Science.gov

Sample records for additional protein bands

  1. A marginal band-associated protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The marginal band of nucleated erythrocytes is a microtubule organelle under rigorous quantitative and spatial control, with properties quite different from those of the microtubule organelles of cultured cells. Previous results suggest that proteins other than tubulin may participate in organizing the marginal band, and may interact with elements of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton in addition to microtubules. To identify such species, we raised mAbs against the proteins that assemble from chicken brain homogenates with tubulin. One such antibody binds to a single protein in chicken erythrocytes, and produces an immunofluorescence pattern colocalizing with marginal band microtubules. Several properties of this protein are identical to those of ezrin, a protein isolated from brush border and localized to motile elements of cultured cells. A significant proportion of the antigen is not soluble in erythrocytes, as determined by extraction with nonionic detergent. This cytoskeleton-associated fraction is unaffected by treatments that solubilize the marginal band microtubules. The protein has properties of both microtubule- and microfilament-associated proteins. In the accompanying manuscript (Goslin, K., E. Birgbauer, G. Banker, and F. Solomon. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:1621-1631), we show that the same antibody recognizes a component of growth cones with a similar dual nature. In early embryonic red blood cells, the antigen is dispersed throughout the cell and does not colocalize with assembled tubulin. Its confinement to the marginal band during development follows rather than precedes that of microtubules. These results, along with previous work, suggest models for the formation of the marginal band. PMID:2677023

  2. Modeling of band-3 protein diffusion in the normal and defective red blood cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Zhang, Yihao; Ha, Vi; Lykotrafitis, George

    2016-04-13

    We employ a two-component red blood cell (RBC) membrane model to simulate lateral diffusion of band-3 proteins in the normal RBC and in the RBC with defective membrane proteins. The defects reduce the connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton (vertical connectivity), or the connectivity of the membrane skeleton itself (horizontal connectivity), and are associated with the blood disorders of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) respectively. Initially, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton limits band-3 lateral mobility by measuring the band-3 macroscopic diffusion coefficients in the normal RBC membrane and in a lipid bilayer without the cytoskeleton. Then, we study band-3 diffusion in the defective RBC membrane and quantify the relation between band-3 diffusion coefficients and percentage of protein defects in HE RBCs. In addition, we illustrate that at low spectrin network connectivity (horizontal connectivity) band-3 subdiffusion can be approximated as anomalous diffusion, while at high horizontal connectivity band-3 diffusion is characterized as confined diffusion. Our simulations show that the band-3 anomalous diffusion exponent depends on the percentage of protein defects in the membrane cytoskeleton. We also confirm that the introduction of attraction between the lipid bilayer and the spectrin network reduces band-3 diffusion, but we show that this reduction is lower than predicted by the percolation theory. Furthermore, we predict that the attractive force between the spectrin filament and the lipid bilayer is at least 20 times smaller than the binding forces at band-3 and glycophorin C, the two major membrane binding sites. Finally, we explore diffusion of band-3 particles in the RBC membrane with defects related to vertical connectivity. We demonstrate that in this case band-3 diffusion can be approximated as confined diffusion for all attraction levels between the spectrin network and the lipid bilayer

  3. Demonstration of a boar testicular protein band that is immunoreactive to proacrosin and proacrosin binding protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yi, L S; Runion, C M; Polakoski, K L

    1992-04-30

    A testicular protein band has been identified and shown to be immunoreactive to both of the proacrosin (53-55 kd) and the proacrosin binding protein (28 kd) antibodies. pH 4.5 extracts of boar testis were prepared and subjected to Western blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies of the proacrosin and the proacrosin binding protein. In addition to their respective antigens, a distinct high molecular weight protein band of approximately 200 kd was detected by both of the antibodies. Gelatin SDS-PAGE analysis of the extracts showed that this protein band was proteinase active. These results suggest that the proacrosin molecule is present as a much higher molecular weight form in the boar testis than the currently known 53-55 kd forms that have been isolated from spermatozoa. PMID:1575748

  4. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  5. Compactional deformation bands in Wingate Sandstone; additional evidence of an impact origin for Upheaval Dome, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Chris H.; Schultz, Richard A.

    2007-04-01

    Field and microstructural observations from Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, show that inelastic strain of the Wingate Sandstone is localized along compactional deformation bands. These bands are tabular discontinuities (< 0.5 cm thick) that accommodate inelastic shear and compaction of inter-granular volume. Measurements of porosity and grain size from non-deformed samples are used to define a set of capped strength envelopes for the Wingate Sandstone. These strength envelopes reveal that compactional deformation bands require at least ca. 0.7 GPa (and potentially more than 2.3 GPa) of effective mean stress in order to nucleate within this sandstone. We find that the most plausible geologic process capable of generating these required magnitudes of mean stress is a meteoritic impact. Therefore the compactional deformation bands observed within the Wingate Sandstone are additional evidence of an impact event at Upheaval Dome and support a post-Wingate (post-Early Jurassic) age for this impact.

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 protein in Ca2+/A23187-treated human erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, G; Piccinini, G; Balduini, C; Seppi, C; Brovelli, A

    1996-01-01

    Human erythrocytes were induced to release membrane vesicles by treatment with Ca2+ and ionophore A23187. In addition to the biochemical changes already known to accompany loading of human erythrocytes with Ca2+, the present study reveals that tyrosine phosphorylation of the anion exchanger band 3 protein also occurs. The relationship between tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 and membrane vesiculation was analysed using quinine (a non-specific inhibitor of the Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel, and the only known inhibitor of Ca(2+)-induced vesiculation) and charybdotoxin, a specific inhibitor of the apamin-insensitive K(+)-channel. Both inhibitors suppressed tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3. In the presence of quinine, membrane vesiculation was also suppressed. In contrast, at the concentration of charybdotoxin required to suppress tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3, membrane vesiculation was only mildly inhibited (16-23% inhibition), suggesting that tyrosine phosphorylation of band 3 is not necessary for membrane vesiculation. Phosphorylation of band 3 was in fact observed when erythrocytes were induced to shrink in a Ca(2+)-independent manner, e.g. by treatment with the K+ ionophore valinomycin or with hypertonic solutions. These observations suggest that band 3 tyrosine phosphorylation occurs when cell volume regulation is required. PMID:8973551

  7. Assembly and bundling of marginal band microtubule protein: role of tau.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, I; Cohen, W D

    1994-01-01

    Microtubule protein extracted from dogfish erythrocyte cytoskeletons by disassembly of marginal bands at low temperature formed linear microtubule (MT) bundles upon reassembly at 22 degrees C. The bundles, which were readily visible by video-enhanced phase contrast or DIC microscopy, increased in length and thickness with time. At steady state after 1 hour, most bundles were 6-11 microns in length and 2-5 MTs in thickness. No inter-MT cross-bridges were visible by negative staining. The bundles exhibited mechanical stability in flow as well as flexibility, in this respect resembling native marginal bands. As analyzed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting, our standard extraction conditions yielded MT protein preparations and bundles containing tau protein but not high molecular weight MAPs such as MAP-2 or syncolin. In addition, late fractions of MT protein obtained by gel filtration were devoid of high molecular weight proteins but still produced MT bundles. The marginal band tau was salt-extractable and heat-stable, bound antibodies to mammalian brain tau, and formed aggregates upon desalting. Antibodies to tau blocked MT assembly, but both assembly and bundling occurred in the presence of antibodies to actin or syncolin. The MTs were "unbundled" by subtilisin or by high salt (0.5-1 M KCl or NaCl), consistent with tau involvement in bundling. High salt extracts retained bundling activity, and salt-induced unbundling was reversible with desalting. However, reversibility was observed only after salt-induced MT disassembly had occurred. Reconstitution experiments showed that addition of marginal band tau to preassembled MTs did not produce bundles, whereas tau presence during MT reassembly did yield bundles. Thus, in this system, tau appears to play a role in both MT assembly and bundling, serving in the latter function as a coassembly factor. PMID:7820858

  8. A band 3-based macrocomplex of integral and peripheral proteins in the RBC membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, Lesley J.; Beckmann, Roland; Ribeiro, M. Leticia; Peters, Luanne L.; Chasis, Joel A.; Delaunay, Jean; Mohandas, Narla; Anstee, David J.; Tanner, Michael J.A.

    2003-06-18

    We have studied the membrane proteins of band 3 anion exchanger (AE1)-deficient mouse and human red blood cells. It has been shown previously that proteins of the band 3 complex are reduced or absent in these cells. In this study we show that proteins of the Rh complex are also greatly reduced (Rh-associated glycoprotein, Rh polypeptides, CD47, glycophorin B) or absent (LW). These observations suggest that the Rh complex is associated with the band 3 complex in healthy RBCs. Mouse band 3 RBCs differed from the human band 3-deficient RBCs in that they retained CD47. Aquaporin 1 was reduced, and its glycosylation was altered in mouse and human band 3-deficient RBCs. Proteins of the glycophorin complex, and other proteins with independent cytoskeletal interactions, were present in normal or increased amounts. To obtain direct evidence for the association of the band 3 and the Rh protein complexes in the RBC, we examined whether Rh complex proteins were coimmunoprecipitated with band 3 from membranes. RhAG and Rh were found to be efficiently coimmunoprecipitated with band 3 from deoxycholate-solubilized membranes. Results suggest that band 3 forms the core of a macrocomplex of integral and peripheral RBC membrane proteins. The presence of these proteins in a single structural Macrocomplex makes it likely that they have linked functional or regulatory roles. We speculate that this macrocomplex may function as an integrated CO2/O2 gas exchange unit (metabolon) in the erythrocyte.

  9. Effect of Cd Addition in Band Gap and Volume Conductivity of SeTe Based Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, Vibhav K.; Kishore, V.; Saraswat, Y. K.; Saxena, N. S.

    2011-10-01

    Presented paper discusses the variation in optical band gap and volume dc conductivity of Se-Te-Cd ternary Chalcogenide glasses as a function of concentration of Cd i.e. the composition of the glasses. Also, the temperature dependence of volume conductivity has been studied. The amorphous nature of these glasses has been confirmed by XRD patterns. Keithley Electrometer/High resistance meter 6517A was used in its FVMI mode to record I_V characteristics at different temperatures. Variation in conductivity, derived from I_V curves, as a function of composition of sample could be accounted for the bonds formed in the system. Additionally, the Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism has also been verified in order to investigate the good agreement with the established fact that most of Chalcogenide glasses obey the Poole-Frenkel conduction mechanism. Absorption spectra were recorded using Ocean Optics USB2000 spectrophotometer in visible region. Band gap calculation using Tauc relation reveals that the system under test is semi-conducting in nature. The observed results are found to be in good agreement with each other.

  10. Characterization of additional vitamin D binding protein variants.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lei; Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S; Wong, Betty Y L; Williams, Rashida; Carpenter, Thomas O; Cole, David E C

    2016-05-01

    The gene (GC) for the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) shows significant genetic variation. Two missense variants, p.D432E and p.T436K, are common polymorphisms and both may influence vitamin D metabolism. However, less common variants, identified biochemically, have been reported previously. This study aimed to identify the underlying mutations by molecular screening and to characterize the mutant proteins by mass spectrometry. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) was used for screening genetic variants in GC exons and exon/intron boundaries of genomic DNA samples. Sanger sequencing identified the specific mutations. An immuno-capture coupled mass spectrometry method was used to characterize protein variants in serum samples. Initial molecular screening identified 10 samples (out of 761) containing an alanine deletion at codon 246 in exon 7 (p.A246del, c.737_739delCTG), and 1 sample (out of 97) containing a cysteine to phenylalanine substitution at codon 311 in exon 8 (p.C311F, c.932G>T). The mutant allele proteins and posttranslational modified products were distinguishable from the wild-type proteins by mass spectrum profiling. Loss of a disulfide bond due to loss of cysteine-311 was accompanied by the appearance of a novel mixed disulfide species, consistent with S-cysteinylation of the remaining unpaired cysteine-299 in the mutant protein. We confirm earlier biochemical studies indicating that there are additional deleterious GC mutations, some of which may be low-frequency variants. The major findings of this study indicate that additional mutant proteins are secreted and can be identified in the circulation. By combining molecular screening and mass spectrometric methods, mutant DBP species can be identified and characterized. PMID:26924582

  11. Assessing Spectral Simulation Protocols for the Amide I Band of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Ana V; Bondarenko, Anna S; Jansen, Thomas L C

    2016-08-01

    We present a benchmark study of spectral simulation protocols for the amide I band of proteins. The amide I band is widely used in infrared spectroscopy of proteins due to the large signal intensity, high sensitivity to hydrogen bonding, and secondary structural motifs. This band has, thus, proven valuable in many studies of protein structure-function relationships. We benchmark spectral simulation protocols using two common force fields in combination with several electrostatic mappings and coupling models. The results are validated against experimental linear absorption and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy for three well-studied proteins. We find two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to be much more sensitive to the simulation protocol than linear absorption and report on the best simulation protocols. The findings demonstrate that there is still room for ideas to improve the existing models for the amide I band of proteins. PMID:27348022

  12. Band 4.1 Proteins Regulate Integrin-Dependent Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youngsin; McCarty, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    Integrins link the extracellular matrix (ECM) to the cytoskeleton to control cell behaviors including adhesion, spreading and migration. Band 4.1 proteins contain 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) domains that likely mediate signaling events and cytoskeletal reorganization via integrins. However, the mechanisms by which Band 4.1 proteins and integrins are functionally interconnected remain enigmatic. Here we have investigated roles for Band 4.1 proteins in integrin-mediated cell spreading. We demonstrate that Proteins 4.1B and 4.1G show overlapping and dynamic patterns of sub-cellular localization in astrocytes spreading on fibronectin. During early stages of cell spreading Proteins 4.1B and 4.1G are enriched in ECM adhesion sites but become more diffusely expressed in later stages of cell spreading. Combinatorial inhibition of Protein 4.1B and 4.1G expression leads to impaired astrocyte spreading. Furthermore, using exogenous expression systems we show that the isolated Protein 4.1 FERM domain significantly enhances β1 integrin-mediated cell spreading. Lastly, Protein 4.1B is dispensable for reactive astrogliosis in experimental models of cortical injury, likely due to functional compensation by related Protein 4.1 family members. Collectively, these findings reveal that Band 4.1 proteins are important intracellular components for integrin-mediated cell spreading. PMID:22982319

  13. Additional comments on the assumption of homogenous survival rates in modern bird banding estimation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Stokes, S.L.; Hines, J.E.; Conroy, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    We examined the problem of heterogeneous survival and recovery rates in bird banding estimation models. We suggest that positively correlated subgroup survival and recovery probabilities may result from winter banding operations and that this situation will produce positively biased survival rate estimates. The magnitude of the survival estimate bias depends on the proportion of the population in each subgroup. Power of the suggested goodness-of-fit test to reject the inappropriate model for heterogeneous data sets was low for all situations examined and was poorest for positively related subgroup survival and recovery rates. Despite the magnitude of some of the biases reported and the relative inability to detect heterogeneity, we suggest that levels of heterogeneity normally encountered in real data sets will produce relatively small biases of average survival rates.

  14. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steffen; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound "water wires" is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded ("dangling") O-H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments. PMID:25494795

  15. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Steffen; Gerwert, Klaus; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound “water wires” is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded (“dangling”) O–H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  16. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Steffen; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Proton conduction along protein-bound "water wires" is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded ("dangling") O-H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  17. Use of isoelectric focusing to discriminate transient oligoclonal bands from monoclonal protein in treated myeloma.

    PubMed

    Henry, Robyn; Glegg, Debra

    2016-06-01

    A 62-year-old diabetic man with prostate cancer first presented to our clinical laboratory in 2003 with a normal serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation. In March 2009 he was diagnosed with an IgG κ myeloma. He underwent treatment and went into remission with the original paraprotein band being undetectable. Over the following 5 years, he developed oligoclonal bands and then eventually relapsed. Serum protein electrophoresis and immunofixation were inconclusive, however, isoelectrofocusing identified the oligoclonal pattern then the return of the original band, indicating relapse. This case illustrates the usefulness of an isoelectric focusing method to correctly determine clonality of small abnormal protein bands. It also highlights the need for appropriate commenting on reported results so that they are not confusing for clinicians. PMID:26641967

  18. Tuning protein-protein interactions using cosolvents: specific effects of ionic and non-ionic additives on protein phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jan; Platten, Florian; Wagner, Dana; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2016-04-21

    Cosolvents are routinely used to modulate the (thermal) stability of proteins and, hence, their interactions with proteins have been studied intensely. However, less is known about their specific effects on protein-protein interactions, which we characterize in terms of the protein phase behavior. We analyze the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl), guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl), glycerol, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We experimentally determined the crystallization boundary (XB) and, in combination with data on the cloud-point temperatures (CPTs), the crystallization gap. In agreement with other studies, our data indicate that the additives might affect the protein phase behavior through electrostatic screening and additive-specific contributions. At high salt concentrations, where electrostatic interactions are screened, both the CPT and the XB are found to be linear functions of the additive concentration. Their slopes quantify the additive-specific changes of the phase behavior and thus of the protein-protein interactions. While the specific effect of NaCl is to induce attractions between proteins, DMSO, glycerol and GuHCl (with increasing strength) weaken attractions and/or induce repulsions. Except for DMSO, changes of the CPT are stronger than those of the XB. Furthermore, the crystallization gap widens in the case of GuHCl and glycerol and narrows in the case of NaCl. We relate these changes to colloidal interaction models, namely square-well and patchy interactions. PMID:27020538

  19. Additional evidence concerning the valence-band offset in HgTe/CdTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. M.; Ehrenreich, H.

    1991-05-01

    The consistency of large values of the valence-band offset, Λ, in HgTe/CdTe superlattices with magneto-optical experiments is examined in light of data on a 90-Å HgTe/40-Å CdTe superlattice. The data are shown to be consistent with values Λ=400+/-40 meV rather than the much smaller cited values. This analysis, when considered with photoemission experiments, leaves intact the conclusion that HgTe/CdTe superlattices are best explained by a large offset.

  20. Colloidal graphenes as heterogeneous additives to enhance protein crystal yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gully, Benjamin S.; Zou, Jianli; Cadby, Gemma; Passon, Daniel M.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan; Bond, Charles S.

    2012-08-01

    In the structural analysis of proteins via X-ray diffraction, a rate-limiting step is in favourable nucleation, a problematic obstacle in successful generation of protein crystals. Here graphene and graphene oxide were applied to protein crystallisation trials, offering improvements in crystalline output and nucleation.In the structural analysis of proteins via X-ray diffraction, a rate-limiting step is in favourable nucleation, a problematic obstacle in successful generation of protein crystals. Here graphene and graphene oxide were applied to protein crystallisation trials, offering improvements in crystalline output and nucleation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31150j

  1. Site-directed circular dichroism of proteins: 1Lb bands of Trp resolve position-specific features in tear lipocalin

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2008-01-01

    The absorption spectra of N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide in various solvents were resolved into the sums of the 1La and 1Lb components. The relative intensities of the 0-0 transitions of the 1Lb bands correlate linearly with the solvent polarity values (ETN). A novel strategy, which utilizes a set of the experimental 1Lb bands, was employed to resolve the near-UV CD spectra of tryptophanyl residues. Resolved spectral parameters from the single-tryptophan mutants of tear lipocalin (TL), F99W and Y87W, corroborate the fluorescence as well as structural data of TL. Analysis of the 1Lb bands of the Trp CD spectra in proteins is a valuable tool to obtain the local features. The “DMSO-like” 1Lb band of Trp CD spectra may be used as a “fingerprint” to identify the tryptophanyl side chains in situations where the benzene rings of Trp have van der Waals interactions with the side chains of its nearest neighbor. In addition, the signs and intensities of the components hold information about the side-chain conformations and dynamics in proteins. Combined with Trp mutagenesis, this method we call site-directed circular dichroism is broadly applicable to various proteins to obtain the position-specific data. PMID:18047823

  2. Site-directed circular dichroism of proteins: 1Lb bands of Trp resolve position-specific features in tear lipocalin.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2008-03-15

    The absorption spectra of N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide in various solvents were resolved into the sums of the (1)L(a) and (1)L(b) components. The relative intensities of the 0-0 transitions of the (1)L(b) bands correlate linearly with the solvent polarity values (E(T)(N)). A novel strategy that uses a set of the experimental (1)L(b) bands was employed to resolve the near-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra of tryptophanyl residues. Resolved spectral parameters from the single-tryptophan mutants of tear lipocalin (TL), F99W and Y87W, corroborate the fluorescence and structural data of TL. Analysis of the (1)L(b) bands of the Trp CD spectra in proteins is a valuable tool to obtain the local features. The dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-like (1)L(b) band of Trp CD spectra may be used as a "fingerprint" to identify the tryptophanyl side chains in situations where the benzene rings of Trp have van der Waals interactions with the side chains of its nearest neighbor. In addition, the signs and intensities of the components hold information about the side chain conformations and dynamics in proteins. Combined with Trp mutagenesis, this method, which we call site-directed circular dichroism, is broadly applicable to various proteins to obtain the position-specific data. PMID:18047823

  3. Colloidal graphenes as heterogeneous additives to enhance protein crystal yield.

    PubMed

    Gully, Benjamin S; Zou, Jianli; Cadby, Gemma; Passon, Daniel M; Iyer, K Swaminathan; Bond, Charles S

    2012-09-01

    In the structural analysis of proteins via X-ray diffraction, a rate-limiting step is in favourable nucleation, a problematic obstacle in successful generation of protein crystals. Here graphene and graphene oxide were applied to protein crystallisation trials, offering improvements in crystalline output and nucleation. PMID:22833181

  4. Erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase mediates the upregulation of membrane band 3 protein expression by iron.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qianchuan; Li, Jinying; Feng, Weihua; Xu, Yanqun; Huang, Zhenxia; Lv, Shuqing; Zhou, Hong; Gao, Lei

    2010-03-01

    Iron deficiency leads to abnormal expression and function of band 3 protein in erythrocytes, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The mRNA of erythroid-specific 5-aminolevulinate synthase (eALAS) contains an iron response element and the eALAS protein is an important mediator of iron utilization by erythrocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) mediated silencing of eALAS on the expression of band 3 protein induced by iron. By real-time RT-PCR and Western blot we showed that at mRNA and protein level iron-induced expression of band 3 protein was lower in eALAS-shRNA transfected K562 cells than in control cells. Of note, the lowest expression was detected in K562 cells cultured in iron deficiency condition (p < 0.01). Thus either iron deficiency or depletion of eALAS could suppress the expression of erythroid band 3 protein. These results demonstrated for the first time that iron and the iron-regulatory system regulate the expression of the erythrocyte membrane proteins. PMID:20087844

  5. Protein Normal Modes: Calculations of Amide Band Positions and Infrared Intensities for Helical Polypeptides and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisdorf, William Charles, Jr.

    , coiled coil, etc.) we examine the effects of helix length, hydrogen bond strength, side chain mass, dihedral angle irregularity, and other structural defects. Additionally, calculations have been done for the experimental structures of melittin and myoglobin. This is the first instance of a normal mode analysis using a spectroscopically-derived force field applied to a protein as large as myoglobin.

  6. Laser-activated protein bands for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Malik, Richard; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1996-01-01

    A 100 micrometer core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the protein based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 plus or minus 5 min. (n equals 24) compared to 23 plus or minus 9 min (n equals 13) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 plus or minus 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 plus or minus 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study, with a total of fifty-seven adult male wistar rats, compared laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. Twenty-four laser soldered nerves and thirteen sutured nerves were characterized at three months and showed successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of 2.4 plus or minus 0.7 mV and 2.7 plus or minus 0.8 mV respectively. Histopathology of the in vivo study, confirmed the comparable regeneration of axons in laser and suture operated nerves. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  7. Hypobaric hypoxia-reoxygenation diminishes band 3 protein functions in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    González, Gustavo; Celedón, Gloria; Sandoval, Mario; González, Gabriela E; Ferrer, Verónica; Astete, Rodrigo; Behn, Claus

    2002-12-01

    We have previously shown that subjects exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia display an erythrocyte membrane protein band 3 with an increased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation. We suggested it was due to an oxidative damage of band 3. We now report that exposure to hypobaric hypoxia followed by reoxygenation affects protein band 3 functions such as anion transport and binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase. Transport capacity was assessed with the fluorescent probe 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino] ethanesulfonate (NBD-taurine). Binding capacity was evaluated from the activity of the membrane-associated enzyme. Healthy young men were exposed for 20 min to hypobaric hypoxia, simulating an altitude of 4,500 m above sea level and after recompression band 3 function was assessed. An inhibition of band 3 anion transport function and a decrease in the binding of glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase to band 3 were observed. Evidence is given supporting the hypothesis that functional alteration of band 3 is due to its oxidative modification originated as a consequence of the exposure to hypobaric hypoxia and further reoxygenation. PMID:12466935

  8. Distinct oligoclonal band antibodies in multiple sclerosis recognize ubiquitous self-proteins.

    PubMed

    Brändle, Simone M; Obermeier, Birgit; Senel, Makbule; Bruder, Jessica; Mentele, Reinhard; Khademi, Mohsen; Olsson, Tomas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Kristoferitsch, Wolfgang; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Wekerle, Hartmut; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus

    2016-07-12

    Oligoclonal Ig bands (OCBs) of the cerebrospinal fluid are a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), a disabling inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). OCBs are locally produced by clonally expanded antigen-experienced B cells and therefore are believed to hold an important clue to the pathogenesis. However, their target antigens have remained unknown, mainly because it was thus far not possible to isolate distinct OCBs against a background of polyclonal antibodies. To overcome this obstacle, we copurified disulfide-linked Ig heavy and light chains from distinct OCBs for concurrent analysis by mass spectrometry and aligned patient-specific peptides to corresponding transcriptome databases. This method revealed the full-length sequences of matching chains from distinct OCBs, allowing for antigen searches using recombinant OCB antibodies. As validation, we demonstrate that an OCB antibody from a patient with an infectious CNS disorder, neuroborreliosis, recognized a Borrelia protein. Next, we produced six recombinant antibodies from four MS patients and identified three different autoantigens. All of them are conformational epitopes of ubiquitous intracellular proteins not specific to brain tissue. Our findings indicate that the B-cell response in MS is heterogeneous and partly directed against intracellular autoantigens released during tissue destruction. In addition to helping elucidate the role of B cells in MS, our approach allows the identification of target antigens of OCB antibodies in other neuroinflammatory diseases and the production of therapeutic antibodies in infectious CNS diseases. PMID:27325759

  9. Differentiation of Campylobacter species by protein banding patterns in polyacrylamide slab gels.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, D A; Lambe, D W

    1984-01-01

    Soluble protein extracts of 37 catalase-positive strains of Campylobacter species were examined by polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Electrophoretic banding patterns showed good correlation with biochemical tests and with available DNA homology data in distinguishing species of Campylobacter but did not differentiate subspecies or biotypes. PAGE patterns indicated that Campylobacter coli is a distinct species. Furthermore, the PAGE patterns indicated that C. jejuni and nalidixic acid-resistant thermophilic Campylobacter species (C. laridis) are each distinct species. The protein banding patterns of C. fetus subsp. venerealis and C. fetus subsp. fetus strains were distinctly different from those of the three thermophilic species. Images PMID:6490829

  10. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  11. Protein stabilisation using additives based on multiple electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Gibson, T D

    1996-01-01

    A method of elevating the storage lifetime of purified proteins has been discovered which appears to confer stability to all proteins investigated and may therefore be classed as generic in action. The basic methodology involves the formation of multiple electrostatic complexes between the protein and selected soluble polyelectrolytes to give protein-polyelectrolyte (PP) complexes and then to add solutions of polyalcohols or other compounds containing multiple hydroxyl groups. Dehydration of the resulting solution by vacuum evaporation, freeze drying or forced air convection produces a dry film or powder of stabilised protein. The method has been used mainly in the preparation of active enzymes for analytical tests. It has also been found that the formation of PP complexes also enhances the stability of enzymes in solution and the technique may be applicable to the stabilisation of virus suspensions by polycations. Examples of stabilised enzymes prepared by these methods are given and the proposed mechanism of stabilisation and applicability of the method to shelf-stable vaccine products are discussed. PMID:8854019

  12. Studies of proteinograms in dermatophytes by disc electrophoresis. 1. Protein bands in relation to growth phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danev, P.; Friedrich, E.; Balabanov, V.

    1983-01-01

    Homogenates were prepared from various growth phases of Microsporum gypseum grown on different amino acids as the nitrogen source. When analyzed on 7.5% polyacrylamide disc gels, the water-soluble proteins in these homogenates gave essentially identical banding patterns.

  13. Computation of the amide I band of polypeptides and proteins using a partial Hessian approach.

    PubMed

    Besley, Nicholas A; Metcalf, Katie A

    2007-01-21

    A partial Hessian approximation for the computation of the amide I band of polypeptides and proteins is introduced. This approximation exploits the nature of the amide I band, which is largely localized on the carbonyl groups of the backbone amide residues. For a set of model peptides, harmonic frequencies computed from the Hessian comprising only derivatives of the energy with respect to the displacement of the carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms of the backbone amide groups introduce mean absolute errors of 15 and 10 cm(-1) from the full Hessian values at the Hartree-Fock/STO-3G and density functional theory EDF16-31G(*) levels of theory, respectively. Limiting the partial Hessian to include only derivatives with respect to the displacement of the backbone carbon and oxygen atoms yields corresponding errors of 24 and 22 cm(-1). Both approximations reproduce the full Hessian band profiles well with only a small shift to lower wave number. Computationally, the partial Hessian approximation is used in the solution of the coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock/Kohn-Sham equations and the evaluation of the second derivatives of the electron repulsion integrals. The resulting computational savings are substantial and grow with the size of the polypeptide. At the HF/STO-3G level, the partial Hessian calculation for a polypeptide comprising five tryptophan residues takes approximately 10%-15% of the time for the full Hessian calculation. Using the partial Hessian method, the amide I bands of the constituent secondary structure elements of the protein agitoxin 2 (PDB code 1AGT) are calculated, and the amide I band of the full protein estimated. PMID:17249900

  14. Backbone additivity in the transfer model of protein solvation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2010-01-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of −54 cal/mol/M compares quite favorably with −43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally. PMID:20306490

  15. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C.; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-05-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of –54 cal/mol/Mcompares quite favorably with –43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally.

  16. Stabilizing Additives Added during Cell Lysis Aid in the Solubilization of Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leibly, David J.; Nguyen, Trang Nhu; Kao, Louis T.; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Barrett, Lynn K.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2012-01-01

    Insoluble recombinant proteins are a major issue for both structural genomics and enzymology research. Greater than 30% of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) appear to be insoluble. The prevailing view is that insolubly expressed proteins cannot be easily solubilized, and are usually sequestered into inclusion bodies. However, we hypothesize that small molecules added during the cell lysis stage can yield soluble protein from insoluble protein previously screened without additives or ligands. We present a novel screening method that utilized 144 additive conditions to increase the solubility of recombinant proteins expressed in E. coli. These selected additives are natural ligands, detergents, salts, buffers, and chemicals that have been shown to increase the stability of proteins in vivo. We present the methods used for this additive solubility screen and detailed results for 41 potential drug target recombinant proteins from infectious organisms. Increased solubility was observed for 80% of the recombinant proteins during the primary and secondary screening of lysis with the additives; that is 33 of 41 target proteins had increased solubility compared with no additive controls. Eleven additives (trehalose, glycine betaine, mannitol, L-Arginine, potassium citrate, CuCl2, proline, xylitol, NDSB 201, CTAB and K2PO4) solubilized more than one of the 41 proteins; these additives can be easily screened to increase protein solubility. Large-scale purifications were attempted for 15 of the proteins using the additives identified and eight (40%) were prepared for crystallization trials during the first purification attempt. Thus, this protocol allowed us to recover about a third of seemingly insoluble proteins for crystallography and structure determination. If recombinant proteins are required in smaller quantities or less purity, the final success rate may be even higher. PMID:23285060

  17. Direct measurement of additional Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling bands in the millimeter-submillimeter range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Luyao; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Three new weak bands of the Ar-H2O vibration-rotation-tunneling spectrum have been measured in the millimeter wavelength range. These bands were predicted from combination differences based on previously measured bands in the submillimeter region. Two previously reported submillimeter bands were also remeasured with higher frequency resolution. These new measurements allow us to obtain accurate information on the Coriolis interaction between the 101 and 110 states. Here we report these results and the associated improved molecular constants.

  18. An experimental and theoretical study of the amino acid side chain Raman bands in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöberg, Béatrice; Foley, Sarah; Cardey, Bruno; Enescu, Mironel

    2014-07-01

    The Raman spectra of a series of tripeptides with the basic formula GlyAAGly where the central amino acid (AA) was tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine, glycine, methionine, histidine, lysine and leucine were measured in H2O. The theoretical Raman spectra obtained using density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2pd) level of theory allows a precise attribution of the vibrational bands. The experimental results show that there is a blue shift in the frequencies of several bands of the amino acid side chains in tripeptides compared to free amino acids, especially in the case of AAs containing aromatic rings. On the other hand, a very good agreement was found between the Raman bands of AA residues in tripeptides and those measured on three model proteins: bovine serum albumin, β-lactoglobulin and lysozyme. The present analysis contributes to an unambiguous interpretation of the protein Raman spectra that is useful in monitoring the biological reactions involving AA side chains alteration.

  19. An atomic view of additive mutational effects in a protein structure

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, M.M.; Terwilliger, T.C.

    1996-04-01

    Substitution of a single amino acid in a protein will often lead to substantial changes in properties. If these properties could be altered in a rational way then proteins could be readily generated with functions tailored to specific uses. When amino acid substitutions are made at well-separated locations in a single protein, their effects are generally additive. Additivity of effects of amino acid substitutions is very useful because the properties of proteins with any combination of substitutions can be inferred directly from those of the proteins with single changes. It would therefore be of considerable interest to have a means of knowing whether substitutions at a particular pair of sites in a protein are likely to lead to additive effects. The structural basis for additivity of effects of mutations on protein function was examined by determining crystal structures of single and double mutants in the hydrophobic core of gene V protein. Structural effects of mutations were found to be cumulative when two mutations were made in a single protein. Additivity occurs in this case because the regions structurally affected by mutations at the two sites do not overlap even though the sites are separated by only 9 {angstrom}. Structural distortions induced by mutations in gene V protein decrease rapidly, but not isotropically, with distance from the site of mutation. It is anticipated that cases where structural and functional effects of mutations will be additive could be identified simply by examining whether the regions structurally affected by each component mutation overlap.

  20. Band 3 Erythrocyte Membrane Protein Acts as Redox Stress Sensor Leading to Its Phosphorylation by p72 Syk

    PubMed Central

    Pantaleo, Antonella; Ferru, Emanuela; Pau, Maria Carmina; Khadjavi, Amina; Mandili, Giorgia; Mattè, Alessandro; Spano, Alessandra; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pippia, Proto; Turrini, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In erythrocytes, the regulation of the redox sensitive Tyr phosphorylation of band 3 and its functions are still partially defined. A role of band 3 oxidation in regulating its own phosphorylation has been previously suggested. The current study provides evidences to support this hypothesis: (i) in intact erythrocytes, at 2 mM concentration of GSH, band 3 oxidation, and phosphorylation, Syk translocation to the membrane and Syk phosphorylation responded to the same micromolar concentrations of oxidants showing identical temporal variations; (ii) the Cys residues located in the band 3 cytoplasmic domain are 20-fold more reactive than GSH; (iii) disulfide linked band 3 cytoplasmic domain docks Syk kinase; (iv) protein Tyr phosphatases are poorly inhibited at oxidant concentrations leading to massive band 3 oxidation and phosphorylation. We also observed that hemichromes binding to band 3 determined its irreversible oxidation and phosphorylation, progressive hemolysis, and serine hyperphosphorylation of different cytoskeleton proteins. Syk inhibitor suppressed the phosphorylation of band 3 also preventing serine phosphorylation changes and hemolysis. Our data suggest that band 3 acts as redox sensor regulating its own phosphorylation and that hemichromes leading to the protracted phosphorylation of band 3 may trigger a cascade of events finally leading to hemolysis. PMID:27034738

  1. Lack of response to addition of degradable protein to a low protein diet fed to midlactation dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Armentano, L E; Bertics, S J; Riesterer, J

    1993-12-01

    Midlactation Holstein cows (n = 24, 12 primiparous) were subjected to four dietary treatments arranged in six Latin squares. Cows were assigned to squares according to parity and previous production within parity. Diets contained 53 to 55% DM from corn silage, and the remaining DM was from concentrates. The basal diet contained 13.9% CP with 9.5% rumen-degraded and 4.4% undegraded intake protein. Three other treatments were formulated to give one diet with more degradable true protein than the basal (11.9% degraded intake protein, 4.3% undegraded intake protein); another with urea added to the basal (12.2% degraded intake protein, 4.5% undegraded intake protein); and a third with additional undegraded protein added to the basal (8.3% degraded intake protein, 7.2% undegraded intake protein). Milk fat and protein concentration were unaffected by diet in all squares. Only the highest producing cows responded significantly to increased undegraded intake protein; milk production was 30.8, 30.9, 31.6, and 33.2 kg/d for basal, added degradable true protein, added urea, and added undegraded protein, respectively. Corresponding protein productions were 913, 929, 927, and 1004 g/d for these cows. Neither degradable true protein nor degradable N increased milk production in the highest producing cows, suggesting that microbial protein production was not limited by the amount of degradable protein in the basal diet. For midlactation, multiparous, and primiparous cows producing < 30 and 25 kg of milk/d, respectively, the protein content of the basal ration appeared to be adequate. PMID:8132882

  2. Do Additional Bands (coastal, NIR-2, Red-Edge and Yellow) in WORLDVIEW-2 Multispectral Imagery Improve Discrimination of AN Invasive Tussock, Buffel Grass (cenchrus Ciliaris)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, V.; Lewis, M.; Ostendorf, B.

    2012-07-01

    Our goals is to determine if Worldview-2 8-band multispectral imagery can be used to discriminate an invasive grass species namely, Buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) in the subtropical arid parts of central Australia and whether it offers a tangible improvement on 4-band (visible and near infra red) multispectral imagery. A Worldview-2 scene was acquired for a 10*10km area just west of Alice Springs in central Australia following heavy rains of early Summer. Mixture Tuned Matched Filtering was used to classify the image. Target and background spectra were selected in the field and extracted from the image. Linear discriminate analysis (LDA) was used to examine the spectral separability of each group of the target/ background spectra. The importance of the additional spectral bands on the image classification was assessed by running LDA for both 8 and 4 bands (red, green, blue and NIR). LDA did not indicate improved separability between groups when additional spectral bands were applied. Preliminary classification results indicate that Buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) is detected with an omission error 44%, commission error of 11.8% and overall accuracy of 59.5%. We were surprised that the additional spectral bands did not improve spectral separability and in part attribute this to the high degree of variance we observed within groups of spectra, which was particularly observable in the NIR2 and Yellow bands. The analyses may be significantly improved by acquiring imagery following the first big rains at the end of the dry season. At this time, phonological differences between our focal species and the surrounding native vegetation should be maximised. We suspect that Worldview-2 will offer even greater potential for the discrimination of Buffel grass under these conditions, being able to fully utilise the yellow-band in particular.

  3. Protein ubiquitination via dehydroalanine: development and insights into the diastereoselective 1,4-addition step.

    PubMed

    Meledin, Roman; Mali, Sachitanand M; Singh, Sumeet K; Brik, Ashraf

    2016-06-01

    We report a strategy for site-specific protein ubiquitination using dehydroalanine (Dha) chemistry for the preparation of ubiquitin conjugates bearing a very close mimic of the native isopeptide bond. Our approach relies on the selective formation of Dha followed by conjugation with hexapeptide bearing a thiol handle derived from the C-terminal of ubiquitin. Subsequently, the resulting synthetic intermediate undergoes native chemical ligation with the complementary part of the ubiquitin polypeptide. It has been proposed that the Michael addition step could result in the formation of a diastereomeric mixture as a result of unselective protonation of the enolate intermediate. It has also been proposed that the chiral protein environment may influence such an addition step. In the protein context these questions remain open and no experimental evidence was provided as to how such a protein environment affects the diastereoselectivity of the addition step. As was previously proposed for the conjugation step on protein bearing Dha, the isopeptide bond formation step in our study resulted in the construction of two protein diastereomers. To assign the ratio of these diastereomers, trypsinization coupled with high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis were performed. Moreover, the obtained peptide diastereomers were compared with identical synthetic peptides having defined stereogenic centers, which enabled the determination of the configuration of the isopeptide mimic in each diastereomer. Our study, which offers a new method for isopeptide bond formation and protein ubiquitination, gives insights into the parameters that affect the stereoselectivity of the addition step to Dha for chemical protein modifications. PMID:27143624

  4. Protein-protein interaction analysis highlights additional loci of interest for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ragnedda, Giammario; Disanto, Giulio; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ebers, George C; Sotgiu, Stefano; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in determining the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). The strongest genetic association in MS is located within the major histocompatibility complex class II region (MHC), but more than 50 MS loci of modest effect located outside the MHC have now been identified. However, the relative candidate genes that underlie these associations and their functions are largely unknown. We conducted a protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis of gene products coded in loci recently reported to be MS associated at the genome-wide significance level and in loci suggestive of MS association. Our aim was to identify which suggestive regions are more likely to be truly associated, which genes are mostly implicated in the PPI network and their expression profile. From three recent independent association studies, SNPs were considered and divided into significant and suggestive depending on the strength of the statistical association. Using the Disease Association Protein-Protein Link Evaluator tool we found that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected by chance when considering both significant regions alone (p<0.0002) and significant plus suggestive (p<0.007). The number of genes involved in the network was 43. Of these, 23 were located within suggestive regions and many of them directly interacted with proteins coded within significant regions. These included genes such as SYK, IL-6, CSF2RB, FCLR3, EIF4EBP2 and CHST12. Using the gene portal BioGPS, we tested the expression of these genes in 24 different tissues and found the highest values among immune-related cells as compared to non-immune tissues (p<0.001). A gene ontology analysis confirmed the immune-related functions of these genes. In conclusion, loci currently suggestive of MS association interact with and have similar expression profiles and function as those significantly associated, highlighting the fact that more common variants remain to be

  5. Effect of cleaning agents and additives on Protein A ligand degradation and chromatography performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lihua; Harding, Jason D; Ivanov, Alexander V; Ramasubramanyan, Natarajan; Dong, Diane D

    2015-03-13

    Protein A chromatography, employing the recombinant Protein A ligand, is widely used as a capture step for antibody and Fc-fusion proteins manufacture. Protein A ligands in these matrices are susceptible to degradation/loss when exposed to cleaning agents such as sodium hydroxide, resulting in loss of capacity on reuse. In this study, MabSelect Protein A ligand and MabSelect SuRe Protein A ligand were chosen to evaluate the impact of alkaline cleaning solutions on the ligands and the packed columns. The Protein A ligands alone and the Protein A columns were incubated or cycled in different concentrations of sodium hydroxide solutions with and without additives, respectively. Ligand integrity (degradation) and ligand function (binding affinity) were studied using SDS-PAGE and customized Biacore technology, surface plasma resonance (SPR) and were successfully correlated with column performance measurement in terms of static binding capacity (SBC), dynamic binding capacity (DBC) and recovery as a function of exposure to cleaning agents with and without additives. The findings and the methodology presented in this study are not only able to determine appropriate cleaning conditions for Protein A chromatography, but also provided tools to enable systematic and rapid study of the cleaning solutions and conditions. PMID:25680549

  6. Assessment of Relationship Between Bacterial Stripe Resistance And Leaf Protein Bands In Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Varieties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talei, D.; Fotokian, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial stripe as a new rice disease in Iran is more frequent nowadays. The objective of this study was to assessment of resistance in rice varieties together with evaluating of zymogram bands resulted from SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. For this purpose, 30 lines were tested in a randomized complete block design with three replications. The analysis of variance showed that there was significant difference between genotypes for resistance. Mean compare based on field results revealed that Domsiyah had the lowest resistance while Nemat and 7162 demonstrated the highest resistance. Laboratory results showed that there were significant difference between protein bands resulted from sensitive and resistance verities. Twenty bands were observed through SDS PAGE electrophoresis of leaf proteins. The 9th and 12th bands were found in sensitive varieties while were not in resistance genotypes. According to the results of this study, 7162 variety can be considered as the sources of resistance in breeding programs. Meanwhile attending to existence of 9th and 12th bands in sensitive varieties, resistance against bacterial stripe of rice maybe influenced by absence of these proteins.

  7. Charge state of arginine as an additive on heat-induced protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Takumi; Yoshizawa, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    Arginine (Arg) is one of the most versatile solvent additives, such as suppressing protein aggregation, increasing solubility of small aromatic compounds and peptides, and preventing protein binding on solid surfaces. In this study, we investigated the role of the charged state of α-amino group of Arg for the prevention of protein aggregation. As expected, Arg effectively suppressed thermal aggregation of hen egg-white lysozyme at neutral pH, whereas the suppression effect diminished at and above pH 9.0, which corresponds to the pK of Arg's α-amino group. The pH dependence of Arg as an aggregation suppressor was confirmed by additional experiments with neutral proteins, bovine hemoglobin and bovine γ-globulin. Interestingly, N-acetylated arginine, which lacks the α-amino group, showed a weaker suppressive effect on protein aggregation than Arg, even at neutral pH. These results indicate that both positively charged α-amino group and guanidinium group play important roles in suppressing heat-induced protein aggregation by Arg. The elucidated limitation of Arg at alkaline pH provides new insight in the application as well as the mechanism of Arg as a solvent additive. PMID:26987431

  8. Precipitation of sword bean proteins by heating and addition of magnesium chloride in a crude extract.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Kaho; Masuda, Tetsuya; Takenaka, Yasuyuki; Masui, Hironori; Tani, Fumito; Arii, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Sword bean (Canavalia gladiata) seeds are a traditional food in Asian countries. In this study, we aimed to determine the optimal methods for the precipitation of sword bean proteins useful for the food development. The soaking time for sword beans was determined by comparing it with that for soybeans. Sword bean proteins were extracted from dried seeds in distilled water using novel methods. We found that most proteins could be precipitated by heating the extract at more than 90 °C. Interestingly, adding magnesium chloride to the extract at lower temperatures induced specific precipitation of a single protein with a molecular weight of approximately 48 kDa. The molecular weight and N-terminal sequence of the precipitated protein was identical to that of canavalin. These data suggested that canavalin was precipitated by the addition of magnesium chloride to the extract. Our results provide important insights into the production of processed foods from sword bean. PMID:27022983

  9. Effect of the addition of CMC on the aggregation behaviour of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Sabato, S. F.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2004-09-01

    The effect of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the aggregation of formulation based on calcium caseinate, commercial whey protein (WPC), and a 1:1 mixture of soy protein isolate (SPI) and whey protein isolate (WPI) was investigated. Protein aggregation could be observed upon addition of CMC, as demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. This aggregation behaviour was enhanced by means of physical treatments, such as heating at 90°C for 30 min or gamma-irradiation at 32 kGy. A synergy resulted from the combination of CMC to gamma-irradiation in Caseinate/CMC and SPI/WPI/CMC formulations. Furthermore, CMC prevented precipitation in irradiated protein solutions for a period of more than 3 months at 4°C.

  10. Effects of buffer additives and thermal processing methods on the solubility of shrimp (Penaeus monodon) proteins and the immunoreactivity of its major allergen.

    PubMed

    Lasekan, Adeseye O; Nayak, Balunkeswar

    2016-06-01

    This study examines the potential of two buffer additives (Tween 20 and DTT) to improve the solubility of proteins from shrimp subjected to different heat treatments and the allergenicity of tropomyosin in the extracts. The concentration of soluble proteins extracted by all the buffers from processed shrimp was significantly reduced compared with untreated samples. The concentration of total soluble proteins from heat treated shrimp increased significantly when phosphate buffer containing both surfactant and reducing agent was used as the extraction buffer. However, the concentrations of heat-stable proteins in the buffers were mostly similar. The electrophoretic profile of extracted proteins showed that tropomyosin is very stable under the different heat treatment methods used in this study except for high pressure steaming where the intensity of tropomyosin band was reduced. Competitive inhibition ELISA showed that high pressure steaming reduced the allergenicity of tropomyosin compared with other heat treatments methods. PMID:26830572

  11. Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics.

    PubMed

    Newson, William R; Kuktaite, Ramune; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Johansson, Eva

    2014-07-16

    Ten chemical additives were selected from the literature for their proposed modifying activity in protein-protein interactions. These consisted of acids, bases, reducing agents, and denaturants and were added to residual deoiled meals of Crambe abyssinica (crambe) and Brassica carinata (carinata) to modify the properties of plastics produced through hot compression molding at 130 °C. The films produced were examined for tensile properties, protein solubility, molecular weight distribution, and water absorption. Of the additives tested, NaOH had the greatest positive effect on tensile properties, with increases of 105% in maximum stress and 200% in strain at maximum stress for crambe and a 70% increase in strain at maximum stress for carinata. Stiffness was not increased by any of the applied additives. Changes in tensile strength and elongation for crambe and elongation for carinata were related to changes in protein solubility. Increased pH was the most successful in improving the protein aggregation and mechanical properties within the complex chemistry of residual oilseed meals. PMID:24971658

  12. Addition of Astra-Ben 20 to Sequester Aflatoxin During Protein Extraction of Contaminated Peanut Meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut meal is an excellent source of high quality protein; however, the relatively high aflatoxin concentrations typically associated with this commodity currently limit applications within the feed market, in addition to being prohibitive for any future food ingredient markets. Accordingly, the e...

