membrane-proximal region of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of proteins with a single transmembrane segment. Many proteins with band 4.1/JEF domains undergo regulated intra- or intermolecular homotypic interactions. Additional properties common to band 4.1/JEF domains of several proteins are binding of phosphoinositides and regulation by GTPases of the Rho family. Many proteins with band 4. 1/JEF domains are associated with the actin-based cytoskeleton and are enriched at points of contact with other cells or the extracellular matrix, from which they can exert control over cell growth. Thus, proteins with band 4.1/JEF domain are at the crossroads between cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction in multicellular organisms. Their importance is underlined by the variety of diseases that can result from their mutations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:9990861

  8. Unusual remodeling of the hyalinization band in vulval lichen sclerosus by type V collagen and ECM 1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Charles A.P.; Teodoro, Walcy R.; Velosa, Ana Paula P.; Garippo, Ana Lucia; Eher, Esmeralda Miristeni; Parra, Edwin Roger; Sotto, Mirian N.; Capelozzi, Vera L.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The vulva is the primary site affected in lichen sclerosus, a chronic dermatosis in women that is histologically characterized by a zone of collagen remodeling in the superior dermis. The normal physiological properties of the vulva depend on the assembly of collagen types I (COLI), III (COLIII) and V (COLV), which form heterotypic fibers, and extracellular matrix protein interactions. COLV regulates the heterotypic fiber diameter, and the preservation of its properties is important for maintaining normal tissue architecture and function. In the current work, we analyzed the expression of COLV and its relationship with COLI, COLIII, elastic fibers and extracellular matrix protein 1 in vulvar biopsies from patients with lichen sclerosus. METHODS: Skin biopsies from 21 patients with lichen sclerosus, classified according to Hewitt histological criteria, were studied and compared to clinically normal vulvar tissue (N=21). Morphology, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, 3D reconstruction and morphometric analysis of COLI, COLIII, COLV deposition, elastic fibers and extracellular matrix 1 expression in a zone of collagen remodeling in the superior dermis were performed. RESULTS: A significant decrease of elastic fibers and extracellular matrix 1 protein was present in the hyalinization zone of lichen sclerosus compared to healthy controls. The non-homogeneous distribution of collagen fibers visualized under immunofluorescence in the hyalinization zone of lichen sclerosus and control skin was confirmed by histomorphometry. Lichen sclerosus dermis shows a significant increase of COLI, COLIII and COLV expression compared to the healthy controls. Significant inverse associations were found between elastic fibers and COLV and between COLV and extracellular matrix 1 expression. A direct association was found between elastic fiber content and extracellular matrix 1 expression. Tridimensional reconstruction of the heterotypic fibers of the lichen sclerosus

  9. Gelation of protein recovered from whole Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) by isoelectric solubilization/precipitation as affected by functional additives.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2007-03-01

    This study demonstrated that the novel isoelectric solubilization/precipitation can be applied to recover functional muscle protein in a continuous mode from whole Antarctic krill. Protein recovered from whole krill had a much lower ash content than whole krill, suggesting good removal of inedible impurities (shell, appendages, etc.). Lipids were retained to a higher degree with krill protein solubilized at acidic rather than basic pH. The viscoelastic modulus (G') showed that recovered krill protein failed to form heat-induced gel unless beef plasma protein (BPP) was added. Therefore, protease inhibitors are suggested for development of krill-derived products. Even with BPP, the G' decreased between 45 and 55 degrees C. However, krill protein solubilized at acidic pH had a higher decrease of the G' than the protein solubilized at basic pH, likely due to krill endogenous cathepsin L. Krill protein-based gels developed from protein solubilized at basic pH, especially pH 12.0, had better texture (torsion and Kramer tests and texture profile analysis) than acidic counterparts, possibly due to higher proteolysis and denaturation at acidic pH. Gels made from protein solubilized at acidic pH were brighter and whiter likely due to a higher lipid content.

  10. Effects of Ethanol Addition on the Efficiency of Subcritical Water Extraction of Proteins and Amino Acids from Porcine Placenta

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, hydrolysates of porcine placenta were obtained and the extraction efficiency for proteins and amino acids was compared between sub- and super-critical water extraction systems; optimum efficiency was found to be achieved using subcritical water (170℃, 10 bar). In this study, the effects of adding ethanol to the subcritical water system were investigated. The lowest-molecular-weight extraction product detected weighed 434 Da, and the efficiency of extraction for low-molecular-weight products was increased when either the concentration of ethanol was decreased, or the extraction time was lengthened from 10 min to 30 min. The highest concentration of free amino acids (approximately 8 mM) was observed following 30 min extraction using pure distilled water. The concentration of free amino acids was significantly lower when ethanol was added or a shorter extraction time was used (p<0.05). Color change of the solution following extraction was measured. There were no significant differences in color between lysates produced with different extraction times when using distilled water (p>0.05); however, using different extraction times produced significant differences in color when using 20% or 50% ethanol solution for subcritical extraction (p<0.05). The range of pH for the hydrolysate solutions was 6.4-7.5. In conclusion, the investigated extraction system was successful in the extraction of ≤ 500 Da hydrolysates from porcine placenta, but addition of ethanol did not yield higher production of low-molecular-weight hydrolysates than that achieved by DW alone. PMID:26761837

  11. Effects of Ethanol Addition on the Efficiency of Subcritical Water Extraction of Proteins and Amino Acids from Porcine Placenta.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hee; Kim, Jae-Hyeong; Min, Sang-Gi; Jo, Yeon-Ji; Chun, Ji-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, hydrolysates of porcine placenta were obtained and the extraction efficiency for proteins and amino acids was compared between sub- and super-critical water extraction systems; optimum efficiency was found to be achieved using subcritical water (170℃, 10 bar). In this study, the effects of adding ethanol to the subcritical water system were investigated. The lowest-molecular-weight extraction product detected weighed 434 Da, and the efficiency of extraction for low-molecular-weight products was increased when either the concentration of ethanol was decreased, or the extraction time was lengthened from 10 min to 30 min. The highest concentration of free amino acids (approximately 8 mM) was observed following 30 min extraction using pure distilled water. The concentration of free amino acids was significantly lower when ethanol was added or a shorter extraction time was used (p<0.05). Color change of the solution following extraction was measured. There were no significant differences in color between lysates produced with different extraction times when using distilled water (p>0.05); however, using different extraction times produced significant differences in color when using 20% or 50% ethanol solution for subcritical extraction (p<0.05). The range of pH for the hydrolysate solutions was 6.4-7.5. In conclusion, the investigated extraction system was successful in the extraction of ≤ 500 Da hydrolysates from porcine placenta, but addition of ethanol did not yield higher production of low-molecular-weight hydrolysates than that achieved by DW alone. PMID:26761837

  12. Effect of annatto addition and bleaching treatments on ultrafiltration flux during production of 80% whey protein concentrate and 80% serum protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael C; Zulewska, Justyna; Barbano, David M

    2013-04-01

    The goals of this study were to determine if adding annatto color to milk or applying a bleaching process to whey or microfiltration (MF) permeate influenced ultrafiltration (UF) flux, diafiltration (DF) flux, or membrane fouling during production of 80% whey protein concentrate (WPC80) or 80% serum protein concentrate (SPC80). Separated Cheddar cheese whey (18 vats using 900 kg of whole milk each) and MF permeate of skim milk (18 processing runs using 800 kg of skim milk each) were produced to make WPC80 and SPC80, respectively. The 6 treatments, replicated 3 times each, that constituted the 18 processing runs within either whey or MF permeate UF were as follows: (1) no annatto; (2) no annatto+benzoyl peroxide (BPO); (3) no annatto+hydrogen peroxide (H2O2); (4) annatto; (5) annatto+BPO; and (6) annatto+H2O2. Approximately 700 kg of whey or 530 kg of MF permeate from each treatment were heated to 50°C and processed in 2 stages (UF and DF) with the UF system in batch recirculation mode using a polyethersulfone spiral-wound UF membrane with a molecular weight cutoff of 10,000 Da. Addition of annatto color had no effect on UF or DF flux. The processes of bleaching whey or MF permeate with or without added color improved flux during processing. Bleaching with H2O2 usually produced higher flux than bleaching with BPO. Bleaching with BPO increased WPC80 flux to a greater extent than it did SPC80 flux. Though no differences in mean flux were observed for a common bleaching treatment between the WPC80 and SPC80 production processes during the UF stage, mean flux during WPC80 DF was higher than mean flux during SPC80 DF for each bleaching treatment. Water flux values before and after processing were used to calculate a fouling coefficient that demonstrated differences in fouling which were consistent with flux differences among treatments. In both processes, bleaching with H2O2 led to the largest reduction in fouling. No effect of annatto on fouling was observed. The

  13. Comparative analysis of the Band 4.1/ezrin-related protein tyrosine phosphatase Pez from two Drosophila species: implications for structure and function.

    PubMed

    Edwards, K; Davis, T; Marcey, D; Kurihara, J; Yamamoto, D

    2001-09-19

    The FERM-PTPs are a group of proteins that have FERM (Band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin homology) domains at or near their N-termini, and PTP (protein tyrosine phosphatase) domains at their C-termini. Their central regions contain either PSD-95, Dlg, ZO-1 homology domains or putative Src homology 3 domain binding sites. The known FERM-PTPs fall into three distinct classes, which we name BAS, MEG, and PEZ, after representative human PTPs. Here we analyze Pez, a novel gene encoding the single PEZ-class protein present in Drosophila. Pez cDNAs were sequenced from the distantly related flies Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila silvestris, and found to be highly conserved except in the central region, which contains at least 21 insertions and deletions. Comparison of fly and human Pez reveals several short conserved motifs in the central region that are likely protein binding sites and/or phosphorylation sites. We also identified novel invertebrate members of the BAS and MEG classes using genome data, and generated an alignment of vertebrate and invertebrate FERM domains of each class. 'Specialized' residues were identified that are conserved only within a given class of PTPs. These residues highlight surface regions that may bind class-specific ligands; for PEZ, these residues cluster on and near FERM subdomain F1. Finally, the PTP domain of fly Pez was modeled based on known PTP tertiary structures, and we conclude that Pez is likely a functional phosphatase despite some unusual features of the active site cleft sequences. Biochemical confirmation of this hypothesis and genetic analysis of Pez are currently underway. PMID:11587846

  14. Ferritin associates with marginal band microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Infante, Anthony A.; Infante, Dzintra; Chan, M.-C.; How, P.-C.; Kutschera, Waltraud; Linhartova, Irena; Muellner, Ernst W.; Wiche, Gerhard; Propst, Friedrich . E-mail: friedrich.propst@univie.ac.at

    2007-05-01

    We characterized chicken erythrocyte and human platelet ferritin by biochemical studies and immunofluorescence. Erythrocyte ferritin was found to be a homopolymer of H-ferritin subunits, resistant to proteinase K digestion, heat stable, and contained iron. In mature chicken erythrocytes and human platelets, ferritin was localized at the marginal band, a ring-shaped peripheral microtubule bundle, and displayed properties of bona fide microtubule-associated proteins such as tau. Red blood cell ferritin association with the marginal band was confirmed by temperature-induced disassembly-reassembly of microtubules. During erythrocyte differentiation, ferritin co-localized with coalescing microtubules during marginal band formation. In addition, ferritin was found in the nuclei of mature erythrocytes, but was not detectable in those of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors. These results suggest that ferritin has a function in marginal band formation and possibly in protection of the marginal band from damaging effects of reactive oxygen species by sequestering iron in the mature erythrocyte. Moreover, our data suggest that ferritin and syncolin, a previously identified erythrocyte microtubule-associated protein, are identical. Nuclear ferritin might contribute to transcriptional silencing or, alternatively, constitute a ferritin reservoir.

  15. Interaction of toxic azo dyes with heme protein: biophysical insights into the binding aspect of the food additive amaranth with human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2015-05-30

    A biophysical study on the interaction of the food colorant amaranth with hemoglobin was undertaken. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric studies proposed for an intimate binding interaction between the dye and the protein. The dye quenched the fluorescence of the protein remarkably and the mechanism of quenching was found to be static in nature. Synchronous fluorescence studies suggested that the polarity around the tryptophan residues was altered in the presence of amaranth whereas the polarity around tyrosine residues remained largely unaltered. 3D fluorescence, FTIR and circular dichroism results suggested that the binding reaction caused conformational changes in hemoglobin. The negative far-UV CD bands exhibited a significantly large decrease in magnitude in the presence of amaranth. From calorimetry studies it was established that the binding was driven by a large positive entropic contribution and a small but favorable enthalpy change.

  16. Interaction of toxic azo dyes with heme protein: biophysical insights into the binding aspect of the food additive amaranth with human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2015-05-30

    A biophysical study on the interaction of the food colorant amaranth with hemoglobin was undertaken. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric studies proposed for an intimate binding interaction between the dye and the protein. The dye quenched the fluorescence of the protein remarkably and the mechanism of quenching was found to be static in nature. Synchronous fluorescence studies suggested that the polarity around the tryptophan residues was altered in the presence of amaranth whereas the polarity around tyrosine residues remained largely unaltered. 3D fluorescence, FTIR and circular dichroism results suggested that the binding reaction caused conformational changes in hemoglobin. The negative far-UV CD bands exhibited a significantly large decrease in magnitude in the presence of amaranth. From calorimetry studies it was established that the binding was driven by a large positive entropic contribution and a small but favorable enthalpy change. PMID:25725343

  17. Gastric Banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding before deciding to have the procedure. Advertisements for a device or procedure may not include ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  18. Additive transgene expression and genetic introgression in multiple green-fluorescent protein transgenic crop x weed hybrid generations.

    PubMed

    Halfhill, M D; Millwood, R J; Weissinger, A K; Warwick, S I; Stewart, C N

    2003-11-01

    The level of transgene expression in crop x weed hybrids and the degree to which crop-specific genes are integrated into hybrid populations are important factors in assessing the potential ecological and agricultural risks of gene flow associated with genetic engineering. The average transgene zygosity and genetic structure of transgenic hybrid populations change with the progression of generations, and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene is an ideal marker to quantify transgene expression in advancing populations. The homozygous T(1) single-locus insert GFP/ Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic canola ( Brassica napus, cv Westar) with two copies of the transgene fluoresced twice as much as hemizygous individuals with only one copy of the transgene. These data indicate that the expression of the GFP gene was additive, and fluorescence could be used to determine zygosity status. Several hybrid generations (BC(1)F(1), BC(2)F(1)) were produced by backcrossing various GFP/Bt transgenic canola ( B. napus, cv Westar) and birdseed rape ( Brassica rapa) hybrid generations onto B. rapa. Intercrossed generations (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) were generated by crossing BC(2)F(1) individuals in the presence of a pollinating insect ( Musca domestica L.). The ploidy of plants in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk hybrid generation was identical to the weedy parental species, B. rapa. AFLP analysis was used to quantify the degree of B. napus introgression into multiple backcross hybrid generations with B. rapa. The F(1) hybrid generations contained 95-97% of the B. napus-specific AFLP markers, and each successive backcross generation demonstrated a reduction of markers resulting in the 15-29% presence in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk population. Average fluorescence of each successive hybrid generation was analyzed, and homozygous canola lines and hybrid populations that contained individuals homozygous for GFP (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) demonstrated significantly higher fluorescence than hemizygous hybrid

  19. Additive transgene expression and genetic introgression in multiple green-fluorescent protein transgenic crop x weed hybrid generations.

    PubMed

    Halfhill, M D; Millwood, R J; Weissinger, A K; Warwick, S I; Stewart, C N

    2003-11-01

    The level of transgene expression in crop x weed hybrids and the degree to which crop-specific genes are integrated into hybrid populations are important factors in assessing the potential ecological and agricultural risks of gene flow associated with genetic engineering. The average transgene zygosity and genetic structure of transgenic hybrid populations change with the progression of generations, and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene is an ideal marker to quantify transgene expression in advancing populations. The homozygous T(1) single-locus insert GFP/ Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic canola ( Brassica napus, cv Westar) with two copies of the transgene fluoresced twice as much as hemizygous individuals with only one copy of the transgene. These data indicate that the expression of the GFP gene was additive, and fluorescence could be used to determine zygosity status. Several hybrid generations (BC(1)F(1), BC(2)F(1)) were produced by backcrossing various GFP/Bt transgenic canola ( B. napus, cv Westar) and birdseed rape ( Brassica rapa) hybrid generations onto B. rapa. Intercrossed generations (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) were generated by crossing BC(2)F(1) individuals in the presence of a pollinating insect ( Musca domestica L.). The ploidy of plants in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk hybrid generation was identical to the weedy parental species, B. rapa. AFLP analysis was used to quantify the degree of B. napus introgression into multiple backcross hybrid generations with B. rapa. The F(1) hybrid generations contained 95-97% of the B. napus-specific AFLP markers, and each successive backcross generation demonstrated a reduction of markers resulting in the 15-29% presence in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk population. Average fluorescence of each successive hybrid generation was analyzed, and homozygous canola lines and hybrid populations that contained individuals homozygous for GFP (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) demonstrated significantly higher fluorescence than hemizygous hybrid

  20. Hydrolyzed casein and whey protein meals comparably stimulate net whole-body protein synthesis in COPD patients with nutritional depletion without an additional effect of leucine co-ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Jonker, Renate; Deutz, Nicolaas EP; Erbland, Marcia L; Anderson, Paula J; Engelen, Mariëlle PKJ

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Muscle wasting commonly occurs in COPD, negatively affecting outcome. The aim was to examine the net whole-body protein synthesis response to two milk protein meals with comparable absorption rates (hydrolyzed casein (hCAS) vs. hydrolyzed whey (hWHEY)) and the effects of co-ingesting leucine. Methods Twelve COPD patients (GOLD stage II-IV) with nutritional depletion, were studied following intake of a 15g hCAS or hWHEY protein meal with or without leucine-co-ingestion, according to a double-blind randomized cross-over design. The isotopic tracers L-[ring-2H5]-Phenylalanine, L-[ring-2H2]-Tyrosine, L-[2H3]-3-Methylhistidine (given via continuous intravenous infusion), and L-[15N]-Phenylalanine (added to the protein meals) were used to measure endogenous whole-body protein breakdown (WbPB), whole-body protein synthesis (WbPS), net protein synthesis (NetPS), splanchnic extraction and myofibrillar protein breakdown (MPB). Analyses were done in arterialized-venous plasma by LC/MS/MS. Results WbPS was greater after intake of the hCAS protein meal (P<0.05) whereas the hWHEY protein meal reduced WbPB more (P<0.01). NetPS was stimulated comparably, with a protein conversion rate greater than 70%. Addition of leucine did not modify the insulin, WbPB, WbPS or MPB response. Conclusions Hydrolyzed casein and whey protein meals comparably and efficiently stimulate whole-body protein anabolism in COPD patients with nutritional depletion without an additional effect of leucine co-ingestion. PMID:23886411

  1. A reward band study of mallards to estimate band reporting rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Burnham, K.P.

    1976-01-01

    Reward bands ($10) were placed on 2,122 hatching-year mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and an additional 11,490 received conventional bands (controls) to estimate band reporting rates. An analysis of band recoveries indicated that the reporting rate was dependent primarily upon three factors: (1) the distance banded birds were recovered from the banding site, (2) band collecting activities of conservation agencies (usually near banding sites), and ( 3) the intensity of banding effort in the region (frequency of banded birds in the population of the region). Reporting rates were uniformly depressed near the banding sites, but they showed an east-west cline at distances greater than 80 km from the banding sites. The reporting rate was highest in the west. Limited data on historical band reporting rates were compiled. Recommendations are given for adjusting band recoveries to account for the nonreporting of bands for 1957-73.

  2. Effect of addition of thermally modified cowpea protein on sensory acceptability and textural properties of wheat bread and sponge cake.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lydia; Euston, Stephen R; Ahmed, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the sensory acceptability and textural properties of leavened wheat bread and sponge cake fortified with cow protein isolates that had been denatured and glycated by thermal treatment. Defatted cowpea flour was prepared from cow pea beans and the protein isolate was prepared (CPI) and thermally denatured (DCPI). To prepare glycated cowpea protein isolate (GCPI) the cowpea flour slurry was heat treated before isolation of the protein. CPI was more susceptible to thermal denaturation than GCPI as determined by turbidity and sulphydryl groups resulting in greater loss of solubility. This is attributed to the higher glycation degree and higher carbohydrate content of GCPI as demonstrated by glycoprotein staining of SDS PAGE gels. Water absorption of bread dough was significantly enhanced by DCPI and to a larger extent GCPI compared to the control, resulting in softer texture. CPI resulted in significantly increased crumb hardness in baked bread than the control whereas DCPI or GCPI resulted in significantly softer crumb. Bread fortified with 4% DCPI or GCPI was similar to control as regards sensory and textural properties whereas 4% CPI was significantly different, limiting its inclusion level to 2%. There was a trend for higher sensory acceptability scores for GCPI containing bread compared DCPI. Whole egg was replaced by 20% by GCPI (3.5%) in sponge cake without affecting the sensory acceptability, whereas CPI and DCPI supplemented cakes were significantly different than the control. PMID:26471676

  3. Conversion of canola meal into a high-protein feed additive via solid-state fungal incubation process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study goal was to determine the optimal fungal culture to reduce glucosinolates (GLS), fiber, and residual sugars while increasing the protein content and nutritional value of canola meal. Solid-state incubation conditions were used to enhance filamentous growth of the fungi. Flask trials were p...

  4. Effect of addition of thermally modified cowpea protein on sensory acceptability and textural properties of wheat bread and sponge cake.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lydia; Euston, Stephen R; Ahmed, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the sensory acceptability and textural properties of leavened wheat bread and sponge cake fortified with cow protein isolates that had been denatured and glycated by thermal treatment. Defatted cowpea flour was prepared from cow pea beans and the protein isolate was prepared (CPI) and thermally denatured (DCPI). To prepare glycated cowpea protein isolate (GCPI) the cowpea flour slurry was heat treated before isolation of the protein. CPI was more susceptible to thermal denaturation than GCPI as determined by turbidity and sulphydryl groups resulting in greater loss of solubility. This is attributed to the higher glycation degree and higher carbohydrate content of GCPI as demonstrated by glycoprotein staining of SDS PAGE gels. Water absorption of bread dough was significantly enhanced by DCPI and to a larger extent GCPI compared to the control, resulting in softer texture. CPI resulted in significantly increased crumb hardness in baked bread than the control whereas DCPI or GCPI resulted in significantly softer crumb. Bread fortified with 4% DCPI or GCPI was similar to control as regards sensory and textural properties whereas 4% CPI was significantly different, limiting its inclusion level to 2%. There was a trend for higher sensory acceptability scores for GCPI containing bread compared DCPI. Whole egg was replaced by 20% by GCPI (3.5%) in sponge cake without affecting the sensory acceptability, whereas CPI and DCPI supplemented cakes were significantly different than the control.

  5. Repetitive titin epitopes with a 42 nm spacing coincide in relative position with known A band striations also identified by major myosin-associated proteins. An immunoelectron-microscopical study on myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Fürst, D O; Nave, R; Osborn, M; Weber, K

    1989-09-01

    A direct titin-thick filament interaction in certain regions of the A band is suggested by results using four new monoclonal antibodies specific for titin in immunoelectron microscopy. Antibodies T30, T31 and T32 identify quasi-repeats in the titin molecule characterized by a 42-43 nm repeat spacing. These stripes seem to coincide with striations established by others on negatively stained cryosections of the A band. Antibodies T30 and T32 recognize epitopes matching five or two of the seven striations per half sacromere known to harbor both the myosin-associated C-protein and an 86K (K = 10(3) Mr) protein. Antibody T31 labels two stripes in the P zone, which correspond to the two positions where decoration is seen with 86K protein, but not with C-protein. The single titin epitope defined by antibody T33 is located 55 nm prior to the center of the M band. This position seems to coincide with the M7 striation defined by others on negatively stained A bands. The T33 epitope position proves that the titin molecule, which is known to be anchored at the Z line, also penetrates into the complex architecture of the M band. The titin epitopes described here enable us to begin to correlate known ultrastructural aspects of the interior part of the A band with the disposition of the titin molecule in the sarcomere. They raise the question of whether there is a regular interaction pattern between titin and the thick filaments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Expression of c-Fos protein in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca and CA3 region, associated with the temporary inactivation of the supramammillary area.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lourdes

    2016-07-01

    The supramammillary (SuM) area is part of the diencephalic nuclei comprising the mammillary bodies, and is a key structure in the memory and spatial learning processes. It is a critical region in the modulation/generation of hippocampal theta rhythm. In addition, many papers have recently shown a clear involvement of this structure in the processes of spatial learning and memory in animal models, although it is still not known how it modulates spatial navigation and response emotional. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of the temporary inactivation of the SuM area on synaptic plasticity of crucial structures in the formation of spatial memory and emotional response. Sprague-Dawley rats were asigned in three groups: a control group where the animals were not subjected to any treatment, and two groups where the rats received microinjections of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in the SuM area (5ng diluted in 0.5μl of saline) or saline (0.5μl). The microinjections were administered 90min before the perfusion. Later, cellular activity in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DBB) and CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus was assessed, by measuring the immediate early gene c-fos. The results show a clear hiperactivity cellular in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca and a clear hypoactivity cellular in the CA3 region of the hippocampus when there was a functional inactivation of the SuM area. It suggests that the SuM area seems to be part of the connection and information input pathways to CA3 region of the hippocampal formation, key for proper functioning in spatial memory and emotional response. PMID:26802745

  7. Expression of c-Fos protein in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca and CA3 region, associated with the temporary inactivation of the supramammillary area.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lourdes

    2016-07-01

    The supramammillary (SuM) area is part of the diencephalic nuclei comprising the mammillary bodies, and is a key structure in the memory and spatial learning processes. It is a critical region in the modulation/generation of hippocampal theta rhythm. In addition, many papers have recently shown a clear involvement of this structure in the processes of spatial learning and memory in animal models, although it is still not known how it modulates spatial navigation and response emotional. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of the temporary inactivation of the SuM area on synaptic plasticity of crucial structures in the formation of spatial memory and emotional response. Sprague-Dawley rats were asigned in three groups: a control group where the animals were not subjected to any treatment, and two groups where the rats received microinjections of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in the SuM area (5ng diluted in 0.5μl of saline) or saline (0.5μl). The microinjections were administered 90min before the perfusion. Later, cellular activity in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DBB) and CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus was assessed, by measuring the immediate early gene c-fos. The results show a clear hiperactivity cellular in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca and a clear hypoactivity cellular in the CA3 region of the hippocampus when there was a functional inactivation of the SuM area. It suggests that the SuM area seems to be part of the connection and information input pathways to CA3 region of the hippocampal formation, key for proper functioning in spatial memory and emotional response.

  8. The Phragmoplast-Orienting Kinesin-12 Class Proteins Translate the Positional Information of the Preprophase Band to Establish the Cortical Division Zone in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lipka, Elisabeth; Gadeyne, Astrid; Stöckle, Dorothee; Zimmermann, Steffi; De Jaeger, Geert; Ehrhardt, David W; Kirik, Viktor; Van Damme, Daniel; Müller, Sabine

    2014-06-27

    The preprophase band (PPB) is a faithful but transient predictor of the division plane in somatic cell divisions. Throughout mitosis the PPBs positional information is preserved by factors that continuously mark the division plane at the cell cortex, the cortical division zone, by their distinct spatio-temporal localization patterns. However, the mechanism maintaining these identity factors at the plasma membrane after PPB disassembly remains obscure. The pair of kinesin-12 class proteins PHRAGMOPLAST ORIENTING KINESIN1 (POK1) and POK2 are key players in division plane maintenance. Here, we show that POK1 is continuously present at the cell cortex, providing a spatial reference for the site formerly occupied by the PPB. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis combined with microtubule destabilization revealed dynamic microtubule-dependent recruitment of POK1 to the PPB during prophase, while POK1 retention at the cortical division zone in the absence of cortical microtubules appeared static. POK function is strictly required to maintain the division plane identity factor TANGLED (TAN) after PPB disassembly, although POK1 and TAN recruitment to the PPB occur independently during prophase. Together, our data suggest that POKs represent fundamental early anchoring components of the cortical division zone, translating and preserving the positional information of the PPB by maintaining downstream identity markers. PMID:24972597

  9. The Phragmoplast-Orienting Kinesin-12 Class Proteins Translate the Positional Information of the Preprophase Band to Establish the Cortical Division Zone in Arabidopsis thaliana[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Lipka, Elisabeth; Gadeyne, Astrid; Stöckle, Dorothee; Zimmermann, Steffi; De Jaeger, Geert; Ehrhardt, David W.; Kirik, Viktor; Van Damme, Daniel; Müller, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The preprophase band (PPB) is a faithful but transient predictor of the division plane in somatic cell divisions. Throughout mitosis the PPBs positional information is preserved by factors that continuously mark the division plane at the cell cortex, the cortical division zone, by their distinct spatio-temporal localization patterns. However, the mechanism maintaining these identity factors at the plasma membrane after PPB disassembly remains obscure. The pair of kinesin-12 class proteins PHRAGMOPLAST ORIENTING KINESIN1 (POK1) and POK2 are key players in division plane maintenance. Here, we show that POK1 is continuously present at the cell cortex, providing a spatial reference for the site formerly occupied by the PPB. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis combined with microtubule destabilization revealed dynamic microtubule-dependent recruitment of POK1 to the PPB during prophase, while POK1 retention at the cortical division zone in the absence of cortical microtubules appeared static. POK function is strictly required to maintain the division plane identity factor TANGLED (TAN) after PPB disassembly, although POK1 and TAN recruitment to the PPB occur independently during prophase. Together, our data suggest that POKs represent fundamental early anchoring components of the cortical division zone, translating and preserving the positional information of the PPB by maintaining downstream identity markers. PMID:24972597

  10. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings secrete proteases from the roots and, after protein addition, grow well on medium without inorganic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, B; Godlewski, M; Zimny, J; Zimny, A

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports on the role of proteases secreted by roots in nitrogen capture by plants. The study was conducted on aseptically cultivated wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum cv. Tacher) obtained from embryos isolated from grains. Seedlings were cultivated for 21 days on deionised water, Murashige Skoog medium (MS), MS without inorganic nitrogen (IN), and MS without IN, in which IN was replaced by casein (0.01%, 0.1% or 1%). Comparison of seedlings grown on these media showed that casein entirely compensated for the lack of inorganic nitrogen in the medium. Shoots and roots of seedlings cultivated on MS medium with this protein had higher fresh weight than those cultivated on MS medium without casein. The increase in fresh weight of seedlings was correlated with casein concentration and proteolytic activity in the medium. In conclusion, wheat that uses proteases secreted by the roots can directly utilise proteins in the medium as a source of nitrogen without prior digestion by microbial proteases and without protein mineralisation. These results suggest the important role of organic nitrogen fertilisers in increasing wheat yield. PMID:18950429

  11. Effects of beta-amyloid protein on M1 and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the medial septum-diagonal band complex of the rat: relationship with cholinergic, GABAergic, and calcium-binding protein perikarya.

    PubMed

    González, Iván; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Sanz-Anquela, José Miguel; Gonzalo-Ruiz, Alicia

    2007-06-01

    Cortical cholinergic dysfunction has been correlated with the expression and processing of beta-amyloid precursor protein. However, it remains unclear as to how cholinergic dysfunction and beta-amyloid (Abeta) formation and deposition might be related to one another. Since the M1- and M2 subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are considered key molecules that transduce the cholinergic message, the purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of the injected Abeta peptide on the number of M1mAchR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum-diagonal band (MS-nDBB) complex of the rat. Injections of Abeta protein into the retrosplenial cortex resulted in a decrease in M1mAChR and M2mAChR immunoreactivity in the MS-nDBB complex. Quantitative analysis revealed a significant reduction in the number of M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-immunoreactive cells in the medial septum nucleus (MS) and in the horizontal nucleus of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) as compared to the corresponding hemisphere in control animals and with that seen in the contralateral hemisphere, which corresponds to the PBS-injected side. Co-localization studies showed that the M1mAChR protein is localized in GABA-immunoreactive cells of the MS-nDBB complex, in particular those of the MS nucleus, while M2mAChR protein is localized in both the cholinergic and GABAergic cells. Moreover, GABAergic cells containing M2mAChR are mainly localized in the MS nucleus, while cholinergic cells containing M2mAChR are localized in the MS and the HDB nuclei. Our findings suggest that Abeta induces a reduction in M1mAChR- and M2mAChR-containing cells, which may contribute to impairments of cholinergic and GABAergic transmission in the MS-nDBB complex.

  12. Modification of water absorption capacity of a plastic based on bean protein using gamma irradiated starches as additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köber, E.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Gavioli, N.; Salmoral, E. M.

    2007-01-01

    Some properties of a bean protein-starch plastic were modified by irradiation of the starch. Two kinds of starch from bean and cassava were irradiated with doses until 50 kGy before their inclusion in the composite. Water absorption of the resultant product was reduced by 36% and 60% in materials containing bean and cassava starch, respectively. A large decline in the elongation is observed till 10 kGy in both materials, while tensile strength diminished by 11% in the cassava composite.

  13. N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,3-butanediamine as effective running electrolyte additive for efficient electrophoretic separation of basic proteins in bare fused-silica capillaries.

    PubMed

    Corradini, D; Cannarsa, G

    1995-04-01

    The effect of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,3-butanediamine (TMBD) in the running electrolyte on the electroosmotic flow and the migration behavior of four standard basic proteins in bare fused-silica capillaries was examined at pH 4.0, 5.5, and 6.5. Depending on the electrolyte pH and additive concentration the electroosmotic flow was either cathodic or anodic. A similar Langmuirian-type dependence of the electroosmotic flow on the concentration of TMBD in the running electrolyte was found at the three experimented pH values, which may be indicative of the specific adsorption of the additive in the immobilized region of the electric double layer at the interface between the capillary wall and the electrolyte solution. Electrophoretic separations of the four standard basic proteins performed at the three above pH values, showed well-resolved, efficient and symmetric peaks, demonstrating the utility of this additive for protein electrophoresis in bare fused-silica capillaries. The variations in separation efficiency, peak capacity, resolution and reproducibility of migration times as a function of the additive concentration at pH 6.5 were also examined.

