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Sample records for additional radial velocity

  1. Radial Velocities with PARAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2010-01-01

    The Physical Research Laboratory Advanced Radial-velocity All-sky Search (PARAS) is an efficient fiber-fed cross-dispersed high-resolution echelle spectrograph that will see first light in early 2010. This instrument is being built at the Physical Research laboratory (PRL) and will be attached to the 1.2m telescope at Gurushikhar Observatory at Mt. Abu, India. PARAS has a single-shot wavelength coverage of 370nm to 850nm at a spectral resolution of R 70000 and will be housed in a vacuum chamber (at 1x10-2 mbar pressure) in a highly temperature controlled environment. This renders the spectrograph extremely suitable for exoplanet searches with high velocity precision using the simultaneous Thorium-Argon wavelength calibration method. We are in the process of developing an automated data analysis pipeline for echelle data reduction and precise radial velocity extraction based on the REDUCE package of Piskunov & Valenti (2002), which is especially careful in dealing with CCD defects, extraneous noise, and cosmic ray spikes. Here we discuss the current status of the PARAS project and details and tests of the data analysis procedure, as well as results from ongoing PARAS commissioning activities.

  2. The fundamental definition of ``radial velocity''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindegren, Lennart; Dravins, Dainis

    2003-04-01

    kinematic or astrometric radial velocity without additional assumptions and data in modelling the process of light emission from the source, the transmission of the signal through space, and its recording by the observer. For historic and practical reasons, the spectroscopic radial-velocity measure is expressed in velocity units as czB, where c is the speed of light and zB is the observed relative wavelength shift reduced to the solar-system barycentre, at an epoch equal to the barycentric time of light arrival. The barycentric radial-velocity measure and the astrometric radial velocity are defined by recent resolutions adopted by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), the motives and consequences of which are explained in this paper.

  3. Radial velocity confirmation of Kepler-91 b. Additional evidence of its planetary nature using the Calar Alto/CAFE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Henning, Th.; Mancini, L.; Ciceri, S.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S. F.

    2014-08-01

    The object transiting the star Kepler-91 was recently assessed as being of planetary nature. The confirmation was achieved by analysing the light-curve modulations observed in the Kepler data. However, quasi-simultaneous studies claimed a self-luminous nature for this object, thus rejecting it as a planet. In this work, we apply anindependent approach to confirm the planetary mass of Kepler-91b by using multi-epoch high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Calar Alto Fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph (CAFE). We obtain the physical and orbital parameters with the radial velocity technique. In particular, we derive a value of 1.09 ± 0.20 MJup for the mass of Kepler-91b, in excellent agreement with our previous estimate that was based on the orbital brightness modulation.

  4. Radial Velocity Challenge at the AIUC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata, Abner; Vanzi, L.; Jones, M.; Brahms, R.

    2017-09-01

    "PUCHEROS (2012, UC observatory) and FIDEOS (2016, ESO-1m La Silla Observatory), are optical echelle high-resolution spectrographs developed in the AIUC, Chile. A thorium-argon hollow-cathode emission-line lamp is used as wavelength calibration method in the two spectrographs. We show the results of the study in radial velocity stability of the instruments. Additionally, we identify the main factors that limit the performance of these spectrographs, and how we deal with them in order to achieve a better stability and precision in radial velocity measures."

  5. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2011-07-10

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  6. Radial velocities from automated telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepe, F.; Mayor, M.

    2004-10-01

    During the past years, precise radial-velocity measurements have been the fundamental tool for the discovery and characterization of almost all the presently known extra-solar planets. The increasing precision and efficiency of this technique has also opened new possibilities for the follow-up of planetary transit candidates, as well as for other fields of astronomy, such as asteroseismology and stellar physics. The example of extra-solar planets illustrates quite clearly the strong need for large observational surveys: 1) In order to get a complete view of the planet "zoo", many stars of various types must be measured and followed up. 2) The detection efficiency increases enormously with the quality and the quantity of data points. Time sampling is a critical parameter. 3) The great diversity of known planetary systems requires covering observation time-scales from one night to several years and even decades. A direct consequence of these factors is that survey programmes require a large amount of telescope time and a continuous follow-up of the observations. In a context of limited resources and large amounts of data, automated telescopes will be of great help, or even required, to carry out these programmes. Based on our experience with CORALIE and HARPS, we shall try to define a series of "requirements" towards automated telescopes for precise radial-velocity measurements.

  7. Tolerancing a radial velocity spectrometer within Zemax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steven R.

    2016-08-01

    Techniques are described for tolerancing a radial velocity spectrometer system within Zemax, including: how to set up and verify the tolerancing model, performance metrics and tolerance operands used, as well as post- Zemax analysis methods. Use of the tolerancing model for various analyses will be discussed, such as: alignment sensitivity, radial velocity sensitivity, and sensitivity of the optical system to temperature changes. Tolerance results from the Keck Planet Finder project (a precision radial velocity spectrometer of asymmetric white pupil design) will be shown.

  8. Radial Velocity Eclipse Mapping of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin-orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  9. RADIAL VELOCITY ECLIPSE MAPPING OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-20

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter–McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin–orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  10. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  11. Combining Transit and Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Leslie A.

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler Mission, combined with ground based radial velocity (RV) follow-up, has revolutionized the observational constraints on sub-Neptune-size planet compositions. Kepler's unprecedentedly large and homogeneous samples of planets with both mass and radius constraints open the possibility of statistical studies of the underlying planet composition distribution. This presentation describes the application of hierarchical Bayesian models to constrain the underlying planet composition distribution from a sample of noisy mass-radius measurements. This approach represents a promising avenue toward a quantitative measurement of the amount of physical scatter in small planet compositions, the identification of planet sub-populations that may be tied to distinct formation pathways, and empirical constraints on the dominant compositional trends in the planet sample. Both the transit and radial velocity techniques are subject to selection effects, and approaches to mitigate the resulting biases will be addressed. In addition to distilling composition-distribution insights from the current sample of Kepler planets with RV masses, this framework may be used to optimize the target selection for future transiting planet RV follow-up surveys.

  12. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour.

  13. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, P.; Bottom, M.; Davison, C.; Mills, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Brinkworth, C.; Tanner, A. M.; Beichman, C. A.; Catanzarite, J.; Crawford, S.; Wallace, J.; Mennesson, B.; Johnson, J. A.; White, R. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; von Braun, K.; Walp, B.; Vasisht, G.; Kane, S. R.; Prato, L. A.; NIRRVs

    2014-01-01

    We present precise radial velocity time-series from a 2.3 micron pilot survey to detect exoplanets around red, low mass, and young stars. We use the CSHELL spectrograph with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility. We present an overview of our Nelder-Mead simplex optimization pipeline for extracting radial velocities. We will also present first light data at 1.6 microns from a near-infrared fiber scrambler used in tandem with our gas cell and CSHELL at IRTF. The fiber scrambler makes use of non-circular core fibers to stabilize the illumination of the slit and echelle grating against changes in seeing, focus, guiding and other sources of systematic radial velocity noise, complementing the wavelength calibration of a gas cell.

  14. On the Radial Velocity Detection of Additional Planets in Transiting, Slowly Rotating M-dwarf Systems: The Case of GJ 1132

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, Ryan; Doyon, René; Menou, Kristen; Delfosse, Xavier; Dumusque, Xavier; Artigau, Étienne

    2017-01-01

    M-dwarfs are known to commonly host high-multiplicity planetary systems. Therefore, M-dwarf planetary systems with a known transiting planet are expected to contain additional small planets (rp ≤ 4 R⊕, mp ≲ 20 M⊕) that are not seen in transit. In this study, we investigate the effort required to detect such planets using precision velocimetry around the sizable subset of M-dwarfs that are slowly rotating (Prot ≳ 40 days), and hence more likely to be inactive. We focus on the test case of GJ 1132. Specifically, we perform a suite of Monte-Carlo simulations of the star’s radial velocity signal, featuring astrophysical contributions from stellar jitter due to rotationally modulated active regions, as well as Keplerian signals from the known transiting planet and hypothetical additional planets not seen in transit. We then compute the detection completeness of non-transiting planets around GJ 1132 and consequently estimate the number of RV measurements required to detect those planets. We show that, with 1 m s‑1 precision per measurement, only ∼50 measurements are required to achieve a 50% detection completeness for all non-transiting planets in the system, as well as planets that are potentially habitable. Throughout this work, we advocate the use of Gaussian process regression as an effective tool for mitigating the effects of stellar jitter including stars with high activity. Given that GJ 1132 is representative of a large population of slowly rotating M-dwarfs, we conclude with a discussion of how our results may be extended to other systems with known transiting planets, such as those that will be discovered with TESS.

  15. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  16. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 μm near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~ 46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m s-1 on our survey targets.

  17. Radial velocity measurements in the F corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavers, W. I.; Eitter, J. J.; Carr, P. H.; Cook, B. C.

    1980-05-01

    A photoelectric radial velocity spectrometer was employed at the February 26, 1979 total solar eclipse in an attempt to detect motion in the F corona. Multiple dip features were recorded in scans made at points 3.2 and 4.3 solar radii west of the sun. By employing simple dynamic models these observations may be interpreted as evidence of the following two separate components of dust in the inner regions of the solar system: dust moving in prograde orbits outside the region beginning at about four solar radii from the sun, and dust falling into the sun with velocities from about 50 to 250 km/s.

  18. The RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Third Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Siviero, A.; Reid, W.; Boeche, C.; Steinmetz, M.; Fulbright, J.; Munari, U.; Zwitter, T.; Watson, F. G.; Wyse, R. F. G.; de Jong, R. S.; Enke, H.; Anguiano, B.; Burton, D.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Ritter, A.; Russel, K. S.; Stupar, M.; Bienaymé, O.; Freeman, K. C.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Campbell, R.; Famaey, B.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B. K.; Matijevič, G.; Parker, Q. A.; Seabroke, G. M.; Sharma, S.; Smith, M. C.; Wylie-de Boer, E.