  13. Application of mid-infrared free-electron laser tuned to amide bands for dissociation of aggregate structure of protein.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takayasu; Yaji, Toyonari; Ohta, Toshiaki; Tsukiyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A mid-infrared free-electron laser (FEL) is a linearly polarized, high-peak powered pulse laser with tunable wavelength within the mid-infrared absorption region. It was recently found that pathogenic amyloid fibrils could be partially dissociated to the monomer form by the irradiation of the FEL targeting the amide I band (C=O stretching vibration), amide II band (N-H bending vibration) and amide III band (C-N stretching vibration). In this study, the irradiation effect of the FEL on keratin aggregate was tested as another model to demonstrate an applicability of the FEL for dissociation of protein aggregates. Synchrotron radiation infrared microscopy analysis showed that the α-helix content in the aggregate structure decreased to almost the same level as that in the monomer state after FEL irradiation tuned to 6.06 µm (amide I band). Both irradiations at 6.51 µm (amide II band) and 8.06 µm (amide III band) also decreased the content of the aggregate but to a lesser extent than for the irradiation at the amide I band. On the contrary, the irradiation tuned to 5.6 µm (non-absorbance region) changed little the secondary structure of the aggregate. Scanning-electron microscopy observation at the submicrometer order showed that the angular solid of the aggregate was converted to non-ordered fragments by the irradiation at each amide band, while the aggregate was hardly deformed by the irradiation at 5.6 µm. These results demonstrate that the amide-specific irradiation by the FEL was effective for dissociation of the protein aggregate to the monomer form. PMID:26698057

  14. X-ray radiation-induced addition of oxygen atoms to protein residues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin

    2016-08-01

    The additions of oxygen and peroxide to residues that result when proteins are exposed to the free radicals produced using the Fenton reaction or X-rays have been studied for over a century. Nevertheless little is known about the impact these modifications have on protein crystal structures. Here evidence is presented that both kinds of modifications occur in protein crystals on a significant scale during the collection of X-ray diffraction data. For example, at least 538 of the 5,351 residues of protein molecules in the crystal used to obtain the structure for photosystem II described by the PDB accession number 3ARC became oxygenated during data collection. PMID:27074249

  15. Phospha-Michael Addition as a New Click Reaction for Protein Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yan-Jiun; Kurra, Yadagiri; Liu, Wenshe R

    2016-03-15

    A new type of click reaction between an alkyl phosphine and acrylamide was developed and applied for site-specific protein labeling in vitro and in live cells. Acrylamide is a small electrophilic olefin that readily undergoes phospha-Michael addition with an alkyl phosphine. Our kinetic study indicated a second-order rate constant of 0.07 m(-1)  s(-1) for the reaction between tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine and acrylamide at pH 7.4. To demonstrate its application in protein functionalization, we used a dansyl-phosphine conjugate to successfully label proteins that were site-specifically installed with N(ɛ) -acryloyl-l-lysine and employed a biotin-phosphine conjugate to selectively probe human proteins that were metabolically labeled with N-acryloyl-galactosamine. PMID:26756316

  16. Nutritional and Protein Deficiencies in the Short Term following Both Gastric Bypass and Gastric Banding

    PubMed Central

    Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Verger, Eric O; Bounaix, Carine; Dao, Maria Carlota; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Chevallier, Jean-Marc; Clément, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Background The number of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery (BS) has increased dramatically in recent years. Therefore, monitoring food intake and its consequences in terms of nutritional status is necessary to prevent nutritional deficiencies. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of food restriction on nutritional parameters in the short-term (≤3 months) period after BS in morbid obesity. Method In a prospective study, we followed 22 obese women who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (GBP) or adjustable gastric banding (AGB) at baseline (T0) and 1 (T1) and 3 (T3) months after surgery. We evaluated food intake, nutrient adequacy and serum concentrations of vitamins and minerals known to be at risk for deficiency following BS. Results Before surgery, we observed suboptimal food intakes, leading to a risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Serum analysis confirmed nutritional deficiencies for iron and thiamine for 27 and 23% of the patients, respectively. The drastic energy and food reduction seen in the short term led to very low probabilities of adequacy for nutrients equivalent across both surgeries. Serum analysis demonstrated a continuous decrease in prealbumin during the follow-up, indicating mild protein depletion in 21 and 57% of GBP patients and 50 and 63% of AGB patients, respectively, at T1 and T3. Regarding vitamins and minerals, systematic supplementation after GBP prevented most nutritional deficiencies. By contrast, AGB patients, for whom there is no systematic supplementation, developed such deficiencies. Conclusions Our results suggest that cautious monitoring of protein intake after BS is mandatory. Furthermore, AGB patients might also benefit from systematic multivitamin and mineral supplementation at least in the short term. PMID:26891123

  17. Nonlinearly Additive Forces in Multivalent Ligand Binding to a Single Protein Revealed with Force Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T V; Rudd, R E; Langry, K C; Balhorn, R L; McElfresh, M W

    2005-07-15

    We present evidence of multivalent interactions between a single protein molecule and multiple carbohydrates at a pH where the protein can bind four ligands. The evidence is based not only on measurements of the force required to rupture the bonds formed between ConcanavalinA (ConA) and {alpha}-D-mannose, but also on an analysis of the polymer-extension force curves to infer the polymer architecture that binds the protein to the cantilever and the ligands to the substrate. We find that although the rupture forces for multiple carbohydrate connections to a single protein are larger than the rupture force for a single connection, they do not scale additively with increasing number. Specifically, the most common rupture forces are approximately 46, 66, and 85 pN, which we argue corresponds to 1, 2, and 3 ligands being pulled simultaneously from a single protein as corroborated by an analysis of the linkage architecture. As in our previous work polymer tethers allow us to discriminate between specific and non-specific binding. We analyze the binding configuration (i.e. serial versus parallel connections) through fitting the polymer stretching data with modified Worm-Like Chain (WLC) models that predict how the effective stiffness of the tethers is affected by multiple connections. This analysis establishes that the forces we measure are due to single proteins interacting with multiple ligands, the first force spectroscopy study that establishes single-molecule multivalent binding unambiguously.

  18. Development of wide band gap p- a-SiOxCy:H using additional trimethylboron as carbon source gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Won; Sichanugrist, Porponth; Janthong, Bancha; Khan, Muhammad Ajmal; Niikura, Chisato; Konagai, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    We report p-type a-SiOxCy:H thin films which were fabricated by introducing additional Trimethylboron (TMB, B(CH3)3) doping gas into conventional standard p-type a-SiOx:H films. The TMB addition into the condition of p-a-SiOx:H improved optical bandgap from 2.14 to 2.20 eV without deterioration of electrical conductivity, which is promising for p-type window layer of thin film solar cells. The suggested p-a-SiOxCy:H films were applied in amorphous silicon solar cells and we found an increase of quantum efficiency at short wavelength regions due to wide bandgap of the new p-layer, and thus efficiency improvement from 10.4 to 10.7% was demonstrated in a-Si:H solar cell by employing the p-a-SiOxCy:H film. In case of a-SiOx:H cell, high open circuit voltage of 1.01 V was confirmed by using the suggested the p-a-SiOxCy:H film as a window layer. This new p-layer can be highly promising as a wide bandgap window layer to improve the performance of thin film silicon solar cells. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. W-band orientation selective DEER measurements on a Gd3+/nitroxide mixed-labeled protein dimer with a dual mode cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Tkach, Igor; Manukovsky, Nurit; Huber, Thomas; Yagi, Hiromasa; Otting, Gottfried; Bennati, Marina; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2013-02-01

    Double electron-electron resonance (DEER) at W-band (95 GHz) was applied to measure the distance between a pair of nitroxide and Gd3+ chelate spin labels, about 6 nm apart, in a homodimer of the protein ERp29. While high-field DEER measurements on systems with such mixed labels can be highly attractive in terms of sensitivity and the potential to access long distances, a major difficulty arises from the large frequency spacing (about 700 MHz) between the narrow, intense signal of the Gd3+ central transition and the nitroxide signal. This is particularly problematic when using standard single-mode cavities. Here we show that a novel dual-mode cavity that matches this large frequency separation dramatically increases the sensitivity of DEER measurements, allowing evolution times as long as 12 μs in a protein. This opens the possibility of accessing distances of 8 nm and longer. In addition, orientation selection can be resolved and analyzed, thus providing additional structural information. In the case of W-band DEER on a Gd3+-nitroxide pair, only two angles and their distributions have to be determined, which is a much simpler problem to solve than the five angles and their distributions associated with two nitroxide spin labels.

  20. Measuring translational diffusion coefficients of peptides and proteins by PFG-NMR using band-selective RF pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shenggen; Weber, Daniel K; Separovic, Frances; Keizer, David W

    2014-07-01

    Molecular translational self-diffusion, a measure of diffusive motion, provides information on the effective molecular hydrodynamic radius, as well as information on the properties of media or solution through which the molecule diffuses. Protein translational diffusion measured by pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) has seen increased application in structure and interaction studies, as structural changes or protein-protein interactions are often accompanied by alteration of their effective hydrodynamic radii. Unlike the analysis of complex mixtures by PFG-NMR, for monitoring changes of protein translational diffusion under various conditions, such as different stages of folding/unfolding, a partial region of the spectrum or even a single resonance is sufficient. We report translational diffusion coefficients measured by PFG-NMR with a modified stimulated echo (STE) sequence where band-selective pulses are employed for all three (1)H RF pulses. Compared with conventional non-selective sequence, e.g. the BPP-LED sequence, the advantage of this modified band-selective excitation short transient (BEST) version of STE (BEST-STE) sequence is multi-fold, namely: (1) potential sensitivity gain as in generalized BEST-based sequences, (2) water suppression is no longer required as the magnetization of solvent water is not perturbed during the measurement, and (3) dynamic range problems due to the presence of intense resonances from molecules other than the protein or peptide of interest, such as non-deuterated detergent micelles, are avoided. PMID:24824112

  1. Nitrogen balancing and xylose addition enhances growth capacity and protein content in Chlorella minutissima cultures.

    PubMed

    Freitas, B C B; Esquível, M G; Matos, R G; Arraiano, C M; Morais, M G; Costa, J A V

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the metabolic changes in Chlorella minutissima cells grown under nitrogen-deficient conditions and with the addition of xylose. The cell density, maximum photochemical efficiency, and chlorophyll and lipid levels were measured. The expression of two photosynthetic proteins, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and the beta subunit (AtpB) of adenosine triphosphate synthase, were measured. Comparison of cells grown in medium with a 50% reduction in the nitrogen concentration versus the traditional medium solution revealed that the cells grown under nitrogen-deficient conditions exhibited an increased growth rate, higher maximum cell density (12.7×10(6)cellsmL(-1)), optimal PSII efficiency (0.69) and decreased lipid level (25.08%). This study has taken the first steps toward protein detection in Chlorella minutissima, and the results can be used to optimize the culturing of other microalgae. PMID:27359061

  2. Interface-engineering additives of poly(oxyethylene tridecyl ether) for low-band gap polymer solar cells consisting of PCDTBT:PCBM₇₀ bulk-heterojunction layers.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yoon Ho; Park, Byoungchoo

    2013-01-14

    We herein report on the improved photovoltaic (PV) effects of using a polymer bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) layer that consists of a low-band gap electron donor polymer of poly(N-9'-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)) (PCDTBT) and an acceptor of [6,6]-phenyl C₇₁ butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM₇₀), doped with an interface-engineering surfactant additive of poly(oxyethylene tridecyl ether) (PTE). The presence of an interface-engineering additive in the PV layer results in excellent performance; the addition of PTE to a PCDTBT:PCBM₇₀ system produces a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.0%, which is much higher than that of a reference device without the additive (4.9%). We attribute this improvement to an increased charge carrier lifetime, which is likely to be the result of the presence of PTE molecules oriented at the interfaces between the BHJ PV layer and the anode and cathode, as well as at the interfaces between the phase-separated BHJ domains. Our results suggest that the incorporation of the PTE interface-engineering additive in the PCDTBT:PCBM₇₀ PV layer results in a functional composite system that shows considerable promise for use in efficient polymer BHJ PV cells. PMID:23389265

  3. Identification of an additional class of C3-binding membrane proteins of human peripheral blood leukocytes and cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, J L; Housley, G A; Dykman, T R; MacDermott, R P; Atkinson, J P

    1985-01-01

    Proteins binding the third component of complement (C3) were isolated by affinity chromatography from surface-labeled solubilized membranes of human peripheral blood cells and cell lines. The isolated molecules were subjected to NaDodSO4/PAGE, and autoradiographs of these gels indicated that C3-binding proteins could be divided into three groups based on Mr: (i) gp200, an approximately 200,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3b/C4b receptor or CR1; (ii) gp140, an approximately 140,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3d receptor or CR2; and (iii) gp45-70, a heretofore unrecognized group of 45,000-70,000 Mr C3-binding molecules. The cell distribution, Mr, antigenic cross-reactivity, and specificity of gp45-70 were examined. Erythrocytes have no detectable gp45-70, but all leukocyte populations examined possess this group of molecules. On neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes, CR1 is the predominant C3-binding glycoprotein, but gp45-70 is present on both cell populations and on macrophage and neutrophil cell lines. B plus null cells, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, and an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell line possess CR1, CR2, and gp45-70. On T cells and T-cell lines gp45-70 is the predominant or, in some cases, the only C3-binding protein isolated. gp45-70 is structurally characterized as a broad band or doublet with a mean Mr that is slightly different for each cell population. gp45-70 binds iC3, C3b, and C4b, but not C3d, indicating that the binding region is probably within the C3c portion of C3b. A polyclonal antibody to CR1 and monoclonal antibodies to CR1 and CR2 do not immunoprecipitate gp45-70. While gp45-70 has not been previously characterized on human cells, a C3b-binding glycoprotein of similar Mr is present on rabbit alveolar macrophages. We conclude that gp45-70 is an additional group of membrane proteins present on human leukocytes that possess ligand-binding activity for C3b. Images PMID:3871945

  4. Identification of an additional class of C3-binding membrane proteins of human peripheral blood leukocytes and cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cole, J L; Housley, G A; Dykman, T R; MacDermott, R P; Atkinson, J P

    1985-02-01

    Proteins binding the third component of complement (C3) were isolated by affinity chromatography from surface-labeled solubilized membranes of human peripheral blood cells and cell lines. The isolated molecules were subjected to NaDodSO4/PAGE, and autoradiographs of these gels indicated that C3-binding proteins could be divided into three groups based on Mr: (i) gp200, an approximately 200,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3b/C4b receptor or CR1; (ii) gp140, an approximately 140,000 Mr molecule previously identified as the C3d receptor or CR2; and (iii) gp45-70, a heretofore unrecognized group of 45,000-70,000 Mr C3-binding molecules. The cell distribution, Mr, antigenic cross-reactivity, and specificity of gp45-70 were examined. Erythrocytes have no detectable gp45-70, but all leukocyte populations examined possess this group of molecules. On neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes, CR1 is the predominant C3-binding glycoprotein, but gp45-70 is present on both cell populations and on macrophage and neutrophil cell lines. B plus null cells, chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, and an Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell line possess CR1, CR2, and gp45-70. On T cells and T-cell lines gp45-70 is the predominant or, in some cases, the only C3-binding protein isolated. gp45-70 is structurally characterized as a broad band or doublet with a mean Mr that is slightly different for each cell population. gp45-70 binds iC3, C3b, and C4b, but not C3d, indicating that the binding region is probably within the C3c portion of C3b. A polyclonal antibody to CR1 and monoclonal antibodies to CR1 and CR2 do not immunoprecipitate gp45-70. While gp45-70 has not been previously characterized on human cells, a C3b-binding glycoprotein of similar Mr is present on rabbit alveolar macrophages. We conclude that gp45-70 is an additional group of membrane proteins present on human leukocytes that possess ligand-binding activity for C3b. PMID:3871945

  5. Application of two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to benchmark models for the amide I band of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Anna S.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel benchmarking method for validating the modelling of vibrational spectra for the amide I region of proteins. We use the linear absorption spectra and two-dimensional infrared spectra of four experimentally well-studied proteins as a reference and test nine combinations of molecular dynamics force fields, vibrational frequency mappings, and coupling models. We find that two-dimensional infrared spectra provide a much stronger test of the models than linear absorption does. The best modelling approach in the present study still leaves significant room for future improvement. The presented benchmarking scheme, thus, provides a way of validating future protocols for modelling the amide I band in proteins.

  6. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  7. Medium modification with bone morphogenetic protein 2 addition for odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Atalayin, Cigdem; Tezel, Huseyin; Dagci, Taner; Yavasoglu, Nefise Ulku Karabay; Oktem, Gulperi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether medium modification improves the odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in vitro and in vivo. DPSC isolated from human impacted third molar teeth were analysed for clusters of differentiation with flow cytometry. Odontogenic differentiation was stimulated by medium modification with the addition of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). The expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein, dentin matrix protein 1, enamelysin/matrix metalloproteinase 20 and the phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome of the cells were analysed with RT-PCR at 7, 14 and 21 days. Then, DPSC were transplanted on the back of immunocompromised mice via a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold, and the structure of the formed tissue was investigated. The cells were identified as mesenchymal stem cells with a 98.3% CD73 and CD90 double-positive cell rate. The increase in mineralization capacity and expression of human enamel-dentin specific transcripts proportional to the culture period were determined after differentiation. Six weeks after transplantation, an osteo-dentin matrix was formed in the group in which odontogenic differentiation was stimulated, and the odontogenic characteristics of the matrix were confirmed by histological examination and RT-PCR analysis. Odontogenic differentiation of the isolated and characterized human DPSC was improved with medium modification by the addition of BMP2 in vitro and in vivo. The defined medium and applied technique have a potential use for forming reparative dentin in the future, but the effects of the method should be investigated in long-term studies. PMID:26981753

  8. Direct vibrational structure of protein metal-binding sites from near-infrared Yb3+ vibronic side band spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Roselli, C; Boussac, A; Mattioli, T A

    1994-01-01

    Near-infrared Yb3+ vibronic side band (VSB) spectroscopy is used to obtain structural information of metal binding sites in metalloproteins. This technique provides a selective "IR-like" vibrational spectrum of those ligands chelated to the Yb3+ ion. VSB spectra of various model complexes of Yb3+ representing different ligand types were studied to provide references for the VSB spectra of Yb(3+)-reconstituted metalloproteins. Ca2+ in the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and Fe3+ in the iron-transporting protein transferrin were replaced with Yb3+. The fluorescence of Yb3+ reconstituted into these two proteins exhibits weak VSBs whose energy shifts, with respect to the main 2F5/2-->2F7/2 Yb3+ electronic transition, represent the vibrational frequencies of the Yb3+ ligands. The chemical nature of the ligands of the Yb3+ in these proteins, as deduced by the observed VSB frequencies, is entirely in agreement with their known crystal structures. For transferrin, replacement of the 12CO3(2-) metal counterion with 13CO3(2-) yielded the expected isotopic shift for the VSBs corresponding to the carbonate vibrational modes. This technique demonstrates enormous potential in elucidating the localized structure of metal binding sites in proteins. PMID:7809143

  9. The Effect of Small Molecule Additives on the Self-Assembly and Functionality of Protein-Polymer Diblock Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Carla; Xu, Liza; Olsen, Bradley

    2013-03-01

    Self-assembly of globular protein-polymer block copolymers into well-defined nanostructures provides a route towards the manufacture of protein-based materials which maintains protein fold and function. The model material mCherry-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) forms self-assembled nanostructures from aqueous solutions via solvent evaporation. To improve retention of protein functionality when dehydrated, small molecules such as trehalose and glycerol are added in solution prior to solvent removal. With as little as 10 wt% additive, improvements in retained functionality of 20-60% are observed in the solid-state as compared to samples in which no additive is present. Higher additive levels (up to 50%) continue to show improvement until approximately 100% of the protein function is retained. These large gains are hypothesized to originate from the ability of the additives to replace hydrogen bonds normally fulfilled by water. The addition of trehalose in the bulk material also improves the thermal stability of the protein by 15-20 °C, while glycerol decreases the thermal stability. Materials containing up to 50% additives remain microphase separated, and, upon incorporation of additives, nanostructure domain spacing tends to increase, accompanied by order-order transitions.

  10. Monitoring Wnt Protein Acylation Using an In Vitro Cyclo-Addition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Yarravarapu, Nageswari; Lum, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a technique for visualizing the lipidation status of Wnt proteins using azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry (click chemistry) and SDS-PAGE. This protocol incorporates in vivo labeling of a Wnt-IgG Fc fusion protein using an alkynylated palmitate probe but departs from a traditional approach by incorporating a secondary cycloaddition reaction performed on single-step purified Wnt protein immobilized on protein A resin. This approach mitigates experimental noise by decreasing the contribution of labeling from other palmitoylated proteins and by providing a robust method for normalizing labeling efficiency based on protein abundance. PMID:27590147

  11. Monitoring Wnt Protein Acylation Using an In Vitro Cyclo-Addition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Rubina; Yarravarapu, Nageswari; Lum, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a technique for visualizing the lipidation status of Wnt proteins using azide-alkyne cycloaddition chemistry (click chemistry) and SDS-PAGE. This protocol incorporates in vivo labeling of a Wnt-IgG Fc fusion protein using an alkynylated palmitate probe but departs from a traditional approach by incorporating a secondary cycloaddition reaction performed on single-step purified Wnt protein immobilized on protein A resin. This approach mitigates experimental noise by decreasing the contribution of labeling from other palmitoylated proteins and by providing a robust method for normalizing labeling efficiency based on protein abundance. PMID:27590147

  12. Use of additives to enhance the properties of cottonseed protein as wood adhesives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein is currently being used commercially as a “green” wood adhesive. Previous work in this laboratory has shown that cottonseed protein isolate, tested on maple wood veneer, produced higher adhesive strength and hot water resistance relative to soy protein. In the present study, cottonseed...

  13. Soy Protein Isolate As Fluid Loss Additive in Bentonite-Water-Based Drilling Fluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Chun; Wu, Qinglin; Song, Kunlin; Lee, Sunyoung; Jin, Chunde; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou

    2015-11-11

    Wellbore instability and formation collapse caused by lost circulation are vital issues during well excavation in the oil industry. This study reports the novel utilization of soy protein isolate (SPI) as fluid loss additive in bentonite-water based drilling fluids (BT-WDFs) and describes how its particle size and concentration influence on the filtration property of SPI/BT-WDFs. It was found that high pressure homogenization (HPH)-treated SPI had superior filtration property over that of native SPI due to the improved ability for the plugging pore throat. HPH treatment also caused a significant change in the surface characteristic of SPI, leading to a considerable surface interaction with BT in aqueous solution. The concentration of SPI had a significant impact on the dispersion state of SPI/BT mixtures in aquesous solution. At low SPI concentrations, strong aggregations were created, resulting in the formation of thick, loose, high-porosity and high-permeability filter cakes and high fluid loss. At high SPI concentrations, intercatlated/exfoliated structures were generated, resulting in the formation of thin, compact, low-porosity and low-permeability filter cakes and low fluid loss. The SPI/BT-WDFs exhibited superior filtration property than pure BT-WDFs at the same solid concentraion, demonstrating the potential utilization of SPI as an effective, renewable, and biodegradable fluid loss reducer in well excavation applications. PMID:26492498

  14. Sensory aroma characteristics of alcalase hydrolyzed rice bran protein concentrate as affected by spray drying and sugar addition.

    PubMed

    Arsa, Supeeraya; Theerakulkait, Chockchai

    2015-08-01

    The sensory aroma characteristics of alcalase hydrolyzed rice bran protein concentrate as affected by spray drying and sugar addition were investigated. Rice bran protein concentrate (RBPC) was hydrolyzed by alcalase. Sucrose, glucose or fructose was added to the liquid rice bran protein hydrolysate (LRBPH) and subsequently spray dried. The sensory aroma intensities of the hydrolysates were evaluated. Results showed that after spray drying, the rice bran protein concentrate powder (RBPC-P) had higher sweet and cocoa-like aroma intensities than RBPC (p ≤ 0.05) and hydrolyzed rice bran protein powder (HRBPP) had higher milk powder-like aroma intensities than LRBPH (p ≤ 0.05). The sweet, cocoa-like and milk powder-like aroma intensities in hydrolyzed rice bran protein powder with fructose addition (HRBPP-F) were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) than those of hydrolyzed rice bran protein powder with sucrose or glucose addition (HRBPP-S or HRBPP-G). HRBPP-F had the highest overall aroma liking score. These results also indicate that spray drying and sugar addition could improve the sensory aroma characteristics of alcalase hydrolyzed RBPC. PMID:26243954

  15. Partial structural characterization of the cytoplasmic domain of the erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3.

    PubMed

    Appell, K C; Low, P S

    1981-11-10

    The cytoplasmic domain of band 3 was released from spectrin-depleted, acetic acid-stripped erythrocyte membrane vesicles by mild chymotryptic digestion. After purification by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography, the fragment preparation was found to be greater than 90% pure on polyacrylamide disc gels in the presence of 0.2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. The subunit Mr from the electrophoretic procedure was estimated at approximately 40,000. The isolated cytoplasmic fragment ws judged to be a dimer, since (i) the unmodified fragment and its disulfide-cross-linked (dimeric) counterpart eluted in the same peak fraction from a Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration column, and (ii) the sedimentation velocity molecular weight of the native fragment was calculated to be approximately 95,000. No evidence of either larger or smaller aggregates was obtained. The frictional ratio of the fragment was measured at 1.6, suggesting a highly elongated morphology. The circular dichroism spectrum of the fragment corresponded to approximately 37% alpha helix. Titration of the cytoplasmic fragment over the physiological pH range gave rise to a reversible 2-fold increase in the intrinsic fluorescence quantum yield (lambda ex, 290 nm; lambda em, 335 nm) between pH 6 and 9. Computer analysis of the data yielded a temperature-dependent apparent pKa of 7.8 at 37 degrees C and 8.1 at 20 degrees C, both with Hill coefficients less than or equal to 1. Calorimetric experiments revealed a similar sensitivity to pH, where the denaturation temperature of the fragment titrated from 74 degrees C at pH 6 to 59 degrees C at pH 8.5, with an apparent pKa of 7.3 and a Hill coefficient less than 1. The enthalpies and widths at half-height of the transitions were also exquisitely sensitive to pH. The fluorescence and calorimetric data could all be described by the titration of a single ionizable group of apparent pKa of 7.8 at 37 degrees C and delta pKa/degrees C of -0.018. The ionization of this critical

  16. CSF oligoclonal banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CFS is the clear fluid that flows in the space around the spinal cord and brain. Oligoclonal bands are proteins called immunoglobulins. The ... system. Oligoclonal bands may be a sign of multiple sclerosis.

  17. Pulmonary artery banding alters the expression of Ca2+ transport proteins in the right atrium in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash C; Varian, Kenneth D; Bal, Naresh C; Abraham, Jessica L; Periasamy, Muthu; Janssen, Paul M L

    2009-06-01

    Following pulmonary artery banding (PAB), the contractile function of right ventricle diminishes over time. Subsequently, the right atrium (RA) has to contract against a higher afterload, but it is unknown to what extent ventricular dysfunction has an effect on the atrial contractility. We hypothesized that right ventricular pressure overload may have an affect on atrial contractility and Ca(2+) transport protein expression. Therefore, we induced pressure overload of the right ventricle by PAB for 10 wk in rabbits and examined the changes in the expression of Ca(2+) transport proteins in the atrium. We demonstrate that PAB significantly decreased the expression of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (Serca) 2a while expression of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-1 was significantly upregulated in the RA but not in the left atria of rabbit hearts, indicating that pressure is the major trigger. A decrease in Serca2a expression was concomitant with a significant decrease in sarcolipin (SLN), possibly indicating a compensatory role of SLN. The decreased expression of SLN was unable to completely restore sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) uptake function of Serca2a. Functional contractile assessments in isolated trabeculae showed no difference between PAB- and sham-operated rabbits at 1 Hz but displayed an enhanced force development at higher frequencies and in the presence of isoproterenol, while twitch timing was unaffected. Our results indicate that right ventricular mechanical overload due to PAB affects the expression of the Ca(2+)-handling proteins in the RA in rabbits. PMID:19376811

  18. Efficient -2 frameshifting by mammalian ribosomes to synthesize an additional arterivirus protein.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Treffers, Emmely E; Li, Yanhua; Tas, Ali; Sun, Zhi; van der Meer, Yvonne; de Ru, Arnoud H; van Veelen, Peter A; Atkins, John F; Snijder, Eric J; Firth, Andrew E

    2012-10-23

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is a gene-expression mechanism used to express many viral and some cellular genes. In contrast, efficient natural utilization of -2 PRF has not been demonstrated previously in eukaryotic systems. Like all nidoviruses, members of the Arteriviridae (a family of positive-stranded RNA viruses) express their replicase polyproteins pp1a and pp1ab from two long ORFs (1a and 1b), where synthesis of pp1ab depends on -1 PRF. These polyproteins are posttranslationally cleaved into at least 13 functional nonstructural proteins. Here we report that porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and apparently most other arteriviruses, use an additional PRF mechanism to access a conserved alternative ORF that overlaps the nsp2-encoding region of ORF1a in the +1 frame. We show here that this ORF is translated via -2 PRF at a conserved G_GUU_UUU sequence (underscores separate ORF1a codons) at an estimated efficiency of around 20%, yielding a transframe fusion (nsp2TF) with the N-terminal two thirds of nsp2. Expression of nsp2TF in PRRSV-infected cells was verified using specific Abs, and the site and direction of frameshifting were determined via mass spectrometric analysis of nsp2TF. Further, mutagenesis showed that the frameshift site and an unusual frameshift-stimulatory element (a conserved CCCANCUCC motif 11 nucleotides downstream) are required to direct efficient -2 PRF. Mutations preventing nsp2TF expression impair PRRSV replication and produce a small-plaque phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that -2 PRF is a functional gene-expression mechanism in eukaryotes and add another layer to the complexity of arterivirus genome expression. PMID:23043113

  19. Bacillus licheniformis Contains Two More PerR-Like Proteins in Addition to PerR, Fur, and Zur Orthologues

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Shin-Yeong; Yang, Yoon-Mo; Ryu, Su-Hyun; Kwon, Yumi; Won, Young-Bin; Lee, Yeh-Eun; Youn, Hwan; Lee, Jin-Won

    2016-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family proteins include sensors of Fe (Fur), Zn (Zur), and peroxide (PerR). Among Fur family proteins, Fur and Zur are ubiquitous in most prokaryotic organisms, whereas PerR exists mainly in Gram positive bacteria as a functional homologue of OxyR. Gram positive bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus encode three Fur family proteins: Fur, Zur, and PerR. In this study, we identified five Fur family proteins from B. licheniformis: two novel PerR-like proteins (BL00690 and BL00950) in addition to Fur (BL05249), Zur (BL03703), and PerR (BL00075) homologues. Our data indicate that all of the five B. licheniformis Fur homologues contain a structural Zn2+ site composed of four cysteine residues like many other Fur family proteins. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the PerR-like proteins (BL00690 and BL00950) as well as PerRBL (BL00075), but not FurBL (BL05249) and ZurBL (BL03703), can sense H2O2 by histidine oxidation with different sensitivity. We also show that PerR2 (BL00690) has a PerR-like repressor activity for PerR-regulated genes in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that B. licheniformis contains three PerR subfamily proteins which can sense H2O2 by histidine oxidation not by cysteine oxidation, in addition to Fur and Zur. PMID:27176811

  20. Coloration of silver-stained protein bands in polyacrylamide gels is caused by light scattering from silver grains of characteristic sizes.

    PubMed Central

    Merril, C R; Bisher, M E; Harrington, M; Steven, A C

    1988-01-01

    This study investigates the physical basis of color effects in the detection of proteins in polyacrylamide gels by silver staining. Specifically, the hypothesis that different colors may correlate with the development of silver grains of characteristic sizes was investigated by electron microscopy. Protein bands that stained brown, yellow, and blue were excised from stained gels and prepared for electron microscopy by thin-sectioning. In each case, the size distributions of globular silver grains were determined directly from the electron micrographs. We found that blue bands have larger silver grains (with diameters of 40-100 nm) than yellow (21-39 nm) or brown bands (17-35 nm). On the basis of these and other observations, a general mechanism is proposed whereby chemical specificity of electrophoretically separated proteins is expressed in color-specific silver staining. Images PMID:2448776

  1. Rapid addition of unlabeled silent solubility tags to proteins using a new substrate-fused sortase reagent.

    PubMed

    Amer, Brendan R; Macdonald, Ramsay; Jacobitz, Alex W; Liauw, Brandon; Clubb, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    Many proteins can't be studied using solution NMR methods because they have limited solubility. To overcome this problem, recalcitrant proteins can be fused to a more soluble protein that functions as a solubility tag. However, signals arising from the solubility tag hinder data analysis because they increase spectral complexity. We report a new method to rapidly and efficiently add a non-isotopically labeled Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier protein (SUMO) solubility tag to an isotopically labeled protein. The method makes use of a newly developed SUMO-Sortase tagging reagent in which SUMO and the Sortase A (SrtA) enzyme are present within the same polypeptide. The SUMO-Sortase reagent rapidly attaches SUMO to any protein that contains the sequence LPXTG at its C-terminus. It modifies proteins at least 15-times faster than previously described approaches, and does not require active dialysis or centrifugation during the reaction to increase product yields. In addition, silently tagged proteins are readily purified using the well-established SUMO expression and purification system. The utility of the SUMO-Sortase tagging reagent is demonstrated using PhoP and green fluorescent proteins, which are ~90 % modified with SUMO at room temperature within four hours. SrtA is widely used as a tool to construct bioconjugates. Significant rate enhancements in these procedures may also be achieved by fusing the sortase enzyme to its nucleophile substrate. PMID:26852413

  2. Parallel β-sheet vibration band increases with proteins dipole moment under exposure to 1765 MHz microwaves.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2016-02-01

    Effects of exposure of 4 h to mobile phones microwaves at 1765 MHz at a power density around 940 mW/m(2) on four typical proteins (hemoglobin in H2 O solution, and myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme in D2 O solution) were studied by means of Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and Fourier self-deconvolution analysis. Increase in intensity of parallel β-sheet component around 1635 cm(-1) was observed after exposure of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and bovine serum albumin, showing that a mechanism of unfolding occurred after exposure, whereas no appreciable change in the amide I region occurred after lysozyme exposure. In addition, a relationship between protein dipole moment and protein unfolding rate was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient r = 0.973 and 95% confidence interval. PMID:26833949

  3. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  4. A myofibrillar protein of insect muscle related to vertebrate titin connects Z band and A band: purification and molecular characterization of invertebrate mini-titin.

    PubMed

    Nave, R; Weber, K

    1990-04-01

    We show that myofibrils of insect flight and leg muscle contain a doublet of polypeptides with apparent molecular weights of 700K (K = 10(3) Mr) (Hmp I) and 600K (Hmp II), respectively. In Locusta migratoria high ionic strength extraction solubilizes only Hmp II, which is readily purified in native form. It probably reflects a proteolytic derivative of the non-extractable Hmp I. On the basis of its viscosity radius and sedimentation coefficient, Hmp II has a molecular weight of 600K and seems to consist of a single polypeptide chain. The highly asymmetric structure of the molecule is confirmed by rotary shadowing. The flexible rods have a uniform diameter of 3-4 nm and an average length of 260 nm. Polyclonal antibodies show cross-reactivity between Hmp II and its putative precursor Hmp I. We discuss the similarities and differences between the larger titin I/titin II of vertebrate sarcomeric muscle and the smaller Hmp I/Hmp II of invertebrate muscle and conclude that the latter may reflect a mini-titin. In line with the smaller length, immunoelectron microscopy locates the insect mini-titin to the I band and a very short portion of the A band only, while vertebrate titin is known to connect the Z band to the M band. Mini-titin has also been purified from several other insects including Drosophila. Immunofluorescence microscopy on frozen sections shows that mini-titin is present in the sarcomeric muscles of various species from different invertebrate phyla. These include Annelida, Nematomorpha, Plathelmintha, Nemertea and Nematoda like Ascaris lumbricoides and Caenorhabditis elegans. This wide-spread occurrence of invertebrate mini-titin is confirmed by immunoblotting experiments. PMID:2117014

  5. Definition of a physiologic aging autoantigen by using synthetic peptides of membrane protein band 3: localization of the active antigenic sites.

    PubMed

    Kay, M M; Marchalonis, J J; Hughes, J; Watanabe, K; Schluter, S F

    1990-08-01

    Senescent cell antigen (SCA), an aging antigen, is a protein that appears on old cells and marks them for removal by the immune system in mammals. It is derived from band 3, a ubiquitous membrane transport protein found in diverse cell types and tissues. We have used synthetic peptides to identify aging antigenic sites on band 3, using a competitive inhibition assay and immunoblotting with IgG directed against the aging antigen on old cells. Results indicate that: (i) the active antigenic sites of the aging antigen reside on membrane protein band 3 residues that are extracellular regions implicated in anion transport (residues 538-554 and 788-827); (ii) a putative ankyrin-binding-region peptide is not involved in SCA activity; and (iii) carbohydrate moieties are not required for the antigenicity or recognition of SCA because synthetic peptides alone abolish binding of senescent cell IgG to erythrocytes. One of the putative transport sites that contributes to the aging antigen is located toward the carboxyl terminus. A model of band 3 is presented. Localization of the active antigenic site on the band 3 molecule facilitates definition of the molecular changes occurring during aging that initiate molecular as well as cellular degeneration. PMID:1696010

  6. Assignment of IR bands of isolated and protein-bound Peridinin in its fundamental and triplet state by static FTIR, time-resolved step-scan FTIR and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzetti, Alberto; Kish, Elizabeth; Robert, Bruno; Spezia, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    The vibrational properties of Peridinin in its fundamental state and in the excited triplet state have been investigated by DFT calculations and static and time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. The infrared spectrum of Peridinin in its fundamental state has been explored in the whole 2000-600 cm-1 range, and interpreted in term of molecular vibrations. In particular, new infrared bands have been identified and assigned to specific molecular vibrations. 3Peridinin molecular vibrations have also been investigated by DFT calculations. In addition, putative IR bands belonging to Peridinin and 3Peridinin have been identified in the step-scan FTIR difference spectrum of the Peridinin-Chlorophyll a-Protein from Amphidinium carterae, where light induce formation of a triplet state localized on one or more Peridinins. The exact nature of the triplet state formed in Peridinin-Chlorophyll a-Protein from dinoflagellates, in particular the possible involvement in this triplet state of 3Chlorophyll a, has been largely debated in the last few years (see Carbonera et al., 2014 [3]); time-resolved differential FTIR experiments have played a key role in this debate. Identification of IR marker bands for the main molecule (Peridinin) implicated in this photophysical process is therefore particularly important and makes this study a significant step towards the full understanding of Peridinin-Chlorophyll-a-Proteins photophysics.

  7. Addition of magnesium chloride to enhance mono-dispersity of a coiled-coil recombinant mouse macrophage protein.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Parveen; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Puri, Munish

    2014-04-01

    X-ray crystallography for the determination of three-dimensional structures of protein macromolecules represents an important tool in function assignment of uncharacterized proteins. However, crystallisation is often difficult to achieve. A protein sample fully characterized in terms of dispersity may increase the likelihood of successful crystallisation by improving the predictability of the crystallisation process. To maximize the probability of crystallisation of a novel mouse macrophage protein (rMMP), target molecule was characterized and refined to improve monodispersity. Addition of MgCl2 at low concentrations resolves the rMMP into a monodisperse solution, and finally successful crystallization of rMMP was achieved. The effect of MgCl2 was studied using gel filtration chromatography and dynamic light scattering. PMID:24385107

  8. A Narrow Amide I Vibrational Band Observed by Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy Reveals Highly Ordered Structures of a Biofilm Protein at the Air/Water Interface†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhuguang; Morales-Acosta, M. Daniela; Li, Shanghao; Liu, Wei; Kanai, Tapan; Liu, Yuting; Chen, Ya-Na; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.; Leblanc, Roger M.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized BslA, a bacterial biofilm protein, at the air/water interface using vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy and observed one of the sharpest amide I band ever reported. Combining methods of surface pressure measurements, thin film X-ray reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy, we showed extremely ordered BslA at the interface. PMID:26779572

  9. Addition of missing loops and domains to protein models by x-ray solution scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Petoukhov, Maxim V; Eady, Nigel A J; Brown, Katherine A; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2002-01-01

    Inherent flexibility and conformational heterogeneity in proteins can often result in the absence of loops and even entire domains in structures determined by x-ray crystallographic or NMR methods. X-ray solution scattering offers the possibility of obtaining complementary information regarding the structures of these disordered protein regions. Methods are presented for adding missing loops or domains by fixing a known structure and building the unknown regions to fit the experimental scattering data obtained from the entire particle. Simulated annealing was used to minimize a scoring function containing the discrepancy between the experimental and calculated patterns and the relevant penalty terms. In low-resolution models where interface location between known and unknown parts is not available, a gas of dummy residues represents the missing domain. In high-resolution models where the interface is known, loops or domains are represented as interconnected chains (or ensembles of residues with spring forces between the C(alpha) atoms), attached to known position(s) in the available structure. Native-like folds of missing fragments can be obtained by imposing residue-specific constraints. After validation in simulated examples, the methods have been applied to add missing loops or domains to several proteins where partial structures were available. PMID:12496082

  10. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycan by EptC protein-mediated addition of phosphoethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nichollas E; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V G; Labbate, Maurizio; Djordjevic, Steven P; Larsen, Martin R; Szymanski, Christine M; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2012-08-24

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni possesses an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate structures that decorate both protein and non-protein surface-exposed structures. An N-linked glycosylation system encoded by the pgl gene cluster mediates the synthesis of a rigidly conserved heptasaccharide that is attached to protein substrates or released as free oligosaccharide in the periplasm. Removal of N-glycosylation results in reduced virulence and impeded host cell attachment. Since the N-glycan is conserved, the N-glycosylation system is also an attractive option for glycoengineering recombinant vaccines in Escherichia coli. To determine whether non-canonical N-glycans are present in C. jejuni, we utilized high throughput glycoproteomics to characterize C. jejuni JHH1 and identified 93 glycosylation sites, including 34 not previously reported. Interrogation of these data allowed the identification of a phosphoethanolamine (pEtN)-modified variant of the N-glycan that was attached to multiple proteins. The pEtN moiety was attached to the terminal GalNAc of the canonical N-glycan. Deletion of the pEtN transferase eptC removed all evidence of the pEtN-glycan but did not globally influence protein reactivity to patient sera, whereas deletion of the pglB oligosaccharyltransferase significantly reduced reactivity. Transfer of eptC and the pgl gene cluster to E. coli confirmed the addition of the pEtN-glycan to a target C. jejuni protein. Significantly reduced, yet above background levels of pEtN-glycan were also observed in E. coli not expressing eptC, suggesting that endogenous E. coli pEtN transferases can mediate the addition of pEtN to N-glycans. The addition of pEtN must be considered in the context of glycoengineering and may alter C. jejuni glycan-mediated structure-function interactions. PMID:22761430

  11. Reconstitution of the mitochondrial Hsp70 (mortalin)-p53 interaction using purified proteins--identification of additional interacting regions.

    PubMed

    Iosefson, Ohad; Azem, Abdussalam

    2010-03-19

    Previous studies have shown that the mammalian mitochondrial 70 kDa heat-shock protein (mortalin) can also be detected in the cytosol. Cytosolic mortalin binds p53 and by doing so, prevents translocation of the tumor suppressor into the nucleus. In this study, we developed a novel binding assay, using purified proteins, for tracking the interaction between p53 and mortalin. Our results reveal that: (i) P53 binds to the peptide-binding site of mortalin which enhances the ability of the former to bind DNA. (ii) An additional previously unknown binding site for mortalin exists within the C-terminal domain of p53. PMID:20153329

  12. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  13. Activity of the Human Rhinovirus 3C Protease Studied in Various Buffers, Additives and Detergents Solutions for Recombinant Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Raheem; Shah, Majid Ali; Tufail, Soban; Ismat, Fouzia; Imran, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mazhar; Mirza, Osman; Rhaman, Moazur

    2016-01-01

    Proteases are widely used to remove affinity and solubility tags from recombinant proteins to avoid potential interference of these tags with the structure and function of the fusion partner. In recent years, great interest has been seen in use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease owing to its stringent sequence specificity and enhanced activity. Like other proteases, activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease can be affected in part by the buffer components and additives that are generally employed for purification and stabilization of proteins, hence, necessitate their removal by tedious and time-consuming procedures before proteolysis can occur. To address this issue, we examined the effect of elution buffers used for common affinity based purifications, salt ions, stability/solubility and reducing agents, and detergents on the activity of the human rhinovirus 3C protease using three different fusion proteins at 4°C, a temperature of choice for purification of many proteins. The results show that the human rhinovirus 3C protease performs better at 4°C than the frequently used tobacco etch virus protease and its activity was insensitive to most of the experimental conditions tested. Though number of fusion proteins tested is limited, we expect that these finding will facilitate the use of the human rhinovirus 3C protease in recombinant protein production for pharmaceutical and biotechnological applications. PMID:27093053

  14. Isoprenoid addition to Ras protein is the critical modification for its membrane association and transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, K; Cox, A D; Hisaka, M M; Graham, S M; Buss, J E; Der, C J

    1992-01-01

    We have introduced a variety of amino acid substitutions into carboxyl-terminal CA1A2X sequence (C = cysteine; A = aliphatic; X = any amino acid) of the oncogenic [Val12]Ki-Ras4B protein to identify the amino acids that permit Ras processing (isoprenylation, proteolysis, and carboxyl methylation), membrane association, and transformation in cultured mammalian cells. While all substitutions were tolerated at the A1 position, substitutions at A2 and X reduced transforming activity. The A2 residue was important for both isoprenylation and AAX proteolysis, whereas the X residue dictated the extent and specificity of isoprenoid modification only. Differences were observed between Ras processing in living cells and farnesylation efficiency in a cell-free system. Finally, one farnesylated mutant did not undergo either proteolysis or carboxyl methylation but still displayed efficient membrane association (approximately 50%) and transforming activity, indicating that farnesylation alone can support Ras transforming activity. Since both farnesylation and carboxyl methylation are critical for yeast a-factor biological activity, the three CAAX-signaled modifications may have different contributions to the function of different CAAX-containing proteins. Images PMID:1631135

  15. Impact of bentonite additions during vinification on protein stability and volatile compounds of Albariño wines.

    PubMed

    Lira, Eugenio; Rodríguez-Bencomo, Juan José; Salazar, Fernando N; Orriols, Ignacio; Fornos, Daniel; López, Francisco

    2015-03-25

    Today, bentonite continues to be one of the most used products to remove proteins in white wines in order to avoid their precipitation in bottles. However, excessive use of bentonite has negative effects on the aroma of final wine, so the optimization of the dose and the time of its application are important for winemakers. This paper analyzes how applying an equal dose of bentonite at different stages (must clarification; beginning, middle, and end of fermentation) affects the macromolecular profile, protein stability, physical-chemical characteristics and aromatic profile of the wine obtained. The results showed the addition during fermentation (especially in the middle and at the end) reduced the total dose required for protein stabilization of Albariño wines and maintained the sensory characteristics of this variety. PMID:25751284

  16. Simultaneous separation of acidic and basic proteins using gemini pyrrolidinium surfactants and hexafluoroisopropanol as dynamic coating additives in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu; Li, Yunfang; Mei, Jie; Cai, Bo; Dong, Jinfeng; Shi, Zhiguo; Xiao, Yuxiu

    2015-09-18

    The separation of acidic and basic proteins using CE has been limited in part due to the adsorption of proteins onto the capillary wall. In this work, the efficient control of EOF and the simultaneous separation of acidic and basic proteins are achieved by use of C18-4-C18PB as a dynamic coating additive, which is a representative surfactant for 1,1'-(butane-1,s-alkyl)bis(1-alkylpyrrolidinium) bromide (Cn-4-CnPB, n=10, 12, 14, 16 and 18). C18-4-C18PB exhibits a powerful capability in the reversal of EOF, and a low concentration even less than 0.001 mM is sufficient to reverse EOF at the tested pH values (3.0-9.0). Baseline separation of eight proteins with sharp peaks and high efficiencies (54,000-297,000 plates/m) is obtained with 30 mM NaH2PO4 buffer (pH 5.0) containing 4 mM C18-4-C18PB. At the same buffer condition, the Cn-4-CnPB with shorter alkyl chain (n=10, 12, 14, 16) cannot achieve the same effective protein separation as C18-4-C18PB. However, the combined use of small amounts (≤0.5%, v/v) of hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and Cn-4-CnPB (n=10, 12, 14, 16) as additives can completely separate all eight proteins with high efficiencies of 81,000-318,000 plates/m. The RSDs of migration time are less than 0.80% and 5.84% for run-to-run and day-to-day assays (n=5), respectively, and the protein recoveries are larger than 90.15%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the simultaneous separation of acidic and basic proteins using Cn-4-CnPB surfactants or Cn-4-CnPB surfactants combined with HFIP as dynamic coating additives. PMID:26300480

  17. Effect of antibiotic, Lacto-lase and probiotic addition in chicken feed on protein and fat content of chicken meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, Noor Amiza; Abdullah, Aminah

    2015-09-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the effect of chicken feed additives (antibiotic, Lacto-lase® and probiotic) on protein and fat content of chicken meat. Chicken fed with control diet (corn-soy based diet) served as a control. The treated diets were added with zinc bacitracin (antibiotic), different amount of Lacto-lase® (a mixture of probiotic and enzyme) and probiotic. Chicken were slaughtered at the age of 43-48 days. Each chicken was divided into thigh, breast, drumstick, drumette and wing. Protein content in chicken meat was determined by using macro-Kjeldahl method meanwhile Soxhlet method was used to analyse fat content. The result of the study showed that the protein content of chicken breast was significantly higher (p≤0.05) while thigh had the lowest protein content (p≤0.05). Antibiotic fed chicken was found to have the highest protein content among the treated chickens but there was no significant different with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® fed chicken (p>0.05). All thighs were significantly higher (p≤0.05) in fat content except for drumette of control chicken while breast contained the lowest fat content compared to other chicken parts studied. The control chicken meat contained significantly higher (p≤0.05) amount of fat compared to the other treated chickens. Chicken fed with 2g/kg Lacto-lase® had the lowest (p≤0.05) fat content. The result of this study indicated that the addition of Lacto-lase® as a replacement of antibiotic in chicken feed will not affect the content of protein and fat of chicken meat.

  18. Effects of in situ cobalt ion addition on the activity of a gfp-oph fusion protein: the fermentation kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wu, C F; Valdes, J J; Bentley, W E

    2001-01-01

    The effects of cobalt ion addition and inducer concentration were studied in the fermentation of E. coli BL21 expressing a GFP (green fluorescent protein)-OPH (organophosphorus hydrolase) fusion protein. It was found that cobalt ion addition improved the OPH activity significantly. When 2 mM of CoCl(2) was supplied during the IPTG-induction phase, OPH activity was enhanced approximately 10-fold compared to the case without cobalt or by the addition of cobalt to the cell extracts. Results indicate, therefore, that incorporation of the cobalt during synthesis is needed for enhanced activity. Also, the maximum OPH activity was not linearly related to inducer concentration. A mathematical model was then constructed to simulate these phenomena. Model parameters were determined by constrained least-squares and optimal IPTG and cobalt addition concentrations were obtained, pinpointing the conditions for the maximum productivity. Finally, the GFP fluorescence intensity was found linear to the OPH activity in each fermentation, demonstrating the function of GFP for monitoring its fusion partner's quantity in the bioreactor. PMID:11485418

  19. Vitellogenin-RNAi and ovariectomy each increase lifespan, increase protein storage, and decrease feeding, but are not additive in grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Tetlak, Alicia G; Burnett, Jacob B; Hahn, Daniel A; Hatle, John D

    2015-12-01

    Reduced reproduction has been shown to increase lifespan in many animals, yet the mechanisms behind this trade-off are unclear. We addressed this question by combining two distinct, direct means of life-extension via reduced reproduction, to test whether they were additive. In the lubber grasshopper, Romalea microptera, ovariectomized (OVX) individuals had a ~20% increase in lifespan and a doubling of storage relative to controls (Sham operated). Similarly, young female grasshoppers treated with RNAi against vitellogenin (the precursor to egg yolk protein) had increased fat body mass and halted ovarian growth. In this study, we compared VgRNAi to two control groups that do not reduce reproduction, namely buffer injection (Buffer) and injection with RNAi against a hexameric storage protein (Hex90RNAi). Each injection treatment was tested with and without ovariectomy. Hence, we tested feeding, storage, and lifespans in six groups: OVX and Buffer, OVX and Hex90RNAi, OVX and VgRNAi, Sham and Buffer, Sham and Hex90RNAi, and Sham and VgRNAi. Ovariectomized grasshoppers and VgRNAi grasshoppers each had similar reductions in feeding (~40%), increases in protein storage in the hemolymph (150-300%), and extensions in lifespan (13-21%). Ovariectomized grasshoppers had higher vitellogenin protein levels than did VgRNAi grasshoppers. Last but not least, when ovariectomy and VgRNAi were applied together, there was no greater effect on feeding, protein storage, or longevity. Hence, feeding regulation, and protein storage in insects, may be conserved components of life-extension via reduced reproduction. PMID:26298568

  20. Hepatitis C Virus E1 and E2 Proteins Used as Separate Immunogens Induce Neutralizing Antibodies with Additive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Beaumont, Elodie; Roch, Emmanuelle; Chopin, Lucie; Roingeard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Various strategies involving the use of hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins as immunogens have been developed for prophylactic vaccination against HCV. However, the ideal mode of processing and presenting these immunogens for effective vaccination has yet to be determined. We used our recently described vaccine candidate based on full-length HCV E1 or E2 glycoproteins fused to the heterologous hepatitis B virus S envelope protein to compare the use of the E1 and E2 proteins as separate immunogens with their use as the E1E2 heterodimer, in terms of immunogenetic potential and the capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. The specific anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibody responses induced in animals immunized with vaccine particles harboring the heterodimer were profoundly impaired with respect to those in animals immunized with particles harboring E1 and E2 separately. Moreover, the anti-E1 and anti-E2 antibodies had additive neutralizing properties that increase the cross-neutralization of heterologous strains of various HCV genotypes, highlighting the importance of including both E1 and E2 in the vaccine for an effective vaccination strategy. Our study has important implications for the optimization of HCV vaccination strategies based on HCV envelope proteins, regardless of the platform used to present these proteins to the immune system. PMID:26966906

  1. Functional mammalian spliceosomal complex E contains SMN complex proteins in addition to U1 and U2 snRNPs

    PubMed Central

    Makarov, Evgeny M.; Owen, Nicholas; Bottrill, Andrew; Makarova, Olga V.