  14. MrpL36p, a highly diverged L31 ribosomal protein homolog with additional functional domains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Elizabeth H; Perez-Martinez, Xochitl; Fox, Thomas D

    2004-01-01

    Translation in mitochondria utilizes a large complement of ribosomal proteins. Many mitochondrial ribosomal components are clearly homologous to eubacterial ribosomal proteins, but others appear unique to the mitochondrial system. A handful of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins appear to be eubacterial in origin but to have evolved additional functional domains. MrpL36p is an essential mitochondrial ribosomal large-subunit component in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Increased dosage of MRPL36 also has been shown to suppress certain types of translation defects encoded within the mitochondrial COX2 mRNA. A central domain of MrpL36p that is similar to eubacterial ribosomal large-subunit protein L31 is sufficient for general mitochondrial translation but not suppression, and proteins bearing this domain sediment with the ribosomal large subunit in sucrose gradients. In contrast, proteins lacking the L31 domain, but retaining a novel N-terminal sequence and a C-terminal sequence with weak similarity to the Escherichia coli signal recognition particle component Ffh, are sufficient for dosage suppression and do not sediment with the large subunit of the ribosome. Interestingly, the activity of MrpL36p as a dosage suppressor exhibits gene and allele specificity. We propose that MrpL36p represents a highly diverged L31 homolog with derived domains functioning in mRNA selection in yeast mitochondria. PMID:15166137

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of Zein Gene Expression in Maize through the Additive and Synergistic Action of opaque2, Prolamine-Box Binding Factor, and O2 Heterodimerizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Yang, Jun; Wu, Yongrui

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) zeins are some of the most abundant cereal seed storage proteins (SSPs). Their abundance influences kernel hardness but compromises its nutritional quality. Transcription factors regulating the expression of zein and other SSP genes in cereals are endosperm-specific and homologs of maize opaque2 (O2) and prolamine-box binding factor (PBF). This study demonstrates that the ubiquitously expressed transcription factors, O2 heterodimerizing proteins (OHPs), specifically regulate 27-kD γ-zein gene expression (through binding to an O2-like box in its promoter) and interact with PBF. The zein content of double mutants OhpRNAi;o2 and PbfRNAi;o2 and the triple mutant PbfRNAi;OhpRNAi;o2 is reduced by 83, 89, and 90%, respectively, compared with the wild type. The triple mutant developed the smallest zein protein bodies, which were merely one-tenth the wild type’s size. Total protein levels in these mutants were maintained in a relatively constant range through proteome rebalancing. These data show that OHPs, O2, and PBF are master regulators of zein storage protein synthesis, acting in an additive and synergistic mode. The differential expression patterns of OHP and O2 genes may cause the slight differences in the timing of 27-kD γ-zein and 22-kD α-zein accumulation during protein body formation. PMID:25901087

  16. Identifying food proteins with allergenic potential: evolution of approaches to safety assessment and research to provide additional tools.

    PubMed

    Ladics, Gregory S; Selgrade, MaryJane K

    2009-08-01

    A safety assessment process exists for genetically engineered crops that includes the evaluation of the expressed protein for allergenic potential. The objectives of this evaluation are twofold: (1) to protect allergic consumers from exposure to known allergenic or cross-reactive proteins, and (2) protect the general population from risks associated with the introduction of genes encoding proteins that are likely to become food allergens. The first systematic approach to address these concerns was formulated by Metcalfe et al. [Metcalfe, D.D., Astwood, J.D., Townsend, R., Sampson, H.A., Taylor, S.L., and Fuchs, R.L. 1996. Assessment of the allergenic potential of foods from genetically engineered crop plants. Crit. Rev. Food Sci. Nutr. 36(5), 165-186.] and subsequently Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) [FAO/WHO, 2001. Evaluation of allergenicity of genetically modified foods. Report of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Consultation on Allergenicity of Foods Derived from Biotechnology. January 22-25, 2001. Rome, Italy]. More recently, Codex [Codex Alimentarius Commission, 2003. Alinorm 03/34: Joint FAO/WHO Food Standard Programme, Codex Alimentarius Commission, Twenty-Fifth Session, Rome, Italy, 30 June-5 July, 2003. Appendix III, Guideline for the conduct of food safety assessment of foods derived from recombinant-DNA plants, and Appendix IV, Annex on the assessment of possible allergenicity. pp. 47-60], noting that no single factor is recognized as an identifier for protein allergenicity, suggested a weight of evidence approach be conducted that takes into account a variety of factors and approaches for an overall assessment of allergenic potential. These various recommendations are based on what is known about allergens, including the history of exposure and safety of the gene(s) source; amino acid sequence identity to human allergens; stability to pepsin digestion in vitro; protein abundance in the crop and

  17. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... adjustable gastric banding; Bariatric surgery - laparoscopic gastric banding; Obesity - gastric banding; Weight loss - gastric banding ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ...

  18. Solvation free energy of the peptide group: its model dependence and implications for the additive-transfer free-energy model of protein stability.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Asthagiri, D; Weber, Valéry

    2013-09-17

    The group-additive decomposition of the unfolding free energy of a protein in an osmolyte solution relative to that in water poses a fundamental paradox: whereas the decomposition describes the experimental results rather well, theory suggests that a group-additive decomposition of free energies is, in general, not valid. In a step toward resolving this paradox, here we study the peptide-group transfer free energy. We calculate the vacuum-to-solvent (solvation) free energies of (Gly)n and cyclic diglycine (cGG) and analyze the data according to experimental protocol. The solvation free energies of (Gly)n are linear in n, suggesting group additivity. However, the slope interpreted as the free energy of a peptide unit differs from that for cGG scaled by a factor of half, emphasizing the context dependence of solvation. However, the water-to-osmolyte transfer free energies of the peptide unit are relatively independent of the peptide model, as observed experimentally. To understand these observations, a way to assess the contribution to the solvation free energy of solvent-mediated correlation between distinct groups is developed. We show that linearity of solvation free energy with n is a consequence of uniformity of the correlation contributions, with apparent group-additive behavior in the water-to-osmolyte transfer arising due to their cancellation. Implications for inferring molecular mechanisms of solvent effects on protein stability on the basis of the group-additive transfer model are suggested.

  19. Yeast ortholog of the Drosophila crooked neck protein promotes spliceosome assembly through stable U4/U6.U5 snRNP addition.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S; McLean, M R; Rymond, B C

    1999-01-01

    Mutants in the Drosophila crooked neck (crn) gene show an embryonic lethal phenotype with severe developmental defects. The unusual crn protein consists of sixteen tandem repeats of the 34 amino acid tetratricopeptide (TPR) protein recognition domain. Crn-like TPR elements are found in several RNA processing proteins, although it is unknown how the TPR repeats or the crn protein contribute to Drosophila development. We have isolated a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, CLF1, that encodes a crooked neck-like factor. CLF1 is an essential gene but the lethal phenotype of a clf1::HIS3 chromosomal null mutant can be rescued by plasmid-based expression of CLF1 or the Drosophila crn open reading frame. Clf1p is required in vivo and in vitro for pre-mRNA 5' splice site cleavage. Extracts depleted of Clf1p arrest spliceosome assembly after U2 snRNP addition but prior to productive U4/U6.U5 association. Yeast two-hybrid analyses and in vitro binding studies show that Clf1p interacts specifically and differentially with the U1 snRNP-Prp40p protein and the yeast U2AF65 homolog, Mud2p. Intriguingly, Prp40p and Mud2p also bind the phylogenetically conserved branchpoint binding protein (BBP/SF1). Our results indicate that Clf1p acts as a scaffolding protein in spliceosome assembly and suggest that Clf1p may support the cross-intron bridge during the prespliceosome-to-spliceosome transition. PMID:10445879

  20. Pairwise additivity of energy components in protein-ligand binding: the HIV II protease-Indinavir case.

    PubMed

    Ucisik, Melek N; Dashti, Danial S; Faver, John C; Merz, Kenneth M

    2011-08-28

    An energy expansion (binding energy decomposition into n-body interaction terms for n ≥ 2) to express the receptor-ligand binding energy for the fragmented HIV II protease-Indinavir system is described to address the role of cooperativity in ligand binding. The outcome of this energy expansion is compared to the total receptor-ligand binding energy at the Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and semiempirical levels of theory. We find that the sum of the pairwise interaction energies approximates the total binding energy to ∼82% for HF and to >95% for both the M06-L density functional and PM6-DH2 semiempirical method. The contribution of the three-body interactions amounts to 18.7%, 3.8%, and 1.4% for HF, M06-L, and PM6-DH2, respectively. We find that the expansion can be safely truncated after n=3. That is, the contribution of the interactions involving more than three parties to the total binding energy of Indinavir to the HIV II protease receptor is negligible. Overall, we find that the two-body terms represent a good approximation to the total binding energy of the system, which points to pairwise additivity in the present case. This basic principle of pairwise additivity is utilized in fragment-based drug design approaches and our results support its continued use. The present results can also aid in the validation of non-bonded terms contained within common force fields and in the correction of systematic errors in physics-based score functions. PMID:21895219

  1. Pairwise additivity of energy components in protein-ligand binding: The HIV II protease-Indinavir case

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Melek N.; Dashti, Danial S.; Faver, John C.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    An energy expansion (binding energy decomposition into n-body interaction terms for n ≥ 2) to express the receptor-ligand binding energy for the fragmented HIV II protease-Indinavir system is described to address the role of cooperativity in ligand binding. The outcome of this energy expansion is compared to the total receptor-ligand binding energy at the Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and semiempirical levels of theory. We find that the sum of the pairwise interaction energies approximates the total binding energy to ∼82% for HF and to >95% for both the M06-L density functional and PM6-DH2 semiempirical method. The contribution of the three-body interactions amounts to 18.7%, 3.8%, and 1.4% for HF, M06-L, and PM6-DH2, respectively. We find that the expansion can be safely truncated after n = 3. That is, the contribution of the interactions involving more than three parties to the total binding energy of Indinavir to the HIV II protease receptor is negligible. Overall, we find that the two-body terms represent a good approximation to the total binding energy of the system, which points to pairwise additivity in the present case. This basic principle of pairwise additivity is utilized in fragment-based drug design approaches and our results support its continued use. The present results can also aid in the validation of non-bonded terms contained within common force fields and in the correction of systematic errors in physics-based score functions. PMID:21895219

  2. Infrared amide I' band of the coiled coil.

    PubMed

    Reisdorf, W C; Krimm, S

    1996-02-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of several coiled-coil proteins have been shown to possess unusual features in the amide I' region. Band maxima occur in the vicinity of 1630 cm-1, with component bands at higher frequency. This is well below the observed band at 1650 cm-1 found in standard alpha-helical polypeptides such as poly-L-alanine. Normal mode calculations on models of the coiled-coil structure have been performed to investigate this issue. We find that the observed band profile can be reproduced with very small random variation on the phi, psi of tropomyosin. We believe that the shift to lower frequency is due to additional hydrogen bonding of the solvent accessible backbone CO groups to water.

  3. Improvement of texture and sensory properties of cakes by addition of potato peel powder with high level of dietary fiber and protein.

    PubMed

    Ben Jeddou, Khawla; Bouaziz, Fatma; Zouari-Ellouzi, Soumaya; Chaari, Fatma; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Ellouz-Ghorbel, Raoudha; Nouri-Ellouz, Oumèma

    2017-02-15

    Demand for health oriented products such as low calories and high fiber product is increasing. The aim of the present work was to determine the effect of the addition of potato peel powders as protein and dietary fiber source on the quality of the dough and the cake. Powders obtained from the two types of peel flour showed interesting water binding capacity and fat absorption capacity. Potato peel flours were incorporated in wheat flours at different concentration. The results showed that peel powders additionally considerably improved the Alveograph profile of dough and the texture of the prepared cakes. In addition color measurements showed a significant difference between the control dough and the dough containing potato peels. The replacement of wheat flour with the potato powders reduced the cake hardness significantly and the L(*) and b(*) dough color values. The increased consumption of cake enriched with potato peel fiber is proposed for health reasons. The study demonstrated that protein/fiber-enriched cake with good sensory quality could be produced by the substitution of wheat flour by 5% of potato peel powder. In addition and technological point of view, the incorporation of potato peel powder at 5% increase the dough strength and elasticity-to-extensibility ratio (P/L). PMID:27664685

  4. Improvement of texture and sensory properties of cakes by addition of potato peel powder with high level of dietary fiber and protein.

    PubMed

    Ben Jeddou, Khawla; Bouaziz, Fatma; Zouari-Ellouzi, Soumaya; Chaari, Fatma; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Ellouz-Ghorbel, Raoudha; Nouri-Ellouz, Oumèma

    2017-02-15

    Demand for health oriented products such as low calories and high fiber product is increasing. The aim of the present work was to determine the effect of the addition of potato peel powders as protein and dietary fiber source on the quality of the dough and the cake. Powders obtained from the two types of peel flour showed interesting water binding capacity and fat absorption capacity. Potato peel flours were incorporated in wheat flours at different concentration. The results showed that peel powders additionally considerably improved the Alveograph profile of dough and the texture of the prepared cakes. In addition color measurements showed a significant difference between the control dough and the dough containing potato peels. The replacement of wheat flour with the potato powders reduced the cake hardness significantly and the L(*) and b(*) dough color values. The increased consumption of cake enriched with potato peel fiber is proposed for health reasons. The study demonstrated that protein/fiber-enriched cake with good sensory quality could be produced by the substitution of wheat flour by 5% of potato peel powder. In addition and technological point of view, the incorporation of potato peel powder at 5% increase the dough strength and elasticity-to-extensibility ratio (P/L).

  5. The use of additive and subtractive approaches to examine the nuclear localization sequence of the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been identified in the N-terminal (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) amino acid sequence of the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1. The importance of this amino acid sequence for nuclear transport of VP1 protein was demonstrated by a genetic "subtractive" study using the constructs pSG5VP1 (full-length VP1) and pSG5 delta 5'VP1 (truncated VP1, lacking amino acids Ala1-Cys11). These constructs were used to transfect COS-7 cells, and expression and intracellular localization of the VP1 protein was visualized by indirect immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the full-length VP1 was expressed and localized in the nucleus, while the truncated VP1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm and not transported to the nucleus. These findings were substantiated by an "additive" approach using FITC-labeled conjugates of synthetic peptides homologous to the NLS of VP1 cross-linked to bovine serum albumin or immunoglobulin G. Both conjugates localized in the nucleus after microinjection into the cytoplasm of 3T6 cells. The importance of individual amino acids found in the basic sequence (Lys3-Arg-Lys5) of the NLS was also investigated. This was accomplished by synthesizing three additional peptides in which lysine-3 was substituted with threonine, arginine-4 was substituted with threonine, or lysine-5 was substituted with threonine. It was found that lysine-3 was crucial for nuclear transport, since substitution of this amino acid with threonine prevented nuclear localization of the microinjected, FITC-labeled conjugate.

  6. Effect of nitrogen addition on the band gap, core level shift, surface energy, and the threshold field of electron emission of the SrTiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, H. J.; Chen, X. F.; Pan, J. S.; Zhu, W.; Sun, Chang Q.

    2007-12-01

    The effect of nitrogen (N) doping on the behavior of field emission, surface energy and the band structure of strontium titanate (SrTiO3) thin films coated on silicon tip arrays has been examined in detail. Measurements using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ellipsometry, water contact angle and field emission testing revealed that the optimal 50%-nitrogen partial pressure (PN) could improve substantially the threshold field of electron emission of the SrTiO3 films accompanied with narrowed band gap, lowered surface energy and work function and a negative energy shift of the N 1s level from 404 to 396 eV. Results evidence consistently the presence of the nonbonding lone pairs and the lone pair induced antibonding dipoles upon tetrahedron formation which is responsible for the observations. At PN below and above the optimal value physisorption and hydrogen bond likes formation like to occur.

  7. Easy determination of the addition of soybean proteins to heat-processed meat products prepared with turkey meat or pork-turkey meat blends that could also contain milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Castro, F; Marina, M L; Rodríguez, J; García, M C

    2005-12-01

    The addition of non-meat proteins to processed meat products is limited by regulations. Therefore, this work has investigated the determination of added soybean proteins in commercial heat-processed meat products prepared with turkey meat or pork-turkey meat blends that could also contain milk proteins. The method consisted of extracting proteins from the meat products in a Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8) and analysing the extract by high-performance liquid chromatography with a linear gradient water-acetonitrile containing 0.05% (v/v) TFA. This method enabled the detection and quantitation of up to 0.08 and 0.28% (w/w), respectively, of soybean proteins (related to 6 g initial product) in these products. Satisfactory precision and recovery data were established. Accuracy was evaluated by a comparison of soybean protein contents determined by the proposed method and the existing AOAC official method based on an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from which no statistically significant differences were observed.

  8. Effects of a Dissostichus mawsoni-CaM recombinant proteins feed additive on the juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) under the acute low temperature challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Wei-Na; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Peng, Chang-Lian; Chen, Liang-Biao

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Dissostichus mawsoni-Calmodulin (Dm-CaM) on growth performance, enzyme activities, respiratory burst, MDA level and immune-related gene expressions of the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) exposed to the acute low temperature stress were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with Dm-CaM protein was fed to the groupers for 6 weeks. No significant difference was observed in the specific growth rates, weight gains and survivals. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to acute low temperature challenge. The groupers fed with Dm-CaM additive diet showed a significant decrease in the respiratory burst activity, while the blood cell number increased significantly at 25 °C by comparing with the control and additive control group. The enzymatic activity of SOD, ACP and ALP increased significantly in Dm-CaM additive group, while MDA level maintained stable with the lowest value. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that the up-regulated transcript expressions of CaM, C3, SOD2, LysC and HSPA4 were observed in Dm-CaM additive group. These results indicated that Dm-CaM additive diet may regulate the grouper immune response to the acute low temperature challenge. PMID:26122279

  9. Effects of a Dissostichus mawsoni-CaM recombinant proteins feed additive on the juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) under the acute low temperature challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Wei-Na; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Peng, Chang-Lian; Chen, Liang-Biao

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Dissostichus mawsoni-Calmodulin (Dm-CaM) on growth performance, enzyme activities, respiratory burst, MDA level and immune-related gene expressions of the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) exposed to the acute low temperature stress were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with Dm-CaM protein was fed to the groupers for 6 weeks. No significant difference was observed in the specific growth rates, weight gains and survivals. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to acute low temperature challenge. The groupers fed with Dm-CaM additive diet showed a significant decrease in the respiratory burst activity, while the blood cell number increased significantly at 25 °C by comparing with the control and additive control group. The enzymatic activity of SOD, ACP and ALP increased significantly in Dm-CaM additive group, while MDA level maintained stable with the lowest value. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that the up-regulated transcript expressions of CaM, C3, SOD2, LysC and HSPA4 were observed in Dm-CaM additive group. These results indicated that Dm-CaM additive diet may regulate the grouper immune response to the acute low temperature challenge.

  10. Bernauer's bands.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander; Gunn, Erica; Gazzano, Massimo; Freudenthal, John; Camp, Eric; Sours, Ryan; Rosseeva, Elena; Kahr, Bart

    2011-06-01

    Ferdinand Bernauer proposed in his monograph, "Gedrillte" Kristalle (1929), that a great number of simple, crystalline substances grow from solution or from the melt as polycrystalline spherulites with helically twisting radii that give rise to distinct bull's-eye patterns of concentric optical bands between crossed polarizers. The idea that many common molecular crystals can be induced to grow as mesoscale helices is a remarkable proposition poorly grounded in theories of polycrystalline pattern formation. Recent reinvestigation of one of the systems Bernauer described revealed that rhythmic precipitation in the absence of helical twisting accounted for modulated optical properties [Gunn, E. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 14234-14235]. Herein, the Bernauer hypothesis is re-examined in detail for three substances described in "Gedrillte" Kristalle, potassium dichromate, hippuric acid, and tetraphenyl lead, using contemporary methods of analysis not available to Bernauer, including micro-focus X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and Mueller matrix imaging polarimetry. Potassium dichromate is shown to fall in the class of rhythmic precipitates of undistorted crystallites, while hippuric acid spherulites are well described as helical fibrils. Tetraphenyl lead spherulites grow by twisting and rhythmic precipitation. The behavior of tetraphenyl lead is likely typical of many substances in "Gedrillte" Kristalle. Rhythmic precipitation and helical twisting often coexist, complicating optical analyses and presenting Bernauer with difficulties in the characterization and classification of the objects of his interest.

  11. Increase in the carbohydrate content of the microalgae Spirulina in culture by nutrient starvation and the addition of residues of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Vieira Salla, Ana Cláudia; Margarites, Ana Cláudia; Seibel, Fábio Ivan; Holz, Luiz Carlos; Brião, Vandré Barbosa; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Colla, Luciane Maria; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Non-renewable sources that will end with time are the largest part of world energy consumption, which emphasizes the necessity to develop renewable sources of energy. This necessity has created opportunities for the use of microalgae as a biofuel. The use of microalgae as a feedstock source for bioethanol production requires high yields of both biomass and carbohydrates. With mixotrophic cultures, wastewater can be used to culture algae. The aim of the study was to increase the carbohydrate content in the microalgae Spirulina with the additions of residues from the ultra and nanofiltration of whey protein. The nutrient deficit in the Zarrouk medium diluted to 20% and the addition of 2.5% of both residue types led to high carbohydrate productivity (60 mg L(-1) d(-1)). With these culture conditions, the increase in carbohydrate production in Spirulina indicated that the conditions were appropriate for use with microalgae as a feedstock in the production of bioethanol.

  12. The primary structure of sensory rhodopsin II: a member of an additional retinal protein subgroup is coexpressed with its transducer, the halobacterial transducer of rhodopsin II.

    PubMed

    Seidel, R; Scharf, B; Gautel, M; Kleine, K; Oesterhelt, D; Engelhard, M

    1995-03-28

    The blue-light receptor genes (sopII) of sensory rhodopsin (SR) II were cloned from two species, the halophilic bacteria Haloarcula vallismortis (vSR-II) and Natronobacterium pharaonis (pSR-II). Upstream of both sopII gene loci, sequences corresponding to the halobacterial transducer of rhodopsin (Htr) II were recognized. In N. pharaonis, psopII and phtrII are transcribed as a single transcript. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of vHtr-II and pHtr-II with Htr-I and the chemotactic methyl-accepting proteins from Escherichia coli revealed considerable identities in the signal domain and methyl-accepting sites. Similarities with Htr-I in Halobacterium salinarium suggest a common principle in the phototaxis of extreme halophiles. Alignment of all known retinal protein sequences from Archaea identifies both SR-IIs as an additional subgroup of the family. Positions defining the retinal binding site are usually identical with the exception of Met-118 (numbering is according to the bacteriorhodopsin sequence), which might explain the typical blue color shift of SR-II to approximately 490 nm. In archaeal retinal proteins, the function can be deduced from amino acids in positions 85 and 96. Proton pumps are characterized by Asp-85 and Asp-96; chloride pumps by Thr-85 and Ala-96; and sensors by Asp-85 and Tyr-96 or Phe-96.

  13. The primary structure of sensory rhodopsin II: a member of an additional retinal protein subgroup is coexpressed with its transducer, the halobacterial transducer of rhodopsin II.

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, R; Scharf, B; Gautel, M; Kleine, K; Oesterhelt, D; Engelhard, M

    1995-01-01

    The blue-light receptor genes (sopII) of sensory rhodopsin (SR) II were cloned from two species, the halophilic bacteria Haloarcula vallismortis (vSR-II) and Natronobacterium pharaonis (pSR-II). Upstream of both sopII gene loci, sequences corresponding to the halobacterial transducer of rhodopsin (Htr) II were recognized. In N. pharaonis, psopII and phtrII are transcribed as a single transcript. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of vHtr-II and pHtr-II with Htr-I and the chemotactic methyl-accepting proteins from Escherichia coli revealed considerable identities in the signal domain and methyl-accepting sites. Similarities with Htr-I in Halobacterium salinarium suggest a common principle in the phototaxis of extreme halophiles. Alignment of all known retinal protein sequences from Archaea identifies both SR-IIs as an additional subgroup of the family. Positions defining the retinal binding site are usually identical with the exception of Met-118 (numbering is according to the bacteriorhodopsin sequence), which might explain the typical blue color shift of SR-II to approximately 490 nm. In archaeal retinal proteins, the function can be deduced from amino acids in positions 85 and 96. Proton pumps are characterized by Asp-85 and Asp-96; chloride pumps by Thr-85 and Ala-96; and sensors by Asp-85 and Tyr-96 or Phe-96. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708770

  14. The E-class PPR protein MEF3 of Arabidopsis thaliana can also function in mitochondrial RNA editing with an additional DYW domain.

    PubMed

    Verbitskiy, Daniil; Merwe, Johannes A van der; Zehrmann, Anja; Härtel, Barbara; Takenaka, Mizuki

    2012-02-01

    In plants, RNA editing is observed in mitochondria and plastids, changing selected C nucleotides into Us in both organelles. We here identify the PPR (pentatricopeptide repeat) protein MEF3 (mitochondrial editing factor 3) of the E domain PPR subclass by genetic mapping of a variation between ecotypes Columbia (Col) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) in Arabidopsis thaliana to be required for a specific RNA editing event in mitochondria. The Ler variant of MEF3 differs from Col in two amino acids in repeats 9 and 10, which reduce RNA editing levels at site atp4-89 to about 50% in Ler. In a T-DNA insertion line, editing at this site is completely lost. In Vitis vinifera the gene most similar to MEF3 continues into a DYW extension beyond the common E domain. Complementation assays with various combinations of PPR and E domains from the vine and A. thaliana proteins show that the vine E region can substitute for the A. thaliana E region with or without the DYW domain. These findings suggest that the additional DYW domain does not disturb the MEF3 protein function in mitochondrial RNA editing in A. thaliana.

  15. Additive method for the prediction of protein-peptide binding affinity. Application to the MHC class I molecule HLA-A*0201.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Blythe, Martin J; Flower, Darren R

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for prediction of binding affinities between proteins and peptides. We exemplify the method through its application to binding predictions of peptides with affinity to major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-A*0201. The method is named "additive" because it is based on the assumption that the binding affinity of a peptide could be presented as a sum of the contributions of the amino acids at each position and the interactions between them. The amino acid contributions and the contributions of the interactions between adjacent side chains and every second side chain were derived using a partial least squares (PLS) statistical methodology using a training set of 420 experimental IC50 values. The predictive power of the method was assessed using rigorous cross-validation and using an independent test set of 89 peptides. The mean value of the residuals between the experimental and predicted pIC50 values was 0.508 for this test set. The additive method was implemented in a program for rapid T-cell epitope search. It is universal and can be applied to any peptide-protein interaction where binding data is known. PMID:12645903

  16. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  17. A Soret marker band for four-coordinate ferric heme proteins from absorption spectra of isolated Fe(III)-Heme+ and Fe(III)-Heme+(His) ions in vacuo.

    PubMed

    Lykkegaard, Morten Køcks; Ehlerding, Anneli; Hvelplund, Preben; Kadhane, Umesh; Kirketerp, Maj-Britt Suhr; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Panja, Subhasis; Wyer, Jean Ann; Zettergren, Henning

    2008-09-10

    In this work, we report the absorption spectra in the Soret band region of isolated Fe(III)-heme+ and Fe(III)-heme+(His) ions in vacuo from action spectroscopy. Fe(III)-heme+ refers to iron(III) coordinated by the dianion of protoporphyrin IX. We find that the absorption of the five-coordinate complex is similar to that of pentacoordinate metmyoglobin variants with hydrophobic binding pockets except for an overall blueshift of about 16 nm. In the case of four-coordinate iron(III), the Soret band is similar to that of five-coordinate iron(III) but much narrower. These spectra serve as a benchmark for theoretical modeling and also serve to identify the coordination state of ferric heme proteins. To our knowledge this is the first unequivocal spectroscopic characterization of isolated 4c ferric heme in the gas phase. PMID:18700762

  18. The effect of membrane fluidization on protein kinase C: Inhibition by ethanol and higher alcohols and stimulation by increased lipid unsaturation or addition non-esterified fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, K.J.A.; Rubin, E.; Stubbs, C.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a membrane bound enzyme that is dependent on calcium, anionic phospholipids, and sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to be fully active. The relationship between membrane fluidity and PKC activity was investigated using model vesicle systems composed of phosphatidylserine alone or in combination with phosphatidylcholine. Effects on membrane fluidity were assessed using the fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene. When membrane fluidity was increased by the addition of short chain n-alkanols, PKC activity was inhibited. There was a linear relationship for a given level of inhibition and the membrane-buffer partition coefficient. By contrast, when the degree of unsaturation in the phosphatidylcholine was increased, although the bilayer was again fluidized, PKC activity was enhanced. The addition of non-esterified fatty acid also activated PKC, either when directly added to the vesicles or when generated by the addition of exogenous phospholipase A[sub 2], and again the bilayer was fluidized. It is proposed that a more fluid membrane lipid bilayer, induced by increased unsaturation or non-esterified fatty acids, facilitated optimal interaction at the DAG site since the effect could be demonstrated in a lipid free system using protamine sulfate.

  19. Additive Promotion of Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Mediated Translation by Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 and an Enterovirus 71-Induced Cleavage Product

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chuan-Tien; Kung, Yu-An; Li, Mei-Ling; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Liu, Shih-Tung; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is indispensable for viral protein translation. Due to the limited coding capacity of their RNA genomes, EV71 and other picornaviruses typically recruit host factors, known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs), to mediate IRES-dependent translation. Here, we show that EV71 viral proteinase 2A is capable of cleaving far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a positive ITAF that directly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region to promote viral IRES-driven translation. The cleavage occurs at the Gly-371 residue of FBP1 during the EV71 infection process, and this generates a functional cleavage product, FBP11-371. Interestingly, the cleavage product acts to promote viral IRES activity. Footprinting analysis and gel mobility shift assay results showed that FBP11-371 similarly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region, but at a different site from full-length FBP1; moreover, FBP1 and FBP11-371 were found to act additively to promote IRES-mediated translation and virus yield. Our findings expand the current understanding of virus-host interactions with regard to viral recruitment and modulation of ITAFs, and provide new insights into translational control during viral infection. PMID:27780225

  20. Early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition and ontogenetic changes in muscle growth mechanisms of rainbow trout: short- and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Alami-Durante, Hélène; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Duval, Carine; Maunas, Patrick; Girod-David, Virginia; Médale, Françoise

    2014-09-14

    As the understanding of the nutritional regulation of muscle growth mechanisms in fish is fragmentary, the present study aimed to (1) characterise ontogenetic changes in muscle growth-related genes in parallel to changes in muscle cellularity; (2) determine whether an early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition affects the muscle growth mechanisms of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) alevins; and (3) determine whether this early feeding of a high-fat (HF) diet to alevins had a long-term effect on muscle growth processes in juveniles fed a commercial diet. Developmental regulation of hyperplasia and hypertrophy was evidenced at the molecular (expression of myogenic regulatory factors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and myosin heavy chains (MHC)) and cellular (number and diameter of white muscle fibres) levels. An early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition stimulated the body growth of alevins but led to a fatty phenotype, with accumulation of lipids in the anterior part, and less caudal muscle when compared at similar body weights, due to a decrease in both the white muscle hyperplasia and maximum hypertrophy of white muscle fibres. These HF diet-induced cellular changes were preceded by a very rapid down-regulation of the expression of fast-MHC. The present study also demonstrated that early dietary composition had a long-term effect on the subsequent muscle growth processes of juveniles fed a commercial diet for 3 months. When compared at similar body weights, initially HF diet-fed juveniles indeed had a lower mean diameter of white muscle fibres, a smaller number of large white muscle fibres, and lower expression levels of MyoD1 and myogenin. These findings demonstrated the strong effect of early feed composition on the muscle growth mechanisms of trout alevins and juveniles.

  1. Laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... laparoscopic gastric banding - discharge; Obesity gastric banding discharge; Weight loss - gastric banding discharge ... as your body gets used to your weight loss and your weight becomes stable. Weight loss may be slower after ...

  2. Increase in the carbohydrate content of the microalgae Spirulina in culture by nutrient starvation and the addition of residues of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Vieira Salla, Ana Cláudia; Margarites, Ana Cláudia; Seibel, Fábio Ivan; Holz, Luiz Carlos; Brião, Vandré Barbosa; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Colla, Luciane Maria; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Non-renewable sources that will end with time are the largest part of world energy consumption, which emphasizes the necessity to develop renewable sources of energy. This necessity has created opportunities for the use of microalgae as a biofuel. The use of microalgae as a feedstock source for bioethanol production requires high yields of both biomass and carbohydrates. With mixotrophic cultures, wastewater can be used to culture algae. The aim of the study was to increase the carbohydrate content in the microalgae Spirulina with the additions of residues from the ultra and nanofiltration of whey protein. The nutrient deficit in the Zarrouk medium diluted to 20% and the addition of 2.5% of both residue types led to high carbohydrate productivity (60 mg L(-1) d(-1)). With these culture conditions, the increase in carbohydrate production in Spirulina indicated that the conditions were appropriate for use with microalgae as a feedstock in the production of bioethanol. PMID:26967336

  3. Effect of whey protein concentrate and sodium chloride addition plus tumbling procedures on technological parameters, physical properties and visual appearance of sous vide cooked beef.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2007-07-01

    Beef muscles cooked by the sous vide system were evaluated for the effects of pre-injection tumbling, brine addition and post-injection tumbling on technological parameters, physical properties, visual appearance and tissue microstructure. The muscles were injected at 120% (over original weight) with a brine formulated to give a concentration of 3.5% whey protein concentrate and 0.7% sodium chloride on an injected raw product basis. Pre-injection tumbling did not affect most of the evaluated parameters. Brine addition reduced significantly the cooking and total weight losses. Total weight loss was 7.2% for injected muscles, and significantly higher (28.2%) for non-injected ones. Brine incorporation increased pH and reduced shear force values of cooked muscles. Extended post-injection tumbling (5rpm-10h) improved brine distribution and visual appearance, and also diminished the shear force values of cooked muscles. However, this treatment increased the weight losses of post-injection tumbling and cooking-pasteurization stages. PMID:22060988

  4. Effect of whey protein concentrate and sodium chloride addition plus tumbling procedures on technological parameters, physical properties and visual appearance of sous vide cooked beef.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2007-07-01

    Beef muscles cooked by the sous vide system were evaluated for the effects of pre-injection tumbling, brine addition and post-injection tumbling on technological parameters, physical properties, visual appearance and tissue microstructure. The muscles were injected at 120% (over original weight) with a brine formulated to give a concentration of 3.5% whey protein concentrate and 0.7% sodium chloride on an injected raw product basis. Pre-injection tumbling did not affect most of the evaluated parameters. Brine addition reduced significantly the cooking and total weight losses. Total weight loss was 7.2% for injected muscles, and significantly higher (28.2%) for non-injected ones. Brine incorporation increased pH and reduced shear force values of cooked muscles. Extended post-injection tumbling (5rpm-10h) improved brine distribution and visual appearance, and also diminished the shear force values of cooked muscles. However, this treatment increased the weight losses of post-injection tumbling and cooking-pasteurization stages.

  5. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirk, K L; Kuklo, T; Klemme, W

    2000-11-01

    Overuse knee injuries are common, but ITBFS is often overlooked as a cause of lateral knee pain in an active population. Iliotibial band friction syndrome is an overuse injury usually seen in long distance runners, cyclists, and military personnel. The exact incidence of the syndrome has been estimated to range from 1.6%-52% depending on the population studied. The diagnosis is often made from a thorough history and clinical examination with an infrequent need for additional studies. Treatment is mostly conservative consisting of rest and anti-inflammatory agents, with only the refractory cases requiring surgical resection of the impinging portion of the ITB.

  6. Effects of the Dietary Addition of Amaranth (Amaranthus mantegazzianus) Protein Isolate on Antioxidant Status, Lipid Profiles and Blood Pressure of Rats.

    PubMed

    Lado, María B; Burini, Julieta; Rinaldi, Gustavo; Añón, María C; Tironi, Valeria A

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the dietary addition of 2.5% (w/w) Amaranthus mantegazzianus protein isolate (AI) on blood pressure, lipid profiles and antioxidative status of Wistar rats were evaluated. Six diets were used to feed animals during 28 days: (base (AIN93G), Chol (cholesterol 1%, w/w), CE (α-tocopherol 0.005%, w/w), CholE (cholesterol 1% (w/w) + α-tocopherol 0.005%, w/w), CAI (AI 2.5% w/w), CholAI (cholesterol 1% (w/w) + AI 2.5%, w/w). Lipid profiles of plasma and liver and faecal cholesterol content were analyzed. Antioxidant status was evaluated by the ferric reducing activity of plasma (FRAP), the 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in plasma and liver. Blood pressure was measured in the tail artery of rats. CholA group presented a significant (α < 0.05) reduction (16%) in the plasma total cholesterol. In liver, the intake of cholesterol (Chol group) induced a significant increment in cholesterol and triglycerides (2.5 and 2.3 times, respectively), which could be decreased (18% and 47%, respectively) by the addition of AI (CholA group). This last group also showed an increased faecal cholesterol excretion (20%). Increment (50%) in FRAP values, diminution of TBA value in plasma and liver (70% and 38%, respectively) and diminution of SOD activity (20%) in plasma of CholA group suggest an antioxidant effect because of the intake of AI. In addition, CA and CholA groups presented a diminution (18%) of blood pressure after 28 days.