    2011-06-01

    We present the third data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) which is the first milestone of the RAVE project, releasing the full pilot survey. The catalog contains 83,072 radial velocity measurements for 77,461 stars in the southern celestial hemisphere, as well as stellar parameters for 39,833 stars. This paper describes the content of the new release, the new processing pipeline, as well as an updated calibration for the metallicity based upon the observation of additional standard stars. Spectra will be made available in a future release. The data release can be accessed via the RAVE Web site.

  19. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): THIRD DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Siebert, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Siviero, A.; Boeche, C.; Steinmetz, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Enke, H.; Anguiano, B.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Fulbright, J.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Munari, U.; Zwitter, T.; Watson, F. G.; Burton, D.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Russel, K. S.

    2011-06-15

    We present the third data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) which is the first milestone of the RAVE project, releasing the full pilot survey. The catalog contains 83,072 radial velocity measurements for 77,461 stars in the southern celestial hemisphere, as well as stellar parameters for 39,833 stars. This paper describes the content of the new release, the new processing pipeline, as well as an updated calibration for the metallicity based upon the observation of additional standard stars. Spectra will be made available in a future release. The data release can be accessed via the RAVE Web site.

  20. pyaneti: Multi-planet radial velocity and transit fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barragán, Oscar; Gandolfi, Davide; Antoniciello, Giuliano

    2017-07-01

    Pyaneti is a multi-planet radial velocity and transit fit software. The code uses Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods with a Bayesian approach and a parallelized ensemble sampler algorithm in Fortran which makes the code fast. It creates posteriors, correlations, and ready-to-publish plots automatically, and handles circular and eccentric orbits. It is capable of multi-planet fitting and handles stellar limb darkening, systemic velocities for multiple instruments, and short and long cadence data, and offers additional capabilities.

  1. Carbon star radial velocities and dark matter in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1986-01-01

    Optical radial velocities of carbon stars in the Milky Way are compared to center-of-mass velocities derived from CO radio emission produced in their circumstellar envelopes. It seems that there is an intrinsic velocity dispersion in the optically measured radial velocities. If the carbon stars in the dwarf spheroidals behave in a fashion similar to those in the Milky Way, then the use of their optical radial velocities to infer the mass-to-light ratio of dwarf spheroidal galaxies and the nature of the dark matter in the universe is suspect. Measurement of the radial velocities of K giants may possibly avoid these uncertainties associated with atmospheric motions.

  2. Precise radial velocities in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.

    Since the first detection of a planet outside our Solar System byWolszczan & Frail (1992), over 500 exoplanets have been found to date2, none of which resemble the Earth. Most of these planets were discovered by measuring the radial velocity (hereafter, RV) of the host star, which wobbles under the gravitational influence of any existing planetary companions. However, this method has yet to achieve the sub-m/s precision necessary to detect an Earth-mass planet in the Habitable Zone (the region around a star that can support liquid water; hereafter, HZ) (Kasting et al. 1993) around a Solar-type star. Even though Kepler (Borucki et al. 2010) has announced several Earth-sized HZ candidates, these targets will be exceptionally difficult to confirm with current astrophysical spectrographs (Borucki et al. 2011). The fastest way to discover and confirm potentiallyhabitable Earth-mass planets is to observe stars with lower masses - in particular, late M dwarfs. While M dwarfs are readily abundant, comprising some 70% of the local stellar population, their low optical luminosity presents a formidable challenge to current optical RV instruments. By observing in the near-infrared (hereafter, NIR), where the flux from M dwarfs peaks, we can potentially reach low RV precisions with significantly less telescope time than would be required by a comparable optical instrument. However, NIR precision RV measurements are a relatively new idea and replete with challenges: IR arrays, unlike CCDs, are sensitive to the thermal background; modal noise is a bigger issue in the NIR than in the optical; and the NIR currently lacks the calibration sources like the very successful thorium-argon (hereafter, ThAr) hollow-cathode lamp and Iodine gas cell of the optical. The PSU Pathfinder (hereafter, Pathfinder) was designed to explore these technical issues with the intention of mitigating these problems for future NIR high-resolution spectrographs, such as the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HZPF

  3. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Pribulla, Theodor; Fischer, Debra E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  4. Spectrographs for the Measurement of Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.

    A radial-velocity measurement derives from a shift in position of spectral features at the focus of a spectrographic instrument. We do not often think about how small these shifts are. It is not generally appreciated that the accuracy to which this shift must be measured is a tiny fraction of a pixel. Or, if we prefer to calculate in microns a surprising minuteness. What precautions should we be taking for the measurement of such small shifts? It is true that, thanks to computers, modern reduction methods allows us to correct for a wide variety of pertubations, provided that these are foreseen and understood; but such reduction procedures will give the best results if such pertubations are kept very small. We must therefore analyse these pertubations and think about how we can control them. The correlation method initiated in its modern form by Roger Griffin, and which we developed further with an optical mask in CORAVEL twenty-five years ago and more recently with a numerical mask in ELODIE, has demonstrated its power. In terms of these methods, the problem of high precision is to improve the correlation peak. Can this be done? Does the correlation method allow us to distinguish the overall radial velocity of the object from possible distortions of the lines? This is certainly a major problem which must be solved. The luminous efficiency of high-precision spectrographs is low. If the use of an optical fibre with scrambling for feeding the spectrograph seems inevitable to us today, it seems to me that the transmission of this system can be considerably improved by a better choice of the F-ratio of the image beam of the telescope which is to be matched with that of the spectrograph. This problem, common to all spectrographs, could be resolved with a specialised focal-plane instrument, giving a much greater than usual F-ratio, resulting in a simplification of the spectrograph optics, and hence an improvement in transmission and a serious decrease in size (which is

  5. Radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain G.; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The frequency splittings of intermediate-degree (3 to 170 deg) p-mode oscillations obtained from a 16-day subset of observations were analyzed. Results show evidence for both radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity. From 0.6 to 0.95 solar radii, the solar internal angular velocity increases systematically from 440 to 463 nHz, corresponding to a positive radial gradient of 66 nHz/solar radius for that portion of the solar interior. Analysis also indicates that the latitudinal differential rotation gradient which is seen at the solar surface persists throughout the convection zone, although there are indications that the differential rotation might disappear entirely below the base of the convection zone. The analysis was extended to include comparisons with additional observational studies and between earlier results and the results of additional inversions of several of the observational datasets. All the comparisons reinforce conclusions regarding the existence of radial and latitudinal gradients in the internal angular velocity.

  6. Radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Edward J., Jr.; Cacciani, Alessandro; Korzennik, Sylvain G.; Tomczyk, Steven; Ulrich, Roger K.; Woodard, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The frequency splittings of intermediate-degree (3 to 170 deg) p-mode oscillations obtained from a 16-day subset of observations were analyzed. Results show evidence for both radial and latitudinal gradients in the solar internal angular velocity. From 0.6 to 0.95 solar radii, the solar internal angular velocity increases systematically from 440 to 463 nHz, corresponding to a positive radial gradient of 66 nHz/solar radius for that portion of the solar interior. Analysis also indicates that the latitudinal differential rotation gradient which is seen at the solar surface persists throughout the convection zone, although there are indications that the differential rotation might disappear entirely below the base of the convection zone. The analysis was extended to include comparisons with additional observational studies and between earlier results and the results of additional inversions of several of the observational datasets. All the comparisons reinforce conclusions regarding the existence of radial and latitudinal gradients in the internal angular velocity.

  7. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  8. RADIAL VELOCITY VARIABILITY OF FIELD BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, L.; Mace, G. N.; Rice, E. L.; McLean, I. S.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Burgasser, A. J.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2015-07-20

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity (RV) precision of ∼2 km s{sup −1}, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1σ upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included seven known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant RV variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant fraction of the orbital period. Specialized techniques are required to reach the high precisions sensitive to motion in orbits of very low-mass systems. For eight objects, including six T dwarfs, we present the first published high-resolution spectra, many with high signal to noise, that will provide valuable comparison data for models of brown dwarf atmospheres.

  9. TRUE MASSES OF RADIAL-VELOCITY EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2015-06-01

    We study the task of estimating the true masses of known radial-velocity (RV) exoplanets by means of direct astrometry on coronagraphic images to measure the apparent separation between exoplanet and host star. Initially, we assume perfect knowledge of the RV orbital parameters and that all errors are due to photon statistics. We construct design reference missions for four missions currently under study at NASA: EXO-S and WFIRST-S, with external star shades for starlight suppression, EXO-C and WFIRST-C, with internal coronagraphs. These DRMs reveal extreme scheduling constraints due to the combination of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, image blurring due to orbital motion, and the “nodal effect,” which is the independence of apparent separation and inclination when the planet crosses the plane of the sky through the host star. Next, we address the issue of nonzero uncertainties in RV orbital parameters by investigating their impact on the observations of 21 single-planet systems. Except for two—GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b, which are observable only by the star-shade missions—we find that current uncertainties in orbital parameters generally prevent accurate, unbiased estimation of true planetary mass. For the coronagraphs, WFIRST-C and EXO-C, the most likely number of good estimators of true mass is currently zero. For the star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, the most likely numbers of good estimators are three and four, respectively, including GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b. We expect that uncertain orbital elements currently undermine all potential programs of direct imaging and spectroscopy of RV exoplanets.