    2012-01-01

    Spliceosomes remove introns from primary gene transcripts. They assemble de novo on each intron through a series of steps that involve the incorporation of five snRNP particles and multiple non-snRNP proteins. In mammals, all the intermediate complexes have been characterized on one transcript (MINX), with the exception of the very first, complex E. We have purified this complex by two independent procedures using antibodies to either U1-A or PRPF40A proteins, which are known to associate at an early stage of assembly. We demonstrate that the purified complexes are functional in splicing using commitment assays. These complexes contain components expected to be in the E complex and a number of previously unrecognized factors, including survival of motor neurons (SMN) and proteins of the SMN-associated complex. Depletion of the SMN complex proteins from nuclear extracts inhibits formation of the E complex and causes non-productive complexes to accumulate. This suggests that the SMN complex stabilizes the association of U1 and U2 snRNPs with pre-mRNA. In addition, the antibody to PRPF40A precipitated U2 snRNPs from nuclear extracts, indicating that PRPF40A associates with U2 snRNPs. PMID:22110043

  2. Characterization of toxins from the broad-banded water snake Helicops angulatus (Linnaeus, 1758): isolation of a cysteine-rich secretory protein, Helicopsin.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Amalid; Sánchez, Elda E; Galán, Jacob A; Tao, W Andy; Guerrero, Belsy; Navarrete, Luis F; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2011-04-01

    Helicops angulatus (broad-banded water snake) according to recent proposals is presently cited in the family Dipsadidae, subfamily Xenodontinae, forming the tribe Hydropsini along with the genera Hydrops and Pseudoeryx. The current work characterizes the proteolytic and neurotoxic activities of H. angulatus crude toxins from salivary excretion (SE) and describes the isolation and identification of a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) called helicopsin. The SE lethal dose (LD₅₀) was 5.3 mg/kg; however, the SE did not contain hemorrhagic activity. Helicopsin was purified using activity-guided, Superose 12 10/300 GL molecular exclusion, Mono Q10 ion exchange, and Protein Pak 60 molecular exclusion. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed a highly purified band of approximately 20 kDa. The minimal lethal dose for helicopsin was 0.4 mg/kg. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis identified 2 unique peptides MEWYPEAAANAER and YTQIVWYK, representing a protein sequence (deleted homology) belonging to cysteine-rich secretory proteins, which are conserved in snake venoms (CRISPs). CRISPs are a large family of cysteine-rich secretory proteins found in various organisms and participate in diverse biological processes. Helicopsin exhibited robust neurotoxic activity as evidenced by immediate death (~8 min) due to respiratory paralysis in NIH mice. These observations for helicopsin purified from H. angulatus provide further evidence of the extensive distribution of highly potent neurotoxins in the Colubroidea superfamily of snakes than previously described. PMID:20931174

  3. Band 4.1 proteins are expressed in the retina and interact with both isoforms of the metabotropic glutamate receptor type 8.

    PubMed

    Rose, Melanie; Dütting, Eva; Enz, Ralf

    2008-06-01

    The function of the CNS depends on the correct regulation of neurotransmitter receptors by interacting proteins. Here, we screened a retinal cDNA library for proteins interacting with the intracellular C-terminus of the metabotropic glutamate receptor isoform 8a (mGluR8a). The band 4.1B protein binds to the C-termini of mGluR8a and mGluR8b, co-localizes with these glutamate receptors in transfected mammalian cells, facilitates their cell surface expression and inhibits the mGluR8 mediated reduction of intracellular cAMP concentrations. In contrast, no interaction with 4.1B was observed for other mGluRs tested. Amino acids encoded by exons 19 and 20 of 4.1B and a stretch of four basic amino acids present in the mGluR8 C-termini mediate the protein interaction. Besides binding to 4.1B, mGluR8 isoforms interact with 4.1G, 4.1N, and 4.1R. Because band 4.1 transcripts undergo extensive alternative splicing, we analyzed the splicing pattern of interacting regions and detected a 4.1B isoform expressed specifically in the retina. Within this tissue, mGluR8 and 4.1B, 4.1G, 4.1N, and 4.1R show a comparable distribution, being expressed in both synaptic layers and in somata of the ganglion cell layer. In summary, our studies identified band 4.1 proteins as new players for the mGluR8 mediated signal transduction. PMID:18373558

  4. Template-dependent nucleotide addition in the reverse (3′-5′) direction by Thg1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Shoko; Suzuki, Tateki; Chen, Meirong; Kato, Koji; Yu, Jian; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Thg1-like protein (TLP) catalyzes the addition of a nucleotide to the 5′-end of truncated transfer RNA (tRNA) species in a Watson-Crick template–dependent manner. The reaction proceeds in two steps: the activation of the 5′-end by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)/guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), followed by nucleotide addition. Structural analyses of the TLP and its reaction intermediates have revealed the atomic detail of the template-dependent elongation reaction in the 3′-5′ direction. The enzyme creates two substrate binding sites for the first- and second-step reactions in the vicinity of one reaction center consisting of two Mg2+ ions, and the two reactions are executed at the same reaction center in a stepwise fashion. When the incoming nucleotide is bound to the second binding site with Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, the 3′-OH of the incoming nucleotide and the 5′-triphosphate of the tRNA are moved to the reaction center where the first reaction has occurred. That the 3′-5′ elongation enzyme performs this elaborate two-step reaction in one catalytic center suggests that these two reactions have been inseparable throughout the process of protein evolution. Although TLP and Thg1 have similar tetrameric organization, the tRNA binding mode of TLP is different from that of Thg1, a tRNAHis-specific G−1 addition enzyme. Each tRNAHis binds to three of the four Thg1 tetramer subunits, whereas in TLP, tRNA only binds to a dimer interface and the elongation reaction is terminated by measuring the accepter stem length through the flexible β-hairpin. Furthermore, mutational analyses show that tRNAHis is bound to TLP in a similar manner as Thg1, thus indicating that TLP has a dual binding mode. PMID:27051866

  5. Peculiarities of zone migration and band broadening in gradient reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of proteins with respect to membrane chromatography.

    PubMed

    Belenkii, B G; Podkladenko, A M; Kurenbin, O I; Mal'tsev, V G; Nasledov, D G; Trushin, S A

    1993-08-13

    The peculiarities of zone migration and band broadening in the reversed-phase gradient HPLC of proteins were investigated. In the isocratic mode a critical composition of the mobile phase was found at which all proteins regardless of their molecular mass migrate with equal velocity and have a capacity factor equal to the phase ratio (VP/V0), i.e., the same capacity factor as a marker of total accessible volume would have in steric exclusion chromatography. It is shown that steric exclusion conditions are never achieved in gradient HPLC. In the first (adsorption stage) of gradient elution where the separation takes place the velocity of a protein increases until it becomes equal to the velocity of the desorbing solvent front at a critical distance X0 from column entrance. Strong broadening is characteristic of this stage. In the second (critical) stage the protein travels the remaining distance (L-X0) with the velocity of the solvent. A definition of X0 is given allowing one very simple calculation of the minimum permissible column length as a function of gradient steepness, mobile phase velocity and protein adsorption parameter. When x = X0 the protein zone has the smallest dispersion. Making L < X0 is especially disadvantageous, as it leads to anomalous bandspreading. The theory of gradient HPLC was refined on this basis and the usefulness of this approach in high-performance membrane chromatography is demonstrated. PMID:8408410

  6. Effect of Protein Additives on Acetylene Reduction (Nitrogen Fixation) by Rhizobium in the Presence and Absence of Soybean Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Stephen J.; Phillips, Donald A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of protein additives on acetylene reduction (N2 fixation) by Rhizobium associated with soybean cells (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) in vitro was studied. Acetylene reduction was promoted on the basal medium supplemented with 1.4 mg of N/ml supplied as aqueous extracts of hexane-extracted soybean, red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), or peas (Pisum sativum L.). Commercial samples of α-casein, or bovine serum albumin also promoted acetylene reduction at a concentration of 1.4 mg of N/ml of basal medium, but egg albumin supplying an equal amount of nitrogen to the basal medium completely suppressed acetylene reduction. Autoclaving the aqueous extract of hexane-extracted soybean meal had no effect on its ability to promote acetylene reduction. The presence of 40 mm succinate decreased acetylene reduction with leguminous proteins supplying 1.4 mg of N/ml but promoted acetylene reduction by Rhizobium 32H1-soybean cell associations on media containing α-casein, bovine serum albumin, or egg albumin suppling 1.4 mg of N/ml. Similar results were obtained with both cowpea Rhizobium 32H1 and Rhizobium japonicum 61A96. Pure cultures of Rhizobium 32H1 developed acetylene-reducing activity in the presence of soybean extract on basal agar medium and in vermiculite supplied with N-free mineral salts plus crude soybean meal. The results suggest that in certain situations, free living Rhizobium may reduce N2 under field conditions. PMID:16659592

  7. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  8. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  9. The gene for human erythrocyte membrane protein band 7. 2 (EPB72) maps to 9q33-q34 centromeric to the Philadelphia chromosome translocation breakpoint region

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.G.; Upender, M.; Ward, D.C.; Forget, B.G. )

    1993-10-01

    Erthrocyte band 7.2b is a 31-kDa integral phosphoprotein absent from the erythrocytes of many patients with hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt). HSt is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by mouth-shaped erythrocyte morphology on peripheral blood smears. The clinical severity of HSt is variable; some patients experience hemolysis and anemia while others are asymptomatic. The red cell membranes of these patients usually exhibit abnormal permeability to sodium and potassium with resultant modification of intracellular water content. The band 7.2b protein has been purified and the cDNA cloned. The approved gene name and symbol are erythrocyte membrane protein band 7.2 and EPB72, respectively, as assigned by the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee. Using a human reticulocyte cDNA library as template, a 491-bp fragment corresponding to the 3' end of the coding region of the EPB72 cDNA was amplified. Three overlapping phase DNA clones were isolated using this probe. Four genomic DNA fragments of 2.0, 2.5, 4.5, and 5.0 kb, respectively, were isolated from these clones. To localize the EPB72 gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization, these genomic DNA fragments were labeled with biotin-11-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes as described. Probes were preannealed to C[sub 0]t1-fractionated DNA to block repetitive sequences. Experiments were analyzed and digitally imaged using a cooled CCD camera. The probes, in combination, gave specific hybridization signals only in chromosome 9q. The gene for erythrocyte membrane protein 7.2 localized to 9q33-q34.

  10. Novel ATPase activity of the polyprotein intermediate, Viral Protein genome-linked-Nuclear Inclusion-a protease, of Pepper vein banding potyvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Chhavi; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pepper vein banding potyvirus VPg harbors Walker motifs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VPg exhibits ATPase activity in the presence of NIa-Pro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plausible structural and functional interplay between VPg and NIa-Pro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional relevance of prolonged presence of VPg-Pro during infection. -- Abstract: Potyviruses temporally regulate their protein function by polyprotein processing. Previous studies have shown that VPg (Viral Protein genome-linked) of Pepper vein banding virus interacts with the NIa-Pro (Nuclear Inclusion-a protease) domain, and modulates the kinetics of the protease. In the present study, we report for the first time that VPg harbors the Walker motifs A and B, and the presence of NIa-Pro, especially in cis (cleavage site (E191A) VPg-Pro mutant), is essential for manifestation of the ATPase activity. Mutation of Lys47 (Walker motif A) and Asp88:Glu89 (Walker motif B) to alanine in E191A VPg-Pro lead to reduced ATPase activity, confirming that this activity was inherent to VPg. We propose that potyviral VPg, established as an intrinsically disordered domain, undergoes plausible structural alterations upon interaction with globular NIa-Pro which induces the ATPase activity.

  11. Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru; Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Jae-won, Chang; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku; Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Yagi, Naoto

    2013-10-15

    Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10–20 keV (△E/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

  12. Additive Effects of Retinoic Acid (RA) and Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP-4) Apoptosis Signaling in Retinoblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Patrick; Doliva, Rebekka; Busch, Maike; Philippeit, Claudia; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Retinoids have been shown to serve promising therapeutic agents for human cancers, e.g. the treatment of neuroblastoma. Synthetic retinoids, specific for particular retinoic acid (RA) receptors, are tested as new therapy strategies. In the present study, application of recombinant retinoic acid (RA) lowers retinoblastoma (RB) cell viability and induces apoptosis in RB cell lines. Combined treatment of RA and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) increases the pro-apoptotic effect of RA in the RB cells lines WERI-Rb1, Y-79, RB355, RBL-30 and RBL-15, indicating an additive effect. We could show that in WERI-Rb1 cells RA/BMP-4 mediated cell death is at least partially caspase-dependent, whereby RA and BMP-4 additively increased (i) Apaf-1 mRNA levels, (ii) caspase-9 cleavage activity and (iii) the number of activated, cleaved caspase-3 positive cells. Compared to single application of RA and BMP-4, combined RA/BMP-4 treatment significantly augments mRNA levels of the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) RARα and RARß and the retinoic X receptor (RXR) RXRγ suggesting an interaction in the induction of these RA receptor subtypes in WERI-Rb1 cells. Agonist studies revealed that both, RARs and RXRs are involved in RA/BMP-4 mediated apoptosis in WERI-Rb1 retinoblastoma cells. Employing specific RAR subtype antagonists and a RXRß and RXRγ knockdown, we proved that RA/BMP-4 apoptosis signaling in WERI-Rb1 cells requires the RA receptor subtypes RARα, RARß, RXRß and RXRγ. Deciphering signaling mechanisms underlying apoptosis induction of RA and BMP-4 in WERI-Rb1 cells, our study provides useful starting-points for future retinoid-based therapy strategies in retinoblastoma. PMID:26173116

  13. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-07-15

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  14. Effects of Ethanol Addition on the Efficiency of Subcritical Water Extraction of Proteins and Amino Acids from Porcine Placenta

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, hydrolysates of porcine placenta were obtained and the extraction efficiency for proteins and amino acids was compared between sub- and super-critical water extraction systems; optimum efficiency was found to be achieved using subcritical water (170℃, 10 bar). In this study, the effects of adding ethanol to the subcritical water system were investigated. The lowest-molecular-weight extraction product detected weighed 434 Da, and the efficiency of extraction for low-molecular-weight products was increased when either the concentration of ethanol was decreased, or the extraction time was lengthened from 10 min to 30 min. The highest concentration of free amino acids (approximately 8 mM) was observed following 30 min extraction using pure distilled water. The concentration of free amino acids was significantly lower when ethanol was added or a shorter extraction time was used (p<0.05). Color change of the solution following extraction was measured. There were no significant differences in color between lysates produced with different extraction times when using distilled water (p>0.05); however, using different extraction times produced significant differences in color when using 20% or 50% ethanol solution for subcritical extraction (p<0.05). The range of pH for the hydrolysate solutions was 6.4-7.5. In conclusion, the investigated extraction system was successful in the extraction of ≤ 500 Da hydrolysates from porcine placenta, but addition of ethanol did not yield higher production of low-molecular-weight hydrolysates than that achieved by DW alone. PMID:26761837

  15. Effect of a Simulated Analogue Telephone Channel on the Performance of a Remote Automatic System for the Detection of Pathologies in Voice: Impact of Linear Distortions on Cepstrum-Based Assessment - Band Limitation, Frequency Response and Additive Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, Rubén; Sáenz-Lechón, Nicolás; Godino-Llorente, Juan Ignacio; Osma-Ruiz, Víctor; Fredouille, Corinne

    Advances in speech signal analysis during the last decade have allowed the development of automatic algorithms for a non-invasive detection of laryngeal pathologies. Performance assessment of such techniques reveals that classification success rates over 90 % are achievable. Bearing in mind the extension of these automatic methods to remote diagnosis scenarios, this paper analyses the performance of a pathology detector based on Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients when the speech signal has undergone the distortion of an analogue communications channel, namely the phone channel. Such channel is modeled as a concatenation of linear effects. It is shown that while the overall performance of the system is degraded, success rates in the range of 80% can still be achieved. This study also shows that the performance degradation is mainly due to band limitation and noise addition.

  16. Janus kinases and focal adhesion kinases play in the 4.1 band: a superfamily of band 4.1 domains important for cell structure and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Girault, J. A.; Labesse, G.; Mornon, J. P.; Callebaut, I.

    1998-01-01

    The band 4.1 domain was first identified in the red blood cell protein band 4.1, and subsequently in ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM proteins) and other proteins, including tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin, talin, unconventional myosins VIIa and X, and protein tyrosine phosphatases. Recently, the presence of a structurally related domain has been demonstrated in the N-terminal region of two groups of tyrosine kinases: the focal adhesion kinases (FAK) and the Janus kinases (JAK). Additional proteins containing the 4.1/JEF (JAK, ERM, FAK) domain include plant kinesin-like calmodulin-binding proteins (KCBP) and a number of uncharacterized open reading frames identified by systematic DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences suggests that band 4.1/JEF domains can be grouped in several families that have probably diverged early during evolution. Hydrophobic cluster analysis indicates that the band 4.1/JEF domains might consist of a duplicated module of approximately 140 residues and a central hinge region. A conserved property of the domain is its capacity to bind to the membrane-proximal region of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of proteins with a single transmembrane segment. Many proteins with band 4.1/JEF domains undergo regulated intra- or intermolecular homotypic interactions. Additional properties common to band 4.1/JEF domains of several proteins are binding of phosphoinositides and regulation by GTPases of the Rho family. Many proteins with band 4. 1/JEF domains are associated with the actin-based cytoskeleton and are enriched at points of contact with other cells or the extracellular matrix, from which they can exert control over cell growth. Thus, proteins with band 4.1/JEF domain are at the crossroads between cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction in multicellular organisms. Their importance is underlined by the variety of diseases that can result from their mutations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:9990861

  17. Effect of the addition of flavan-3-ols on the HPLC-DAD salivary-protein profile.

    PubMed

    Quijada-Morín, Natalia; Crespo-Expósito, Carlos; Rivas-Gonzalo, Julián C; García-Estévez, Ignacio; Escribano-Bailón, María Teresa

    2016-09-15

    The interaction between monomeric flavan-3-ols and salivary proteins has been studied using HPLC-DAD. A chromatographic method has been described and seven protein fractions were collected. The peptides and proteins present in each fraction have been identified using nLC-MS-MS analysis. The interaction between saliva and catechin, epicatechin and gallocatechin has been studied. These compounds interact in a discriminated way with salivary proteins: catechin causes a decrease of some fractions, epicatechin causes the decrease or increase of fractions while gallocatechin seems to cause an increase of two fractions. This variable behavior is explained, for the decrease in the chromatographic area, by the precipitation of salivary proteins and, for the increase of the area, by the formation of soluble complexes and/or for the formation of new peaks. PMID:27080905

  18. Recessive Mutations in the Gene Encoding the Tight Junction Protein Occludin Cause Band-like Calcification with Simplified Gyration and Polymicrogyria

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, Mary C.; Daly, Sarah B.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Black, Graeme C.M.; Pilz, Daniela T.; Brockmann, Knut; McEntagart, Meriel; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Zaki, Maha; Wolf, Nicole I.; Ladda, Roger L.; Sell, Susan; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Squier, Waney; Dobyns, William B.; Livingston, John H.; Crow, Yanick J.

    2010-01-01

    Band-like calcification with simplified gyration and polymicrogyria (BLC-PMG) is a rare autosomal-recessive neurological disorder showing highly characteristic clinical and neuroradiological features. Affected individuals demonstrate early-onset seizures, severe microcephaly, and developmental arrest with bilateral, symmetrical polymicrogyria (PMG) and a band of gray matter calcification on brain imaging; as such, the disorder can be considered as a “pseudo-TORCH” syndrome. By using autozygosity mapping and copy number analysis we identified intragenic deletions and mutations in OCLN in nine patients from six families with BLC-PMG. The OCLN gene encodes occludin, an integral component of tight junctions. Neuropathological analysis of an affected individual showed similarity to the mouse model of occludin deficiency with calcification predominantly associated with blood vessels. Both intracranial calcification and PMG are heterogeneous in etiology. Neuropathological and clinical studies of PMG have suggested that in utero ischemic or vascular insults may contribute to this common cortical abnormality. Tight junctions are functional in cerebral blood vessels early in fetal development and continue to play a vital role in maintenance of the blood-brain barrier during postnatal life. We provide evidence that the tight junction protein occludin (encoded by the OCLN gene) is involved in the pathogenesis of malformations of cortical development. PMID:20727516

  19. Interaction of toxic azo dyes with heme protein: biophysical insights into the binding aspect of the food additive amaranth with human hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2015-05-30

    A biophysical study on the interaction of the food colorant amaranth with hemoglobin was undertaken. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric studies proposed for an intimate binding interaction between the dye and the protein. The dye quenched the fluorescence of the protein remarkably and the mechanism of quenching was found to be static in nature. Synchronous fluorescence studies suggested that the polarity around the tryptophan residues was altered in the presence of amaranth whereas the polarity around tyrosine residues remained largely unaltered. 3D fluorescence, FTIR and circular dichroism results suggested that the binding reaction caused conformational changes in hemoglobin. The negative far-UV CD bands exhibited a significantly large decrease in magnitude in the presence of amaranth. From calorimetry studies it was established that the binding was driven by a large positive entropic contribution and a small but favorable enthalpy change. PMID:25725343

  20. Additive transgene expression and genetic introgression in multiple green-fluorescent protein transgenic crop x weed hybrid generations.

    PubMed

    Halfhill, M D; Millwood, R J; Weissinger, A K; Warwick, S I; Stewart, C N

    2003-11-01

    The level of transgene expression in crop x weed hybrids and the degree to which crop-specific genes are integrated into hybrid populations are important factors in assessing the potential ecological and agricultural risks of gene flow associated with genetic engineering. The average transgene zygosity and genetic structure of transgenic hybrid populations change with the progression of generations, and the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene is an ideal marker to quantify transgene expression in advancing populations. The homozygous T(1) single-locus insert GFP/ Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) transgenic canola ( Brassica napus, cv Westar) with two copies of the transgene fluoresced twice as much as hemizygous individuals with only one copy of the transgene. These data indicate that the expression of the GFP gene was additive, and fluorescence could be used to determine zygosity status. Several hybrid generations (BC(1)F(1), BC(2)F(1)) were produced by backcrossing various GFP/Bt transgenic canola ( B. napus, cv Westar) and birdseed rape ( Brassica rapa) hybrid generations onto B. rapa. Intercrossed generations (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) were generated by crossing BC(2)F(1) individuals in the presence of a pollinating insect ( Musca domestica L.). The ploidy of plants in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk hybrid generation was identical to the weedy parental species, B. rapa. AFLP analysis was used to quantify the degree of B. napus introgression into multiple backcross hybrid generations with B. rapa. The F(1) hybrid generations contained 95-97% of the B. napus-specific AFLP markers, and each successive backcross generation demonstrated a reduction of markers resulting in the 15-29% presence in the BC(2)F(2) Bulk population. Average fluorescence of each successive hybrid generation was analyzed, and homozygous canola lines and hybrid populations that contained individuals homozygous for GFP (BC(2)F(2) Bulk) demonstrated significantly higher fluorescence than hemizygous hybrid

  1. Ferritin associates with marginal band microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Infante, Anthony A.; Infante, Dzintra; Chan, M.-C.; How, P.-C.; Kutschera, Waltraud; Linhartova, Irena; Muellner, Ernst W.; Wiche, Gerhard; Propst, Friedrich . E-mail: friedrich.propst@univie.ac.at

    2007-05-01

    We characterized chicken erythrocyte and human platelet ferritin by biochemical studies and immunofluorescence. Erythrocyte ferritin was found to be a homopolymer of H-ferritin subunits, resistant to proteinase K digestion, heat stable, and contained iron. In mature chicken erythrocytes and human platelets, ferritin was localized at the marginal band, a ring-shaped peripheral microtubule bundle, and displayed properties of bona fide microtubule-associated proteins such as tau. Red blood cell ferritin association with the marginal band was confirmed by temperature-induced disassembly-reassembly of microtubules. During erythrocyte differentiation, ferritin co-localized with coalescing microtubules during marginal band formation. In addition, ferritin was found in the nuclei of mature erythrocytes, but was not detectable in those of bone marrow erythrocyte precursors. These results suggest that ferritin has a function in marginal band formation and possibly in protection of the marginal band from damaging effects of reactive oxygen species by sequestering iron in the mature erythrocyte. Moreover, our data suggest that ferritin and syncolin, a previously identified erythrocyte microtubule-associated protein, are identical. Nuclear ferritin might contribute to transcriptional silencing or, alternatively, constitute a ferritin reservoir.

  2. The addition of a protein-rich breakfast and its effects on acute appetite control and food intake in ‘breakfast-skipping’ adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Leidy, HJ; Racki, EM

    2014-01-01

    Background Breakfast skipping (BS) is closely associated with overeating (in the evening), weight gain and obesity. It is unclear whether the addition of breakfast, with emphasis on dietary protein, leads to better appetite and energy intake regulation in adolescents. Objective The purpose of the study was to examine the impact of addition of a normal-protein (PN) breakfast vs protein-rich (PR) breakfast on appetite and food intake in ‘breakfast-skipping’ adolescents. Subjects and Design A total of 13 adolescents (age 14.3 ± 0.3 years; body mass index percentile 79 ± 4 percentile; skipped breakfast 5 ± 1× per week) randomly completed 3 testing days that included a PN (18 ± 1 g protein), PR (48 ± 2 g protein) or BS. Breakfast was 24% of estimated daily energy needs. Appetite, satiety and hormonal responses were collected over 5 h followed by an ad libitum lunch and 24-h food intake assessments. Results Perceived appetite was not different following PN vs BS; PR led to greater reductions vs BS (P<0.01) and PN (P< 0.001). Fullness was greater following both breakfast meals vs BS (P<0.01) but was not different between meals. Ghrelin was not different among treatments. Greater PYY concentrations were observed following both breakfast meals vs BS (P<0.01) but was not different between meals. Lunch energy intake was not different following PN vs BS; PR led to fewer kcal consumed vs BS (P<0.01) and PN (P<0.005). Daily food intake was not different among treatments. Conclusions Breakfast led to increased satiety through increased fullness and PYY concentrations in ‘breakfast skipping’ adolescents. A breakfast rich in dietary protein provides additional benefits through reductions in appetite and energy intake. These findings suggest that the addition of a protein-rich breakfast might be an effective strategy to improve appetite control in young people. PMID:20125103

  3. Emulsifying properties and oil/water (O/W) interface adsorption behavior of heated soy proteins: effects of heating concentration, homogenizer rotating speed, and salt addition level.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhumei; Chen, Yeming; Kong, Xiangzhen; Zhang, Caimeng; Hua, Yufei

    2014-02-19

    The adsorption of heat-denatured soy proteins at the oil/water (O/W) interface during emulsification was studied. Protein samples were prepared by heating protein solutions at concentrations of 1-5% (w/v) and were then diluted to 0.3% (w/v). The results showed that soy proteins that had been heated at higher concentrations generated smaller droplet size of emulsion. Increase in homogenizer rotating speed resulted in higher protein adsorption percentages and lower surface loads at the O/W interface. Surface loads for both unheated and heated soy proteins were linearly correlated with the unadsorbed proteins' equilibrium concentration at various rotating speeds. With the rise in NaCl addition level, protein adsorption percentage and surface loads of emulsions increased, whereas lower droplet sizes were obtained at the ionic strength of 0.1 M. The aggregates and non-aggregates displayed different adsorption behaviors when rotating speed or NaCl concentration was varied. PMID:24460091

  4. Gastric Banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding before deciding to have the procedure. Advertisements for a device or procedure may not include ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  5. Effect of addition of thermally modified cowpea protein on sensory acceptability and textural properties of wheat bread and sponge cake.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Lydia; Euston, Stephen R; Ahmed, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates the sensory acceptability and textural properties of leavened wheat bread and sponge cake fortified with cow protein isolates that had been denatured and glycated by thermal treatment. Defatted cowpea flour was prepared from cow pea beans and the protein isolate was prepared (CPI) and thermally denatured (DCPI). To prepare glycated cowpea protein isolate (GCPI) the cowpea flour slurry was heat treated before isolation of the protein. CPI was more susceptible to thermal denaturation than GCPI as determined by turbidity and sulphydryl groups resulting in greater loss of solubility. This is attributed to the higher glycation degree and higher carbohydrate content of GCPI as demonstrated by glycoprotein staining of SDS PAGE gels. Water absorption of bread dough was significantly enhanced by DCPI and to a larger extent GCPI compared to the control, resulting in softer texture. CPI resulted in significantly increased crumb hardness in baked bread than the control whereas DCPI or GCPI resulted in significantly softer crumb. Bread fortified with 4% DCPI or GCPI was similar to control as regards sensory and textural properties whereas 4% CPI was significantly different, limiting its inclusion level to 2%. There was a trend for higher sensory acceptability scores for GCPI containing bread compared DCPI. Whole egg was replaced by 20% by GCPI (3.5%) in sponge cake without affecting the sensory acceptability, whereas CPI and DCPI supplemented cakes were significantly different than the control. PMID:26471676

  6. Conversion of canola meal into a high-protein feed additive via solid-state fungal incubation process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study goal was to determine the optimal fungal culture to reduce glucosinolates (GLS), fiber, and residual sugars while increasing the protein content and nutritional value of canola meal. Solid-state incubation conditions were used to enhance filamentous growth of the fungi. Flask trials were p...

  7. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) seedlings secrete proteases from the roots and, after protein addition, grow well on medium without inorganic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, B; Godlewski, M; Zimny, J; Zimny, A

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports on the role of proteases secreted by roots in nitrogen capture by plants. The study was conducted on aseptically cultivated wheat seedlings (Triticum aestivum cv. Tacher) obtained from embryos isolated from grains. Seedlings were cultivated for 21 days on deionised water, Murashige Skoog medium (MS), MS without inorganic nitrogen (IN), and MS without IN, in which IN was replaced by casein (0.01%, 0.1% or 1%). Comparison of seedlings grown on these media showed that casein entirely compensated for the lack of inorganic nitrogen in the medium. Shoots and roots of seedlings cultivated on MS medium with this protein had higher fresh weight than those cultivated on MS medium without casein. The increase in fresh weight of seedlings was correlated with casein concentration and proteolytic activity in the medium. In conclusion, wheat that uses proteases secreted by the roots can directly utilise proteins in the medium as a source of nitrogen without prior digestion by microbial proteases and without protein mineralisation. These results suggest the important role of organic nitrogen fertilisers in increasing wheat yield. PMID:18950429

  8. Modification of water absorption capacity of a plastic based on bean protein using gamma irradiated starches as additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köber, E.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Gavioli, N.; Salmoral, E. M.

    2007-01-01

    Some properties of a bean protein-starch plastic were modified by irradiation of the starch. Two kinds of starch from bean and cassava were irradiated with doses until 50 kGy before their inclusion in the composite. Water absorption of the resultant product was reduced by 36% and 60% in materials containing bean and cassava starch, respectively. A large decline in the elongation is observed till 10 kGy in both materials, while tensile strength diminished by 11% in the cassava composite.

  9. Additive effect of calreticulin and translation initiation factor eIF4E on secreted protein production in the baculovirus expression system.

    PubMed

    Teng, Chao-Yi; van Oers, Monique M; Wu, Tzong-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    The baculovirus expression vector system is widely used for the production of recombinant proteins. However, the yield of membrane-bound or secreted proteins is relatively low when compared with intracellular or nuclear proteins. In a previous study, we had demonstrated that the co-expression of the human chaperones calreticulin (CALR) or β-synuclein (β-syn) increased the production of a secreted protein considerably. A similar effect was also seen when co-expressing insect translation initiation factor eIF4E. In this study, different combinations of the three genes were tested (CALR alone, β-syn + CALR, or β-syn + CALR + eIF4E) to further improve secretory protein production by assessing the expression level of a recombinant secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEFP). An additional 1.8-fold increment of SEFP production was obtained when cells co-expressed all the three "helper" genes, compared to cells, in which only CALR was co-produced with SEFP. Moreover, the duration of the SEFP production lasted much longer in cells that co-expressed these three "helper" genes, up to 10 dpi was observed. Utilization of this "triple-supporters" containing vector offers significant advantages when producing secreted proteins and is likely to have benefits for the production of viral vaccines and other pharmaceutical products. PMID:23900798

  10. Surface protein imprinted core-shell particles for high selective lysozyme recognition prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinran; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Jianxi; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-12-24

    A novel kind of lysozyme (Lys) surface imprinted core-shell particles was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) strategy. With controllable polymer shell chain length, such particles showed obviously improved selectivity for protein recognition. After the RAFT initial agent and template protein was absorbed on silica particles, the prepolymerization solution, with methacrylic acid and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate as the monomers, and N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) as the cross-linker, was mixed with the silica particles, and the polymerization was performed at 40 °C in aqueous phase through the oxidation-reduction initiation. Ater polymerization, with the template protein removal and destroying dithioester groups with hexylamine, the surface Lyz imprinted particles were obtained with controllable polymer chain length. The binding capacity of the Lys imprinted particles could reach 5.6 mg protein/g material, with the imprinting factor (IF) as 3.7, whereas the IF of the control material prepared without RAFT strategy was only 1.6. The absorption equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min. Moreover, Lys could be selectively recognized by the imprinted particles from both a four-proteins mixture and egg white sample. All these results demonstrated that these particles prepared by RAFT strategy are promising to achieve the protein recognition with high selectivity. PMID:25434676

  11. Expression of c-Fos protein in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca and CA3 region, associated with the temporary inactivation of the supramammillary area.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lourdes

    2016-07-01

    The supramammillary (SuM) area is part of the diencephalic nuclei comprising the mammillary bodies, and is a key structure in the memory and spatial learning processes. It is a critical region in the modulation/generation of hippocampal theta rhythm. In addition, many papers have recently shown a clear involvement of this structure in the processes of spatial learning and memory in animal models, although it is still not known how it modulates spatial navigation and response emotional. The aim of the present research was to study the effect of the temporary inactivation of the SuM area on synaptic plasticity of crucial structures in the formation of spatial memory and emotional response. Sprague-Dawley rats were asigned in three groups: a control group where the animals were not subjected to any treatment, and two groups where the rats received microinjections of tetrodotoxin (TTX) in the SuM area (5ng diluted in 0.5μl of saline) or saline (0.5μl). The microinjections were administered 90min before the perfusion. Later, cellular activity in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DBB) and CA3 region of the dorsal hippocampus was assessed, by measuring the immediate early gene c-fos. The results show a clear hiperactivity cellular in medial septum/diagonal band of Broca and a clear hypoactivity cellular in the CA3 region of the hippocampus when there was a functional inactivation of the SuM area. It suggests that the SuM area seems to be part of the connection and information input pathways to CA3 region of the hippocampal formation, key for proper functioning in spatial memory and emotional response. PMID:26802745

  12. A reward band study of mallards to estimate band reporting rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Burnham, K.P.

    1976-01-01

    Reward bands ($10) were placed on 2,122 hatching-year mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), and an additional 11,490 received conventional bands (controls) to estimate band reporting rates. An analysis of band recoveries indicated that the reporting rate was dependent primarily upon three factors: (1) the distance banded birds were recovered from the banding site, (2) band collecting activities of conservation agencies (usually near banding sites), and ( 3) the intensity of banding effort in the region (frequency of banded birds in the population of the region). Reporting rates were uniformly depressed near the banding sites, but they showed an east-west cline at distances greater than 80 km from the banding sites. The reporting rate was highest in the west. Limited data on historical band reporting rates were compiled. Recommendations are given for adjusting band recoveries to account for the nonreporting of bands for 1957-73.

  13. Band Together!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    After nearly a decade as band director at St. James High School in St. James, Missouri, Derek Limback knows that the key to building a successful program is putting the program itself above everything else. Limback strives to augment not only his students' musical prowess, but also their leadership skills. Key to his philosophy is instilling a…

  14. Quantifying Additive Interactions of the Osmolyte Proline with Individual Functional Groups of Proteins: Comparisons with Urea and Glycine Betaine, Interpretation of m-Values

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Roger C.; Guinn, Emily J.; Capp, Michael W.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Record, M. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To quantify interactions of the osmolyte L-proline with protein functional groups and predict its effects on protein processes, we use vapor pressure osmometry to determine chemical potential derivatives dµ2/dm3 = µ23 quantifying preferential interactions of proline (component 3) with 21 solutes (component 2) selected to display different combinations of aliphatic or aromatic C, amide, carboxylate, phosphate or hydroxyl O, and/or amide or cationic N surface. Solubility data yield µ23 values for 4 less-soluble solutes. Values of µ23 are dissected using an ASA-based analysis to test the hypothesis of additivity and obtain α-values (proline interaction potentials) for these eight surface types and three inorganic ions. Values of µ23 predicted from these α-values agree with experiment, demonstrating additivity. Molecular interpretation of α-values using the solute partitioning model yields partition coefficients (Kp) quantifying the local accumulation or exclusion of proline in the hydration water of each functional group. Interactions of proline with native protein surface and effects of proline on protein unfolding are predicted from α-values and ASA information and compared with experimental data, with results for glycine betaine and urea, and with predictions from transfer free energy analysis. We conclude that proline stabilizes proteins because of its unfavorable interactions with (exclusion from) amide oxygens and aliphatic hydrocarbon surface exposed in unfolding, and that proline is an effective in vivo osmolyte because of the osmolality increase resulting from its unfavorable interactions with anionic (carboxylate and phosphate) and amide oxygens and aliphatic hydrocarbon groups on the surface of cytoplasmic proteins and nucleic acids. PMID:23909383

  15. Yeast ortholog of the Drosophila crooked neck protein promotes spliceosome assembly through stable U4/U6.U5 snRNP addition.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, S; McLean, M R; Rymond, B C

    1999-01-01

    Mutants in the Drosophila crooked neck (crn) gene show an embryonic lethal phenotype with severe developmental defects. The unusual crn protein consists of sixteen tandem repeats of the 34 amino acid tetratricopeptide (TPR) protein recognition domain. Crn-like TPR elements are found in several RNA processing proteins, although it is unknown how the TPR repeats or the crn protein contribute to Drosophila development. We have isolated a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, CLF1, that encodes a crooked neck-like factor. CLF1 is an essential gene but the lethal phenotype of a clf1::HIS3 chromosomal null mutant can be rescued by plasmid-based expression of CLF1 or the Drosophila crn open reading frame. Clf1p is required in vivo and in vitro for pre-mRNA 5' splice site cleavage. Extracts depleted of Clf1p arrest spliceosome assembly after U2 snRNP addition but prior to productive U4/U6.U5 association. Yeast two-hybrid analyses and in vitro binding studies show that Clf1p interacts specifically and differentially with the U1 snRNP-Prp40p protein and the yeast U2AF65 homolog, Mud2p. Intriguingly, Prp40p and Mud2p also bind the phylogenetically conserved branchpoint binding protein (BBP/SF1). Our results indicate that Clf1p acts as a scaffolding protein in spliceosome assembly and suggest that Clf1p may support the cross-intron bridge during the prespliceosome-to-spliceosome transition. PMID:10445879

  16. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of dipeptides in protein hydrolysate by a TNBS derivatization-aided standard addition method.

    PubMed

    Hanh, Vu Thi; Kobayashi, Yutaro; Maebuchi, Motohiro; Nakamori, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish, through a standard addition method, a convenient quantification assay for dipeptides (GY, YG, SY, YS, and IY) in soybean hydrolysate using 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonate (TNBS) derivatization-aided LC-TOF-MS. Soybean hydrolysate samples (25.0 mg mL(-1)) spiked with target standards were subjected to TNBS derivatization. Under the optimal LC-MS conditions, five target dipeptides derivatized with TNBS were successfully detected. Examination of the standard addition curves, with a correlation coefficient of r(2) > 0.979, provided a reliable quantification of the target dipeptides, GY, YG, SY, YS, and IY, in soybean hydrolysate to be 424 ± 20, 184 ± 9, 2188 ± 199, 327 ± 16, and 2211 ± 133 μg g(-1) of hydrolysate, respectively. The proposed LC-MS assay is a reliable and convenient assay method, with no interference from matrix effects in hydrolysate, and with no requirement for the use of an isotope labeled internal standard. PMID:26212980

  17. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Moscona-Amir, E.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-07-12

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ or anti-..cap alpha../sub 0/ antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed.

  18. Pairwise additivity of energy components in protein-ligand binding: the HIV II protease-Indinavir case.

    PubMed

    Ucisik, Melek N; Dashti, Danial S; Faver, John C; Merz, Kenneth M

    2011-08-28

    An energy expansion (binding energy decomposition into n-body interaction terms for n ≥ 2) to express the receptor-ligand binding energy for the fragmented HIV II protease-Indinavir system is described to address the role of cooperativity in ligand binding. The outcome of this energy expansion is compared to the total receptor-ligand binding energy at the Hartree-Fock, density functional theory, and semiempirical levels of theory. We find that the sum of the pairwise interaction energies approximates the total binding energy to ∼82% for HF and to >95% for both the M06-L density functional and PM6-DH2 semiempirical method. The contribution of the three-body interactions amounts to 18.7%, 3.8%, and 1.4% for HF, M06-L, and PM6-DH2, respectively. We find that the expansion can be safely truncated after n=3. That is, the contribution of the interactions involving more than three parties to the total binding energy of Indinavir to the HIV II protease receptor is negligible. Overall, we find that the two-body terms represent a good approximation to the total binding energy of the system, which points to pairwise additivity in the present case. This basic principle of pairwise additivity is utilized in fragment-based drug design approaches and our results support its continued use. The present results can also aid in the validation of non-bonded terms contained within common force fields and in the correction of systematic errors in physics-based score functions. PMID:21895219

  19. Function-Biased Choice of Additives for Optimization of Protein Crystallization: The Case of the Putative Thioesterase PA5185 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    SciTech Connect

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Wang, Shuren; Koclega, Katarzyna D.; Zheng, Heping; Evdokimova, Elena; Kudritska, Marina; Cymborowski, Marcin; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Minor, Wladek

    2009-09-15

    The crystal structure of PA5185, a putative thioesterase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, was solved using multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction to 2.4 {angstrom}. Analysis of the structure and information about the putative function of the protein were used to optimize crystallization conditions. The crystal growth was optimized by applying additives with chemical similarity to a fragment of a putative PA5185 substrate (CoA or its derivative). Using new crystallization conditions containing this function-biased set of additives, several new crystal forms were produced, and structures of three of them (in three different space groups) were determined. One of the new crystal forms had an improved resolution limit of 1.9 {angstrom}, and another displayed an alternative conformation of the highly conserved loop containing Asn26, which could play a physiological role. Surprisingly, none of the additives were ordered in the crystal structures. Application of function-biased additives could be used as a standard optimization protocol for producing improved diffraction, or new crystal forms, which may lead to better understanding of the biological functions of proteins.

  20. Optimization of the β-Elimination/Michael Addition Chemistry on Reversed-Phase Supports for Mass Spectrometry Analysis of O-Linked Protein Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Nika, Heinz; Nieves, Edward; Hawke, David H.; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue

    2013-01-01

    We previously adapted the β-elimination/Michael addition chemistry to solid-phase derivatization on reversed-phase supports, and demonstrated the utility of this reaction format to prepare phosphoseryl peptides in unfractionated protein digests for mass spectrometric identification and facile phosphorylation-site determination. Here, we have expanded the use of this technique to β-N-acetylglucosamine peptides, modified at serine/threonine, phosphothreonyl peptides, and phosphoseryl/phosphothreonyl peptides, followed in sequence by proline. The consecutive β-elimination with Michael addition was adapted to optimize the solid-phase reaction conditions for throughput and completeness of derivatization. The analyte remained intact during derivatization and was recovered efficiently from the silica-based, reversed-phase support with minimal sample loss. The general use of the solid-phase approach for enzymatic dephosphorylation was demonstrated with phosphoseryl and phosphothreonyl peptides and was used as an orthogonal method to confirm the identity of phosphopeptides in proteolytic mixtures. The solid-phase approach proved highly suitable to prepare substrates from low-level amounts of protein digests for phosphorylation-site determination by chemical-targeted proteolysis. The solid-phase protocol provides for a simple, robust, and efficient tool to prepare samples for phosphopeptide identification in MALDI mass maps of unfractionated protein digests, using standard equipment available in most biological laboratories. The use of a solid-phase analytical platform is expected to be readily expanded to prepare digest from O-glycosylated- and O-sulfonated proteins for mass spectrometry-based structural characterization. PMID:23997661

  1. The use of additive and subtractive approaches to examine the nuclear localization sequence of the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been identified in the N-terminal (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) amino acid sequence of the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1. The importance of this amino acid sequence for nuclear transport of VP1 protein was demonstrated by a genetic "subtractive" study using the constructs pSG5VP1 (full-length VP1) and pSG5 delta 5'VP1 (truncated VP1, lacking amino acids Ala1-Cys11). These constructs were used to transfect COS-7 cells, and expression and intracellular localization of the VP1 protein was visualized by indirect immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the full-length VP1 was expressed and localized in the nucleus, while the truncated VP1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm and not transported to the nucleus. These findings were substantiated by an "additive" approach using FITC-labeled conjugates of synthetic peptides homologous to the NLS of VP1 cross-linked to bovine serum albumin or immunoglobulin G. Both conjugates localized in the nucleus after microinjection into the cytoplasm of 3T6 cells. The importance of individual amino acids found in the basic sequence (Lys3-Arg-Lys5) of the NLS was also investigated. This was accomplished by synthesizing three additional peptides in which lysine-3 was substituted with threonine, arginine-4 was substituted with threonine, or lysine-5 was substituted with threonine. It was found that lysine-3 was crucial for nuclear transport, since substitution of this amino acid with threonine prevented nuclear localization of the microinjected, FITC-labeled conjugate.

  2. Effects of a Dissostichus mawsoni-CaM recombinant proteins feed additive on the juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) under the acute low temperature challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Wei-Na; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Peng, Chang-Lian; Chen, Liang-Biao

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Dissostichus mawsoni-Calmodulin (Dm-CaM) on growth performance, enzyme activities, respiratory burst, MDA level and immune-related gene expressions of the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) exposed to the acute low temperature stress were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with Dm-CaM protein was fed to the groupers for 6 weeks. No significant difference was observed in the specific growth rates, weight gains and survivals. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to acute low temperature challenge. The groupers fed with Dm-CaM additive diet showed a significant decrease in the respiratory burst activity, while the blood cell number increased significantly at 25 °C by comparing with the control and additive control group. The enzymatic activity of SOD, ACP and ALP increased significantly in Dm-CaM additive group, while MDA level maintained stable with the lowest value. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that the up-regulated transcript expressions of CaM, C3, SOD2, LysC and HSPA4 were observed in Dm-CaM additive group. These results indicated that Dm-CaM additive diet may regulate the grouper immune response to the acute low temperature challenge. PMID:26122279

  3. Protein and Calorie Restriction Contribute Additively to Protection from Renal Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Partly via Leptin Reduction in Male Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Lauren T; Treviño-Villarreal, J Humberto; Mejia, Pedro; Grondin, Yohann; Harputlugil, Eylul; Hine, Christopher; Vargas, Dorathy; Zheng, Hanqiao; Ozaki, C Keith; Kristal, Bruce S; Simpson, Stephen J; Mitchell, James R

    2015-01-01

    Background: Short-term dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition preconditions against surgical stress in rodents; however, the nutritional basis and underlying nutrient/energy-sensing pathways remain poorly understood. Objectives: We investigated the relative contribution of protein restriction (PR) vs. calorie restriction (CR) to protection from renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and changes in organ-autonomous nutrient/energy-sensing pathways and hormones underlying beneficial effects. Methods: Mice were preconditioned on experimental diets lacking total calories (0–50% CR) or protein/essential amino acids (EAAs) vs. complete diets consumed ad libitum (AL) for 1 wk before IRI. Renal outcome was assessed by serum markers and histology and integrated over a 2-dimensional protein/energy landscape by geometric framework analysis. Changes in renal nutrient/energy-sensing signal transduction and systemic hormones leptin and adiponectin were also measured. The genetic requirement for amino acid sensing via general control non-derepressible 2 (GCN2) was tested with knockout vs. control mice. The involvement of the hormone leptin was tested by injection of recombinant protein vs. vehicle during the preconditioning period. Results: CR-mediated protection was dose dependent up to 50% with maximal 2-fold effect sizes. PR benefits were abrogated by EAA re-addition and additive with CR, with maximal benefits at any given amount of CR occurring with a protein-free diet. GCN2 was not required for functional benefits of PR. Activation and repression of nutrient/energy-sensing kinases, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), respectively, on PR reflected a state of negative energy balance, paralleled by 13% weight loss and an 87% decrease in leptin, independent of calorie intake. Recombinant leptin administration partially abrogated benefits of dietary preconditioning against renal IRI. Conclusions: In male mice, PR

  4. The use of the Rx spin label in orientation measurement on proteins, by EPR† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cp04753f Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, M. A.; McKay, J. E.; Robinson, J. L. S.; EL Mkami, H.; Smith, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    The bipedal spin label Rx is more restricted in its conformation and dynamics than its monopodal counterpart R1. To systematically investigate the utility of the Rx label, we have attempted to comprehensively survey the attachment of Rx to protein secondary structures. We have examined the formation, structure and dynamics of the spin label in relation to the underlying protein in order to determine feasibility and optimum conditions for distance and orientation measurement by pulsed EPR. The labeled proteins have been studied using molecular dynamics, CW EPR, pulsed EPR distance measurement at X-band and orientation measurement at W-band. The utility of different modes and positions of attachment have been compared and contrasted. PMID:26426572

  5. Additive method for the prediction of protein-peptide binding affinity. Application to the MHC class I molecule HLA-A*0201.

    PubMed

    Doytchinova, Irini A; Blythe, Martin J; Flower, Darren R

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for prediction of binding affinities between proteins and peptides. We exemplify the method through its application to binding predictions of peptides with affinity to major histocompatibility complex class I molecule HLA-A*0201. The method is named "additive" because it is based on the assumption that the binding affinity of a peptide could be presented as a sum of the contributions of the amino acids at each position and the interactions between them. The amino acid contributions and the contributions of the interactions between adjacent side chains and every second side chain were derived using a partial least squares (PLS) statistical methodology using a training set of 420 experimental IC50 values. The predictive power of the method was assessed using rigorous cross-validation and using an independent test set of 89 peptides. The mean value of the residuals between the experimental and predicted pIC50 values was 0.508 for this test set. The additive method was implemented in a program for rapid T-cell epitope search. It is universal and can be applied to any peptide-protein interaction where binding data is known. PMID:12645903

  6. Sodium Benzoate, a Metabolite of Cinnamon and a Food Additive, Upregulates Neuroprotective Parkinson Disease Protein DJ-1 in Astrocytes and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Khasnavis, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    DJ-1 (PARK7) is a neuroprotective protein that protects cells from oxidative stress. Accordingly, loss-of-function DJ-1 mutations have been linked with a familial form of early onset Parkinson disease. Mechanisms by which DJ-1 level could be enriched in the CNS are poorly understood. Recently we have discovered anti-inflammatory activity of sodium benzoate (NaB), a metabolite of cinnamon and a widely-used food additive. Here we delineate that NaB is also capable of increasing the level of DJ-1 in primary mouse and human astrocytes and human neurons highlighting another novel neuroprotective effect of this compound. Reversal of DJ-1-inducing effect of NaB by mevalonate, farnesyl phosphate, but not cholesterol and ubiquinone, suggests that depletion of intermediates, but not end products, of the mevalonate pathway is involved in the induction of DJ-1 by NaB. Accordingly, either an inhibitor of p21ras farnesyl protein transferase (FPTI) or a dominant-negative mutant of p21ras alone was also able to increase the expression of DJ-1 in astrocytes suggesting an involvement of p21ras in DJ-1 expression. However, an inhibitor of geranyl geranyl transferase (GGTI) and a dominant-negative mutant of p21rac had no effect on the expression of DJ-1, indicating the specificity of the effect. Similarly lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an activator of small G proteins, also inhibited the expression of DJ-1, and NaB and FPTI, but not GGTI, abrogated LPS-mediated inhibition. Together, these results suggest that NaB upregulates DJ-1 via modulation of mevalonate metabolites and that p21ras, but not p21rac, is involved in the regulation of DJ-1. PMID:21701815

  7. Early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition and ontogenetic changes in muscle growth mechanisms of rainbow trout: short- and long-term effects.