  7. Effects of the Dietary Addition of Amaranth (Amaranthus mantegazzianus) Protein Isolate on Antioxidant Status, Lipid Profiles and Blood Pressure of Rats.

    PubMed

    Lado, María B; Burini, Julieta; Rinaldi, Gustavo; Añón, María C; Tironi, Valeria A

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the dietary addition of 2.5% (w/w) Amaranthus mantegazzianus protein isolate (AI) on blood pressure, lipid profiles and antioxidative status of Wistar rats were evaluated. Six diets were used to feed animals during 28 days: (base (AIN93G), Chol (cholesterol 1%, w/w), CE (α-tocopherol 0.005%, w/w), CholE (cholesterol 1% (w/w) + α-tocopherol 0.005%, w/w), CAI (AI 2.5% w/w), CholAI (cholesterol 1% (w/w) + AI 2.5%, w/w). Lipid profiles of plasma and liver and faecal cholesterol content were analyzed. Antioxidant status was evaluated by the ferric reducing activity of plasma (FRAP), the 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in plasma and liver. Blood pressure was measured in the tail artery of rats. CholA group presented a significant (α < 0.05) reduction (16%) in the plasma total cholesterol. In liver, the intake of cholesterol (Chol group) induced a significant increment in cholesterol and triglycerides (2.5 and 2.3 times, respectively), which could be decreased (18% and 47%, respectively) by the addition of AI (CholA group). This last group also showed an increased faecal cholesterol excretion (20%). Increment (50%) in FRAP values, diminution of TBA value in plasma and liver (70% and 38%, respectively) and diminution of SOD activity (20%) in plasma of CholA group suggest an antioxidant effect because of the intake of AI. In addition, CA and CholA groups presented a diminution (18%) of blood pressure after 28 days. PMID:26497504

  8. Effect of protein source and protease addition on performance, blood metabolites and nutrient digestibility of turkeys fed on low-protein diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch.

    PubMed

    Shahir, M H; Rahimi, R; Taheri, H R; Heidariniya, A; Baradaran, N; Asadi Kermani, Z

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a monocomponent protease and dietary inclusion of canola meal (CM) and poultry by-product meal (PBM) on growth performance, carcass characteristics and blood metabolites of turkeys fed on low crude protein (CP) diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch. Experimental treatments included control, maize-soybean meal diet including 258.3 g/kg CP; negative control 1 (NC1), maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg); NC2, control diet (CP, 258.3 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg); NC3, maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg). Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets were created by addition of protease enzyme (30 000 units/kg of diet) to the NC1 and NC3 diets, respectively. The NC3 group had lower body weight gain (BWG) compared to those fed on the control diet, and no improvement with enzyme addition (NC3 + P) was achieved. The protease addition to the NC1 diet (NC1 + P) improved BWG to the level of the control diet. The NC1 group had higher feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to the control and NC3 + P, but protease addition to the NC1 diet improved FCR. Protease addition to the low CP diets resulted in higher nitrogen (N) retention than in the control and NC2 groups. Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets increased apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of CP compared to the control group. It was concluded that addition of CM (up to 80 g/kg) and PBM (up to 80 g/kg) to turkey diets had no negative effect on growth performance from 28 to 55 d of age. The NC1 + P group achieved the BWG of the control group which was partially due to increases in N retention and AID of CP, but the NC3 + P group failed to recover the growth losses. This difference implies that the efficacy of the protease may depend upon the protein source in the ration. PMID:27074290

  9. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  10. Q-band ENDOR spectra of the Rieske protein from Rhodobacter capsulatus ubiquinol-cyctochrome c oxidoreductase show two histidines coordinated to the (2Fe-2S) cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Gurbiel, R.J. Jagiellonian Univ., Krakow ); Ohnishi, Tomoko; Robertson, D.E.; Daldal, F. ); Hoffman, B.M. )

    1991-12-10

    Electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) experiments were performed on {sup 14}N (natural abundance) and {sup 15}N-enriched iron-sulfur Rieske protein in the ubiquinol-cytochrome c{sub 2} oxidoreductase from Rhodobactor capsulatus. The experiments proved that two distinct nitrogenous ligands, histidines, are undoubtedly ligated to the Rieske (2Fe-2S) center. The calculations of hyperfine tensors give values similar but not identical to those of the Rieske-type cluster in phthalate dioxygenase of Pseudomonas cepacia and suggest a slightly different geometry of the iron-sulfur cluster in the two proteins.

  11. Come Join the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of students in Blue Springs, Missouri, are joining the band, drawn by a band director who emphasizes caring and inclusiveness. In the four years since Melissia Goff arrived at Blue Springs High School, the school's extensive band program has swelled. The marching band alone has gone from 100 to 185 participants. Also under Goff's…

  12. High confidence proteomic analysis of yeast LDs identifies additional droplet proteins and reveals connections to dolichol synthesis and sterol acetylation[S

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Erin; Guo, Xiuling; Christiano, Romain; Chitraju, Chandramohan; Kory, Nora; Harrison, Kenneth; Haas, Joel; Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate protein inventories are essential for understanding an organelle’s functions. The lipid droplet (LD) is a ubiquitous intracellular organelle with major functions in lipid storage and metabolism. LDs differ from other organelles because they are bounded by a surface monolayer, presenting unique features for protein targeting to LDs. Many proteins of varied functions have been found in purified LD fractions by proteomics. While these studies have become increasingly sensitive, it is often unclear which of the identified proteins are specific to LDs. Here we used protein correlation profiling to identify 35 proteins that specifically enrich with LD fractions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Of these candidates, 30 fluorophore-tagged proteins localize to LDs by microscopy, including six proteins, several with human orthologs linked to diseases, which we newly identify as LD proteins (Cab5, Rer2, Say1, Tsc10, YKL047W, and YPR147C). Two of these proteins, Say1, a sterol deacetylase, and Rer2, a cis-isoprenyl transferase, are enzymes involved in sterol and polyprenol metabolism, respectively, and we show their activities are present in LD fractions. Our results provide a highly specific list of yeast LD proteins and reveal that the vast majority of these proteins are involved in lipid metabolism. PMID:24868093

  13. Lateral Diffusion of Proteins on Supported Lipid Bilayers: Additive Friction of Synaptotagmin 7 C2A–C2B Tandem Domains

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synaptotagmin (Syt) family of proteins contains tandem C2 domains, C2A and C2B, which bind membranes in the presence of Ca2+ to trigger vesicle fusion during exocytosis. Despite recent progress, the role and extent of interdomain interactions between C2A and C2B in membrane binding remain unclear. To test whether the two domains interact on a planar lipid bilayer (i.e., experience thermodynamic interdomain contacts), diffusion of fluorescent-tagged C2A, C2B, and C2AB domains from human Syt7 was measured using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with single-particle tracking. The C2AB tandem exhibits a lateral diffusion constant approximately half the value of the isolated single domains and does not change when additional residues are engineered into the C2A–C2B linker. This is the expected result if C2A and C2B are separated when membrane-bound; theory predicts that C2AB diffusion would be faster if the two domains were close enough together to have interdomain contact. Stopped-flow measurements of membrane dissociation kinetics further support an absence of interdomain interactions, as dissociation kinetics of the C2AB tandem remain unchanged when rigid or flexible linker extensions are included. Together, the results suggest that the two C2 domains of Syt7 bind independently to planar membranes, in contrast to reported interdomain cooperativity in Syt1. PMID:25437758

  14. Effects of feeding corn silage inoculated with microbial additives on the ruminal fermentation, microbial protein yield, and growth performance of lambs.

    PubMed

    Basso, F C; Adesogan, A T; Lara, E C; Rabelo, C H S; Berchielli, T T; Teixeira, I A M A; Siqueira, G R; Reis, R A

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of feeding corn silage inoculated without or with either Lactobacillus buchneri (LB) alone or a combination of LB and Lactobacillus plantarum (LBLP) on the apparent digestibility, ruminal fermentation, microbial protein synthesis, and growth performance of lambs. Thirty Santa Inês×Dorper crossbred intact males lambs weighing 20.4±3.8 kg were blocked by weight into 10 groups. Lambs in each group were randomly assigned to 1 of the following 3 dietary treatments: untreated (Control), LB, and LBLP silage. Lambs were fed experimental diets for 61 d. The apparent digestibility was indirectly estimated from indigestible NDF measured on d 57 to 59. Spot urine samples were collected from all animals on d 59 to estimate microbial protein synthesis. Lambs were slaughtered for carcass evaluation on d 61 when they weighed 32.4±5.2 kg. Six additional ruminally cannulated Santa Inês×Dorper crossbred wethers weighing 40.5±1.8 kg were used to examine dietary effects on ruminal fermentation. Average daily gain was increased when lambs were fed LBLP silage (P<0.05) but not LB silage. The LBLP silage had the highest (P<0.05) lactic acid concentration and both inoculated silages had greater acetic acid concentrations than the Control silage (P<0.05). Inoculation of corn silage increased intakes of DM, OM, CP, NDF, total carbohydrate (CHO), and GE by the lambs but decreased digestibility of DM, OM, CP, total and nonstructural carbohydrates, and concentration of GE and ME. (P<0.05). Nevertheless, lambs fed inoculated silages had greater microbial N supply than those on the Control treatment (P<0.05). The acetate to propionate ratio was lower in ruminal fluid of wethers in LBLP treatment than LB and Control treatment (P<0.05) and ruminal pH tended to be greater in LB lambs than in LBLP and Control wethers (P<0.10). Finally, the inoculation with both bacteria combined enhanced the silage fermentation. The intakes of DM, OM, CP, NDF, and GE

  15. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  16. The Oxygen a Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Hoo, Jiajun; Hodges, Joseph; Long, David A.; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Okumura, Mitchio; Bui, Thinh Quoc; Rupasinghe, Priyanka

    2014-06-01

    The oxygen A band is used for numerous atmospheric experiments, but spectral line parameters that sufficiently describe the spectrum to the level required by OCO2 and other high precision/accuracy experiments are lacking. Fourier transform spectra from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and cavity ring down spectra from the National Institute of Standards and Technology were fitted simultaneously using the William and Mary multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique into a single solution including the entire band. In addition, photoacoustic spectra already available from the California Institute of Technology will be added to the solution. The three types of spectrometers are complementary allowing the strengths of each to fill in the weaknesses of the others. With this technique line positions, intensities, widths, shifts, line mixing, Dicke narrowing, temperature dependences and collision induced absorption have been obtained in a single physically consistent fit. D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. M. Devi, M. A. H. Smith, and D. Atkins, JQSRT 1995;53:705-21. Part of the research described in this paper was performed at The College of William and Mary, the, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Support for the National Institute of Standards and Technology was provided by the NIST Greenhouse Gas Measurements and Climate Research Program and a NIST Innovations in Measurement Science (IMS) award.

  17. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  18. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  19. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  20. Protein detection in gels without fixation.

    PubMed

    Joo, Won-A; Speicher, David W

    2007-05-01

    A number of alternative methods are described for detecting proteins in polyacrylamide gels that do not require fixation of the protein either prior to staining or in conjunction with staining. The primary advantage of avoiding fixation is that this makes it easier to remove proteins of interest from the gels for subsequent analysis. In general, the sensitivity of protein detection methods that avoid fixation is lower than for detection methods using fixation. For any given method, sensitivity is dependent on the volume of the protein band within the gel; hence, sensitivity is highest for sharp, narrow bands. Techniques described in this unit include protocols for protein detection in gels by SDS precipitation, preparation of contact blots, staining with imidazole-zinc, and use of the fluorescent labels IAEDANS and fluorescamine. Several additional methods, including the use of tryptophan fluorescence, guide strips, and minimal protein staining, are discussed in the Commentary.

  1. Photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soukoulis, C.M. |

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the theoretical and experimental efforts in obtaining a photonic band gap, a frequency band in three-dimensional dielectric structures in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, is presented.

  2. Characterization of a highly conserved human homolog to the chicken neural cell surface protein Bravo/Nr-CAM that maps to chromosome band 7q31

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, R.P.; Vielmetter, J.; Dreyer, W.J.

    1996-08-01

    The neuronal cell adhesion molecule Bravo/Nr-CAM is a cell surface protein of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily and is closely related to the L1/NgCAM and neurofascin molecules, all of which contain six immunoglobulin domains, five fibronectin repeats, a transmembrane region, and an intracellular domain. Chicken Bravo/Nr-CAM has been shown to interact with other cell surface molecules of the Ig superfamily and has been implicated in specific pathfinding roles of axonal growth cones in the developing nervous system. We now report the characterization of cDNA clones encoding the human Bravo/Nr-CAM protein, which, like its chicken homolog, is composed of six V-like Ig domains and five fibronectin type III repeats. The human Bravo/Nr-CAM homolog also contains a transmembrane and intracellular domain, both of which are 100% conserved at the amino acid level compared to its chicken homolog. Overall, the human Bravo/Nr-CAM homolog is 82% identical to the chicken Bravo/Nr-CAM amino acid sequence. Independent cDNAs encoding four different isoforms were also identified, all of which contain alternatively spliced variants around the fifth fibronectin type III repeat, including one isoform that had been previously identified for chicken Bravo/Nr-CAM. Northern blot analysis reveals one mRNA species of approximately 7.0 kb in adult human brain tissue. Fluorescence in situ hybridization maps the gene for human Bravo/Nr-CAM to human chromosome 7q31.1-q31.2. This chromosomal locus has been previously identified as containing a tumore suppressor candidate gene commonly deleted in certain human cancer tissues. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Using a biomimetic membrane surface experiment to investigate the activity of the magnetite biomineralisation protein Mms6† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Including Mms6 protein and peptide sequences, additional QCM-D and SEM data and protein modelling. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ra16469a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Scott M.; Rawlings, Andrea E.; Galloway, Johanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are able to synthesise precise nanoparticles of the iron oxide magnetite within their cells. These particles are formed in dedicated organelles termed magnetosomes. These lipid membrane compartments use a range of biomineralisation proteins to nucleate and regulate the magnetite crystallisation process. A key component is the membrane protein Mms6, which binds to iron ions and helps to control the formation of the inorganic core. We have previously used Mms6 on gold surfaces patterned with a self-assembled monolayer to successfully produce arrays of magnetic nanoparticles. Here we use this surface system as a mimic of the interior face of the magnetosome membrane to study differences between intact Mms6 and the acid-rich C-terminal peptide subregion of the Mms6 protein. When immobilised on surfaces, the peptide is unable to reproduce the particle size or homogeneity control exhibited by the full Mms6 protein in our experimental setup. Moreover, the peptide is unable to support anchoring of a dense array of nanoparticles to the surface. This system also allows us to deconvolute particle binding from particle nucleation, and shows that Mms6 particle binding is less efficient when supplied with preformed magnetite nanoparticles when compared to particles precipitated from solution in the presence of the surface immobilised Mms6. This suggests that Mms6 binds to iron ions rather than to magnetite surfaces in our system, and is perhaps a nucleating agent rather than a controller of magnetite crystal growth. The comparison between the peptide and the protein under identical experimental conditions indicates that the full length sequence is required to support the full function of Mms6 on surfaces. PMID:27019707

  4. Coexistence of congenital red cell pyruvate kinase and band 3 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Branca, R; Costa, E; Rocha, S; Coelho, H; Quintanilha, A; Cabeda, J M; Santos-Silva, A; Barbot, J

    2004-08-01

    The authors report the case of a 9-year-old Caucasian girl, born in northern Portugal, with chronic nonspherocytic haemolytic anaemia and without family history of anaemia. The aethiological study of this anaemia revealed pyruvate kinase deficiency (PKD), because of two previously described mutations (426Arg-->Trp and 510Arg-->Gln). Since the blood smear revealed features not fully compatible with PKD diagnosis, additional tests were performed for the propositus and her parents, namely red blood cell membrane protein analysis. A decrease in proteins band 3 (15%) and 4.2 (18%) was found in the propositus. Her father presented only a decrease in band 3 (11%). Coexistence of PKD and erythrocyte membrane proteins deficiency in the same patient is very uncommon. Our findings suggest that a careful blood smear observation may lead to the identification of a combined deficiency in erythrocyte membrane proteins and enzymopathies.

  5. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  6. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  7. Refinement of the localization of the gene for human intra-acrosomal protein SP-10 (ACRV1) to the junction of bands q23 [yields] q24 of chromosome 11 by nonisotopic in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, W.L.; Von Kap-Herr, C.; Kurth, B.; Kurth, B.; Wright, R.M.; Flickinger, C.J.; Herr, J.C. ); Eddy, R.; Shows, T. )

    1993-11-01

    The human sperm antigen SP-10 is a testis-specific protein associated with the matrix of the acrosomal vesicle in developing spermatids and the acrosomal matrix and membranes of ejaculated sperm. A previous study, utilizing somatic cell hybrids, localized the gene for SP-10 to chromosome 11 and assigned the gene symbol ACRV1 (acrosomal vesicle protein-1). Although previous analysis of several somatic cell hybrids containing portions of chromosome 11 indicated that ACRV1 was in the p12 [yields] q13 region, the present fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using cDNA, ribo, and genomic versions of probes for SP-10 coupled to analysis of an expanded series of somatic cell hybrids demonstrated the refined localization of ACRV1 to the junction of bands q23 and q24 of chromosome 11. A comparison of the three types of probes used for the in situ study demonstrated that while the genomic probe hybridized most efficiently, the riboprobe hybridized to the same location and was superior to the cDNA probe in mapping this single-copy gene. This report emphasizes the utility of riboprobes for chromosome localization of single-copy genes. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regnier, Fred E.; Gooding, Karen M.

    Because of the complexity of cellular material and body fluids, it is seldom possible to analyze a natural product directly. Qualitative and quantitative analyses must often be preceded by some purification step that separates the molecular species being examined from interfering materials. In the case of proteins, column liquid chromatography has been used extensively for these fractionations. With the advent of gel permeation, cation exchange, anion exchange, hydrophobic, and affinity chromatography, it became possible to resolve proteins through their fundamental properties of size, charge, hydrophobicity, and biological affinity. The chromatographic separations used in the early isolation and characterization of many proteins later became analytical tools in their routine analysis. Unfortunately, these inherently simple and versatile column chromatographic techniques introduced in the 50s and 60s have a severe limitation in routine analysis-separation time. It is common to encounter 1-24 h separation times with the classical gel-type supports.

  9. The cytoskeletal adaptor protein band 4.1B is required for the maintenance of paranodal axoglial septate junctions in myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2011-06-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B-null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axoglial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in the study by Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after 1 year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at ∼ 1 year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  10. The Cytoskeletal Adaptor Protein Band 4.1B is Required for the Maintenance of Paranodal Axo-Glial Septate Junctions in Myelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D.; Dupree, Jeffrey L.; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2011-01-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axo-glial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after one year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at about one year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  11. Physicochemical Changes and Glycation Reaction in Intermediate-Moisture Protein-Sugar Foods with and without Addition of Resveratrol during Storage.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhanwu; Gu, Mantun; Hao, Wangjun; Shen, Yixiao; Zhang, Weimin; Zheng, Lili; Ai, Binling; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Xu, Zhimin

    2016-06-22

    An intermediate-moisture food (IMF) model consisting of whey protein isolate and glucose and an IMF model fortified with resveratrol were used to study the effect of resveratrol on physicochemical changes and glycation of protein-sugar-rich foods during storage. The water activity (aw) of the storage was controlled at 0.75 or 0.56. The browning rate or hardness of fortified IMFs was significantly lower than that of IMFs after 45-day storage. The rate of Maillard reaction in the samples stored at aw 0.56 was higher than that of samples stored at aw 0.75. The fortified IMFs had lower levels of AGEs (advanced glycation end products), CML (N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine), and insoluble protein during storage. The inhibition capability of resveratrol against glycation was also confirmed by using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis to monitor glycated proteins and protein aggregation in the samples. The results of this study suggested that resveratrol could be used as an inhibitor to reduce the formation of undesirable AGEs and other Maillard reaction products in foods during storage. PMID:27218138

  12. Computer modelling integrated with micro-CT and material testing provides additional insight to evaluate bone treatments: Application to a beta-glycan derived whey protein mice model.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, D; Tu, P T; Dickinson, M; Watson, M; Blais, A; Das, R; Cornish, J; Fernandez, J

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a whey protein diet on computationally predicted mechanical strength of murine bones in both trabecular and cortical regions of the femur. There was no significant influence on mechanical strength in cortical bone observed with increasing whey protein treatment, consistent with cortical tissue mineral density (TMD) and bone volume changes observed. Trabecular bone showed a significant decline in strength with increasing whey protein treatment when nanoindentation derived Young׳s moduli were used in the model. When microindentation, micro-CT phantom density or normalised Young׳s moduli were included in the model a non-significant decline in strength was exhibited. These results for trabecular bone were consistent with both trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) and micro-CT indices obtained independently. The secondary aim of this study was to characterise the influence of different sources of Young׳s moduli on computational prediction. This study aimed to quantify the predicted mechanical strength in 3D from these sources and evaluate if trends and conclusions remained consistent. For cortical bone, predicted mechanical strength behaviour was consistent across all sources of Young׳s moduli. There was no difference in treatment trend observed when Young׳s moduli were normalised. In contrast, trabecular strength due to whey protein treatment significantly reduced when material properties from nanoindentation were introduced. Other material property sources were not significant but emphasised the strength trend over normalised material properties. This shows strength at the trabecular level was attributed to both changes in bone architecture and material properties.

  13. Sub-band adaptive noise cancelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, James G.; Goubran, Rafik A.

    The technique of using sub-band adaptive filters for acoustic noise suppression is examined. Simulation results are presented for experimental systems trained with white noise and colored noise for both decimated and non-decimated sub-band signals. To illustrate the usefulness of the sub-band approach for a real application, the full band and sub-band noise cancellers were applied to car data. Estimates of the input and output power spectra for the different cases are presented. It is shown that the full-band noise canceller is unable to attenuate the noise in the higher frequencies due to the low input signal power in this region. The sub-band decomposition of the input signal can significantly increase the rate as compared to a full-band implementation under certain conditions. This increase in convergence speed is manifested as an increased noise attenuation in those regions of the input spectrum with relatively low amounts of power. In addition, the sub-band processing is seen to eliminate the noise enhancement phenomenon found in acoustic noise cancellers for mobile telephony.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of iliotibial band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ekman, E F; Pope, T; Martin, D F; Curl, W W

    1994-01-01

    Seven cases of iliotibial band syndrome and the pathoanatomic findings of each, as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging, are presented. These findings were compared with magnetic resonance imaging scans of 10 age- and sex-matched control knees without evidence of lateral knee pain. Magnetic resonance imaging signal consistent with fluid was seen deep to the iliotibial band in the region of the lateral femoral epicondyle in five of the seven cases. Additionally, when compared with the control group, patients with iliotibial band syndrome demonstrated a significantly thicker iliotibial band over the lateral femoral epicondyle (P < 0.05). Thickness of the iliotibial band in the disease group was 5.49 +/- 2.12 mm, as opposed to 2.52 +/- 1.56 mm in the control group. Cadaveric dissections were performed on 10 normal knees to further elucidate the exact nature of the area under the iliotibial band. A potential space, i.e., a bursa, was found between the iliotibial band and the knee capsule. This series suggests that magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates objective evidence of iliotibial band syndrome and can be helpful when a definitive diagnosis is essential. Furthermore, correlated with anatomic dissection, magnetic resonance imaging identifies this as a problem within a bursa beneath the iliotibial band and not a problem within the knee joint.

  15. Photonic band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yablonovitch, E.

    1993-05-01

    We learned how to create 3-dimensionally periodic dielectric structures which are to photon waves, as semiconductor crystals are to electron waves. That is, these photonic crystals have a photonic bandgap, a band of frequencies in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, irrespective of propagation direction in space. Photonic bandgaps provide for spontaneous emission inhibition and allow for a new class of electromagnetic micro-cavities. If the perfect 3-dimensional periodicity is broken by a local defect, then local electromagnetic modes can occur within the forbidden bandgap. The addition of extra dielectric material locally, inside the photonic crystal, produces {open_quotes}donor{close_quotes} modes. Conversely, the local removal of dielectric material from the photonic crystal produces {open_quotes}acceptor{close_quotes} modes. Therefore, it will now be possible to make high-Q electromagnetic cavities of volume {approx_lt}1 cubic wavelength, for short wavelengths at which metallic cavities are useless. These new dielectric micro-resonators can cover the range all the way from millimeter waves, down to ultraviolet wavelengths.

  16. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  17. Rubber Band Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowens, John

    2005-01-01

    Not only are rubber bands great for binding objects together, but they can be used in a simple science experiment that involves predicting, problem solving, measuring, graphing, and experimenting. In this article, the author describes how rubber bands can be used to teach the force of mass.

  18. Singing with the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Timothy Meyer; Wright, Gary K.

    2012-01-01

    Usually band, orchestra, and choir directors work independently. However, the authors--one a choral director, the other a band director--have learned that making music together makes friends. Not only can ensemble directors get along, but joint concerts may be just the way to help students see how music can reach the heart. Combined instrumental…

  19. Progressive Band Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Kevin; Chang, Chein-I

    2009-01-01

    Progressive band selection (PBS) reduces spectral redundancy without significant loss of information, thereby reducing hyperspectral image data volume and processing time. Used onboard a spacecraft, it can also reduce image downlink time. PBS prioritizes an image's spectral bands according to priority scores that measure their significance to a specific application. Then it uses one of three methods to select an appropriate number of the most useful bands. Key challenges for PBS include selecting an appropriate criterion to generate band priority scores, and determining how many bands should be retained in the reduced image. The image's Virtual Dimensionality (VD), once computed, is a reasonable estimate of the latter. We describe the major design details of PBS and test PBS in a land classification experiment.

  20. Band crossing in 83Y revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristancho, F.; Gross, C. J.; Lieb, K. P.; Rudolph, D.; Skeppstedt, Ö.; Bentley, M. A.; Gelletly, W.; Price, H. G.; Simpson, J.; Durell, J. L.; Varley, B. J.; Rastikerdar, S.

    1992-04-01

    Gamma rays from the reaction 28Si( 58Ni, 3p) 83Y at a beam energy of 195 MeV were recorded in recoil-γ- and γγ-coincidence mode with the POLYTESSA array and the Daresbury recoil mass separator. The known rotational bands were extended up to probable spins {49+}/{2}and{45-}/{2}; many new interconnecting dipole transitions and an additional cascade were established. The bands are interpreted in terms of the cranked shell model; they exhibit two band crossings each, associated with g{9}/{2} neutron and proton alignment. In the negative-parity yrast bands a strong signature inversion with Δe'=-100 keV and a crossing pattern alternating in the favoured and unfavoured band develop. Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov cranking calculations with a Woods-Saxon single-particle potential have been performed to illustrate the various shape changes and explain this signature inversion.

  1. [Decomposition of hemoglobin UV absorption spectrum into absorption spectra of prosthetic group and apoprotein by means of an additive model].

    PubMed

    Lavrinenko, I A; Vashanov, G A; Artyukhov, V G

    2015-01-01

    The decomposition pathways of hemoglobin UV absorption spectrum into the absorption spectra of the protein and non-protein components are proposed and substantiated by means of an additive model. We have established that the heme component has an absorption band with a maximum at λ(max) = 269.2 nm (ε = 97163) and the apoprotein component has an absorption band with a maximum at λ(max) = 278.4 nm (ε = 48669) for the wavelength range from 240.0 to 320.0 nm. An integral relative proportion of absorption for the heme fraction (78.8%) and apoprotein (21.2%) in the investigating wavelength range is defined.

  2. Long-term cryopreservation of human mesenchymal stem cells using carboxylated poly-l-lysine without the addition of proteins or dimethyl sulfoxide.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kazuaki; Hayashi, Fumiaki; Nagashima, Toshio; Hyon, Suong Hyu

    2013-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) are known for their potential to undergo mesodermal differentiation into many cell types, including osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Therefore, hBMSCs can be used for a variety of regenerative medicine therapies, in fact, hBMC-derived osteocytes have already been used in bone reconstruction. This study discusses the viability and the differentiation properties of hBMSCs that have been cryopreserved in the absence of proteins or dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) by using a novel polyampholyte cryoprotective agent (CPA). This CPA is based on carboxylated poly-l-lysine (COOH-PLL) and it was produced by a reaction between ε-poly-l-lysine and succinic anhydride. (1)H-NMR and two-dimensional correlation ((1)H-(13)C HSQC) spectroscopy revealed that COOH-PLL did not have a special structure in solution. The hBMSCs can be cryopreserved for 24 months at -80 °C by using a 7.5% (w/w) cryopreserving solution of COOH-PLL, which introduces carboxyl groups that result in > 90% cell viability after thawing. Furthermore, the cryopreserved hBMSCs fully retained both their proliferative capacity as well as their potential for osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy showed that the polyampholyte CPA did not penetrate the cell membrane; rather, it attached to the membrane during cryopreservation. These results indicate that the cryoprotective mechanisms of COOH-PLL might differ from those of currently used small molecule CPAs. These results also suggest that using COOH-PLL as a CPA for hBMSC preservation can eliminate the use of proteins and DMSO, which would be safer if these cells were used for cell transplantation or regenerative medicine. PMID:23829460

  3. The marginal band system in nymphalid butterfly wings.

    PubMed

    Taira, Wataru; Kinjo, Seira; Otaki, Joji M

    2015-01-01

    Butterfly wing color patterns are highly complex and diverse, but they are believed to be derived from the nymphalid groundplan, which is composed of several color pattern systems. Among these pattern systems, the marginal band system, including marginal and submarginal bands, has rarely been studied. Here, we examined the color pattern diversity of the marginal band system among nymphalid butterflies. Marginal and submarginal bands are usually expressed as a pair of linear bands aligned with the wing margin. However, a submarginal band can be expressed as a broken band, an elongated oval, or a single dot. The marginal focus, usually a white dot at the middle of a wing compartment along the wing edge, corresponds to the pupal edge spot, one of the pupal cuticle spots that signify the locations of color pattern organizing centers. A marginal band can be expressed as a semicircle, an elongated oval, or a pair of eyespot-like structures, which suggest the organizing activity of the marginal focus. Physical damage at the pupal edge spot leads to distal dislocation of the submarginal band in Junonia almana and in Vanessa indica, suggesting that the marginal focus functions as an organizing center for the marginal band system. Taken together, we conclude that the marginal band system is developmentally equivalent to other symmetry systems. Additionally, the marginal band is likely a core element and the submarginal band a paracore element of the marginal band system, and both bands are primarily specified by the marginal focus organizing center.

  4. Multiple band structures of {sup 131}Cs

    SciTech Connect

    Sihotra, S.; Palit, R.; Naik, Z.; Joshi, P. K.; Deo, A. Y.; Jain, H. C.; Singh, K.; Goswamy, J.; Mehta, D.; Singh, N.; Malik, S. S.; Praharaj, C. R.

    2008-09-15

    Excited states in {sup 131}Cs were investigated through in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic techniques following its population in the {sup 124}Sn({sup 11}B, 4n) fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 46 MeV. The previously known level scheme has been substantially extended up to {approx}9 MeV excitation energy and 49/2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) spin with the addition of seven new band structures. The present level scheme consisting of 15 bands exhibits a variety of collective features in this nucleus at intermediate spin. The excitation energies of the observed levels in different bands and the corresponding ratios of transition strengths, i.e., B(M1)/B(E2), have been compared with the results of projected deformed Hartree-Fock calculations based on various quasiparticle configurations. A strongly coupled band has been reassigned a high-K three-quasiparticle {pi}h{sub 11/2} x {nu}(h{sub 11/2}d{sub 3/2}) configuration based on the properties of this band and that of its new coupled side band. The configurations of these bands are also discussed in the framework of tilted-axis cranking model calculations and the systematics of the odd-A Cs isotopes. Additional three energetically closely placed coupled bands have been assigned different unpaired three-quasiparticle configurations. {gamma}-vibrational bands coupled to the {pi}h{sub 11/2} and {pi}g{sub 7/2} single-particle configurations have been reported in this nucleus. Observation of new E1 transitions linking the opposite-parity {pi}h{sub 11/2} and {pi}d{sub 5/2} bands provides fingerprints of possible octupole correlations.

  5. Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Ronald

    2010-07-20

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy.

  6. Chiral Bands and Triaxiality

    SciTech Connect

    Petrache, C.M.

    2004-02-27

    The results obtained with the GASP array in the A=130 mass region are reviewed, emphasizing the discovery excited highly-deformed bands and their decay out, the study of the odd-odd Pr nuclei up to high spins, the discovery of stable triaxial bands in Nd nuclei close to the N=82 shell closure. The very recent studies of nuclei near the proton drip line are described. A discussion of the origin of the various doublet bands observed in odd-odd nuclei of the A=130 mass region is presented.

  7. Iliotibial band friction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Published articles on iliotibial band friction syndrome have been reviewed. These articles cover the epidemiology, etiology, anatomy, pathology, prevention, and treatment of the condition. This article describes (1) the various etiological models that have been proposed to explain iliotibial band friction syndrome; (2) some of the imaging methods, research studies, and clinical experiences that support or call into question these various models; (3) commonly proposed treatment methods for iliotibial band friction syndrome; and (4) the rationale behind these methods and the clinical outcome studies that support their efficacy. PMID:21063495

  8. Tremor bands sweep Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Vidale, J. E.; Sweet, J. R.; Creager, K. C.; Wech, A.; Houston, H.

    2009-12-01

    In the last few years, the spatiotemporal distribution of non-volcanic tremor (NVT) activity has been watched with intense curiosity in Cascadia, Japan, and San Andreas Fault. During an episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event in the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ), the dominant tremor migration pattern is characterized by along-strike marching of tremor at a rate of 10 km/day. Spatiotemporal evolution gives critical clues on the physical mechanism of NVT, and the evolving state of stress in the fault. However, tremor migration, its variations over different time-scales, and its underlying physics remain poorly understood. We recorded the May 2008 ETS event in Cascadia with a dense small-aperture seismic array, and beamformed to detect and locate tremor with unparalleled resolution [Ghosh et al., GRL, 2009]. The beams reveal that tremor occurs in elongated bands that extend ~50 km in the direction parallel to the convergence of CSZ and only 10-15 km in the along-strike direction. This is in contrast to the wider blobs of tremor locations seen using a conventional envelope cross-correlation method. The peak activities of the tremor bands are well separated in space and time. Each band remains active for a good part of a day, and fades away while the adjacent band is slowly peaking up. During the 2008 ETS event, these convergence-parallel tremor bands swept the Cascadia megathrust from SE to NW in the region most clearly imaged by our array, producing the long-term tremor migration. Embedded within the bands lie long streaks of tremor that show steady and rapid migration on time-scales of several minutes to an hour at velocities of several tens of km/hr. These tremor streaks also propagate mostly convergence-parallel, along a particular band, both up- and down-dip. The elongated shape of the tremor bands may cause by the tendency of the tremor streaks to align parallel to the direction of subduction. We propose that each tremor band is the result of failure of a section

  9. Decay of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in {sup 194}Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  10. CSF oligoclonal banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... system. Oligoclonal bands may be a sign of multiple sclerosis. How the Test is Performed A sample of ... Performed This test helps support the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, it does not confirm the diagnosis. ...