  10. Radial Velocity Monitoring of Kepler Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Isaacson, Howard; Hambleton, Kelly; Thompson, Susan E.; Prša, Andrej; Kurtz, Donald W.; Howard, Andrew W.; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity-period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  11. True Masses of Radial-Velocity Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    2015-06-01

    We study the task of estimating the true masses of known radial-velocity (RV) exoplanets by means of direct astrometry on coronagraphic images to measure the apparent separation between exoplanet and host star. Initially, we assume perfect knowledge of the RV orbital parameters and that all errors are due to photon statistics. We construct design reference missions for four missions currently under study at NASA: EXO-S and WFIRST-S, with external star shades for starlight suppression, EXO-C and WFIRST-C, with internal coronagraphs. These DRMs reveal extreme scheduling constraints due to the combination of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, image blurring due to orbital motion, and the “nodal effect,” which is the independence of apparent separation and inclination when the planet crosses the plane of the sky through the host star. Next, we address the issue of nonzero uncertainties in RV orbital parameters by investigating their impact on the observations of 21 single-planet systems. Except for two—GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b, which are observable only by the star-shade missions—we find that current uncertainties in orbital parameters generally prevent accurate, unbiased estimation of true planetary mass. For the coronagraphs, WFIRST-C and EXO-C, the most likely number of good estimators of true mass is currently zero. For the star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, the most likely numbers of good estimators are three and four, respectively, including GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b. We expect that uncertain orbital elements currently undermine all potential programs of direct imaging and spectroscopy of RV exoplanets.

  12. Radial velocity fitting challenge. I. Simulating the data set including realistic stellar radial-velocity signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, X.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Stellar signals are the main limitation for precise radial-velocity (RV) measurements. These signals arise from the photosphere of the stars. The m s-1 perturbation created by these signals prevents the detection and mass characterization of small-mass planetary candidates such as Earth-twins. Several methods have been proposed to mitigate stellar signals in RV measurements. However, without precisely knowing the stellar and planetary signals in real observations, it is extremely difficult to test the efficiency of these methods. Aims: The goal of the RV fitting challenge is to generate simulated RV data including stellar and planetary signals and to perform a blind test within the community to test the efficiency of the different methods proposed to recover planetary signals despite stellar signals. Methods: In this first paper, we describe the simulation used to model the measurements of the RV fitting challenge. Each simulated planetary system includes the signals from instrumental noise, stellar oscillations, granulation, supergranulation, stellar activity, and observed and simulated planetary systems. In addition to RV variations, this simulation also models the effects of instrumental noise and stellar signals on activity observables obtained by HARPS-type high-resolution spectrographs, that is, the calcium activity index log (R'HK) and the bisector span and full width at half maximum of the cross-correlation function. Results: We publish the 15 systems used for the RV fitting challenge including the details about the planetary systems that were injected into each of them. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Parana Observatory, ESO (Chile), with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6-m telescope.The simulated data sets are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/593/A5 and at the wiki of the RV fitting challenge http://https://rv-challenge.wikispaces.com.

  13. The Carina Project. IV. Radial Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, M.; Nonino, M.; Bono, G.; Ferraro, I.; François, P.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Thévenin, F.; Stetson, P. B.; Walker, A. R.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Corsi, C. E.; Dall’Ora, M.; Gilmozzi, R.; James, C. R.; Merle, T.; Pulone, L.; Romaniello, M.

    2011-04-01

    We present new and accurate radial velocity (RV) measurements of luminous stars of all ages (old horizontal branch, intermediate-age red clump, and young blue plume, as well as red giants of a range of ages: 20.6 ≤ V ≤ 22) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on low-resolution spectra collected with the FORS2 multiobject slit spectrograph at the VLT. This data set was complemented by RV measurements based on medium- and high-resolution archive spectra of brighter (V ≲ 20.6) Carina targets collected with the GIRAFFE multiobject fiber spectrograph at the VLT. The combined sample includes more than 21,340 individual spectra of ≈2000 stars covering the entire body of the galaxy. The mean ( = 220.4 ± 0.1 km s-1) and the dispersion (σ = 11.7 ± 0.1 km s-1) of the RV distribution of candidate Carina stars (∼1210 objects, 180 ≤ RV ≤ 260 km s-1, 4σ) agree quite well with similar measurements available in the literature. To further improve the statistics, the accurate RV measurements recently provided by Walker et al. were also added to the current data set. We ended up with a sample of ∼1370 RV measurements of candidate Carina stars that is ≈75% larger than any previous Carina RV sample. We found that the hypothesis that the Carina RV distribution is Gaussian can be discarded at 99% confidence level. The mean RV across the body of the galaxy varies from ∼220 km s-1 at a distance of 7‧ (∼200 pc) from the center to ∼223 km s-1 at 13‧ (∼400 pc, 6σ level) and flattens out to a constant value of ∼221 km s-1 at larger distances (600 pc, 4σ level). Moreover, and even more importantly, we found that in the Carina regions where the mean RV is smaller, the dispersion is also smaller, and the RV distribution is more centrally peaked (i.e., the kurtosis attains larger values). The difference in mean RV is more than 4 km s-1 (9σ level) when moving from east to west and more than 3 km s-1 (∼7σ level) when moving from north to south

  14. Radial velocity signatures of Zeeman broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Shulyak, D.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Jeffers, S. V.; Morin, J.; Zechmeister, M.; Kochukhov, O.; Piskunov, N.

    2013-04-01

    Stellar activity signatures such as spots and plages can significantly limit the search for extrasolar planets. Current models of activity-induced radial velocity (RV) signals focus on the impact of temperature contrast in spots according to which they predict the signal to diminish toward longer wavelengths. The Zeeman effect on RV measurements counteracts this: the relative importance of the Zeeman effect on RV measurements should grow with wavelength because the Zeeman displacement itself grows with λ, and because a magnetic and cool spot contributes more to the total flux at longer wavelengths. In this paper, we model the impact of active regions on stellar RV measurements including both temperature contrast in spots and line broadening by the Zeeman effect. We calculate stellar line profiles using polarized radiative transfer models including atomic and molecular Zeeman splitting over large wavelength regions from 0.5 to 2.3 μm. Our results show that the amplitude of the RV signal caused by the Zeeman effect alone can be comparable to that caused by temperature contrast; a spot magnetic field of ~1000 G can produce a similar RV amplitude as a spot temperature contrast of ~1000 K. Furthermore, the RV signal caused by cool and magnetic spots increases with wavelength, in contrast to the expectation from temperature contrast alone. We also calculate the RV signal caused by variations in average magnetic field strength from one observation to the next, for example due to a magnetic cycle, but find it unlikely that this can significantly influence the search for extrasolar planets. As an example, we derive the RV amplitude of the active M dwarf AD Leo as a function of wavelength using data from the HARPS spectrograph. Across this limited wavelength range, the RV signal does not diminish at longer wavelengths but shows evidence for the opposite behavior, consistent with a strong influence of the Zeeman effect. We conclude that the RV signal of active stars does

  15. Measuring Stellar Radial Velocities with a LISA Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, David

    2016-05-01

    Conventional wisdom says it should not be possible to measure stellar radial velocities with a useful degree of precision with a spectrograph having spectral resolution of 1000. This paper will demonstrate that with a combination of careful observational technique and the use of cross correlation it is possible to far exceed initial expectations. This is confirmed by reproducing the known radial velocity of a catalogued SB1 star with a precision of 5.2 km/s. To demonstrate the scientific potential of such a spectrograph, we use radial velocity measurements to confirm the binary nature and measure the orbital period and parameters of a suspected post common envelope binary.

  16. The Radial Velocity Precision of Fiber-fed Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gordon A. H.; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Bohlender, David A.; Yang, Stephenson

    2003-06-01

    We have measured the radial velocities of five 51 Peg-type stars and one star known to be constant in velocity. Our measurements, on 20 Å centered at 3947 Å, were conventional, using Th/Ar comparison spectra taken every 20 or 40 minutes between the stellar exposures. Existing IRAF routines were used for the reduction. We find σRV<=20 m s-1, provided that four measurements (out of 72) with residuals greater than 5 σRV are neglected. The observations were made on five nights with the CFHT Gecko spectrograph (R~110,000), fiber-fed by the CAFE system; σRV<=10 m s-1 seems possible with additional care. This study was incidental to the main observing program and is certainly not exhaustive, but the small value of σRV implies that the fiber feed/image slicer system on Gecko+CAFE essentially eliminates the long-standing problem of guiding errors in radial velocity measurements. We are not promoting this conventional approach for serious Doppler planet searches (especially with Gecko, which has such a small multiplex gain), but the precision is valuable for observations made in spectral regions remote from telluric lines or captive-gas fiducials. Instrument builders might consider the advantages of the CAFE optics, which incorporate agitation and invert the object and pupil to illuminate the slit and grating, respectively, in future spectrograph designs.

  17. Precise Radial Velocity First Light Observations With iSHELL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cale, Bryson Lee; Plavchan, Peter; Nishimoto, America; Tanner, Angelle M.; Gagne, Jonathan; Gao, Peter; Furlan, Elise; White, Russel J.; Walp, Bernie; von Braun, Kaspar; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Johnson, John A.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Henry, Todd J.; Catanzarite, Joseph; Kane, Stephen R.; Beichman, Charles; Ciardi, David R.; Wallace, J. Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam

    2017-01-01

    We present our first light observations with the new iSHELL spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope facility. iShell replaces the 25 year old CSHELL with improvements in spectral grasp (~40x), resolution (70,000 versus 46,000), throughput, optics, and detector characteristics. With CSHELL, we obtained a radial velocity precision of 3 m/s on a bright red giant and we identified several radial velocity variable M dwarfs for future follow up. Our goal with iSHELL is to characterize the precise radial velocity performance of the methane isotopologue absorption gas cell in the calibration unit. We observe bright nearby radial velocity standards to better understand the instrument and data reduction techniques. We have updated our CSHELL analysis code to handle multiple orders and the increased number of pixels. It is feasible that we will obtain a radial velocity precision of < 3 m/s, sufficient to detect terrestrial planets in the habitable zone of nearby M dwarfs. We will also follow up radial velocity variables we have discovered, along with transiting exoplanets orbiting M dwarfs identified with the K2 and TESS missions.