    PubMed

    Alami-Durante, Hélène; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Duval, Carine; Maunas, Patrick; Girod-David, Virginia; Médale, Françoise

    2014-09-14

    As the understanding of the nutritional regulation of muscle growth mechanisms in fish is fragmentary, the present study aimed to (1) characterise ontogenetic changes in muscle growth-related genes in parallel to changes in muscle cellularity; (2) determine whether an early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition affects the muscle growth mechanisms of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) alevins; and (3) determine whether this early feeding of a high-fat (HF) diet to alevins had a long-term effect on muscle growth processes in juveniles fed a commercial diet. Developmental regulation of hyperplasia and hypertrophy was evidenced at the molecular (expression of myogenic regulatory factors, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and myosin heavy chains (MHC)) and cellular (number and diameter of white muscle fibres) levels. An early decrease in dietary protein:energy ratio by fat addition stimulated the body growth of alevins but led to a fatty phenotype, with accumulation of lipids in the anterior part, and less caudal muscle when compared at similar body weights, due to a decrease in both the white muscle hyperplasia and maximum hypertrophy of white muscle fibres. These HF diet-induced cellular changes were preceded by a very rapid down-regulation of the expression of fast-MHC. The present study also demonstrated that early dietary composition had a long-term effect on the subsequent muscle growth processes of juveniles fed a commercial diet for 3 months. When compared at similar body weights, initially HF diet-fed juveniles indeed had a lower mean diameter of white muscle fibres, a smaller number of large white muscle fibres, and lower expression levels of MyoD1 and myogenin. These findings demonstrated the strong effect of early feed composition on the muscle growth mechanisms of trout alevins and juveniles. PMID:24949706

  8. Band anticrossing in dilute nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, W.; Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Wu, J.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.

    2003-12-23

    Alloying III-V compounds with small amounts of nitrogen leads to dramatic reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy in the resulting dilute nitride alloys. The effect originates from an anti-crossing interaction between the extended conduction-band states and localized N states. The interaction splits the conduction band into two nonparabolic subbands. The downward shift of the lower conduction subband edge is responsible for the N-induced reduction of the fundamental band-gap energy. The changes in the conduction band structure result in significant increase in electron effective mass and decrease in the electron mobility, and lead to a large enhance of the maximum doping level in GaInNAs doped with group VI donors. In addition, a striking asymmetry in the electrical activation of group IV and group VI donors can be attributed to mutual passivation process through formation of the nearest neighbor group-IV donor nitrogen pairs.

  9. Increase in the carbohydrate content of the microalgae Spirulina in culture by nutrient starvation and the addition of residues of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Vieira Salla, Ana Cláudia; Margarites, Ana Cláudia; Seibel, Fábio Ivan; Holz, Luiz Carlos; Brião, Vandré Barbosa; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Colla, Luciane Maria; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Non-renewable sources that will end with time are the largest part of world energy consumption, which emphasizes the necessity to develop renewable sources of energy. This necessity has created opportunities for the use of microalgae as a biofuel. The use of microalgae as a feedstock source for bioethanol production requires high yields of both biomass and carbohydrates. With mixotrophic cultures, wastewater can be used to culture algae. The aim of the study was to increase the carbohydrate content in the microalgae Spirulina with the additions of residues from the ultra and nanofiltration of whey protein. The nutrient deficit in the Zarrouk medium diluted to 20% and the addition of 2.5% of both residue types led to high carbohydrate productivity (60 mg L(-1) d(-1)). With these culture conditions, the increase in carbohydrate production in Spirulina indicated that the conditions were appropriate for use with microalgae as a feedstock in the production of bioethanol. PMID:26967336

  10. Dilatational band formation in bone

    PubMed Central

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Diab, Tamim; Sroga, Grazyna E.; Ural, Ani; Boskey, Adele L.; Gundberg, Caren M.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Toughening in hierarchically structured materials like bone arises from the arrangement of constituent material elements and their interactions. Unlike microcracking, which entails micrometer-level separation, there is no known evidence of fracture at the level of bone’s nanostructure. Here, we show that the initiation of fracture occurs in bone at the nanometer scale by dilatational bands. Through fatigue and indentation tests and laser confocal, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies on human and bovine bone specimens, we established that dilatational bands of the order of 100 nm form as ellipsoidal voids in between fused mineral aggregates and two adjacent proteins, osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OPN). Laser microdissection and ELISA of bone microdamage support our claim that OC and OPN colocalize with dilatational bands. Fracture tests on bones from OC and/or OPN knockout mice (OC−/−, OPN−/−, OC-OPN−/−;−/−) confirm that these two proteins regulate dilatational band formation and bone matrix toughness. On the basis of these observations, we propose molecular deformation and fracture mechanics models, illustrating the role of OC and OPN in dilatational band formation, and predict that the nanometer scale of tissue organization, associated with dilatational bands, affects fracture at higher scales and determines fracture toughness of bone. PMID:23129653

  11. TDRS Ku band gateway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Cynthia; Lecha, Javier; Principe, Caleb M.; Ross, Douglas

    1987-01-01

    The Wideband Transport Frame Formatter (WTFF) is the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) ku-band return link gateway. The WTFF system is a multiplexing device developed to process and downlink the high rate data generated by a wide variety of users. The WTFF is designed to frame and format high data rate user channels into transport frames and multiplex according to a predefined schedule into two bit streams that are compatible with TDRS Ku I and Q band service. The combined data rate will be 300 Mbps. The WTFF will service up to eight input channels generating data in the range of 10 to 150 Mbps. In addition to these input channels, audio data will be accepted by the WTFF system and inserted in the downlink. A second function of the WTFF is to provide telecommunication coding as assigned to each virtual channel to ensure a given quality of service.

  12. Effects of the Dietary Addition of Amaranth (Amaranthus mantegazzianus) Protein Isolate on Antioxidant Status, Lipid Profiles and Blood Pressure of Rats.

    PubMed

    Lado, María B; Burini, Julieta; Rinaldi, Gustavo; Añón, María C; Tironi, Valeria A

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the dietary addition of 2.5% (w/w) Amaranthus mantegazzianus protein isolate (AI) on blood pressure, lipid profiles and antioxidative status of Wistar rats were evaluated. Six diets were used to feed animals during 28 days: (base (AIN93G), Chol (cholesterol 1%, w/w), CE (α-tocopherol 0.005%, w/w), CholE (cholesterol 1% (w/w) + α-tocopherol 0.005%, w/w), CAI (AI 2.5% w/w), CholAI (cholesterol 1% (w/w) + AI 2.5%, w/w). Lipid profiles of plasma and liver and faecal cholesterol content were analyzed. Antioxidant status was evaluated by the ferric reducing activity of plasma (FRAP), the 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in plasma and liver. Blood pressure was measured in the tail artery of rats. CholA group presented a significant (α < 0.05) reduction (16%) in the plasma total cholesterol. In liver, the intake of cholesterol (Chol group) induced a significant increment in cholesterol and triglycerides (2.5 and 2.3 times, respectively), which could be decreased (18% and 47%, respectively) by the addition of AI (CholA group). This last group also showed an increased faecal cholesterol excretion (20%). Increment (50%) in FRAP values, diminution of TBA value in plasma and liver (70% and 38%, respectively) and diminution of SOD activity (20%) in plasma of CholA group suggest an antioxidant effect because of the intake of AI. In addition, CA and CholA groups presented a diminution (18%) of blood pressure after 28 days. PMID:26497504

  13. Effect of protein source and protease addition on performance, blood metabolites and nutrient digestibility of turkeys fed on low-protein diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch.

    PubMed

    Shahir, M H; Rahimi, R; Taheri, H R; Heidariniya, A; Baradaran, N; Asadi Kermani, Z

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a monocomponent protease and dietary inclusion of canola meal (CM) and poultry by-product meal (PBM) on growth performance, carcass characteristics and blood metabolites of turkeys fed on low crude protein (CP) diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch. Experimental treatments included control, maize-soybean meal diet including 258.3 g/kg CP; negative control 1 (NC1), maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg); NC2, control diet (CP, 258.3 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg); NC3, maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg). Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets were created by addition of protease enzyme (30 000 units/kg of diet) to the NC1 and NC3 diets, respectively. The NC3 group had lower body weight gain (BWG) compared to those fed on the control diet, and no improvement with enzyme addition (NC3 + P) was achieved. The protease addition to the NC1 diet (NC1 + P) improved BWG to the level of the control diet. The NC1 group had higher feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to the control and NC3 + P, but protease addition to the NC1 diet improved FCR. Protease addition to the low CP diets resulted in higher nitrogen (N) retention than in the control and NC2 groups. Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets increased apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of CP compared to the control group. It was concluded that addition of CM (up to 80 g/kg) and PBM (up to 80 g/kg) to turkey diets had no negative effect on growth performance from 28 to 55 d of age. The NC1 + P group achieved the BWG of the control group which was partially due to increases in N retention and AID of CP, but the NC3 + P group failed to recover the growth losses. This difference implies that the efficacy of the protease may depend upon the protein source in the ration. PMID:27074290

  14. Functional topography of band 3: specific structural alteration linked to function aberrations in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.M.B.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Lawrence, C.

    1988-01-01

    Band 3 is the major anion transport polypeptide of erythrocytes. It appears to be the binding site of several glycolytic enzymes. Structurally, band 3 is the major protein spanning the erythrocyte membrane and connects the plasma membrane to band 2.1, which binds to the cytoskeleton. In the present study, the authors report an alteration of band 3 molecule that is associated with the following changes: erythrocyte shape change from discoid to thorny cells (acanthocytes), restriction of rotational diffusion of band 3 in the membrane, increase in anion transport, and decrease in the number of high-affinity ankyrin-binding sites. Changes in erythrocyte IgG binding, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fluorescence polarization (indicative of membrane fluidity), and other membrane proteins as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were not detected. Cells containing the altered band 3 polypeptide were obtained from individuals with abnormal erythrocyte morphology. Two-dimensional peptide maps revealed differences in the M/sub r/ 17,000 anion transport segment of band 3 consistent with additions of tyrosines or tyrosine-containing peptides. The data suggest that (i) this alteration of band 3 does not result in accelerated aging as does cleavage and (ii) structural changes in the anion transport region result in alterations in anion transport.

  15. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  16. A Simple Band for Gastric Banding.

    PubMed

    Broadbent

    1993-08-01

    The author has noted that flexible gastric bands have occasionally stenosed the gastric stoma or allowed it to dilate. A band was developed using a soft outer silicone rubber tube over a holding mechanism made out of a nylon cable tie passed within the silicone tube. This simple, easily applied band is rigid, resisting scar contracture and dilatation. PMID:10757939

  17. PTPN13, a Fas-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase, is located on the long arm of chromosome 4 at band q21.3

    SciTech Connect

    Inazawa, Johji; Ariyama, Takeshi; Abe, Tatsuo

    1996-01-15

    PTPN13 is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that associates with the C-terminal negative regulatory domain in the Fas (APO-1/CD95) receptor. The PTPN13 protein contains six GLGF repeats that have been found in the rat postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95) and the Drosophila tumor suppressor protein, lethal-(1)-disclarge-1 (dlg-1). The localization of the PTPN13 gene to human chromosome 4q21.3 was determined by both FISH and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids. This 4q21.3 chromosomal region contains a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease as well as the region frequently deleted in liver and ovarian cancers, suggesting that PTPN13 is a candidate for one of the putative tumor suppressor genes on the long arm of chromosome 4. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  19. Identification of Renibacterium salmoninarum surface proteins by radioiodination.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, A; Bakken, V

    1994-09-01

    Surface exposed proteins of Renibacterium salmoninarum were identified by radiolabelling whole bacterial cells with 125I, followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. The most prominent bands had molecular masses of approximately 57 kDa and 22 kDa; in addition, some less intensively labelled bands were detected. Polyclonal sera raised against the 22 kDa protein did not react with the 57 kDa protein. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of the purified 22 kDa protein showed no similarity with the sequence of the 57 kDa protein. PMID:7926685

  20. The Association of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor δ and Additional Gene-Gene Interaction with C-Reactive Protein in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiao-Ying; Yuan, Hao-Zheng; Gu, Ru; Gao, Yan-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Gao, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To examine the association between 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors δ (PPARδ) polymorphisms and C-reactive protein (CRP) level and additional gene-gene interaction. Methods. Line regression analysis was performed to verify polymorphism association between SNP and CRP levels. Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) was employed to analyze the interaction. Results. A total of 1028 subjects (538 men, 490 women) were selected. The carriers of the C allele (TC or CC) of rs2016520 were associated with a significant decreased level of CRP, regression coefficients was −0.338, and standard error was 0.104 (p = 0.001). The carriers of the G allele (CG or GG) of rs9794 were also significantly associated with decreased level of CRP, regression coefficients was −0.219, and standard error was 0.114 (p = 0.012). We also found a potential gene-gene interaction between rs2016520 and rs9794. Subjects with rs2016520-TC or CC, rs9794-CG or GG genotypes have lowest CRP level, difference (95% CI) = −0.50 (−0.69 to −0.21) (p < 0.001), compared to subjects with rs2016520-TT and rs9794-CC genotypes. Conclusions. rs2016520 and rs9794 minor allele of PPARδ and combined effect between the two SNP were associated with decreased CRP level. PMID:26884762

  1. Lateral Diffusion of Proteins on Supported Lipid Bilayers: Additive Friction of Synaptotagmin 7 C2A–C2B Tandem Domains

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synaptotagmin (Syt) family of proteins contains tandem C2 domains, C2A and C2B, which bind membranes in the presence of Ca2+ to trigger vesicle fusion during exocytosis. Despite recent progress, the role and extent of interdomain interactions between C2A and C2B in membrane binding remain unclear. To test whether the two domains interact on a planar lipid bilayer (i.e., experience thermodynamic interdomain contacts), diffusion of fluorescent-tagged C2A, C2B, and C2AB domains from human Syt7 was measured using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with single-particle tracking. The C2AB tandem exhibits a lateral diffusion constant approximately half the value of the isolated single domains and does not change when additional residues are engineered into the C2A–C2B linker. This is the expected result if C2A and C2B are separated when membrane-bound; theory predicts that C2AB diffusion would be faster if the two domains were close enough together to have interdomain contact. Stopped-flow measurements of membrane dissociation kinetics further support an absence of interdomain interactions, as dissociation kinetics of the C2AB tandem remain unchanged when rigid or flexible linker extensions are included. Together, the results suggest that the two C2 domains of Syt7 bind independently to planar membranes, in contrast to reported interdomain cooperativity in Syt1. PMID:25437758

  2. Effects of feeding corn silage inoculated with microbial additives on the ruminal fermentation, microbial protein yield, and growth performance of lambs.

    PubMed

    Basso, F C; Adesogan, A T; Lara, E C; Rabelo, C H S; Berchielli, T T; Teixeira, I A M A; Siqueira, G R; Reis, R A

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of feeding corn silage inoculated without or with either Lactobacillus buchneri (LB) alone or a combination of LB and Lactobacillus plantarum (LBLP) on the apparent digestibility, ruminal fermentation, microbial protein synthesis, and growth performance of lambs. Thirty Santa Inês×Dorper crossbred intact males lambs weighing 20.4±3.8 kg were blocked by weight into 10 groups. Lambs in each group were randomly assigned to 1 of the following 3 dietary treatments: untreated (Control), LB, and LBLP silage. Lambs were fed experimental diets for 61 d. The apparent digestibility was indirectly estimated from indigestible NDF measured on d 57 to 59. Spot urine samples were collected from all animals on d 59 to estimate microbial protein synthesis. Lambs were slaughtered for carcass evaluation on d 61 when they weighed 32.4±5.2 kg. Six additional ruminally cannulated Santa Inês×Dorper crossbred wethers weighing 40.5±1.8 kg were used to examine dietary effects on ruminal fermentation. Average daily gain was increased when lambs were fed LBLP silage (P<0.05) but not LB silage. The LBLP silage had the highest (P<0.05) lactic acid concentration and both inoculated silages had greater acetic acid concentrations than the Control silage (P<0.05). Inoculation of corn silage increased intakes of DM, OM, CP, NDF, total carbohydrate (CHO), and GE by the lambs but decreased digestibility of DM, OM, CP, total and nonstructural carbohydrates, and concentration of GE and ME. (P<0.05). Nevertheless, lambs fed inoculated silages had greater microbial N supply than those on the Control treatment (P<0.05). The acetate to propionate ratio was lower in ruminal fluid of wethers in LBLP treatment than LB and Control treatment (P<0.05) and ruminal pH tended to be greater in LB lambs than in LBLP and Control wethers (P<0.10). Finally, the inoculation with both bacteria combined enhanced the silage fermentation. The intakes of DM, OM, CP, NDF, and GE

  3. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  4. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  5. The addition of heat shock protein HSPA8 to cryoprotective media improves the survival of brown bear (Ursus arctos) spermatozoa during chilling and after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rodríguez, M; Alvarez, M; Borragan, S; Martinez-Pastor, F; Holt, W V; Fazeli, A; de Paz, P; Anel, L

    2013-02-01

    The Cantabrian brown bear survives as a small remnant population in northern Spain and semen cryopreservation for future artificial insemination is one of the measures being implemented for conservation of this species. As part of this program we investigated the value of adding heat shock protein A8 (HSPA8) to media (N-[Tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid-TRIS-fructose with 20% egg yolk) used for chilling and cryopreserving the spermatozoa. Semen samples from eight brown bears were obtained by electroejaculation during the breeding season. In experiment 1, we tested three concentrations of HSPA8 (0.5, 1, and 5 μg/mL) to determine whether sperm motility (computer assisted sperm analysis system) and sperm survival could be improved during refrigeration (5 °C) up to 48 hours. Results showed that sperm viability (test with propidium iodide) was improved by the addition of 0.5 and 5 μg/mL HSPA8. In experiment 2, HSPA8 was added to the cryopreservation media (6% final glycerol concentration) before the freezing process. Though there were no differences in sperm viability immediately after thawing (analyses to 0 hours), plasma membrane permeability (test with YO-PRO-1) was significantly lower by the presence of HSPA8 (1 μg/mL) and acrosomal damage (test with peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate) was reduced by higher concentrations of HSPA8 (1 and 5 μg/mL) (analyses after thermal stress test incubating over 2 hours to 37 °C). In experiment 3, results of a simple progression test carried out through artificial mucus (hyaluronic acid 4 mg/mL) showed a significant decrease in the total number of sperm able to swim a distance of 0.5 to 2 cm through a capillary tube for all HSPA8-based extenders. Nevertheless, the distance traveled by the vanguard spermatozoa, which represent a highly motile subpopulation, was restored by the inclusion of 1 and 5 μg/mL HSPA8 in the cryopreservation media. Thus, the HSPA8 addition to extender improves

  6. Come Join the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Cathy Applefeld

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of students in Blue Springs, Missouri, are joining the band, drawn by a band director who emphasizes caring and inclusiveness. In the four years since Melissia Goff arrived at Blue Springs High School, the school's extensive band program has swelled. The marching band alone has gone from 100 to 185 participants. Also under Goff's…

  7. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  8. Using a biomimetic membrane surface experiment to investigate the activity of the magnetite biomineralisation protein Mms6† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Including Mms6 protein and peptide sequences, additional QCM-D and SEM data and protein modelling. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ra16469a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Scott M.; Rawlings, Andrea E.; Galloway, Johanna M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are able to synthesise precise nanoparticles of the iron oxide magnetite within their cells. These particles are formed in dedicated organelles termed magnetosomes. These lipid membrane compartments use a range of biomineralisation proteins to nucleate and regulate the magnetite crystallisation process. A key component is the membrane protein Mms6, which binds to iron ions and helps to control the formation of the inorganic core. We have previously used Mms6 on gold surfaces patterned with a self-assembled monolayer to successfully produce arrays of magnetic nanoparticles. Here we use this surface system as a mimic of the interior face of the magnetosome membrane to study differences between intact Mms6 and the acid-rich C-terminal peptide subregion of the Mms6 protein. When immobilised on surfaces, the peptide is unable to reproduce the particle size or homogeneity control exhibited by the full Mms6 protein in our experimental setup. Moreover, the peptide is unable to support anchoring of a dense array of nanoparticles to the surface. This system also allows us to deconvolute particle binding from particle nucleation, and shows that Mms6 particle binding is less efficient when supplied with preformed magnetite nanoparticles when compared to particles precipitated from solution in the presence of the surface immobilised Mms6. This suggests that Mms6 binds to iron ions rather than to magnetite surfaces in our system, and is perhaps a nucleating agent rather than a controller of magnetite crystal growth. The comparison between the peptide and the protein under identical experimental conditions indicates that the full length sequence is required to support the full function of Mms6 on surfaces. PMID:27019707

  9. X-Band/Ka-Band Dichroic Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jacqueline C.

    1993-01-01

    Dichroic plate designed nearly transparent to circularly polarized microwaves at frequencies between 31.8 and 34.7 GHz (in and near Ka band) and reflective at frequencies between 8.4 and 8.5 GHz (in the X band). Made of electrically conductive material and contains rectangular holes in staggered pattern.

  10. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  11. A Novel Ku-Band/Ka-Band and Ka-Band/E-Band Multimode Waveguide Couplers for Power Measurement of Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Harmonic Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Simons, Rainee N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and test results for a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler (MDC). The coupler, fabricated from two dissimilar frequency band waveguides, is capable of isolating power at the second harmonic frequency from the fundamental power at the output port of a traveling-wave tube (TWT) amplifier. Test results from proof-of-concept demonstrations are presented for a Ku-band/Ka-band MDC and a Ka-band/E-band MDC. In addition to power measurements at harmonic frequencies, a potential application of the MDC is in the design of a satellite borne beacon source for atmospheric propagation studies at millimeter-wave (mm-wave) frequencies (Ka-band and E-band).

  12. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  13. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  14. Characterization of a highly conserved human homolog to the chicken neural cell surface protein Bravo/Nr-CAM that maps to chromosome band 7q31

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, R.P.; Vielmetter, J.; Dreyer, W.J.

    1996-08-01

    The neuronal cell adhesion molecule Bravo/Nr-CAM is a cell surface protein of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily and is closely related to the L1/NgCAM and neurofascin molecules, all of which contain six immunoglobulin domains, five fibronectin repeats, a transmembrane region, and an intracellular domain. Chicken Bravo/Nr-CAM has been shown to interact with other cell surface molecules of the Ig superfamily and has been implicated in specific pathfinding roles of axonal growth cones in the developing nervous system. We now report the characterization of cDNA clones encoding the human Bravo/Nr-CAM protein, which, like its chicken homolog, is composed of six V-like Ig domains and five fibronectin type III repeats. The human Bravo/Nr-CAM homolog also contains a transmembrane and intracellular domain, both of which are 100% conserved at the amino acid level compared to its chicken homolog. Overall, the human Bravo/Nr-CAM homolog is 82% identical to the chicken Bravo/Nr-CAM amino acid sequence. Independent cDNAs encoding four different isoforms were also identified, all of which contain alternatively spliced variants around the fifth fibronectin type III repeat, including one isoform that had been previously identified for chicken Bravo/Nr-CAM. Northern blot analysis reveals one mRNA species of approximately 7.0 kb in adult human brain tissue. Fluorescence in situ hybridization maps the gene for human Bravo/Nr-CAM to human chromosome 7q31.1-q31.2. This chromosomal locus has been previously identified as containing a tumore suppressor candidate gene commonly deleted in certain human cancer tissues. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  15. The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus Tat binding protein is a transcriptional activator belonging to an additional family of evolutionarily conserved genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohana, B; Moore, P A; Ruben, S M; Southgate, C D; Green, M R; Rosen, C A

    1993-01-01

    The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus Tat protein is a powerful transcriptional activator when bound to an RNA structure (TAR) present at the extreme 5' terminus of viral mRNA. Since transcriptional activation requires binding of Tat to RNA, it has been suggested that Tat enhances initiation or elongation through a direct interaction with cellular transcription factors. Here we show through protein fusion experiments that the previously identified cellular Tat binding protein, TBP-1, although unable to bind DNA, is a strong transcriptional activator when brought into proximity of several promoter elements. Transcriptional activity depends upon the integrity of at least two highly conserved domains: one resembling a nucleotide-binding motif and the other motif common to proteins with helicase activity. Our studies further reveal that TBP-1 represents one member of a large, highly conserved gene family that encodes proteins demonstrating strong amino acid conservation across species. Finally, we identified a second family member that, although 77% similar to TBP-1, does not activate transcription from the promoters examined. This finding, together with the observation that TBP-1 does not activate each promoter examined, suggests that this gene family may encode promoter-specific transcriptional activators. Images PMID:8419915

  16. Physicochemical Changes and Glycation Reaction in Intermediate-Moisture Protein-Sugar Foods with and without Addition of Resveratrol during Storage.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Zhanwu; Gu, Mantun; Hao, Wangjun; Shen, Yixiao; Zhang, Weimin; Zheng, Lili; Ai, Binling; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Xu, Zhimin

    2016-06-22

    An intermediate-moisture food (IMF) model consisting of whey protein isolate and glucose and an IMF model fortified with resveratrol were used to study the effect of resveratrol on physicochemical changes and glycation of protein-sugar-rich foods during storage. The water activity (aw) of the storage was controlled at 0.75 or 0.56. The browning rate or hardness of fortified IMFs was significantly lower than that of IMFs after 45-day storage. The rate of Maillard reaction in the samples stored at aw 0.56 was higher than that of samples stored at aw 0.75. The fortified IMFs had lower levels of AGEs (advanced glycation end products), CML (N(ε)-(carboxymethyl)-l-lysine), and insoluble protein during storage. The inhibition capability of resveratrol against glycation was also confirmed by using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis to monitor glycated proteins and protein aggregation in the samples. The results of this study suggested that resveratrol could be used as an inhibitor to reduce the formation of undesirable AGEs and other Maillard reaction products in foods during storage. PMID:27218138

  17. Photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soukoulis, C.M. |

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the theoretical and experimental efforts in obtaining a photonic band gap, a frequency band in three-dimensional dielectric structures in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, is presented.

  18. Study of total dry matter and protein extraction from canola meal as affected by the pH, salt addition and use of zeta-potential/turbidimetry analysis to optimize the extraction conditions.

    PubMed

    Gerzhova, Alina; Mondor, Martin; Benali, Marzouk; Aider, Mohammed

    2016-06-15

    Total dry matter and proteins were differentially and preferentially extracted from canola meal (CM) under different conditions. The effect of the extraction medium pH, CM concentration and salt concentrations were found to have different influences on the extractability of total dry matter and proteins from CM. The pH of the extracting medium had the most significant effect. The maximal total dry matter (42.8±1.18%) extractability was obtained with 5% CM at pH 12 without salt addition, whereas the maximal for total protein (58.12±1.47%) was obtained with 15% CM under the same conditions. The minimal extractability for the dry matter (26.63±0.67%) was obtained with 5% CM at pH 10 without salt added and the minimal protein extractability was observed in a 10% CM at pH 10, in 0.01 NaCl. Turbidity and ζ-potential measurements indicated that pH 5 was the optimum condition for the highest protein extraction yield. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that salt addition contributes to higher solubility of canola proteins specifically cruciferin fraction, although it reduces napin extraction. PMID:26868572

  19. Flat Band Quastiperiodic Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua; Flach, Sergej; Danieli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Translationally invariant lattices with flat bands (FB) in their band structure possess irreducible compact localized flat band states, which can be understood through local rotation to a Fano structure. We present extension of these quasi-1D FB structures under incommensurate lattices, reporting on the FB effects to the Metal-Insulator Transition.

  20. Fe3O4NPs mediated nonenzymatic electrochemical immunosensor for the total protein of Nosema bombycis detection without addition of substrate.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hua; Zhang, Qiqi; Wang, Qin; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Yali; Yuan, Ruo

    2015-04-28

    In this work, we proposed a novel electrochemical immunosensor for sensitive detection of the total protein of Nosema bombycis based on Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4NPs) as catalyst to electrocatalyze the reduction of methylene blue (MB) with the aid of Fe3O4NPs-DNA dendrimers for the signal amplification. PMID:25806964

  1. A novel zinc-finger HIT protein with an additional PAPA-1-like region from Suaeda liaotungensis K. enhanced transgenic Arabidopsis drought and salt stresses tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Lan; Hu, Yu-Xin; Yang, Xing; Yu, Xiao-Dong; Li, Qiu-Li

    2014-12-01

    Zinc-finger HIT belongs to the cross-brace zinc finger protein family and is involved in the regulation of plant defense and stress responses. In this study, we cloned a full-length zinc-finger HIT gene (1,377 bp) named SlPAPA1 using polymerase chain reaction from Suaeda liaotungensis K. and investigated its function by overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis. SlPAPA1 contains a zinc-finger HIT domain and a Pim-1-associated protein-1 (PAP-1)-associated protein-1-like (PAPA-1-like) conserved region. Its expression in S. liaotungensis was induced by drought, high-salt, and cold (4 °C) stresses and by abscisic acid (ABA). Subcellular localization experiments in onion epidermal cells indicated that SlPAPA1 is localized in the nucleus. Yeast-one hybrid assays showed that SlPAPA1 functions as a transcriptional activator. SlPAPA1 transgenic Arabidopsis displayed a higher survival ratio and lower rate of water loss under drought stress; a higher germination ratio, higher survival ratio, and lower root inhibition rate under salt stress; and a lower germination ratio and root inhibition rate under ABA treatment, compared with wild-type Arabidopsis. These results suggested that SlPAPA1 functions as a stress-responsive zinc-finger HIT protein involved in the ABA-dependent signaling pathway and may have potential applications in transgenic breeding to enhance crops abiotic stress tolerances. PMID:25119646

  2. The Cytoskeletal Adaptor Protein Band 4.1B is Required for the Maintenance of Paranodal Axo-Glial Septate Junctions in Myelinated Axons

    PubMed Central

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D.; Dupree, Jeffrey L.; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A.

    2011-01-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axo-glial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after one year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at about one year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  3. The cytoskeletal adaptor protein band 4.1B is required for the maintenance of paranodal axoglial septate junctions in myelinated axons.

    PubMed

    Buttermore, Elizabeth D; Dupree, Jeffrey L; Cheng, JrGang; An, Xiuli; Tessarollo, Lino; Bhat, Manzoor A

    2011-06-01

    Precise targeting and maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons is essential for saltatory conduction. Caspr and Caspr2, which localize at paranodal and juxtaparanodal domains, contain binding sites for the cytoskeletal adaptor protein 4.1B. The exact role of 4.1B in the organization and maintenance of axonal domains is still not clear. Here, we report the generation and characterization of 4.1B-null mice. We show that loss of 4.1B in the PNS results in mislocalization of Caspr at paranodes and destabilization of paranodal axoglial septate junctions (AGSJs) as early as postnatal day 30. In the CNS, Caspr localization is progressively disrupted and ultrastructural analysis showed paranodal regions that were completely devoid of AGSJs, with axolemma separated from the myelin loops, and loops coming off the axolemma. Most importantly, our phenotypic analysis of previously generated 4.1B mutants, used in the study by Horresh et al. (2010), showed that Caspr localization was not affected in the PNS, even after 1 year; and 4.1R was neither expressed, nor enriched at the paranodes. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis of these 4.1B mutants showed destabilization of CNS AGSJs at ∼ 1 year. We also discovered that the 4.1B locus is differentially expressed in the PNS and CNS, and generates multiple splice isoforms in the PNS, suggesting 4.1B may function differently in the PNS versus CNS. Together, our studies provide direct evidence that 4.1B plays a pivotal role in interactions between the paranodal AGSJs and axonal cytoskeleton, and that 4.1B is critically required for long-term maintenance of axonal domains in myelinated axons. PMID:21632923

  4. Diffuse interstellar bands in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, O.; Henning, Thomas; Pfau, Werner; Stognienko, R.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo code for radiation transport calculations is used to compare the profiles of the lambda lambda 5780 and 6613 Angstrom diffuse interstellar bands in the transmitted and the reflected light of a star embedded within an optically thin dust cloud. In addition, the behavior of polarization across the bands were calculated. The wavelength dependent complex indices of refraction across the bands were derived from the embedded cavity model. In view of the existence of different families of diffuse interstellar bands the question of other parameters of influence is addressed in short.

  5. Computer modelling integrated with micro-CT and material testing provides additional insight to evaluate bone treatments: Application to a beta-glycan derived whey protein mice model.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, D; Tu, P T; Dickinson, M; Watson, M; Blais, A; Das, R; Cornish, J; Fernandez, J

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a whey protein diet on computationally predicted mechanical strength of murine bones in both trabecular and cortical regions of the femur. There was no significant influence on mechanical strength in cortical bone observed with increasing whey protein treatment, consistent with cortical tissue mineral density (TMD) and bone volume changes observed. Trabecular bone showed a significant decline in strength with increasing whey protein treatment when nanoindentation derived Young׳s moduli were used in the model. When microindentation, micro-CT phantom density or normalised Young׳s moduli were included in the model a non-significant decline in strength was exhibited. These results for trabecular bone were consistent with both trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) and micro-CT indices obtained independently. The secondary aim of this study was to characterise the influence of different sources of Young׳s moduli on computational prediction. This study aimed to quantify the predicted mechanical strength in 3D from these sources and evaluate if trends and conclusions remained consistent. For cortical bone, predicted mechanical strength behaviour was consistent across all sources of Young׳s moduli. There was no difference in treatment trend observed when Young׳s moduli were normalised. In contrast, trabecular strength due to whey protein treatment significantly reduced when material properties from nanoindentation were introduced. Other material property sources were not significant but emphasised the strength trend over normalised material properties. This shows strength at the trabecular level was attributed to both changes in bone architecture and material properties. PMID:26599826

  6. Dark Bands on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Dark crisscrossing bands on Jupiter's moon Europa represent widespread disruption from fracturing and the possible eruption of gases and rocky material from the moon's interior in this four-frame mosaic of images from NASA's Galileo spacecraft. These and other features suggest that soft ice or liquid water was present below the ice crust at the time of disruption. The data do not rule out the possibility that such conditions exist on Europa today. The pictures were taken from a distance of 156,000 kilometers (about 96,300 miles) on June 27, 1996. Many of the dark bands are more than 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) long, exceeding the length of the San Andreas fault of California. Some of the features seen on the mosaic resulted from meteoritic impact, including a 30- kilometer (18.5 mile) diameter crater visible as a bright scar in the lower third of the picture. In addition, dozens of shallow craters seen in some terrains along the sunset terminator zone (upper right shadowed area of the image) are probably impact craters. Other areas along the terminator lack craters, indicating relatively youthful surfaces, suggestive of recent eruptions of icy slush from the interior. The lower quarter of the mosaic includes highly fractured terrain where the icy crust has been broken into slabs as large as 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) across. The mosaic covers a large part of the northern hemisphere and includes the north pole at the top of the image. The sun illuminates the surface from the left. The area shown is centered on 20 degrees north latitude and 220 degrees west longitude and is about as wide as the United States west of the Mississippi River. The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  7. Effect of wzx (rfbX) mutations on A-band and B-band lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa O5.

    PubMed

    Burrows, L L; Lam, J S

    1999-02-01

    The wbp cluster of Pseudomonas aeruginosa O5 encodes a number of proteins involved in biosynthesis of the heteropolymeric and Wzy-dependent B-band O antigen, including Wzy, the O-antigen polymerase, and Wzz, the regulator of O-antigen chain length. A gene (formerly wbpF), contiguous with wzy in the wbp cluster, is predicted to encode a highly hydrophobic protein with multiple membrane-spanning domains. This secondary structure is consistent with that of Wzx (RfbX), the putative O-antigen unit translocase or "flippase." Insertion of a Gmr cassette at two separate sites within the putative wzx gene led in both cases to the loss of B-band lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen production. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the successful generation of chromosomal wzx gene replacement mutations. Surprisingly, inactivation of wzx also led to a marked delay in production of the ATP-binding cassette-transporter-dependent, D-rhamnose homopolymer, A-band LPS. This effect on A-band LPS synthesis was alleviated by supplying multiple copies of WbpL in trans. WbpL, a WecA (Rfe) homologue, was shown recently to be essential for the initiation of both A-band and B-band LPS synthesis in P. aeruginosa O5 (H. L. Rocchetta, L. L. Burrows, J. C. Pacan, and J. S. Lam, Mol. Microbiol. 28:1103-1119, 1998). These results suggest that the delay in A-band LPS production may arise from insufficient access to WbpL when the completed B-band O unit is not successfully translocated to the periplasm. Without adequate WbpL, A-band LPS synthesis is delayed. A subset of wzx mutants appeared to have accumulated second-site mutations which either restored the normal expression of A-band LPS or abolished A-band expression completely. Complementation studies showed that all of the additional mutations affecting LPS synthesis that were characterized in this study were located within the B-band LPS genes. PMID:9922263

  8. Mapping of the human SAP1 (SRF accessory protein 1) gene and SAP2, a gene encoding a related protein, to chromosomal bands 1q32 and 12q23, respectively

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, J.; Sheer, D.; Patel, K.

    1994-10-01

    SAP1, SAP2, and ELK1 form a related subgroup of ETS-domain proteins that can form ternary complexes with the transcription factor SRF at the c-fos serum response element (SRE). SAP1 was identified by a genetic screen for proteins interacting with SRF expressed in yeast, and SAP2 by its homology with SAP1; ELK1 was previously identified by its homology to the ETS domain. cDNA probes were used to isolate cosmid and phage clones harboring genes encoding SAP1 and SAP2. These clones were subsequently used to map the genes to 1q32 and 12q23, respectively, by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Banded ion morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Frahm, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Bands of ions have been observed at constant pitch angle by the Dynamics Explorer High- and Low-Altitude Plasma Instruments at auroral latitudes. The observed ion-dispersion pattern shows lower-energy ions toward the equatorward side of the band and higher-energy ions toward the poleward side of the band. Ion bands have their highest-energy flux at small pitch angles. The observed bands have been correlated with storm phase (by Dst) and substorm phase (by AE). Bands are more likely to occur during main-storm phase than during recovery storm phase. Substorm correlations are statistically significant, but there is a hint that most bands occur during substorm recovery phase. Two models have the potential of producing ion signatures that are similar to the band feature. They are the time-of-flight mechanism and the convective dispersion mechanism. Under a time-of-flight mechanism, ions are dispersed along a magnetic filed line with higher-energy particles outrunning lower energy particles. Ions are dispersed perpendicular to the magnetic field under convective dispersion. A time-of-flight effect does not explain the band energy-latitude dependence observed in the southern night or northern day very well, whereas the convective dispersion mechanism easily accomplishes this.

  10. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs.

  11. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  12. Singing with the Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altman, Timothy Meyer; Wright, Gary K.

    2012-01-01

    Usually band, orchestra, and choir directors work independently. However, the authors--one a choral director, the other a band director--have learned that making music together makes friends. Not only can ensemble directors get along, but joint concerts may be just the way to help students see how music can reach the heart. Combined instrumental…

  13. Rubber Band Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowens, John

    2005-01-01

    Not only are rubber bands great for binding objects together, but they can be used in a simple science experiment that involves predicting, problem solving, measuring, graphing, and experimenting. In this article, the author describes how rubber bands can be used to teach the force of mass.

  14. Reconstitution of maltose chemotaxis in Escherichia coli by addition of maltose-binding protein to calcium-treated cells of maltose regulon mutants.

    PubMed

    Brass, J M; Manson, M D

    1984-03-01

    Maltose chemotaxis was reconstituted in delta malE cells lacking maltose-binding protein (MBP). Purified MBP was introduced into intact cells during incubation with 250 mM CaCl2 in Tris-hydrochloride buffer at 0 degrees C. After removal of extracellular CaCl2 and MBP, chemotaxis was measured with tethered bacteria in a flow chamber or with free-swimming cells in a capillary assay. About 20% of tethered cells responded to 10(-4) M maltose; the mean response times were about half those of CaCl2-treated wild-type cells (100 s as opposed to 190 s). In capillary tests, the maltose response of reconstituted cells was between 15 and 40% of the aspartate response, about the same percentage as in wild-type cells. The best reconstitution was seen with 0.5 to 1 mM MBP in the reconstitution mixture, which is similar to the periplasmic MBP concentration estimated for maltose-induced wild-type cells. Strains containing large deletions of the malB region and malT mutants lacking the positive regulator gene of the mal regulon also could be reconstituted for maltose chemotaxis, showing that no product of the mal regulon other than MBP is essential for maltose chemotaxis. PMID:6321442

  15. Progressive Band Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Kevin; Chang, Chein-I

    2009-01-01

    Progressive band selection (PBS) reduces spectral redundancy without significant loss of information, thereby reducing hyperspectral image data volume and processing time. Used onboard a spacecraft, it can also reduce image downlink time. PBS prioritizes an image's spectral bands according to priority scores that measure their significance to a specific application. Then it uses one of three methods to select an appropriate number of the most useful bands. Key challenges for PBS include selecting an appropriate criterion to generate band priority scores, and determining how many bands should be retained in the reduced image. The image's Virtual Dimensionality (VD), once computed, is a reasonable estimate of the latter. We describe the major design details of PBS and test PBS in a land classification experiment.

  16. Bulk band gaps in divalent hexaborides

    SciTech Connect

    Denlinger, Jonathan; Clack, Jules A.; Allen, James W.; Gweon, Gey-Hong; Poirier, Derek M.; Olson, Cliff G.; Sarrao, John L.; Bianchi, Andrea D.; Fisk, Zachary

    2002-08-01

    Complementary angle-resolved photoemission and bulk-sensitive k-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering of divalent hexaborides reveal a >1 eV X-point gap between the valence and conduction bands, in contradiction to the band overlap assumed in several models of their novel ferromagnetism. This semiconducting gap implies that carriers detected in transport measurements arise from defects, and the measured location of the bulk Fermi level at the bottom of the conduction band implicates boron vacancies as the origin of the excess electrons. The measured band structure and X-point gap in CaB6 additionally provide a stringent test case for proper inclusion of many-body effects in quasi-particle band calculations.

  17. Design of Phosphonium-Type Zwitterion as an Additive to Improve Saturated Water Content of Phase-Separated Ionic Liquid from Aqueous Phase toward Reversible Extraction of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoritsugu; Kohno, Yuki; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    We designed phosphonium-type zwitterion (ZI) to control the saturated water content of separated ionic liquid (IL) phase in the hydrophobic IL/water biphasic systems. The saturated water content of separated IL phase, 1-butyl-3-methyimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, was considerably improved from 0.4 wt% to 62.8 wt% by adding N,N,N-tripentyl-4-sulfonyl-1-butanephosphonium-type ZI (P555C4S). In addition, the maximum water content decreased from 62.8 wt% to 34.1 wt% by increasing KH2PO4/K2HPO4 salt content in upper aqueous phosphate buffer phase. Horse heart cytochrome c (cyt.c) was dissolved selectively in IL phase by improving the water content of IL phase, and spectroscopic analysis revealed that the dissolved cyt.c retained its higher ordered structure. Furthermore, cyt. c dissolved in IL phase was re-extracted again from IL phase to aqueous phase by increasing the concentration of inorganic salts of the buffer solution. PMID:24013379

  18. Chiral Bands and Triaxiality

    SciTech Connect

    Petrache, C.M.

    2004-02-27

    The results obtained with the GASP array in the A=130 mass region are reviewed, emphasizing the discovery excited highly-deformed bands and their decay out, the study of the odd-odd Pr nuclei up to high spins, the discovery of stable triaxial bands in Nd nuclei close to the N=82 shell closure. The very recent studies of nuclei near the proton drip line are described. A discussion of the origin of the various doublet bands observed in odd-odd nuclei of the A=130 mass region is presented.

  19. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... gastric banding is not a "quick fix" for obesity. It will greatly change your lifestyle. You must ... panel on weight loss surgery: executive report update. Obesity . 2009;17:842-62. PMID: 19396063 www.ncbi. ...

  20. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... lining), heartburn , or stomach ulcers Infection in the port, which may need antibiotics or surgery Injury to ... may not be able to reach the access port to tighten or loosen the band (you would ...

  1. Decay of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-12-31

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in {sup 194}Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  2. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy ... Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous system (CNS) and collect waste products, as well as ...

  3. CSF oligoclonal banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... system. Oligoclonal bands may be a sign of multiple sclerosis. How the Test is Performed A sample of ... Performed This test helps support the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, it does not confirm the diagnosis. ...

  4. Polygonal deformation bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonellini, Marco; Mollema, Pauline Nella

    2015-12-01

    We report for the first time the occurrence of polygonal faults in sandstone, which is compelling given that layer-bound polygonal fault systems have been observed so far only in fine-grained sediments such as clay and chalk. The polygonal faults are shear deformation bands that developed under shallow burial conditions via strain hardening in dm-wide zones. The edges of the polygons are 1-5 m long. The shear deformation bands are organized as conjugate faults along each edge of the polygon and form characteristic horst-like structures. The individual deformation bands have slip magnitudes ranging from a few mm to 1.5 cm; the cumulative average slip magnitude in a zone is up to 10 cm. The deformation bands heaves, in aggregate form, accommodate a small isotropic horizontal extension (strain <0.005). The individual shear deformation bands show abutting T-junctions, veering, curving, and merging where they mechanically interact. Crosscutting relationships are rare. The interactions of the deformation bands are similar to those of mode I opening fractures. The documented fault networks have important implications for evaluating the geometry of km-scale polygonal fault systems in the subsurface, top seal integrity, as well as constraining paleo-tectonic stress regimes.

  5. Development of softcopy environment for primary color banding visibility assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byungseok; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Allebach, Jan P.

    2008-01-01

    Fine-pitch banding is one of the most unwanted artifacts in laser electrophotographic (EP) printers. It is perceived as a quasiperiodic fluctuation in the process direction. Therefore, it is essential for printer vendors to know how banding is perceived by humans in order to improve print quality. Monochrome banding has been analyzed and assessed by many researchers; but there is no literature that deals with the banding of color laser printers as measured from actual prints. The study of color banding is complicated by the fact that the color banding signal is physically defined in a three-dimensional color space, while banding perception is described in a one-dimensional sense such as more banding or less banding. In addition, the color banding signal arises from the independent contributions of the four primary colorant banding signals. It is not known how these four distinct signals combine to give rise to the perception of color banding. In this paper, we develop a methodology to assess the banding visibility of the primary colorant cyan based on human visual perception. This is our first step toward studying the more general problem of color banding in combinations of two or more colorants. According to our method, we print and scan the cyan test patch, and extract the banding profile as a one dimensional signal so that we can freely adjust the intensity of banding. Thereafter, by exploiting the pulse width modulation capability of the laser printer, the extracted banding profile is used to modulate a pattern consisting of periodic lines oriented in the process direction, to generate extrinsic banding. This avoids the effect of the halftoning algorithm on the banding. Furthermore, to conduct various banding assessments more efficiently, we also develop a softcopy environment that emulates a hardcopy image on a calibrated monitor, which requires highly accurate device calibration throughout the whole system. To achieve the same color appearance as the hardcopy

  6. Diet after gastric banding

    MedlinePlus

    ... while you are losing weight quickly. Eating mostly protein, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains will help your body get the nutrients it needs. Protein may be the most important of these foods. ...

  7. Effect of monomeric and oligomeric sugar osmolytes on DeltaGD, the Gibbs energy of stabilization of the protein at different pH values: is the sum effect of monosaccharide individually additive in a mixture?

    PubMed

    Poddar, Nitesh Kumar; Ansari, Z A; Singh, R K Brojen; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Ahmad, Faizan

    2008-12-01

    Thermal denaturation curves of ribonuclease-A were measured by monitoring changes in the far-UV circular dichroism (CD) spectra in the presence of different concentrations of six sugars (glucose, fructose, galactose, sucrose, raffinose and stachyose) and mixture of monosaccharide constituents of each oligosaccharide at various pH values in the range of 6.0-2.0. These measurements gave values of T(m) (midpoint of denaturation), DeltaH(m) (enthalpy change at T(m)), DeltaC(p) (constant-pressure heat capacity change) under a given solvent condition. Using these values of DeltaH(m), T(m) and DeltaC(p) in appropriate thermodynamic relations, thermodynamic parameters at 25 degrees C, namely, DeltaG(D)(o) (Gibbs energy change), DeltaH(D)(o) (enthalpy change), and DeltaS(D)(o) (entropy change) were determined at a given pH and concentration of each sugar (including its mixture of monosaccharide constituents). Our main conclusions are: (i) each sugar stabilizes the protein in terms of T(m) and DeltaG(D)(o), and this stabilization is under enthalpic control, (ii) the protein stabilization by the oligosaccharide is significantly less than that by the equimolar concentration of the constituent monosaccharides, and (iii) the stabilization by monosaccharides in a mixture is fully additive. Furthermore, measurements of the far- and near-UV CD spectra suggested that secondary and tertiary structures of protein in their native and denatured states are not perturbed on the addition of sugars. PMID:18835508

  8. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  9. Synthesizing folded band chaos.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Hayes, Scott T; Pethel, Shawn D; Blakely, Jonathan N

    2007-04-01

    A randomly driven linear filter that synthesizes Lorenz-like, reverse-time chaos is shown also to produce Rössler-like folded band wave forms when driven using a different encoding of the random source. The relationship between the topological entropy of the random source, dissipation in the linear filter, and the positive Lyapunov exponent for the reverse-time wave form is exposed. The two drive encodings are viewed as grammar restrictions on a more general encoding that produces a chaotic superset encompassing both the Lorenz butterfly and Rössler folded band paradigms of nonlinear dynamics. PMID:17500950

  10. Band structure of 235U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Clark, R. M.; Cline, D.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M. A.; Diamond, R. M.; Fallon, P.; Görgen, A.; Hayes, A. B.; Lane, G. J.; Lee, I.-Y.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Schmidt, G.; Stephens, F. S.; Svensson, C. E.; Teng, R.; Vetter, K.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Over a period of several years we have performed three separate experiments at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron in which 235U (thick target) was Coulomb-excited. The program involved stand-alone experiments with Gammmasphere and with the 8pi Spectrometer using 136Xe beams at 720 MeV, and a CHICO-Gammasphere experiment with a 40Ca beam at 184 MeV. In addition to extending the known negative-parity bands to high spin, we have assigned levels in some seven positive-parity bands which are in some cases (e.g., [631]1/2, [624]7/2, and [622]5/2) strongly populated by E3 excitation. The CHICO data have been analyzed to extract E2 and E3 matrix elements from the observed yields. Additionally, many M1 matrix elements could be extracted from the γ-ray branching ratios. A number of new features have emerged, including the unexpected attenuation of magnetic transitions between states of the same Nilsson multiplet, the breakdown of Coriolis staggering at high spin, and the effect of E3 collectivity on Coriolis interactions.