  11. Laparoscopic Gastric Banding

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Michel; Giusti, Vittorio; Worreth, Marc; Héraief, Eric; Calmes, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of laparoscopic gastric banding using 2 different bands (the Lapband [Bioenterics, Carpinteria, CA] and the SAGB [Swedish Adjustable Gastric Band; Obtech Medical, 6310 Zug, Switzerland]) in terms of weight loss and correction of comorbidities, short-and long-term complications, and improvement of quality of life in morbidly obese patients Summary Background Data: During the past 10 years, gastric banding has become 1 of the most common bariatric procedures, at least in Europe and Australia. Weight loss can be excellent, but it is not sufficient in a significant proportion of patients, and a number of long-term complications can develop. We hypothesized that the type of band could be of importance in the outcome. Methods: One hundred eighty morbidly obese patients were randomly assigned to receive the Lapband or the SAGB. All the procedures were performed by the same surgeon. The primary end point was weight loss, and secondary end points were correction of comorbidities, early- and long-term complications, importance of food restriction, and improvement of quality of life. Results: Initial weight loss was faster in the Lapband group, but weight loss was eventually identical in the 2 groups. There was a trend toward more early band-related complications and more band infections with the SAGB, but the study had limited power in that respect. Correction of comorbidities, food restriction, long-term complications, and improvement of quality of life were identical. Only 55% to 60% of the patients achieved an excess weight loss of at least 50% in both groups. There was no difference in the incidence of long-term complications. Conclusions: Gastric banding can be performed safely with the Lapband or the SAGB with similar short- and midterm results with respect to weight loss and morbidity. Only 50% to 60% of the patients will achieve sufficient weight loss, and close to 10% at least will develop severe

  12. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  13. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  14. Development of softcopy environment for primary color banding visibility assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungseok; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Allebach, Jan P.

    2008-01-01

    Fine-pitch banding is one of the most unwanted artifacts in laser electrophotographic (EP) printers. It is perceived as a quasiperiodic fluctuation in the process direction. Therefore, it is essential for printer vendors to know how banding is perceived by humans in order to improve print quality. Monochrome banding has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers; but there is no literature that deals with the banding of color laser printers as measured from actual prints. The study of color banding is complicated by the fact that the color banding signal is physically defined in a three-dimensional color space, while banding perception is described in a one-dimensional sense such as more banding or less banding. In addition, the color banding signal arises from the independent contributions of the four primary colorant banding signals. It is not known how these four distinct signals combine to give rise to the perception of color banding. In this paper, we develop a methodology to assess the banding visibility of the primary colorant cyan based on human visual perception. This is our first step toward studying the more general problem of color banding in combinations of two or more colorants. According to our method, we print and scan the cyan test patch, and extract the banding profile as a one dimensional signal so that we can freely adjust the intensity of banding. Thereafter, by exploiting the pulse width modulation capability of the laser printer, the extracted banding profile is used to modulate a pattern consisting of periodic lines oriented in the process direction, to generate extrinsic banding. This avoids the effect of the halftoning algorithm on the banding. Furthermore, to conduct various banding assessments more efficiently, we also develop a softcopy environment that emulates a hardcopy image on a calibrated monitor, which requires highly accurate device calibration throughout the whole system. To achieve the same color appearance as the hardcopy

  15. Two chicken erythrocyte band 3 mRNAs are generated by alternative transcriptional initiation and differential RNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H R; Kennedy, B S; Engel, J D

    1989-01-01

    The erythrocyte anion transport protein (band 3) mediates two distinct cellular functions: it provides plasma membrane attachment sites for the erythroid cytoskeletal network, and it also functions as the anion transporter between the erythrocyte cytoplasm and extracellular milieu. We previously showed that two chicken band 3 polypeptides are encoded by two different mRNAs with different translation initiation sites. Here we show that these two band 3 mRNAs are transcribed from two separate promoters within a single gene. In addition, the two pre-mRNAs are differentially spliced, leading to fusion with coding exons used in common in the two mRNAs. The chicken erythrocyte band 3 gene is therefore the first example of a gene that has two promoters within a single locus which function equally efficiently in one cell type at the same developmental stage. Images PMID:2601717

  16. Design of Phosphonium-Type Zwitterion as an Additive to Improve Saturated Water Content of Phase-Separated Ionic Liquid from Aqueous Phase toward Reversible Extraction of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoritsugu; Kohno, Yuki; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    We designed phosphonium-type zwitterion (ZI) to control the saturated water content of separated ionic liquid (IL) phase in the hydrophobic IL/water biphasic systems. The saturated water content of separated IL phase, 1-butyl-3-methyimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, was considerably improved from 0.4 wt% to 62.8 wt% by adding N,N,N-tripentyl-4-sulfonyl-1-butanephosphonium-type ZI (P555C4S). In addition, the maximum water content decreased from 62.8 wt% to 34.1 wt% by increasing KH2PO4/K2HPO4 salt content in upper aqueous phosphate buffer phase. Horse heart cytochrome c (cyt.c) was dissolved selectively in IL phase by improving the water content of IL phase, and spectroscopic analysis revealed that the dissolved cyt.c retained its higher ordered structure. Furthermore, cyt. c dissolved in IL phase was re-extracted again from IL phase to aqueous phase by increasing the concentration of inorganic salts of the buffer solution. PMID:24013379

  17. Tethys’ Mysterious Equatorial Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Catherine; Helfenstein, P.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Burns, J. A.; Denk, T.; Porco, C.

    2007-10-01

    We investigate a conspicuous equatorial albedo band on Tethys by analyzing Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images obtained in several wavelengths. The band, first seen in Voyager data by Stooke (1989;2002) is symmetric 15° on either side of the equator and extends from 0° to 160°W that is, almost centered on the leading part of Tethys. There is no evidence that the band is topographically-based; margins are gradational and there is no visible difference in underlying geology. Because of the otherwise broadly-uniform albedo of Tethys, subtle albedo and color variations are easily detected and we sampled them after correcting each image for wavelength-dependent limb darkening effects using Hapke's (2002) photometric model. In the ISS CL1-CL2 filter (611nm), the average albedo contrast of the band with adjacent cratered plains is only about 3%. Compared to its surroundings, the band is about 2-3% brighter in the NAC CL1-UV3 filter (338nm), 2-3% darker in the NAC CL1-GRN (568nm) and 8% darker in the NAC CL1-IR3 filter (930nm). This may indicate that the band exposes regolith composed of cleaner ice with a different grain-size distribution than surrounding materials. The average global photometric properties of Tethys are affected by the E-Ring (Verbiscer et al. 2007). However, dynamical explanations for the narrow albedo band that involve E-ring particles so far are unlikely given the broad nature of the E-ring and the inclination of Tethys. References: Hapke, B. 2002. Icarus 157, 523-534; Stooke, P.J. 1989. Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf. 20th, 1071-1072; Stooke, P.J. 2002, Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf, 33rd, #1553; Verbiscer et al. 2007. Science 315, pp.815.

  18. FERM proteins in animal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tepass, Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    Proteins containing a FERM domain are ubiquitous components of the cytocortex of animal cells where they are engaged in structural, transport, and signaling functions. Recent years have seen a wealth of genetic studies in model organisms that explore FERM protein function in development and tissue organization. In addition, mutations in several FERM protein-encoding genes have been associated with human diseases. This review will provide a brief overview of the FERM domain structure and the FERM protein superfamily and then discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism of function and developmental requirement of several FERM proteins including Moesin, Myosin-VIIA, Myosin-XV, Coracle/Band4.1 as well as Yurt and its vertebrate homologs Mosaic Eyes and EPB41L5/YMO1/Limulus. PMID:19596566

  19. Photonic band gap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  20. Gamma-irradiation influence on the structure and properties of calcium caseinate-whey protein isolate based films. Part 2. Influence of polysaccharide addition and radiation treatment on the structure and functional properties of the films.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Krystyna; Salmieri, Stephane; Lacroix, Monique

    2006-11-15

    The influence of gamma-irradiation (32 kGy) followed by the addition of polysaccharides (potato starch, soluble potato starch, and sodium alginate) and heating on the properties of the films based on calcium caseinate (CC)-whey proteins isolate (WPI) and the gels formed with CaCl(2) was evaluated. Radiation induced an improvement of the mechanical and barrier properties of all films. The polysaccharides' effect on the irradiated and non-irradiated CC-WPI gels could be predicted as the sum of their separate effects on CC and on WPI, apart from the alginate interaction with the irradiated CC-WPI. The better properties of the films achieved after admixing polysaccharides to the formerly irradiated protein solution correspond to the smaller strength of gels. Properties of the films and gels prepared using the irradiated proteins and alginate differed depending on whether alginate was admixed before or after irradiation. Results were related to the protein structure, interaction with polysaccharides, and the film's microstructure.

  1. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  2. Band 3 and its alterations in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Kay, M M

    2004-03-01

    Band 3 proteins, members of the anion exchange family of proteins (AE 0-3), are involved in a number of physiological activities such as cell volume and osmotic homeostasis, HCO3-/Cl- exchange, red cell aging, IgG binding and cellular removal, and the maintenance of the structural integrity of cells. They are present in the membranes of all cells and cellular organelles examined including Golgi, mitochondria and nuclei. The first polymorphisms of band 3 discovered were the asymptomatic band 3 Memphis variants carrying the Lys --> Gly substitution at position 56 in the cytoplasmic tail, and band 3 Texas (high transport band 3 Texas) with a mutation in the critical transmembrane, anion transport domain (Pro --> Leu substitution at position 868). The rate at which band 3 mutations were discovered accelerated in the mid 1990s and there are now over 50 known. The most common polymorphisms of band 3 are the Diego blood group antigens which reside on extracellular loops of the protein. Southeast Asia ovalocytosis (SAO; a nine amino acid deletion of residues 400-408) is a band 3 mutation known only in the heterozygous state in which it does not cause disease. It is thought to confer resistance to malaria by altering red cell deformability. Band 3 mutations are responsible for a subset of the heterogeneous group of disorders known as hereditary spherocytosis (HS). HS is a relatively common congenital or inherited group of anemias characterized by chronic hemolysis and abnormal red cell morphology. Red cells in the subset of HS with band 3 mutations behave like they are band 3 deficient either because the mutant protein is not incorporated into the membrane or because it is not functional. HS can be caused by mutations in any of at least 5 proteins involved in membrane stability. Band 3 mutations are associated with diseases in cells besides erythrocytes. For example, 2 types of distal renal tubular acidosis are the result of band 3 mutations either alone or combined with

  3. Accurate band-to-band registration of AOTF imaging spectrometer using motion detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pengwei; Zhao, Huijie; Jin, Shangzhong; Li, Ningchuan

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the problem of platform vibration induced band-to-band misregistration with acousto-optic imaging spectrometer in spaceborne application. Registrating images of different bands formed at different time or different position is difficult, especially for hyperspectral images form acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer. In this study, a motion detection method is presented using the polychromatic undiffracted beam of AOTF. The factors affecting motion detect accuracy are analyzed theoretically, and calculations show that optical distortion is an easily overlooked factor to achieve accurate band-to-band registration. Hence, a reflective dual-path optical system has been proposed for the first time, with reduction of distortion and chromatic aberration, indicating the potential of higher registration accuracy. Consequently, a spectra restoration experiment using additional motion detect channel is presented for the first time, which shows the accurate spectral image registration capability of this technique.

  4. Multi-Band-SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curtis A.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A useful extension to SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) utilizing sidebands of the excitation pulse is introduced. This MRI method, called Multi-Band-SWIFT, achieves much higher bandwidth than standard SWIFT by using multiple segmented excitations (bands) of the field of view. A description of the general idea and variants of the pulse sequence are presented. From simulations and semi-phenomenological theory, estimations of power deposition and signal-to-noise ratio are made. MB-SWIFT and ZTE (zero-TE) sequences are compared based on images of a phantom and human mandible. Multi-Band-SWIFT provides a bridge between SWIFT and ZTE sequences and allows greatly increased excitation and acquisition bandwidths relative to standard SWIFT for the same hardware switching parameters and requires less peak amplitude of the radiofrequency field (or greater flip angle at same peak amplitude) as compared to ZTE. Multi-Band-SWIFT appears to be an attractive extension of SWIFT for certain musculoskeletal and other medical imaging applications, as well as for imaging materials.

  5. The Steel Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Describes studying the steel drum, an import from Trinidad, as an instrument of intellectual growth. Describes how developing a steel drum band provided Montessori middle school students the opportunity to experience some important feelings necessary to emotional growth during this difficult age: competence, usefulness, independence, and…

  6. Colloquium: Topological band theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, A.; Lin, Hsin; Das, Tanmoy

    2016-04-01

    The first-principles band theory paradigm has been a key player not only in the process of discovering new classes of topologically interesting materials, but also for identifying salient characteristics of topological states, enabling direct and sharpened confrontation between theory and experiment. This review begins by discussing underpinnings of the topological band theory, which involve a layer of analysis and interpretation for assessing topological properties of band structures beyond the standard band theory construct. Methods for evaluating topological invariants are delineated, including crystals without inversion symmetry and interacting systems. The extent to which theoretically predicted properties and protections of topological states have been verified experimentally is discussed, including work on topological crystalline insulators, disorder and interaction driven topological insulators (TIs), topological superconductors, Weyl semimetal phases, and topological phase transitions. Successful strategies for new materials discovery process are outlined. A comprehensive survey of currently predicted 2D and 3D topological materials is provided. This includes binary, ternary, and quaternary compounds, transition metal and f -electron materials, Weyl and 3D Dirac semimetals, complex oxides, organometallics, skutterudites, and antiperovskites. Also included is the emerging area of 2D atomically thin films beyond graphene of various elements and their alloys, functional thin films, multilayer systems, and ultrathin films of 3D TIs, all of which hold exciting promise of wide-ranging applications. This Colloquium concludes by giving a perspective on research directions where further work will broadly benefit the topological materials field.

  7. New results on the superdeformed {sup 196}Pb nucleus: The decay of the excited bands to the yrast band

    SciTech Connect

    Bouneau, S.; Azaiez, F.; Duprat, J.

    1996-12-31

    The study of the superdeformed (SD) {sup 196}Pb nucleus has been revisited using the EUROGAM phase 2 spectrometer. In addition to the known yrast and two lowest excited SD bands, a third excited SD band has been seen. All of the three excited bands were found to decay to the yrast SD band through, presumably, E1 transitions, allowing relative spin and excitation energy assignments. Comparisons with calculations using the random-phase approximation suggest that all three excited bands can be interpreted as octupole vibrational structures.

  8. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  9. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  10. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  11. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  12. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  13. Use of native gels to measure protein binding to SSB.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jin; Mikawa, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    We describe a procedure to detect protein binding to SSB by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions. As an example, we show the interaction of Thermus thermophilus (Tth) SSB with its cognate RecO protein. The interaction is detected as decay of the band corresponding to SSB by addition of RecO. We also demonstrate analysis of the RecO-RecR interaction as another example of this method. PMID:22976186

  14. Protein machines and self assembly in muscle organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barral, J. M.; Epstein, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    The remarkable order of striated muscle is the result of a complex series of protein interactions at different levels of organization. Within muscle, the thick filament and its major protein myosin are classical examples of functioning protein machines. Our understanding of the structure and assembly of thick filaments and their organization into the regular arrays of the A-band has recently been enhanced by the application of biochemical, genetic, and structural approaches. Detailed studies of the thick filament backbone have shown that the myosins are organized into a tubular structure. Additional protein machines and specific myosin rod sequences have been identified that play significant roles in thick filament structure, assembly, and organization. These include intrinsic filament components, cross-linking molecules of the M-band and constituents of the membrane-cytoskeleton system. Muscle organization is directed by the multistep actions of protein machines that take advantage of well-established self-assembly relationships. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Sorbitol dehydrogenase. Full-length cDNA sequencing reveals a mRNA coding for a protein containing an additional 42 amino acids at the N-terminal end.

    PubMed

    Wen, Y; Bekhor, I

    1993-10-01

    A cDNA clone encoding rat sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) was isolated from a rat testis lambda ZAP II cDNA library. The full-length cDNA insert contained 2277 base pairs (bp), starting 182 bp upstream from an ATG codon where translation to the active enzyme SDH is presumed to be initiated. A second ATG codon, however, was found 126 bp upstream, aligned in the same reading frame as that of the active enzyme. Therefore, the coding sequence for SDH can be translated into an additional 42-amino-acid polypeptide linked to the N-terminal amino acid of the enzyme, generating a pre-sorbitol dehydrogenase. The sequence data indicate that the nucleotide environment around this ATG codon is more favorable towards it being the actual open reading frame (ORF) for a pre-SDH than the ATG codon preceding the nucleotide sequence for SDH. Since no known SDH starts with the additional 42 amino acids, it may be that post-translational removal of this polypeptide accompanies the release of the active enzyme. Next, the 3' untranslated region of the cDNA contained a non-coding 1021 bp downstream from the TAA stop codon. The latter sequence included three putative poly(A) signals: one at nucleotides 1362-1367, the second at nucleotides 1465-1470, and the third at nucleotides 2212-2217 [17 bp away from the poly(A) tail]. In addition to the above findings we also report a variance in one of the amino acids in the SDH cDNA sequence. This variance occurs at position 957-960, where threonine is coded for instead of aspartic acid; in the rat testis SDH cDNA, we find the sequence is ACG instead of GAC, as was reported for the rat liver SDH cDNA. Northern-blot hybridization analysis showed that SDH mRNA is a doublet, one band of 4 kb and the other of 2.3-2.4 kb, in both the rat liver and the rat lens, further confirming that the isolated SDH cDNA constituted a full-length cDNA.

  16. Noise exposure in marching bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  17. Preprophase band formation and cortical division zone establishment: RanGAP behaves differently from microtubules during their band formation.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Takatoshi; Nakai, Tomonori; Sonobe, Seiji; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Correct positioning of the division plane is a prerequisite for plant morphogenesis. The preprophase band (PPB) is a key intracellular structure of division site determination. PPB forms in G2 phase as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) that narrows in prophase and specializes few-micrometer-wide cortical belt region, named the cortical division zone (CDZ), in late prophase. The PPB comprises several molecules, some of which act as MT band organization and others remain in the CDZ marking the correct insertion of the cell plate in telophase. Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) is accumulated in the CDZ and forms a RanGAP band in prophase. However, little is known about when and how RanGAPs gather in the CDZ, and especially with regard to their relationships to MT band formation. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal distribution of RanGAPs and MTs in the preprophase of onion root tip cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and showed that the RanGAP band appeared in mid-prophase as the width of MT band was reduced to nearly 7 µm. Treatments with cytoskeletal inhibitors for 15 min caused thinning or broadening of the MT band but had little effects on RanGAP band in mid-prophase and most of late prophase cells. Detailed image analyses of the spatial distribution of RanGAP band and MT band showed that the RanGAP band positioned slightly beneath the MT band in mid-prophase. These results raise a possibility that RanGAP behaves differently from MTs during their band formation. PMID:26237087

  18. [Evolution of differential chromosome banding].

    PubMed

    Rodionov, A V

    1999-03-01

    Specific chromosome banding patterns in different eukaryotic taxons are reviewed. In all eukaryotes, chromosomes are composed of alternating bands, each differing from the adjacent material by the molecular composition and structural characteristics. In minute chromosomes of fungi and Protozoa, these bands are represented by kinetochores (Kt- (Cd-)bands), nucleolus organizers (N-bands), and telomeres as well as the euchromatin. In genomes of most fungi and protists, long clusters of tandem repeats and, consequently, C-bands were not revealed but they are likely to be found out in species with chromosomes visible under a light microscope, which are several tens of million bp in size. Chromosomes of Metazoa are usually larger. Even in Cnidaria, they contain C-bands, which are replicated late in the S phase. In Deuterostomia, chromosome euchromatin regions differ by replication time: bands replicating at the first half of the S phase alternate with bands replicating at the second half of the S phase. Longitudinal differentiation in the replication pattern of euchromatic regions is observed in all classes of Vertebrata beginning with the bony fish although the time when it developed in Deuterostomia is unknown. Apparently, the evolution of early and late replicating subdomains in Vertebrata euchromatin promoted fast accumulation of differences in the molecular composition of nucleoproteid complexes characteristic of early and late replicating bands. As a result, the more contrasting G/R and Q-banding patterns of chromosomes developed especially in Eutheria. The evolution of Protostomia and Plantae followed another path. An increase in chromosome size was not accompanied by the appearance of wide RBE and RBL euchromatin bands. The G/R-like banding within the interstitial chromosome regions observed in some representatives of Invertebrates and higher plants arose independently in different phylogenetic lineages. This banding pattern seems to be closer to that of C-banding

  19. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  20. Crater Floor Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    12 February 2004 The somewhat concentric bands in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image may be an expression of eroded layered material. The crater in which these occur is found at middle southern latitude near the west rim of the giant Hellas impact basin. The picture is located near 36.6oS, 321.2oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left; the image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  1. Octupole and hexadecapole bands in 152Sm

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P E; Kulp, W D; Wood, J L; Bandyopadhyay, D; Christen, S; Choudry, S; Dewald, A; Fitzler, A; Fransen, C; Jessen, K; Jolie, J; Kloezer, A; Kudejova, P; Kumar, A; Lesher, S R; Linnemann, A; Lisetskiy, A; Martin, D; Masur, M; McEllistrem, M T; Moller, O; Mynk, M; Orce, J N; Pejovic, P; Pissulla, T; Regis, J; Schiller, A; Tonev, D; Yates, S W

    2005-05-13

    The nucleus {sup 152}Sm is characterized by a variety of low-energy collective modes, conventionally described as rotations, {beta} vibrations, and {gamma} vibrations. Recently, it has been suggested that {sup 152}Sm is at a critical point between spherical and deformed collective phases. Consequently, {sup 152}Sm is being studied by a variety of techniques, including radioactive decay, multi-step Coulomb excitation, in-beam ({alpha},2n{gamma}) {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, and (n,n'{gamma}) spectroscopy. The present work focuses on the latter two reactions; these have been used to investigate the low-lying bands associated with the octupole degree of freedom, including one built on the first excited 0{sup +} band. In addition, the K{sup {pi}} = 4{sup +} hexadecapole vibrational band has been identified.

  2. Hazard banding in compliance with the new Globally Harmonised System (GHS) for use in control banding tools.

    PubMed

    Arnone, Mario; Koppisch, Dorothea; Smola, Thomas; Gabriel, Stefan; Verbist, Koen; Visser, Remco

    2015-10-01

    Many control banding tools use hazard banding in risk assessments for the occupational handling of hazardous substances. The outcome of these assessments can be combined with advice for the required risk management measures (RMMs). The Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has resulted in a change in the hazard communication elements, i.e. Hazard (H) statements instead of Risk-phrases. Hazard banding schemes that depend on the old form of safety information have to be adapted to the new rules. The purpose of this publication is to outline the rationales for the assignment of hazard bands to H statements under the GHS. Based on this, this publication proposes a hazard banding scheme that uses the information from the safety data sheets as the basis for assignment. The assignment of hazard bands tiered according to the severity of the underlying hazards supports the important principle of substitution. Additionally, the set of assignment rules permits an exposure-route-specific assignment of hazard bands, which is necessary for the proposed route-specific RMMs. Ideally, all control banding tools should apply the same assignment rules. This GHS-compliant hazard banding scheme can hopefully help to establish a unified hazard banding strategy in the various control banding tools. PMID:26206396

  3. Shell model description of band structure in 48Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Velazquez, Victor M.

    2007-02-12

    The band structure for normal and abnormal parity bands in 48Cr are described using the m-scheme shell model. In addition to full fp-shell, two particles in the 1d3/2 orbital are allowed in order to describe intruder states. The interaction includes fp-, sd- and mixed matrix elements.

  4. Steel Band Repertoire: The Case for Original Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In the past few decades, the steel band art form has experienced consistent growth and development in several key respects. For example, in the United States, the sheer number of steel band programs has steadily increased, and it appears that this trend will continue in the future. Additionally, pan builders and tuners have made great strides in…

  5. Implications of gamma band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, E; Luster, B; D'Onofrio, S; Mahaffey, S; Bisagno, V; Urbano, F J

    2016-07-01

    The fact that the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the reticular activating system places it in a unique position to modulate sensory input and fight-or-flight responses. Arousing stimuli simultaneously activate ascending projections of the PPN to the intralaminar thalamus to trigger cortical high-frequency activity and arousal, as well as descending projections to reticulospinal systems to alter posture and locomotion. As such, the PPN has become a target for deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, modulating gait, posture, and higher functions. This article describes the latest discoveries on PPN physiology and the role of the PPN in a number of disorders. It has now been determined that high-frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and two calcium channels in PPN cells. Moreover, there are three different PPN cell types that have one or both calcium channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. Based on the new discoveries, novel mechanisms are proposed for insomnia as a waking disorder. In addition, neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1), which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, may be responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in at least some patients with these diseases. Recent results suggest that NCS-1 modulates PPN gamma band activity and that lithium acts to reduce the effects of over expressed NCS-1, accounting for its effectiveness in bipolar disorder.

  6. The cytoskeletal binding domain of band 3 is required for multiprotein complex formation and retention during erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Satchwell, Timothy J; Hawley, Bethan R; Bell, Amanda J; Ribeiro, M. Leticia; Toye, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Band 3 is the most abundant protein in the erythrocyte membrane and forms the core of a major multiprotein complex. The absence of band 3 in human erythrocytes has only been reported once, in the homozygous band 3 Coimbra patient. We used in vitro culture of erythroblasts derived from this patient, and separately short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of band 3, to investigate the development of a band 3-deficient erythrocyte membrane and to specifically assess the stability and retention of band 3 dependent proteins in the absence of this core protein during terminal erythroid differentiation. Further, using lentiviral transduction of N-terminally green fluorescent protein-tagged band 3, we demonstrated the ability to restore expression of band 3 to normal levels and to rescue secondary deficiencies of key proteins including glycophorin A, protein 4.2, CD47 and Rh proteins arising from the absence of band 3 in this patient. By transducing band 3-deficient erythroblasts from this patient with band 3 mutants with absent or impaired ability to associate with the cytoskeleton we also demonstrated the importance of cytoskeletal connectivity for retention both of band 3 and of its associated dependent proteins within the reticulocyte membrane during the process of erythroblast enucleation. PMID:25344524

  7. Block 3 X-band receiver-exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of an X-band exciter, for use in the X-Band Uplink Subsystem, was completed. The exciter generates the drive signal for the X-band transmitter and also generates coherent test signals for the S- and X-band Block 3 translator and a Doppler reference signal for the Doppler extractor system. In addition to the above, the exciter generates other reference signals that are described. Also presented is an overview of the exciter design and some test data taken on the prototype. A brief discussion of the Block 3 Doppler extractor is presented.

  8. Biologically inspired band-edge laser action from semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cih-Su; Liau, Chi-Shung; Sun, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to light up band-edge stimulated emission arising from a semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition. To illustrate our working principle, here we demonstrate the feasibility on the composite of SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and chicken albumen. SnO2 NWs, which merely emit visible defect emission, are observed to generate a strong ultraviolet fluorescence centered at 387 nm assisted by chicken albumen at room temperature. In addition, a stunning laser action is further discovered in the albumen/SnO2 NWs composite system. The underlying mechanism is interpreted in terms of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the chicken albumen protein to SnO2 NWs. More importantly, the giant oscillator strength of shallow defect states, which is served orders of magnitude larger than that of the free exciton, plays a decisive role. Our approach therefore shows that bio-materials exhibit a great potential in applications for novel light emitters, which may open up a new avenue for the development of bio-inspired optoelectronic devices. PMID:25758749

  9. Biologically inspired band-edge laser action from semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cih-Su; Liau, Chi-Shung; Sun, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-03-01

    A new approach is proposed to light up band-edge stimulated emission arising from a semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition. To illustrate our working principle, here we demonstrate the feasibility on the composite of SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and chicken albumen. SnO2 NWs, which merely emit visible defect emission, are observed to generate a strong ultraviolet fluorescence centered at 387 nm assisted by chicken albumen at room temperature. In addition, a stunning laser action is further discovered in the albumen/SnO2 NWs composite system. The underlying mechanism is interpreted in terms of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the chicken albumen protein to SnO2 NWs. More importantly, the giant oscillator strength of shallow defect states, which is served orders of magnitude larger than that of the free exciton, plays a decisive role. Our approach therefore shows that bio-materials exhibit a great potential in applications for novel light emitters, which may open up a new avenue for the development of bio-inspired optoelectronic devices.

  10. Biologically inspired band-edge laser action from semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cih-Su; Liau, Chi-Shung; Sun, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to light up band-edge stimulated emission arising from a semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition. To illustrate our working principle, here we demonstrate the feasibility on the composite of SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and chicken albumen. SnO2 NWs, which merely emit visible defect emission, are observed to generate a strong ultraviolet fluorescence centered at 387 nm assisted by chicken albumen at room temperature. In addition, a stunning laser action is further discovered in the albumen/SnO2 NWs composite system. The underlying mechanism is interpreted in terms of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the chicken albumen protein to SnO2 NWs. More importantly, the giant oscillator strength of shallow defect states, which is served orders of magnitude larger than that of the free exciton, plays a decisive role. Our approach therefore shows that bio-materials exhibit a great potential in applications for novel light emitters, which may open up a new avenue for the development of bio-inspired optoelectronic devices.

  11. Flat Chern Band in a Two-Dimensional Organometallic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band structure, namely, the flat Chern band, has recently been proposed to spawn high-temperature fractional quantum Hall states. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains doubtful whether such a “romance of flatland” could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design of a two-dimensional indium-phenylene organometallic framework that realizes a nearly flat Chern band right around the Fermi level by combining lattice geometry, spin-orbit coupling, and ferromagnetism. An effective four-band model is constructed to reproduce the first-principles results. Our design, in addition, provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials by virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology.

  12. Flat Chern band in a two-dimensional organometallic framework.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band structure, namely, the flat Chern band, has recently been proposed to spawn high-temperature fractional quantum Hall states. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains doubtful whether such a "romance of flatland" could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design of a two-dimensional indium-phenylene organometallic framework that realizes a nearly flat Chern band right around the Fermi level by combining lattice geometry, spin-orbit coupling, and ferromagnetism. An effective four-band model is constructed to reproduce the first-principles results. Our design, in addition, provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials by virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology.

  13. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  14. Flat Chern band in a two-dimensional organometallic framework.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band structure, namely, the flat Chern band, has recently been proposed to spawn high-temperature fractional quantum Hall states. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains doubtful whether such a "romance of flatland" could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design of a two-dimensional indium-phenylene organometallic framework that realizes a nearly flat Chern band right around the Fermi level by combining lattice geometry, spin-orbit coupling, and ferromagnetism. An effective four-band model is constructed to reproduce the first-principles results. Our design, in addition, provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials by virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology. PMID:23521279

  15. Activity of the upstream TATA-less promoter of the p21(Waf1/Cip1) gene depends on transcription factor IIA (TFIIA) in addition to TFIIA-reactive TBP-like protein.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidefumi; Maeda, Ryo; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Tamura, Taka-aki

    2014-07-01

    TATA-binding protein-like protein (TLP) binds to transcription factor IIA (TFIIA) with high affinity, although the significance of this binding is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of TFIIA in transcriptional regulation of the p21(Waf1/Cip1) (p21) gene. It has been shown that TLP is indispensable for p53-activated transcription from an upstream TATA-less promoter of the p21 gene. We found that mutant TLPs having decreased TFIIA-binding ability exhibited weakened transcriptional activation function for the upstream promoter. Activity of the upstream promoter was enhanced considerably by an increased amount of TFIIA in a p53-dependent manner, whereas activity of the TATA-containing downstream promoter was enhanced only slightly. TFIIA potentiated the upstream promoter additively with TLP. Although TFIIA is recruited to both promoters, activity of the upstream promoter was much more dependent on TFIIA. Recruitment of TFIIA and TLP to the upstream promoter was augmented in etoposide-treated cells, in which the amount of TFIIA-TLP complex is increased, and TFIIA-reactive TLP was required for the recruitment of both factors. It was confirmed that etoposide-stimulated transcription depends on TLP. We also found that TFIIA-reactive TLP acts to decrease cell growth rate, which can be explained by interaction of the p21 promoter with the transcription factors that we examined. The results of the present study suggest that the upstream TATA-less promoter of p21 needs TFIIA and TFIIA-reactive TLP for p53-dependent transcriptional enhancement.

  16. Addition of a C-Terminal Cysteine Improves the Anti-Herpes Simplex Virus Activity of a Peptide Containing the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 TAT Protein Transduction Domain▿

    PubMed Central

    Bultmann, Hermann; Teuton, Jeremy; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that peptides containing the protein transduction domain (PTD) of the human immunodeficiency virus tat protein (GRKKRRQRRR) were effective inhibitors of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry (H. Bultmann and C. R. Brandt, J. Biol. Chem. 277:36018-36023, 2002). We now show that the addition of a single cysteine residue to the C terminus of the TAT PTD (TAT-C peptide) improves the antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2. The principle effect of adding the cysteine was to enable the peptide to inactivate virions and to induce a state of resistance to infection in cells pretreated with peptide. The TAT-C peptide acted extracellularly, immediately blocked entry of adsorbed virus, prevented VP16 translocation to the nucleus, and blocked syncytium formation and cell-cell spread. Thus, TAT-C peptides are fusion inhibitors. The induction of the resistance of cells to infection was rapid, recovered with a half-life of 5 to 6 h, and could be reinduced by peptide treatment. TAT-C bound to heparan sulfate but was a poor competitor for viral attachment. The antiviral activity depended on the net positive charge of the peptide but not on chirality, and a free sulfhydryl group was not essential for antiviral activity because TAT-C dimers were at least as effective as monomers. The unique combination of antiviral activities and low toxicity combine to make TAT-C a strong candidate for further development as a drug to block HSV infection. PMID:17261627

  17. Temperature dependence of the band-band absorption coefficient in crystalline silicon from photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hieu T.; Rougieux, Fiacre E.; Mitchell, Bernhard; Macdonald, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The band-band absorption coefficient in crystalline silicon has been determined using spectral photoluminescence measurements across the wavelength range of 990-1300 nm, and a parameterization of the temperature dependence has been established to allow interpolation of accurate values of the absorption coefficient for any temperature between 170 and 363 K. Band-band absorption coefficient measurements across a temperature range of 78-363 K are found to match well with previous results from MacFarlane et al. [Phys. Rev. 111, 1245 (1958)], and are extended to significantly longer wavelengths. In addition, we report the band-band absorption coefficient across the temperature range from 270-350 K with 10 K intervals, a range in which most practical silicon based devices operate, and for which there are only sparse data available at present. Moreover, the absorption coefficient is shown to vary by up to 50% for every 10 K increment around room temperature. Furthermore, the likely origins of the differences among the absorption coefficient of several commonly referenced works by Green [Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 92, 1305 (2008)], Daub and Würfel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1020 (1995)], and MacFarlane et al. [Phys. Rev. 111, 1245 (1958)] are discussed.