  18. Illumination Profile & Dispersion Variation Effects on Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieves, Nolan; Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil B.; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SDSS-III

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS) measures radial velocities using a fiber-fed dispersed fixed-delay interferometer (DFDI) with a moderate dispersion spectrograph. This setup allows a unique insight into the 2D illumination profile from the fiber on to the dispersion grating. Illumination profile investigations show large changes in the profile over time and fiber location. These profile changes are correlated with dispersion changes and long-term radial velocity offsets, a major problem within the MARVELS radial velocity data. Characterizing illumination profiles creates a method to both detect and correct radial velocity offsets, allowing for better planet detection. Here we report our early results from this study including improvement of radial velocity data points from detected giant planet candidates. We also report an illumination profile experiment conducted at the Kitt Peak National Observatory using the EXPERT instrument, which has a DFDI mode similar to MARVELS. Using profile controlling octagonal-shaped fibers, long term offsets over a 3 month time period were reduced from ~50 m/s to within the photon limit of ~4 m/s.

  19. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. VIII. Testing for the presence of planets with CRIRES infrared radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, Trifon; Reffert, Sabine; Zechmeister, Mathias; Reiners, Ansgar; Quirrenbach, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    Context. We have been monitoring 373 very bright (V ≤ 6 mag) G and K giants with high precision optical Doppler spectroscopy for more than a decade at Lick Observatory. Our goal was to discover planetary companions around those stars and to better understand planet formation and evolution around intermediate-mass stars. However, in principle, long-term, g-mode nonradial stellar pulsations or rotating stellar features, such as spots, could effectively mimic a planetary signal in the radial velocity data. Aims: Our goal is to compare optical and infrared radial velocities for those stars with periodic radial velocity patterns and to test for consistency of their fitted radial velocity semiamplitudes. Thereby, we distinguish processes intrinsic to the star from orbiting companions as reason for the radial velocity periodicity observed in the optical. Methods: Stellar spectra with high spectral resolution have been taken in the H-band with the CRIRES near-infrared spectrograph at ESO's VLT for 20 stars of our Lick survey. Radial velocities are derived using many deep and stable telluric CO2 lines for precise wavelength calibration. Results: We find that the optical and near-infrared radial velocities of the giant stars in our sample are consistent. We present detailed results for eight stars in our sample previously reported to have planets or brown dwarf companions. All eight stars passed the infrared test. Conclusions: We conclude that the planet hypothesis provides the best explanation for the periodic radial velocity patterns observed for these giant stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under program IDs 088.D-0132, 089.D-0186, 090.D-0155 and 091.D-0365.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. Radial Velocity Kinematics of the Cataclysmic Binary Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Christopher; Thorstensen, J.

    2007-12-01

    We will present an investigation of the systemic radial velocity distribution of cataclysmic variable stars (CVs). We have critically mined the astrophysical literature published until 2007 September, resulting in a dataset of 308 systemic radial velocities found using emission and/or absorption lines. From these data, we find the solar motion and velocity ellipsoid parameters for three groups: (1) all CVs, (2) nonmagnetic CVs (dwarf novae and UX UMa novalike variables), and (3) 66 magnetic CVs (AM Her/Polar stars and DQ Her/Intermediate Polar stars). We find the kinematics of CVs to be consistent with a moderately old disk population.

  1. Radial velocities of remote globular clusters - stalking the missing mass

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.C.

    1985-10-01

    Measurements good to 25 km/s are presented of radial velocities of five remote galactic globular clusters, based on aperture-plate spectra of individual stars at 3.0 A resolution. Velocities with respect to the galactic rest-frame of two individual systems, Eridanus and Palomar 14, are large enough to suggest a total mass for the Galaxy of 1 trillion solar masses. A similar mass is inferred from the average of the galactocentric distance times velocity squared. 36 references.

  2. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Robert S.

    1988-08-01

    Researchers are measuring small changes in the line-of-sight velocities of stars to detect the oscillating reflex acceleration induced by large planets. The intention is to observe enough stars for a long enough time to be able to make a statement of the probability of planets in a certain range of masses even if no planetary perturbations are detected. To make these measurements of Doppler shift with the required sensitivity, a new instrument was specifically designed, built and tested for this campaign of ground-based planet detection. The instrument is an optical spectrometer for which wavelengths are first calibrated by transmission through a tunable Fabry-Perot etalon interferometer. The intrinsic stability of the etalon and an image-scrambling fiber optic light feed provide great sensitivity to line-of-sight accelerations and immunity to systematic errors.

  3. Errors in radial velocity variance from Doppler wind lidar

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Doubrawa, P.; ...

    2016-08-29

    A high-fidelity lidar turbulence measurement technique relies on accurate estimates of radial velocity variance that are subject to both systematic and random errors determined by the autocorrelation function of radial velocity, the sampling rate, and the sampling duration. Our paper quantifies the effect of the volumetric averaging in lidar radial velocity measurements on the autocorrelation function and the dependence of the systematic and random errors on the sampling duration, using both statistically simulated and observed data. For current-generation scanning lidars and sampling durations of about 30 min and longer, during which the stationarity assumption is valid for atmospheric flows, themore » systematic error is negligible but the random error exceeds about 10%.« less

  4. Errors in radial velocity variance from Doppler wind lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Doubrawa, P.; Pryor, S. C.

    2016-08-29

    A high-fidelity lidar turbulence measurement technique relies on accurate estimates of radial velocity variance that are subject to both systematic and random errors determined by the autocorrelation function of radial velocity, the sampling rate, and the sampling duration. Our paper quantifies the effect of the volumetric averaging in lidar radial velocity measurements on the autocorrelation function and the dependence of the systematic and random errors on the sampling duration, using both statistically simulated and observed data. For current-generation scanning lidars and sampling durations of about 30 min and longer, during which the stationarity assumption is valid for atmospheric flows, the systematic error is negligible but the random error exceeds about 10%.

  5. The fitting of radial velocity curves using Adaptive Simulated Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias-Marzoa, R.; López-Morales, M.; Arévalo Morales, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    We present a new code for fitting radial velocities of stellar binaries and exoplanets using an Adaptive Simulated Annealing (ASA) global minimisation method. ASA belongs to the family of Monte Carlo methods and its main advantages are that it only needs evaluations of the objective function, it does not rely on derivatives, and the parameters space can be periodically redefined and rescaled for individual parameters. ASA is easily scalable since the physics is concentrated in only one function and can be modified to account for more complex models. Our ASA code minimises the χ^2 function in the multidimensional parameters space to obtain the full set of parameters (P, T_p, e, ω, γ, K_1, K_2) of the keplerian radial velocity curves which best represent the observations. As a comparison we checked our results with the published solutions for several binary stars and exoplanets with available radial velocities data. We achieve good agreement within the limits imposed by the uncertainties.

  6. The Pulsational Nature of R-Coronae - Light and Radial Velocity Variations during 1990 and 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernie, J. D.; Lawson, W. A.

    1993-12-01

    We report photometry and radial velocities of the R Coronae Borealis (RCB) star R CrB, obtained during 1991. We compare these observations with published photometry obtained during 1990 and velocities obtained during 1990 and 1991, and analyse these data using Fourier techniques. In line with the conclusions of earlier analyses, the pulsational nature of R CrB is difficult to quantify, particularly on timescales of longer than a yea The 1990 data are possibly consistent with the presence of a 43-d radial pulsation mode. During 1991 there was some evidence for a periodicity near this value in the radial velocities, but not in the photometric data. Additional data are desirable to investigate the possible presence of one or more periodicities in the light and radial velocity curves.

  7. The LCES HIRES/Keck Precision Radial Velocity Exoplanet Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, R. Paul; Vogt, Steven S.; Laughlin, Gregory; Burt, Jennifer A.; Rivera, Eugenio J.; Tuomi, Mikko; Teske, Johanna; Arriagada, Pamela; Diaz, Matias; Holden, Brad; Keiser, Sandy

    2017-05-01

    We describe a 20 year survey carried out by the Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet Survey Team (LCES), using precision radial velocities from HIRES on the Keck I telescope to find and characterize extrasolar planetary systems orbiting nearby F, G, K, and M dwarf stars. We provide here 60,949 precision radial velocities for 1624 stars contained in that survey. We tabulate a list of 357 significant periodic signals that are of constant period and phase, and not coincident in period and/or phase with stellar activity indices. These signals are thus strongly suggestive of barycentric reflex motion of the star induced by one or more candidate exoplanets in Keplerian motion about the host star. Of these signals, 225 have already been published as planet claims, 60 are classified as significant unpublished planet candidates that await photometric follow-up to rule out activity-related causes, and 54 are also unpublished, but are classified as “significant” signals that require confirmation by additional data before rising to classification as planet candidates. Of particular interest is our detection of a candidate planet with M\\sin (i)=3.8 {M}\\oplus , and P = 9.9 days orbiting Lalande 21185, the fourth-closest main-sequence star to the Sun. For each of our exoplanetary candidate signals, we provide the period and semi-amplitude of the Keplerian orbital fit, and a likelihood ratio estimate of its statistical significance. We also tabulate 18 Keplerian-like signals that we classify as likely arising from stellar activity.