  11. Completely Flat Band in a Crystal of Finite Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Dai S.

    2016-04-01

    Conditions for the existence of a completely flat band in a crystal of finite thickness are clarified. Furthermore, the condition for the localization of the flat band states near the surfaces is also discussed. It is also found that a completely flat band can appear in a crystal where a lattice point has multiple orbital states. In addition to the known results for honeycomb and diamond lattices, a localized completely flat band is found in a crystal of the wurtzite structure of finite thickness. A completely flat band is also found in many other crystals, but it is extended in the direction perpendicular to the surface.

  12. Accurate band-to-band registration of AOTF imaging spectrometer using motion detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pengwei; Zhao, Huijie; Jin, Shangzhong; Li, Ningchuan

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the problem of platform vibration induced band-to-band misregistration with acousto-optic imaging spectrometer in spaceborne application. Registrating images of different bands formed at different time or different position is difficult, especially for hyperspectral images form acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer. In this study, a motion detection method is presented using the polychromatic undiffracted beam of AOTF. The factors affecting motion detect accuracy are analyzed theoretically, and calculations show that optical distortion is an easily overlooked factor to achieve accurate band-to-band registration. Hence, a reflective dual-path optical system has been proposed for the first time, with reduction of distortion and chromatic aberration, indicating the potential of higher registration accuracy. Consequently, a spectra restoration experiment using additional motion detect channel is presented for the first time, which shows the accurate spectral image registration capability of this technique.

  13. Multi-Band-SWIFT

    PubMed Central

    Corum, Curtis A.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A useful extension to SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) utilizing sidebands of the excitation pulse is introduced. This MRI method, called Multi-Band-SWIFT, achieves much higher bandwidth than standard SWIFT by using multiple segmented excitations (bands) of the field of view. A description of the general idea and variants of the pulse sequence are presented. From simulations and semi-phenomenological theory, estimations of power deposition and signal-to-noise ratio are made. MB-SWIFT and ZTE (zero-TE) sequences are compared based on images of a phantom and human mandible. Multi-Band-SWIFT provides a bridge between SWIFT and ZTE sequences and allows greatly increased excitation and acquisition bandwidths relative to standard SWIFT for the same hardware switching parameters and requires less peak amplitude of the radiofrequency field (or greater flip angle at same peak amplitude) as compared to ZTE. Multi-Band-SWIFT appears to be an attractive extension of SWIFT for certain musculoskeletal and other medical imaging applications, as well as for imaging materials. PMID:25557859

  14. Colloquium: Topological band theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, A.; Lin, Hsin; Das, Tanmoy

    2016-04-01

    The first-principles band theory paradigm has been a key player not only in the process of discovering new classes of topologically interesting materials, but also for identifying salient characteristics of topological states, enabling direct and sharpened confrontation between theory and experiment. This review begins by discussing underpinnings of the topological band theory, which involve a layer of analysis and interpretation for assessing topological properties of band structures beyond the standard band theory construct. Methods for evaluating topological invariants are delineated, including crystals without inversion symmetry and interacting systems. The extent to which theoretically predicted properties and protections of topological states have been verified experimentally is discussed, including work on topological crystalline insulators, disorder and interaction driven topological insulators (TIs), topological superconductors, Weyl semimetal phases, and topological phase transitions. Successful strategies for new materials discovery process are outlined. A comprehensive survey of currently predicted 2D and 3D topological materials is provided. This includes binary, ternary, and quaternary compounds, transition metal and f -electron materials, Weyl and 3D Dirac semimetals, complex oxides, organometallics, skutterudites, and antiperovskites. Also included is the emerging area of 2D atomically thin films beyond graphene of various elements and their alloys, functional thin films, multilayer systems, and ultrathin films of 3D TIs, all of which hold exciting promise of wide-ranging applications. This Colloquium concludes by giving a perspective on research directions where further work will broadly benefit the topological materials field.

  15. Multi-Band-SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curtis A.; Garwood, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A useful extension to SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) utilizing sidebands of the excitation pulse is introduced. This MRI method, called Multi-Band-SWIFT, achieves much higher bandwidth than standard SWIFT by using multiple segmented excitations (bands) of the field of view. A description of the general idea and variants of the pulse sequence are presented. From simulations and semi-phenomenological theory, estimations of power deposition and signal-to-noise ratio are made. MB-SWIFT and ZTE (zero-TE) sequences are compared based on images of a phantom and human mandible. Multi-Band-SWIFT provides a bridge between SWIFT and ZTE sequences and allows greatly increased excitation and acquisition bandwidths relative to standard SWIFT for the same hardware switching parameters and requires less peak amplitude of the radiofrequency field (or greater flip angle at same peak amplitude) as compared to ZTE. Multi-Band-SWIFT appears to be an attractive extension of SWIFT for certain musculoskeletal and other medical imaging applications, as well as for imaging materials.

  16. The Steel Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Bruce

    1996-01-01

    Describes studying the steel drum, an import from Trinidad, as an instrument of intellectual growth. Describes how developing a steel drum band provided Montessori middle school students the opportunity to experience some important feelings necessary to emotional growth during this difficult age: competence, usefulness, independence, and…

  17. Europa Triple Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This picture of Europa, a moon of Jupiter, was obtained on February 20, 1997, by the Solid State Imaging system onboard the Galileo spacecraft during its sixth orbit around Jupiter. The area is centered at 9.3 degrees north latitude, 275.7 degrees west longitude, on the trailing hemisphere of Europa. As Europa moves in its orbit around Jupiter, the trailing hemisphere is the portion which is always on the moon's backside opposite to its direction of motion. The area depicted is about 32 kilometers by 40 kilometers (20 miles by 25 miles). Resolution is 54 meters (59 yards). The Sun illuminates the scene from the right (east).

    A section of a triple band crosses the upper left of the picture and extends for hundreds of miles across the surface. Triple bands derive their name from their appearance at lower resolution as a narrow bright band flanked by a pair of darker bands. At the high resolution of this picture, however, the triple band is much more complex and is composed of a system of ridges 6 kilometers (4 miles) across. Some ridges reach heights of about 180 meters (200 yards). Other features include a hill in the center of the picture about 480 meters (500 yards) high. Two mounds about 6 kilometers across (4 miles) are seen in the bottom of the picture. The ridges, hills and mounds probably all represent uplifts of the icy crust of Europa by processes originating from the interior.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  18. New results on the superdeformed {sup 196}Pb nucleus: The decay of the excited bands to the yrast band

    SciTech Connect

    Bouneau, S.; Azaiez, F.; Duprat, J.

    1996-12-31

    The study of the superdeformed (SD) {sup 196}Pb nucleus has been revisited using the EUROGAM phase 2 spectrometer. In addition to the known yrast and two lowest excited SD bands, a third excited SD band has been seen. All of the three excited bands were found to decay to the yrast SD band through, presumably, E1 transitions, allowing relative spin and excitation energy assignments. Comparisons with calculations using the random-phase approximation suggest that all three excited bands can be interpreted as octupole vibrational structures.

  19. Protein machines and self assembly in muscle organization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barral, J. M.; Epstein, H. F.

    1999-01-01

    The remarkable order of striated muscle is the result of a complex series of protein interactions at different levels of organization. Within muscle, the thick filament and its major protein myosin are classical examples of functioning protein machines. Our understanding of the structure and assembly of thick filaments and their organization into the regular arrays of the A-band has recently been enhanced by the application of biochemical, genetic, and structural approaches. Detailed studies of the thick filament backbone have shown that the myosins are organized into a tubular structure. Additional protein machines and specific myosin rod sequences have been identified that play significant roles in thick filament structure, assembly, and organization. These include intrinsic filament components, cross-linking molecules of the M-band and constituents of the membrane-cytoskeleton system. Muscle organization is directed by the multistep actions of protein machines that take advantage of well-established self-assembly relationships. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. Orff Techniques to Freshen Up Band Rehearsal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misenhelter, Dale

    2004-01-01

    Experienced band directors know they need teaching strategies and activities that are not only innovative but also provide creative and engaging breaks in the routine for students. In addition, expectations based on the National Standards suggest new approaches to many of the performance-polishing strategies directors have come to rely on.…

  1. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  2. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  3. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  4. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  5. Micromechanics of shear banding

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  6. Noise exposure in marching bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  7. Preprophase band formation and cortical division zone establishment: RanGAP behaves differently from microtubules during their band formation

    PubMed Central

    Yabuuchi, Takatoshi; Nakai, Tomonori; Sonobe, Seiji; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Correct positioning of the division plane is a prerequisite for plant morphogenesis. The preprophase band (PPB) is a key intracellular structure of division site determination. PPB forms in G2 phase as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) that narrows in prophase and specializes few-micrometer-wide cortical belt region, named the cortical division zone (CDZ), in late prophase. The PPB comprises several molecules, some of which act as MT band organization and others remain in the CDZ marking the correct insertion of the cell plate in telophase. Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) is accumulated in the CDZ and forms a RanGAP band in prophase. However, little is known about when and how RanGAPs gather in the CDZ, and especially with regard to their relationships to MT band formation. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal distribution of RanGAPs and MTs in the preprophase of onion root tip cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and showed that the RanGAP band appeared in mid-prophase as the width of MT band was reduced to nearly 7 µm. Treatments with cytoskeletal inhibitors for 15 min caused thinning or broadening of the MT band but had little effects on RanGAP band in mid-prophase and most of late prophase cells. Detailed image analyses of the spatial distribution of RanGAP band and MT band showed that the RanGAP band positioned slightly beneath the MT band in mid-prophase. These results raise a possibility that RanGAP behaves differently from MTs during their band formation. PMID:26237087

  8. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Goldman, Don S.

    1995-01-01

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  9. Cannibal crickets on a forced march for protein and salt.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stephen J; Sword, Gregory A; Lorch, Patrick D; Couzin, Iain D

    2006-03-14

    Swarming and mass migration are spectacular and sometimes devastating features of the biology of various animal species. These phenomena are typically associated with actual or anticipated depletion of food resources after an increase in population density, but the mechanisms driving such collective movements are poorly understood. Here we reveal that insects in large, coordinated migratory bands consisting of millions of Mormon crickets in western North America were deprived of two essential nutritional resources: protein and salt. The insects themselves provided a major source of these nutrients, and cannibalism was rife. We show that protein and salt satiation reduced cannibalism and that protein satiation inhibited walking. Additionally, experimentally reducing the motility or mobility of crickets substantially increased their risk of being cannibalized by other band members. As a result, the availability of protein and salt in the habitat will influence the extent to which bands march, both through the direct effect of nutrient state on locomotion and indirectly through the threat of cannibalism by resource-deprived crickets approaching from the rear. The crickets are, in effect, on a forced march. Migratory band formation and subsequent mass movement, therefore, are manifestations of specific tradeoffs between the costs and benefits of group living. Bands afford antipredator benefits to individual group members. Group movement then mitigates the resulting costs of intraspecific competition, namely local depletion of nutritional resources and the associated increased risk of cannibalism. PMID:16537500

  10. Implications of gamma band activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rill, E; Luster, B; D'Onofrio, S; Mahaffey, S; Bisagno, V; Urbano, F J

    2016-07-01

    The fact that the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) is part of the reticular activating system places it in a unique position to modulate sensory input and fight-or-flight responses. Arousing stimuli simultaneously activate ascending projections of the PPN to the intralaminar thalamus to trigger cortical high-frequency activity and arousal, as well as descending projections to reticulospinal systems to alter posture and locomotion. As such, the PPN has become a target for deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, modulating gait, posture, and higher functions. This article describes the latest discoveries on PPN physiology and the role of the PPN in a number of disorders. It has now been determined that high-frequency activity during waking and REM sleep is controlled by two different intracellular pathways and two calcium channels in PPN cells. Moreover, there are three different PPN cell types that have one or both calcium channels and may be active during waking only, REM sleep only, or both. Based on the new discoveries, novel mechanisms are proposed for insomnia as a waking disorder. In addition, neuronal calcium sensor protein-1 (NCS-1), which is over expressed in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, may be responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in at least some patients with these diseases. Recent results suggest that NCS-1 modulates PPN gamma band activity and that lithium acts to reduce the effects of over expressed NCS-1, accounting for its effectiveness in bipolar disorder. PMID:26597124

  11. Octupole and hexadecapole bands in 152Sm

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P E; Kulp, W D; Wood, J L; Bandyopadhyay, D; Christen, S; Choudry, S; Dewald, A; Fitzler, A; Fransen, C; Jessen, K; Jolie, J; Kloezer, A; Kudejova, P; Kumar, A; Lesher, S R; Linnemann, A; Lisetskiy, A; Martin, D; Masur, M; McEllistrem, M T; Moller, O; Mynk, M; Orce, J N; Pejovic, P; Pissulla, T; Regis, J; Schiller, A; Tonev, D; Yates, S W

    2005-05-13

    The nucleus {sup 152}Sm is characterized by a variety of low-energy collective modes, conventionally described as rotations, {beta} vibrations, and {gamma} vibrations. Recently, it has been suggested that {sup 152}Sm is at a critical point between spherical and deformed collective phases. Consequently, {sup 152}Sm is being studied by a variety of techniques, including radioactive decay, multi-step Coulomb excitation, in-beam ({alpha},2n{gamma}) {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, and (n,n'{gamma}) spectroscopy. The present work focuses on the latter two reactions; these have been used to investigate the low-lying bands associated with the octupole degree of freedom, including one built on the first excited 0{sup +} band. In addition, the K{sup {pi}} = 4{sup +} hexadecapole vibrational band has been identified.

  12. Steel Band Repertoire: The Case for Original Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In the past few decades, the steel band art form has experienced consistent growth and development in several key respects. For example, in the United States, the sheer number of steel band programs has steadily increased, and it appears that this trend will continue in the future. Additionally, pan builders and tuners have made great strides in…

  13. Hazard banding in compliance with the new Globally Harmonised System (GHS) for use in control banding tools.

    PubMed

    Arnone, Mario; Koppisch, Dorothea; Smola, Thomas; Gabriel, Stefan; Verbist, Koen; Visser, Remco

    2015-10-01

    Many control banding tools use hazard banding in risk assessments for the occupational handling of hazardous substances. The outcome of these assessments can be combined with advice for the required risk management measures (RMMs). The Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has resulted in a change in the hazard communication elements, i.e. Hazard (H) statements instead of Risk-phrases. Hazard banding schemes that depend on the old form of safety information have to be adapted to the new rules. The purpose of this publication is to outline the rationales for the assignment of hazard bands to H statements under the GHS. Based on this, this publication proposes a hazard banding scheme that uses the information from the safety data sheets as the basis for assignment. The assignment of hazard bands tiered according to the severity of the underlying hazards supports the important principle of substitution. Additionally, the set of assignment rules permits an exposure-route-specific assignment of hazard bands, which is necessary for the proposed route-specific RMMs. Ideally, all control banding tools should apply the same assignment rules. This GHS-compliant hazard banding scheme can hopefully help to establish a unified hazard banding strategy in the various control banding tools. PMID:26206396

  14. Laboratory Investigation of the Airglow Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Brian; Yu, Shanshan; Crawford, Timothy J.; Miller, Charles E.; Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    2013-06-01

    We report the first high spectral resolution laboratory measurements of oxygen A-band night glow simulated using a static discharge cell. Our static discharge system reproduces the conditions of the mesospheric oxygen night glow - suggesting O(^1D) + O_2 as the primary source of the emission. Additionally, use of the static cell has enabled us to collect spectra for rare molecular oxygen isotopologues using isotopically enriched samples. The (0,0), (0,1), and (1,1) b-Xvibrational bands were observed with a Bruker 125 HR for all six isotopologues. The (1,2) and (2,2) bands were observed also for the main isotopologue. The frequencies of the observed (0,1) transitions resolved discrepancies in Raman data for (16-17, 17-17, and 17-18), enabling us to improve the vibrational parameterization of the ground electronic state in the global fit of Yu et al. Rotationally resolved intensities were determined for the (0,0), (0,1) and (1,1) bands. The experimental band intensity ratios I(0,0)/I(0,1) = 13.6 and I(0,0)/I(1,1) = 60 are in excellent agreement with the recent mesospheric remote sensing data. S. Yu, C.E. Miller, B.J. Drouin, H.S.P. Müller, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024304, 2012

  15. Biologically inspired band-edge laser action from semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cih-Su; Liau, Chi-Shung; Sun, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to light up band-edge stimulated emission arising from a semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition. To illustrate our working principle, here we demonstrate the feasibility on the composite of SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and chicken albumen. SnO2 NWs, which merely emit visible defect emission, are observed to generate a strong ultraviolet fluorescence centered at 387 nm assisted by chicken albumen at room temperature. In addition, a stunning laser action is further discovered in the albumen/SnO2 NWs composite system. The underlying mechanism is interpreted in terms of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the chicken albumen protein to SnO2 NWs. More importantly, the giant oscillator strength of shallow defect states, which is served orders of magnitude larger than that of the free exciton, plays a decisive role. Our approach therefore shows that bio-materials exhibit a great potential in applications for novel light emitters, which may open up a new avenue for the development of bio-inspired optoelectronic devices. PMID:25758749

  16. Biologically inspired band-edge laser action from semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cih-Su; Liau, Chi-Shung; Sun, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chia; Lin, Tai-Yuan; Chen, Yang-Fang

    2015-03-01

    A new approach is proposed to light up band-edge stimulated emission arising from a semiconductor with dipole-forbidden band-gap transition. To illustrate our working principle, here we demonstrate the feasibility on the composite of SnO2 nanowires (NWs) and chicken albumen. SnO2 NWs, which merely emit visible defect emission, are observed to generate a strong ultraviolet fluorescence centered at 387 nm assisted by chicken albumen at room temperature. In addition, a stunning laser action is further discovered in the albumen/SnO2 NWs composite system. The underlying mechanism is interpreted in terms of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the chicken albumen protein to SnO2 NWs. More importantly, the giant oscillator strength of shallow defect states, which is served orders of magnitude larger than that of the free exciton, plays a decisive role. Our approach therefore shows that bio-materials exhibit a great potential in applications for novel light emitters, which may open up a new avenue for the development of bio-inspired optoelectronic devices.

  17. Block 3 X-band receiver-exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, C. E.

    1987-05-01

    The development of an X-band exciter, for use in the X-Band Uplink Subsystem, was completed. The exciter generates the drive signal for the X-band transmitter and also generates coherent test signals for the S- and X-band Block 3 translator and a Doppler reference signal for the Doppler extractor system. In addition to the above, the exciter generates other reference signals that are described. Also presented is an overview of the exciter design and some test data taken on the prototype. A brief discussion of the Block 3 Doppler extractor is presented.

  18. Block 3 X-band receiver-exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of an X-band exciter, for use in the X-Band Uplink Subsystem, was completed. The exciter generates the drive signal for the X-band transmitter and also generates coherent test signals for the S- and X-band Block 3 translator and a Doppler reference signal for the Doppler extractor system. In addition to the above, the exciter generates other reference signals that are described. Also presented is an overview of the exciter design and some test data taken on the prototype. A brief discussion of the Block 3 Doppler extractor is presented.

  19. Game theory based band selection for hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Aiye; He, Zhenyu; Huang, Fengchen

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes a new evaluation criterion for band selection for hyperspectral imagery. The combination of information and class separability is used to be as a new evaluation criterion, at the same time, the correlation between bands is used as a constraint condition. In addition, the game theory is introduced into the band selection to coordinate the potential conflict of search the optimal band combination using information and class separability these two evaluation criteria. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective on AVIRIS hyperspectral data.

  20. Controlling the band gap energy of cluster-assembled materials.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Sukhendu; Reber, Arthur C; Qian, Meichun; Weiss, Paul S; Khanna, Shiv N; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-11-19

    Cluster-assembled materials combine the nanoscale size and composition-dependent properties of clusters, which have highly tunable magnetic and electronic properties useful for a great variety of potential technologies. To understand the emergent properties as clusters are assembled into hierarchical materials, we have synthesized 23 cluster-assembled materials composed of As7(3-)-based motifs and different countercations and measured their band gap energies. We found that the band gap energy varies from 1.09 to 2.21 eV. In addition, we have carried out first principles electronic structure studies to identify the physical mechanisms that enable control of the band gap edges of the cluster assemblies. The choice of counterion has a profound effect on the band gap energy in ionic cluster assemblies. The top of the valence band is localized on the arsenic cluster, while the conduction band edge is located on the alkali metal counterions. Changing the counterion changes the position of the conduction band edge, enabling control of the band gap energy. We can also vary the architecture of the ionic solid by incorporating cryptates as counterions, which provide charge but are separated from the clusters by bulky ligands. Higher dimensionality typically decreases the band gap energy through band broadening; however band gap energies increased upon moving from zero-dimensional (0D) to two-dimensional (2D) assemblies. This is because internal electric fields generated by the counterion preferentially stabilize the adjacent lone pair orbitals that mark the top of the valence band. Thus, the choice of the counterion can control the position of the conduction band edge of ionic cluster assemblies. In addition, the dimensionality of the solid via internal electric fields can control the valence band edge. Through covalently linking arsenic clusters into composite building blocks, we have also been able to tune the band gap energy. We used a theoretical description based on

  1. The additional loss of Bak and not the lack of the protein tyrosine kinase p56/Lck in one JCaM1.6 subclone caused pronounced apoptosis resistance in response to stimuli of the intrinsic pathway.

    PubMed

    Rudner, J; Mueller, A-C; Matzner, N; Huber, S M; Handrick, R; Belka, C; Jendrossek, V

    2009-05-01

    Ionising radiation, hypoxia, and the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor Celecoxib are known agonists of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway that involves mitochondrial damage upstream of caspase activation. Mitochondrial integrity is regulated by the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein family members Bak and Bax. Upstream of the mitochondria, many kinases and phosphatases control the apoptotic response. However, the role of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p56/Lck during apoptosis is controversial. The present investigation demonstrate the existence of two JCaM1.6 subclones, one expressing and one deficient for Bak. The lack of p56/Lck expression in JCaM1.6 cells per se did hardly affect apoptosis induced by ionising radiation, hypoxia, or Celecoxib. Only the additional loss of Bak expression, as observed in one JCaM1.6 subclone, rendered the cells resistant. siRNA-mediated downregulation of Bak and p56/Lck mimicked the observed effects in the subclones. Earlier experiments performed with the Bak-negative clone might have lead to the wrong assumption that lack of p56/Lck alone, and not the additonal loss of Bak, was responsible for reduced sensitivity towards stimuli of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. PMID:19343496

  2. Elevation of neuron specific enolase and brain iron deposition on susceptibility-weighted imaging as diagnostic clues for beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration in early childhood: Additional case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Takano, Kyoko; Shiba, Naoko; Wakui, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Aida, Noriko; Inaba, Yuji; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kosho, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN), also known as static encephalopathy of childhood with neurodegeneration in adulthood (SENDA), is a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). BPAN is caused by mutations in an X-linked gene WDR45 that is involved in autophagy. BPAN is characterized by developmental delay or intellectual disability until adolescence or early adulthood, followed by severe dystonia, parkinsonism, and progressive dementia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows iron deposition in the bilateral globus pallidus (GP) and substantia nigra (SN). Clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in early childhood are limited. We report a 3-year-old girl with BPAN who presented with severe developmental delay and characteristic facial features. In addition to chronic elevation of serum aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and soluble interleukin-2 receptor, she had persistent elevation of neuron specific enolase (NSE) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. MRI using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) demonstrated iron accumulation in the GP and SN bilaterally. Targeted next-generation sequencing identified a de novo splice-site mutation, c.831-1G>C in WDR45, which resulted in aberrant splicing evidenced by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Persistent elevation of NSE and iron deposition on SWI may provide clues for diagnosis of BPAN in early childhood. PMID:26481852

  3. Flat Chern band in a two-dimensional organometallic framework.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band structure, namely, the flat Chern band, has recently been proposed to spawn high-temperature fractional quantum Hall states. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains doubtful whether such a "romance of flatland" could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design of a two-dimensional indium-phenylene organometallic framework that realizes a nearly flat Chern band right around the Fermi level by combining lattice geometry, spin-orbit coupling, and ferromagnetism. An effective four-band model is constructed to reproduce the first-principles results. Our design, in addition, provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials by virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology. PMID:23521279

  4. Flat Chern Band in a Two-Dimensional Organometallic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band structure, namely, the flat Chern band, has recently been proposed to spawn high-temperature fractional quantum Hall states. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains doubtful whether such a “romance of flatland” could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design of a two-dimensional indium-phenylene organometallic framework that realizes a nearly flat Chern band right around the Fermi level by combining lattice geometry, spin-orbit coupling, and ferromagnetism. An effective four-band model is constructed to reproduce the first-principles results. Our design, in addition, provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials by virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology.

  5. Theory of band comparison in even-even nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, B.; Merchant, A. C.; Perez, S. M.

    2003-08-01

    We previously found that a cluster model reproduces satisfactorily the properties of normal deformed (ND) ground state and superdeformed (SD) excited bands in a wide range of even-even nuclei. We show here that the fractional change of the transition energies in two bands described by similar core-cluster configurations is closely related to the fractional change in the corresponding reduced masses. We compare our predictions to data on ground state ND bands for a series of light rare-earth and actinide isotopes, and on SD bands in the A˜150 and 190 regions. The model strongly suggests the existence of similar excited SD bands in 212Pb and 212Po, in addition to the observed α-cluster-like ND ground state bands of these nuclei.

  6. Band Structure Characteristics of Nacreous Composite Materials with Various Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, H. W.; Chen, B. S.

    2016-06-01

    Nacreous composite materials have excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength, high toughness, and wide phononic band gap. In order to research band structure characteristics of nacreous composite materials with various defects, supercell models with the Brick-and-Mortar microstructure are considered. An efficient multi-level substructure algorithm is employed to discuss the band structure. Furthermore, two common systems with point and line defects and varied material parameters are discussed. In addition, band structures concerning straight and deflected crack defects are calculated by changing the shear modulus of the mortar. Finally, the sensitivity of band structures to the random material distribution is presented by considering different volume ratios of the brick. The results reveal that the first band gap of a nacreous composite material is insensitive to defects under certain conditions. It will be of great value to the design and synthesis of new nacreous composite materials for better dynamic properties.

  7. Shuttle Ku-band and S-band communications implementation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodds, J. G.; Huth, G. K.; Nilsen, P. W.; Polydoros, A.; Simon, M. K.; Weber, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Various aspects of the shuttle orbiter S-band network communication system, the S-band payload communication system, and the Ku-band communication system are considered. A method is proposed for obtaining more accurate S-band antenna patterns of the actual shuttle orbiter vehicle during flight because the preliminary antenna patterns using mock-ups are not realistic that they do not include the effects of additional appendages such as wings and tail structures. The Ku-band communication system is discussed especially the TDRS antenna pointing accuracy with respect to the orbiter and the modifications required and resulting performance characteristics of the convolutionally encoded high data rate return link to maintain bit synchronizer lock on the ground. The TDRS user constraints on data bit clock jitter and data asymmetry on unbalanced QPSK with noisy phase references are included. The S-band payload communication system study is outlined including the advantages and experimental results of a peak regulator design built and evaluated by Axiomatrix for the bent-pipe link versus the existing RMS-type regulator. The nominal sweep rate for the deep-space transponder of 250 Hz/s, and effects of phase noise on the performance of a communication system are analyzed.

  8. Protein buffering in model systems and in whole human saliva.

    PubMed

    Lamanda, Andreas; Cheaib, Zeinab; Turgut, Melek Dilek; Lussi, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the buffer attributes (value, power, range and optimum) of two model systems for whole human resting saliva, the purified proteins from whole human resting saliva and single proteins. Two model systems, the first containing amyloglucosidase and lysozyme, and the second containing amyloglucosidase and alpha-amylase, were shown to provide, in combination with hydrogencarbonate and di-hydrogenphosphate, almost identical buffer attributes as whole human resting saliva. It was further demonstrated that changes in the protein concentration as small as 0.1% may change the buffer value of a buffer solution up to 15 times. Additionally, it was shown that there was a protein concentration change in the same range (0.16%) between saliva samples collected at the time periods of 13:00 and others collected at 9:00 am and 17:00. The mode of the protein expression changed between these samples corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the change of the buffer value at pH 6.7. Finally, SDS Page and Ruthenium II tris (bathophenantroline disulfonate) staining unveiled a constant protein expression in all samples except for one 50 kDa protein band. As the change in the expression pattern of that 50 kDa protein band corresponded to the change in basic buffer power and the buffer value at pH 6.7, it was reasonable to conclude that this 50 kDa protein band may contain the protein(s) belonging to the protein buffer system of human saliva. PMID:17327922

  9. Development of Wide Band Feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ujihara, H.; Ichikawa, R.

    2012-12-01

    Wide Band feeds are being developed at NICT, NAOJ, and some universities in Japan for VLBI2010, SKA, and MARBLE. SKA, the Square Kilometre Array, will comprise thousands of radio telescopes with square kilometer aperture size for radio astronomy. MARBLE consists of small portable VLBI stations developed at NICT and GSI in Japan. They all need wide band feeds with a greater than 1:10 frequency ratio. Thus we have been studying wide band feeds with dual linear polarization for these applications.

  10. A microsomal ATP-binding protein involved in efficient protein transport into the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Dierks, T; Volkmer, J; Schlenstedt, G; Jung, C; Sandholzer, U; Zachmann, K; Schlotterhose, P; Neifer, K; Schmidt, B; Zimmermann, R

    1996-01-01

    Protein transport into the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum depends on nucleoside triphosphates. Photoaffinity labelling of microsomes with azido-ATP prevents protein transport at the level of association of precursor proteins with the components of the transport machinery, Sec61alpha and TRAM proteins. The same phenotype of inactivation was observed after depleting a microsomal detergent extract of ATP-binding proteins by passage through ATP-agarose and subsequent reconstitution of the pass-through into proteoliposomes. Transport was restored by co-reconstitution of the ATP eluate. This eluate showed eight distinct bands in SDS gels. We identified five lumenal proteins (Grp170, Grp94, BiP/Grp78, calreticulin and protein disulfide isomerase), one membrane protein (ribophorin I) and two ribosomal proteins (L4 and L5). In addition to BiP (Grp78), Grp170 was most efficiently retained on ATP-agarose. Purified BiP did not stimulate transport activity. Sequence analysis revealed a striking similarity of Grp170 and the yeast microsomal protein Lhs1p which was recently shown to be involved in protein transport into yeast microsomes. We suggest that Grp170 mediates efficient insertion of polypeptides into the microsomal membrane at the expense of nucleoside triphosphates. Images PMID:9003769

  11. Garage Band or GarageBand[R]? Remixing Musical Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vakeva, Lauri

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I suggest that it is perhaps time to consider the pedagogy of popular music in more extensive terms than conventional rock band practices have to offer. One direction in which this might lead is the expansion of the informal pedagogy based on a "garage band" model to encompass various modes of digital artistry wherever this artistry…

  12. Diffusion properties of band 3 in human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Jeffrey O.

    The plasma membrane of the human erythrocyte (RBC) is a six fold symmetric network held together at various pinning points by several multi-protein complexes. This unique architecture is what gives the RBC its remarkable material properties and any disruptions to the network can have severe consequences for the cell. Band 3 is a major transmembrane protein that plays the role of linking the fluid lipid bilayer to the cytoskeletal network. To interrogate the structural integrity of the RBC membrane we have tracked individual band 3 molecules in RBCs displaying a variety of pathologies that are all a consequence of membrane or network related defects. These diseases are spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and pyropokilocytosis. We have also investigated the protein related diseases sickle cell, and south east asian ovalocytosis. To assess the impact that the network has on the dynamic organization of the cell we have also studied the mobility of band 3 in RBC progenitor cells. Individual band 3 molecules were imaged at 120 frames/second and their diffusion coefficients and compartment sizes recorded. The distributions of the compartment sizes combined with the information about the short and long time diffusion of band 3 has given us insight into the architecture of the membrane in normal and diseased cells. The observation that different membrane pathologies can be distinguished, even to the point of different molecular origins of the same disease, implies that the mobility of transmembrane proteins may be a useful tool for characterizing the "health" of the membrane.

  13. A protective surface protein from type V group B streptococci shares N-terminal sequence homology with the alpha C protein.

    PubMed

    Lachenauer, C S; Madoff, L C

    1996-10-01

    Infection by group B streptococci (GBS) is an important cause of bacterial disease in neonates, pregnant women, and nonpregnant adults. Historically, serotypes Ia, Ib, II, and III have been most prevalent among disease cases; recently, type V strains have emerged as important strains in the United States and elsewhere. In addition to type-specific capsular polysaccharides, many GBS strains possess surface proteins which demonstrate a laddering pattern on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and resistance to trypsin digestion. These include the alpha C protein, the R proteins, and protein Rib. Some of these proteins elicit protective antibodies in animals. We demonstrate a trypsin-resistant laddering protein purified from a type V GBS strain by mutanolysin extraction and column chromatography. This protein contains a major 90-kDa band and a series of smaller bands spaced approximately 10 kDa apart on SDS-PAGE. Cross-reactivity of the type V protein with the alpha C protein and with R1 was demonstrated on Western blot (immunoblot). N-terminal sequence analysis of the protein revealed residue identity with 17 of 18 residues at corresponding positions on the alpha protein. Western blot of SDS extracts of 41 clinical type V isolates with rabbit antiserum to the protein demonstrated a homologous protein in 25 isolates (61%); two additional strains exhibited a heterologous pattern which was also demonstrated with 4G8, a monoclonal antibody directed to the alpha C protein repeat region. Rabbit antiserum raised to the type V protein conferred protection in neonatal mice against a type V strain bearing a homologous protein. These data support the hypothesis that there exists a family of trypsin-resistant, laddering GBS surface proteins which may play a role in immunity to GBS infection. PMID:8926097

  14. A protective surface protein from type V group B streptococci shares N-terminal sequence homology with the alpha C protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lachenauer, C S; Madoff, L C

    1996-01-01

    Infection by group B streptococci (GBS) is an important cause of bacterial disease in neonates, pregnant women, and nonpregnant adults. Historically, serotypes Ia, Ib, II, and III have been most prevalent among disease cases; recently, type V strains have emerged as important strains in the United States and elsewhere. In addition to type-specific capsular polysaccharides, many GBS strains possess surface proteins which demonstrate a laddering pattern on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and resistance to trypsin digestion. These include the alpha C protein, the R proteins, and protein Rib. Some of these proteins elicit protective antibodies in animals. We demonstrate a trypsin-resistant laddering protein purified from a type V GBS strain by mutanolysin extraction and column chromatography. This protein contains a major 90-kDa band and a series of smaller bands spaced approximately 10 kDa apart on SDS-PAGE. Cross-reactivity of the type V protein with the alpha C protein and with R1 was demonstrated on Western blot (immunoblot). N-terminal sequence analysis of the protein revealed residue identity with 17 of 18 residues at corresponding positions on the alpha protein. Western blot of SDS extracts of 41 clinical type V isolates with rabbit antiserum to the protein demonstrated a homologous protein in 25 isolates (61%); two additional strains exhibited a heterologous pattern which was also demonstrated with 4G8, a monoclonal antibody directed to the alpha C protein repeat region. Rabbit antiserum raised to the type V protein conferred protection in neonatal mice against a type V strain bearing a homologous protein. These data support the hypothesis that there exists a family of trypsin-resistant, laddering GBS surface proteins which may play a role in immunity to GBS infection. PMID:8926097

  15. Gamma Band Activity in the RAS-intracellular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Rill, E.; Kezunovic, N.; D’Onofrio, S.; Luster, B.; Hyde, J.; Bisagno, V.; Urbano, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band activity participates in sensory perception, problem solving, and memory. This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the intrinsic membrane properties behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms involve high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels or sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. Rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as in the cortex, gamma band activity in the RAS may participate in the processes of preconscious awareness, and provide the essential stream of information for the formulation of many of our actions. We address three necessary next steps resulting from these discoveries, an intracellular mechanism responsible for maintaining gamma band activity based on persistent G-protein activation, separate intracellular pathways that differentiate between gamma band activity during waking vs during REM sleep, and an intracellular mechanism responsible for the dysregulation in gamma band activity in schizophrenia. These findings open several promising research avenues that have not been thoroughly explored. What are the effects of sleep or REM sleep deprivation on these RAS mechanisms? Are these mechanisms involved in memory processing during waking and/or during REM sleep? Does gamma band processing differ during waking vs REM sleep after sleep or REM sleep deprivation? PMID:24309750

  16. Band of Rubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This artist's animation illustrates a massive asteroid belt in orbit around a star the same age and size as our Sun. Evidence for this possible belt was discovered by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope when it spotted warm dust around the star, presumably from asteroids smashing together.

    The view starts from outside the belt, where planets like the one shown here might possibly reside, then moves into to the dusty belt itself. A collision between two asteroids is depicted near the end of the movie. Collisions like this replenish the dust in the asteroid belt, making it detectable to Spitzer.

    The alien belt circles a faint, nearby star called HD 69830 located 41 light-years away in the constellation Puppis. Compared to our own solar system's asteroid belt, this one is larger and closer to its star - it is 25 times as massive, and lies just inside an orbit equivalent to that of Venus. Our asteroid belt circles between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

    Because Jupiter acts as an outer wall to our asteroid belt, shepherding its debris into a series of bands, it is possible that an unseen planet is likewise marshalling this belt's rubble. Previous observations using the radial velocity technique did not locate any large gas giant planets, indicating that any planets present in this system would have to be the size of Saturn or smaller.

    Asteroids are chunks of rock from 'failed' planets, which never managed to coalesce into full-sized planets. Asteroid belts can be thought of as construction sites that accompany the building of rocky planets.

  17. Obituary: David L. Band (1957-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    two new follow-up missions to CGRO, the Swift and Fermi observatories, Band seized an opportunity in 2001 to join the staff of the Fermi Science Support Center at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt Maryland. He was hired as the lead scientist for user support functions and to help to define and implement planning for the 2008 launch of the Fermi spacecraft. He brought a high level of energy and enthusiasm to the job, becoming in many ways the heart and soul of that organization. Neil Gehrels, the Goddard Astroparticle Physics Division Director and a Fermi deputy project scientist notes that "David was the perfect person for community support, with this outgoing personality and deep knowledge of astrophysics." Band also became an important member of the Fermi science team; despite his failing health, he actively contributed to the first Fermi gamma-ray burst publication as well as making important contributions to the burst detection and data analysis techniques. Additionally, Band was known as a great communicator and mentor. He supervised a PhD student at UCSD who has subsequently been appointed to a faculty position. At Goddard, Band was an integral part of the weekly scientific discussion groups within the gamma-ray astronomy group and he would always find the time to share his knowledge and expertise with new postdoctoral fellows and senior scientists alike. He was also involved with planning the EXIST mission, a candidate for a future NASA mission. He will be greatly missed by his many friends and colleagues within the Fermi mission and the high-energy astrophysics community.

  18. Paleomagnetic dating of liesegang bands

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, K.A.; Elmore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Paleomagnetic analysis, in conjunction with petrographic studies, was used to date the formation of hematite liesegang bands in the Ordovician Upper Arbuckle Group in southern Oklahoma. The hematite bands form symmetrical patterns on both sides of calcite-filled fractures in dolomite beds. The bands decrease in abundance and become more diffuse away from the fractures. Dedolomite is common near the fractures. Samples from distinctly banded dolomite near the fractures contain a relatively strong chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) with a southeasterly declination and shallow inclination. Samples farther from the fractures that are less distinctly banded or have no bands contain a weaker and less table CRM. Petrographic evidence and stable demagnetization to 600/sup 0/C indicate that the CRM resides in hematite. Samples were collected from both flanks of the Arbuckle Anticline (late Pennsylvanian folding), and a fold test demonstrates that the CRM is post-folding. The pole position for the CRM corresponds to the Early Permian (approx. 280 Ma) part of the Apparent Polar Wander Path for stable North America. These results suggest that the liesegang bands formed in the Early Permian, probably by rhythmic precipitation of hematite from fluids that moved out from the fractures. The fluids also apparently caused dedolomitization and precipitation of calcite in intercrystalline pore spaces. These fluids were probably the source of iron for the bands, although iron released from dedolimitization of ferroan dolomite may have been a local source.

  19. Orbiter KU-band transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halterman, R.

    1976-01-01

    The design, build, and test of an engineering breadboard Ku band quadraphase shift keyed and wideband frequency modulated transmitter are described. This orbiter Ku band transmitter drawer is to simulate the orbiter transmitter and meet the functional requirements of the orbiter communication link.

  20. The Moral Ends of Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allsup, Randall Everett

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical framework through which to reimagine and revitalize contemporary music education practices, using the large ensemble paradigm called "band" as the primary unit of analysis. Literature suggests that band places too much emphasis on teacher control and external measures of validation. Critics propose replacing…

  1. Collective vibrational effects in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins studied by isotopic substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, O. F.; Johansson, C.; Christensen, D. H.; Hvidt, S.; Flink, J.; Høime Hansen, S.; Poulsen, F.

    2000-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to study the fast dynamics of simple liquid amides and proteins. Raman spectra in the visible region of liquid amides are obtained with a triple additive scanning monochromator, whereas FT-Raman technique is used in the near-IR region in order to avoid fluorescence from impurities in the proteins. Raman spectra are shown in the amide-I region of HCONHCH 3 ( N-methylformamide with all isotopes in their natural abundance), H 13CONHCH 3, HC 18ONHCH 3, human growth hormone, frog tropomyosin and chymotrypsin inhibitor 2 including C-13 and N-15 enriched samples of the latter. Resonance energy transfer (RET) between amide molecules gives rise to a non-coincidence effect of the anisotropic and the isotropic components of the amide-I band. This effect influences the band position in mixtures of liquid amide isotopomers. A further spectral feature caused by collective vibrational modes in the hydrogen bonded liquid amides is named coalescence of bands in mixtures of isotopomers (CBMI). The result of this effect is that only one band is found in mixtures of isotopomers where bands at different frequencies are observed for each of the isotopomers. A similar effect may account for the observation of protein amide-I bands with frequencies dependent only on the secondary structure of the protein and not on the amino acid residues. RET and CBMI are due to a collectivity of vibrational modes in different amide molecules. This collectivity may be related to a cooperativity of hydrogen bonds. A low-frequency band around 100 cm -1 is observed in hydrogen bonded liquid amides and proteins. Isotopic substitution shows that the mode corresponding to this band involves displacements of atoms in hydrogen bonds. This mode may drive a breaking of the hydrogen bond.

  2. Use of abnormal preprophase bands to decipher division plane determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granger, C.; Cyr, R.

    2001-01-01

    Many premitotic plant cells possess a cortical preprophase band of microtubules and actin filaments that encircles the nucleus. In vacuolated cells, the preprophase band is visibly connected to the nucleus by a cytoplasmic raft of actin filaments and microtubules termed the phragmosome. Typically, the location of the preprophase band and phragmosome corresponds to, and thus is thought to influence, the location of the cell division plane. To better understand the function of the preprophase band and phragmosome in orienting division, we used a green fluorescent protein-based microtubule reporter protein to observe mitosis in living tobacco bright yellow 2 cells possessing unusual preprophase bands. Observations of mitosis in these unusual cells support the involvement of the preprophase band/phragmosome in properly positioning the preprophase nucleus, influencing spindle orientation such that the cytokinetic phragmoplast initially grows in an appropriate direction, and delineating a region in the cell cortex that attracts microtubules and directs later stages of phragmoplast growth. Thus, the preprophase band/phragmosome appears to perform several interrelated functions to orient the division plane. However, functional information associated with the preprophase band is not always used or needed and there appears to be an age or distance-dependent character to the information. Cells treated with the anti-actin drug, latrunculin B, are still able to position the preprophase nucleus suggesting that microtubules may play a dominant role in premitotic positioning. Furthermore, in treated cells, spindle location and phragmoplast insertion are frequently abnormal suggesting that actin plays a significant role in nuclear anchoring and phragmoplast guidance. Thus, the microtubule and actin components of the preprophase band/phragmosome execute complementary activities to ensure proper orientation of the division plane.

  3. Analysis of rdxA and Involvement of Additional Genes Encoding NAD(P)H Flavin Oxidoreductase (FrxA) and Ferredoxin-Like Protein (FdxB) in Metronidazole Resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Dong-Hyeon; El-Zaatari, Fouad A. K.; Kato, Mototsugu; Osato, Michael S.; Reddy, Rita; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y.

    2000-01-01

    Metronidazole (Mtz) is a critical ingredient of modern multidrug therapies for Helicobacter pylori infection. Mtz resistance reduces the effectiveness of these combinations. Although null mutations in a rdxA gene that encodes oxygen-insensitive NAD(P)H nitroreductase was reported in Mtz-resistant H. pylori, an intact rdxA gene has also been reported in Mtz-resistant H. pylori, suggesting that additional Mtz resistance mechanisms exist in H. pylori. We explored the nature of Mtz resistance among 544 clinical H. pylori isolates to clarify the role of rdxA inactivation in Mtz resistance and to identify another gene(s) responsible for Mtz resistance in H. pylori. Mtz resistance was present in 33% (181 of 544) of the clinical isolates. There was marked heterogeneity of resistance, with Mtz MICs ranging from 8 to ≥256 μg/ml. rdxA inactivation resulted in Mtz MICs of up to 32 μg/ml for 6 Mtz-sensitive H. pylori strains and 128 μg/ml for one Mtz-sensitive strain. Single or dual (with rdxA) inactivation of genes that encode ferredoxin-like protein (designated fdxB) and NAD(P)H flavin oxidoreductase (frxA) also increased the MICs of Mtz for sensitive and resistant strains with low to moderate levels of Mtz resistance. fdxB inactivation resulted in a lower level of resistance than that from rdxA inactivation, whereas frxA inactivation resulted in MICs similar to those seen with rdxA inactivation. Further evidence for involvement of the frxA gene in Mtz resistance included the finding of a naturally inactivated frxA but an intact rdxA in an Mtz-resistant strain, complementation of Mtz sensitivity from an Mtz-sensitive strain to an Mtz-resistant strain or vice versa by use of naturally inactivated or functional frxA genes, respectively, and transformation of an Mtz-resistant Escherichia coli strain to an Mtz sensitive strain by a naturally functional frxA gene but not an inactivated frxA gene. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that null mutations in fdx

  4. The late addition of core lipids to nascent apolipoprotein B100, resulting in the assembly and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, is independent of both microsomal triglyceride transfer protein activity and new triglyceride synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Meihui; Liang Js, Jun-shan; Fisher, Edward A; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2002-02-01

    Although microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and newly synthesized triglyceride (TG) are critical for co-translational targeting of apolipoprotein B (apoB100) to lipoprotein assembly in hepatoma cell lines, their roles in the later stages of lipoprotein assembly remain unclear. Using N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-norleucinal to prevent proteasomal degradation, HepG2 cells were radiolabeled and chased for 0-90 min (chase I). The medium was changed and cells chased for another 150 min (chase II) in the absence (control) or presence of Pfizer MTP inhibitor CP-10447 (CP). As chase I was extended, inhibition of apoB100 secretion by CP during chase II decreased from 75.9% to only 15% of control (no CP during chase II). Additional studies were conducted in which chase I was either 0 or 90 min, and chase II was in the presence of [(3)H]glycerol and either BSA (control), CP (inhibits both MTP activity and TG synthesis),BMS-1976360-1) (BMS) (inhibits only MTP activity), or triacsin C (TC) (inhibits only TG synthesis). When chase I was 0 min, CP, BMS, and TC reduced apoB100 secretion during chase II by 75.3, 73.9, and 53.9%. However, when chase I was 90 min, those agents reduced apoB100 secretion during chase II by only 16.0, 19.2, and 13.9%. Of note, all three inhibited secretion of newly synthesized TG during chase II by 80, 80, and 40%, whether chase I was 0 or 90 min. In both HepG2 cells and McA-RH7777 cells, if chase I was at least 60 min, inhibition of TG synthesis and/or MTP activity did not affect the density of secreted apoB100-lipoproteins under basal conditions. Oleic acid increased secretion of TG-enriched apoB100-lipoproteins similarly in the absence or presence of either of CP, BMS, or TC. We conclude that neither MTP nor newly synthesized TG is necessary for the later stages of apoB100-lipoprotein assembly and secretion in either HepG2 or McA-RH7777 cells. PMID:11704664

  5. Formation of Shear Bands in Drying Colloidal Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Kiatkirakajorn, Pree-Cha; Goehring, Lucas

    2015-08-21

    In directionally dried colloidal dispersions regular bands can appear behind the drying front, inclined at ±45° to the drying line. Although these features have been noted to share visual similarities with shear bands in metal, no physical mechanism for their formation has ever been suggested, until very recently. Here, through microscopy of silica and polystyrene dispersions, dried in Hele-Shaw cells, we demonstrate that the bands are indeed associated with local shear strains. We further show how the bands form, that they scale with the thickness of the drying layer, and that they are eliminated by the addition of salt to the drying dispersions. Finally, we reveal the origins of these bands in the compressive forces associated with drying, and show how they affect the optical properties (birefringence) of colloidal films and coatings. PMID:26340215

  6. Dual- and triple-band AR coatings for IR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Daniel; Stolov, Yevgeni; Azran, Amnon; Gilo, Mordechai

    2013-06-01

    Dual-band infrared camera systems allow viewing and comparison of the 3-5µ and 8-12µ spectrum regions, improve visibility at sunrise/sunset and help distinguish between targets and decoys. They also enhance the ability to defeat many IR countermeasures such as smoke, camouflage and flares. As dual band 3rd generation FLIR systems progress, we introduce coatings for these systems. This paper describes advanced dual band coatings for the 3-5µ and 8-12µ spectrum regions, with reference to single band coatings. Theoretical and measured designs are shown for ZnSe, ZnS, Ge and IG-6 substrates. Triple band AR coatings with additional transmittance at 1.06µ are also demonstrated.

  7. Formation of Shear Bands in Drying Colloidal Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiatkirakajorn, Pree-Cha; Goehring, Lucas

    2015-08-01

    In directionally dried colloidal dispersions regular bands can appear behind the drying front, inclined at ±45 ° to the drying line. Although these features have been noted to share visual similarities with shear bands in metal, no physical mechanism for their formation has ever been suggested, until very recently. Here, through microscopy of silica and polystyrene dispersions, dried in Hele-Shaw cells, we demonstrate that the bands are indeed associated with local shear strains. We further show how the bands form, that they scale with the thickness of the drying layer, and that they are eliminated by the addition of salt to the drying dispersions. Finally, we reveal the origins of these bands in the compressive forces associated with drying, and show how they affect the optical properties (birefringence) of colloidal films and coatings.

  8. Interactions with M-band Titin and Calpain 3 Link Myospryn (CMYA5) to Tibial and Limb-girdle Muscular Dystrophies*

    PubMed Central

    Sarparanta, Jaakko; Blandin, Gaëlle; Charton, Karine; Vihola, Anna; Marchand, Sylvie; Milic, Astrid; Hackman, Peter; Ehler, Elisabeth; Richard, Isabelle; Udd, Bjarne

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the C terminus of titin, situated at the M-band of the striated muscle sarcomere, cause tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD) and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2J. Mutations in the protease calpain 3 (CAPN3), in turn, lead to LGMD2A, and secondary CAPN3 deficiency in LGMD2J suggests that the pathomechanisms of the diseases are linked. Yeast two-hybrid screens carried out to elucidate the molecular pathways of TMD/LGMD2J and LGMD2A resulted in the identification of myospryn (CMYA5, cardiomyopathy-associated 5) as a binding partner for both M-band titin and CAPN3. Additional yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation studies confirmed both interactions. The interaction of myospryn and M-band titin was supported by localization of endogenous and transfected myospryn at the M-band level. Coexpression studies showed that myospryn is a proteolytic substrate for CAPN3 and suggested that myospryn may protect CAPN3 from autolysis. Myospryn is a muscle-specific protein of the tripartite motif superfamily, reported to function in vesicular trafficking and protein kinase A signaling and implicated in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The novel interactions indicate a role for myospryn in the sarcomeric M-band and may be relevant for the molecular pathomechanisms of TMD/LGMD2J and LGMD2A. PMID:20634290

  9. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  10. S-Band Loads for SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, A.; Decker, F.-J.; LeClair, R.; /INTA Technologies, Santa Clara

    2012-08-28

    The S-Band loads on the current SLAC linac RF system were designed, in some cases, 40+ years ago to terminate 2-3 MW peak power into a thin layer of coated Kanthal material as the high power absorber [1]. The technology of the load design was based on a flame-sprayed Kanthal wire method onto a base material. During SLAC linac upgrades, the 24 MW peak klystrons were replaced by 5045 klystrons with 65+ MW peak output power. Additionally, SLED cavities were introduced and as a result, the peak power in the current RF setup has increased up to 240 MW peak. The problem of reliable RF peak power termination and RF load lifetime required a careful study and adequate solution. Results of our studies and three designs of S-Band RF load for the present SLAC RF linac system is discussed. These designs are based on the use of low conductivity materials.