  18. Shuttle Ku-band and S-band communications implementation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, J. G.; Huth, G. K.; Nilsen, P. W.; Polydoros, A.; Simon, M. K.; Weber, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of the shuttle orbiter S-band network communication system, the S-band payload communication system, and the Ku-band communication system are considered. A method is proposed for obtaining more accurate S-band antenna patterns of the actual shuttle orbiter vehicle during flight because the preliminary antenna patterns using mock-ups are not realistic that they do not include the effects of additional appendages such as wings and tail structures. The Ku-band communication system is discussed especially the TDRS antenna pointing accuracy with respect to the orbiter and the modifications required and resulting performance characteristics of the convolutionally encoded high data rate return link to maintain bit synchronizer lock on the ground. The TDRS user constraints on data bit clock jitter and data asymmetry on unbalanced QPSK with noisy phase references are included. The S-band payload communication system study is outlined including the advantages and experimental results of a peak regulator design built and evaluated by Axiomatrix for the bent-pipe link versus the existing RMS-type regulator. The nominal sweep rate for the deep-space transponder of 250 Hz/s, and effects of phase noise on the performance of a communication system are analyzed.

  19. Bioaccessibility of folic acid and (6S)-5-methyltetrahydrofolate decreases after the addition of folate-binding protein to yogurt as studied in a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model.

    PubMed

    Arkbåge, Karin; Verwei, Miriam; Havenaar, Robert; Witthöft, Cornelia

    2003-11-01

    Milk products are only moderate sources of folate. Nevertheless, they are of interest due to their content of folate-binding proteins (FBP), which in some studies have been reported to increase folate bioavailability. The effect of FBP on folate bioavailability has been widely discussed. The aim of this study was to investigate the bioaccessibility of folic acid and (6S)-5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-CH3-H4folate) from fortified yogurt using a dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal model (TIM). In addition, the effect of FBP on folate bioaccessibility and the stability of FBP added to yogurt during gastrointestinal passage were investigated. Folate bioaccessibility was 82% from yogurt fortified with folic acid and 5-CH3-H4folate. The addition of FBP to yogurt decreased (P < 0.05) folate bioaccessibility. The lowering effect of FBP was more pronounced in yogurt fortified with folic acid (34% folate bioaccessibility) than from yogurt fortified with 5-CH3-H4folate (57% folate bioaccessibility). After gastrointestinal passage, 17% of the FBP in yogurt fortified with 5-CH3-H4folate and 34% of the FBP in yogurt fortified with folic acid were recovered. No difference in folate bioaccessibility was found between folate-fortified yogurt and folate-fortified pasteurized milk (P = 0.10), whereas the lowering effect of FBP was (P < 0.05) greater in yogurt compared with pasteurized milk. In conclusion, based on the high bioaccessibility of folic acid and 5-CH3-H4folate, yogurt without active FBP can be considered to be an appropriate food matrix for folate fortification.

  20. Development of Wide Band Feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujihara, H.; Ichikawa, R.

    2012-12-01

    Wide Band feeds are being developed at NICT, NAOJ, and some universities in Japan for VLBI2010, SKA, and MARBLE. SKA, the Square Kilometre Array, will comprise thousands of radio telescopes with square kilometer aperture size for radio astronomy. MARBLE consists of small portable VLBI stations developed at NICT and GSI in Japan. They all need wide band feeds with a greater than 1:10 frequency ratio. Thus we have been studying wide band feeds with dual linear polarization for these applications.

  1. Ethmocephaly with amniotic band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Das, Gobinda; Gayen, Sibnath; Bandyopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Das, Debabrata

    2012-10-01

    Ethmocephaly is the rarest form of holoprosencephaly, which occurs due to an incomplete cleavage of the forebrain. Clinically, the disease presents with a proboscis, hypotelorism, microphthalmos and malformed ears. Amniotic band syndrome is another rare congenital malformation with ring-like constriction bands in the limbs, head, face or trunk. We present a case of ethmocephaly with amniotic band syndrome, which is likely the first of its kind, published in the literature. PMID:23248551

  2. Iliotibial band Z-lengthening.

    PubMed

    Richards, David P; Alan Barber, F; Troop, Randal L

    2003-03-01

    Iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) is a common overuse injury reported to afflict 1.6% to 12% of runners. It results from an inflammatory response secondary to excessive friction that occurs between the lateral femoral epicondyle and the iliotibial band. Initial treatments include rest, anti-inflammatory medication, modalities (ice or heat), stretching, physical therapy, and possibly a cortisone injection. In recalcitrant cases of ITBFS, surgery has been advocated. This report describes a surgical technique of Z-lengthening of the iliotibial band in patients presenting with lateral knee pain localized to the iliotibial band at the lateral femoral epicondyle and Gerdy's tubercle who failed all nonoperative efforts.

  3. Hemoglobin interacting proteins and implications of spectrin hemoglobin interaction.

    PubMed

    Basu, Avik; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-10-14

    In this report we have analyzed interacting partners of hemoglobin inside erythrocyte and sought possible implications of hemoglobin-spectrin interaction. Our list of identified cytosolic hemoglobin interacting proteins includes redox regulators like peroxiredoxin-2, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1, flavin reductase and chaperones like HSP70, α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein. Others include metabolic enzymes like carbonic anhydrase-1, selenium binding protein-1, purine nucleoside phosphorylase and nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Additionally, various membrane proteins like α and β spectrin, ankyrin, band3, protein4.1, actin and glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase have been shown to interact with hemoglobin. Our result indicates that major membrane skeleton protein spectrin, that also has a chaperone like activity, helps to fold the unstable alpha-globin chains in vitro. Taken together our results could provide insight into a protein network evolved around hemoglobin molecule inside erythrocyte that may add a new perspective in understanding the hemoglobin function and homeostasis.

  4. Elevation of neuron specific enolase and brain iron deposition on susceptibility-weighted imaging as diagnostic clues for beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration in early childhood: Additional case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Takano, Kyoko; Shiba, Naoko; Wakui, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Aida, Noriko; Inaba, Yuji; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kosho, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN), also known as static encephalopathy of childhood with neurodegeneration in adulthood (SENDA), is a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). BPAN is caused by mutations in an X-linked gene WDR45 that is involved in autophagy. BPAN is characterized by developmental delay or intellectual disability until adolescence or early adulthood, followed by severe dystonia, parkinsonism, and progressive dementia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows iron deposition in the bilateral globus pallidus (GP) and substantia nigra (SN). Clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in early childhood are limited. We report a 3-year-old girl with BPAN who presented with severe developmental delay and characteristic facial features. In addition to chronic elevation of serum aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and soluble interleukin-2 receptor, she had persistent elevation of neuron specific enolase (NSE) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. MRI using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) demonstrated iron accumulation in the GP and SN bilaterally. Targeted next-generation sequencing identified a de novo splice-site mutation, c.831-1G>C in WDR45, which resulted in aberrant splicing evidenced by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Persistent elevation of NSE and iron deposition on SWI may provide clues for diagnosis of BPAN in early childhood.

  5. Garage Band or GarageBand[R]? Remixing Musical Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vakeva, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I suggest that it is perhaps time to consider the pedagogy of popular music in more extensive terms than conventional rock band practices have to offer. One direction in which this might lead is the expansion of the informal pedagogy based on a "garage band" model to encompass various modes of digital artistry wherever this artistry…

  6. Diffusion properties of band 3 in human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Jeffrey O.

    The plasma membrane of the human erythrocyte (RBC) is a six fold symmetric network held together at various pinning points by several multi-protein complexes. This unique architecture is what gives the RBC its remarkable material properties and any disruptions to the network can have severe consequences for the cell. Band 3 is a major transmembrane protein that plays the role of linking the fluid lipid bilayer to the cytoskeletal network. To interrogate the structural integrity of the RBC membrane we have tracked individual band 3 molecules in RBCs displaying a variety of pathologies that are all a consequence of membrane or network related defects. These diseases are spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and pyropokilocytosis. We have also investigated the protein related diseases sickle cell, and south east asian ovalocytosis. To assess the impact that the network has on the dynamic organization of the cell we have also studied the mobility of band 3 in RBC progenitor cells. Individual band 3 molecules were imaged at 120 frames/second and their diffusion coefficients and compartment sizes recorded. The distributions of the compartment sizes combined with the information about the short and long time diffusion of band 3 has given us insight into the architecture of the membrane in normal and diseased cells. The observation that different membrane pathologies can be distinguished, even to the point of different molecular origins of the same disease, implies that the mobility of transmembrane proteins may be a useful tool for characterizing the "health" of the membrane.

  7. Obituary: David L. Band (1957-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    two new follow-up missions to CGRO, the Swift and Fermi observatories, Band seized an opportunity in 2001 to join the staff of the Fermi Science Support Center at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland. He was hired as the lead scientist for user support functions and to help to define and implement planning for the 2008 launch of the Fermi spacecraft. He brought a high level of energy and enthusiasm to the job, becoming in many ways the heart and soul of that organization. Neil Gehrels, the Goddard Astroparticle Physics Division Director and a Fermi deputy project scientist notes that "David was the perfect person for community support, with this outgoing personality and deep knowledge of astrophysics." Band also became an important member of the Fermi science team; despite his failing health, he actively contributed to the first Fermi gamma-ray burst publication as well as making important contributions to the burst detection and data analysis techniques. Additionally, Band was known as a great communicator and mentor. He supervised a PhD student at UCSD who has subsequently been appointed to a faculty position. At Goddard, Band was an integral part of the weekly scientific discussion groups within the gamma-ray astronomy group and he would always find the time to share his knowledge and expertise with new postdoctoral fellows and senior scientists alike. He was also involved with planning the EXIST mission, a candidate for a future NASA mission. He will be greatly missed by his many friends and colleagues within the Fermi mission and the high-energy astrophysics community.

  8. Band of Rubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist's animation illustrates a massive asteroid belt in orbit around a star the same age and size as our Sun. Evidence for this possible belt was discovered by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope when it spotted warm dust around the star, presumably from asteroids smashing together.

    The view starts from outside the belt, where planets like the one shown here might possibly reside, then moves into to the dusty belt itself. A collision between two asteroids is depicted near the end of the movie. Collisions like this replenish the dust in the asteroid belt, making it detectable to Spitzer.

    The alien belt circles a faint, nearby star called HD 69830 located 41 light-years away in the constellation Puppis. Compared to our own solar system's asteroid belt, this one is larger and closer to its star - it is 25 times as massive, and lies just inside an orbit equivalent to that of Venus. Our asteroid belt circles between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

    Because Jupiter acts as an outer wall to our asteroid belt, shepherding its debris into a series of bands, it is possible that an unseen planet is likewise marshalling this belt's rubble. Previous observations using the radial velocity technique did not locate any large gas giant planets, indicating that any planets present in this system would have to be the size of Saturn or smaller.

    Asteroids are chunks of rock from 'failed' planets, which never managed to coalesce into full-sized planets. Asteroid belts can be thought of as construction sites that accompany the building of rocky planets.

  9. Band Dispersion During Isoelectric Focusing in a Microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Prashanta; Shim, Jaesool; Ivory, Cornelius F.

    2008-11-01

    Ampholyte based isoelectric focusing (IEF) is simulated for a two-dimensional horse shoe microchannel. Mobility correction for proteins and ampholytes are considered in the model because the mobility of both large molecules (proteins) and small molecules (ampholytes) varies with ionic strength in the IEF process. Four model proteins are allowed to focus in the presence of 25 biprotic carrier ampholytes in a horse shoe microchannel. Normalized variances of protein bands are calculated from numerical results using moment method. We particularly show dispersion behavior of proteins in IEF and discuss the differences between linear electrophoretic transports and nonlinear IEF in a horse shoe microchannel. Our numerical results show that protein spreading is induced by a turn during gradient formation stage, but the dispersed bands are rearranged and straighten as double peaks of a protein start to focus at the focal point. The rearrangement of spreading band is very unique compared to other linear electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmotic flow and capillary zone electrophoresis) and is independent of channel position and channel shape. Hence, one can perform the IEF to separate proteins in complex geometry without incorporating hyperturns.

  10. Gamma Band Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma band activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma band activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma band processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750

  11. Broadening the frequency band of microstrip antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenko, V. Iu.; Efremov, Iu. G.

    1989-07-01

    Three techniques for broadening the band of microstrip antennas are examined: (1) the introduction of additional resonators; (2) the use of an additional stub galvanically connected to the main resonator; and (3) the use of an electrically variable diode capacitor. It is shown that the third method (i.e., the electrical tuning of the resonant frequencies) has the greatest potential for multichannel systems; an antenna is proposed which can operate with a tuning speed of 4 microsec at an output power of 1 kW.

  12. Paleomagnetic dating of liesegang bands

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, K.A.; Elmore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Paleomagnetic analysis, in conjunction with petrographic studies, was used to date the formation of hematite liesegang bands in the Ordovician Upper Arbuckle Group in southern Oklahoma. The hematite bands form symmetrical patterns on both sides of calcite-filled fractures in dolomite beds. The bands decrease in abundance and become more diffuse away from the fractures. Dedolomite is common near the fractures. Samples from distinctly banded dolomite near the fractures contain a relatively strong chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) with a southeasterly declination and shallow inclination. Samples farther from the fractures that are less distinctly banded or have no bands contain a weaker and less table CRM. Petrographic evidence and stable demagnetization to 600/sup 0/C indicate that the CRM resides in hematite. Samples were collected from both flanks of the Arbuckle Anticline (late Pennsylvanian folding), and a fold test demonstrates that the CRM is post-folding. The pole position for the CRM corresponds to the Early Permian (approx. 280 Ma) part of the Apparent Polar Wander Path for stable North America. These results suggest that the liesegang bands formed in the Early Permian, probably by rhythmic precipitation of hematite from fluids that moved out from the fractures. The fluids also apparently caused dedolomitization and precipitation of calcite in intercrystalline pore spaces. These fluids were probably the source of iron for the bands, although iron released from dedolimitization of ferroan dolomite may have been a local source.

  13. The Moral Ends of Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical framework through which to reimagine and revitalize contemporary music education practices, using the large ensemble paradigm called "band" as the primary unit of analysis. Literature suggests that band places too much emphasis on teacher control and external measures of validation. Critics propose replacing…

  14. Orbiter KU-band transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halterman, R.

    1976-01-01

    The design, build, and test of an engineering breadboard Ku band quadraphase shift keyed and wideband frequency modulated transmitter are described. This orbiter Ku band transmitter drawer is to simulate the orbiter transmitter and meet the functional requirements of the orbiter communication link.

  15. Report from the banding lab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  16. PHYSIOLOGY AND BIO – CHEMISTRY OF GERMINATION OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF SEEDS – V PROTEIN AND SUGAR CONTENTS OF SEEDS UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT SPECTRAL BANDS OF LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, A. K.; Boissya, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    The estimation of total protein and total sugars of cucumber, mango, paddy, radish and tomato seeds in dry, wet and germinating conditions were studied. Also the results are discussed in the light of possible physiological and bio – chemical change taking place inside the seeds during the process of absorption and germination. PMID:22557525

  17. Identification of polymer surface adsorbed proteins implicated in pluripotent human embryonic stem cell expansion† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6bm00214e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Hammad, Moamen; Rao, Wei; Smith, James G. W.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Langer, Robert; Young, Lorraine E.; Barrett, David A.; Davies, Martyn C.; Denning, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Improved biomaterials are required for application in regenerative medicine, biosensing, and as medical devices. The response of cells to the chemistry of polymers cultured in media is generally regarded as being dominated by proteins adsorbed to the surface. Here we use mass spectrometry to identify proteins adsorbed from a complex mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) conditioned medium found to support pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) expansion on a plasma etched tissue culture polystyrene surface. A total of 71 proteins were identified, of which 14 uniquely correlated with the surface on which pluripotent stem cell expansion was achieved. We have developed a microarray combinatorial protein spotting approach to test the potential of these 14 proteins to support expansion of a hESC cell line (HUES-7) and a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (ReBl-PAT) on a novel polymer (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) methacrylamide). These proteins were spotted to form a primary array yielding several protein mixture ‘hits’ that enhanced cell attachment to the polymer. A second array was generated to test the function of a refined set of protein mixtures. We found that a combination of heat shock protein 90 and heat shock protein-1 encourage elevated adherence of pluripotent stem cells at a level comparable to fibronectin pre-treatment. PMID:27466628

  18. Dual-band infrared camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, H.; Schlemmer, H.

    2005-10-01

    Every year, numerous accidents happen on European roads due to bad visibility (fog, night, heavy rain). Similarly, the dramatic aviation accidents of year 2001 in Milan and Zurich have reminded us that aviation safety is equally affected by reduced visibility. A dual-band thermal imager was developed in order to raise human situation awareness under conditions of reduced visibility especially in the automotive and aeronautical context but also for all transportation or surveillance tasks. The chosen wavelength bands are the Short Wave Infrared SWIR and the Long Wave Infrared LWIR band which are less obscured by reduced visibility conditions than the visible band. Furthermore, our field tests clearly show that the two different spectral bands very often contain complementary information. Pyramidal fusion is used to integrate complementary and redundant features of the multi-spectral images into a fused image which can be displayed on a monitor to provide more and better information for the driver or pilot.

  19. Use of abnormal preprophase bands to decipher division plane determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C.; Cyr, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many premitotic plant cells possess a cortical preprophase band of microtubules and actin filaments that encircles the nucleus. In vacuolated cells, the preprophase band is visibly connected to the nucleus by a cytoplasmic raft of actin filaments and microtubules termed the phragmosome. Typically, the location of the preprophase band and phragmosome corresponds to, and thus is thought to influence, the location of the cell division plane. To better understand the function of the preprophase band and phragmosome in orienting division, we used a green fluorescent protein-based microtubule reporter protein to observe mitosis in living tobacco bright yellow 2 cells possessing unusual preprophase bands. Observations of mitosis in these unusual cells support the involvement of the preprophase band/phragmosome in properly positioning the preprophase nucleus, influencing spindle orientation such that the cytokinetic phragmoplast initially grows in an appropriate direction, and delineating a region in the cell cortex that attracts microtubules and directs later stages of phragmoplast growth. Thus, the preprophase band/phragmosome appears to perform several interrelated functions to orient the division plane. However, functional information associated with the preprophase band is not always used or needed and there appears to be an age or distance-dependent character to the information. Cells treated with the anti-actin drug, latrunculin B, are still able to position the preprophase nucleus suggesting that microtubules may play a dominant role in premitotic positioning. Furthermore, in treated cells, spindle location and phragmoplast insertion are frequently abnormal suggesting that actin plays a significant role in nuclear anchoring and phragmoplast guidance. Thus, the microtubule and actin components of the preprophase band/phragmosome execute complementary activities to ensure proper orientation of the division plane.

  20. Formation of Shear Bands in Drying Colloidal Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Kiatkirakajorn, Pree-Cha; Goehring, Lucas

    2015-08-21

    In directionally dried colloidal dispersions regular bands can appear behind the drying front, inclined at ±45° to the drying line. Although these features have been noted to share visual similarities with shear bands in metal, no physical mechanism for their formation has ever been suggested, until very recently. Here, through microscopy of silica and polystyrene dispersions, dried in Hele-Shaw cells, we demonstrate that the bands are indeed associated with local shear strains. We further show how the bands form, that they scale with the thickness of the drying layer, and that they are eliminated by the addition of salt to the drying dispersions. Finally, we reveal the origins of these bands in the compressive forces associated with drying, and show how they affect the optical properties (birefringence) of colloidal films and coatings. PMID:26340215

  1. 47 CFR 15.255 - Operation within the band 57-64 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... band, as measured with a 100 kHz resolution bandwidth spectrum analyzer. The center frequency must be... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the band 57-64 GHz. 15.255... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.255 Operation within the band...

  2. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  3. X-Band RF Gun Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-06-22

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  4. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  5. The First Six ALMA Band 10 Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Gonzalez, A.; Kroug, M.; Kaneko, K.; Miyachi, A.; Yokoshima, T.; Kuroiwa, K.; Ogawa, H.; Makise, K.; Wang, Z.; Uzawa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The first six Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Band 10 (787-950 GHz) receivers have been developed and characterized during the receiver preproduction phase. State-of-the-art measurement systems at THz frequencies have been implemented and successfully used to measure the performance of the first six receivers. Extensive tests ranging from receiver sensitivity and stability to optical aperture efficiency on the secondary antenna have been performed. Performance of all six receivers is well within the stringent ALMA requirements. Moreover, our extensive tests have shown that there are no big performance differences between receivers. These results indicate that the ALMA Band 10 receiver is ready for the production phase, during which an additional 67 receivers will be produced and characterized.

  6. Diluted magnetic semiconductors with narrow band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a method to realize diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) with p - and n -type carriers by choosing host semiconductors with a narrow band gap. By employing a combination of the density function theory and quantum Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate such semiconductors using Mn-doped BaZn2As2 , which has a band gap of 0.2 eV. In addition, we found a nontoxic DMS Mn-doped BaZn2Sb2 , of which the Curie temperature Tc is predicted to be higher than that of Mn-doped BaZn2As2 , the Tc of which was up to 230 K in a recent experiment.

  7. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  8. Dual passband dichroic plate for X-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    A need arose in the Deep Space Network for a dichroic plate that would simultaneously pass two desired frequency bands in the X-band region. In addition, the plate must be totally reflective for S-band frequencies. A dielectrically loaded dichroic plate is described that was developed to meet this need. The unique microwave properties that the new dichroic plate had to possess were: (1) insertion losses of less than 0.04 dB for X-band uplink frequencies centered at 7167 MHz and for X-band downlink frequencies centered at about 8425 MHz; (2) insertion losses that met the low loss requirements at 30 deg incidence angle simultaneously for both parallel and perpendicular polarizations; (3) total reflectivity at S-band frequencies; and (4) ability to maintain these electrical characteristics while passing 100 kW of CW power at X-band or while reflecting 100 kW of CW power at S-band. The dual passband dichroic plate is a thick metallic plate having an array of periodic round holes filled with Teflon plugs. Test results on an experimental prototype plate indicate that it is technically possible to design a dielectrically filled dichroic plate that meets all of the technical requirements.

  9. Report on holographic tests at S-band and K-band on the DSS-63 64 metre antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godwin, M. P.; Schoessow, E. P.; Richards, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution holographic tests were carried out on DSS-63 at S-band and K-band during May l985. These tests followed a mechanical retrofit which involved the addition of structural bracing to the backing structure. Geosynchronous satellite beacons were used as sources for the tests. At a resolution of 0.4m the S-band and K-band tests revealed rms deviations of the surface to be 2.73mm and 1.53mm, respectively. The difference between these two results is thought to be due mainly to contamination of the S-band surface error map by expected and generally predictable subreflector diffraction effects. The S-band map is also known to be contaminated by diffraction from the subreflector support struts and has a higher noise level than the K-band map. A list of corrections to be applied to the reflector panels is derived from the K-band map. These corrections are predicted to reduce the rms deviation from 1.53mm to 0.86mm at 0.4m resolution. Comparison with results obtained before the mechanical retrofit suggests the major effect of the added structural bracing to be reduction of a third order deformation of the reflector about its axis.

  10. M1 bands and intruder bands in {sup 113}In

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrawarthy, R.S.; Pillay, R.G.

    1997-01-01

    High spin states in {sup 113}In have been established up to 6.2 MeV in excitation energy and to a tentative spin of (43/2{sup {minus}}) through the reaction {sup 110}Pd({sup 7}Li, 4n){sup 113}In at a beam energy of 40 MeV. In-beam measurements involved {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences, angular distribution of emitted gamma rays, and directional correlation of oriented states. M1 bands consisting of {Delta}I=1 dipole transitions have been observed. Possible quasiparticle configurations suggest that these bands are similar to the shears bands observed in Pb nuclei. Two intruder bands based on the {pi}h{sub 11/2} orbital and {pi}g{sub 7/2} orbital have been observed. Results of the total Routhian surface and cranked shell model calculations are compared with the experimental data. Alignment features of the intruder bands in the N=62 and 64 isotones are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  12. In vitro refolding with simultaneous purification of recombinant human parathyroid hormone (rhPTH 1-34) from Escherichia coli directed by protein folding size exclusion chromatography (PF-SEC): implication of solution additives and their role on aggregates and renaturation.

    PubMed

    Vemula, Sandeep; Vemula, Sushma; Dedaniya, Akshay; Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are frequently hampered by aggregation during the refolding and purification process. A simple and rapid method for in vitro refolding and purification of recombinant human parathyroid hormone (rhPTH 1-34) expressed in Escherichia coli with protein folding size exclusion chromatography (PF-SEC) was developed in the present work. Discrete effects of potential solution additives such as urea, polypolyethylene glycol, proline, and maltose on the refolding with simultaneous purification of rhPTH were investigated. The results of individual additives indicated that both maltose and proline had remarkable influences on the efficiency of refolding with a recovery yield of 65 and 66% respectively. Further, the synergistic effect of these additives on refolding was also explored. These results demonstrate that the additive combinations are more effective for inhibiting protein aggregation during purification of rhPTH in terms of recovery yield, purity, and specific activity. The maltose and proline combination system achieved the highest renatured rhPTH having a recovery yield of 78%, a purity of ≥99%, and a specific activity of 3.31 × 10(3) cAMP pM/cell respectively, when compared to the classical dilution method yield (41%) and purity (97%). In addition, the role of maltose and proline in a combined system on protein aggregation and refolding has been explained. The molecular docking (in silico) scores of maltose (-10.91) and proline (-9.0) support the in vitro results.

  13. Band offsets and band bending at heterovalent semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, A.; Bass, U.; Mahapatra, S.; Schumacher, C.; Geurts, J.; Brunner, K.

    2010-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of band offsets and band bending at heterovalent semiconductor heterointerfaces. A perfectly abrupt heterovalent interface is usually thermodynamically unstable, and atomic intermixing of materials with different numbers of valence electrons causes large variations in band offsets and local doping density, depending on the spatial arrangement of atoms at the interface. The studied prototypical II-VI/III-V semiconductor interfaces are n -doped ZnSe/GaAs (001) heterostructures with varied composition profiles close to the interface, which were realized by molecular-beam epitaxy with different amounts of Zn or Se predeposited on n -GaAs prior to n -ZnSe layer growth. The samples are characterized by temperature-dependent electrical transport across the interface, electrochemical capacitance-voltage profiling, Raman spectroscopy, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction. We find that the potential barrier in the conduction band at a Zn-rich n -ZnSe/ n -GaAs interface is as high as 550 meV and it gradually decreases with Se predeposition down to about 70 meV. A large depletion region at the heterointerface, about 50 nm wide, is assigned to significant intermixing of acceptor-type atoms, resulting in an effective electron deficit of 1.5×1013cm-2 . The depletion width and the acceptor density around the interface are nearly independent from the growth start procedure. Se predeposition, however, partially shifts the depletion region at the heterointerface from GaAs into ZnSe, compared to Zn predeposition. The results are discussed on the basis of a band-bending model accounting for variable band offsets, interface state density and atomic interdiffusion profiles depending on growth start.

  14. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  15. William Band at Yenching University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  16. Ka-band study: 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Horttor, R. L.; Clauss, R. C.; Wilcher, J. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Mudgway, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Ka-band study team was chartered in late 1987 to bring together all the planning elements for establishing 32 GHz (Ka-band) as the primary downlink frequency for deep-space operation, and to provide a stable baseline from which to pursue that development. This article summarizes the results of that study at its conclusion in mid-1988, and corresponds to material presented to NASA's Office of Space Operations on July 14, 1988. For a variety of reasons, Ka-band is the right next major step in deep-space communications. It offers improved radio metric accuracy through reduced plasma sensitivity and increased bandwidth. Because of these improvements, it offers the opportunity to reduce costs in the flight radio system or in the DSN by allocating part of the overall benefits of Ka-band to this cost reduction. A mission scenario is being planned that can drive at least two and possibly all three of the DSN subnets to provide a Ka-band downlink capability by the turn of the century. The implementation scenario devised by the study team is believed to be feasible within reasonable resource expectations, and capable of providing the needed upgrade as a natural follow-on to the technology development which is already underway.

  17. Identification of New Hot Bands in the Blue and Green Band Systems of FeH.

    PubMed

    Wilson; Brown

    1999-10-01

    A particularly rich region of the electronic spectrum of FeH from 525 to 545 nm was investigated using the techniques of dispersed and undispersed laser-induced fluorescence. Analysis has led to the discovery that several different electronic transitions are embedded in this region; the (0, 0) and (1, 1) bands of the e(6)Pi-a(6)Delta (green) system, the (0, 2) band of the g(6)Phi-X(4)Delta (intercombination) system, the (0, 1) band of the g(6)Phi-a(6)Delta (blue) system, and the (0, 0) band of the g(6)Phi-b(6)Pi system. Seventy-five lines were assigned in the (0, 1) band of the g(6)Phi-a(6)Delta transition. These, with the assignment of an additional 14 lines in the 583 nm region to the (0, 1) band of the e(6)Pi-a(6)Delta transition, led to the extension of the known term values to higher J values for the Omega = 9/2, 7/2, and 5/2 spin components of the v = 1 level of the a(6)Delta state and the novel characterization of the a(6)Delta(3/2) (v = 1) and g(6)Phi(5/2) (v = 0) components. A further 73 lines were assigned to the first four subbands of the (1, 1) band of the e(6)Pi-a(6)Delta transition and term values for the lowest four spin components of the v = 1 level of the e(6)Pi state were determined. This provides the first experimental measurement of a vibrational interval in one of the higher lying electronic states of FeH. The interval does not appear to vary strongly between the spin components (DeltaG(1/2) = 1717, 1713, 1710 cm(-1) for Omega = 7/2, 5/2, 3/2, respectively). Remarkably few of the hot-band transitions assigned in this work could be identified in the complex, high-temperature spectrum of FeH recorded by P. McCormack and S. O'Connor [Astron. Astrophys. Suppl. 26, 373-380 (1976)]. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Durable proteo-hybrid vesicles for the extended functional lifetime of membrane proteins in bionanotechnology† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional supporting data and experimental methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cc04207d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sanobar; Li, Mengqiu; Muench, Stephen P.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The full capabilities of membrane proteins in bionanotechnology can only be realised through improvements in their reconstitution environments that combine biocompatibility to support function and durability for long term stability. We demonstrate that hybrid vesicles composed of natural phospholipids and synthetic diblock copolymers have the potential to achieve these criteria. PMID:27540604

  19. Decay from the superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.G.; Khoo, T.L.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    Superdeformed bands in {sup 194}H g were studied using the early implementation of Gammasphere. The response functions for the Ge detectors were measured for the first time as part of this experiment. Experiments were performed with both a backed target (where the residue stopped in the Au backing) and a thin target (where the residue recoiled into vacuum). This will permit measurements of the decay times of the quasicontinuum {gamma}rays. The spectrum in coincidence with the yrast SD band in {sup 194}Hg reveals the same features as found in the quasicontinuum structure in {sup 192}Hg. These features include: statistical {gamma}rays feeding the SD band, a pronounced E2 peak from transitions feeding the SD band, a Ml/E2 bump at low energies that is associated with the last stages of feeding of the superdeformed band, and a quasicontinuous distribution from {gamma}rays linking SD and normal states, including a sizable clustering of strength around 1.7 MeV. The remarkable similarity of the spectra coincident with SD bands in {sup 192,194}Hg provides additional support for a statistical process for decay out of the SD states. This similarity contrasts with differences observed in the spectrum coincident with the SD band in the odd-even {sup 191}Hg, confirming the predictions about the role of pairing (in normal states) in influencing the shape of the decay-out spectrum.

  20. Direct band gap silicon allotropes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Xu, Bo; Sun, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Zhao, Zhisheng; Yu, Dongli; Fan, Changzeng; He, Julong

    2014-07-16

    Elemental silicon has a large impact on the economy of the modern world and is of fundamental importance in the technological field, particularly in solar cell industry. The great demand of society for new clean energy and the shortcomings of the current silicon solar cells are calling for new materials that can make full use of the solar power. In this paper, six metastable allotropes of silicon with direct or quasidirect band gaps of 0.39-1.25 eV are predicted by ab initio calculations at ambient pressure. Five of them possess band gaps within the optimal range for high converting efficiency from solar energy to electric power and also have better optical properties than the Si-I phase. These Si structures with different band gaps could be applied to multiple p-n junction photovoltaic modules.

  1. Band structures in 99Rh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, V.; Singh, K.; Sihotra, S.; Singh, N.; Goswamy, J.; Malik, S. S.; Ragnarsson, I.; Trivedi, T.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Kumar, R.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Palit, R.; Bharti, A.; Mehta, D.

    2014-10-01

    Excited states in the 99Rh nucleus were populated using the fusion-evaporation reaction 75As(28Si,2p2n) at {{E}_{lab}}=120\\;MeV and the de-excitations were investigated through in-beam γ-ray spectroscopic techniques using the INGA spectrometer consisting of 18 clover detectors. The observed band structures are discussed in the framework of tilted axis cranking shell-model calculations. Level structures at low energies are identified as resulting from the rotational bands based on the \\pi {{p}_{1/2}} and \\pi {{g}_{9/2}} configurations. The \\Delta I = 1 coupled bands are observed at higher excitation energies and have been interpreted as based on the \\pi {{g}_{9/2}}\\otimes \

  2. Salmon testes meal as a functional feed additive in fish meal and plant-protein based diets for rainbow trout(Oncorhynchus mykiss walbaum)and nile tilapia(Oreochromis niloticus L.) fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report that salmon testes meal (TM) produced from Alaskan seafood processing byproducts is a potential protein source for aquafeed formulations. A series of feeding trials was conducted using three different fish species; including Nile tilapia, rainbow trout, and white sturgeon at their early gr...