  8. ESPRESSO: the radial velocity machine for the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mégevand, Denis; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Di Marcantonio, Paolo; Cabral, Alexandre; Riva, Marco; Abreu, Manuel; Pepe, Francesco; Cristiani, Stefano; Rebolo Lopez, Rafael; Santos, Nuno C.; Dekker, Hans; Aliverti, Matteo; Allende, Carlos; Amate, Manuel; Avila, Gerardo; Baldini, Veronica; Bandy, Timothy; Bristow, Paul; Broeg, Christopher; Cirami, Roberto; Coelho, João.; Conconi, Paolo; Coretti, Igor; Cupani, Guido; D'Odorico, Valentina; De Caprio, Vincenzo; Delabre, Bernard; Dorn, Reinhold; Figueira, Pedro; Fragoso, Ana; Galeotta, Samuele; Genolet, Ludovic; Gomes, Ricardo; González Hernández, Jonay; Hughes, Ian; Iwert, Olaf; Kerber, Florian; Landoni, Marco; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Lovis, Christophe; Maire, Charles; Mannetta, Marco; Martins, Carlos C. J. A. P.; Molaro, Paolo; Monteiro, Manuel A. S.; Moschetti, Manuele; Oliveira, Antonio; Zapatero Osorio, Maria Rosa; Poretti, Ennio; Rasilla, José L.; Santana Tschudi, Samuel; Santos, Pedro; Sosnowska, Danuta; Sousa, Sérgio; Tenegi, Fabio; Toso, Giorgio; Vanzella, Eros; Viel, Matteo

    2014-07-01

    ESPRESSO is the next generation ground based European exoplanets hunter. It will combine the efficiency of modern echelle spectrograph with extreme radial-velocity and spectroscopic precision. It will be installed at Paranal's VLT in order to achieve two magnitudes gain with respect to its predecessor HARPS, and the instrumental radial-velocity precision will be improved to reach 10 cm/s level. We have constituted a Consortium of astronomical research institutes to fund, design and build ESPRESSO on behalf of and in collaboration with ESO, the European Southern Observatory. The spectrograph will be installed at the Combined Coudé Laboratory (CCL) of the VLT, it will be linked to the four 8.2 meters Unit Telescopes through four optical "Coudé trains" and will be operated either with a single telescope or with up to four UTs, enabling an additional 1.5 magnitude gain. Thanks to its characteristics and ability of combining incoherently the light of 4 large telescopes, ESPRESSO will offer new possibilities in many fields of astronomy. Our main scientific objectives are, however, the search and characterization of rocky exoplanets in the habitable zone of quiet, near-by G to M-dwarfs, and the analysis of the variability of fundamental physical constants. The project is, for most of its workpackages, in the procurement or development phases, and the CCL infrastructure is presently under adaptation work. In this paper, we present the scientific objectives, the capabilities of ESPRESSO, the technical solutions for the system and its subsystems. The project aspects of this facility are also described, from the consortium and partnership structure to the planning phases and milestones.

  9. New systemic radial velocities of suspected RR Lyrae binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, E.; Barnes, T. G.; Kolenberg, K.

    2016-05-01

    Among the tens of thousands of known RR Lyrae stars there are only a handful that show indications of possible binarity. The question why this is the case is still unsolved, and has recently sparked several studies dedicated to the search for additional RR Lyraes in binary systems. Such systems are particularly valuable because they might allow to constrain the stellar mass. Most of the recent studies, however, are based on photometry by finding a light time effect in the timings of maximum light. This approach is a very promising and successful one, but it has a major drawback: by itself, it cannot serve as a definite proof of binarity, because other phenomena such as the Blazhko effect or intrinsic period changes could lead to similar results. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements, on the other hand, can serve as definite proof of binarity. We have therefore started a project to study spectroscopically RR Lyrae stars that are suspected to be binaries. We have obtained radial velocity (RV) curves with the 2.1m telescope at McDonald observatory. From these we derive systemic RVs which we will compare to previous measurements in order to find changes induced by orbital motions. We also construct templates of the RV curves that can facilitate future studies. We also observed the most promising RR Lyrae binary candidate, TU UMa, as no recent spectroscopic measurements were available. We present a densely covered pulsational RV curve, which will be used to test the predictions of the orbit models that are based on the O - C variations.

  10. Radial velocities in the globular cluster ω Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijns, R. A.; Seitzer, P.; Arnold, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Ingerson, T.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; van de Ven, G.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    2006-01-01

    We have used the ARGUS multi-object spectrometer at the CTIO 4 m Blanco telescope to obtain 2756 radial velocity measurements for 1966 individual stars in the globular cluster ω Centauri brighter than blue photographic magnitude of about 16.5. Of these, 1589 stars are cluster members. A comparison with two independent radial velocity studies, carried out by Suntzeff & Kraft and by Mayor et al., demonstrates that the median error of our measurements is below 2 km s-1 for the stars brighter than B-magnitude 15, which constitute the bulk of the sample. The observed velocity dispersion decreases from about 15 km s-1 in the inner few arcmin to about 6 km s-1 at a radius of 25'. The cluster shows significant rotation, with a maximum amplitude of about 6 km s-1 in the radial zone between 6' and 10'. In a companion paper by van de Ven et al., we correct these radial velocities for the perspective rotation caused by the space motion of the cluster, and combine them with the internal proper motions of nearly 8000 cluster members measured by van Leeuwen et al., to construct a detailed dynamical model of ω Centauri and to measure its distance.

  11. Radial velocity information in solar-type spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merline, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    A criterion is developed for determining the amount of radial velocity information theoretically available at the earth's surface from a star as a function of wavelength and spectral resolution. A description of the study is provided. The wavelength dependence is examined as well as the dependence on resolution, frequency information, and the problem of time-dependent astrophysical phenomena.

  12. High precision radial velocities: the case for NIR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Gratton, R.

    In the context of the preparation for the high resolution spectrograph HIRES for E-ELT, we are studying the possibility to derive high-precision radial velocities (RV) on a prototype:GIANO, the near-infrared (NIR) echelle spectrograph now available at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Radial velocities measured from near-infrared spectra are a potential tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool stars. High resolution infrared spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. In particular, no other IR instruments have GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range. We have developed an ensemble of IDL procedures to measure high precision radial velocities on GIANO spectra. Taking into account the achieved precisions with GIANO, we constrain the sample of targets for which GIANO is better than HARPS-N, but with the advent of GIARPS (GIANO+HARPS-N), GIANO will improve its performances and include a much larger sample of stars. The NIR range is the future of RV measurements, especially because the jitter due to the star surface activities is reduced in the NIR. As a consequence, HIRES working in NIR range might be very useful, and for a wide range of cases, it will be more efficient than HIRES working in the visible range, for detection and characterization of planets using radial velocity technique.

  13. Results on fibre scrambling for high accuracy radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Gerardo; Singh, Paul; Chazelas, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    We present in this paper experimental data on fibres and scramblers to increase the photometrical stability of the spectrograph PSF. We have used round, square, octagonal fibres and beam homogenizers. This study is aimed to enhance the accuracy measurements of the radial velocities for ESO ESPRESSO (VLT) and CODEX (E-ELT) instruments.

  14. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC HALO STARS IN VIRGO

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Thomas G.; Mateo, Mario; Martinez-Delgado, David E-mail: mmateo@umich.ed

    2010-11-15

    We present multi-slit radial velocity measurements for 111 stars in the direction of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS). The stars were photometrically selected to be probable main-sequence stars in the Galactic halo. When compared with the radial velocity distribution expected for the halo of the Milky Way, as well as the distribution seen in a control field, we observe a significant excess of negative velocity stars in the field, which can likely be attributed to the presence of a stellar stream. This kinematic excess peaks at a Galactic standard of rest radial velocity of -75 km s{sup -1}. A rough distance estimate suggests that this feature extends from {approx}15 kpc out to, and possibly beyond, the {approx}30 kpc limit of the study. The mean velocity of these stars is incompatible with those of the VSS itself (V{sub gsr} {approx} 130 km s{sup -1}), which we weakly detect, but it is consistent with radial velocity measurements of nearby 2MASS M-giants and SDSS+SEGUE K/M-giants and blue horizontal branch stars that constitute the leading tidal tail of the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy. Some oblate models for the shape of the Milky Way's dark matter halo predict that the leading arm of the Sagittarius Stream should pass through this volume, and have highly negative (V{sub gsr} {approx}< -200 km s{sup -1}) radial velocities, as it descends down from the northern Galactic hemisphere toward the Galactic plane. The kinematic feature observed in this study, if it is in fact Sagittarius debris, is not consistent with these predictions, and instead, like other leading stream radial velocity measurements, is consistent with a recently published triaxial halo model, or, if axisymmetry is imposed, favors a prolate shape for the Galactic halo potential. However, a rough distance estimate to the observed kinematic feature places it somewhat closer (D {approx} 15-30 kpc) than the Sagittarius models predict (D {approx} 35-45 kpc).

  15. Radial velocities in three fields along the southern galactic equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoyelle, J.

    1987-09-01

    A list of radial velocities for 764 stars is given for three fields in the Vela-Carina region of the Galaxy. They were obtained from GPO-plates taken at La Silla and reduced following Fehrenbach's method. Slit-spectra were collected with the 152 cm-spectrographic telescope at La Silla, to derive an accurate radial velocity for a sufficient number of calibration stars: out of the 29 stars, 26 had no formerly published value. The global motions of 10 to 14 km/s can be considered as normal on the basis of galactic rotation. Some stars however show high velocities. The case of HD 81471 (Sp type A7 Iab) suggest that a detailed study of this star is to be recommended.