  11. X-Band RF Gun Development

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold; Dolgashev, Valery; Tantawi, Sami; Anderson, Scott; Hartemann, Fred; Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore

    2012-06-22

    In support of the MEGa-ray program at LLNL and the High Gradient research program at SLAC, a new X-band multi-cell RF gun is being developed. This gun, similar to earlier guns developed at SLAC for Compton X-ray source program, will be a standing wave structure made of 5.5 cells operating in the pi mode with copper cathode. This gun was designed following criteria used to build SLAC X-band high gradient accelerating structures. It is anticipated that this gun will operate with surface electric fields on the cathode of 200 MeV/m with low breakdown rate. RF will be coupled into the structure through a final cell with symmetric duel feeds and with a shape optimized to minimize quadrupole field components. In addition, geometry changes to the original gun, operated with Compton X-ray source, will include a wider RF mode separation, reduced surface electric and magnetic fields.

  12. Rotational Bands in 172W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J.; Guess, C. J.; Tandel, S.; Chowdhury, P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Hartley, D. J.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Shirwadkar, U.; Wang, X.; Zhu, S.

    2015-10-01

    Studying the structure of rotational bands in 172W is valuable for gaining a better understanding of deformed nuclei. Highly excited states of the isotope were populated from a 230 MeV 50Ti beam incident on a 128Te target at Argonne National Laboratory using the ATLAS accelerator. γ emissions from 172W in the range were measured using Compton suppressed germanium detectors in the Gammasphere array. Using this data, three new rotational bands were found, and several other bands were expanded. Swarthmore College Summer Research Fellowship.

  13. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  14. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  15. Dual passband dichroic plate for X-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Franco, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    A need arose in the Deep Space Network for a dichroic plate that would simultaneously pass two desired frequency bands in the X-band region. In addition, the plate must be totally reflective for S-band frequencies. A dielectrically loaded dichroic plate is described that was developed to meet this need. The unique microwave properties that the new dichroic plate had to possess were: (1) insertion losses of less than 0.04 dB for X-band uplink frequencies centered at 7167 MHz and for X-band downlink frequencies centered at about 8425 MHz; (2) insertion losses that met the low loss requirements at 30 deg incidence angle simultaneously for both parallel and perpendicular polarizations; (3) total reflectivity at S-band frequencies; and (4) ability to maintain these electrical characteristics while passing 100 kW of CW power at X-band or while reflecting 100 kW of CW power at S-band. The dual passband dichroic plate is a thick metallic plate having an array of periodic round holes filled with Teflon plugs. Test results on an experimental prototype plate indicate that it is technically possible to design a dielectrically filled dichroic plate that meets all of the technical requirements.

  16. Band Selection Procedure for Reduction of High Resolution Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasztor, L.; Csillag, F.

    In this paper we present a technique for reduction of spectra based on the methods of multivariate statistical analysis. The procedure was developed for general processing of digital, high resolution spectra. The recursive band selection method can be applied in studies for weighting (original) spectral bands according their sensitivity to a predefined classification scheme. Additionally, definition of medium and broad band systems is possible, which can efficiently substitute the original spectrum. According to the characteristics of the method resulted from a remote sensing application (convergence, robustness), it is suggested for use in different (radio, UV, X-ray etc.) astronomical studies as well.

  17. Evidence for Temperature-Dependent Electron Band Dispersion in Pentacene

    SciTech Connect

    Koch,N.; Vollmer, A.; Salzmann, I.; Nickel, B.; Weiss, H.; Rabe, J.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence for temperature-dependent electron band dispersion in a pentacene thin film polymorph on graphite is provided by angle- and energy-dependent ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The bands derived from the highest occupied molecular orbital exhibit dispersion of {approx}190 meV at room temperature, and {approx}240 meV at 120 K. Intermolecular electronic coupling in pentacene thin films is thus confirmed to be dependent on temperature and possibly crystal structure, as suggested by additional infrared absorption measurements.

  18. Band formation in coupled-resonator slow-wave structures.

    PubMed

    Möller, Björn M; Woggon, Ulrike; Artemyev, Mikhail V

    2007-12-10

    Sequences of coupled-resonator optical waveguides (CROWs) have been examined as slow-wave structures. The formation of photonic bands in finite systems is studied in the frame of a coupled oscillator model. Several types of resonator size tuning in the system are evaluated in a systematical manner. We show that aperiodicities in sequences of coupled microspheres provide an additional degree of freedom for the design of photonic bands. PMID:19551030

  19. Modulation of erythrocyte band 4.1 binding by volume expansion.

    PubMed

    Musch, M W; Goldstein, L

    2001-02-15

    Erythrocyte band 4.1 is an important protein in the control and maintenance of the cytoskeleton. Skate erythrocyte band 3, the anion exchanger, appears to play a pivotal role in the regulation of volume-stimulated solute efflux during volume expansion. Because band 4.1 interacts with band 3, we tested whether their interaction might change during volume expansion. Skate red blood cells were volume-expanded in either hypotonic media (one-half osmolarity) or were swollen under isoosmotic conditions by inclusion of ethylene glycol or ammonium chloride in the medium. Microsomal membranes isolated from red cells under volume expanded conditions demonstrated a significant decrease in the amount of band 4.1 bound to band 3. In unstimulated cells, approximately one third of the binding of band 4.1 occurred to band 3. This binding was characterized as being sensitive to competition by the peptide IRRRY. The majority of band 4.1 is bound to glycophorin (as demonstrated in other species), and this binding does not change during volume expansion. The alteration in band 4.1:band 3 interaction occurs within 5 min after volume expansion and is transient, returning to near normal interaction within 60 min. Two drugs that promote band 3 oligomerization, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate and DIDS, also decreased band 4.1 interaction with band 3. Band 4.1 and ankyrin binding to band 3 may be reciprocally related as high-affinity ankyrin binding sites to band 3 observed under volume-expanded conditions are decreased by inclusion of band 4.1 in the binding reactions. J. Exp. Zool. 289:177-183, 2001. PMID:11170014

  20. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  1. Isogeometric analysis of shear bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger-Vergiat, Luc; McAuliffe, Colin; Waisman, Haim

    2014-08-01

    Numerical modeling of shear bands present several challenges, primarily due to strain softening, strong nonlinear multiphysics coupling, and steep solution gradients with fine solution features. In general it is not known a priori where a shear band will form or propagate, thus adaptive refinement is sometimes necessary to increase the resolution near the band. In this work we explore the use of isogeometric analysis for shear band problems by constructing and testing several combinations of NURBS elements for a mixed finite element shear band formulation. Owing to the higher order continuity of the NURBS basis, fine solution features such as shear bands can be resolved accurately and efficiently without adaptive refinement. The results are compared to a mixed element formulation with linear functions for displacement and temperature and Pian-Sumihara shape functions for stress. We find that an element based on high order NURBS functions for displacement, temperature and stress, combined with gauss point sampling of the plastic strain leads to attractive results in terms of rate of convergence, accuracy and cpu time. This element is implemented with a -bar strain projection method and is shown to be nearly locking free.

  2. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  3. Report on holographic tests at S-band and K-band on the DSS-63 64 metre antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godwin, M. P.; Schoessow, E. P.; Richards, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    High resolution holographic tests were carried out on DSS-63 at S-band and K-band during May l985. These tests followed a mechanical retrofit which involved the addition of structural bracing to the backing structure. Geosynchronous satellite beacons were used as sources for the tests. At a resolution of 0.4m the S-band and K-band tests revealed rms deviations of the surface to be 2.73mm and 1.53mm, respectively. The difference between these two results is thought to be due mainly to contamination of the S-band surface error map by expected and generally predictable subreflector diffraction effects. The S-band map is also known to be contaminated by diffraction from the subreflector support struts and has a higher noise level than the K-band map. A list of corrections to be applied to the reflector panels is derived from the K-band map. These corrections are predicted to reduce the rms deviation from 1.53mm to 0.86mm at 0.4m resolution. Comparison with results obtained before the mechanical retrofit suggests the major effect of the added structural bracing to be reduction of a third order deformation of the reflector about its axis.

  4. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  5. Autophosphorylation and rapid dephosphorylation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase from Blastocladiella emersonii zoospores.

    PubMed

    Gomes, S L; Juliani, M H; da Costa Maia, J C; Rangel-Aldao, R

    1983-06-10

    The photoaffinity label 8-azido[32P]adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate and affinity chromatography on N6-(2-aminoethyl)-cAMP-Sepharose were used to analyze the cAMP-binding proteins present in cell-free extracts of Blastocladiella emersonii zoospores. In the presence of a mixture of protease inhibitors, 8-azido[32P]cAMP was specifically and quantitatively incorporated into a major protein band of Mr = 58,000, and three minor protein bands of Mr = 50,000, Mr = 43,000, and Mr = 36,000 respectively, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryl-amide gel electrophoresis. In the absence of the protease inhibitors, the Mr = 58,000 protein band was converted into the lower molecular weight cAMP-binding proteins, indicating a high sensitivity of the intact Mr = 58,000 protein band to endogenous proteases. The Mr = 58,000 protein corresponded to the regulatory subunit (R), of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase of zoospores, as shown by their identical behavior on DEAE-cellulose chromatography. The partially purified protein kinase incorporated 32P from [gamma-32P] ATP . Mg2+ into R as demonstrated by the specific adsorption of the 32P-labeled protein with N6-(2-aminoethyl)-cAMP-Sepharose. The incorporated 32P group was rapidly removed by endogenous phosphoprotein phosphatases in the presence of cAMP, as shown by pulse-chase experiments with [gamma-32P]ATP. Dephosphorylation of R-cAMP and rapid proteolysis may indicate two other mechanisms, in addition to cAMP, for the control of this protein kinase in vivo. PMID:6304069

  6. Salmon testes meal as a functional feed additive in fish meal and plant-protein based diets for rainbow trout(Oncorhynchus mykiss walbaum)and nile tilapia(Oreochromis niloticus L.) fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report that salmon testes meal (TM) produced from Alaskan seafood processing byproducts is a potential protein source for aquafeed formulations. A series of feeding trials was conducted using three different fish species; including Nile tilapia, rainbow trout, and white sturgeon at their early gr...

  7. Chemically induced compaction bands: Triggering conditions and band thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanou, Ioannis; Sulem, Jean

    2014-02-01

    During compaction band formation, various mechanisms can be involved at different scales. Mechanical and chemical degradation of the solid skeleton and grain damage are important factors that may trigger instabilities in the form of compaction bands. Here we explore the conditions of compaction band formation in quartz- and carbonate-based geomaterials by considering the effect of chemical dissolution and grain breakage. As the stresses/deformations evolve, the grains of the material break, leading to an increase of their specific surface. Consequently, their dissolution is accelerated and chemical softening is triggered. By accounting for (a) the mass diffusion of the system, (b) a macroscopic failure criterion with dissolution softening, and (c) the reaction kinetics at the microlevel, a model is proposed and the conditions for compaction instabilities are investigated. Distinguishing the microscale (grain level) from the macrolevel (representative elementary volume) and considering the heterogeneous microstructure of the representative elementary volume, it is possible to discuss the thickness and periodicity of compaction bands. Two case studies are investigated. The first one concerns a sandstone rock reservoir which is water flooded and the second one a carbonate rock in which CO2 is injected for storage. It is shown that compaction band instabilities are possible in both cases.

  8. Identification of cDNA encoding an additional. alpha. subunit of a human GTP-binding protein: Expression of three. alpha. sub i subtypes in human tissues and cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ang, S.L.; Bloch, D.B.; Bloch, K.D.; Kawahara, Y.; Tolman, C.; Lee, R.; Seidman, J.G.; Neer, E.J. )

    1988-06-01

    The guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), which mediate hormonal regulation of many membrane functions, are composed of {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} subunits. The authors have cloned and characterized cDNA from a human T-cell library encoding a form of {alpha}{sub i} that is different from the human {alpha}{sub i} subtypes previously reported. {alpha}{sub i} is the {alpha} subunit of a class of G proteins that inhibits adenylate cyclase and regulates other enzymes and ion channels. This cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 354 amino acids and is assigned to encode the {alpha}{sub i-3} subtype of G proteins on the basis of its similarity to other {alpha}{sub i}-like cDNAs and the presence of a predicted site for ADP ribosylation by pertussis toxin. They have determined the expression of mRNA for this and two other subtypes of human {alpha}{sub i} ({alpha}{sub i-1} and {alpha}{sub i-2}) in a variety of human fetal tissues and in human cell lines. All three {alpha}{sub i} subtypes were present in the tissues tested. However, analysis of individual cell types reveals specificity of {alpha}{sub i-1} expression. mRNA for {alpha}{i-1} is absent in T cells, B cells, and monocytes but is present in other cell lines. The finding of differential expression of {alpha}{sub i-1} genes may permit characterization of distinct physiological roles for this {alpha}{sub i} subunit. mRNA for {alpha}{sub i-2} and {alpha}{sub i-3} was found in all the primary and transformed cell lines tested. Thus, some cells contain all three {alpha}{sub i} subtypes. This observation raises the question of how cells prevent cross talk among receptors that are coupled to effectors through such similar {alpha} proteins.

  9. Band loss by nestling mourning doves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaczynski, C.F.; Kiel, W.H.

    1963-01-01

    Nestling mourning doves (Zenaidura macroura) were banded and checked for band loss prior to fledging at Parchman, Mississippi, during the months of June-August, 1960. Three hundred seventy-seven nestlings 4-6 days of age were banded, 117 with size 3 bands, 120 with size 3A bands, and 140 with size 3A bands secured by Dalzoflex tape. Two hundred twenty nestlings 7-9 days of age were banded, 114 with size 3 bands and 106 with size 3A bands. In the 4- to 6-day age group, 66.3 percent of the size 3A bands were lost. This was a statistically significant departure from the 7.7 percent loss of size 3 bands. No taped bands were lost. However, predators ate 13.8 percent of the nestlings with taped bands and significantly fewer of the nestlings banded without tape. In the 4- to 6-day age group, percentages of nestlings known to be available for band recovery at 9 days or older were: size 3, 69.2 percent; size 3A with tape, 59.0 percent; size 3A, 25.8 percent. In the 7-to 9-day age group, there was a 3.3 percent loss of size 3A bands and no loss of size 3 bands. The minimum age at which nestlings were banded without subsequent loss of bands was 6 days for size 3 and 8 days for size 3A.

  10. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  11. Density Banding in Coral Skeletons: A Biotic Response to Sea Surface Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C. A.; Oehlert, A. M.; Piggot, A. M.; Yau, P. M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2008-12-01

    Density bands in the CaCO3 (aragonite) skeleton of scleractinian corals are commonly used as chronometers, where crystalline couplets of high and low density bands represent the span of one year. This provides a sensitive reconstructive tool for paleothermometry, paleoclimatology and paleoecology. However, the detailed mechanisms controlling aragonite nucleation and crystallization events and the rate of skeletal growth remain uncertain. The organic matrix, composed of macromolecules secreted by the calicoblastic ectoderm, is closely associated with skeletal precipitation and is itself incorporated into the skeleton. We postulate that density banding is primarily controlled by changes in the rate of aragonite crystal precipitation mediated by the coral holobiont response to changes in sea surface temperature (SST). To test this hypothesis, data were collected from coral skeleton-tissue biopsies (2.5 cm in diameter) extracted from four species of Montastraea growing on the fringing reef tract of Curacao, Netherlands Antilles (annual mean variation in SST is 29° C in mid-September to 26° C in late February). Samples were collected in the following three contextual modes: 1) at two sites (Water Plant and Playa Kalki) along a lateral 25 km spatial transect; 2) across a vertical bathymetric gradient from 5 to 15 m water depth at each site; and 3) at strategic time periods spanning the 3° C annual variations in SST. Preliminary results indicate that skeletal density banding is also expressed in the organic matrix, permitting biochemical characterization and correlation of the organic matrix banding to the skeletal banding. In addition, both surficial and ectodermal mucins were characterized in terms of total protein content, abundance and location of their anionic, cationic, and neutral macromolecular constituents. Furthermore, the ratio of mucocytes in the oral ectoderm to gastrodermal symbiotic zooxanthellae has permitted estimates of seasonal carbon allocation by

  12. A comparative protein profile of mammalian erythrocyte membranes identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Savita; Punjabi, Vinny; Zingde, Surekha M; Gokhale, Sadashiv M

    2014-11-01

    A comparative analysis of erythrocyte membrane proteins of economically important animals, goat (Capra aegagrus hircus), buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), pig (Sus scrofa), cow (Bos tauras), and human (Homo sapiens) was performed. Solubilized erythrocyte membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), visualized by staining the gels with Commassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), and identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Emerging results show that all major erythrocyte membrane proteins present in human are also seen in all the animals except for band 4.5 which could not be identified. Band 3 is seen as more intense and compact, band 4.1 appears as a doublet in all the animal erythrocyte membranes, band 4.2 exhibits a slightly higher molecular weight (Mr) in buffalo, and cow and band 4.9 has a higher Mr in all the animals relative to the human protein. In addition, there are two new bands in the goat membrane, band G1, identified as HSP 90α, and band G2 identified as HSP 70. A new band C2 identified as HSP 70 is also seen in cow membranes. Peroxiredoxin II is of lower intensity and/or higher Mr in the animals. The difference in size of the proteins possibly indicates the variations in the composition of the amino acids. The difference in intensity of the proteins among these mammalians highlights the presence of less or more number of copies of that protein per cell. This data complement the earlier observations of differences in the sialoglycoprotein profile and effect of proteases and neuraminidase on agglutination among the mammalian erythrocytes. This study provides a platform to understand the molecular architecture of the individual erythrocytes, and in turn the dependent disorders, their phylogenetic relationship and also generates a database of erythrocyte membrane proteins of mammals. The animals selected for this study are of economic importance as

  13. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  14. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  15. Ka-band study: 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layland, J. W.; Horttor, R. L.; Clauss, R. C.; Wilcher, J. H.; Wallace, R. J.; Mudgway, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Ka-band study team was chartered in late 1987 to bring together all the planning elements for establishing 32 GHz (Ka-band) as the primary downlink frequency for deep-space operation, and to provide a stable baseline from which to pursue that development. This article summarizes the results of that study at its conclusion in mid-1988, and corresponds to material presented to NASA's Office of Space Operations on July 14, 1988. For a variety of reasons, Ka-band is the right next major step in deep-space communications. It offers improved radio metric accuracy through reduced plasma sensitivity and increased bandwidth. Because of these improvements, it offers the opportunity to reduce costs in the flight radio system or in the DSN by allocating part of the overall benefits of Ka-band to this cost reduction. A mission scenario is being planned that can drive at least two and possibly all three of the DSN subnets to provide a Ka-band downlink capability by the turn of the century. The implementation scenario devised by the study team is believed to be feasible within reasonable resource expectations, and capable of providing the needed upgrade as a natural follow-on to the technology development which is already underway.

  16. Correlations in a Band Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentef, Michael; Kunes, Jan; Kampf, Arno P.; Werner, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Using DMFT we find a discontinuous band-to-Mott insulator transition upon an increase in the local Coulomb repulsion in a covalent band insulator [1,2], defined as a band insulator with partially filled local orbitals. The corresponding band gap is a hybridization gap arising from a particular pattern of hopping integrals. Similar characteristics apply to materials such as FeSi, FeSb2 or CoTiSb [3], some of which exhibit temperature dependent magnetic and transport properties reminiscent of Kondo insulators. Both charge and spin gaps in the covalent band insulator shrink with increasing Coulomb repulsion. At moderate interaction strengths the gap renormalization is well described by a renormalization factor analogous to the quasiparticle weight in a Fermi liquid. [4pt] [1] M. Sentef, J. Kunes, P. Werner, and A.P. Kampf, Phys. Rev. B 80, 155116 (2009) [0pt] [2] A.P. Kampf, M. Kollar, J. Kunes, M. Sentef, and D. Vollhardt, arXiv:0910.5126

  17. William Band at Yenching University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Danian

    2008-04-01

    William Band (1906-1993) has been widely remembered by his American colleagues and students as ``a fine physicist and teacher,'' who taught at Washington State University in Pullman between 1949 and 1971 and authored Introduction to Quantum Statistics (1954) and Introduction to Mathematical Physics (1959). Not many, however, knew much about Band's early career, which was very ``uncommon and eventful.'' Born in England, Band graduated from University of Liverpool in 1927 with an MsSc degree in physics. Instead of pursuing his Ph.D. at Cambridge, he chose to teach physics at Yenching University, a prestigious Christian university in Beijing, China. Arriving in 1929, Band established his career at Yenching, where he taught and researched the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics, pioneered the study on low-temperature superconductivity in China, founded the country's first graduate program in physics, and chaired the Physics Department for 10 years until he fled from Yenching upon hearing of the attack on Pearl Harbor. It took him two years to cross Japanese occupied areas under the escort of the Communist force; he left China in early 1945. This presentation will explore Band's motivation to work in China and his contributions to the Chinese physics research and education.

  18. Rational, yet simple, design and synthesis of an antifreeze-protein inspired polymer for cellular cryopreservation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5cc04647e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Daniel E.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Antifreeze (glyco) proteins AF(G)Ps are potent ice recrystallization inhibitors, which is a desirable property to enhance cryopreservation of donor tissue/cells. Here we present the rational synthesis of a new, biomimetic, ice-recrystallization inhibiting polymer derived from a cheap commodity polymer, based on an ampholyte structure. The polymer is used to enhance the cryopreservation of red blood cells, demonstrating a macromolecular solution to tissue storage. PMID:26176027

  19. Human antibody response to outer membrane proteins of Campylobacter jejuni during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, S D; Bradbury, W C

    1984-01-01

    Two techniques were used to isolate outer membrane proteins from Campylobacter jejuni, EDTA-lysozyme extraction and sodium-N-lauroylsarcosinate (Sarkosyl) solubilization. The protein profiles of the two preparations were similar, with a few additional bands in the EDTA-lysozyme preparations. The major outer membrane protein was 43,000 (43K) daltons, and there were 8 to 10 minor bands ranging from 92K to 14K daltons. There was no difference in the protein profile of a strain causing an infection (strain 17) and the resulting stool isolate (strain 17J). Sera collected before the infection and during the acute and convalescent stages were used with Western blotting and immunoautoradiographic techniques to determine the antigenicity of outer membrane proteins. A number of antigenic proteins were detected before the infection by their reaction with preinfection serum (61K, 51K, 43K, 40K, 34K, and 31K daltons), and three additional bands appeared during the infection when acute and convalescent sera were used (92K, 56K, and 19K daltons). Furthermore, an area of the gel at less than 14.4K daltons that did not stain with Coomassie brilliant blue became visible in the immune blots when the convalescent serum was used. Images PMID:6198286

  20. Identification of New Hot Bands in the Blue and Green Band Systems of FeH.

    PubMed

    Wilson; Brown

    1999-10-01

    A particularly rich region of the electronic spectrum of FeH from 525 to 545 nm was investigated using the techniques of dispersed and undispersed laser-induced fluorescence. Analysis has led to the discovery that several different electronic transitions are embedded in this region; the (0, 0) and (1, 1) bands of the e(6)Pi-a(6)Delta (green) system, the (0, 2) band of the g(6)Phi-X(4)Delta (intercombination) system, the (0, 1) band of the g(6)Phi-a(6)Delta (blue) system, and the (0, 0) band of the g(6)Phi-b(6)Pi system. Seventy-five lines were assigned in the (0, 1) band of the g(6)Phi-a(6)Delta transition. These, with the assignment of an additional 14 lines in the 583 nm region to the (0, 1) band of the e(6)Pi-a(6)Delta transition, led to the extension of the known term values to higher J values for the Omega = 9/2, 7/2, and 5/2 spin components of the v = 1 level of the a(6)Delta state and the novel characterization of the a(6)Delta(3/2) (v = 1) and g(6)Phi(5/2) (v = 0) components. A further 73 lines were assigned to the first four subbands of the (1, 1) band of the e(6)Pi-a(6)Delta transition and term values for the lowest four spin components of the v = 1 level of the e(6)Pi state were determined. This provides the first experimental measurement of a vibrational interval in one of the higher lying electronic states of FeH. The interval does not appear to vary strongly between the spin components (DeltaG(1/2) = 1717, 1713, 1710 cm(-1) for Omega = 7/2, 5/2, 3/2, respectively). Remarkably few of the hot-band transitions assigned in this work could be identified in the complex, high-temperature spectrum of FeH recorded by P. McCormack and S. O'Connor [Astron. Astrophys. Suppl. 26, 373-380 (1976)]. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10479583

  1. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  2. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  3. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  4. Decay from the superdeformed bands in {sup 194}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.G.; Khoo, T.L.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    Superdeformed bands in {sup 194}H g were studied using the early implementation of Gammasphere. The response functions for the Ge detectors were measured for the first time as part of this experiment. Experiments were performed with both a backed target (where the residue stopped in the Au backing) and a thin target (where the residue recoiled into vacuum). This will permit measurements of the decay times of the quasicontinuum {gamma}rays. The spectrum in coincidence with the yrast SD band in {sup 194}Hg reveals the same features as found in the quasicontinuum structure in {sup 192}Hg. These features include: statistical {gamma}rays feeding the SD band, a pronounced E2 peak from transitions feeding the SD band, a Ml/E2 bump at low energies that is associated with the last stages of feeding of the superdeformed band, and a quasicontinuous distribution from {gamma}rays linking SD and normal states, including a sizable clustering of strength around 1.7 MeV. The remarkable similarity of the spectra coincident with SD bands in {sup 192,194}Hg provides additional support for a statistical process for decay out of the SD states. This similarity contrasts with differences observed in the spectrum coincident with the SD band in the odd-even {sup 191}Hg, confirming the predictions about the role of pairing (in normal states) in influencing the shape of the decay-out spectrum.

  5. Oilseed crop discrimination: selection of optimum bands and role of middle infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. A.; Bhatt, H. P.; Ajai

    Several statistical separability measures have been analysed to determine the best subset of bands from six bands (excluding thermal IR) of Landsat Thematic Mapper data to obtain the best combination for discrimination between oilseed crop, orchards, scrubs, acacia and forests. The effects of the addition of the middle-infrared band to the visible and near-infrared bands have also been studied. The inclusion of the middle-infrared bands has led to considerable improvement in crop classification. Band combinations 2-3-4-5 and 1-2-4-5 are found to be the best four band combinations and 3-4-5 and 1-4-5 are found to be the best band triplets for crop discrimination.

  6. Fast reversible single-step method for enhanced band contrast of polyacrylamide gels for automated detection.

    PubMed

    Ling, Wei-Li; Lua, Wai-Heng; Gan, Samuel Ken-En

    2015-05-01

    Staining SDS-PAGE is commonly used in protein analysis for many downstream characterization processes. Although staining and destaining protocols can be adjusted, they can be laborious, and faint bands often become false negatives. Similarly, these faint bands hinder automated software band detections that are necessary for quantitative analyses. To overcome these problems, we describe a single-step rapid and reversible method to increase (up to 500%) band contrast in stained gels. Through the use of alcohols, we improved band detection and facilitated gel storage by drying the gels into compact white sheets. This method is suitable for all stained SDS-PAGE gels, including gradient gels and is shown to improve automated band detection by enhanced band contrast. PMID:25782090

  7. Fast reversible single-step method for enhanced band contrast of polyacrylamide gels for automated detection

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Wei-Li; Lua, Wai-Heng; Gan, Samuel Ken-En

    2015-01-01

    Staining SDS-PAGE is commonly used in protein analysis for many downstream characterization processes. Although staining and destaining protocols can be adjusted, they can be laborious, and faint bands often become false negatives. Similarly, these faint bands hinder automated software band detections that are necessary for quantitative analyses. To overcome these problems, we describe a single-step rapid and reversible method to increase (up to 500%) band contrast in stained gels. Through the use of alcohols, we improved band detection and facilitated gel storage by drying the gels into compact white sheets. This method is suitable for all stained SDS-PAGE gels, including gradient gels and is shown to improve automated band detection by enhanced band contrast. PMID:25782090

  8. Shear Banding of Complex Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divoux, Thibaut; Fardin, Marc A.; Manneville, Sebastien; Lerouge, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Even in simple geometries, many complex fluids display nontrivial flow fields, with regions where shear is concentrated. The possibility for such shear banding has been known for several decades, but in recent years, we have seen an upsurge in studies offering an ever-more precise understanding of the phenomenon. The development of new techniques to probe the flow on multiple scales with increasing spatial and temporal resolution has opened the possibility for a synthesis of the many phenomena that could only have been thought of separately before. In this review, we bring together recent research on shear banding in polymeric and soft glassy materials and highlight their similarities and disparities.

  9. Banded Terrain in East Hellas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-460, 22 August 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle camera image shows banded terrain in easternmost Hellas Planitia, between the distal ends of Dao and Harmakhis valleys. These bands probably indicate the location of eroded, layered bedrock that has been covered by a mantling deposit that, itself, became eroded to form the very small pits and bumps that pervade the region. This picture is located near 41.1oS, 275.0oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/upper left.

  10. Flat Chern Band in a Two-Dimensional Organometallic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zheng-Fei; Mei, Jia-Wei; Wu, Yong-Shi; Liu, Feng

    2013-03-01

    By combining exotic band dispersion with nontrivial band topology, an interesting type of band, namely the flat chern band (FCB), has recently been proposed, in which carriers experience strong Coulomb interaction as well as topological frustration that in together spawn unprecedented topological strongly-correlated electronic states, such as high-temperature fractional quantum hall state. Despite the proposal of several theoretical lattice models, however, it remains a doubt whether such a ``romance of flatland'' could exist in a real material. Here, we present a first-principles design to realize a nearly FCB right around the Fermi level in a two-dimensional (2D) Indium-Phenylene Organometallic Framework (IPOF). Our design in addition provides a general strategy to synthesize topologically nontrivial materials in virtue of organic chemistry and nanotechnology. Supported by DOE-BES and ARL

  11. Tunable band gap of boron nitride interfaces under uniaxial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Elizane E.; Manhabosco, Taíse M.; de Oliveira, Alan B.; Batista, Ronaldo J. C.

    2012-11-01

    In this work we show, by means of a density functional theory formalism, that the interaction between hydrogen terminated boron nitride surfaces gives rise to a metallic interface with free carriers of opposite sign at each surface. A band gap can be induced by decreasing the surface separation. The size of the band gap changes continuously from zero up to 4.4 eV with decreasing separation, which is understood in terms of the interaction between surface states. Due to the high thermal conductivity of cubic boron nitride and the coupling between band gap and applied pressure, such tunable band gap interfaces may be used in highly stable electronic and electromechanical devices. In addition, the spatial separation of charge carriers at the interface may lead to photovoltaic applications.

  12. Tunable Band Gap of Boron Nitride Interfaces under Uniaxial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Elizane; Manhabosco, Taise; de Oliveira, Alan; Batista, Ronaldo

    2013-03-01

    In this work we show, by means of a density functional theory formalism, that the interaction between hydrogen terminated boron nitride surfaces gives rise to a metallic interface with free carries of opposite sign at each surface. A band gap can be induced by decreasing the surface separation. The size of the band gap changes continuously from zero up to 4.4 eV with decreasing separation, which is understood in terms of the interaction between surface states.Due to the high thermal conductivity of cubic boron nitride and the coupling between band gap and applied pressure, such tunable band gap interfaces may be used in high stable electronic and electromechanical devices. In addition, the spacial separation of charge carries at the interface may lead to photovoltaic applications. The authors thank tha brazilian agencies Fapemig, CNPq and Capes

  13. Band offsets in c-Si/Si-XII heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Jamal I.; Malone, Brad D.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-08-01

    Silicon has a rich phase diagram with a multitude of phases existing over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, in addition to the common cubic silicon (c-Si) phase. One such phase, Si-XII, was first observed less than 2 decades ago in diamond anvil experiments, and more recently as a product of nanoindentation. In some of these latter experiments, I-V measurements were performed to characterize the c-Si/Si-XII interface that results when Si-XII is formed in cubic silicon substrates. In this paper we describe calculations of the band offsets in c-Si/Si-XII heterojunctions. We find that the heterojunction is of Type I and that the band offsets are estimated to be ΔEv=0.3 eV and ΔEc=0.5 eV for the valence bands and conduction bands, respectively.

  14. Mars Global Surveyor Ka-Band Frequency Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D.; Butman, S.; Shambayati, S.

    2000-01-01

    for the feed and electronics equipment. A dichroic plate is used to reflect the X-band energy and pass the Ka-band energy to another mirror. The RF energy for each band is then focused onto a feed horn and low-noise amplifier package. After amplification and RF/IF downconversion, the IF signals are sent to the Experimental Tone Tracker (ETT), a digital phase-lock-loop receiver, which simultaneously tracks both X-band and Ka-band carrier signals. Once a signal is detected, the ETT outputs estimates of the SNR in a I -Hz bandwidth (Pc/No), baseband phase and frequency of the signals every I -sec. Between December 1996 and December 1998, the Ka-band and X-band signals from MGS were tracked on a regular basis using the ETT. The Ka-band downlink frequencies described here were referenced to the spacecraft's on-board USO which was also the X-band frequency reference (fka= 3.8 fx). The ETT estimates of baseband phase at I -second sampled time tags were converted to sky frequency estimates. Frequency residuals were then generated for each band by removing a model frequency from each observable frequency at each time tag. The model included Doppler and other effects derived from spacecraft trajectory files obtained from the MGS Navigation Team. A simple troposphere correction was applied to the data. In addition to residuals, the USO frequencies emitted by the spacecraft were estimated. For several passes, the USO frequencies were determined from X-band data and from Ka-band data (referred to X-band by dividing by 3.8) and were found to be in good agreement. In addition, X-band USO frequency estimates from MGS Radio Science data acquired from operational DSN stations were available for comparison and were found to agree within the I Hz level. The remaining sub-Hertz differences were attributed to the different models and software algorithms used by MGS Radio Science and KaBLE-11. A summary of the results of a linear fit of the USO frequency versus time (day of year) is

  15. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  16. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  17. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  18. The zebrafish band 4.1 member Mir is involved in cell movements associated with gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Michelle N; Chan, Bosco M C; Kelly, Gregory M

    2003-12-15

    Cellular processes rely on dynamic events occurring between the cortical cytoskeleton and plasma membrane. Members of the Band 4.1 superfamily, which are best known for their ability to tether the cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, play prominent structural and regulatory roles that influence cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, endo- and exocytosis, cell polarity, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. We have identified a new member of the zebrafish Band 4.1 superfamily, which is the homolog of human myosin regulatory light chain interacting protein (MIR), and have examined its role in embryonic development. Zebrafish Mir contains the conserved amino-terminal plasma membrane-binding FERM (Band 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin) domain as well as other putative protein-protein interacting domains, including a RING finger. Overall, zebrafish Mir is 71% identical to human MIR located at chromosome 6p23-p22.3, and maps on linkage group 19 to a region of synteny with human chromosome 6. In situ hybridization and RT-PCR revealed that mir is expressed maternally and ubiquitously throughout development. Blocking Mir translation using a mir-specific, morpholino-based, knock-down strategy or expressing Mir constructs lacking the RING finger domain disrupts gastrulation and leads to subsequent trunk and tail defects. In severe cases, morphants exogastrulate. The synergistic effect seen when two mir-specific morpholinos are used in conjunction reflects the specific knock-down of mir. In addition, morphant phenotypes induced by mir-specific morpholinos are rescued by overexpression of the full-length Mir. In situ hybridization analysis with mesodermal- and neural-specific markers shows that morphants exhibit a delay in cell movements associated with gastrulation, epiboly, convergence, and extension. A yeast two-hybrid analysis was performed to identify binding partners that may participate with Mir during gastrulation, and Annexin V, a calcium channel protein, was

  19. Solvent effect on Raman spectra of conformational key bands of chloroacetone and bromoacetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiratori, Yosuke; Kato, Minoru; Taniguchi, Yoshihiro

    1999-11-01

    Raman spectra were measured for chloroacetone and bromoacetone in various solvents at 20°C. The authors recorded the C-X (X:Cl and Br) stretching modes for both chloroacetone and bromoacetone and the CO stretching mode for bromoacetone. In each spectrum for aqueous solutions, an additional band appeared on the lower frequency side of the band of the syn conformer. These bands are assigned to the syn conformer which forms a hydrogen bond between each halogen atom of haloacetones and water molecule. From solvent effects on peak frequencies, half band widths and band profiles, the authors discussed local hydration structures of haloacetones.

  20. Wide band data collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkiewicz, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The Incorporated Research Institutes for Seismology (IRIS) approached NASA Headquarters in 1986 about the need to collect data daily from seismic stations around the world as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) mission. A typical IRIS Seismic Station generates 16 Megabytes of data per day when there is seismic activity. The Preliminary Design Parameters of the Wide Band Data Collection System are summarized.

  1. Resistive band for turbomachine blade

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Herbert Chidsey; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-08-25

    A turbomachine system includes a rotor that defines a longitudinal axis of the turbomachine system. A first blade is coupled to the rotor, and the first blade has first and second laminated plies. A first band is coupled to the first blade and is configured to resist separation of the first and second laminated plies.

  2. Band structure in 113Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P.; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Sharma, H. P.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The structure of collective bands in 113Sn, populated in the reaction 100Mo(19F,p 5 n ) at a beam energy of 105 MeV, has been studied. A new positive-parity sequence of eight states extending up to 7764.9 keV and spin (39 /2+) has been observed. The band is explained as arising from the coupling of the odd valence neutron in the g7 /2 or the d5 /2 orbital to the deformed 2p-2h proton configuration of the neighboring even-A Sn isotope. Lifetimes of six states up to an excitation energy of 9934.9 keV and spin 47 /2-belonging to a Δ I =2 intruder band have been measured for the first time, including an upper limit for the last state, from Doppler-shift-attenuation data. A moderate average quadrupole deformation β2=0.22 ±0.02 is deduced from these results for the five states up to spin 43 /2- . The transition quadrupole moments decrease with increase in rotational frequency, indicating a reduction of collectivity with spin, a feature common for terminating bands. The behavior of the kinematic and dynamic moments of inertia as a function of rotational frequency has been studied and total Routhian surface calculations have been performed in an attempt to obtain an insight into the nature of the states near termination.

  3. K-Band Latching Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piotrowski, W. S.; Raue, J. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design, development, and tests are described for two single-pole-double-throw latching waveguide ferrite switches: a K-band switch in WR-42 waveguide and a Ka-band switch in WR-28 waveguide. Both switches have structurally simple junctions, mechanically interlocked without the use of bonding materials; they are impervious to the effects of thermal, shock, and vibration stresses. Ferrite material for the Ka-band switch with a proper combination of magnetic and dielectric properties was available and resulted in excellent low loss, wideband performance. The high power handling requirement of the K-band switch limited the choice of ferrite to nickel-zinc compositions with adequate magnetic properties, but with too low relative dielectric constant. The relative dielectric constant determines the junction dimensions for given frequency responses. In this case the too low value unavoidably leads to a larger than optimum junction volume, increasing the insertion loss and restricting the operating bandwidth. Efforts to overcome the materials-related difficulties through the design of a composite junction with increased effective dielectric properties efforts to modify the relative dielectric constant of nickel-zinc ferrite are examined.

  4. Curriculum Guide for Beginners Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazar, W. Gayre

    This curriculum guide for beginners band is the product of a team of teachers, administrators, and supervisory personnel. The prime objectives in the beginning instrument class is the development of correct playing habits, with emphasis on posture, holding position, embouchure, breathing, tonguing, good tone production and intonation. Subjects…

  5. Tolerance bands for functional data.

    PubMed

    Rathnayake, Lasitha N; Choudhary, Pankaj K

    2016-06-01

    Often the object of inference in biomedical applications is a range that brackets a given fraction of individual observations in a population. A classical estimate of this range for univariate measurements is a "tolerance interval." This article develops its natural extension for functional measurements, a "tolerance band," and proposes a methodology for constructing its pointwise and simultaneous versions that incorporates both sparse and dense functional data. Assuming that the measurements are observed with noise, the methodology uses functional principal component analysis in a mixed model framework to represent the measurements and employs bootstrapping to approximate the tolerance factors needed for the bands. The proposed bands also account for uncertainty in the principal components decomposition. Simulations show that the methodology has, generally, acceptable performance unless the data are quite sparse and unbalanced, in which case the bands may be somewhat liberal. The methodology is illustrated using two real datasets, a sparse dataset involving CD4 cell counts and a dense dataset involving core body temperatures. PMID:26574904

  6. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOEpatents

    Goldberg, David A.; Flood, William S.; Arthur, Allan A.; Voelker, Ferdinand

    1986-01-01

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  7. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 763-775 MHz and 793... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  8. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 758-775 MHz and 788... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  9. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 758-775 MHz and 788... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  10. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 763-775 MHz and 793... and portables subject to Commission-approved regional planning committee regional plans....

  11. 47 CFR 90.531 - Band plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Band plan. 90.531 Section 90.531 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND...-805 MHz Bands § 90.531 Band plan. This section sets forth the band plan for the 763-775 MHz and...

  12. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  13. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  14. Three-Dimensional Structure of Vertebrate Muscle Z-Band: The Small-Square Lattice Z-Band in Rat Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Morris, Edward P.; Luther, Pradeep K.

    2015-01-01

    The Z-band in vertebrate striated muscle crosslinks actin filaments of opposite polarity from adjoining sarcomeres and transmits tension along myofibrils during muscular contraction. It is also the location of a number of proteins involved in signalling and myofibrillogenesis; mutations in these proteins lead to myopathies. Understanding the high-resolution structure of the Z-band will help us understand its role in muscle contraction and the role of these proteins in the function of muscle. The appearance of the Z-band in transverse-section electron micrographs typically resembles a small-square lattice or a basketweave appearance. In longitudinal sections, the Z-band width varies more with muscle type than species: slow skeletal and cardiac muscles have wider Z-bands than fast skeletal muscles. As the Z-band is periodic, Fourier methods have previously been used for three-dimensional structural analysis. To cope with variations in the periodic structure of the Z-band, we have used subtomogram averaging of tomograms of rat cardiac muscle in which subtomograms are extracted and compared and similar ones are averaged. We show that the Z-band comprises four to six layers of links, presumably α-actinin, linking antiparallel overlapping ends of the actin filaments from the adjoining sarcomeres. The reconstruction shows that the terminal 5–7 nm of the actin filaments within the Z-band is devoid of any α-actinin links and is likely to be the location of capping protein CapZ. PMID:26362007

  15. Three-Dimensional Structure of Vertebrate Muscle Z-Band: The Small-Square Lattice Z-Band in Rat Cardiac Muscle.

    PubMed

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Morris, Edward P; Luther, Pradeep K

    2015-11-01

    The Z-band in vertebrate striated muscle crosslinks actin filaments of opposite polarity from adjoining sarcomeres and transmits tension along myofibrils during muscular contraction. It is also the location of a number of proteins involved in signalling and myofibrillogenesis; mutations in these proteins lead to myopathies. Understanding the high-resolution structure of the Z-band will help us understand its role in muscle contraction and the role of these proteins in the function of muscle. The appearance of the Z-band in transverse-section electron micrographs typically resembles a small-square lattice or a basketweave appearance. In longitudinal sections, the Z-band width varies more with muscle type than species: slow skeletal and cardiac muscles have wider Z-bands than fast skeletal muscles. As the Z-band is periodic, Fourier methods have previously been used for three-dimensional structural analysis. To cope with variations in the periodic structure of the Z-band, we have used subtomogram averaging of tomograms of rat cardiac muscle in which subtomograms are extracted and compared and similar ones are averaged. We show that the Z-band comprises four to six layers of links, presumably α-actinin, linking antiparallel overlapping ends of the actin filaments from the adjoining sarcomeres. The reconstruction shows that the terminal 5-7nm of the actin filaments within the Z-band is devoid of any α-actinin links and is likely to be the location of capping protein CapZ. PMID:26362007

  16. Identification of the interaction between vimentin and nucleocapsid protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Shi, HongYan; Chen, JianFei; Shi, Da; Dong, Hui; Feng, Li

    2015-03-16

    Nucleocapsid (N) protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) packages viral RNA genome to form a ribonucleoprotein complex. In addition to its function as a structural protein, N protein is involved in cell apoptosis or cell-cycle regulation. N protein possibly interacts with host factors to modulate cellular functions. To identify cellular proteins that interacted with N protein of TGEV, methods of GST pull-down and Co-IP were utilized to precipitate cellular proteins of swine testicular (ST). Bound cellular proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE. Analysis of interacting proteins by mass spectrometry allowed identification of 15 cellular protein bands representative of 12 cellular proteins including vimentin that bound to N protein. Furthermore, the function of vimentin cytoskeleton in ST cells during TGEV infection was examined. Vimentin cytoskeleton was required for virus replication. The present study thus provides protein-related information about interaction of TGEV N protein with host cell that should be useful for understanding host cell response to coronavirus pathogenesis infection and the underlying mechanism of coronavirus replication. PMID:25533531

  17. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  18. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  19. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  20. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  1. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  2. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  3. Highly sensitive and simple fluorescence staining of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-based gels by using hydrophobic tail-mediated enhancement of fluorescein luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chulhun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Donghoon; Jung, Duk Young; Suh, Myungkoo

    2003-10-01

    Fluorescein has an extremely low luminescence intensity in acidic aqueous media. However, when it was bound to proteins, subsequent increase of luminescence intensity took place. Furthermore, when a hydrophobic tail, such as aliphatic hydrocarbons, was introduced to fluorescein, more dramatic increase of luminescence intensity was observed upon binding to proteins. In the present study, by utilizing this luminescence enhancement, three hydrophobic fluorescein dyes (5-dodecanoyl amino fluorescein, 5-hexadecanoyl amino fluorescein, and 5-octadecanoyl amino fluorescein) were examined as noncovalent fluorescent stains of protein bands in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Effective incorporation of the dyes to proteins in gels was accomplished either simply by adding dyes at the protein fixation step, or by treating gels with a staining solution after the fixation. The sensitivity of this staining method using the fluorescein derivatives was approximately 1 ng/band for most proteins. For some cases, protein bands containing as low as 0.1 ng were successfully visualized. In addition, the detection sensitivity showed much less protein-to-protein variation than silver staining. This new staining method was also successfully applied to two-dimensional electrophoresis of rat brain proteins. Its overall sensitivity was comparable to that of silver staining. PMID:14595675

  4. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  5. Comparing C- and L-band SAR images for sea ice motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtiranta, J.; Siiriä, S.; Karvonen, J.

    2015-02-01

    Pairs of consecutive C-band synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images are routinely used for sea ice motion estimation. The L-band radar has a fundamentally different character, as its longer wavelength penetrates deeper into sea ice. L-band SAR provides information on the seasonal sea ice inner structure in addition to the surface roughness that dominates C-band images. This is especially useful in the Baltic Sea, which lacks multiyear ice and icebergs, known to be confusing targets for L-band sea ice classification. In this work, L-band SAR images are investigated for sea ice motion estimation using the well-established maximal cross-correlation (MCC) approach. This work provides the first comparison of L-band and C-band SAR images for the purpose of motion estimation. The cross-correlation calculations are hardware accelerated using new OpenCL-based source code, which is made available through the author's web site. It is found that L-band images are preferable for motion estimation over C-band images. It is also shown that motion estimation is possible between a C-band and an L-band image using the maximal cross-correlation technique.

  6. Interband interaction between bulk and surface resonance bands of a Pb-adsorbed Ge(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakata, Tomohiro; Takeda, Sakura N.; Kitagawa, Kosuke; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the valence band structure of a Pb-adsorbed Ge(001) surface by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Three Ge bands, G1, G2, and G3, were observed in a Ge(001) 2 × 1 clean surface. In addition to these three bands, a fourth band (R band) is found on the surface with 2 ML of Pb. The R band continuously appeared even when the surface superstructure was changed. The position of the R band does not depend on Pb coverage. These results indicate that the R band derives from Ge subsurface states, known as surface resonance states. Furthermore, the effective mass of G3 is significantly reduced when the R band exists. We found that this reduction of G3 effective mass was explained by the interaction of the G3 and R bands. Consequently, the surface resonance band is considered to penetrate into the Ge subsurface region affecting the Ge bulk states. We determine the hybridization energy to be 0.068 eV by fitting the observed bands.

  7. Soluble scute proteins of healthy and ill desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homer, B.L.; Li, C.; Berry, K.H.; Denslow, N.D.; Jacobson, E.R.; Sawyer, R.H.; Williams, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives - To characterize protein composition of shell scute of desert tortoises and to determine whether detectable differences could be used to identify healthy tortoises from tortoises with certain illnesses. Animals - 20 desert tortoises. Procedures - Complete postmortem examinations were performed on all tortoises. Plastron scute proteins were solubilized, scute proteins were separated by use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and proteins were analyzed, using densitometry. Two-dimensional immobilized pH gradient-PAGE (2D IPG-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis, using polyclonal antisera to chicken-feather ?? keratin and to alligator-scale ?? keratin, were conducted on representative samples. The 14-kd proteins were analyzed for amino acid composition. Results - The SDS-PAGE and densitometry revealed 7 distinct bands, each with a mean relative protein concentration of > 1 %, ranging from 8 to 47 kd, and a major protein component of approximately 14 kd that constituted up to 75% of the scute protein. The 2D IPG-PAGE revealed additional distinct 62-and 68-kd protein bands. On immunoblot analysis, the 14-, 32-, and 45-kd proteins reacted with both antisera. The 14-kd proteins had an amino acid composition similar to that of chicken ?? keratins. There was a substantial difference in the percentage of the major 14-kd proteins from scute of ill tortoises with normal appearing shells, compared with 14-kd proteins of healthy tortoises. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - The major protein components of shell scute of desert tortoises have amino acid composition and antigenic features of ?? keratins. Scute protein composition may be altered in tortoises with certain systemic illnesses.

  8. Analysis of serrations and shear bands fractality in UFGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliopoulos, Aggelos C.; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos S.; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2015-05-01

    Tsallis nonextensive statistics is employed to characterize serrated flow, as well as multiple shear band formation in ultrafine grain (UFG) size materials. Two such UFG materials, a bi-modal Al-Mg alloy and a Fe-Cu alloy, were chosen. In the first case, at low strain rates serrated flow emerges as recorded in the stress-strain graphs, whereas at high strain rates, extensive shear banding occurs. In the second case, multiple shear banding is the only mechanism for plastic deformation, but serrations in the stress-strain graph are not recorded. The analysis aims at the estimation of Tsallis entropic index qstat (stat denotes stationary state), as well as the estimation of fractal dimension. The results reveal that the distributions of serrations and shear bands do not follow Gaussian statistics as implied by Boltzmann-Gibbs extensive thermodynamics, but are approximated instead by Tsallis q-Gaussian distributions, as suggested by nonextensive thermodynamics. In addition, fractal analysis of multiple shear band images reveals a (multi)fractal and hierarchical profile of the spatial arrangement of shear bands.

  9. From Good to Great: 9 Tips for Motivating Your Band

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waymire, Mark D.; Snead, Todd E.