  3. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Frequency Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    2000-01-01

    for the feed and electronics equipment. A dichroic plate is used to reflect the X-band energy and pass the Ka-band energy to another mirror. The RF energy for each band is then focused onto a feed horn and low-noise amplifier package. After amplification and RF/IF downconversion, the IF signals are sent to the Experimental Tone Tracker (ETT), a digital phase-lock-loop receiver, which simultaneously tracks both X-band and Ka-band carrier signals. Once a signal is detected, the ETT outputs estimates of the SNR in a I -Hz bandwidth (Pc/No), baseband phase and frequency of the signals every I -sec. Between December 1996 and December 1998, the Ka-band and X-band signals from MGS were tracked on a regular basis using the ETT. The Ka-band downlink frequencies described here were referenced to the spacecraft's on-board USO which was also the X-band frequency reference (fka= 3.8 fx). The ETT estimates of baseband phase at I -second sampled time tags were converted to sky frequency estimates. Frequency residuals were then generated for each band by removing a model frequency from each observable frequency at each time tag. The model included Doppler and other effects derived from spacecraft trajectory files obtained from the MGS Navigation Team. A simple troposphere correction was applied to the data. In addition to residuals, the USO frequencies emitted by the spacecraft were estimated. For several passes, the USO frequencies were determined from X-band data and from Ka-band data (referred to X-band by dividing by 3.8) and were found to be in good agreement. In addition, X-band USO frequency estimates from MGS Radio Science data acquired from operational DSN stations were available for comparison and were found to agree within the I Hz level. The remaining sub-Hertz differences were attributed to the different models and software algorithms used by MGS Radio Science and KaBLE-11. A summary of the results of a linear fit of the USO frequency versus time (day of year) is

  4. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Frequency Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    2000-01-01

    environment for the feed and electronics equipment. A dichroic plate is used to reflect the X-band energy and pass the Ka-band energy to another mirror. The RF energy for each band is then focused onto a feed horn and low-noise amplifier package. After amplification and RF/IF downconversion, the IF signals are sent to the Experimental Tone Tracker (ETT), a digital phase-lock-loop receiver, which simultaneously tracks both X-band and Ka-band carrier signals. Once a signal is detected, the ETT outputs estimates of the SNR in a I -Hz bandwidth (Pc/No), baseband phase and frequency of the signals every I -sec. Between December 1996 and December 1998, the Ka-band and X-band signals from MGS were tracked on a regular basis using the ETT. The Ka-band downlink frequencies described here were referenced to the spacecraft's on-board USO which was also the X-band frequency reference (f(sub ka)= 3.8 f(sub x)). The ETT estimates of baseband phase at I -second sampled time tags were converted to sky frequency estimates. Frequency residuals were then generated for each band by removing a model frequency from each observable frequency at each time tag. The model included Doppler and other effects derived from spacecraft trajectory files obtained from the MGS Navigation Team. A simple troposphere correction was applied to the data. In addition to residuals, the USO frequencies emitted by the spacecraft were estimated. For several passes, the USO frequencies were determined from X-band data and from Ka-band data (referred to X-band by dividing by 3.8) and were found to be in good agreement. In addition, X-band USO frequency estimates from MGS Radio Science data acquired from operational DSN stations were available for comparison and were found to agree within the I Hz level. The remaining sub-Hertz differences were attributed to the different models and software algorithms used by MGS Radio Science and KaBLE-11. A summary of the results of a linear fit of the USO frequency versus time (day of

  5. Band-gap scaling of graphene nanohole superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Z. F.; Shi, Q. W.; Yang, Jinlong; Liu, Feng

    2009-12-01

    Based on the tight-binding model, we investigate band structures of graphene nanohole (GNH) superlattices as a function of NH size and density. One common origin of band gaps for GNH superlattices with NHs of either armchair or zigzag edges is the quantum-confinement effect due to the periodic potential introduced by the NHs, which turns the semimetallic sheet into a direct-gap semiconductor. Additional band gaps also open for GNH superlattices with NHs of zigzag edges in a ferromagnetic ground state, arising from the staggered sublattice potential on the zigzag edges due to edge magnetization. Our calculations reveal a generic scaling relation that both types of band gaps increase linearly with the product of NH size and density.

  6. Flat Chern Band in a Two-Dimensional Organometallic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band, namely the flat chern band (FCB), has recently been proposed, in which carriers experience strong Coulomb interaction as well as topological frustration that in together spawn unprecedented topological strongly-correlated electronic states, such as high-temperature fractional quantum hall state. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains a doubt whether such a ``romance of flatland'' could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design to realize a nearly FCB right around the Fermi level in a two-dimensional (2D) Indium-Phenylene Organometallic Framework (IPOF). Our design in addition provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials in virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology. Supported by DOE-BES and ARL

  7. Electronic properties of Janus silicene: new direct band gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Minglei; Ren, Qingqiang; Wang, Sake; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2016-11-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we propose a new class of materials, Janus silicene, which is silicene asymmetrically functionalized with hydrogen and halogen atoms. Formation energies and phonon dispersion indicated that all the Janus silicene systems exhibit good kinetic stability. As compared to silicane, all Janus silicene systems are direct band gap semiconductors. The band gap of Janus silicene can take any value between 1.91 and 2.66 eV by carefully tuning the chemical composition of the adatoms. In addition, biaxial elastic strain can further reduce the band gap to 1.11 eV (under a biaxial tensile strain up to 10%). According to moderate direct band gap, these materials demonstrate potential applications in optoelectronics, exhibiting a very wide spectral range, and they are expected to be highly stable under ambient conditions.

  8. Band offsets in c-Si/Si-XII heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Jamal I.; Malone, Brad D.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-08-01

    Silicon has a rich phase diagram with a multitude of phases existing over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, in addition to the common cubic silicon (c-Si) phase. One such phase, Si-XII, was first observed less than 2 decades ago in diamond anvil experiments, and more recently as a product of nanoindentation. In some of these latter experiments, I-V measurements were performed to characterize the c-Si/Si-XII interface that results when Si-XII is formed in cubic silicon substrates. In this paper we describe calculations of the band offsets in c-Si/Si-XII heterojunctions. We find that the heterojunction is of Type I and that the band offsets are estimated to be ΔEv=0.3 eV and ΔEc=0.5 eV for the valence bands and conduction bands, respectively.

  9. A comparative protein profile of mammalian erythrocyte membranes identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Savita; Punjabi, Vinny; Zingde, Surekha M; Gokhale, Sadashiv M

    2014-11-01

    A comparative analysis of erythrocyte membrane proteins of economically important animals, goat (Capra aegagrus hircus), buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), pig (Sus scrofa), cow (Bos tauras), and human (Homo sapiens) was performed. Solubilized erythrocyte membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), visualized by staining the gels with Commassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), and identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Emerging results show that all major erythrocyte membrane proteins present in human are also seen in all the animals except for band 4.5 which could not be identified. Band 3 is seen as more intense and compact, band 4.1 appears as a doublet in all the animal erythrocyte membranes, band 4.2 exhibits a slightly higher molecular weight (Mr) in buffalo, and cow and band 4.9 has a higher Mr in all the animals relative to the human protein. In addition, there are two new bands in the goat membrane, band G1, identified as HSP 90α, and band G2 identified as HSP 70. A new band C2 identified as HSP 70 is also seen in cow membranes. Peroxiredoxin II is of lower intensity and/or higher Mr in the animals. The difference in size of the proteins possibly indicates the variations in the composition of the amino acids. The difference in intensity of the proteins among these mammalians highlights the presence of less or more number of copies of that protein per cell. This data complement the earlier observations of differences in the sialoglycoprotein profile and effect of proteases and neuraminidase on agglutination among the mammalian erythrocytes. This study provides a platform to understand the molecular architecture of the individual erythrocytes, and in turn the dependent disorders, their phylogenetic relationship and also generates a database of erythrocyte membrane proteins of mammals. The animals selected for this study are of economic importance as

  10. Additive-free digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Freire, Sergio L S; Tanner, Brendan

    2013-07-16

    Digital microfluidics, a technique for manipulation of droplets, is becoming increasingly important for the development of miniaturized platforms for laboratory processes. Despite the enthusiasm, droplet motion is frequently hindered by the desorption of proteins or other analytes to surfaces. Current approaches to minimize this unwanted surface fouling involve the addition of extra species to the droplet or its surroundings, which might be problematic depending on the droplet content. Here, a new strategy is introduced to move droplets containing cells and other analytes on solid substrates, without extra moieties; in particular, droplets with bovine serum albumin could be moved at a concentration 2000 times higher than previously reported (without additives). This capability is achieved by using a soot-based superamphiphobic surface combined with a new device geometry, which favors droplet rolling. Contrasting with electrowetting, wetting forces are not required for droplet motion.

  11. Gastric band migration following laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB): two cases of endoscopic management using a gastric band cutter.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Pawel; Hady, Hady Razak; Baniukiewicz, Andrzej; Dąbrowski, Andrzej; Kaminski, Fabian; Dadan, Jacek

    2012-06-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) is one of the most frequently used minimally invasive and reversible procedures for the treatment of morbid obesity. Migration of the gastric band into the gastric lumen is a rare late complication of LAGB. Previous attempts at endoscopic removal of migrated bands have included the use of endoscopic scissors, laser ablation and argon plasma coagulation (APC). We report two cases of successful endoscopic management of gastric band migration using a gastric band cutter. PMID:23256012

  12. Triaxial strongly deformed bands in {sup 164}Hf and the effect of elevated yrast line

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Wenchao

    2012-10-20

    Two exotic rotational bands have been identified in {sup 164}Hf and linked to known states. They are interpreted as being associated with the calculated triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) potential energy minimum. The bands are substantially stronger and are located at much lower spins than the previously discovered TSD bands in {sup 168}Hf. In addition to the proton and neutron shell gaps at large trixiality, it was proposed that the relative excitation energy of TSD bands above the yrast line plays an important role in the population of TSD bands.

  13. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 763-775 MHz and 793... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  14. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 758-775 MHz and 788... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  15. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 758-775 MHz and 788... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  16. K-Band Latching Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  17. Curriculum Guide for Beginners Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazar, W. Gayre

    This curriculum guide for beginners band is the product of a team of teachers, administrators, and supervisory personnel. The prime objectives in the beginning instrument class is the development of correct playing habits, with emphasis on posture, holding position, embouchure, breathing, tonguing, good tone production and intonation. Subjects…

  18. Wide band data collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkiewicz, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The Incorporated Research Institutes for Seismology (IRIS) approached NASA Headquarters in 1986 about the need to collect data daily from seismic stations around the world as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) mission. A typical IRIS Seismic Station generates 16 Megabytes of data per day when there is seismic activity. The Preliminary Design Parameters of the Wide Band Data Collection System are summarized.

  19. Band structure in 113Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P.; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of collective bands in 113Sn, populated in the reaction 100Mo(19F,p 5 n ) at a beam energy of 105 MeV, has been studied. A new positive-parity sequence of eight states extending up to 7764.9 keV and spin (39 /2+) has been observed. The band is explained as arising from the coupling of the odd valence neutron in the g7 /2 or the d5 /2 orbital to the deformed 2p-2h proton configuration of the neighboring even-A Sn isotope. Lifetimes of six states up to an excitation energy of 9934.9 keV and spin 47 /2-belonging to a Δ I =2 intruder band have been measured for the first time, including an upper limit for the last state, from Doppler-shift-attenuation data. A moderate average quadrupole deformation β2=0.22 ±0.02 is deduced from these results for the five states up to spin 43 /2- . The transition quadrupole moments decrease with increase in rotational frequency, indicating a reduction of collectivity with spin, a feature common for terminating bands. The behavior of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia as a function of rotational frequency has been studied and total Routhian surface calculations have been performed in an attempt to obtain an insight into the nature of the states near termination.

  20. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, David A.; Flood, William S.; Arthur, Allan A.; Voelker, Ferdinand

    1986-01-01

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  1. Band Spectra and Molecular Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronig, R. De L.

    2011-06-01

    Introduction; Part I. The Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules and their Classification by Means of Quantum Numbers: 1. General foundations; 2. Wave mechanics of diatomic molecules; 3. Electronic levels; 4. Vibrational levels; 5. Rotational levels; 6. Stark and Zeeman effect; 7. Energy levels of polyatomic molecules; Part II. Fine Structure and Wave Mechanical Properties of the Energy Levels of Diatomic Molecules: 8. The perturbation function; 9. Rotational distortion of spin multiplets; 10. Fine structure; 11. Perturbations and predissociation; 12. Even and odd levels; 13. Symmetrical and antisymmetrical levels; Part III. Selection Rules and Intensities in Diatomic Molecules: 14. General foundations; 15. Electronic bands; 16. Vibrational bands; 17. Rotational bands; 18. Band spectra and nuclear structure; 19. Transitions in the Stark and Zeeman effect; Part IV. Macroscopic Properties of Molecular Gases: 20. Scattering; 21. Dispersion; 22. Kerr and Faraday effect; 23. Dielectric constants; 24. Magnetic susceptibilities; 25. Specific heats; Part V. Molecule Formation and Chemical Binding: 26. Heteropolar molecules; 27. Homopolar molecules. Chemical forces between two H-atoms and two He-atoms; 28. The general theory of homopolar compounds; Bibliography; Subject index.

  2. Resistive band for turbomachine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Herbert Chidsey; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-08-25

    A turbomachine system includes a rotor that defines a longitudinal axis of the turbomachine system. A first blade is coupled to the rotor, and the first blade has first and second laminated plies. A first band is coupled to the first blade and is configured to resist separation of the first and second laminated plies.

  3. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  4. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  5. Rational, yet simple, design and synthesis of an antifreeze-protein inspired polymer for cellular cryopreservation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc04647e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Daniel E.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins AF(G)Ps are potent ice recrystallization inhibitors, which is a desirable property to enhance cryopreservation of donor tissue/cells. Here we present the rational synthesis of a new, biomimetic, ice-recrystallization inhibiting polymer derived from a cheap commodity polymer, based on an ampholyte structure. The polymer is used to enhance the cryopreservation of red blood cells, demonstrating a macromolecular solution to tissue storage. PMID:26176027

  6. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method extension to quantify simultaneously melamine and cyanuric acid in egg powder and soy protein in addition to milk products.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Mondal, Ana Mary; Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Konings, Erik; Acheson-Shalom, Ruth; Delatour, Thierry

    2010-11-24

    As a consequence of the adulteration of infant formulas and milk powders with melamine (MEL) in China in 2008, much attention has been devoted to the analysis of MEL [and cyanuric acid (CA)] in dairy products. Several methods based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or Raman spectroscopy have been described in the literature. However, no method is available for the simultaneous determination of MEL and CA in other raw materials, which are considered as high-risk materials for economically motivated adulteration. The present paper reports the results of an interlaboratory-based performance evaluation conducted with seven laboratories worldwide. The purpose was to demonstrate the ability of a cleanup-free LC-MS/MS method, originally developed for cow's milk and milk-powdered infant formula, to quantify MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg for MEL in egg powder and soy protein, respectively. For CA, LOD and LOQ were 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg in egg powder and 1.0 and 1.50 mg/kg in soy protein, respectively. Recoveries ranged within a 97-113% range for both MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Reproducibility values (RSD(R)) from seven laboratories were within a 5.4-11.7% range for both analytes in the considered matrices. Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values between 0.4 and 0.7 indicate acceptable among-laboratory precision for the method described. PMID:21038852

  7. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method extension to quantify simultaneously melamine and cyanuric acid in egg powder and soy protein in addition to milk products.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Mondal, Ana Mary; Desmarchelier, Aurélien; Konings, Erik; Acheson-Shalom, Ruth; Delatour, Thierry

    2010-11-24

    As a consequence of the adulteration of infant formulas and milk powders with melamine (MEL) in China in 2008, much attention has been devoted to the analysis of MEL [and cyanuric acid (CA)] in dairy products. Several methods based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), or Raman spectroscopy have been described in the literature. However, no method is available for the simultaneous determination of MEL and CA in other raw materials, which are considered as high-risk materials for economically motivated adulteration. The present paper reports the results of an interlaboratory-based performance evaluation conducted with seven laboratories worldwide. The purpose was to demonstrate the ability of a cleanup-free LC-MS/MS method, originally developed for cow's milk and milk-powdered infant formula, to quantify MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 and 0.05 mg/kg for MEL in egg powder and soy protein, respectively. For CA, LOD and LOQ were 0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg in egg powder and 1.0 and 1.50 mg/kg in soy protein, respectively. Recoveries ranged within a 97-113% range for both MEL and CA in egg powder and soy protein. Reproducibility values (RSD(R)) from seven laboratories were within a 5.4-11.7% range for both analytes in the considered matrices. Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values between 0.4 and 0.7 indicate acceptable among-laboratory precision for the method described.

  8. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  9. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  10. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  11. Effects of external pH on binding of external sulfate, 4.4-dinitro- stilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DNDS), and chloride to the band 3 anion exchange protein

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A model in which two positively-charged titratable sites enhance the affinity for anionic substrates can explain the increase in external iodide dissociation constant (K(O)(I)) with increasing pH(O) (Liu, S. J., F.-Y. Law, and P.A. Knauf. 1996.f Gen.Physiol. 107:271-291). If sulfate binds to the same external site as I-, this model predicts that the SO(4)= dissociation constant (K(O)(S)) should also increase. The data at pH 0 8.5 to 10 fit this prediction, and the pK for the titration is not significantly different from that (pKc) for the low-pK group that affects K(O)(1). The dissociation constant for the apparently competitive inhibitor, DNDS (4,4-dinitrostilbene-2,2'- disulfonate), also increases greatly as pH(O) increases. Particularly at high pH(O), a noncompetitive inhibition by DNDS is also evident. Increasing pH(O) from 7.2 to 11.2 increases the competitive dissociation constant by 700-fold, but the noncompetitive is only increased 20-fold. The pK values for these effects are similar to pKc for K(O)(1), as expected if DNDS binds near the external transport site, but it seems likely that additional titratable groups also affect DNDS binding. The apparent affinity for external Cl- is also affected by pH(O), in a manner similar to that observed for I-. Pretreatment with the amino-selective reagent, bis-sulfosuccinimidyl suberate (BSSS), decreases the apparent Cl- affinity at pH 8.5, but two titrations are still evident, the first (lower) of which decreases the apparent C- affinity, and the second of which surprisingly increases it. Thus, the BSSS-reactive amino groups (probably Lys-539 and Lys-851) do not seem to be involved in the titrations that affect Cl- affinity. In general, the data support the concept that a positively charged amino group (or groups), together with a guanidino group, plays an important role in the binding of substrates and inhibitors at or near the external transport site. PMID:8833347

  12. A Comparison of the Ka-Band Deep-Space Link with the X-Band Link through Emulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shambayati, S.

    2009-08-01

    than the current X-band practice. Therefore, it is recommended that the Ka-band link be designed for maximum expected capacity and additional onboard storage and retransmission schemes be used to assure data completeness, provided that the delay requirements on the data are not too stringent. The results also show that a Ka-band link designed with 80 percent MAR offers near-maximum capacity with significantly smaller losses than lower MAR values. Therefore, it is recommended that 80 percent MAR be used for future Ka-band link designs. The delay-throughput performance results indicate that a spacecraft storage equal to three to four times the maximum amount of new data collected before a pass is sufficient to assure nearly 100 percent data completeness. This result, however, needs to be verified through a more systematic analysis.

  13. Identification of non-zein proteins in BR473 maize protein bodies by LC-nanoESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bicudo, Rogério Campos; Bicudo, Tatiana Campos; Forato, Lucimara A; Titato, Guilherme M; Colnago, Luiz A; Lanças, Fernando M

    2009-11-01

    The nutritional value of maize seed is limited due to its high content of storage proteins (zeins), which are deficient in essential amino acids such as lysine and tryptophan. In a previous paper, we showed that protein bodies obtained from BR473 maize variety, developed by Embrapa (Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation), were mainly constituted by Z27 and a smaller quantity of Z50 gamma-zeins. Besides zein proteins, other not identified protein band in the SDS/PAGE was also observed, which could indicate the presence of non-zein proteins additionally to gamma-zeins. In the present paper, we have demonstrated the presence of non-zein proteins in BR473 maize protein bodies by LC-nanoESI-MS/MS and database searching. This fact could be related to the excellent energetic value and higher protein quality of BR473 maize grains, since high lysine concentration in some maize varieties has been related to the presence of cytoskeleton proteins that are non-zeins. We have identified the following proteins: Brittle-1 protein (chloroplast precursor), Legumin-1, glyceroldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and elongation factor 1-alpha.

  14. Three-Dimensional Structure of Vertebrate Muscle Z-Band: The Small-Square Lattice Z-Band in Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Morris, Edward P.; Luther, Pradeep K.

    2015-01-01

    The Z-band in vertebrate striated muscle crosslinks actin filaments of opposite polarity from adjoining sarcomeres and transmits tension along myofibrils during muscular contraction. It is also the location of a number of proteins involved in signalling and myofibrillogenesis; mutations in these proteins lead to myopathies. Understanding the high-resolution structure of the Z-band will help us understand its role in muscle contraction and the role of these proteins in the function of muscle. The appearance of the Z-band in transverse-section electron micrographs typically resembles a small-square lattice or a basketweave appearance. In longitudinal sections, the Z-band width varies more with muscle type than species: slow skeletal and cardiac muscles have wider Z-bands than fast skeletal muscles. As the Z-band is periodic, Fourier methods have previously been used for three-dimensional structural analysis. To cope with variations in the periodic structure of the Z-band, we have used subtomogram averaging of tomograms of rat cardiac muscle in which subtomograms are extracted and compared and similar ones are averaged. We show that the Z-band comprises four to six layers of links, presumably α-actinin, linking antiparallel overlapping ends of the actin filaments from the adjoining sarcomeres. The reconstruction shows that the terminal 5–7 nm of the actin filaments within the Z-band is devoid of any α-actinin links and is likely to be the location of capping protein CapZ. PMID:26362007

  15. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  16. A protein homologous to the Torpedo postsynaptic 58K protein is present at the myotendinous junction

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The 58K protein is a peripheral membrane protein enriched in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR)-rich postsynaptic membrane of Torpedo electric organ. Because of its coexistence with AChRs in the postsynaptic membrane in both electrocytes and skeletal muscle, it is thought to be involved in the formation and maintenance of AChR clusters. Using an mAb against the 58K protein of Torpedo electric organ, we have identified a single protein band in SDS-PAGE analysis of Xenopus myotomal muscle with an apparent molecular mass of 48 kD. With this antibody, the distribution of this protein was examined in the myotomal muscle fibers with immunofluorescence techniques. We found that the 48K protein is concentrated at the myotendinous junctions (MTJs) of these muscle fibers. The MTJ is also enriched in talin and vinculin. By double labeling muscle fibers with antibodies against talin and the 48K protein, these two proteins were found to colocalize at the membrane invaginations of the MTJ. In cultured myotomal muscle cells, the 48K protein and talin are also colocalized at sites of membrane-myofibril interaction. The 48K protein is, however, not found at focal adhesion sites in nonmuscle cells, which are enriched in talin. These data suggest that the 48K protein is specifically involved in the interaction of myofibrillar actin filaments with the plasma membrane at the MTJ. In addition to the MTJ localization, 48K protein is also present at AChR clusters both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, this protein is shared by both the MTJ and the neuromuscular junction. PMID:2112550

  17. Interband interaction between bulk and surface resonance bands of a Pb-adsorbed Ge(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Tomohiro; Takeda, Sakura N.; Kitagawa, Kosuke; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the valence band structure of a Pb-adsorbed Ge(001) surface by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Three Ge bands, G1, G2, and G3, were observed in a Ge(001) 2 × 1 clean surface. In addition to these three bands, a fourth band (R band) is found on the surface with 2 ML of Pb. The R band continuously appeared even when the surface superstructure was changed. The position of the R band does not depend on Pb coverage. These results indicate that the R band derives from Ge subsurface states, known as surface resonance states. Furthermore, the effective mass of G3 is significantly reduced when the R band exists. We found that this reduction of G3 effective mass was explained by the interaction of the G3 and R bands. Consequently, the surface resonance band is considered to penetrate into the Ge subsurface region affecting the Ge bulk states. We determine the hybridization energy to be 0.068 eV by fitting the observed bands.

  18. Isolation of an additional soybean cDNA encoding Ypt/Rab-related small GTP-binding protein and its functional comparison to Sypt using a yeast ypt1-1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Y; Cheong, N E; Lee, D C; Lee, K O; Je, D Y; Bahk, J D; Cho, M J; Lee, S Y

    1996-07-01

    We have previously reported the isolation of a gene from a soybean cDNA library encoding a Ypt/Rab-related small GTP-binding protein, Sypt. Here, we report the isolation of a second Ypt/Rab-related gene, designated Srab2, from the same soybean cDNA library. And we compare the in vivo function of the two soybean genes utilizing a yeast ypt1-1 mutant. The Srab2 gene encodes 211 amino acid residues with a molecular mass of 23 169 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Srab2 is closely related to the rat (76%) and human (75%) Rab2 proteins, but it shares relatively little homology to Sypt (46%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ypt proteins (41%). Genomic Southern blot analysis using the cDNA insert of Srab2 revealed that it belongs to a multigene family in the soybean genome. The protein encoded by Srab2 gene, when expressed in Escherichia coli, disclosed a GTP-binding activity. The expression pattern of the Srab2 gene is quite different from that of the Sypt gene. The Srab2 gene is predominantly expressed in the plumule region, while expression was very low in the other areas in soybean seedlings. On the other hand, the Sypt mRNA is not detectable in any tissues of soybean seedlings grown in the dark. However, light significantly suppressed the Srab2 gene expression, but enhanced the transcript levels of the Sypt gene in leaf and, at even higher levels, in root tissues. When the Srab2 and Sypt genes are introduced separately into a S cerevisiae defective in vesicular transport function, the Srab2 gene cannot complement the temperature-sensitive yeast ypt1-1 mutation at all, in contrast to the Sypt gene. In conclusion, the difference of functional complementation of the yeast mutation together with differential expression of the two genes suggest that the in vivo roles of the Srab2 and Sypt genes may be different in soybean cells.

  19. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  20. Analysis of serrations and shear bands fractality in UFGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliopoulos, Aggelos C.; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos S.; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2015-05-01

    Tsallis nonextensive statistics is employed to characterize serrated flow, as well as multiple shear band formation in ultrafine grain (UFG) size materials. Two such UFG materials, a bi-modal Al-Mg alloy and a Fe-Cu alloy, were chosen. In the first case, at low strain rates serrated flow emerges as recorded in the stress-strain graphs, whereas at high strain rates, extensive shear banding occurs. In the second case, multiple shear banding is the only mechanism for plastic deformation, but serrations in the stress-strain graph are not recorded. The analysis aims at the estimation of Tsallis entropic index qstat (stat denotes stationary state), as well as the estimation of fractal dimension. The results reveal that the distributions of serrations and shear bands do not follow Gaussian statistics as implied by Boltzmann-Gibbs extensive thermodynamics, but are approximated instead by Tsallis q-Gaussian distributions, as suggested by nonextensive thermodynamics. In addition, fractal analysis of multiple shear band images reveals a (multi)fractal and hierarchical profile of the spatial arrangement of shear bands.

  1. Temporal patterns of apparent leg band retention in North American geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, Guthrie; Kendall, William L.; Moser, Timothy J.; White, Gary C.; Doherty, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    An important assumption of mark?recapture studies is that individuals retain their marks, which has not been assessed for goose reward bands. We estimated aluminum leg band retention probabilities and modeled how band retention varied with band type (standard vs. reward band), band age (1-40 months), and goose characteristics (species and size class) for Canada (Branta canadensis), cackling (Branta hutchinsii), snow (Chen caerulescens), and Ross?s (Chen rossii) geese that field coordinators double-leg banded during a North American goose reward band study (N = 40,999 individuals from 15 populations). We conditioned all models in this analysis on geese that were encountered with >1 leg band still attached (n = 5,747 dead recoveries and live recaptures). Retention probabilities for standard aluminum leg bands were high (estimate of 0.9995, SE = 0.001) and constant over 1-40 months. In contrast, apparent retention probabilities for reward bands demonstrated an interactive relationship between 5 size and species classes (small cackling, medium Canada, large Canada, snow, and Ross?s geese). In addition, apparent retention probabilities for each of the 5 classes varied quadratically with time, being lower immediately after banding and at older age classes. The differential retention probabilities among band type (reward vs. standard) that we observed suggests that 1) models estimating reporting probability should incorporate differential band loss if it is nontrivial, 2) goose managers should consider the costs and benefits of double-banding geese on an operational basis, and 3) the United States Geological Survey Bird Banding Lab should modify protocols for receiving recovery data.

  2. Ku-band miniature modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Ku-band microminiature modulators were designed to convert a 10 mW signal at 400 MHz to a 10 mW signal at 15 GHz. The designs incorporate gallium arsenide Schottky barrier varactors used in upper-sideband up-converters. The use of Ku-band microstrip circulators and hairpin resonator bandpass filters at 2.1 GHz and 2.5 GHz is included. The design and fabrication of a single up-conversion unit with a double up-conversion unit are compared. Various filter configurations are studies, and the use of both alumina and quartz substrates are considered. The various impedance matching networks are evaluated using computer aided design techniques.

  3. ALMA Band 5 Cartridge Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billade, Bhushan; Lapkin, I.; Nystrom, O.; Sundin, E.; Fredrixon, M.; Finger, R.; Rashid, H.; Desmaris, V.; Meledin, D.; Pavolotsky, A.; Belitsky, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Work presented here concerns the design and performance of the ALMA Band 5 cold cartridge, one of the 10 frequency channels of ALMA project, a radio interferometer under construction at Atacama Desert in Chile. The Band 5 cartridge is a dual polarization receiver with the polarization separation performed by orthomode transducer (OMT). For each polarization, Band 5 receiver employs sideband rejection (2SB) scheme based on quadrature layout, with SIS mixers covering 163-211 GHz with 4-8 GHz IF. The LO injection circuitry is integrated with mixer chip and is implemented on the same substrate, resulting in a compact 2SB assembly. Amongst the other ALMA bands, the ALMA Band 5 being the lowest frequency band that uses all cold optics, has the largest mirror. Consequently, ALMA Band 5 mirror along with its support structure leaves very little room for placing OMT, mixers and IF subsystems. The constraints put by the size of cold optics and limited cartridge space, required of us to revise the original 2SB design and adopt a design where all the components like OMT, mixer, IF hybrid, isolators and IF amplifier are directly connected to each other without using any co-ax cables in-between. The IF subsystem uses the space between 4 K and 15 K stage of the cartridge and is thermally connected to 4 K stage. Avoiding co-ax cabling required use of custom designed IF hybrid, furthermore, due to limited cooling capacity at 4 K stage, resistive bias circuitry for the mixers is moved to 15 K stage and the IF hybrid along with an integrated bias-T is implemented using superconducting micro-strip lines. The E-probes for both LO and RF waveguide-to-microstrip transitions are placed perpendicular to the wave direction (back-piece configuration). The RF choke at the end of the probes provides a virtual ground for the RF/LO signal, and the choke is DC grounded to the chassis. The on-chip LO injection is done using a microstrip line directional coupler with slot-line branches in the

  4. Evolution of a light-harvesting protein by addition of new subunits and rearrangement of conserved elements: crystal structure of a cryptophyte phycoerythrin at 1.63-A resolution.

    PubMed

    Wilk, K E; Harrop, S J; Jankova, L; Edler, D; Keenan, G; Sharples, F; Hiller, R G; Curmi, P M

    1999-08-01

    Cryptophytes are unicellular photosynthetic algae that use a lumenally located light-harvesting system, which is distinct from the phycobilisome structure found in cyanobacteria and red algae. One of the key components of this system is water-soluble phycoerythrin (PE) 545 whose expression is enhanced by low light levels. The crystal structure of the heterodimeric alpha(1)alpha(2)betabeta PE 545 from the marine cryptophyte Rhodomonas CS24 has been determined at 1.63-A resolution. Although the beta-chain structure is similar to the alpha and beta chains of other known phycobiliproteins, the overall structure of PE 545 is novel with the alpha chains forming a simple extended fold with an antiparallel beta-ribbon followed by an alpha-helix. The two doubly linked beta50/beta61 chromophores (one on each beta subunit) are in van der Waals contact, suggesting that exciton-coupling mechanisms may alter their spectral properties. Each alpha subunit carries a covalently linked 15,16-dihydrobiliverdin chromophore that is likely to be the final energy acceptor. The architecture of the heterodimer suggests that PE 545 may dock to an acceptor protein via a deep cleft and that energy may be transferred via this intermediary protein to the reaction center.

  5. From Good to Great: 9 Tips for Motivating Your Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waymire, Mark D.; Snead, Todd E.

    2007-01-01

    While being part of a good band program has positive benefits, participating in a great program often provides even more benefits. The reputation of a great program is usually far-reaching, attracting, statewide, and possibly national attention. Additional monies, more alumni support, special performance opportunities (all-state, Midwest, etc.),…

  6. ASTRONOMY: Researchers Get Spectrum Bands.

    PubMed

    Taubes, G

    2000-06-23

    Radio astronomers have been in danger of losing a precious band of the electromagnetic spectrum--the millimeter wavelengths, which promise insight into subjects as diverse as the origins of life and the birth of stars--to the burgeoning telecommunications industry, as millimeter wavelengths also look promising for transmitting high-bandwidth wireless information over relatively short distances. Earlier this month, however, astronomers won an international agreement that guarantees critical wavelengths safe for research. PMID:17758893

  7. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  8. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  9. S-Band propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  10. S-Band propagation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-08-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  11. A Smile Face Monopole Antenna with Quadruple Band-Notched Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Lin; Kong, Fang-Ling; Wang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    A compact planar ultra-wideband (UWB) monopole antenna with quadruple band-notched characteristics is presented. The notched band at 3.3-4.2 GHz (C-band) is obtained by embedding a pair of Z-shaped slots on the elliptical radiation patch. Meanwhile, a modified U-shaped slot is etched in the radiation patch to create the notched band at 4.9-5.4 GHz for WLAN. In addition, by introducing E-shaped stubs on the back layer, the notched bands at 5.5-6.1 GHz for WLAN and 7-8.15 GHz for downlink of X-band satellite communication system are obtained. The antenna is fabricated and measured, showing broadband matched impedance and good Omni-directional patterns with high fidelity and phase linearity (outside the notched bands).

  12. Hypersonic crystal band gaps in Ni/Cu superlattice nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-Guang; Shen, Tie

    2016-03-01

    The hexagonal and tetragonal ordered arrays were prepared by Ni/Cu superlattice nanowires on the porous anodic alumina membrane template, and their phonon band structures were calculated by using the plane wave expansion method. Numerical results show that the hypersonic band gaps can be acquired by adjusting the structural parameters. Along the different wave-vector directions, the width and position of band gap would vary. If the nanowires'filling fraction is increased continuously, the width of the first band gap firstly increases and then decreases within a certain range. The height of superlattice nanowire elementary unit can only affect the width of band gap within a quite narrow range. When the height of elementary unit remains unchanged, the decrease of the Cu-component ratio can contribute to the formation of a wider band gap. Additionally, the wide band gap is more easily formed in tetragonal structure than in hexagonal structure.

  13. Using Lunar Observations to Assess Terra MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chen, Hongda

    2010-01-01

    MODIS collects data in both the reflected solar and thermal emissive regions using 36 spectral bands. The center wavelengths of these bands cover the3.7 to 14.24 micron region. In addition to using its on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a full aperture solar diffuser (SD) and a blackbody (BB), lunar observations have been scheduled on a regular basis to support both Terra and Aqua MODIS on-orbit calibration and characterization. This paper provides an overview of MODIS lunar observations and their applications for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and thermal emissive bands (TEB) with an emphasis on potential calibration improvements of MODIS band 21 at 3.96 microns. This spectral band has detectors set with low gains to enable fire detection. Methodologies are proposed and examined on the use of lunar observations for the band 21 calibration. Also presented in this paper are preliminary results derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations and remaining challenging issues.

  14. Ku-Band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, H. G.; Goff, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    All work performed on the Ku-band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model program since the release of the preliminary final report is summarized. Developments on the program fall into three distinct categories: (1) modifications to the existing Ku-band radar tracking performance computer model; (2) the addition of a highly accurate, nonrealtime search and acquisition performance computer model to the total software package developed on this program; and (3) development of radar cross section (RCS) computation models for three additional satellites. All changes in the tracking model involved improvements in the automatic gain control (AGC) and the radar signal strength (RSS) computer models. Although the search and acquisition computer models were developed under the auspices of the Hughes Aircraft Company Ku-Band Integrated Radar and Communications Subsystem program office, they have been supplied to NASA as part of the Ku-band radar performance comuter model package. Their purpose is to predict Ku-band acquisition performance for specific satellite targets on specific missions. The RCS models were developed for three satellites: the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft, the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft, and the Space Telescopes.

  15. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  16. Optical band gaps of organic semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, José C. S.; Taveira, Ricardo J. S.; Lima, Carlos F. R. A. C.; Mendes, Adélio; Santos, Luís M. N. B. F.