  16. State of the Field: Extreme Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Debra A.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Arriagada, Pamela; Baluev, Roman V.; Bean, Jacob L.; Bouchy, Francois; Buchhave, Lars A.; Carroll, Thorsten; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Crepp, Justin R.; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Diddams, Scott A.; Dumusque, Xavier; Eastman, Jason D.; Endl, Michael; Figueira, Pedro; Ford, Eric B.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Fournier, Paul; Fűrész, Gabor; Gaudi, B. Scott; Gregory, Philip C.; Grundahl, Frank; Hatzes, Artie P.; Hébrard, Guillaume; Herrero, Enrique; Hogg, David W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Jorden, Paul; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Latham, David W.; Laughlin, Greg; Loredo, Thomas J.; Lovis, Christophe; Mahadevan, Suvrath; McCracken, Tyler M.; Pepe, Francesco; Perez, Mario; Phillips, David F.; Plavchan, Peter P.; Prato, Lisa; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Reiners, Ansgar; Robertson, Paul; Santos, Nuno C.; Sawyer, David; Segransan, Damien; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Steinmetz, Tilo; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stéphane; Valenti, Jeff A.; Wang, Sharon X.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2016-06-01

    The Second Workshop on Extreme Precision Radial Velocities defined circa 2015 the state of the art Doppler precision and identified the critical path challenges for reaching 10 cm s-1 measurement precision. The presentations and discussion of key issues for instrumentation and data analysis and the workshop recommendations for achieving this bold precision are summarized here. Beginning with the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher spectrograph, technological advances for precision radial velocity (RV) measurements have focused on building extremely stable instruments. To reach still higher precision, future spectrometers will need to improve upon the state of the art, producing even higher fidelity spectra. This should be possible with improved environmental control, greater stability in the illumination of the spectrometer optics, better detectors, more precise wavelength calibration, and broader bandwidth spectra. Key data analysis challenges for the precision RV community include distinguishing center of mass (COM) Keplerian motion from photospheric velocities (time correlated noise) and the proper treatment of telluric contamination. Success here is coupled to the instrument design, but also requires the implementation of robust statistical and modeling techniques. COM velocities produce Doppler shifts that affect every line identically, while photospheric velocities produce line profile asymmetries with wavelength and temporal dependencies that are different from Keplerian signals. Exoplanets are an important subfield of astronomy and there has been an impressive rate of discovery over the past two decades. However, higher precision RV measurements are required to serve as a discovery technique for potentially habitable worlds, to confirm and characterize detections from transit missions, and to provide mass measurements for other space-based missions. The future of exoplanet science has very different trajectories depending on the precision that can

  17. Radial Velocity Detection of Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    2004-01-01

    This NASA Origins Program grant supported four closely related research programs at The University of Texas at Austin: 1) The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) Program, using the McDonald Observatory 2.7m Harlan Smith telescope and its 2dcoud6 spectrometer, 2) A high-precision radial-velocity survey of Hyades dwarfs, using the Keck telescope and its HIRES spectrograph, 3) A program at McDonald Observatory to obtain spectra of the parent stars of planetary systems at R = 210,000, and 4) the start of high precision radial velocity surveys using the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. The most important results from NASA support of these research programs are described below. A list of all papers published under support of this grant is included at the end.

  18. Radial velocity data analysis with compressed sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Nathan C.; Boué, G.; Laskar, J.; Correia, A. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel approach for analysing radial velocity data that combines two features: all the planets are searched at once and the algorithm is fast. This is achieved by utilizing compressed sensing techniques, which are modified to be compatible with the Gaussian process framework. The resulting tool can be used like a Lomb-Scargle periodogram and has the same aspect but with much fewer peaks due to aliasing. The method is applied to five systems with published radial velocity data sets: HD 69830, HD 10180, 55 Cnc, GJ 876 and a simulated very active star. The results are fully compatible with previous analysis, though obtained more straightforwardly. We further show that 55 Cnc e and f could have been respectively detected and suspected in early measurements from the Lick Observatory and Hobby-Eberly Telescope available in 2004, and that frequencies due to dynamical interactions in GJ 876 can be seen.

  19. THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE): FOURTH DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Carrillo, I.; Boeche, C.; Roeser, S.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; De Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Anguiano, B.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron, and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline that is also improved compared to that available for the RAVE DR3 and Chemical DR1 data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration Web site and the Vizier database.

  20. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Fourth Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Boeche, C.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; de Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Roeser, S.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Carrillo, I.; Anguiano, B.; Burton, D.; Campbell, R.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Russell, K. S.; Stupar, M.; Watson, F. G.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B. K.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Conrad, C.; Famaey, B.; Faure, C.; Just, A.; Kos, J.; Matijevič, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Minchev, I.; Scholz, R.; Sharma, S.; Siviero, A.; de Boer, E. Wylie; Žerjal, M.

    2013-11-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atmospheric parameters are computed using a new pipeline, based on the algorithms of MATISSE and DEGAS. The spectral degeneracies and the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometric information are now better taken into consideration, improving the parameter determination compared to the previous RAVE data releases. The individual abundances for six elements (magnesium, aluminum, silicon, titanium, iron, and nickel) are also given, based on a special-purpose pipeline that is also improved compared to that available for the RAVE DR3 and Chemical DR1 data releases. Together with photometric information and proper motions, these data can be retrieved from the RAVE collaboration Web site and the Vizier database.

  1. STARSPOT JITTER IN PHOTOMETRY, ASTROMETRY, AND RADIAL VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V. V.; Beichman, C. A.; Lebreton, J.; Malbet, F.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Shao, M.; Fischer, D. A.

    2009-12-10

    Analytical relations are derived for the amplitude of astrometric, photometric, and radial velocity (RV) perturbations caused by a single rotating spot. The relative power of the starspot jitter is estimated and compared with the available data for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and HD 166435, as well as with numerical simulations for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and the Sun. A Sun-like star inclined at i = 90 deg. at 10 pc is predicted to have an rms jitter of 0.087 muas in its astrometric position along the equator, and 0.38 m s{sup -1} in radial velocities. If the presence of spots due to stellar activity is the ultimate limiting factor for planet detection, the sensitivity of SIM Lite to Earth-like planets in habitable zones is about an order of magnitude higher than the sensitivity of prospective ultra-precise RV observations of nearby stars.

  2. Radial Velocities and Space Motions for nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upgren, A. R.; Sperauskas, J.

    2005-10-01

    The McCormick lists of stars and the Fourth Edition of the Catalog of Nearby Stars (CNS4) complement each other. Together they can be used to evaluate sources of systematic error in either of them. In addition to the 900 McCormick dwarf K-M stars brighter than about 11.5, the CNS4 includes all similar dwarfs believed to be within 25 parsecs of the Sun that appear to be missed in the former source. All of the stars from both sources are known to have precise trigonometric parallaxes, proper motions and, of course, positions. At the Moletai Observatory and elsewhere, radial velocities mostly to± 1 km/sec are almost complete for these dwarf stars. The goal is to have a sample of some 1200 dwarf stars with spatial coordinates and their first time derivatives for which the Lutz-Kelker and Malmquist corrections can be evaluated. Hopefully, age-related stellar measures will also be provided in a later phase of the program.

  3. Short-period terrestrial planets and radial velocity stellar jitter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Stellar jitter is the main limitation to ultra-precise radial velocity (RV) measurements. It currently precludes our ability to detect a planet like the Earth. Short-period terrestrial planets present first the advantage of inducing a stronger RV signal. In addition, the signal produced by these planets have a period completely different than stellar activity. This allows us, when the observational strategy is adequate, to decorrelate the planetary signal from the jitter induced by the star using filtering techniques. I will show the examples of Kepler-78b and Corot-7b, where the amplitude of the planetary signal can be detected, despite the stellar activity jitter that is 5 and 3 times larger, respectively. The cases of Alpha Cen Bb will also be reviewed, with a new reduction of the published data that increases the significance of the planetary signal.This project is funded by ETAEARTH, a transnational collaboration between European countries and the US (the Swiss Space Office, the Harvard Origin of Life Initiative, the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, the University of Geneva, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the Italian National Astrophysical Institute, the University of St. Andrews, Queens University Belfast, and the University of Edinburgh) setup to optimize the synergy between space-and ground-based data whose scientific potential for the characterization of extrasolar planets can only be fully exploited when analyzed together.

  4. New measurements of radial velocities in clusters of galaxies. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proust, D.; Mazure, A.; Sodre, L.; Capelato, H.; Lund, G.

    1988-03-01

    Heliocentric radial velocities are determined for 100 galaxies in five clusters, on the basis of 380-518-nm observations obtained using a CCD detector coupled by optical fibers to the OCTOPUS multiobject spectrograph at the Cassegrain focus of the 3.6-m telescope at ESO La Silla. The data-reduction procedures and error estimates are discussed, and the results are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized.

  5. An extensive radial velocity survey towards NGC 6253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Melo, C. H. F.; Santos, N. C.; Queloz, D.; Piotto, G.; Desidera, S.; Bedin, L. R.; Momany, Y.; Saviane, I.

    2016-04-01

    The old and metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 was observed with the Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) multi-object spectrograph during an extensive radial velocity campaign monitoring 317 stars with a median of 15 epochs per object. All the targeted stars are located along the upper main sequence of the cluster between 14.8 < V < 16.5. Fifty nine stars are confirmed cluster members both by radial velocities and proper motions and do not show evidence of variability. We detected 45 variable stars among which 25 belong to NGC 6253. We were able to derive an orbital solution for four cluster members (and for two field stars) yielding minimum masses in between ˜90 MJ and ˜460 MJ and periods between 3 and 220 d. Simulations demonstrated that this survey was sensitive to objects down to 30 MJ at 10 days orbital periods with a detection efficiency equal to 50 per cent. On the basis of these results we concluded that the observed frequency of binaries down to the hydrogen burning limit and up to 20 d orbital period is around (1.5 ± 1.3) per cent in NGC 6253. The overall observed frequency of binaries around the sample of cluster stars is (13 ± 3) per cent. The median radial velocity precision achieved by the GIRAFFE spectrograph in this magnitude range was around ˜240 m s- 1 (˜180 m s- 1 for UVES). Based on a limited follow-up analysis of seven stars in our sample with the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectrograph we determined that a precision of 35 m s- 1 can be reached in this magnitude range, offering the possibility to further extend the variability analysis into the substellar domain. Prospects are even more favourable once considering the upcoming ESPRESSO spectrograph at VLT.