    2007-01-01

    While being part of a good band program has positive benefits, participating in a great program often provides even more benefits. The reputation of a great program is usually far-reaching, attracting, statewide, and possibly national attention. Additional monies, more alumni support, special performance opportunities (all-state, Midwest, etc.),…

  10. Septic complications of hemorrhoidal banding.

    PubMed

    Quevedo-Bonilla, G; Farkas, A M; Abcarian, H; Hambrick, E; Orsay, C P

    1988-05-01

    Rubber band ligation is an efficacious and cost-effective alternative to conventional hemorrhoidectomy for symptomatic internal hemorrhoids. Even though the well-recognized complications of bleeding and thrombosis occur infrequently, far more serious septic complications have only recently been described, as evidenced in five of our patients: four cases were serious enough to necessitate surgical intervention, and one patient died. Pain followed by urinary dysfunction with or without toxic symptoms should alert the physician to the probability of localized perianal or systemic sepsis. Acute awareness of these rare but potentially life-threatening complications and immediate aggressive treatment is mandatory if death is to be prevented. Rubber band ligation of internal hemorrhoids need not be abandoned; however, the indications should be clear, the technique mastered, and a close patient follow-up maintained. PMID:3358691

  11. Ku-band miniature modulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Ku-band microminiature modulators were designed to convert a 10 mW signal at 400 MHz to a 10 mW signal at 15 GHz. The designs incorporate gallium arsenide Schottky barrier varactors used in upper-sideband up-converters. The use of Ku-band microstrip circulators and hairpin resonator bandpass filters at 2.1 GHz and 2.5 GHz is included. The design and fabrication of a single up-conversion unit with a double up-conversion unit are compared. Various filter configurations are studies, and the use of both alumina and quartz substrates are considered. The various impedance matching networks are evaluated using computer aided design techniques.

  12. ALMA Band 5 Cartridge Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billade, Bhushan; Lapkin, I.; Nystrom, O.; Sundin, E.; Fredrixon, M.; Finger, R.; Rashid, H.; Desmaris, V.; Meledin, D.; Pavolotsky, A.; Belitsky, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Work presented here concerns the design and performance of the ALMA Band 5 cold cartridge, one of the 10 frequency channels of ALMA project, a radio interferometer under construction at Atacama Desert in Chile. The Band 5 cartridge is a dual polarization receiver with the polarization separation performed by orthomode transducer (OMT). For each polarization, Band 5 receiver employs sideband rejection (2SB) scheme based on quadrature layout, with SIS mixers covering 163-211 GHz with 4-8 GHz IF. The LO injection circuitry is integrated with mixer chip and is implemented on the same substrate, resulting in a compact 2SB assembly. Amongst the other ALMA bands, the ALMA Band 5 being the lowest frequency band that uses all cold optics, has the largest mirror. Consequently, ALMA Band 5 mirror along with its support structure leaves very little room for placing OMT, mixers and IF subsystems. The constraints put by the size of cold optics and limited cartridge space, required of us to revise the original 2SB design and adopt a design where all the components like OMT, mixer, IF hybrid, isolators and IF amplifier are directly connected to each other without using any co-ax cables in-between. The IF subsystem uses the space between 4 K and 15 K stage of the cartridge and is thermally connected to 4 K stage. Avoiding co-ax cabling required use of custom designed IF hybrid, furthermore, due to limited cooling capacity at 4 K stage, resistive bias circuitry for the mixers is moved to 15 K stage and the IF hybrid along with an integrated bias-T is implemented using superconducting micro-strip lines. The E-probes for both LO and RF waveguide-to-microstrip transitions are placed perpendicular to the wave direction (back-piece configuration). The RF choke at the end of the probes provides a virtual ground for the RF/LO signal, and the choke is DC grounded to the chassis. The on-chip LO injection is done using a microstrip line directional coupler with slot-line branches in the

  13. Temporal patterns of apparent leg band retention in North American geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, G.S.; Kendall, W.L.; Moser, T.J.; White, Gary C.; Doherty, P.F.

    2009-01-01

    An important assumption of mark?recapture studies is that individuals retain their marks, which has not been assessed for goose reward bands. We estimated aluminum leg band retention probabilities and modeled how band retention varied with band type (standard vs. reward band), band age (1-40 months), and goose characteristics (species and size class) for Canada (Branta canadensis), cackling (Branta hutchinsii), snow (Chen caerulescens), and Ross?s (Chen rossii) geese that field coordinators double-leg banded during a North American goose reward band study (N = 40,999 individuals from 15 populations). We conditioned all models in this analysis on geese that were encountered with >1 leg band still attached (n = 5,747 dead recoveries and live recaptures). Retention probabilities for standard aluminum leg bands were high (estimate of 0.9995, SE = 0.001) and constant over 1-40 months. In contrast, apparent retention probabilities for reward bands demonstrated an interactive relationship between 5 size and species classes (small cackling, medium Canada, large Canada, snow, and Ross?s geese). In addition, apparent retention probabilities for each of the 5 classes varied quadratically with time, being lower immediately after banding and at older age classes. The differential retention probabilities among band type (reward vs. standard) that we observed suggests that 1) models estimating reporting probability should incorporate differential band loss if it is nontrivial, 2) goose managers should consider the costs and benefits of double-banding geese on an operational basis, and 3) the United States Geological Survey Bird Banding Lab should modify protocols for receiving recovery data.

  14. PAR-3 and PAR-1 Inhibit LET-99 Localization to Generate a Cortical Band Important for Spindle Positioning in Caenorhabditis elegans Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jui-Ching

    2007-01-01

    The conserved PAR proteins are localized in asymmetric cortical domains and are required for the polarized localization of cell fate determinants in many organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, LET-99 and G protein signaling act downstream of the PARs to regulate spindle positioning and ensure asymmetric division. PAR-3 and PAR-2 localize LET-99 to a posterior cortical band through an unknown mechanism. Here we report that LET-99 asymmetry depends on cortically localized PAR-1 and PAR-4 but not on cytoplasmic polarity effectors. In par-1 and par-4 embryos, LET-99 accumulates at the entire posterior cortex, but remains at low levels at the anterior cortex occupied by PAR-3. Further, PAR-3 and PAR-1 have graded cortical distributions with the highest levels at the anterior and posterior poles, respectively, and the lowest levels of these proteins correlate with high LET-99 accumulation. These results suggest that PAR-3 and PAR-1 inhibit the localization of LET-99 to generate a band pattern. In addition, PAR-1 kinase activity is required for the inhibition of LET-99 localization, and PAR-1 associates with LET-99. Finally, examination of par-1 embryos suggests that the banded pattern of LET-99 is critical for normal posterior spindle displacement and to prevent spindle misorientation caused by cell shape constraints. PMID:17761536

  15. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  16. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  17. ASTRONOMY: Researchers Get Spectrum Bands.

    PubMed

    Taubes, G

    2000-06-23

    Radio astronomers have been in danger of losing a precious band of the electromagnetic spectrum--the millimeter wavelengths, which promise insight into subjects as diverse as the origins of life and the birth of stars--to the burgeoning telecommunications industry, as millimeter wavelengths also look promising for transmitting high-bandwidth wireless information over relatively short distances. Earlier this month, however, astronomers won an international agreement that guarantees critical wavelengths safe for research. PMID:17758893

  18. Nonzero Quadrupole Moments of Candidate Tetrahedral Bands

    SciTech Connect

    Bark, R. A.; Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Smit, F. D.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Lindsay, R.

    2010-01-15

    Negative-parity bands in the vicinity of {sup 156}Gd and {sup 160}Yb have been suggested as candidates for the rotation of tetrahedral nuclei. We report the observation of the odd and even-spin members of the lowest energy negative-parity bands in {sup 160}Yb and {sup 154}Gd. The properties of these bands are similar to the proposed tetrahedral band of {sup 156}Gd and its even-spin partner. Band-mixing calculations are performed and absolute and relative quadrupole moments deduced for {sup 160}Yb and {sup 154}Gd. The values are inconsistent with zero, as required for tetrahedral shape, and the bands are interpreted as octupole vibrational bands. The failure to observe the in-band E2 transitions of the bands at low spins can be understood using the measured B(E1) and B(E2) values.

  19. S-Band propagation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briskman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A geosynchronous satellite system capable of providing many channels of digital audio radio service (DARS) to mobile platforms within the contiguous United States using S-band radio frequencies is being implemented. The system is designed uniquely to mitigate both multipath fading and outages from physical blockage in the transmission path by use of satellite spatial diversity in combination with radio frequency and time diversity. The system also employs a satellite orbital geometry wherein all mobile platforms in the contiguous United States have elevation angles greater than 20 deg to both of the diversity satellites. Since implementation of the satellite system will require three years, an emulation has been performed using terrestrial facilities in order to allow evaluation of DARS capabilities in advance of satellite system operations. The major objective of the emulation was to prove the feasibility of broadcasting from satellites 30 channels of CD quality programming using S-band frequencies to an automobile equipped with a small disk antenna and to obtain quantitative performance data on S-band propagation in a satellite spatial diversity system.

  20. Band-selective radiofrequency pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geen, Helen; Freeman, Ray

    A theoretical treatment is given of the general problem of designing amplitude-modulated radiofrequency pulses that will excite a specified band of frequencies within a high-resolution NMR spectrum with uniform intensity and phase but with negligible excitation elsewhere. First a trial pulse envelope is defined in terms of a finite Fourier series and its frequency-domain profile calculated through the Bloch equations. The result is compared with the desired target profile to give a multidimensional error surface. The method of simulated annealing is then used to find the global minimum on this surface and the result refined by standard gradient-descent optimization. In this manner, a family of new shaped radio-frequency pulses, known as BURP ( band-selective, uniform response, pure-phase) pulses, has been created. These are of two classes—pulses that excite or invert z magnetization and those that act as general-rotation πr/2 or π pulses irrespective of the initial condition of the nuclear magnetization. It was found convenient to design the latter class as amplitude-modulated time-symmetric pulses. Tables of Fourier coefficients and pulse-shape ordinates are given for practical implementation of BURP pulses, together with the calculated frequency-domain responses and experimental verifications. Examples of the application of band-selective pulses in conventional and multidimensional spectroscopy are given. Pure-phase pulses of this type should also find applications in magnetic resonance imaging where refocusing schemes are undesirable.

  1. Possible explanation for the white band artifact seen in clinically retrieved polyethylene tibial components.

    PubMed

    Willie, B M; Gingell, D T; Bloebaum, R D; Hofmann, A A

    2000-12-01

    Studies have focused attention on the appearance of a subsurface white band in clinically retrieved polyethylene components and the possible contribution of this phenomenon to early polyethylene delamination. Unconsolidated polyethylene particles and oxidation have been suggested as possible reasons for the appearance of the white band. Calcium stearate and other additives used in processing ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene may also contribute to formation of the white band. A quantitative investigation was conducted on 11 retrieved tibial components that exhibited a subsurface white band to determine whether the amount of calcium stearate particles and additives were greater in the white band region when compared with the mid-portion of the same section of polyethylene. Calcium stearate particles and other additives were quantified using backscattered electron imaging with correlated elemental analysis. The particles were identified based on morphology and elemental patterns similar to reference calcium stearate particles and known additives. Significantly more (p < 0. 0001) calcium stearate particles and additives were present in the white band region (4578 +/- 418 particles/mm(2); mean +/- standard error) than the mid-portion region (1250 +/- 147 particles/mm(2)) of the sectioned tibial inserts. The percent area occupied by calcium stearate particles and additives was five times higher (p < 0.0001) within the white band region (0.81 +/- 0.10%) than the mid-portion region (0.16 +/- 0.03%). The increased presence of calcium stearate and other additives in the white band region suggests that they may play a role in the formation of the white band. In future investigations it may be important to consider how calcium stearate and other additives in polyethylene resins affect white band formation and the possible contribution to crazing, early delamination, and osteolysis in total joint replacement. PMID:11007625

  2. Ku-Band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnusson, H. G.; Goff, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    All work performed on the Ku-band rendezvous radar performance computer simulation model program since the release of the preliminary final report is summarized. Developments on the program fall into three distinct categories: (1) modifications to the existing Ku-band radar tracking performance computer model; (2) the addition of a highly accurate, nonrealtime search and acquisition performance computer model to the total software package developed on this program; and (3) development of radar cross section (RCS) computation models for three additional satellites. All changes in the tracking model involved improvements in the automatic gain control (AGC) and the radar signal strength (RSS) computer models. Although the search and acquisition computer models were developed under the auspices of the Hughes Aircraft Company Ku-Band Integrated Radar and Communications Subsystem program office, they have been supplied to NASA as part of the Ku-band radar performance comuter model package. Their purpose is to predict Ku-band acquisition performance for specific satellite targets on specific missions. The RCS models were developed for three satellites: the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft, the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft, and the Space Telescopes.

  3. Optical band gaps of organic semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, José C. S.; Taveira, Ricardo J. S.; Lima, Carlos F. R. A. C.; Mendes, Adélio; Santos, Luís M. N. B. F.

    2016-08-01

    UV-Vis can be used as an easy and forthright technique to accurately estimate the band gap energy of organic π-conjugated materials, widely used as thin films/composites in organic and hybrid electronic devices such as OLEDs, OPVs and OFETs. The electronic and optical properties, including HOMO-LUMO energy gaps of π-conjugated systems were evaluated by UV-Vis spectroscopy in CHCl3 solution for a large number of relevant π-conjugated systems: tris-8-hydroxyquinolinatos (Alq3, Gaq3, Inq3, Al(qNO2)3, Al(qCl)3, Al(qBr)3, In(qNO2)3, In(qCl)3 and In(qBr)3); triphenylamine derivatives (DDP, p-TTP, TPB, TPD, TDAB, m-MTDAB, NPB, α-NPD); oligoacenes (naphthalene, anthracene, tetracene and rubrene); oligothiophenes (α-2T, β-2T, α-3T, β-3T, α-4T and α-5T). Additionally, some electronic properties were also explored by quantum chemical calculations. The experimental UV-Vis data are in accordance with the DFT predictions and indicate that the band gap energies of the OSCs dissolved in CHCl3 solution are consistent with the values presented for thin films.

  4. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  5. Using Lunar Observations to Assess Terra MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chen, Hongda

    2010-01-01

    MODIS collects data in both the reflected solar and thermal emissive regions using 36 spectral bands. The center wavelengths of these bands cover the3.7 to 14.24 micron region. In addition to using its on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a full aperture solar diffuser (SD) and a blackbody (BB), lunar observations have been scheduled on a regular basis to support both Terra and Aqua MODIS on-orbit calibration and characterization. This paper provides an overview of MODIS lunar observations and their applications for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and thermal emissive bands (TEB) with an emphasis on potential calibration improvements of MODIS band 21 at 3.96 microns. This spectral band has detectors set with low gains to enable fire detection. Methodologies are proposed and examined on the use of lunar observations for the band 21 calibration. Also presented in this paper are preliminary results derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations and remaining challenging issues.

  6. A Smile Face Monopole Antenna with Quadruple Band-Notched Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiao-Lin; Kong, Fang-Ling; Wang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    A compact planar ultra-wideband (UWB) monopole antenna with quadruple band-notched characteristics is presented. The notched band at 3.3-4.2 GHz (C-band) is obtained by embedding a pair of Z-shaped slots on the elliptical radiation patch. Meanwhile, a modified U-shaped slot is etched in the radiation patch to create the notched band at 4.9-5.4 GHz for WLAN. In addition, by introducing E-shaped stubs on the back layer, the notched bands at 5.5-6.1 GHz for WLAN and 7-8.15 GHz for downlink of X-band satellite communication system are obtained. The antenna is fabricated and measured, showing broadband matched impedance and good Omni-directional patterns with high fidelity and phase linearity (outside the notched bands).

  7. Hypersonic crystal band gaps in Ni/Cu superlattice nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-Guang; Shen, Tie

    2016-03-01

    The hexagonal and tetragonal ordered arrays were prepared by Ni/Cu superlattice nanowires on the porous anodic alumina membrane template, and their phonon band structures were calculated by using the plane wave expansion method. Numerical results show that the hypersonic band gaps can be acquired by adjusting the structural parameters. Along the different wave-vector directions, the width and position of band gap would vary. If the nanowires'filling fraction is increased continuously, the width of the first band gap firstly increases and then decreases within a certain range. The height of superlattice nanowire elementary unit can only affect the width of band gap within a quite narrow range. When the height of elementary unit remains unchanged, the decrease of the Cu-component ratio can contribute to the formation of a wider band gap. Additionally, the wide band gap is more easily formed in tetragonal structure than in hexagonal structure.

  8. Deoxynivalenol Impairs Hepatic and Intestinal Gene Expression of Selected Oxidative Stress, Tight Junction and Inflammation Proteins in Broiler Chickens, but Addition of an Adsorbing Agent Shifts the Effects to the Distal Parts of the Small Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Osselaere, Ann; Santos, Regiane; Hautekiet, Veerle; De Backer, Patrick; Chiers, Koen; Ducatelle, Richard; Croubels, Siska

    2013-01-01

    Broiler chickens are rather resistant to deoxynivalenol and thus, clinical signs are rarely seen. However, effects of subclinical concentrations of deoxynivalenol on both the intestine and the liver are less frequently studied at the molecular level. During our study, we investigated the effects of three weeks of feeding deoxynivalenol on the gut wall morphology, intestinal barrier function and inflammation in broiler chickens. In addition, oxidative stress was evaluated in both the liver and intestine. Besides, the effect of a clay-based mycotoxin adsorbing agent on these different aspects was also studied. Our results show that feeding deoxynivalenol affects the gut wall morphology both in duodenum and jejenum of broiler chickens. A qRT-PCR analysis revealed that deoxynivalenol acts in a very specific way on the intestinal barrier, since only an up-regulation in mRNA expression of claudin 5 in jejunum was observed, while no effects were seen on claudin 1, zona occludens 1 and 2. Addition of an adsorbing agent resulted in an up-regulation of all the investigated genes coding for the intestinal barrier in the ileum. Up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 and two markers of oxidative stress (heme-oxigenase or HMOX and xanthine oxidoreductase or XOR) were mainly seen in the jejunum and to a lesser extent in the ileum in response to deoxynivalenol, while in combination with an adsorbing agent main effect was seen in the ileum. These results suggest that an adsorbing agent may lead to higher concentrations of deoxynivalenol in the more distal parts of the small intestine. In the liver, XOR was up-regulated due to DON exposure. HMOX and HIF-1α (hypoxia-inducible factor 1α) were down-regulated due to feeding DON but also due to feeding the adsorbing agent alone or in combination with DON. PMID:23922676

  9. Novel Dual-band Slot Antenna Design for Bluetooth and UWB Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai-Yan; Shao, Wei; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Ma, Xiao-Liang

    2014-05-01

    A novel technique to introduce an additional low frequency band to compact ultra wideband (UWB) slot antennas is proposed in this paper. To get an additional Bluetooth band, a parasitic strip is mounted on the back side of the slot edge. Because of the interaction of the strip and the slot edge, the Bluetooth band can be obtained while a notch band between the Bluetooth band and UWB band also appears. Two types of feeding, coplanar waveguide and microstrip line, are investigated. The proposed antennas are both fabricated on a low-cost FR4 substrate and have compact size (24 mm × 28 mm × 1 mm). The good agreement between measured and simulated results verifies our design.

  10. Multitude multicolor chromosome banding (mMCB) - a comprehensive one-step multicolor FISH banding method.

    PubMed

    Weise, A; Heller, A; Starke, H; Mrasek, K; Kuechler, A; Pool-Zobel, B L; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2003-01-01

    Multicolor chromosome banding (MCB) using one single chromosome-specific MCB probe set per experiment was previously reported as powerful tool in molecular cytogenetics for the characterization of all kinds of human marker chromosomes. However, a quick analysis of karyotypes with highly complex chromosomal changes was hampered by the problem that up to 24 MCB experiments were necessary for a comprehensive karyotype description. To overcome that limitation the 138 available region-specific microdissection-derived libraries for all human chromosomes were combined to one single probe set, called multitude MCB (mMCB). A typical fluorescence banding pattern along the human karyotype is produced, which can be evaluated either by transforming these profiles into chromosome region-specific pseudo-colors or more reliably by studying the fluorescence profiles. The mMCB probe set has been applied on chromosomes of normal male and female probands, two primary myelodysplastic syndromes and two solid tumor cell lines. Additionally, a cell line of Gorilla gorilla (GGO) studied previously by single chromosome-specific MCB was reevaluated by the mMCB method. All results were in concordance with those obtained in parallel or by other cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic approaches indicating that mMCB is a powerful multicolor FISH banding tool for fast characterization of complex karyotypes. PMID:15004461

  11. Results of MODIS Band-to-Band Registration Characterization Using On-Orbit Lunar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Sun, Junqiang; Angal,Amit

    2011-01-01

    Since launch, lunar observations have been made regularly by both Terra and Aqua MODIS and used for a number of sensor calibration and characterization related applications, including radiometric stability monitoring, spatial characterization, optical leak and electronic cross-talk characterization, and calibration inter-comparison. MODIS has 36 spectral bands with a total of 490 individual detectors. They are located on four focal plane assemblies (FPA). This paper focuses on the use of MODIS lunar observations to characterize its band-to-band registration (BBR). In addition to BBR, the approach developed by the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) can be used to characterize MODIS detector-to-detector registration (DDR). Long-term BBR results developed from this approach are presented and compared with that derived from a unique on-board calibrator (OBC). Results show that on-orbit changes of BBR have been very small for both Terra and Aqua MODIS and this approach can be applied to other remote sensing instruments.

  12. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  13. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  14. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  15. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  16. Exploiting the Terahertz Band for Radionavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, John Scott; Mickelson, Pascal; Yeak, Jeremy; Kremeyer, Kevin; Rife, Jason

    2016-06-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of GPS-like ranging at terahertz (THz) frequencies. It is well established that GPS carrier signals are vulnerable to jamming via radio-frequency interference (RFI). As a result, there is a need for alternative radionavigation systems. THz signals offer a compelling option. Because of their high frequency (roughly ×100 higher than GPS), THz signals can be used to make highly precise range measurements. In addition, the large separation between the GPS and THz frequencies means that interference at GPS frequencies is very unlikely to impact the THz band. This paper lays the groundwork for a GPS-like ranging capability at THz frequencies. To this end, we identify key differences between THz hardware and GPS (radio frequency) hardware; we experimentally evaluate performance of a 0.30-THz system on a compact outdoor test range, and we introduce a measurement error model that highlights the distinctive role that multipath interference plays at THz frequencies.

  17. Two band model for the cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shiu; White, Steven

    2009-03-01

    We use a numerical canonical transformation approach to derive an effective two-band model for the hole-doped cuprates, which keeps both oxygen and copper orbitals but removes double occupancy from each. A similar model was considered previously by Frenkel, Gooding, Shraiman, and Siggia (PRB 41, number 1, page 350). We compare the numerically derived model with previously obtained analytical results. In addition to the usual hopping terms between oxygens tpp and Cu-Cu exchange terms Jdd, the model also includes a strong copper-oxygen exchange interaction Jpd and a Kondo-like spin-flip oxygen-oxygen hopping term Kpdp. We use the density matrix renormalization group to study the charge, spin, and pairing properties of the derived model on ladder systems.

  18. Ku-band radar threshold analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, C. L.; Polydoros, A.

    1979-01-01

    The statistics of the CFAR threshold for the Ku-band radar was determined. Exact analytical results were developed for both the mean and standard deviations in the designated search mode. The mean value is compared to the results of a previously reported simulation. The analytical results are more optimistic than the simulation results, for which no explanation is offered. The normalized standard deviation is shown to be very sensitive to signal-to-noise ratio and very insensitive to the noise correlation present in the range gates of the designated search mode. The substantial variation in the CFAR threshold is dominant at large values of SNR where the normalized standard deviation is greater than 0.3. Whether or not this significantly affects the resulting probability of detection is a matter which deserves additional attention.

  19. Deleting titin's I-band/A-band junction reveals critical roles for titin in biomechanical sensing and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Granzier, Henk L; Hutchinson, Kirk R; Tonino, Paola; Methawasin, Mei; Li, Frank W; Slater, Rebecca E; Bull, Mathew M; Saripalli, Chandra; Pappas, Christopher T; Gregorio, Carol C; Smith, John E

    2014-10-01

    Titin, the largest protein known, forms a giant filament in muscle where it spans the half sarcomere from Z disk to M band. Here we genetically targeted a stretch of 14 immunoglobulin-like and fibronectin type 3 domains that comprises the I-band/A-band (IA) junction and obtained a viable mouse model. Super-resolution optical microscopy (structured illumination microscopy, SIM) and electron microscopy were used to study the thick filament length and titin's molecular elasticity. SIM showed that the IA junction functionally belongs to the relatively stiff A-band region of titin. The stiffness of A-band titin was found to be high, relative to that of I-band titin (∼ 40-fold higher) but low, relative to that of the myosin-based thick filament (∼ 70-fold lower). Sarcomere stretch therefore results in movement of A-band titin with respect to the thick filament backbone, and this might constitute a novel length-sensing mechanism. Findings disproved that titin at the IA junction is crucial for thick filament length control, settling a long-standing hypothesis. SIM also showed that deleting the IA junction moves the attachment point of titin's spring region away from the Z disk, increasing the strain on titin's molecular spring elements. Functional studies from the cellular to ex vivo and in vivo left ventricular chamber levels showed that this causes diastolic dysfunction and other symptoms of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Thus, our work supports titin's important roles in diastolic function and disease of the heart. PMID:25246556

  20. Current in the Protein Nanowires: Quantum Calculations of the Base States.

    PubMed

    Suprun, Anatol D; Shmeleva, Liudmyla V

    2016-12-01

    It is known that synthesis of adenosine triphosphoric acid in mitochondrions may be only completed on the condition of transport of the electron pairs, which were created due to oxidation processes, to mitochondrions. As of today, many efforts were already taken in order to understand those processes that occur in the course of donor-acceptor electron transport between cellular organelles (that is, between various proteins and protein structures). However, the problem concerning the mechanisms of electron transport over these organelles still remains understudied. This paper is dedicated to the investigation of these same issues.It has been shown that regardless of the amino acid inhomogeneity of the primary structure, it is possible to apply a representation of the second quantization in respect of the protein molecule (hereinafter "numbers of filling representation"). Based on this representation, it has been established that the primary structure of the protein molecule is actually a semiconductor nanowire. In addition, at the same time, its conduction band, into which an electron is injected as the result of donor-acceptor processes, consists of five sub-bands. Three of these sub-bands have normal dispersion laws, while the rest two sub-bands have abnormal dispersion laws (reverse laws). Test calculation of the current density was made under the conditions of the complete absence of the factors, which may be interpreted as external fields. It has been shown that under such conditions, current density is exactly equal to zero. This is the evidence of correctness of the predictive model of the conductivity band of the primary structure of the protein molecule (protein nanowire). At the same time, it makes it possible to apply the obtained results in respect of the actual situation, where factors, which may be interpreted as external fields, exist. PMID:26858156

  1. Three rhamnosyltransferases responsible for assembly of the A-band D-rhamnan polysaccharide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a fourth transferase, WbpL, is required for the initiation of both A-band and B-band lipopolysaccharide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rocchetta, H L; Burrows, L L; Pacan, J C; Lam, J S

    1998-06-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa A-band lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecule has an O-polysaccharide region composed of trisaccharide repeat units of alpha1-->2, alpha1-->3, alpha1-->3 linked D-rhamnose (Rha). The A-band polysaccharide is assembled by the alpha-D-rhamnosyltransferases, WbpX, WbpY and WbpZ. WbpZ probably transfers the first Rha residue onto the A-band accepting molecule, while WbpY and WbpX subsequently transfer two alpha1-->3 linked Rha residues and one alpha1-->2 linked Rha respectively. The last two transferases are predicted to be processive, alternating in their activities to complete the A-band polymer. The genes coding for these transferases were identified at the 3' end of the A-band biosynthetic cluster. Two additional genes, psecoA and uvrD, border the 3' end of the cluster and are predicted to encode a coenzyme A transferase and a DNA helicase II enzyme respectively. Chromosomal wbpX, wbpY and wbpZ mutants were generated, and Western immunoblot analysis demonstrates that these mutants are unable to synthesize A-band LPS, while B-band synthesis is unaffected. WbpL, a transferase encoded within the B-band biosynthetic cluster, was previously proposed to initiate B-band biosynthesis through the addition of Fuc2NAc (2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-D-galactose) to undecaprenol phosphate (Und-P). In this study, chromosomal wbpL mutants were generated that did not express A band or B band, indicating that WbpL initiates the synthesis of both LPS molecules. Cross-complementation experiments using WbpL and its homologue, Escherichia coli WecA, demonstrates that WbpL is bifunctional, initiating B-band synthesis with a Fuc2NAc residue and A-band synthesis with either a GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine) or GalNAc (N-acetylgalactosamine) residue. These data indicate that A-band polysaccharide assembly requires four glycosyltransferases, one of which is necessary for initiating both A-band and B-band LPS synthesis. PMID:9680202

  2. The Low Band Observatory (LOBO): Expanding the VLA Low Frequency Commensal System for Continuous, Broad-band, sub-GHz Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Helmboldt, Joseph F.; Peters, Wendy M.; Brisken, Walter; Hyman, Scott D.; Polisensky, Emil; Hicks, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) are currently commissioning the VLA Low Frequency Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE) on a subset of JVLA antennas at modest bandwidth. Its bounded scientific goals are to leverage thousands of JVLA on-sky hours per year for ionospheric and transient studies, and to demonstrate the practicality of a prime-focus commensal system on the JVLA. Here we explore the natural expansion of VLITE to a full-antenna, full-bandwidth Low Band Observatory (LOBO) that would follow naturally from a successful VLITE experience. The new Low Band JVLA receivers, coupled with the existing primary focus feeds, can access two frequency bands: 4 band (54 - 86 MHz) and P band (236-492 MHz). The 4 band feeds are newly designed and now undergoing testing. If they prove successful then they can be permanently mounted at the primary focus, unlike their narrow band predecessors. The combination of Low Band receivers and fixed, primary-focus feeds could provide continuous, broad-band data over two complimentary low-frequency bands. The system would also leverage the relatively large fields-of-view of ~10 degrees at 4 band, and ~2.5 degrees at P band, coupling an excellent survey capability with a natural advantage for serendipitous discoveries. We discuss the compelling science case that flows from LOBO's robust imaging and time domain capabilities coupled with thousands of hours of wide-field, JVLA observing time each year. We also touch on the possibility to incorporate Long Wavelength Array (LWA) stations as additional 'dishes' through the LOBO backend, to improve calibration and sensitivity in LOBO's 4 band.

  3. Polypeptide-dependent protein kinase from bakers' yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagita, Y; Abdel-Ghany, M; Raden, D; Nelson, N; Racker, E

    1987-01-01

    The purification and properties of a protein serine kinase (PK-P) extracted with Triton X-100 from membranes of bakers' yeast are described. The enzyme is virtually inactive unless either a histone or a heat-stable polypeptide from yeast membranes and Mg2+ are added. Other divalent cations substitute for Mg2+ poorly or not at all; most of them, including Mn2+, inhibit when added in the presence of 5 mM Mg2+. The enzyme is unstable but can be stabilized by addition of 0.1% Triton X-100 and 20% glycerol. The final preparation shows, on silver-stained electrophoresis gels, two major bands (Mr 41,000 and 35,000). According to gel filtration the molecular weight of the active protein is about 75,000. Of the two subunits, only the smaller one appears to be autophosphorylated. In addition to casein, the enzyme phosphorylates several proteins including the H+-ATPase (Mr 100,000) in the yeast plasma membrane. In order to demonstrate the phosphorylation of the ATPase (up to 0.9 equivalents), exposure of the latter to an acid phosphatase was required. Other phosphorylated proteins include mRNA cap-binding protein from mammalian erythrocytes and yeast, a glucocorticoid receptor protein, and a preparation of the guanine nucleotide-binding proteins Gi and Go from brain. A partial purification of a natural activator from yeast plasma membranes is described. Images PMID:3547402

  4. Biomass estimator for NIR image with a few additional spectral band images taken from light UAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pölönen, Ilkka; Salo, Heikki; Saari, Heikki; Kaivosoja, Jere; Pesonen, Liisa; Honkavaara, Eija

    2012-05-01

    A novel way to produce biomass estimation will offer possibilities for precision farming. Fertilizer prediction maps can be made based on accurate biomass estimation generated by a novel biomass estimator. By using this knowledge, a variable rate amount of fertilizers can be applied during the growing season. The innovation consists of light UAS, a high spatial resolution camera, and VTT's novel spectral camera. A few properly selected spectral wavelengths with NIR images and point clouds extracted by automatic image matching have been used in the estimation. The spectral wavelengths were chosen from green, red, and NIR channels.

  5. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  6. The DSS-14 C-band exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, D. R.

    1989-05-01

    The development and implementation of a C-band exciter for use with the Block IV Receiver-Exciter Subsystem at Deep Space Station 14 (DSS-14) has been completed. The exciter supplements the standard capabilities of the Block IV system by providing a drive signal for the C-band transmitter while generating coherent translation frequencies for C-band (5-GHz) to S-band (2.2- to 2.3-GHz) Doppler extraction, C-band to L-band (1.6-GHz) zero delay measurements, and a level calibrated L-band test signal. Exciter functions are described, and a general explanation and description of the C-band uplink controller is presented.

  7. Lessons Learned from Laparoscopic Gastric Banding.

    PubMed

    Broadbent

    1993-11-01

    The author reviews 27 laparoscopic gastric banding operations, of which 19 cases were completed. Of the 27 operations, eight were revisions of earlier laparoscopic banding. The lessons learned from these cases are highlighted. PMID:10757955

  8. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David T.; Reinhart, Richard C.; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Michael

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASA's Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  9. Studying NASA's Transition to Ka-Band Communications for Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelmins, David; Reinhart, Richard; Mortensen, Dale; Welch, Bryan; Downey, Joseph; Evans, Mike

    2014-01-01

    As the S-band spectrum becomes crowded, future space missions will need to consider moving command and telemetry services to Ka-band. NASAs Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed provides a software-defined radio (SDR) platform that is capable of supporting investigation of this service transition. The testbed contains two S-band SDRs and one Ka-band SDR. Over the past year, SCaN Testbed has demonstrated Ka-band communications capabilities with NASAs Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) using both open- and closed-loop antenna tracking profiles. A number of technical areas need to be addressed for successful transition to Ka-band. The smaller antenna beamwidth at Ka-band increases the criticality of antenna pointing, necessitating closed loop tracking algorithms and new techniques for received power estimation. Additionally, the antenna pointing routines require enhanced knowledge of spacecraft position and attitude for initial acquisition, versus an S-band antenna. Ka-band provides a number of technical advantages for bulk data transfer. Unlike at S-band, a larger bandwidth may be available for space missions, allowing increased data rates. The potential for high rate data transfer can also be extended for direct-to-ground links through use of variable or adaptive coding and modulation. Specific examples of Ka-band research from SCaN Testbeds first year of operation will be cited, such as communications link performance with TDRSS, and the effects of truss flexure on antenna pointing.

  10. Identification of the UIR bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Fred M.

    2016-06-01

    Starlight undergoing multiple scattering processes within fluffy grains results in extinction, UV 2175A bump, DIBs and the UIR bands. Spectroscopic lab and DIB data has identified the highly fluorescent molecule Dipyridyl Magnesium Tetrabenzoporphyrin (MgTBP). Reflection and Raman scattering experimental data will be presented which designates this molecule as the primary source for UIR signals. MgTBP sublimes at about 500OC. It is produced via high temperature plasma synthesis within and subsequently ejected from comets which in turn are by-products of solar system-planetary development. Interstellar dust is the left-over refuse which implies prodigious solar system evolution in each galaxy.

  11. Black Scholes’ model and Bollinger bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Xudong; Zheng, Weian

    2006-11-01

    Bollinger bands are well-known in stock market as a popular technical analysis tool. We found that Black-Scholes stock price model had this Bollinger bands property also. In this paper, we give the proof of this phenomenon, and give a new distribution of a statistics generated by the Bollinger bands.

  12. Nylon cable band reactions in ovariohysterectomized bitches.

    PubMed

    Werner, R E; Straughan, A J; Vezin, D

    1992-01-01

    Nylon cable bands used as ligatures caused postsurgical complications in 5 ovariohysterectomized bitches. Clinical signs included fever, stiffness, strangury, draining fistulae, vaginal discharge, and tenesmus. Most signs first appeared several years after surgery, and all signs were resolved after removal of the bands. On the basis of our experience, we suggest that nylon cable bands not be used for ovariohysterectomy ligations. PMID:1537693

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of amniotic band syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Laxmi Devi; Hamza, Zareena V; Thampi, Madhavan Venugopalan; Nampoothiri, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Amniotic band can cause a broad spectrum of anomalies ranging from simple band constrictions to major craniofacial and visceral defects. It can cause significant neonatal morbidity. Accurate diagnosis will help in the management of the present pregnancy and in counseling with regard to future pregnancies. Here we report three cases of amniotic band syndrome detected in the prenatal period. PMID:27081225

  14. S and Ku band frequency source development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The results of the two part S- and Ku-band source development program are described. The S- and Ku-band sources were designed, fabricated, and evaluated. A high performance S- and Ku-band microwave signal source using state-of-the-art oscillator and microwave source technology was developed.

  15. Tap Teens' Curiosity with Lab Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Lab Band project used with 12th grade students at the Westgate Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada). Explains that each band student taught a peer how to play their instrument which created versatility in the band. States that all students kept a reflective journal. (CMK)

  16. X-band uplink feedcone capabilities, components, and layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlin, H.; Freiley, A.; Hartop, R.

    1986-11-01

    Two new X-(7.2 GHz up, 8.4 GHz down) and S-band (2.1 to 2.3 Ghz) common aperture (XSC) feedcones are being added to the DSS 45 and DSS 65 34-Meter Efficiency Antennas. These new feedcones are modifications of the existing SXC feedcone design incorporating a new high power (20-kW) X-band transmitter. The modified Antenna Microwave Subsystem design also incorporates two additional X-band low noise amplifiers and greater phase stability performance to meet both the increased stability requirements for Galileo gravity wave experiments and requirements for spacecraft navigation near the Sun. A third XSC will be constructed for DSS 15 later.

  17. Engineering flat electronic bands in quasiperiodic and fractal loop geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2015-11-01

    Exact construction of one electron eigenstates with flat, non-dispersive bands, and localized over clusters of various sizes is reported for a class of quasi-one-dimensional looped networks. Quasiperiodic Fibonacci and Berker fractal geometries are embedded in the arms of the loop threaded by a uniform magnetic flux. We work out an analytical scheme to unravel the localized single particle states pinned at various atomic sites or over clusters of them. The magnetic field is varied to control, in a subtle way, the extent of localization and the location of the flat band states in energy space. In addition to this we show that an appropriate tuning of the field can lead to a re-entrant behavior of the effective mass of the electron in a band, with a periodic flip in its sign.

  18. Orbiter S-band direct link system verification test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vermillion, B. K.

    1980-01-01

    Space-to-ground S-band communications system compatibility and performance tests were performed for the various radio frequency links. These tests consisted of the various uplink and downlink signal combinations (data rates) for the phase modulation system and both realtime and playback data rates for the frequency modulated downlink systems. In addition, tests involving encryption/decryption, Doppler, and acquisition were performed. Results show that the S-band transponder for the space shuttle orbiter is compatible with the S-band equipment of the AFSCF/RTS (Air Force Satellite Control Facility/Remote Tracking Station). It is also concluded that the performance of the orbiter-AFSCF/RTS direct link exceeds the required performance and that this communications link will meet the system requirements of the Space Transportation System.

  19. Tri-band microstrip antenna design for wireless communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Gehan; Mohanna, Mahmoud; Rabeh, Mohamed L.

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces a novel rectangular tri-band patch antenna that is fabricated and measured for wireless communication systems. The introduced antenna is designed for WLAN and WiMAX applications. The desired tri-band operation was obtained by proper loading for a rectangular patch antenna using slots and shorting pins. The optimal location and dimension for the loaded elements were obtained with the aid of interfacing a Genetic Algorithm (GA) model with an Ansoft High Frequency Structural Simulator (HFSS). The results obtained from our simulated antenna show 5.8% impedance matching band width at 2.4 GHz, 3.7% at 3.5 GHz and 1.57% at 5.7 GHz. In addition, an equivalent circuit of the proposed antenna is introduced using the least square curve fitting optimization technique.

  20. 47 CFR 15.257 - Operation within the band 92-95 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 92-95 GHz. 15.257 Section 15.257 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.257 Operation within the band 92-95 GHz. (a) Operation of devices under...

  1. 47 CFR 15.255 - Operation within the band 57-64 GHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 57-64 GHz. 15.255 Section 15.255 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.255 Operation within the band 57-64 GHz. (a) Operation under the provisions...

  2. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  3. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  4. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  5. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  6. 47 CFR 15.243 - Operation in the band 890-940 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation in the band 890-940 MHz. 15.243 Section 15.243 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.243 Operation in the band...

  7. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  8. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  9. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  10. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  11. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  12. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  13. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  14. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  15. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  16. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  17. 47 CFR 15.227 - Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the band 26.96-27.28 MHz. 15.227 Section 15.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.227 Operation within the band...

  18. 47 CFR 15.243 - Operation in the band 890-940 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation in the band 890-940 MHz. 15.243 Section 15.243 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.243 Operation in the band...

  19. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  20. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  1. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  2. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  3. 47 CFR 15.240 - Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz. 15.240 Section 15.240 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.240 Operation in the band...

  4. 47 CFR 15.240 - Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz. 15.240 Section 15.240 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.240 Operation in the band...

  5. 47 CFR 15.240 - Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz. 15.240 Section 15.240 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.240 Operation in the band...

  6. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  7. 47 CFR 15.243 - Operation in the band 890-940 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 890-940 MHz. 15.243 Section 15.243 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.243 Operation in the band...

  8. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  9. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  10. 47 CFR 15.225 - Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the band 13.110-14.010 MHz. 15.225 Section 15.225 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.225 Operation within the band...

  11. 47 CFR 15.243 - Operation in the band 890-940 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation in the band 890-940 MHz. 15.243 Section 15.243 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.243 Operation in the band...

  12. 47 CFR 15.239 - Operation in the band 88-108 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.239 Operation in the band 88-108 MHz. (a) Emissions from the intentional radiator shall be confined within a band 200 kHz wide centered... the general radiated emission limits in § 15.209. (d) A custom built telemetry intentional...

  13. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  14. 47 CFR 15.229 - Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation within the band 40.66-40.70 MHz. 15.229 Section 15.229 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.229 Operation within the band...

  15. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  16. 47 CFR 15.240 - Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz. 15.240 Section 15.240 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.240 Operation in the band...

  17. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  18. 47 CFR 15.241 - Operation in the band 174-216 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation in the band 174-216 MHz. 15.241 Section 15.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.241 Operation in the band...

  19. 47 CFR 15.240 - Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation in the band 433.5-434.5 MHz. 15.240 Section 15.240 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.240 Operation in the band...

  20. 47 CFR 15.223 - Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation in the band 1.705-10 MHz. 15.223 Section 15.223 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.223 Operation in the band...

  1. 47 CFR 15.243 - Operation in the band 890-940 MHz.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Operation in the band 890-940 MHz. 15.243 Section 15.243 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.243 Operation in the band...

  2. V-band IMPATT transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.; Ying, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    A V-band transmitter for communication application was developed that has 30 dB gain and consists of six stages of IMPATT amplifiers. The low and medium power stages are stable amplifiers while the two high power stages are triggered oscillators. Hybrid couplers in the form of Magic Tees were used for power combining two single diode IMPATT modules in the high driver stage and for a single diode IMPATT modules at the output stage. Output power of 4 watts CW across a 2.5 GHz band centered at 60 GHz was achieved with an input power of 4 mW. Dynamic range of the amplifier chain is in excess of 7 dB. A single diode one watt stable amplifier over a bandwidth greater than 2.5 GHz, a high power ( 1 watt) stable amplifier capable of operating in either the constant current or constant voltage mode and verification of the advantages of the latter mode of operation; and a 10 channel modulator with built in test equipment (specifically protective circuitry, failure monitoring, and mode of failure indicated) were also developed. The performance requirements of circulators/isolators for reflection amplifiers were also defined and verified.

  3. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  4. Spectral Band Selection for Urban Material Classification Using Hyperspectral Libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, A.; Chehata, N.; Briottet, X.; Paparoditis, N.

    2016-06-01

    In urban areas, information concerning very high resolution land cover and especially material maps are necessary for several city modelling or monitoring applications. That is to say, knowledge concerning the roofing materials or the different kinds of ground areas is required. Airborne remote sensing techniques appear to be convenient for providing such information at a large scale. However, results obtained using most traditional processing methods based on usual red-green-blue-near infrared multispectral images remain limited for such applications. A possible way to improve classification results is to enhance the imagery spectral resolution using superspectral or hyperspectral sensors. In this study, it is intended to design a superspectral sensor dedicated to urban materials classification and this work particularly focused on the selection of the optimal spectral band subsets for such sensor. First, reflectance spectral signatures of urban materials were collected from 7 spectral libraires. Then, spectral optimization was performed using this data set. The band selection workflow included two steps, optimising first the number of spectral bands using an incremental method and then examining several possible optimised band subsets using a stochastic algorithm. The same wrapper relevance criterion relying on a confidence measure of Random Forests classifier was used at both steps. To cope with the limited number of available spectra for several classes, additional synthetic spectra were generated from the collection of reference spectra: intra-class variability was simulated by multiplying reference spectra by a random coefficient. At the end, selected band subsets were evaluated considering the classification quality reached using a rbf svm classifier. It was confirmed that a limited band subset was sufficient to classify common urban materials. The important contribution of bands from the Short Wave Infra-Red (SWIR) spectral domain (1000-2400 nm) to material

  5. The Hayabusa Spacecraft Asteroid Multi-band Imaging Camera (AMICA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Tholen, David J.; Hirata, Naru; Demura, Hirohide; Nemoto, Etsuko; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Higuchi, Yuta; Sogame, Akito; Yamamoto, Aya; Kitazato, Kohei; Yokota, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Takashi; Hashimoto, Tatsuaki; Saito, Jun

    2010-06-01

    The Hayabusa Spacecraft Asteroid Multi-band Imaging Camera (AMICA) has acquired more than 1400 multispectral and high-resolution images of its target asteroid, 25143 Itokawa, since late August 2005. In this paper, we summarize the design and performance of AMICA. In addition, we describe the calibration methods, assumptions, and models, based on measurements. Major calibration steps include corrections for linearity and modeling and subtraction of bias, dark current, read-out smear, and pixel-to-pixel responsivity variations. AMICA v-band data were calibrated to radiance using in-flight stellar observations. The other band data were calibrated to reflectance by comparing them to ground-based observations to avoid the uncertainty of the solar irradiation in those bands. We found that the AMICA signal was linear with respect to the input signal to an accuracy of ≪1% when the signal level was <3800 DN. We verified that the absolute radiance calibration of the AMICA v-band (0.55 μm) was accurate to 4% or less, the accuracy of the disk-integrated spectra with respect to the AMICA v-band was about 1%, and the pixel-to-pixel responsivity (flat-field) variation was 3% or less. The uncertainty in background zero level was 5 DN. From wide-band observations of star clusters, we found that the AMICA optics have an effective focal length of 120.80 ± 0.03 mm, yielding a field-of-view (FOV) of 5.83° × 5.69°. The resulting geometric distortion model was accurate to within a third of a pixel. We demonstrated an image-restoration technique using the point-spread functions of stars, and confirmed that the technique functions well in all loss-less images. An artifact not corrected by this calibration is scattered light associated with bright disks in the FOV.

  6. Search for superdeformed bands in {sup 154}Dy

    SciTech Connect

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L.

    1995-08-01

    The island of superdeformation in the vicinity of the doubly magic {sup 152}Dy yrast superdeformed (SD) band is thought to be well understood in the framework of cranked mean field calculations. In particular, the calculations suggested that in {sup 154}Dy there should be no yrast or near yrast SD minimum in the 40-60 h spin range, where SD bands in this mass region are thought to be {sup 153}Dy nucleus, it is populated. However, with the presence of five SD bands in the neighboring necessary to ascertain if the addition of one single neutron diminishes the importance of shell effects to the extent that superdeformation can no longer be sustained. In an experiment utilizing the increased resolving power of the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, the reaction {sup 122}Sn({sup 36}S,4n) at 165 MeV was employed to populate high spin states in {sup 154}Dy. In a four-day run with 36 detectors, over one billion triple and higher fold coincidence events were recorded. One new SD band was identified and was assigned to {sup 154}Dy. From comparisons with the Im{sup (2)} moments of inertia of the SD bands in {sup 152}Dy and {sup 153}Dy, a configuration based on (514)9/2{sup 2} neutrons coupled to the {sup 152}Dy SD core was proposed. One unexpected and as yet unexplained feature of this new SD band is that the transition energies are almost identical to those of an excited SD band in {sup 153}Dy. It is also worth noting that the feeding of the yrast states is similar to that achieved by the deexcitation from the ensemble of all entry states in the reaction. This observation emphasizes the statistical nature of the decay-out process. A paper reporting these results was accepted for publication.

  7. Vibrational lifetimes of protein amide modes

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Rella, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Measurement of the lifetimes of vibrational modes in proteins has been achieved with a single frequency infrared pump-probe technique using the Stanford Picosecond Free-electron Laser, These are the first direct measurements of vibrational dynamics in the polyamide structure of proteins. In this study, modes associated with the protein backbone are investigated. Results for the amide I band, which consists mainly of the stretching motion of the carbonyl unit of the amide linkage, show that relaxation from the first vibrational excited level (v=1) to the vibrational ground state (v=0) occurs within 1.5 picoseconds with apparent first order kinetics. Comparison of lifetimes for myoglobin and azurin, which have differing secondary structures, show a small but significant difference. The lifetime for the amide I band of myoglobin is 300 femtoseconds shorter than for azurin. Further measurements are in progress on other backbone vibrational modes and on the temperature dependence of the lifetimes. Comparison of vibrational dynamics for proteins with differing secondary structure and for different vibrational modes within a protein will lead to a greater understanding of energy transfer and dissipation in biological systems. In addition, these results have relevance to tissue ablation studies which have been conducted with pulsed infrared lasers. Vibrational lifetimes are necessary for calculating the rate at which the energy from absorbed infrared photons is converted to equilibrium thermal energy within the irradiated volume. The very fast vibrational lifetimes measured here indicate that mechanisms which involve direct vibrational up-pumping of the amide modes with consecutive laser pulses, leading to bond breakage or weakening, are not valid.