    2016-08-01

    UV-Vis can be used as an easy and forthright technique to accurately estimate the band gap energy of organic π-conjugated materials, widely used as thin films/composites in organic and hybrid electronic devices such as OLEDs, OPVs and OFETs. The electronic and optical properties, including HOMO-LUMO energy gaps of π-conjugated systems were evaluated by UV-Vis spectroscopy in CHCl3 solution for a large number of relevant π-conjugated systems: tris-8-hydroxyquinolinatos (Alq3, Gaq3, Inq3, Al(qNO2)3, Al(qCl)3, Al(qBr)3, In(qNO2)3, In(qCl)3 and In(qBr)3); triphenylamine derivatives (DDP, p-TTP, TPB, TPD, TDAB, m-MTDAB, NPB, α-NPD); oligoacenes (naphthalene, anthracene, tetracene and rubrene); oligothiophenes (α-2T, β-2T, α-3T, β-3T, α-4T and α-5T). Additionally, some electronic properties were also explored by quantum chemical calculations. The experimental UV-Vis data are in accordance with the DFT predictions and indicate that the band gap energies of the OSCs dissolved in CHCl3 solution are consistent with the values presented for thin films.

  17. Dual band HEIWIP detectors with nitride materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unil Perera, A. G.; Ariyawansa, Gamini; Jayasinghe, Ranga; Byrum, Laura; Dietz, Nikolaus; Matsik, Steven G.; Ferguson, Ian T.; Luo, Hui; Bezinger, Andrew; Liu, Hui Chun

    2007-09-01

    Detection of both UV and IR radiation is useful for numerous applications such as firefighting and military sensing. At present, UV and IR dual wavelength band detection requires separate detector elements. Here results are presented for a GaN/AlGaN single detector element capable of measuring both UV and IR response. The initial detector used to prove the dualband concept consists of an undoped AlGaN barrier layer between two highly doped GaN emitter/contact layers. The UV response is due to interband absorption in the AlGaN barrier region producing electron-hole pairs which are then swept out of the barrier by an applied electric field and collected at the contacts. The IR response is due to free carrier absorption in the emitters and internal photoemission over the work function at the emitter barrier interface, followed by collection at the opposite contact. The UV threshold for the initial detector was 360 nm while the IR response was in the 8-14 micron range. Optimization of the detector to improve response in both spectral ranges will be discussed. Designs capable of distinguishing the simultaneously measured UV and IR by using three contacts and separate IR and UV active regions will be presented. The same approach can be used with other material combinations to cover additional wavelength ranges, e.g. GaAs/AlGaAs NIR-FIR dual band detectors.

  18. Line Parameters for the Oxygen a Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; Hoo, Jiajun; Sung, Keeyoon; Hodges, Joseph T.; Long, David A.; Bui, Thinh; Rupasinghe, Priyanka Milinda; Okumura, Mitchio

    2013-06-01

    Simulation of the oxygen A band to a level that is sufficient for accurate studies of the Earth's atmosphere is complex in that not only are Doppler and Lorentz broadening important, but also Dicke narrowing, pressure shifts, line mixing and speed dependence. In addition all of these parameters except the speed dependence require temperature dependence parameters as well. To measure all of the required line parameters with the multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique, spectra were acquired by the Bruker IFS125-HR Fourier Transform Spectrometer at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in combination with various multpass cells, a cavity ring down spectrometer at NIST and a photoacoustic spectrometer at the California Institute of Technology. The combination of the data from these three very different types of spectrometers in a single simultaneous fit of the entire band enables the measurement of all of these quantities. The results to this point will be summarized. D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. M. Devi, M. A. H. Smith, and D. Atkins, JQSRT 1995;53:705-21. Support for the work at William and Mary was provided by JPL and the NIST Greenhouse Gas Measurements and Climate Research Program. Part of the research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contracts with National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Support for the work at NIST was provided by at the NIST Greenhouse Gas Measurements and Climate Research Program and an Innovations in Measurement Sciences (IMS) award.

  19. Multitude of bands in ^156Dy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, L. L.; Hartley, D. J.; Curien, D.; Dudek, J.; Gall, B.; Allmond, M.; Beausang, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; McCutchan, E. A.; Stefanescu, I.; Zhu, S.; Garrett, P. E.; Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Riley, M. A.; Wang, X. F.; Schunck, N.; Yu, C. H.; Sharpey-Schafer, J.; Majola, S.; Simpson, J.

    2009-10-01

    A Gammasphere measurement was performed on rotational bands in ^156Dy using the ^148Nd(^12C,4n) reaction at 65 MeV with the Atlas accelerator at Argonne. The projectile was chosen to populate many bands at low to medium spins. We have added new transitions and new bands to the family of negative-parity structures in this N = 90 nucleus. The lowest lying bands in this region have generally been associated with octupole vibrational modes, converting to two-quasiparticle bands at moderate frequencies. There are deviations from this picture in ^156Dy, due perhaps to the robustness of the octupole vibration through the first band crossing.

  20. An extension to flat band ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulacsi, M.; Kovacs, G.; Gulacsi, Z.

    2014-11-01

    From flat band ferromagnetism, we learned that the lowest energy half-filled flat band gives always ferromagnetism if the localized Wannier states on the flat band satisfy the connectivity condition. If the connectivity conditions are not satisfied, ferromagnetism does not appear. We show that this is not always the case namely, we show that ferromagnetism due to flat bands can appear even if the connectivity condition does not hold due to a peculiar behavior of the band situated just above the flat band.

  1. Novel Dual-band Slot Antenna Design for Bluetooth and UWB Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai-Yan; Shao, Wei; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Ma, Xiao-Liang

    2014-05-01

    A novel technique to introduce an additional low frequency band to compact ultra wideband (UWB) slot antennas is proposed in this paper. To get an additional Bluetooth band, a parasitic strip is mounted on the back side of the slot edge. Because of the interaction of the strip and the slot edge, the Bluetooth band can be obtained while a notch band between the Bluetooth band and UWB band also appears. Two types of feeding, coplanar waveguide and microstrip line, are investigated. The proposed antennas are both fabricated on a low-cost FR4 substrate and have compact size (24 mm × 28 mm × 1 mm). The good agreement between measured and simulated results verifies our design.

  2. Enantioselective synthesis of primary 1-(aryl)alkylamines by nucleophilic 1,2-addition of organolithium reagents to hydroxyoxime ethers and application to asymmetric synthesis of G-protein-coupled receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Atobe, Masakazu; Yamazaki, Naoki; Kibayashi, Chihiro

    2004-08-20

    (E)-Arylaldehyde oxime ethers bearing a (1S)-2-hydroxy-1-phenylethyl or (2R)-1-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl group as a chiral auxiliary, both derived from a single precursor, methyl (R)-mandelate, underwent nucleophilic addition with organolithium reagents via six-membered chelates to give the diastereomerically enriched (R)- and (S)-adducts, respectively, which, after chiral auxiliary removal by reductive N-O bond cleavage, led to the corresponding (R)- and (S)-1-(aryl)ethylamines. This organolithium addition protocol using methyllithium was applied in an enantiodivergent fashion to the preparation of both enantiomers of 1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)ethylamine, which has been previously used as an efficient chiral auxiliary for the synthesis of natural products in this laboratory. The synthetic utility of this methodology involving diastereoselective methyl addition was demonstrated by further application to the asymmetric synthesis of a new type of calcium receptor agonist (calcimimetics), (R)-(+)-NPS R-568 and its thio analogue. Furthermore, diastereoselective vinylation was accomplished by application of the hydroxy oxime ether-based protocol using vinyllithium, which allowed the development of the enantioselective synthesis of the NK-1 receptor antagonists, (+)-CP-99,994 and (+)-CP-122,721.

  3. S-band and X-band integrated PWT photoelectron linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D.; Newsham, D.; Zeng, J.; Rosenzweig, J.

    2001-05-01

    A compact high-energy injector, which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific, industrial, and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator. By focusing the beam with solenoids or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, high brightness and low energy spread are achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerances and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. Cold test results for this device are presented. DULY Research is also actively engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in a SBIR project. When completed, the higher frequency structure will be approximately three times smaller. Design considerations for this device are discussed following the S-band cold test results.

  4. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  5. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  6. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  7. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  8. Optimization of band gaps of 2D photonic crystals by the rapid generic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun-tao

    2011-01-01

    Based on the rapid genetic algorithm (RGA), the band gap structures of square lattices with square scatters are optimized. In the optimizing process, gene codes are used to express square scatters and the fitting function adopts the relative values of the largest absolute photonic band gaps (PBGs). By changing the value of filling factor, three cell forms with large photonic band gaps are obtained. In addition, the comparison between the rapid genetic algorithm and the general genetic algorithm (GGA) is analyzed.

  9. Highly sensitive and simple fluorescence staining of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-based gels by using hydrophobic tail-mediated enhancement of fluorescein luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chulhun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Donghoon; Jung, Duk Young; Suh, Myungkoo

    2003-10-01

    Fluorescein has an extremely low luminescence intensity in acidic aqueous media. However, when it was bound to proteins, subsequent increase of luminescence intensity took place. Furthermore, when a hydrophobic tail, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons, was introduced to fluorescein, more dramatic increase of luminescence intensity was observed upon binding to proteins. In the present study, by utilizing this luminescence enhancement, three hydrophobic fluorescein dyes (5-dodecanoyl amino fluorescein, 5-hexadecanoyl amino fluorescein, and 5-octadecanoyl amino fluorescein) were examined as noncovalent fluorescent stains of protein bands in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Effective incorporation of the dyes to proteins in gels was accomplished either simply by adding dyes at the protein fixation step, or by treating gels with a staining solution after the fixation. The sensitivity of this staining method using the fluorescein derivatives was approximately 1 ng/band for most proteins. For some cases, protein bands containing as low as 0.1 ng were successfully visualized. In addition, the detection sensitivity showed much less protein-to-protein variation than silver staining. This new staining method was also successfully applied to two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat brain proteins. Its overall sensitivity was comparable to that of silver staining.

  10. Highly sensitive and simple fluorescence staining of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-based gels by using hydrophobic tail-mediated enhancement of fluorescein luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chulhun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Donghoon; Jung, Duk Young; Suh, Myungkoo

    2003-10-01

    Fluorescein has an extremely low luminescence intensity in acidic aqueous media. However, when it was bound to proteins, subsequent increase of luminescence intensity took place. Furthermore, when a hydrophobic tail, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons, was introduced to fluorescein, more dramatic increase of luminescence intensity was observed upon binding to proteins. In the present study, by utilizing this luminescence enhancement, three hydrophobic fluorescein dyes (5-dodecanoyl amino fluorescein, 5-hexadecanoyl amino fluorescein, and 5-octadecanoyl amino fluorescein) were examined as noncovalent fluorescent stains of protein bands in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Effective incorporation of the dyes to proteins in gels was accomplished either simply by adding dyes at the protein fixation step, or by treating gels with a staining solution after the fixation. The sensitivity of this staining method using the fluorescein derivatives was approximately 1 ng/band for most proteins. For some cases, protein bands containing as low as 0.1 ng were successfully visualized. In addition, the detection sensitivity showed much less protein-to-protein variation than silver staining. This new staining method was also successfully applied to two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat brain proteins. Its overall sensitivity was comparable to that of silver staining. PMID:14595675

  11. Ku-band radar threshold analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, C. L.; Polydoros, A.

    1979-01-01

    The statistics of the CFAR threshold for the Ku-band radar was determined. Exact analytical results were developed for both the mean and standard deviations in the designated search mode. The mean value is compared to the results of a previously reported simulation. The analytical results are more optimistic than the simulation results, for which no explanation is offered. The normalized standard deviation is shown to be very sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio and very insensitive to the noise correlation present in the range gates of the designated search mode. The substantial variation in the CFAR threshold is dominant at large values of SNR where the normalized standard deviation is greater than 0.3. Whether or not this significantly affects the resulting probability of detection is a matter which deserves additional attention.

  12. Tissue characterization by using narrow band imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gono, Kazuhiro

    2010-02-01

    NBI (Narrow Band Imaging) was first introduced in the market in 2005 as a technique enabling to enhance image contrast of capillaries on a mucosal surface(1). It is classified as an Optical-Digital Method for Image-Enhanced Endoscopy(2). To date, the application has widely spread not only to gastrointestinal fields such as esophagus, stomach and colon but also the organs such as bronchus and bladder. The main target tissue of NBI enhancement is capillaries. However, findings of many clinical studies conducted by endoscopy physicians have revealed that NBI observation enables to enhance more other structures in addition to capillaries. There is a close relationship between those enhanced structures and histological microstructure of a tissue. This report introduces the tissue microstructures enhanced by NBI and discusses the possibility of optimized illumination wavelength in observing living tissues.

  13. Exploiting the Terahertz Band for Radionavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, John Scott; Mickelson, Pascal; Yeak, Jeremy; Kremeyer, Kevin; Rife, Jason

    2016-10-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of GPS-like ranging at terahertz (THz) frequencies. It is well established that GPS carrier signals are vulnerable to jamming via radio-frequency interference (RFI). As a result, there is a need for alternative radionavigation systems. THz signals offer a compelling option. Because of their high frequency (roughly ×100 higher than GPS), THz signals can be used to make highly precise range measurements. In addition, the large separation between the GPS and THz frequencies means that interference at GPS frequencies is very unlikely to impact the THz band. This paper lays the groundwork for a GPS-like ranging capability at THz frequencies. To this end, we identify key differences between THz hardware and GPS (radio frequency) hardware; we experimentally evaluate performance of a 0.30-THz system on a compact outdoor test range, and we introduce a measurement error model that highlights the distinctive role that multipath interference plays at THz frequencies.

  14. Protein profile and alpha-lactalbumin concentration in the milk of standard and transgenic goats expressing recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, H; Schirm, M; Deslauriers, J; Turcotte, C; Bordignon, V

    2009-08-01

    The expression of recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical interest in the milk of transgenic farm animals can result in phenotypes exhibiting compromised lactation performance, as a result of the extraordinary demand placed on the mammary gland. In this study, we investigated differences in the protein composition of milk from control and transgenic goats expressing recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase. In Experiment 1, the milk was characterized by gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in order to identify protein bands that were uniquely visible in the transgenic milk and/or at differing band densities compared with controls. Differences in protein content were additionally evaluated by computer assisted band densitometry. Proteins identified in the transgenic milk only included serum proteins (i.e. complement component 3b, ceruloplasmin), a cytoskeleton protein (i.e. actin) and a stress-induced protein (94 kDA glucose-regulated protein). Proteins exhibiting evident differences in band density between the transgenic and control groups included immunoglobulins, serum albumin, beta-lactoglobulin and alpha-lactalbumin. These results were found to be indicative of compromised epithelial tight junctions, premature mammary cell death, and protein synthesis stress resulting from transgene expression. In Experiment 2, the concentration of alpha-lactalbumin was determined using the IDRing assay and was found to be significantly reduced on day 1 of lactation in transgenic goats (4.33 +/- 0.97 vs. 2.24 +/- 0.25 mg/ml, P < 0.01), but was not different from non-transgenic controls by day 30 (0.99 +/- 0.46 vs. 0.90 +/- 0.11 mg/ml, P > 0.05). We concluded that a decreased/delayed expression of the alpha-lactalbumin gene may be the cause for the delayed start of milk production observed in this herd of transgenic goats.

  15. The Low Band Observatory (LOBO): Expanding the VLA Low Frequency Commensal System for Continuous, Broad-band, sub-GHz Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Helmboldt, Joseph F.; Peters, Wendy M.; Brisken, Walter; Hyman, Scott D.; Polisensky, Emil; Hicks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) are currently commissioning the VLA Low Frequency Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) on a subset of JVLA antennas at modest bandwidth. Its bounded scientific goals are to leverage thousands of JVLA on-sky hours per year for ionospheric and transient studies, and to demonstrate the practicality of a prime-focus commensal system on the JVLA. Here we explore the natural expansion of VLITE to a full-antenna, full-bandwidth Low Band Observatory (LOBO) that would follow naturally from a successful VLITE experience. The new Low Band JVLA receivers, coupled with the existing primary focus feeds, can access two frequency bands: 4 band (54 - 86 MHz) and P band (236-492 MHz). The 4 band feeds are newly designed and now undergoing testing. If they prove successful then they can be permanently mounted at the primary focus, unlike their narrow band predecessors. The combination of Low Band receivers and fixed, primary-focus feeds could provide continuous, broad-band data over two complimentary low-frequency bands. The system would also leverage the relatively large fields-of-view of ~10 degrees at 4 band, and ~2.5 degrees at P band, coupling an excellent survey capability with a natural advantage for serendipitous discoveries. We discuss the compelling science case that flows from LOBO's robust imaging and time domain capabilities coupled with thousands of hours of wide-field, JVLA observing time each year. We also touch on the possibility to incorporate Long Wavelength Array (LWA) stations as additional 'dishes' through the LOBO backend, to improve calibration and sensitivity in LOBO's 4 band.

  16. Orchestrating the Band: A New Direction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mairs, David

    2000-01-01

    Contends that marching bands should explore the classical repertoire of the symphony orchestra. Discusses three reasons why the audience and students enjoy this type of music. Includes a list of classical music that has worked for bands. (CMK)

  17. Rotational Bands in 11B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyanova, A. S.; Danilov, A. N.; Dmitriev, S. V.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Goncharov, S. A.; Gurov, Yu. B.; Maslov, V. A.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Trzaska, W.; Heikkinen, P.; Julin, R.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Tyurin, G. P.; Burtebaev, N.; Zholdybayev, T.

    2015-06-01

    Differential cross-sections of the 11B + α inelastic scattering at E(α) = 65 leading to the most of the known 11B states at the excitation energies up to 14 MeV were measured. The data analysis was done by DWBA and in some cases by the modified diffraction model allowing determining the radii of the excited states. The radii of the states with excitation energies less than ~ 7 MeV with the accuracy not less than 0.1-0.15 fm coincide with the radius of the ground state. This result is consistent with the traditional view of the shell structure of the low-lying states in 11B. Most of the observed high-energy excited states are distributed among four rotational bands. The moments of inertia of band states are close to the moment of inertia of the Hoyle state of 12C. The calculated radii, related to these bands, are 0.7 - 1.0 fm larger than the radius of the ground state, and are close to the radius of the Hoyle state. These results are in agreement with existing predictions about various cluster structure of 11B at high excitation energies. The state with the excitation energy 12.56 MeV, Iπ = 1/2+, T = 1/2 and the root mean square radius R ~ 6 fm predicted in the frame of the alpha condensate hypothesis was not found. The observed level at 12.6 MeV really has T = 1/2, probably, Iπ = 3/2+ and the radius close to that of the ground state.

  18. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David; Reinhart, Richard; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Mike

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASAs Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  19. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASA's Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  20. CSF oligoclonal banding - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... performed: This test helps confirm the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). The laboratory procedure is called CSF electrophoresis, which is a method used to study the levels of protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In electrophoresis, a ...

  1. Identification of the UIR bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Fred M.

    2016-06-01

    Starlight undergoing multiple scattering processes within fluffy grains results in extinction, UV 2175A bump, DIBs and the UIR bands. Spectroscopic lab and DIB data has identified the highly fluorescent molecule Dipyridyl Magnesium Tetrabenzoporphyrin (MgTBP). Reflection and Raman scattering experimental data will be presented which designates this molecule as the primary source for UIR signals. MgTBP sublimes at about 500OC. It is produced via high temperature plasma synthesis within and subsequently ejected from comets which in turn are by-products of solar system-planetary development. Interstellar dust is the left-over refuse which implies prodigious solar system evolution in each galaxy.

  2. Soluble scute proteins of healthy and ill desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homer, B.L.; Li, C.; Berry, K.H.; Denslow, N.D.; Jacobson, E.R.; Sawyer, R.H.; Williams, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives - To characterize protein composition of shell scute of desert tortoises and to determine whether detectable differences could be used to identify healthy tortoises from tortoises with certain illnesses. Animals - 20 desert tortoises. Procedures - Complete postmortem examinations were performed on all tortoises. Plastron scute proteins were solubilized, scute proteins were separated by use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and proteins were analyzed, using densitometry. Two-dimensional immobilized pH gradient-PAGE (2D IPG-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis, using polyclonal antisera to chicken-feather ?? keratin and to alligator-scale ?? keratin, were conducted on representative samples. The 14-kd proteins were analyzed for amino acid composition. Results - The SDS-PAGE and densitometry revealed 7 distinct bands, each with a mean relative protein concentration of > 1 %, ranging from 8 to 47 kd, and a major protein component of approximately 14 kd that constituted up to 75% of the scute protein. The 2D IPG-PAGE revealed additional distinct 62-and 68-kd protein bands. On immunoblot analysis, the 14-, 32-, and 45-kd proteins reacted with both antisera. The 14-kd proteins had an amino acid composition similar to that of chicken ?? keratins. There was a substantial difference in the percentage of the major 14-kd proteins from scute of ill tortoises with normal appearing shells, compared with 14-kd proteins of healthy tortoises. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - The major protein components of shell scute of desert tortoises have amino acid composition and antigenic features of ?? keratins. Scute protein composition may be altered in tortoises with certain systemic illnesses.

  3. On sampling band-pass signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, R.; Shahshahani, M.

    1989-01-01

    Four techniques for uniform sampling of band-bass signals are examined. The in-phase and quadrature components of the band-pass signal are computed in terms of the samples of the original band-pass signal. The relative implementation merits of these techniques are discussed with reference to the Deep Space Network (DSN).

  4. Prenatal diagnosis of amniotic band syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Laxmi Devi; Hamza, Zareena V; Thampi, Madhavan Venugopalan; Nampoothiri, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic band can cause a broad spectrum of anomalies ranging from simple band constrictions to major craniofacial and visceral defects. It can cause significant neonatal morbidity. Accurate diagnosis will help in the management of the present pregnancy and in counseling with regard to future pregnancies. Here we report three cases of amniotic band syndrome detected in the prenatal period. PMID:27081225

  5. Black Scholes’ model and Bollinger bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Xudong; Zheng, Weian

    2006-11-01

    Bollinger bands are well-known in stock market as a popular technical analysis tool. We found that Black-Scholes stock price model had this Bollinger bands property also. In this paper, we give the proof of this phenomenon, and give a new distribution of a statistics generated by the Bollinger bands.

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of amniotic band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Laxmi Devi; Hamza, Zareena V; Thampi, Madhavan Venugopalan; Nampoothiri, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic band can cause a broad spectrum of anomalies ranging from simple band constrictions to major craniofacial and visceral defects. It can cause significant neonatal morbidity. Accurate diagnosis will help in the management of the present pregnancy and in counseling with regard to future pregnancies. Here we report three cases of amniotic band syndrome detected in the prenatal period.

  7. Tap Teens' Curiosity with Lab Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Lab Band project used with 12th grade students at the Westgate Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada). Explains that each band student taught a peer how to play their instrument which created versatility in the band. States that all students kept a reflective journal. (CMK)

  8. Spiral Cloud Band Associated with a Tornado.

    PubMed

    Sadowski, A

    1960-09-16

    The radarscope photographic sequence, by far the best example on record, reveals a spirally banded structure about 10 miles in diameter which is similar to spiral bands of hurricanes ranging as far as 250 miles and to the banded cloud structure of well-developed storms of 1000 miles as photographed by Tiros I.

  9. S and Ku band frequency source development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of the two part S- and Ku-band source development program are described. The S- and Ku-band sources were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. A high performance S- and Ku-band microwave signal source using state-of-the-art oscillator and microwave source technology was developed.

  10. Fermentation and addition of enzymes to a diet based on high-moisture corn, rapeseed cake, and peas improve digestibility of nonstarch polysaccharides, crude protein, and phosphorus in pigs.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, G V; Jensen, B B; Bach Knudsen, K E; Canibe, N

    2015-05-01

    Fluctuating prices of cereals have led to an interest in alternative ingredients for feed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fermentation and the addition of nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP)-degrading enzymes on the ileal and total tract digestibility of nutrients of a diet based on locally grown crops. Four diets were fed including a nonfermented liquid standard grower diet (Control) and 3 experimental diets based on high-moisture corn, rapeseed cake, and peas fed as nonfermented liquid feed (nFLF), fermented liquid feed (FLF), or FLF supplemented with an enzyme mixture of β-glucanase + xylanase + pectinase (FLF+Enz). The FLF was prepared by mixing feed and water (1:2.5, wt/wt) and, once daily, replacing 50% of the mixture with an equal amount of fresh feed and water. The diets were fed to 8 ileal cannulated barrows in a double Latin square design. Ileal digesta and feces were collected after an adaption period of 10 d. Results showed microbiologically good-quality fermented diets. The levels of Enterobacteriaceae were 5.1 to 5.4 log cfu/g in FLF and FLF+Enz vs. 6.3 log cfu/g in nFLF in the ileum and 5.1 to 5.2 log cfu/g in FLF and FLF+Enz vs. 6.3 log cfu/g in nFLF in the feces. Apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of CP was increased by fermentation (73.2% in FLF vs. 69.0% in nFLF; P = 0.033), and digestibility of P showed a tendency (P = 0.073) toward an increase. Addition of the enzyme mixture resulted in a pronounced reduction of dietary NSP compared with FLF (12.8% total NSP in FLF+Enz vs. 15.9% total NSP in FLF; P< 0.001), which also led to increased apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of total and insoluble NSP (total NSP, 31.1% in FLF+Enz vs. 13.6% in FLF; P = 0.002). The Control did not, in general, show higher digestibility values than the experimental diet. However, in the cases were it did, fermentation and enzyme addition brought the digestibility to the level of the Control. In conclusion, fermentation increased the ATTD of CP

  11. Deoxynivalenol impairs hepatic and intestinal gene expression of selected oxidative stress, tight junction and inflammation proteins in broiler chickens, but addition of an adsorbing agent shifts the effects to the distal parts of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Osselaere, Ann; Santos, Regiane; Hautekiet, Veerle; De Backer, Patrick; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard; Croubels, Siska

    2013-01-01

    Broiler chickens are rather resistant to deoxynivalenol and thus, clinical signs are rarely seen. However, effects of subclinical concentrations of deoxynivalenol on both the intestine and the liver are less frequently studied at the molecular level. During our study, we investigated the effects of three weeks of feeding deoxynivalenol on the gut wall morphology, intestinal barrier function and inflammation in broiler chickens. In addition, oxidative stress was evaluated in both the liver and intestine. Besides, the effect of a clay-based mycotoxin adsorbing agent on these different aspects was also studied. Our results show that feeding deoxynivalenol affects the gut wall morphology both in duodenum and jejenum of broiler chickens. A qRT-PCR analysis revealed that deoxynivalenol acts in a very specific way on the intestinal barrier, since only an up-regulation in mRNA expression of claudin 5 in jejunum was observed, while no effects were seen on claudin 1, zona occludens 1 and 2. Addition of an adsorbing agent resulted in an up-regulation of all the investigated genes coding for the intestinal barrier in the ileum. Up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 and two markers of oxidative stress (heme-oxigenase or HMOX and xanthine oxidoreductase or XOR) were mainly seen in the jejunum and to a lesser extent in the ileum in response to deoxynivalenol, while in combination with an adsorbing agent main effect was seen in the ileum. These results suggest that an adsorbing agent may lead to higher concentrations of deoxynivalenol in the more distal parts of the small intestine. In the liver, XOR was up-regulated due to DON exposure. HMOX and HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) were down-regulated due to feeding DON but also due to feeding the adsorbing agent alone or in combination with DON.

  12. Biomass estimator for NIR image with a few additional spectral band images taken from light UAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pölönen, Ilkka; Salo, Heikki; Saari, Heikki; Kaivosoja, Jere; Pesonen, Liisa; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-05-01

    A novel way to produce biomass estimation will offer possibilities for precision farming. Fertilizer prediction maps can be made based on accurate biomass estimation generated by a novel biomass estimator. By using this knowledge, a variable rate amount of fertilizers can be applied during the growing season. The innovation consists of light UAS, a high spatial resolution camera, and VTT's novel spectral camera. A few properly selected spectral wavelengths with NIR images and point clouds extracted by automatic image matching have been used in the estimation. The spectral wavelengths were chosen from green, red, and NIR channels.

  13. Tri-band microstrip antenna design for wireless communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Gehan; Mohanna, Mahmoud; Rabeh, Mohamed L.

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel rectangular tri-band patch antenna that is fabricated and measured for wireless communication systems. The introduced antenna is designed for WLAN and WiMAX applications. The desired tri-band operation was obtained by proper loading for a rectangular patch antenna using slots and shorting pins. The optimal location and dimension for the loaded elements were obtained with the aid of interfacing a Genetic Algorithm (GA) model with an Ansoft High Frequency Structural Simulator (HFSS). The results obtained from our simulated antenna show 5.8% impedance matching band width at 2.4 GHz, 3.7% at 3.5 GHz and 1.57% at 5.7 GHz. In addition, an equivalent circuit of the proposed antenna is introduced using the least square curve fitting optimization technique.

  14. Engineering flat electronic bands in quasiperiodic and fractal loop geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2015-11-01

    Exact construction of one electron eigenstates with flat, non-dispersive bands, and localized over clusters of various sizes is reported for a class of quasi-one-dimensional looped networks. Quasiperiodic Fibonacci and Berker fractal geometries are embedded in the arms of the loop threaded by a uniform magnetic flux. We work out an analytical scheme to unravel the localized single particle states pinned at various atomic sites or over clusters of them. The magnetic field is varied to control, in a subtle way, the extent of localization and the location of the flat band states in energy space. In addition to this we show that an appropriate tuning of the field can lead to a re-entrant behavior of the effective mass of the electron in a band, with a periodic flip in its sign.

  15. V-band IMPATT transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.; Ying, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    A V-band transmitter for communication application was developed that has 30 dB gain and consists of six stages of IMPATT amplifiers. The low and medium power stages are stable amplifiers while the two high power stages are triggered oscillators. Hybrid couplers in the form of Magic Tees were used for power combining two single diode IMPATT modules in the high driver stage and for a single diode IMPATT modules at the output stage. Output power of 4 watts CW across a 2.5 GHz band centered at 60 GHz was achieved with an input power of 4 mW. Dynamic range of the amplifier chain is in excess of 7 dB. A single diode one watt stable amplifier over a bandwidth greater than 2.5 GHz, a high power ( 1 watt) stable amplifier capable of operating in either the constant current or constant voltage mode and verification of the advantages of the latter mode of operation; and a 10 channel modulator with built in test equipment (specifically protective circuitry, failure monitoring, and mode of failure indicated) were also developed. The performance requirements of circulators/isolators for reflection amplifiers were also defined and verified.

  16. 47 CFR 15.243 - Operation in the band 890-940 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation in the band 890-940 MHz. 15.243 Section 15.243 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.243 Operation in the band...

  17. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  18. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  19. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  20. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  1. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  2. 47 CFR 15.255 - Operation within the band 57-64 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 57-64 GHz. 15.255 Section 15.255 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.255 Operation within the band...

  3. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  4. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  5. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  6. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  7. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  8. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  9. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  10. 47 CFR 15.240 - Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz. 15.240 Section 15.240 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.240 Operation in the band...

  11. 47 CFR 15.240 - Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz. 15.240 Section 15.240 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.240 Operation in the band...

  12. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  13. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  14. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  15. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  16. 47 CFR 15.240 - Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz. 15.240 Section 15.240 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.240 Operation in the band...

  17. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  18. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  19. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  20. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  1. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  2. 47 CFR 15.243 - Operation in the band 890-940 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation in the band 890-940 MHz. 15.243 Section 15.243 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.243 Operation in the band...

  3. 47 CFR 15.243 - Operation in the band 890-940 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 890-940 MHz. 15.243 Section 15.243 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.243 Operation in the band...

  4. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  5. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  6. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  7. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  8. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  9. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  10. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  11. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  12. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  13. 47 CFR 15.243 - Operation in the band 890-940 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation in the band 890-940 MHz. 15.243 Section 15.243 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.243 Operation in the band...

  14. 47 CFR 15.240 - Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz. 15.240 Section 15.240 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.240 Operation in the band...

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of amber color silicate glasses and factors affecting the amber related absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Morsi, Morsi M; El-Sherbiny, Samya I; Mohamed, Karam M

    2015-06-15

    The effects of carbon, Fe2O3 and Na2SO4 contents on the amber color of glass with composition (wt%) 64.3 SiO2, 25.7 CaO, 10 Na2O were studied. The effect of some additives that could be found in glass batch or cullets on the amber related absorption band(s) was also studied. An amber related absorption band due to the chromophore Fe(3+)O3S(2-) was recorded at 420 nm with shoulder at 440 nm. A second amber related band recorded at 474 nm with shoulder at 483 nm was assigned to FeS. Increasing melting time at 1400°C up to 6h caused fainting of the amber color, decreases the intensities of the amber related bands and shifted the first band to 406 nm. Addition of ZnO, Cu2O and NaNO3 to the glass produced decolorizing effect and vanishing of the amber related bands. The effects of melting time and these additives were explained on the bases of destruction the amber chromophore and its conversion into Fe(3+) in tetrahedral sites or ZnS. Addition of Se intensifies the amber related bands and may cause dark coloration due to the formation of Se° and polyselenide. Amber color can be monitored through measuring the absorption in the range 406-420 nm.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of amber color silicate glasses and factors affecting the amber related absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsi, Morsi M.; El-sherbiny, Samya I.; Mohamed, Karam M.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of carbon, Fe2O3 and Na2SO4 contents on the amber color of glass with composition (wt%) 64.3 SiO2, 25.7 CaO, 10 Na2O were studied. The effect of some additives that could be found in glass batch or cullets on the amber related absorption band(s) was also studied. An amber related absorption band due to the chromophore Fe3+O3S2- was recorded at 420 nm with shoulder at 440 nm. A second amber related band recorded at 474 nm with shoulder at 483 nm was assigned to FeS. Increasing melting time at 1400 °C up to 6 h caused fainting of the amber color, decreases the intensities of the amber related bands and shifted the first band to 406 nm. Addition of ZnO, Cu2O and NaNO3 to the glass produced decolorizing effect and vanishing of the amber related bands. The effects of melting time and these additives were explained on the bases of destruction the amber chromophore and its conversion into Fe3+ in tetrahedral sites or ZnS. Addition of Se intensifies the amber related bands and may cause dark coloration due to the formation of Se° and polyselenide. Amber color can be monitored through measuring the absorption in the range 406-420 nm.

  17. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  18. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  19. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  20. Sarks as additional fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Frampton, Paul H.; Jack Ng, Y.; Nishino, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Osamu

    1991-03-01

    An extension of the standard model is proposed. The gauge group is SU(2) X ⊗ SU(3) C ⊗ SU(2) S ⊗ U(1) Q, where all gauge symmetries are unbroken. The colour and electric charge are combined with SU(2) S which becomes strongly coupled at approximately 500 GeV and binds preons to form fermionic and vector bound states. The usual quarks and leptons are singlets under SU(2) X but additional fermions, called sarks. transform under it and the electroweak group. The present model explains why no more than three light quark-lepton families can exist. Neutral sark baryons, called narks, are candidates for the cosmological dark matter having the characteristics designed for WIMPS. Further phenomenological implications of sarks are analyzed i including electron-positron annihilation. Z 0 decay, flavor-changing neutral currents. baryon-number non-conservation, sarkonium and the neutron electric dipole moment.