  6. Proxima Centauri reloaded: Unravelling the stellar noise in radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasso, M.; Del Sordo, F.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The detection and characterisation of Earth-like planets with Doppler signals of the order of 1 m s-1 currently represent one of the greatest challenge for extrasolar-planet hunters. As results for such findings are often controversial, it is desirable to provide independent confirmations of the discoveries. Testing different models for the suppression of non-Keplerian stellar signals usually plaguing radial velocity data is essential to ensuring findings are robust and reproducible. Aims: Using an alternative treatment of the stellar noise to that discussed in the discovery paper, we re-analyse the radial velocity dataset that led to the detection of a candidate terrestrial planet orbiting the star Proxima Centauri. We aim to confirm the existence of this outstanding planet, and test the existence of a second planetary signal. Methods: Our technique jointly modelled Keplerian signals and residual correlated signals in radial velocities using Gaussian processes. We analysed only radial velocity measurements without including other ancillary data in the fitting procedure. In a second step, we have compared our outputs with results coming from photometry, to provide a consistent physical interpretation. Our analysis was performed in a Bayesian framework to quantify the robustness of our findings. Results: We show that the correlated noise can be successfully modelled as a Gaussian process regression, and contains a periodic term modulated on the stellar rotation period and characterised by an evolutionary timescale of the order of one year. Both findings appear to be robust when compared with results obtained from archival photometry, thus providing a reliable description of the noise properties. We confirm the existence of a coherent signal described by a Keplerian orbit equation that can be attributed to the planet Proxima b, and provide an independent estimate of the planetary parameters. Our Bayesian analysis dismisses the existence of a second planetary

  7. Radial Velocity Detection of Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1998-01-01

    The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) was designed to search for Jovian-mass planets in orbit around solar-type stars by making high-precision measurements of the Radial Velocity (RV) of a star, to attempt to detect the reflex orbital motion of the star around the star-planet barycenter. In our solar system, the velocity of the Sun around the Sun-Jupiter barycenter averages 12.3 m/ s. The MOPS survey started operation in September 1987, and searches 36 bright, nearby, solar-type dwarfs to 10 m/s precision. The survey was started using telluric O2 absorption lines as the velocity reference metric. Observations use the McDonald Observatory 2.7-m Harlan Smith Telescope coude spectrograph with the six-foot camera. This spectrograph configuration isolates a single order of the echelle grating on a Texas Instruments 800 x 800 CCD. The telluric line method gave us a routine radial velocity precision of about 15 m/s for stars down to about 5-th magnitude. However, the data obtained with this technique suffered from some source of long-term systematic errors, which was probably the intrinsic velocity variability of the terrestrial atmosphere, i.e. winds. In order to eliminate this systematic error and to improve our overall measurement precision, we installed a stabilized I2 gas absorption cell as the velocity metric for the MOPS in October 1990. In use at the telescope, the cell is placed directly in front of the spectrograph entrance slit, with starlight passing through the cell. The use of this sealed stabilized I2 cell removes potential problems with possible long-term drifts in the velocity metric. The survey now includes a sample of 36 nearby F, G, and K type stars of luminosity class V or IV-V.

  8. Radial velocities of nearby K and M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, A.A.

    1988-09-01

    A correlation radial-velocity meter was used during 1985-87 to make 931 measurements of the radial velocities of 206 nearby stars in Gliese's catalog. The characteristic accuracy was 0.5 km/sec. A homogeneous sample of 162 K and M dwarfs in the region delta > -10/degree/, 14/sup h/ < ..cap alpha.. < 3/sup h/ contains 41 stars with variable or probably variable velocity; 10 stars have been identified for the first time as spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of spectroscopic binaries in the classes K0-K2 is 17%, in the classes M0 and later 36%, and in the complete sample 27%. Among the systems with a period less than one year low-mass (M/sub 2/ sin i < 0.1Msub solar) satellites have not been found; for all stars the velocity spread exceeds 7 km/sec. For the systems GL 58.2 and 791.3, which have the greatest mass function, the lines of secondary components have been detected.

  9. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) on the island of Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E) observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE). These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first-order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g., horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  10. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-06-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) on the island Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E) observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE). These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of a pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g. horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Cepheid radial velocity amplitude modulations (Anderson, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. I.

    2014-06-01

    A total of 983 radial velocity measurements of the four Cepheids QZ Nor (125), V335 Pup (95), l Car (324), and RS Pup (439) are provided. The measurements are based on observations carried out between April 2011 and February 2014 that were obtained using the Coralie spectrograph, mounted to the Swiss 1.2m Euler telescope located at La Silla Observatory, Chile. For each Cepheid, a table with the barycentric Julian date of observation, radial velocity, and the measurement uncertainty are provided. In addition, a table containing the identifiers, coordinates, and pulsation periods used to phase-fold the data (see the figures in the article) is provided. (5 data files).

  12. RADIAL VELOCITY CONFIRMATION OF A BINARY DETECTED FROM PULSE TIMINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, B. N.; Dunlap, B. H.; Clemens, J. C.

    2011-08-10

    A periodic variation in the pulse timings of the pulsating hot subdwarf B (sdB) star CS 1246 was recently discovered via the observed minus calculated (O-C) diagram and suggests the presence of a binary companion with an orbital period of two weeks. Fits to this phase variation, when interpreted as orbital reflex motion, imply CS 1246 orbits a barycenter 11 lt-s away with a velocity of 16.6 km s{sup -1}. Using the Goodman spectrograph on the SOAR telescope, we decided to confirm this hypothesis by obtaining radial velocity measurements of the system over several months. Our spectra reveal a velocity variation with amplitude, period, and phase in accordance with the O-C diagram predictions. This corroboration demonstrates that the rapid pulsations of hot sdB stars can be adequate clocks for the discovery of binary companions via the pulse timing method.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity and photometry for GJ3470 (Bonfils+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfils, X.; Gillon, M.; Udry, S.; Armstrong, D.; Bouchy, F.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Fumel, A.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; McCormac, J.; Neves, V.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Pollaco, D.; Queloz, D.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-11-01

    The tables contain radial-velocity and photometry time series of GJ3470. Radial velocities were obtained with he HARPS spectrograph. Photometry was obtained with TRAPPIST, EulerCam and NITES telescopes. (5 data files).

  14. Galactic kinematics and dynamics from Radial Velocity Experiment stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, J.; Burnett, B.; Kordopatis, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Gilmore, G.; Bienayme, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Famaey, B.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W. A.; Seabroke, G.; Siebert, A.; Watson, F.; Williams, M. E. K.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.

    2014-04-01

    We analyse the kinematics of ˜400 000 stars that lie within ˜2 kpc of the Sun and have spectra measured in the Radial Velocity Experiment. We decompose the sample into hot and cold dwarfs, red-clump and non-clump giants. The kinematics of the clump giants are consistent with being identical with those of the giants as a whole. Without binning the data we fit Gaussian velocity ellipsoids to the meridional-plane components of velocity of each star class and give formulae from which the shape and orientation of the velocity ellipsoid can be determined at any location. The data are consistent with the giants and the cool dwarfs sharing the same velocity ellipsoids, which have vertical velocity dispersion rising from 21 km s-1 in the plane to ˜55 km s-1 at |z| = 2 kpc and radial velocity dispersion rising from 37 km s-1 to 82 km s-1 in the same interval. At (R, z), the longest axis of one of these velocity ellipsoids is inclined to the Galactic plane by an angle ˜0.8 arctan(z/R). We use a novel formula to obtain precise fits to the highly non-Gaussian distributions of vφ components in eight bins in the (R, z) plane. We compare the observed velocity distributions with the predictions of a published dynamical model fitted to the velocities of stars that lie within ˜150 pc of the Sun and star counts towards the Galactic pole. The predictions for the vz distributions are exceptionally successful. The model's predictions for vφ are successful except for the hot dwarfs, and its predictions for vr fail significantly only for giants that lie far from the plane. If distances to the model's stars are overestimated by 20 per cent, the predicted distributions of vr and vz components become skew, and far from the plane broader. The broadening significantly improves the fits to the data. The ability of the dynamical model to give such a good account of a large body of data to which it was not fitted inspires confidence in the fundamental correctness of the assumed, disc

  15. A Catalogue of Galaxies Having Radial Velocities: Volume 15: Part 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrick, L. W.; Gutsch, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A tabulation of galaxies which have radial velocities is presented. The parameters of each galaxy are: (1) an abbreviation for the catalog designation, (2) RA(1950), (3) Dec. (1950), (4) new galactic longitude, (5) new galactic latitude, (6) morphological type, (7) magnitude, (8) observed radial velocity in kilometers per second (9) radial velocity corrected for solar motion, and (10) estimated error in radial velocity in kilometers per second.

  16. ELODIE: A spectrograph for accurate radial velocity measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.; Queloz, D.; Mayor, M.; Adrianzyk, G.; Knispel, G.; Kohler, D.; Lacroix, D.; Meunier, J.-P.; Rimbaud, G.; Vin, A.

    1996-10-01

    The fibre-fed echelle spectrograph of Observatoire de Haute-Provence, ELODIE, is presented. This instrument has been in operation since the end of 1993 on the 1.93 m telescope. ELODIE is designed as an updated version of the cross-correlation spectrometer CORAVEL, to perform very accurate radial velocity measurements such as needed in the search, by Doppler shift, for brown-dwarfs or giant planets orbiting around nearby stars. In one single exposure a spectrum at a resolution of 42000 (λ/{DELTA}λ) ranging from 3906A to 6811A is recorded on a 1024x1024 CCD. This performance is achieved by using a tanθ=4 echelle grating and a combination of a prism and a grism as cross-disperser. An automatic on-line data treatment reduces all the ELODIE echelle spectra and computes cross-correlation functions. The instrument design and the data reduction algorithms are described in this paper. The efficiency and accuracy of the instrument and its long term instrumental stability allow us to measure radial velocities with an accuracy better than 15m/s for stars up to 9th magnitude in less than 30 minutes exposure time. Observations of 16th magnitude stars are also possible to measure velocities at about 1km/s accuracy. For classic spectroscopic studies (S/N>100) 9th magnitude stars can be observed in one hour exposure time.

  17. An Ongoing Program of Radial Velocities of Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperauskas, J.; Boyle, R. P.; Harlow, J.; Jahreiss, H.; Upgren, A. R.