  8. Moesin: a member of the protein 4.1-talin-ezrin family of proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lankes, W T; Furthmayr, H

    1991-01-01

    Moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein, pronounced mó ez in) has previously been isolated from bovine uterus and characterized as a possible receptor protein for heparan sulfate. We now have cloned and sequenced its complete cDNA, which represents a single 4.2-kilobase mRNA encoding a protein of 577 amino acids. It contains no apparent signal peptide or transmembrane domain. In addition, the protein shows significant sequence identity (72%) to ezrin (cytovillin, p81), as well as similarity to protein 4.1 and talin. All of the latter proteins have been postulated to serve as structural links between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. A similar role for moesin is implied by structure and domain predictions derived from the cDNA-deduced peptide sequence. Furthermore, our data indicate that moesin is identical to the 77-kDa band that copurifies with ezrin in its isolation from human placenta [Bretscher, A. (1989) J. Cell Biol. 108, 921-930]. Images PMID:1924289

  9. Targeted homozygous deletion of M-band titin in cardiomyocytes prevents sarcomere formation.

    PubMed

    Musa, Hanny; Meek, Stephen; Gautel, Mathias; Peddie, Dianna; Smith, Andrew J H; Peckham, Michelle

    2006-10-15

    Titin, a multifunctional protein that stretches from the Z-disk to the M-band in heart and skeletal muscle, contains a kinase domain, phosphorylation sites and multiple binding sites for structural and signalling proteins in the M-band. To determine whether this region is crucial for normal sarcomere development, we created mouse embryonic stem cell (ES) lines in which either one or both alleles contained a targeted deletion of the entire M-band-coding region, leaving Z-disk-binding and myosin-filament-binding sites intact. ES cells were differentiated into cardiomyocytes, and myofibrillogenesis investigated by immunofluorescence microscopy. Surprisingly, deletion of one allele did not markedly affect differentiation into cardiomyocytes, suggesting that a single intact copy of the titin gene is sufficient for normal myofibrillogenesis. By contrast, deletion of both alleles resulted in a failure of differentiation beyond an early stage of myofibrillogenesis. Sarcomeric myosin remained in non-striated structures, Z-disk proteins, such as alpha-actinin, were mainly found in primitive dot-like structures on actin stress fibres, M-band-associated proteins (myomesin, obscurin, Nbr1, p62 and MURF2) remained punctate. These results show that integration of the M-band region of titin is required for myosin filament assembly, M-band formation and maturation of the Z-disk. PMID:17038546

  10. Imaging of the diffusion of single band 3 molecules on normal and mutant erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kodippili, Gayani C.; Spector, Jeff; Sullivan, Caitlin; Kuypers, Frans A.; Labotka, Richard; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane-spanning proteins may interact with a variety of other integral and peripheral membrane proteins via a diversity of protein-protein interactions. Not surprisingly, defects or mutations in any one of these interacting components can impact the physical and biological properties on the entire complex. Here we use quantum dots to image the diffusion of individual band 3 molecules in the plasma membranes of intact human erythrocytes from healthy volunteers and patients with defects in one of their membrane components, leading to well-known red cell pathologies (hereditary spherocytosis, hereditary elliptocytosis, hereditary hydrocytosis, Southeast Asian ovalocytosis, and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis). After characterizing the motile properties of the major subpopulations of band 3 in intact normal erythrocytes, we demonstrate that the properties of these subpopulations of band 3 change significantly in diseased cells, as evidenced by changes in the microscopic and macroscopic diffusion coefficients of band 3 and in the compartment sizes in which the different band 3 populations can diffuse. Because the above membrane abnormalities largely arise from defects in other membrane components (eg, spectrin, ankyrin), these data suggest that single particle tracking of band 3 might constitute a useful tool for characterizing the general structural integrity of the human erythrocyte membrane. PMID:19369229

  11. Multi - band Persistent Scatterer Interferometry data integration for landslide analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, Silvia; Mateos, Rosa; Mora, Oscar; García, Inma; Sánchez, Ciscu; Sanabria, Margarita; López, Maite; Mulas, Joaquin; Hernández, Mario; Herrera, Gerardo

    2013-04-01

    We present a methodology to perform a geomorphological assessment of ground movements over wide areas, by improving Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) analysis for landslide studies. The procedure relies on the integrated use of multi-band EO data acquired by different satellite sensors in different time intervals, to provide a detailed investigation of ground displacements. The methodology, throughout the cross-comparison and integration of PS data in different microwave bands (ALOS in L-band, ERS1/2 and ENVISAT in C-band, COSMOSKY-MED in X-band), is applied on the Tramontana Range in the northwestern part of Mallorca island (Spain), extensively affected by mass movements across time, especially during the last years. We increase the confidence degree of the available interferometric data and we homogenize all PS targets by implementing and classifying them through common criteria. Therefore, PSI results are combined with geo-thematic data and pre-existing landslide inventories of the study area, in order to improve the landslide database, providing additional information on the detected ground displacements. The results of this methodology are used to elaborate landslide activity maps, permitting to jointly exploit heterogeneous PS data for analyzing landslides at regional scale. Moreover, from a geomorphological perspective, the proposed approach exploits the implemented PS data to achieve a reliable spatial analysis of movement rates, whatever referred to certain landslide phenomena or to other natural processes, in order to perform ground motion activity maps within a wide area.

  12. Thematic mapper studies band correlation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, S. G.; Kiang, R.

    1976-01-01

    Spectral data representative of thematic mapper candidate bands 1 and 3 to 7 were obtained by selecting appropriate combinations of bands from the JSC 24 channel multispectral scanner. Of all the bands assigned, only candidate bands 4 (.74 mu to .80 mu) and 5 (.80 mu to .91 mu) showed consistently high intercorrelation from region to region and time to time. This extremely high correlation persisted when looking at the composite data set in a multitemporal, multilocation domain. The GISS investigations lend positive confirmation to the hypothesis, that TM bands 4 and 5 are redundant.

  13. WIDE BAND REGENERATIVE FREQUENCY DIVIDER AND MULTIPLIER

    DOEpatents

    Laine, E.F.

    1959-11-17

    A regenerative frequency divider and multiplier having wide band input characteristics is presented. The circuit produces output oscillations having frequencies related by a fixed ratio to input oscillations over a wide band of frequencies. In accomplishing this end, the divider-multiplier includes a wide band input circuit coupled by mixer means to a wide band output circuit having a pass band related by a fixed ratio to that of the input circuit. A regenerative feedback circuit derives a fixed frequency ratio feedback signal from the output circuit and applies same to the mixer means in proper phase relation to sustain fixed frequency ratio oscillations in the output circuit.

  14. Protein extraction from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Denecke, M

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for the separation of protein originating from activated sludge were compared. In one method, the total protein was isolated out of the activated sludge (crude extract). These samples included all dissolved proteins originating from the bacterial cells and biofilm made up of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Every time polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) was done, the protein bands from samples of crude extract were covered by polymeric substances including carbohydrates, uronic acids or humic compounds. Using the immunoblot technique it was possible to demonstrate the presence of the heat shock protein HSP70 in crude extracts of activated sludge. The comparison of protein fingerprints required that clear and distinct bands appear on the PAGE analysis. To this end, a procedure to separates bacterial cells from the EPS was developed. Bacterial cells were separated by incubation with EDTA and subsequent filtration. The isolated cells were directly incubated in a sample buffer. PMID:16898150

  15. An efficient atomistic quantum mechanical simulation on InAs band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhi; Jiang, Xiang-Wei; Li, Shu-Shen; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2014-03-24

    We have presented a fully atomistic quantum mechanical simulation method on band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) field-effect transistors (FETs). Our simulation approach is based on the linear combination of bulk band method with empirical pseudopotentials, which is an atomist method beyond the effective-mass approximation or k.p perturbation method, and can be used to simulate real-size devices (∼10{sup 5} atoms) efficiently (∼5 h on a few computational cores). Using this approach, we studied the InAs dual-gate BTBT FETs. The I-V characteristics from our approach agree very well with the tight-binding non-equilibrium Green's function results, yet our method costs much less computationally. In addition, we have studied ways to increase the tunneling current and analyzed the effects of different mechanisms for that purpose.

  16. Lab-on-a-chip and SDS-PAGE analysis of hemolymph protein profile from Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) infected with entomopathogenic nematode and fungus.

    PubMed

    Golo, Patrícia Silva; Dos Santos, Alessa Siqueira de Oliveira; Monteiro, Caio Marcio Oliveira; Perinotto, Wendell Marcelo de Souza; Quinelato, Simone; Camargo, Mariana Guedes; de Sá, Fillipe Araujo; Angelo, Isabele da Costa; Martins, Marta Fonseca; Prata, Marcia Cristina de Azevedo; Bittencourt, Vânia Rita Elias Pinheiro

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, lab-on-a-chip electrophoresis (LoaC) was suggested as an alternative method to the conventional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions (SDS-PAGE) to analyze raw cell-free tick hemolymph. Rhipicephalus microplus females were exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae senso latu IBCB 116 strain and/or to the entomopathogenic nematode Heterorhabditis indica LPP1 strain. Hemolymph from not exposed or exposed ticks was collected 16 and 24 h after exposure and analyze by SDS-PAGE or LoaC. SDS-PAGE yielded 15 bands and LoaC electrophoresis 17 bands. Despite the differences in the number of bands, when the hemolymph protein profiles of exposed or unexposed ticks were compared in the same method, no suppressing or additional bands were detected among the treatments regardless the method (i.e., SDS-PAGE or chip electrophoresis using the Protein 230 Kit®). The potential of LoaC electrophoresis to detect protein bands from tick hemolymph was considered more efficient in comparison to the detection obtained using the traditional SDS-PAGE method, especially when it comes to protein subunits heavier than 100 KDa. LoaC electrophoresis provided a very good reproducibility, and is much faster than the conventional SDS-PAGE method, which requires several hours for one analysis. Despite both methods can be used to analyze tick hemolymph composition, LoaC was considered more suitable for cell-free hemolymph protein separation and detection. LoaC hemolymph band percent data reported changes in key proteins (i.e., HeLp and vitellogenin) exceptionally important for tick embryogenesis. This study reported, for the first time, tick hemolymph protein profile using LoaC. PMID:27174026

  17. Passive Microwave Measurements Over Conifer Forests at L-Band and C-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Chauhan, N.; Kim, E.; Bidwell, S.; Goodberlet, M.; Haken, M.; deMatthaeis, P.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been made at L-band and C-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study the response of passive microwave instruments to biomass and soil moisture. A series of aircraft measurements were made in July, August and November, 1999 over relatively homogenous conifer forests of varying biomass. Three radiometers participated in these measurements. These were: 1) the L-band radiometer ESTAR, a horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer which has been used extensively in past measurements of soil moisture; 2) the L-band radiometer SLFMR, a vertically polarized cross-track scanner which has been used successfully in the past for mapping sea surface salinity; and 3) The ACMR, a new C-band radiometer which operates at V- and H-polarization and in the configuration for these experiments did not scan. All three radiometers were flown on the NASA P-3 aircraft based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The ESTAR and SLFMR were mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and imaged across track whereas the ACMR was mounted to look aft at 54 degrees up from nadir. Data was collected at altitudes of 915 meters and 457 meters. The forests consisted of relatively homogeneous "managed" stands of conifer located near Waverly, Virginia. This is a relatively flat area about 30 miles southeast of Richmond, VA with numerous stands of trees being grown for the forestry industry. The stands selected for study consisted of areas of regrowth and mature stands of pine. In addition, a small stand of very large trees was observed. Soil moisture sampling was done in each stand during the aircraft over flights. Data was collected on July 7, August 27, November 15 and November 30, 1999. Measurements were made with ESTAR on all days. The ACMR flew on the summer missions and the SLFMR was present only on the August 27 flight. Soil moisture varied from quite dry on July 7 to quite moist on November 30 (which was shortly after a period of rain). The microwave

  18. Two-dimensional shear bands growing dynamically in plates: An investigation of transient deformation fields, temperature fields and shear band toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosakis, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    The phenomenon of dynamic initiation and propagation of two-dimensional adiabatic shear bands is experimentally and numerically investigated. Prenotched metal plates are subjected to asymmetric impact load histories (dynamic mode-II loading). Dynamic shear bands emanate from the notch-tip and propagate rapidly in a direction nearly parallel to the direction of impact. Real time temperature histories along a line intersecting and perpendicular to the shear band paths are recorded by means of a high speed infrared detector system. The materials studied are C-300 (a maraging steel), HY-100 steel and Ti-6Al-4V. Experiments show that the peak temperatures inside the propagating shear bands are approaching 90% of the melting point for C-300 and are significantly lower for the titanium alloy (up to 6000C). Additionally, measured distances of shear band propagation indicate stronger resistance to shear banding by HY-100 steel and Ti-6Al-4V. Deformation fields around the propagating shear band are recorded using high speed photography. Shear band speeds are found to strongly depend on impact velocity are as high as 1200 m/s for C-300 steel. Finite element simulations of the experiment are carried out under the context of plane strain, considering finite deformations, inertia, heat conduction, thermal softening, strain hardening and strain-rate hardening. In the simulations, the shear band propagation is assumed to be governed by a critical plastic strain criterion. The results are compared with experimental measurements obtained using the high speed infrared detectors and high speed photography. Finally, the numerical calculations are used to investigate motions of shear band toughness. The shear band driving force is calculated as a function of shear band velocity and compared to the crack driving force versus velocity relations for mode-I, opening cracks in the same material.

  19. Reliability of flipper-banded penguins as indicators of climate change.

    PubMed

    Saraux, Claire; Le Bohec, Céline; Durant, Joël M; Viblanc, Vincent A; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Beaune, David; Park, Young-Hyang; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Stenseth, Nils C; Le Maho, Yvon

    2011-01-13

    In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change highlighted an urgent need to assess the responses of marine ecosystems to climate change. Because they lie in a high-latitude region, the Southern Ocean ecosystems are expected to be strongly affected by global warming. Using top predators of this highly productive ocean (such as penguins) as integrative indicators may help us assess the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. Yet most available information on penguin population dynamics is based on the controversial use of flipper banding. Although some reports have found the effects of flipper bands to be deleterious, some short-term (one-year) studies have concluded otherwise, resulting in the continuation of extensive banding schemes and the use of data sets thus collected to predict climate impact on natural populations. Here we show that banding of free-ranging king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) impairs both survival and reproduction, ultimately affecting population growth rate. Over the course of a 10-year longitudinal study, banded birds produced 41% [corrected] fewer chicks and had a survival rate 16 percentage points [corrected] lower than non-banded birds, demonstrating a massive long-term impact of banding and thus refuting the assumption that birds will ultimately adapt to being banded. Indeed, banded birds still arrived later for breeding at the study site and had longer foraging trips even after 10 years. One of our major findings is that responses of flipper-banded penguins to climate variability (that is, changes in sea surface temperature and in the Southern Oscillation index) differ from those of non-banded birds. We show that only long-term investigations may allow an evaluation of the impact of flipper bands and that every major life-history trait can be affected, calling into question the banding schemes still going on. In addition, our understanding of the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems based on flipper-band

  20. The Effects of Band Director Leadership Style and Student Leadership Ability on Band Festival Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, P. Dru

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between band director leadership styles and the strength of student leadership within the bands. This study also examined the differences between leadership styles, student leadership strength, and band festival ratings (marching and concert). Subjects (N = 42) were band directors from Texas and Arkansas who…

  1. Band models and correlations for infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1975-01-01

    Absorption of infrared radiation by various line and band models are briefly reviewed. Narrow band model relations for absorptance are used to develop 'exact' formulations for total absorption by four wide band models. Application of a wide band model to a particular gas largely depends upon the spectroscopic characteristic of the absorbing-emitting molecule. Seven continuous correlations for the absorption of a wide band model are presented and each one of these is compared with the exact (numerical) solutions of the wide band models. Comparison of these results indicate the validity of a correlation for a particular radiative transfer application. In radiative transfer analyses, use of continuous correlations for total band absorptance provides flexibilities in various mathematical operations.

  2. Destabilized bioluminescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Michael S.; Rakesh, Gupta; Gary, Sayler S.

    2007-07-31

    Purified nucleic acids, vectors and cells containing a gene cassette encoding at least one modified bioluminescent protein, wherein the modification includes the addition of a peptide sequence. The duration of bioluminescence emitted by the modified bioluminescent protein is shorter than the duration of bioluminescence emitted by an unmodified form of the bioluminescent protein.

  3. S-band transponder experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sjogren, W. L.; Gottlieb, P.; Muller, P. M.; Wollenhaupt, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    The experiment which derives data from three lunar-orbiting objects, the command-service module (CSM), the lunar module (LM), and the subsatellite in the S-band is described. Each provides detailed information on the near-side lunar gravitational field. The primary emphasis is on the low-altitude (20 km) CSM data. The LM data cover a very short time span and are somewhat redundant with the CSM data. The resolution of the high-altitude (100 km) CSM data is not as great as that of the low altitude data. The low-altitude CSM and LM data coverage and the complementary coverage obtained during the Apollo 14 mission are presented. The experiment uses the same technique of gravity determination employed on the Lunar Orbiter, in the data of which the large anomalies called mascons were first observed. The data consist of variations in the spacecraft speed as measured by the Earth-based radio tracking system.

  4. Circular birefringence of banded spherulites.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyan; Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Freudenthal, John; Nichols, Shane; Kahr, Bart

    2014-04-01

    Crystal optical properties of banded spherulites of 21 different compounds--molecular crystals, polymers, and minerals--with helically twisted fibers were analyzed with Mueller matrix polarimetry. The well-established radial oscillations in linear birefringence of many polycrystalline ensembles is accompanied by oscillations in circular birefringence that cannot be explained by the natural optical activity of corresponding compounds, some of which are centrosymmetric in the crystalline state. The circular birefringence is shown to be a consequence of misoriented, overlapping anisotropic lamellae, a kind of optical activity associated with the mesoscale stereochemistry of the refracting components. Lamellae splay as a consequence of space constraints related to simultaneous twisting of anisometric lamellae. This mechanism is supported by quantitative simulations of circular birefringence arising from crystallite twisting and splaying under confinement. PMID:24625095

  5. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  6. Topics in topological band systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhoushen

    The discovery of integer quantum Hall effect and its subsequent theoretical formulation heralded a new paradigm of thinking in condensed matter physics, which has by now blossomed into the rapidly growing field of topological phases. In this work we investigate several mutually related topics in the framework of topological band theory. In Chapter 2, we study solutions to boundary states on a lattice and see how they are related to the bulk topology. To elicit a real space manifestation of the non-trivial topology, the presence of a physical edge is not strictly necessary. We study two other possibilities, namely the entanglement spectrum associated with an imaginary spatial boundary, and the localization centers of Wannier functions, in Chapters 3,4, and 5. Topological classification through discrete indices is so far possible only for systems described by pure quantum states---in the existing scheme, quantization is lost for systems in mixed states. In Chapter 6, we present a program through which discrete topological indices can be defined for topological band systems at finite temperature, based on Uhlmann's parallel transport of density matrices. The potential of topologocal insulators in realistic applications lies in the existence of Dirac nodes on its surface spectrum. Dirac physics, however, is not exclusive to TI surfaces. In a recently discovered class of materials known as Weyl semimetals, energy nodes which emit linear dispersions also occur in the bulk material. In Chapter 7, we study the possibility of resonance states induced by localized impurities near the nodal energy in Weyl semimetals, which will help us in understanding the stability of density-of-state suppression at the energy nodes. Finally, in Chapter 8, we apply the topological characterization developed for noninteracting particles to a class of interacting spin models in 3D, which are generalizations of Kitaev's honeycomb model, and identify several exotic quantum phases such as spin

  7. Development of a banding database for North Pacific albatross: Implications for future data collection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, P.F., Jr.; Kendall, W.L.; Sillett, S.; Gustafson, M.; Flint, B.; Naughton, M.; Robbins, C.S.; Pyle, P.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of fishery practices on black-footed (Phoebastria nigripes) and Laysan albatross (Phoebastria immutabilis) continue to be a source of contention and uncertainty. Some of this uncertainty is a result of a lack of estimates of albatross demographic parameters such as survival. To begin to address these informational needs, a database of albatross banding and encounter records was constructed. Due to uncertainty concerning data collection and validity of assumptions required for mark-recapture analyses, these data should be used with caution. Although demographic parameter estimates are of interest to many, band loss rates, temporary emigration rates, and discontinuous banding effort can confound these estimates. We suggest a number of improvements in data collection that can help ameliorate problems, including the use of double banding and collecting data using a `robust? design. Additionally, sustained banding and encounter efforts are needed to maximize the value of these data. With these modifications, the usefulness of the banding data could be improved markedly.

  8. Radiometric Quality of the MODIS Bands at 667 and 678nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2010-01-01

    The MODIS instruments on Terra and Aqua were designed to allow the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence effects over ocean. The retrieval algorithm is based on the difference between the water-leaving radiances at 667nm and 678nm. The water-leaving radiances at these wavelengths are usually very low relative to the top- of-atmosphere radiances. The high radiometric accuracy needed to retrieve the small fluorescence signal lead to a dual gain design for the 667 and 678nm bands. This paper discusses the benefits obtained from this design choice and provides justification for the use of only one set of gains for global processing of ocean color products. Noise characteristics of the two bands and their related products are compared to other products of bands from 412nm to 2130nm. The impact of polarization on the two bands is discussed. In addition, the impact of stray light on the two bands is compared to other MODIS bands.

  9. Radiometric Quality of the MODIS Bands at 667 and 678nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meister, Gerhard; Franz, Bryan A.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS instruments on Terra and Aqua were designed to allow the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence effects over ocean. The retrieval algorithm is based on the difference between the water-leaving radiances at 667nm and 678nm. The water-leaving radiances at these wavelengths are usually very low relative to the top-of-atmosphere radiances. The high radiometric accuracy needed to retrieve the small fluorescence signal lead to a dual gain design for the 667 and 678nm bands. This paper discusses the benefits obtained from this design choice and provides justification for the use of only one set of gains for global processing of ocean color products. Noise characteristics of the two bands and their related products are compared to other products of bands from 412nm to 2130nm. The impact of polarization on the two bands is discussed. In addition, the impact of stray light on the two bands is compared to other MODIS bands.

  10. 25 CFR 75.6 - Additions to the roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.6 Additions to the roll. There shall be... of Eastern Cherokee Indian blood, and those persons who apply for membership on or after August 14, 1963, possess at least 1/16 degree Eastern Cherokee Indian blood, except that persons who also...

  11. 25 CFR 75.6 - Additions to the roll.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... THE EASTERN BAND OF CHEROKEE INDIANS, NORTH CAROLINA § 75.6 Additions to the roll. There shall be... of Eastern Cherokee Indian blood, and those persons who apply for membership on or after August 14, 1963, possess at least 1/16 degree Eastern Cherokee Indian blood, except that persons who also...

  12. Analysis of novel sph (spherocytosis) alleles in mice reveals allele-specific loss of band 3 and adducin in α-spectrin–deficient red cells

    PubMed Central

    Robledo, Raymond F.; Lambert, Amy J.; Birkenmeier, Connie S.; Cirlan, Marius V.; Cirlan, Andreea Flavia M.; Campagna, Dean R.; Lux, Samuel E.

    2010-01-01

    Five spontaneous, allelic mutations in the α-spectrin gene, Spna1, have been identified in mice (spherocytosis [sph], sph1J, sph2J, sph2BC, sphDem). All cause severe hemolytic anemia. Here, analysis of 3 new alleles reveals previously unknown consequences of red blood cell (RBC) spectrin deficiency. In sph3J, a missense mutation (H2012Y) in repeat 19 introduces a cryptic splice site resulting in premature termination of translation. In sphIhj, a premature stop codon occurs (Q1853Stop) in repeat 18. Both mutations result in markedly reduced RBC membrane spectrin content, decreased band 3, and absent β-adducin. Reevaluation of available, previously described sph alleles reveals band 3 and adducin deficiency as well. In sph4J, a missense mutation occurs in the C-terminal EF hand domain (C2384Y). Notably, an equally severe hemolytic anemia occurs despite minimally decreased membrane spectrin with normal band 3 levels and present, although reduced, β-adducin. The severity of anemia in sph4J indicates that the highly conserved cysteine residue at the C-terminus of α-spectrin participates in interactions critical to membrane stability. The data reinforce the notion that a membrane bridge in addition to the classic protein 4.1-p55-glycophorin C linkage exists at the RBC junctional complex that involves interactions between spectrin, adducin, and band 3. PMID:20056793

  13. Influence of Intermediate Principal Stress on Deformation Band Formation in Porous Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issen, K. A.; Ingraham, M. D.; Dewers, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, field observations of volumetric deformation bands (compaction bands and dilation bands) have prompted renewed laboratory and theoretical research efforts to understand conditions for deformation band formation. Historically, laboratory experiments have been conducted on cylindrical cores using axisymmetric stress states, where the intermediate principal stress is equal to either minimum or maximum compression. While experimentally convenient, it is not clear that these specialized stress states are common in field settings, where the intermediate principal stress likely falls between minimum and maximum compression. Additionally, theoretical predictions developed using a bifurcation approach to strain localization (Rudnicki and Rice, 1975) suggest that the deformation band type predicted to form (compaction, compactant shear, dilatant shear, dilation), and the orientation of the band relative to maximum compression, both depend on the magnitude of the intermediate principal stress relative to maximum and minimum compression. To examine the role of the intermediate principal stress in deformation band formation, a suite of true triaxial tests were conducted on Castlegate sandstone; this paper focuses on comparing theoretical predictions with experimental observations. Tests covered a wide range of mean stresses, from dilatant to compactant response. For a given mean stress, five stress states were tested, in which the intermediate principal stress was: A) equal to minimum compression, B) greater than the minimum but less than halfway to maximum compression, C) halfway between minimum and maximum compression, D) greater than halfway but less than maximum compression, and E) equal to maximum compression. Overall, reasonable agreement was found between predicted and observed band angles (defined as the angle between the band normal and maximum compression). Low mean stress tests produced the predicted high angles bands; at intermediate stresses

  14. Protein Quantity and Quality of Safflower Seed Improved by NP Fertilizer and Rhizobacteria (Azospirillum and Azotobacter spp.).

    PubMed

    Nosheen, Asia; Bano, Asghari; Yasmin, Humaira; Keyani, Rumana; Habib, Rabia; Shah, Syed T A; Naz, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Rhizobacteria (Azotobacter spp.) have improved the quality and quantity of safflower seed protein.Protein quality was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and new bands were found in response to different combinations of rhizobacteria and lower doses of fertilizers.The PGPR application has reduced the use of fertilizers upto 50%. Protein is an essential part of the human diet. The aim of this present study was to improve the protein quality of safflower seed by the application of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in combination with conventional nitrogen and phosphate (NP) fertilizers. The seeds of two safflower cultivars Thori and Saif-32, were inoculated with Azospirillum and Azotobacter and grown under field conditions. Protein content and quality was assessed by crude protein, amino acid analysis, and SDS-PAGE. Seed crude protein and amino acids (methionine, phenylalanine, and glutamic acid) showed significant improvements (55-1250%) by Azotobacter supplemented with a quarter dose of fertilizers (BTQ) at P ≤ 0.05. Additional protein bands were induced in Thori and Saif-32 by BTQ and BTH (Azotobacter supplemented with a half dose of fertilizer) respectively. The Azospirillum in combination with half dose of fertilizer (SPH) and BTQ enhanced both indole acetic acid (IAA) (90%) and gibberellic acid (GA) (23-27%) content in safflower leaf. Taken together, these data suggest that Azospirillum and Azotobacter along with significantly reduced (up to 75%) use of NP fertilizers could improve the quality and quantity of safflower seed protein. PMID:26941744

  15. Protein Quantity and Quality of Safflower Seed Improved by NP Fertilizer and Rhizobacteria (Azospirillum and Azotobacter spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Nosheen, Asia; Bano, Asghari; Yasmin, Humaira; Keyani, Rumana; Habib, Rabia; Shah, Syed T. A.; Naz, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Rhizobacteria (Azotobacter spp.) have improved the quality and quantity of safflower seed protein.Protein quality was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and new bands were found in response to different combinations of rhizobacteria and lower doses of fertilizers.The PGPR application has reduced the use of fertilizers upto 50%. Protein is an essential part of the human diet. The aim of this present study was to improve the protein quality of safflower seed by the application of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) in combination with conventional nitrogen and phosphate (NP) fertilizers. The seeds of two safflower cultivars Thori and Saif-32, were inoculated with Azospirillum and Azotobacter and grown under field conditions. Protein content and quality was assessed by crude protein, amino acid analysis, and SDS-PAGE. Seed crude protein and amino acids (methionine, phenylalanine, and glutamic acid) showed significant improvements (55–1250%) by Azotobacter supplemented with a quarter dose of fertilizers (BTQ) at P ≤ 0.05. Additional protein bands were induced in Thori and Saif-32 by BTQ and BTH (Azotobacter supplemented with a half dose of fertilizer) respectively. The Azospirillum in combination with half dose of fertilizer (SPH) and BTQ enhanced both indole acetic acid (IAA) (90%) and gibberellic acid (GA) (23–27%) content in safflower leaf. Taken together, these data suggest that Azospirillum and Azotobacter along with significantly reduced (up to 75%) use of NP fertilizers could improve the quality and quantity of safflower seed protein. PMID:26941744

  16. Polaronlike vibrational bands of molecular crystals with one-dimensional hydrogen-bond chains: N-methylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Gako; Suzuki, Kazuaki; Nakayama, Hideyuki; Ishii, Kikujiro

    1991-05-01

    N-methylacetamide (NMA) crystal forms one-dimensional hydrogen-bond chains, which are similar to those in an acetanilide (ACN) crystal for which an unconventional vibrational band accompanying the amide-I band has been observed. Infrared spectra of NMA crystals show an additional band on the small-wave-number side of the amide-II band as the temperature is lowered. There is a close resemblance between this band and the band of ACN. It is likely that these bands appear by the same mechanism. The polaron model, which has been employed to explain the band of ACN, was found to be applicable also to the case of NMA, although the main vibrational mode is amide I in ACN and amide II in NMA.

  17. Oxygen isotope variability within Nautilus shell growth bands

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Linzmeier, Benjamin J.; Kozdon, Reinhard; Peters, Shanan E.; Valley, John W.

    2016-04-21

    Nautilus is often used as an analogue for the ecology and behavior of extinct externally shelled cephalopods. Nautilus shell grows quickly, has internal growth banding, and is widely believed to precipitate aragonite in oxygen isotope equilibrium with seawater. Pieces of shell from a wild-caught Nautilus macromphalus from New Caledonia and from a Nautilus belauensis reared in an aquarium were cast in epoxy, polished, and then imaged. Growth bands were visible in the outer prismatic layer of both shells. The thicknesses of the bands are consistent with previously reported daily growth rates measured in aquarium reared individuals. In situ analysis ofmore » oxygen isotope ratios using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with 10 μm beam-spot size reveals inter- and intra-band δ18O variation. In the wild-caught sample, a traverse crosscutting 45 growth bands yielded δ18O values ranging 2.5‰, from +0.9 to -1.6 ‰ (VPDB), a range that is larger than that observed in many serial sampling of entire shells by conventional methods. The maximum range within a single band (~32 μm) was 1.5‰, and 27 out of 41 bands had a range larger than instrumental precision (±2 SD = 0.6‰). The results from the wild individual suggest depth migration is recorded by the shell, but are not consistent with a simple sinusoidal, diurnal depth change pattern. In addition, to create the observed range of δ18O, however, this Nautilus must have traversed a temperature gradient of at least ~12°C, corresponding to approximately 400 m depth change. Isotopic variation was also measured in the aquarium-reared sample, but the pattern within and between bands likely reflects evaporative enrichment arising from a weekly cycle of refill and replacement of the aquarium water. Overall, this work suggests that depth migration behavior in ancient nektonic mollusks could be elucidated by SIMS analysis across individual growth bands.« less

  18. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Ka-band (32 GHz) Demonstration: Cruise Phase Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shambayati, Shervin; Morabito, David; Border, James S.; Davarian, Faramaz; Lee, Dennis; Mendoza, Ricardo; Britcliffe, Michael; Weinreb, Sander

    2006-01-01

    The X-band (8.41 GHz) frequency currently used for deep space telecommunications is too narrow (50 MHz) to support future high rate missions. Because of this NASA has decided to transition to Ka-band (32 GHz) frequencies. As weather effects cause much larger fluctuations on Ka-band than on X-band, the traditional method of using a few dBs of margin to cover these fluctuations is wasteful of power for Ka-band; therefore, a different operations concept is needed for Ka-band links. As part of the development of the operations concept for Ka-band, NASA has implemented a fully functioning Ka-band communications suite on its Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). This suite will be used during the primary science phase to develop and refine the Ka-band operations concept for deep space missions. In order to test the functional readiness of the spacecraft and the Deep Space Network's (DSN) readiness to support the demonstration activities a series of passes over DSN 34-m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antennas were scheduled during the cruise phase of the mission. MRO was launched on August 12, 2005 from Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, USA and went into Mars Orbit on March 10, 2006. A total of ten telemetry demonstration and one high gain antenna (HGA) calibration passes were allocated to the Ka-band demonstration. Furthermore, a number of "shadow" passes were also scheduled where, during a regular MRO track over a Ka-band capable antenna, Ka-band was identically configured as the X-band and tracked by the station. In addition, nine Ka-band delta differential one way ranging ((delta)DOR) passes were scheduled. During these passes, the spacecraft and the ground system were put through their respective paces. Among the highlights of these was setting a single day record for data return from a deep space spacecraft (133 Gbits) achieved during one 10-hour pass; achieving the highest data rate ever from a planetary mission (6 Mbps) and successfully demonstrating Ka-band DDOR

  19. Effect of oviductal fluid proteins on buffalo sperm characteristics during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Imam, S; Ansari, M R; Ahmed, N; Kumaresan, A

    2008-05-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of oviductal proteins on sperm function. Abbatoir-derived buffalo oviducts were flushed with PBS; the fluid recovered (protein concentration, 2.3 mg/mL; average of 3.5 mg protein/oviduct) was centrifuged, dialyzed, and clarified, and the supernatant applied to a Heparin-Sepharose affinity column. Unbound fractions were collected and bound proteins were separately eluted (with elution buffer). Eight distinct protein bands (from 12 to 177 kDa) in the H-unbound fraction and 15 distinct protein bands (from 12 to 165 kDa) in the H-bound fraction were detected in SDS-PAGE. Semen from four buffalo bulls was divided into three parts: Parts 1 and 2 were treated with the heparin binding (H-bound) and non-heparin binding (H-unbound) oviductal proteins, respectively, whereas Part 3 remained as an untreated control. Equilibrated and frozen-thawed semen was assessed for motility, viability, intact acrosome percentage, mucus penetration distance, and hypo-osmotic swelling test. The H-bound oviductal fluid proteins enhanced (P<0.05) the proportion of sperm that were progressively motile, alive, had an intact acrosome and functional plasma membrane (hypo-osmotic swelling test), as well as the distance covered in the cervical mucus sperm penetration test during cryopreservation. Addition of the H-unbound oviductal protein fraction did not increase sperm motility and penetration distance but increased (P<0.05) the proportion of sperm that were live, had an intact acrosome, and functional plasma membrane (hypo-osmotic swelling test). We concluded that the H-bound fraction of buffalo oviductal fluid protein(s) maintained sperm motility, viability and membrane integrity during cryopreservation, whereas the H-unbound proteins maintained sperm viability and membrane integrity. PMID:18359071

  20. Estimating survival rates from banding of adult and juvenile birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.

    1974-01-01

    The restrictive assumptions required by most available methods for estimating survival probabilities render them unsuitable for analyzing real banding data. A model is proposed which allows survival rates and recovery rates to vary with the calendar year, and also allows juveniles to have rates different from adults. In addition to survival rates and recovery rates, the differential vulnerability factors of juveniles relative to adults are estimated. Minimum values of the variances of the estimators are also given. The new procedure is applied to sets of duck and goose data in which reasonably large numbers of adult and juvenile birds were banded. The results are shown to be generally comparable to those procured by other methods, but, in addition, insight into the extent of annual variation is gained. Combining data from adults and juveniles also increases the effective sample size, since the juveniles are assumed to enter the adult age class after surviving their initial year.

  1. Conformational changes in human red cell membrane proteins induced by sugar binding.

    PubMed

    Janoshazi, A; Kifor, G; Solomon, A K

    1991-09-01

    We have previously shown that the human red cell glucose transport protein and the anion exchange protein, band 3, are in close enough contact that information can be transmitted from the glucose transport protein to band 3. The present experiments were designed to show whether information could be transferred in the reverse direction, using changes in tryptophan fluorescence to report on the conformation of the glucose transport protein. To see whether tryptophan fluorescence changes could be attributed to the glucose transport protein, we based our experiments on procedures used by Helgerson and Carruthers [Helgerson, A. L., Carruthers, A., (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262:5464-5475] to displace cytochalasin B (CB), the specific D-glucose transport inhibitor, from its binding site on the inside face of the glucose transport protein, and we showed that these procedures modified tryptophan fluorescence. Addition of 75 mM maltose, a nontransportable disaccharide which also displaces CB, caused a time-dependent biphasic enhancement of tryptophan fluorescence in fresh red cells, which was modulated by the specific anion exchange inhibitor, DBDS (4,4'-dibenzamido-2,2'-stilbene disulfonate). In a study of nine additional disaccharides, we found that both biphasic kinetics and DBDS effects depended upon specific disaccharide conformation, indicating that these two effects could be attributed to a site sensitive to sugar conformation. Long term (800 sec) experiments revealed that maltose binding (+/- DBDS) caused a sustained damped anharmonic oscillation extending over the entire 800 sec observation period. Mathematical analysis of the temperature dependence of these oscillations showed that 2 microM DBDS increased the damping term activation energy, 9.5 +/- 2.8 kcal mol-1 deg-1, by a factor of four to 39.7 +/- 5.1 kcal mol-1 deg-1, providing strong support for the view that signalling between the glucose transport protein and band 3 goes in both directions. PMID:1744899

  2. Fine structure of the amide i band in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1988-05-01

    Their absorption spectrum of both single crystals and powdered samples of acetanilide (a model system for proteins) has been studied in the amide i region, where a narrow band has been identified as a highly trapped soliton state. The powder-sample spectra have been decomposed using four Lorentzian bands. A strong temperature dependence has been found for the intensity of two of the subbands, which also show a complementary behavior. Polarization studies performed on thin crystals have shown that the subbands have the same polarization. Low-temperature spectra of partially deuterated samples show the presence of the subbands at the same absorption frequencies found using the fitting procedure in the spectra of nondeuterated samples. The soliton model currently proposed to explain the origin of the anomalous amide i component at 1650 cm-1 still holds, but some modification of the model is required to account for the new features revealed by this study.

  3. Q/V-band communications and propagation experiments using ALPHASAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudelka, O.

    2011-12-01

    The lower satellite frequency bands become more and more congested; therefore it will be necessary to exploit higher frequencies for satellite communications. New broadband applications (e.g. 3D-TV, fast Internet access) will require additional spectrum in the future. The Ku-band is highly utilised nowadays and Ka-band systems, which have been extensively studied in the 1990s, are already in commercial use. The next frontier is the Q/V-band. At millimetre waves the propagation effects are significant. The traditional approach of implementing large fade margins is impractical, since this leads to high EIRP and G/ T figures for the ground stations, resulting in unacceptable costs. Fade mitigation techniques by adaptive coding and modulation (ACM) offer a cost-effective solution to this problem. ESA will launch the ALPHASAT satellite in 2012. It will carry experimental Ka- and Q/V-band propagation and communications payloads, enabling propagation measurements throughout Europe and communications experiments. Three communications spot beams will be covering Northern Italy, Southern Italy and Austria with some overlap. Joanneum Research and Graz University of Technology are preparing for communications and propagation experiments using these new payloads of ALPHASAT in close cooperation with ESA, the Italian Space Agency ASI, Politecnico di Milano and Università Tor Vergata. The main focus of the communications experiments is on ACM techniques. The paper describes the design of the planned Q/V-band ground station with the planned ACM tests and investigations as well as the architecture of the communications terminal, based on a versatile software-defined radio platform.

  4. Adaptive Confidence Bands for Nonparametric Regression Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, T. Tony; Low, Mark; Ma, Zongming

    2014-01-01

    A new formulation for the construction of adaptive confidence bands in non-parametric function estimation problems is proposed. Confidence bands are constructed which have size that adapts to the smoothness of the function while guaranteeing that both the relative excess mass of the function lying outside the band and the measure of the set of points where the function lies outside the band are small. It is shown that the bands adapt over a maximum range of Lipschitz classes. The adaptive confidence band can be easily implemented in standard statistical software with wavelet support. Numerical performance of the procedure is investigated using both simulated and real datasets. The numerical results agree well with the theoretical analysis. The procedure can be easily modified and used for other nonparametric function estimation models. PMID:26269661

  5. Magnetic bearing stiffness control using frequency band filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming

    1989-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings can be implemented with frequency band-reject filtering that decreases the bearing stiffness and damping at a small bandwidth around a chosen frequency. The control scheme was used for reducing a rotor dynamic force, such as an imbalance force, transmitted to the bearing stator. The scheme creates additional system vibration modes at the same frequency. It also shows that the amount of force reduction is limited by the stability requirement of these modes.

  6. On the photodissociation of uranium hexafluoride in the B band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menghini, M.; Morales, P.; Dore, P.; Schisano, M. I.

    1986-06-01

    The rate of photodissociation of uranium hexafluoride is measured for the first time as a function of wavelength in the B band. The experimental technique used tests the collision-free behavior and, with the addition of a buffer gas, the collisional effects on molecular relaxation. In both cases, the dissociation yield is strongly nonuniform. A qualitative interpretation of these results is attempted. Their relevance to the subject of laser isotopic separation and more generally of selective photochemistry is outlined.

  7. Twisted bilayer blue phosphorene: A direct band gap semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, D. A.; Duque, C. A.; Correa, J. D.; Suárez Morell, Eric

    2016-09-01

    We report that two rotated layers of blue phosphorene behave as a direct band gap semiconductor. The optical spectrum shows absorption peaks in the visible region of the spectrum and in addition the energy of these peaks can be tuned with the rotational angle. These findings makes twisted bilayer blue phosphorene a strong candidate as a solar cell or photodetection device. Our results are based on ab initio calculations of several rotated blue phosphorene layers.

  8. Shuttle Ku-band and S-band communications implementations study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, G. K.; Nessibou, T.; Nilsen, P. W.; Simon, M. K.; Weber, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    The interfaces between the Ku-band system and the TDRSS, between the S-band system and the TDRSS, GSTDN and SGLS networks, and between the S-band payload communication equipment and the other Orbiter avionic equipment were investigated. The principal activities reported are: (1) performance analysis of the payload narrowband bent-pipe through the Ku-band communication system; (2) performance evaluation of the TDRSS user constraints placed on the S-band and Ku-band communication systems; (3) assessment of the shuttle-unique S-band TDRSS ground station false lock susceptibility; (4) development of procedure to make S-band antenna measurements during orbital flight; (5) development of procedure to make RFI measurements during orbital flight to assess the performance degradation to the TDRSS S-band communication link; and (6) analysis of the payload interface integration problem areas.

  9. Assessment of Thematic Mapper Band-to-band Registration by the Block Correlation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, D. H.; Wrigley, R. C.; Mertz, F. C.; Hall, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Rectangular blocks of pixels from one band image were statistically correlated against blocks centered on identical pixels from a second band image. The block pairs were shifted in pixel increments both vertically and horizontally with respect to each other and the correlation coefficient to the maximum correlation was taken as the best estimate of registration error for each block pair. For the band combinations of the Arkansas scene studied, the misregistration of TM spectral bands within the noncooled focal plane lie well within the 0.2 pixel target specification. Misregistration between the middle IR bands is well within this specification also. The thermal IR band has an apparent misregistration with TM band 7 of approximately 3 pixels in each direction. The TM band 3 has a misregistration of approximately 0.2 pixel in the across-scan direction and 0.5 pixel in the along-scan direction, with both TM bands 5 and 7.

  10. Assessment of Thematic Mapper band-to-band registration by the block correlation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, D. H.; Wrigley, R. C.; Mertz, F. C.; Hall, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Rectangular blocks of pixels from one band image were statistically correlated against blocks centered on identical pixels from a second band image. The block pairs were shifted in pixel increments both vertically and horizontally with respect to each other and the correlation coefficient to the maximum correlation was taken as the best estimate of registration error for each block pair. For the band combinations of the Arkansas scene studied, the misregistration of TM spectral bands within the noncooled focal plane lie well within the 0.2 pixel target specification. Misregistration between the middle IR bands is well within this specification also. The thermal IR band has an apparent misregistration with TM band 7 of approximately 3 pixels in each direction. The TM band 3 has a misregistration of approximately 0.2 pixel in the across-scan direction and 0.5 pixel in the along-scan direction, with both TM bands 5 and 7.

  11. Josephson systems based on ballistic point contacts between single-band and multi-band superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerin, Y. S.; Kiyko, A. S.; Omelyanchouk, A. N.; Il'ichev, E.

    2015-11-01

    The Josephson effect in ballistic point contacts between single-band and multi-band superconductors was investigated. It was found that in the case of Josephson junctions formed by a single-band and an s±-wave two-band superconductor as well as by a single-band and a three-band superconductor the junctions become frustrated, showing the φ-contact properties. Depending on the ground state of a three-band superconductor with time-reversal symmetry breaking, the Josephson junction can have from one to three energy minima, some of which can be locally stable. We also study the behavior of a dc SQUID based on the Josephson junctions between single-band and multi-band superconductors. Some features on the dependences of the critical current and the total magnetic flux on the applied flux of a dc SQUID based on the Josephson point contacts between a single-band superconductor and an s±-wave superconductor, three-band superconductor with broken time-reversal symmetry and three-band superconductor without broken time-reversal symmetry as compared to the conventional dc SQUIDs based on single-band superconductors were found. The results can be used as an experimental tool to detect the existence of multi-band structure and time-reversal symmetry breaking.

  12. Microstrip Triband Bandstop Fitler with Sharp Stop Band Skirts and Independently Controllable Second Stop Band Response

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Young

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a compact planar triband bandstop filter (TBBSF) with compact size and high selectivity. The structure of the filter incorporates two folded trisection stepped-impedance resonators (TSSIRs). One of these resonators is designed to operate at the first and third center frequencies and the other resonator is designed to operate at the second center frequency of the proposed filter. To achieve a compact size filter, alternating impedance lines of the resonators are folded widthwise and also one resonator is embedded within another. Theoretical analysis and design procedures are described, including the synthesis equations for each resonator. The main advantage of the proposed method is that the filter provides flexibility to tune the second center frequency and control the corresponding bandwidth without changing the first and third stop band response. Additionally, several reflection zeros (RZs) are introduced in the pass band to improve its flatness. To demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed design method, both the first and second order TBBSFs were designed, simulated, and fabricated, with center frequencies of 1.92 GHz, 3.55 GHz, and 5.5 GHz. PMID:25019098

  13. Topological Raman band in the carbon nanohorn.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken-ichi; Sekine, Yoshiaki; Tateno, Kouta; Gotoh, Hideki

    2013-09-13

    Raman spectroscopy has been used in chemistry and physics to investigate the fundamental process involving light and phonons. The carbon nanohorn introduces a new subject to Raman spectroscopy, namely topology. We show theoretically that a photoexcited carrier with a nonzero winding number activates a topological D Raman band through the Aharonov-Bohm effect. The topology-induced D Raman band can be distinguished from the ordinary D Raman band for a graphene edge by its peak position. PMID:24074113

  14. Fade Mitigation Techniques at Ka-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dissanayake, Asoka (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Rain fading is the dominant propagation impairment affecting Ka-band satellite links and rain fade mitigation is a key element in the design of Ka-band satellite networks. Some of the common fade mitigation techniques include: power control, diversity, adaptive coding, and resource sharing. The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides an excellent opportunity to develop and test Ka-band rain impairment amelioration techniques. Up-link power control and diversity are discussed in this paper.

  15. X-BAND KLYSTRON DEVELOPMENT AT SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, Arnold E.; /SLAC

    2009-08-03

    The development of X-band klystrons at SLAC originated with the idea of building an X-band Linear Collider in the late 1980's. Since then much effort has been expended in developing a reliable X-band Power source capable of delivering >50 MW RF power in pulse widths >1.5 {micro}s. I will report on some of the technical issues and design strategies which have led to the current SLAC klystron designs.

  16. A novel antifungal protein of Bacillus subtilis B25.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhiqiong; Lin, Baoying; Zhang, Rongyi

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis B25 was isolated from banana rhizosphere soil. It has been confirmed for B25 to have stronger antagonism against Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.cubense, Additionally B25 has good inhibitory to plant pathogens, including Corynespora cassiicola, Alternaria solani, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides on potato dextrose agar (PDA) plates. The antagonistic substance can be extracted from cell-free culture broth supernatants by 70% (w/v) (NH4)2 SO4 saturation. Clear blank band was observed between the protein and a pathogen. The examination of antagonistic mechanism under light microscope showed that the antifungal protein of B25 appeared to inhibit pathogens by leading to mycelium and spores tumescence, distortion, abnormality. The isolation procedure comprised ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex Fast Flow and gel filtration chromatography on SephadexG-100. The purified antifungal fraction showed a single band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The active fraction was identified by NanoLC-ESI-MS/MS The amino acid sequences of 17 peptides segments were obtained. The analysis of the protein suggested that it was a hypothetical protein (gi154685475), with a relative molecular mass of 38708.67 Da and isoelectric point (pI) of 5.63. PMID:24255843

  17. Spectrin-like proteins in green algae (Desmidiaceae).

    PubMed

    Holzinger, A; De Ruijter, N; Emons, A M; Lütz-Meindl, U

    1999-01-01

    Immunochemical detection of actin as well as spectrin-like proteins have been carried out in the green algae Micrasterias denticulata, Closterium lunula, and Euastrum oblongum. In these algae, actin is detected on Western blots at 43 kDa with antibodies to actin from higher plant and animal origin. By use of antibodies to human and chicken erythrocyte spectrin a cross-reactivity with desmid proteins is found at about the molecular mass of 220 kDa, where also human erythrocyte spectrin is detected. Additional bands are present at 120 kDa and 70 kDa, which are probably breakdown products. An antibody against chicken alpha-actinin, a small protein of the spectrin superfamily, recognizes bands at 90 kDa, where it is expected, and 70 kDa, probably the same breakdown product as mentioned for spectrin. Isoelectric focusing provides staining at pI 4.6 with antibodies against spectrin. Immunogold labelling of spectrin and alpha-actinin antigens on high-pressure frozen, freeze-substituted Micrasterias denticulata cells with the same antibodies exhibits staining, especially at membranes of different populations of secretory vesicles, at dictyosomes, and the plasma membrane. However, no clear correlation to the growth pattern of the cell could be observed. Taken together, our results demonstrate the presence of spectrin-like proteins in desmid cells which are probably functional in exocytosis. PMID:10579899

  18. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  19. A thermodynamic study of shear banding in polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooshyar, Soroush; Germann, Natalie

    2016-06-01

    Although shear banding is a ubiquitous phenomenon observed in soft materials, the mechanisms that give rise to shear-band formation are not always the same. In this work, we develop a new two-fluid model for semi-dilute entangled polymer solutions using the generalized bracket approach of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The model is based on the hypothesis that the direct coupling between polymer stress and concentration is the driving mechanism of steady shear-band formation. To obtain smooth banded profiles in the two-fluid framework, a new stress-diffusive term is added to the time evolution equation for the conformation tensor. The advantage of the new model is that the differential velocity is treated as a state variable. This allows a straightforward implementation of the additional boundary conditions arising from the derivative diffusive terms with respect to this new state variable. To capture the overshoot of the shear stress during the start of a simple shear flow, we utilize a nonlinear Giesekus relaxation. Moreover, we include an additional relaxation term that resembles the term used in the Rouse linear entangled polymer model to account for convective constraint release and chain stretch to generate the upturn of the flow curve at large shear rates. Numerical calculations performed for cylindrical Couette flow confirm the independency of the solution from the deformation history and initial conditions. Furthermore, we find that stress-induced migration is the responsible diffusive term for steady-state shear banding. Because of its simplicity, the new model is an ideal candidate for the use in the simulation of more complex flows.

  20. Band engineering of thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanzhong; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G J

    2012-12-01

    Lead chalcogenides have long been used for space-based and thermoelectric remote power generation applications, but recent discoveries have revealed a much greater potential for these materials. This renaissance of interest combined with the need for increased energy efficiency has led to active consideration of thermoelectrics for practical waste heat recovery systems-such as the conversion of car exhaust heat into electricity. The simple high symmetry NaCl-type cubic structure, leads to several properties desirable for thermoelectricity, such as high valley degeneracy for high electrical conductivity and phonon anharmonicity for low thermal conductivity. The rich capabilities for both band structure and microstructure engineering enable a variety of approaches for achieving high thermoelectric performance in lead chalcogenides. This Review focuses on manipulation of the electronic and atomic structural features which makes up the thermoelectric quality factor. While these strategies are well demonstrated in lead chalcogenides, the principles used are equally applicable to most good thermoelectric materials that could enable improvement of thermoelectric devices from niche applications into the mainstream of energy technologies. PMID:23074043