  1. Search for superdeformed bands in {sup 154}Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.

    1995-08-01

    The island of superdeformation in the vicinity of the doubly magic {sup 152}Dy yrast superdeformed (SD) band is thought to be well understood in the framework of cranked mean field calculations. In particular, the calculations suggested that in {sup 154}Dy there should be no yrast or near yrast SD minimum in the 40-60 h spin range, where SD bands in this mass region are thought to be {sup 153}Dy nucleus, it is populated. However, with the presence of five SD bands in the neighboring necessary to ascertain if the addition of one single neutron diminishes the importance of shell effects to the extent that superdeformation can no longer be sustained. In an experiment utilizing the increased resolving power of the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, the reaction {sup 122}Sn({sup 36}S,4n) at 165 MeV was employed to populate high spin states in {sup 154}Dy. In a four-day run with 36 detectors, over one billion triple and higher fold coincidence events were recorded. One new SD band was identified and was assigned to {sup 154}Dy. From comparisons with the Im{sup (2)} moments of inertia of the SD bands in {sup 152}Dy and {sup 153}Dy, a configuration based on (514)9/2{sup 2} neutrons coupled to the {sup 152}Dy SD core was proposed. One unexpected and as yet unexplained feature of this new SD band is that the transition energies are almost identical to those of an excited SD band in {sup 153}Dy. It is also worth noting that the feeding of the yrast states is similar to that achieved by the deexcitation from the ensemble of all entry states in the reaction. This observation emphasizes the statistical nature of the decay-out process. A paper reporting these results was accepted for publication.

  2. The Hayabusa Spacecraft Asteroid Multi-band Imaging Camera (AMICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Tholen, David J.; Hirata, Naru; Demura, Hirohide; Nemoto, Etsuko; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Higuchi, Yuta; Sogame, Akito; Yamamoto, Aya; Kitazato, Kohei; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tatsuaki; Saito, Jun

    2010-06-01

    The Hayabusa Spacecraft Asteroid Multi-band Imaging Camera (AMICA) has acquired more than 1400 multispectral and high-resolution images of its target asteroid, 25143 Itokawa, since late August 2005. In this paper, we summarize the design and performance of AMICA. In addition, we describe the calibration methods, assumptions, and models, based on measurements. Major calibration steps include corrections for linearity and modeling and subtraction of bias, dark current, read-out smear, and pixel-to-pixel responsivity variations. AMICA v-band data were calibrated to radiance using in-flight stellar observations. The other band data were calibrated to reflectance by comparing them to ground-based observations to avoid the uncertainty of the solar irradiation in those bands. We found that the AMICA signal was linear with respect to the input signal to an accuracy of ≪1% when the signal level was <3800 DN. We verified that the absolute radiance calibration of the AMICA v-band (0.55 μm) was accurate to 4% or less, the accuracy of the disk-integrated spectra with respect to the AMICA v-band was about 1%, and the pixel-to-pixel responsivity (flat-field) variation was 3% or less. The uncertainty in background zero level was 5 DN. From wide-band observations of star clusters, we found that the AMICA optics have an effective focal length of 120.80 ± 0.03 mm, yielding a field-of-view (FOV) of 5.83° × 5.69°. The resulting geometric distortion model was accurate to within a third of a pixel. We demonstrated an image-restoration technique using the point-spread functions of stars, and confirmed that the technique functions well in all loss-less images. An artifact not corrected by this calibration is scattered light associated with bright disks in the FOV.

  3. Space Object Temperature Determination from Multi-Band Infrared Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, C.; Snell, H.; Griffin, J.; Kraemer, K.; Price, S.; Kendra, M.; Mizuno, D. %P. E37

    We describe a technique to determine the temperature of a Resident Space Object (RSO) from multiple infrared (IR) bands. The characteristic temperature of an object is the temperature of the Planck function that has the closest least squares fit to the observed irradiance in at least three infrared bands. The characteristic temperature and the effective solid angle are free parameters in a formulation that requires simultaneous minimization, across all bands, of chi-square expressions using modeled irradiances and the measured irradiances and their errors. Solutions are determined from a multi-dimensional Levenberg-Marquardt fitting algorithm. The advantage of this approach is that it provides a single, best-fit solution to the RSO modeled as a gray body radiator. In contrast, a 2-band (color) temperature approach using three or more bands produces different solutions for different band combinations with no objective way of determining which solution is best. We apply this technique to IR measurements of RSOs obtained by the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite. The AFRL MSX database of serendipitous RSO observations contains multi-band IR measurements for hundreds of objects, including payloads, rocket bodies, and debris. Using this technique, we have obtained object characteristic temperatures and Infrared Cross Sections (IRCS) under a large variety of phase angle and solar illumination conditions, including eclipse. We examine specific cases in detail. We also compare and contrast results for population groups based on orbit type (LEO - low earth orbit, MEO - medium earth orbit, and GEO - geostationary earth orbit) and other parameters of interest. In addition, we look at a number of cases where color and characteristic temperatures and solid angles have been determined for the same object measurements and show that the characteristic parameters are more consistent with the Planck function model when expressed as their equivalent isophotal emissions.

  4. Spectral Band Selection for Urban Material Classification Using Hyperspectral Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, A.; Chehata, N.; Briottet, X.; Paparoditis, N.

    2016-06-01

    In urban areas, information concerning very high resolution land cover and especially material maps are necessary for several city modelling or monitoring applications. That is to say, knowledge concerning the roofing materials or the different kinds of ground areas is required. Airborne remote sensing techniques appear to be convenient for providing such information at a large scale. However, results obtained using most traditional processing methods based on usual red-green-blue-near infrared multispectral images remain limited for such applications. A possible way to improve classification results is to enhance the imagery spectral resolution using superspectral or hyperspectral sensors. In this study, it is intended to design a superspectral sensor dedicated to urban materials classification and this work particularly focused on the selection of the optimal spectral band subsets for such sensor. First, reflectance spectral signatures of urban materials were collected from 7 spectral libraires. Then, spectral optimization was performed using this data set. The band selection workflow included two steps, optimising first the number of spectral bands using an incremental method and then examining several possible optimised band subsets using a stochastic algorithm. The same wrapper relevance criterion relying on a confidence measure of Random Forests classifier was used at both steps. To cope with the limited number of available spectra for several classes, additional synthetic spectra were generated from the collection of reference spectra: intra-class variability was simulated by multiplying reference spectra by a random coefficient. At the end, selected band subsets were evaluated considering the classification quality reached using a rbf svm classifier. It was confirmed that a limited band subset was sufficient to classify common urban materials. The important contribution of bands from the Short Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) spectral domain (1000-2400 nm) to material

  5. Current in the Protein Nanowires: Quantum Calculations of the Base States.

    PubMed

    Suprun, Anatol D; Shmeleva, Liudmyla V

    2016-12-01

    It is known that synthesis of adenosine triphosphoric acid in mitochondrions may be only completed on the condition of transport of the electron pairs, which were created due to oxidation processes, to mitochondrions. As of today, many efforts were already taken in order to understand those processes that occur in the course of donor-acceptor electron transport between cellular organelles (that is, between various proteins and protein structures). However, the problem concerning the mechanisms of electron transport over these organelles still remains understudied. This paper is dedicated to the investigation of these same issues.It has been shown that regardless of the amino acid inhomogeneity of the primary structure, it is possible to apply a representation of the second quantization in respect of the protein molecule (hereinafter "numbers of filling representation"). Based on this representation, it has been established that the primary structure of the protein molecule is actually a semiconductor nanowire. In addition, at the same time, its conduction band, into which an electron is injected as the result of donor-acceptor processes, consists of five sub-bands. Three of these sub-bands have normal dispersion laws, while the rest two sub-bands have abnormal dispersion laws (reverse laws). Test calculation of the current density was made under the conditions of the complete absence of the factors, which may be interpreted as external fields. It has been shown that under such conditions, current density is exactly equal to zero. This is the evidence of correctness of the predictive model of the conductivity band of the primary structure of the protein molecule (protein nanowire). At the same time, it makes it possible to apply the obtained results in respect of the actual situation, where factors, which may be interpreted as external fields, exist. PMID:26858156

  6. Current in the Protein Nanowires: Quantum Calculations of the Base States.

    PubMed

    Suprun, Anatol D; Shmeleva, Liudmyla V

    2016-12-01

    It is known that synthesis of adenosine triphosphoric acid in mitochondrions may be only completed on the condition of transport of the electron pairs, which were created due to oxidation processes, to mitochondrions. As of today, many efforts were already taken in order to understand those processes that occur in the course of donor-acceptor electron transport between cellular organelles (that is, between various proteins and protein structures). However, the problem concerning the mechanisms of electron transport over these organelles still remains understudied. This paper is dedicated to the investigation of these same issues.It has been shown that regardless of the amino acid inhomogeneity of the primary structure, it is possible to apply a representation of the second quantization in respect of the protein molecule (hereinafter "numbers of filling representation"). Based on this representation, it has been established that the primary structure of the protein molecule is actually a semiconductor nanowire. In addition, at the same time, its conduction band, into which an electron is injected as the result of donor-acceptor processes, consists of five sub-bands. Three of these sub-bands have normal dispersion laws, while the rest two sub-bands have abnormal dispersion laws (reverse laws). Test calculation of the current density was made under the conditions of the complete absence of the factors, which may be interpreted as external fields. It has been shown that under such conditions, current density is exactly equal to zero. This is the evidence of correctness of the predictive model of the conductivity band of the primary structure of the protein molecule (protein nanowire). At the same time, it makes it possible to apply the obtained results in respect of the actual situation, where factors, which may be interpreted as external fields, exist.

  7. Iliotibial band syndrome: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Eric J; Kim, Suezie; Calcei, Jacob G; Park, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Iliotibial band syndrome is a common overuse injury typically seen in runners, cyclists, and military recruits. Affected patients report lateral knee pain associated with repetitive motion activities. The diagnosis is usually made based on a characteristic history and physical examination, with imaging studies reserved for cases of recalcitrant disease to rule out other pathologic entities. Several etiologies have been proposed for iliotibial band syndrome, including friction of the iliotibial band against the lateral femoral epicondyle, compression of the fat and connective tissue deep to the iliotibial band, and chronic inflammation of the iliotibial band bursa. The mainstay of treatment is nonsurgical; however, in persistent or chronic cases, surgical management is indicated.

  8. Dust bands in the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Mark V.; Greenberg, Richard; Dermott, Stanley F.; Nicholson, Philip D.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the original IRAS observations leading to the discovery of the three dust bands in the asteroid belt and the analysis of data. Special attention is given to an analytical model of the dust band torus and to theories concerning the origin of the dust bands, with special attention given to the collisional equilibrium (asteroid family), the nonequilibrium (random collision), and the comet hypotheses of dust-band origin. It is noted that neither the equilibrium nor nonequilibrium models, as currently formulated, present a complete picture of the IRAS dust-band observations.

  9. WIDE BAND REGENERATIVE FREQUENCY DIVIDER AND MULTIPLIER

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1959-11-17

    A regenerative frequency divider and multiplier having wide band input characteristics is presented. The circuit produces output oscillations having frequencies related by a fixed ratio to input oscillations over a wide band of frequencies. In accomplishing this end, the divider-multiplier includes a wide band input circuit coupled by mixer means to a wide band output circuit having a pass band related by a fixed ratio to that of the input circuit. A regenerative feedback circuit derives a fixed frequency ratio feedback signal from the output circuit and applies same to the mixer means in proper phase relation to sustain fixed frequency ratio oscillations in the output circuit.

  10. Passive Microwave Measurements Over Conifer Forests at L-Band and C-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Chauhan, N.; Kim, E.; Bidwell, S.; Goodberlet, M.; Haken, M.; deMatthaeis, P.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been made at L-band and C-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study the response of passive microwave instruments to biomass and soil moisture. A series of aircraft measurements were made in July, August and November, 1999 over relatively homogenous conifer forests of varying biomass. Three radiometers participated in these measurements. These were: 1) the L-band radiometer ESTAR, a horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer which has been used extensively in past measurements of soil moisture; 2) the L-band radiometer SLFMR, a vertically polarized cross-track scanner which has been used successfully in the past for mapping sea surface salinity; and 3) The ACMR, a new C-band radiometer which operates at V- and H-polarization and in the configuration for these experiments did not scan. All three radiometers were flown on the NASA P-3 aircraft based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The ESTAR and SLFMR were mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and imaged across track whereas the ACMR was mounted to look aft at 54 degrees up from nadir. Data was collected at altitudes of 915 meters and 457 meters. The forests consisted of relatively homogeneous "managed" stands of conifer located near Waverly, Virginia. This is a relatively flat area about 30 miles southeast of Richmond, VA with numerous stands of trees being grown for the forestry industry. The stands selected for study consisted of areas of regrowth and mature stands of pine. In addition, a small stand of very large trees was observed. Soil moisture sampling was done in each stand during the aircraft over flights. Data was collected on July 7, August 27, November 15 and November 30, 1999. Measurements were made with ESTAR on all days. The ACMR flew on the summer missions and the SLFMR was present only on the August 27 flight. Soil moisture varied from quite dry on July 7 to quite moist on November 30 (which was shortly after a period of rain). The microwave

  11. Reliability of flipper-banded penguins as indicators of climate change.

    PubMed

    Saraux, Claire; Le Bohec, Céline; Durant, Joël M; Viblanc, Vincent A; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Beaune, David; Park, Young-Hyang; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Stenseth, Nils C; Le Maho, Yvon

    2011-01-13

    In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlighted an urgent need to assess the responses of marine ecosystems to climate change. Because they lie in a high-latitude region, the Southern Ocean ecosystems are expected to be strongly affected by global warming. Using top predators of this highly productive ocean (such as penguins) as integrative indicators may help us assess the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. Yet most available information on penguin population dynamics is based on the controversial use of flipper banding. Although some reports have found the effects of flipper bands to be deleterious, some short-term (one-year) studies have concluded otherwise, resulting in the continuation of extensive banding schemes and the use of data sets thus collected to predict climate impact on natural populations. Here we show that banding of free-ranging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) impairs both survival and reproduction, ultimately affecting population growth rate. Over the course of a 10-year longitudinal study, banded birds produced 41% [corrected] fewer chicks and had a survival rate 16 percentage points [corrected] lower than non-banded birds, demonstrating a massive long-term impact of banding and thus refuting the assumption that birds will ultimately adapt to being banded. Indeed, banded birds still arrived later for breeding at the study site and had longer foraging trips even after 10 years. One of our major findings is that responses of flipper-banded penguins to climate variability (that is, changes in sea surface temperature and in the Southern Oscillation index) differ from those of non-banded birds. We show that only long-term investigations may allow an evaluation of the impact of flipper bands and that every major life-history trait can be affected, calling into question the banding schemes still going on. In addition, our understanding of the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems based on flipper-band

  12. Reliability of flipper-banded penguins as indicators of climate change.

    PubMed

    Saraux, Claire; Le Bohec, Céline; Durant, Joël M; Viblanc, Vincent A; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Beaune, David; Park, Young-Hyang; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Stenseth, Nils C; Le Maho, Yvon

    2011-01-13

    In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlighted an urgent need to assess the responses of marine ecosystems to climate change. Because they lie in a high-latitude region, the Southern Ocean ecosystems are expected to be strongly affected by global warming. Using top predators of this highly productive ocean (such as penguins) as integrative indicators may help us assess the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. Yet most available information on penguin population dynamics is based on the controversial use of flipper banding. Although some reports have found the effects of flipper bands to be deleterious, some short-term (one-year) studies have concluded otherwise, resulting in the continuation of extensive banding schemes and the use of data sets thus collected to predict climate impact on natural populations. Here we show that banding of free-ranging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) impairs both survival and reproduction, ultimately affecting population growth rate. Over the course of a 10-year longitudinal study, banded birds produced 41% [corrected] fewer chicks and had a survival rate 16 percentage points [corrected] lower than non-banded birds, demonstrating a massive long-term impact of banding and thus refuting the assumption that birds will ultimately adapt to being banded. Indeed, banded birds still arrived later for breeding at the study site and had longer foraging trips even after 10 years. One of our major findings is that responses of flipper-banded penguins to climate variability (that is, changes in sea surface temperature and in the Southern Oscillation index) differ from those of non-banded birds. We show that only long-term investigations may allow an evaluation of the impact of flipper bands and that every major life-history trait can be affected, calling into question the banding schemes still going on. In addition, our understanding of the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems based on flipper-band

  13. The Effects of Band Director Leadership Style and Student Leadership Ability on Band Festival Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, P. Dru

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between band director leadership styles and the strength of student leadership within the bands. This study also examined the differences between leadership styles, student leadership strength, and band festival ratings (marching and concert). Subjects (N = 42) were band directors from Texas and Arkansas who…

  14. A Survey of Beginning Band Methods for Elementary, Middle and High School Band Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVito, Donald R.

    A survey explored the various band method books available for use with public school beginning band programs. The selection of a beginning band method has an affect on the curriculum and future musical growth and development of public school music education students. The first section surveys band methods for the concepts they cover, the choice of…

  15. Band models and correlations for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption of infrared radiation by various line and band models are briefly reviewed. Narrow band model relations for absorptance are used to develop 'exact' formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Application of a wide band model to a particular gas largely depends upon the spectroscopic characteristic of the absorbing-emitting molecule. Seven continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model are presented and each one of these is compared with the exact (numerical) solutions of the wide band models. Comparison of these results indicate the validity of a correlation for a particular radiative transfer application. In radiative transfer analyses, use of continuous correlations for total band absorptance provides flexibilities in various mathematical operations.

  16. Membrane proteins in senescent erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Dale, G L

    1989-01-01

    The examination of erythrocyte senescence has been facilitated by recent advances in techniques for the isolation of aged red cells. One of these methods, which uses biotinylated rabbit erythrocytes, has been used to examine the state of membrane proteins in effete cells. These aged red cells were found to have normal ratios of alpha-spectrin and beta-spectrin as well as normal levels of ankyrin. The observation concerning ankyrin is particularly important due to the sensitivity of this protein to proteolysis and the postulated action of proteinases in the aging process. The senescent erythrocytes were also found to have an altered ratio of bands 4.1a and 4.1b without any apparent change in the total level of 4.1. In addition, the analysis of the aged cell membranes did not show any large-molecular-mass aggregated protein at the origin of the SDS/polyacrylamide gels, indicating a lack of transglutaminase activity in the senescence process for rabbit erythrocytes. These results indicate that aging of the rabbit erythrocyte is not accompanied by gross proteolytic degradation or transglutaminase-catalysed cross-linking of membrane components. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2522000

  17. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  18. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  19. S-band transponder experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Gottlieb, P.; Muller, P. M.; Wollenhaupt, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    The experiment which derives data from three lunar-orbiting objects, the command-service module (CSM), the lunar module (LM), and the subsatellite in the S-band is described. Each provides detailed information on the near-side lunar gravitational field. The primary emphasis is on the low-altitude (20 km) CSM data. The LM data cover a very short time span and are somewhat redundant with the CSM data. The resolution of the high-altitude (100 km) CSM data is not as great as that of the low altitude data. The low-altitude CSM and LM data coverage and the complementary coverage obtained during the Apollo 14 mission are presented. The experiment uses the same technique of gravity determination employed on the Lunar Orbiter, in the data of which the large anomalies called mascons were first observed. The data consist of variations in the spacecraft speed as measured by the Earth-based radio tracking system.

  20. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  1. Circular birefringence of banded spherulites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Freudenthal, John; Nichols, Shane; Kahr, Bart

    2014-04-01

    Crystal optical properties of banded spherulites of 21 different compounds--molecular crystals, polymers, and minerals--with helically twisted fibers were analyzed with Mueller matrix polarimetry. The well-established radial oscillations in linear birefringence of many polycrystalline ensembles is accompanied by oscillations in circular birefringence that cannot be explained by the natural optical activity of corresponding compounds, some of which are centrosymmetric in the crystalline state. The circular birefringence is shown to be a consequence of misoriented, overlapping anisotropic lamellae, a kind of optical activity associated with the mesoscale stereochemistry of the refracting components. Lamellae splay as a consequence of space constraints related to simultaneous twisting of anisometric lamellae. This mechanism is supported by quantitative simulations of circular birefringence arising from crystallite twisting and splaying under confinement. PMID:24625095

  2. Landsat TM and ETM+ thermal band calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barsi, J.A.; Schott, J.R.; Palluconi, F. D.; Helder, D.L.; Hook, S.J.; Markham, B.L.; Chander, G.; O'Donnell, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    Landsat-5 has been imaging the Earth since March 1984, and Landsat-7 was added to the series of Landsat instruments in April 1999. The Landsat Project Science Office and the Landsat-7 Image Assessment System have been monitoring the on-board calibration of Landsat-7 since launch. Additionally, two separate university teams have been evaluating the on-board thermal calibration of Landsat-7 through ground-based measurements since launch. Although not monitored as closely over its lifetime, a new effort is currently being made to validate the calibration of Landsat-5. Two university teams are beginning to collect ground truth under Landsat-5, along with using other vicarious calibration methods to go back into the archive to validate the history of the calibration of Landsat-5. This paper considers the calibration efforts for the thermal band, band 6, of both the Landsat-5 and Landsat-7 instruments. Though stable since launch, Landsat-7 had an initial calibration error of about 3 K, and changes were made to correct for this beginning 1 October 2000 for data processed with the National Landsat Archive Production System (NLAPS) and beginning 20 December 2000 for data processed with the Landsat Product Generation System (LPGS). Recent results from Landsat-5 vicarious calibration efforts show an offset of –0.7 K over the lifetime of the instrument. This suggests that historical calibration efforts may have been detecting errors in processing systems rather than changes in the instrument. A correction to the Landsat-5 processing has not yet been implemented but will be in the near future.

  3. Band terminations in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasjev, A. V.

    2008-11-15

    The analysis of the terminating bands has been performed in the relativistic mean field framework. It was shown that nuclear magnetism provides an additional binding to the energies of the specific configuration and this additional binding increases with spin and has its maximum exactly at the terminating state. This suggests that the terminating states can be an interesting probe of the time-odd mean fields provided that other effects can be reliably isolated. Unfortunately, a reliable isolation of these effects is not that simple: many terms of the density functional theories contribute into the energies of the terminating states and the deficiencies in the description of those terms affect the result. The recent suggestion [H. Zdunczuk, W. Satula, and R. A. Wyss, Phys. Rev. C 71, 024305 (2005)] that the relative energies of the terminating states in the N{ne}Z,A{approx}44 mass region given by {delta}E provide unique and reliable constraints on time-odd mean fields and the strength of spin-orbit interaction in density functional theories has been reanalyzed. The current investigation shows that the {delta}E value is affected also by the relative placement of the states with different orbital angular momentum l, namely, the placement of the d (l=2) and f (l=3) states. This indicates the dependence of the {delta}E value on the properties of the central potential.

  4. Topics in topological band systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhoushen

    The discovery of integer quantum Hall effect and its subsequent theoretical formulation heralded a new paradigm of thinking in condensed matter physics, which has by now blossomed into the rapidly growing field of topological phases. In this work we investigate several mutually related topics in the framework of topological band theory. In Chapter 2, we study solutions to boundary states on a lattice and see how they are related to the bulk topology. To elicit a real space manifestation of the non-trivial topology, the presence of a physical edge is not strictly necessary. We study two other possibilities, namely the entanglement spectrum associated with an imaginary spatial boundary, and the localization centers of Wannier functions, in Chapters 3,4, and 5. Topological classification through discrete indices is so far possible only for systems described by pure quantum states---in the existing scheme, quantization is lost for systems in mixed states. In Chapter 6, we present a program through which discrete topological indices can be defined for topological band systems at finite temperature, based on Uhlmann's parallel transport of density matrices. The potential of topologocal insulators in realistic applications lies in the existence of Dirac nodes on its surface spectrum. Dirac physics, however, is not exclusive to TI surfaces. In a recently discovered class of materials known as Weyl semimetals, energy nodes which emit linear dispersions also occur in the bulk material. In Chapter 7, we study the possibility of resonance states induced by localized impurities near the nodal energy in Weyl semimetals, which will help us in understanding the stability of density-of-state suppression at the energy nodes. Finally, in Chapter 8, we apply the topological characterization developed for noninteracting particles to a class of interacting spin models in 3D, which are generalizations of Kitaev's honeycomb model, and identify several exotic quantum phases such as spin

  5. L-band/P-band SAR comparison for search and rescue: recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais, Houra; Mansfield, Arthur W.

    1999-08-01

    A key question in SAR-aided search is the relative utility of L-Band versus P-Band data. A continuing study is underway using target data collected by the NASA Search and Rescue Mission. This paper presents the most recent results of the investigation, including Navy P-3 SAR data at L-Band and JPL SAR data at L-band and P-band.

  6. Development of a banding database for North Pacific albatross: Implications for future data collection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, P.F.; Kendall, W.L.; Sillett, S.; Gustafson, M.; Flint, B.; Naughton, M.; Robbins, C.S.; Pyle, P.; Macintyre, Ian G.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of fishery practices on black-footed (Phoebastria nigripes) and Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) continue to be a source of contention and uncertainty. Some of this uncertainty is a result of a lack of estimates of albatross demographic parameters such as survival. To begin to address these informational needs, a database of albatross banding and encounter records was constructed. Due to uncertainty concerning data collection and validity of assumptions required for mark-recapture analyses, these data should be used with caution. Although demographic parameter estimates are of interest to many, band loss rates, temporary emigration rates, and discontinuous banding effort can confound these estimates. We suggest a number of improvements in data collection that can help ameliorate problems, including the use of double banding and collecting data using a `robust? design. Additionally, sustained banding and encounter efforts are needed to maximize the value of these data. With these modifications, the usefulness of the banding data could be improved markedly.

  7. Radiometric Quality of the MODIS Bands at 667 and 678nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS instruments on Terra and Aqua were designed to allow the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence effects over ocean. The retrieval algorithm is based on the difference between the water-leaving radiances at 667nm and 678nm. The water-leaving radiances at these wavelengths are usually very low relative to the top-of-atmosphere radiances. The high radiometric accuracy needed to retrieve the small fluorescence signal lead to a dual gain design for the 667 and 678nm bands. This paper discusses the benefits obtained from this design choice and provides justification for the use of only one set of gains for global processing of ocean color products. Noise characteristics of the two bands and their related products are compared to other products of bands from 412nm to 2130nm. The impact of polarization on the two bands is discussed. In addition, the impact of stray light on the two bands is compared to other MODIS bands.

  8. Radiometric Quality of the MODIS Bands at 667 and 678nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2010-01-01

    The MODIS instruments on Terra and Aqua were designed to allow the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence effects over ocean. The retrieval algorithm is based on the difference between the water-leaving radiances at 667nm and 678nm. The water-leaving radiances at these wavelengths are usually very low relative to the top- of-atmosphere radiances. The high radiometric accuracy needed to retrieve the small fluorescence signal lead to a dual gain design for the 667 and 678nm bands. This paper discusses the benefits obtained from this design choice and provides justification for the use of only one set of gains for global processing of ocean color products. Noise characteristics of the two bands and their related products are compared to other products of bands from 412nm to 2130nm. The impact of polarization on the two bands is discussed. In addition, the impact of stray light on the two bands is compared to other MODIS bands.

  9. Expression of P53 protein after exposure to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, A. M.; Salvador, C.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Ostrosky, P.; Brandan, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most important tumor suppressor genes is p53 gene, which is involved in apoptotic cell death, cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest. The expression of p53 gene can be evaluated by determining the presence of P53 protein in cells using Western Blot assay with a chemiluminescent method. This technique has shown variabilities that are due to biological factors. Film developing process can influence the quality of the p53 bands obtained. We irradiated tumor cell lines and human peripheral lymphocytes with 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays to standardize irradiation conditions, to compare ionizing radiation with actinomycin D and to reduce the observed variability of P53 protein induction levels. We found that increasing radiation doses increase P53 protein induction while it decreases viability. We also conclude that ionizing radiation could serve as a positive control for Western Blot analysis of protein P53. In addition, our results show that the developing process may play an important role in the quality of P53 protein bands and data interpretation.

  10. Quantitative study of band structure in BaTiO3 particles with vacant ionic sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshime, Norihiro; Kano, Jun; Ikeda, Naoshi; Teranishi, Takashi; Fujii, Tatsuo; Ueda, Takeji; Ohkubo, Tomoko

    2016-10-01

    Levels of the conduction band minimum and the valence band maximum in ion-deficient BaTiO3 particles were investigated with optical band gap and ionization energy measurements. Though it is known that the quantification of the band structure in an insulator is difficult, due to the poor electrical conductivity of BaTiO3, systematic variation in the band energy levels was found that correlated with the introduction of vacancies. Photoelectron yield spectroscopy provided direct observation of the occupancy level of electrons, which is altered by the presence of oxygen and barium vacancies. In addition, the conduction band deviation from the vacuum level was determined by optical reflectance spectroscopy. Our results show that: (1) Introduction of oxygen vacancies forms a donor level below the conduction band. (2) The conduction band is shifted to a lower level by a larger number of oxygen vacancies, while the valence band also shifts to a lower level, due to the reduction in the density of O 2p orbitals. (3) Introduction of barium vacancies widens the band gap. Since barium vacancies can induce a small number of oxygen vacancies with accompanying charge compensation, this behavior suppresses any large formation of donor levels in the gap states, indicating that cation vacancies can control the number of both donor and acceptor levels.

  11. Optimization of EEG frequency bands for improved diagnosis of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Vialatte, Francois; Cichocki, Andrzej; Latchoumane, Charles; Jeong, Jaesung; Dauwels, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many clinical studies have shown that electroencephalograms (EEG) of Alzheimer patients (AD) often have an abnormal power spectrum. In this paper a frequency band analysis of AD EEG signals is presented, with the aim of improving the diagnosis of AD from EEG signals. Relative power in different EEG frequency bands is used as features to distinguish between AD patients and healthy control subjects. Many different frequency bands between 4 and 30 Hz are systematically tested, besides the traditional frequency bands, e.g., theta band (4-8 Hz). The discriminative power of the resulting spectral features is assessed through statistical tests (Mann-Whitney U test). Moreover, linear discriminant analysis is conducted with those spectral features. The optimized frequency ranges (4-7 Hz, 8-15 Hz, 19-24 Hz) yield substantially better classification performance than the traditional frequency bands (4-8 Hz, 8-12 Hz, 12-30 Hz); the frequency band 4-7 Hz is the optimal frequency range for detecting AD, which is similar to the classical theta band. The frequency bands were also optimized as features through leave-one-out crossvalidation, resulting in error-free classification. The optimized frequency bands may improve existing EEG based diagnostic tools for AD. Additional testing on larger AD datasets is required to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. 47 CFR 15.257 - Operation within the band 92-95 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... section are subject to the radiofrequency radiation exposure requirements specified in 47 CFR 1.1307(b), 2... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.257 Operation within the band...

  13. 47 CFR 15.257 - Operation within the band 92-95 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... section are subject to the radiofrequency radiation exposure requirements specified in 47 CFR 1.1307(b), 2... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.257 Operation within the band...

  14. 47 CFR 15.257 - Operation within the band 92-95 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... section are subject to the radiofrequency radiation exposure requirements specified in 47 CFR 1.1307(b), 2... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.257 Operation within the band...

  15. 47 CFR 15.257 - Operation within the band 92-95 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... section are subject to the radiofrequency radiation exposure requirements specified in 47 CFR 1.1307(b), 2... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.257 Operation within the band...

  16. Taking Another Look at the 3-Micron Absorption Band on Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, E. S.; Rivkin, A. S.; Cohen, B. A.

    2002-01-01

    Improved 3 micron spectra show that band depths have been underestimated. Using a revised continuum, the asteroid and meteorite spectra match better. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  17. 77 FR 54511 - Facilitating the Use of Microwave for Wireless Backhaul and Other Uses and Providing Additional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... antennas and wider channels in other part 101 microwave bands. We also seek comment on a proposal to revise our rules to change our treatment of smaller antennas in the 10.7-11.7 GHz band (11 GHz band). We also... seek comment on making additional changes to our antenna standards to reflect advances in...

  18. Polarization sensitive CARS of protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikishev, Andrey Y.; Koroteev, Nikolai I.; Otto, Cees; Greve, Jan

    1995-01-01

    One of the most interesting problems of modern biophysics is the problem of enzyme conformational changes during the catalytic act. There are some bands in the vibrational spectra of proteins that may be sensitive to the conformational state of the macromolecule. The aim of the present study is to reveal the changes in protein vibrational spectra associated with the interaction with the substrate by means of highly sensitive PSCARS spectroscopy and to refer these spectroscopic changes to the possible conformations of the protein molecule. The peculiarities of the experimental method applied are associated mainly with a very high nonresonant background to resonant signal ratio. This makes necessary the polarization suppression of the background, the sufficient quality of which may only be achieved with very high polarization quality of the pumping beams and rather thin samples (about 2 mm). The PSCARS spectra were measured of protein chymotrypsin and its complex with antranilic acid (model of substrate in this system) solutions in water and heavy water. The spectra were obtained within three frequency ranges: 800 - 900 cm-1, 1180 - 1300 cm-1, 1580 - 1700 cm-1. The vibrational bands analyzed were amide I, amide III, and several bands belonging to tyrosine and tryptophan. It was demonstrated that all the bands studied were sensitive to the ligand binding. The fitting procedure was applied to all the PSCARS spectra and the vibrational bands' parameters were determined (positions, bandwidths, amplitudes). Hereafter we present some details on the results obtained for amide I band.

  19. Polaronlike vibrational bands of molecular crystals with one-dimensional hydrogen-bond chains: N-methylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Gako; Suzuki, Kazuaki; Nakayama, Hideyuki; Ishii, Kikujiro

    1991-05-01

    N-methylacetamide (NMA) crystal forms one-dimensional hydrogen-bond chains, which are similar to those in an acetanilide (ACN) crystal for which an unconventional vibrational band accompanying the amide-I band has been observed. Infrared spectra of NMA crystals show an additional band on the small-wave-number side of the amide-II band as the temperature is lowered. There is a close resemblance between this band and the band of ACN. It is likely that these bands appear by the same mechanism. The polaron model, which has been employed to explain the band of ACN, was found to be applicable also to the case of NMA, although the main vibrational mode is amide I in ACN and amide II in NMA.

  20. Identification of Ige-binding proteins of raw and cooked extracts of Loligo edulis (white squid).

    PubMed

    Yadzir, Zailatul Hani Mohamad; Misnan, Rosmilah; Abdullah, Noormalin; Bakhtiar, Faizal; Arip, Masita; Murad, Shahnaz

    2010-05-01

    Allergy to different classes of mollusks, including squid, which are members of the class Cephalopods has been reported. Tropomyosin, a major muscle protein, is the only well-recognized allergen in squid. The aim of this study was to characterize IgE-binding proteins of local Loligo edulis (white squid) consumed in Malaysia. Protein profiles and IgE-binding proteins were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting using sera from 23 patients with positive skin prick test to raw squid extract. SDS-PAGE of the raw extract exhibited 21 protein bands (10-170 kDa) but those ranging from 19 to 29 kDa and 41 to 94 kDa were not found in the cooked extract. Immunoblotting of raw extract demonstrated 16 IgE-binding bands, ranging from 13 to 170 kDa. A heat-resistant 36 kDa protein, corresponding to squid tropomyosin, was identified as the major allergen of both extracts. In addition, a 50 kDa heat-sensitive protein was shown to be a major allergen of the raw extract. Our findings indicate that the allergen extract used for diagnosis of squid allergy should contain both the 36 kDa and 50 kDa proteins.