    2003-12-01

    The lists of stars found by Vyssotsky at the McCormick Observatory and the Fourth Edition of the Catalog of Nearby Stars (CNS4) complement each other. Each was limited in a different way, but together they can be used to evaluate sources of systematic error in either of them. The lists of Vyssotsky comprise almost 900 stars, brighter than a limiting visual magnitude of about 11.5. and thus form a magnitude-limited sample. The CNS4 includes all stars believed to be within 25 parsecs of the Sun, and thus forms a distance-limited group. Limits in magnitude are prone to the Malmquist bias by which stars of a given range in magnitude may average spuriously brighter than stars within a given distance range appropriate for the mean distance modulus. The CNS4 stars may be subject to a slight Lutz-Kelker effect. This also requires a correction that depends mainly on the ratios of the standard errors in the distances to the stars, to the distances, themselves. This is a status report on a survey seeking completeness in the six dynamical properties (positions along the three orthogonal axes, and their first time-derivatives). Parallax, proper motion and radial velocity are the stellar properties required for this information and, as is frequently the case among sets of faint stars, the radial velocities are not always available. We seek to obtain radial velocities for a full dynamical picture for more than one thousand nearby stars of which some two-thirds have been observed. It would be most desirable to follow with age-related measures for all stars

  18. Multifractal structures in radial velocity measurements for exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Sahil Agarwal, Debra A. Fischer, John S. Wettlaufer

    2015-01-01

    The radial velocity method is a powerful way to search for exoplanetary systems and it led to many discoveries of exoplanets in the last 20 years.Nevertheless, in order observe Earth-like planets, such method needs to be refined, i.e. one needs to improve the signal-to-noise ratio.On one hand this can be achieved by building spectrographs with better performances, but on the other hand it is also central to understand the noise present in the data.Radial-velocity data are time-series which contains the effect of planets as well as of stellar disturbances. Therefore, they are the result of different physical processes which operate on different time-scales, acting in a not always periodic fashionI present here a possible approach to such problem, which consists in looking for multifractal structures in the time-series coming from radial velocity measurements, identifying the underlying long-range correlations and fractal scaling properties, and connecting them to the underlying physical processes, like stellar oscillation, granulation, rotation, and magnetic activity.This method has been previously applied to satellite data related to Arctic sea albedo, relevant for identify trends and noise in the Arctic sea ice (Agarwal, Moon and Wettlaufer, Proc. R. Soc., 2012).Here we use such analysis for exoplanetary data related to possible Earth-like planets.Moreover, we apply the same procedure to synthetic data from numerical simulation of stellar dynamos, which give insight on the mechanism responsible for the noise. In such way we can therefore raise the signal-to-noise ratio in the data using the synthetic data as predicted noise to be subtracted from the observations.

  19. Interpretation of F-corona radial velocity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, L. I.

    1987-03-01

    The observations made during the July 31, 1981 solar eclipse of the F-corona radial velocities between 3 and 7 solar radii are interpreted, assuming direct circular Keplerian motion of dust grains. Diffraction and isotropic scattering are considered. If the grains are assumed to be of silica, a best fit to observations is found for grain radii of about 0.4 micron, a border of dust-free zone from 6 to 14 solar radii, or a high concentration of grains at the same interval of heliocentric distances.

  20. Signals embedded in the radial velocity noise. Periodic variations in the τ Ceti velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuomi, M.; Jones, H. R. A.; Jenkins, J. S.; Tinney, C. G.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S. S.; Barnes, J. R.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; O'Toole, S.; Horner, J.; Bailey, J.; Carter, B. D.; Wright, D. J.; Salter, G. S.; Pinfield, D.

    2013-03-01

    Context. The abilities of radial velocity exoplanet surveys to detect the lowest-mass extra-solar planets are currently limited by a combination of instrument precision, lack of data, and "jitter". Jitter is a general term for any unknown features in the noise, and reflects a lack of detailed knowledge of stellar physics (asteroseismology, starspots, magnetic cycles, granulation, and other stellar surface phenomena), as well as the possible underestimation of instrument noise. Aims: We study an extensive set of radial velocities for the star HD 10700 (τ Ceti) to determine the properties of the jitter arising from stellar surface inhomogeneities, activity, and telescope-instrument systems, and perform a comprehensive search for planetary signals in the radial velocities. Methods: We performed Bayesian comparisons of statistical models describing the radial velocity data to quantify the number of significant signals and the magnitude and properties of the excess noise in the data. We reached our goal by adding artificial signals to the "flat" radial velocity data of HD 10700 and by seeing which one of our statistical noise models receives the greatest posterior probabilities while still being able to extract the artificial signals correctly from the data. We utilised various noise components to assess properties of the noise in the data and analyse the HARPS, AAPS, and HIRES data for HD 10700 to quantify these properties and search for previously unknown low-amplitude Keplerian signals. Results: According to our analyses, moving average components with an exponential decay with a timescale from a few hours to few days, and Gaussian white noise explains the jitter the best for all three data sets. Fitting the corresponding noise parameters results in significant improvements of the statistical models and enables the detection of very weak signals with amplitudes below 1 m s-1 level in our numerical experiments. We detect significant periodicities that have no

  1. Radial Velocity Variability of mid-F Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. D.; Hatzes, A. P.

    1994-05-01

    The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search program has been obtaining high precision (sigma ~ 10ms(-1) ) observations of a sample of 36 slowly rotating F, G, and K dwarfs since the fall of 1987. The primary purpose of this survey has been to detect sub-stellar companions to these stars. Most of the survey stars seem to have a level of intrinsic stellar radial velocity variability of about 20ms(-1) or less. However, the four stars of type F6 and earlier all seem to show significantly larger intrinsic variability of 40ms(-1) or more. These stars are pi (3) Orionis (F6V), alpha Canis Minoris A (F5IV-V), theta Ursae Majoris, and gamma Serpens. Stars of spectral type F8 and later do not seem to show this large level of radial velocity variability. One star of type F7V has recently been added to the survey, but we do not yet have sufficient data on it to determine its level of intrinsic variability. We present the observational data on these variable mid-F dwarfs, along with statistical analysis of the data in order to determine possible periodicities within the data. It is possible that these stars may represent the extreme ``tail end'' of the cool delta Scuti stars, or they may be a new class of variable stars in their own right.

  2. Improve Radial Velocity Precision with Better Data Analysis Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuesong Wang, Sharon; Wright, Jason; Zhao, Ming

    2015-12-01

    The synergy between Kepler and the ground-based radial velocity (RV) surveys have made numerous discoveries of low-mass exoplanets, opening the age of Earth analogs. However, Earth analogs such as Kepler 452-b require a much higher RV precision ( ~ 10 cm/s) than the achievable with current instruments (~ 1 m/s) and understanding of stellar photosphere. This presentation will cover some of the instrumental and data issues that are currently hindering us from achieving the sub 1 m/s precision, as well as remedies and ways forward with future RV instruments. Highlights of our work include: (1) how telluric contamination affects RV precision and how to "telluric-proof" a Doppler pipeline; (2) how errors in the deconvolved stellar reference spectrum can mimic the signal of a super-Earth on a ~1 year orbit; (3) the battle with imperfections in the iodine reference spectra and how an ultra-high resolution (R ~ 500,000) echelle spectrum can help; (4) and a new RV extraction code in Python which incorporates MCMC and Gaussian Processes. This research is based on radial velocity data taken with iodine cell calibrators using Keck/HIRES and HET/HRS.

  3. Radial velocity planet detection biases at the stellar rotational period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Plavchan, Peter; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David R.; Swift, Jonathan; Kane, Stephen R.

    2016-07-01

    Future generations of precise radial velocity (RV) surveys aim to achieve sensitivity sufficient to detect Earth mass planets orbiting in their stars' habitable zones. A major obstacle to this goal is astrophysical RV noise caused by active areas moving across the stellar limb as a star rotates. In this paper, we quantify how stellar activity impacts exoplanet detection with radial velocities as a function of orbital and stellar rotational periods. We perform data-driven simulations of how stellar rotation affects planet detectability and compile and present relations for the typical time-scale and amplitude of stellar RV noise as a function of stellar mass. We show that the characteristic time-scales of quasi-periodic RV jitter from stellar rotational modulations coincides with the orbital period of habitable-zone exoplanets around early M-dwarfs. These coincident periods underscore the importance of monitoring the targets of RV habitable-zone planet surveys through simultaneous photometric measurements for determining rotation periods and activity signals, and mitigating activity signals using spectroscopic indicators and/or RV measurements at different wavelengths.

  4. A Goldilocks principle for modelling radial velocity noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, F.; Tuomi, M.; Jones, H. R. A.; Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S.

    2016-09-01

    The Doppler measurements of stars are diluted and distorted by stellar activity noise. Different choices of noise models and statistical methods have led to much controversy in the confirmation of exoplanet candidates obtained through analysing radial velocity data. To quantify the limitation of various models and methods, we compare different noise models and signal detection criteria for various simulated and real data sets in the Bayesian framework. According to our analyses, the white noise model tend to interpret noise as signal, leading to false positives. On the other hand, the red noise models are likely to interpret signal as noise, resulting in false negatives. We find that the Bayesian information criterion combined with a Bayes factor threshold of 150 can efficiently rule out false positives and confirm true detections. We further propose a Goldilocks principle aimed at modelling radial velocity noise to avoid too many false positives and too many false negatives. We propose that the noise model with RHK-dependent jitter is used in combination with the moving average model to detect planetary signals for M dwarfs. Our work may also shed light on the noise modelling for hotter stars, and provide a valid approach for finding similar principles in other disciplines.

  5. Catalog of radial velocities for northern Cepheids measured with a correlation spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorynya, N. A.; Irsmambetova, T. R.; Rastorgouev, A. S.; Samus, N. N.

    1992-09-01

    A catalog containing 1446 individual radial velocity values for 79 field Cepheids and three Cepheids in globular clusters, and 32 averaged radial velocities of the Cepheid Alpha UMi derived from 100 individual velocity parameters is presented. A table of gamma velocities for 30 Cepheids with sufficiently good coverage of Vr curves is included. Radial velocity observations of CE Cas A and CF Cas, which are photometric members of the open cluster NGC 7790, made it possible to estimate the radial velocity of the cluster (-78.0 km/s).

  6. Precise Radial Velocity Measurements for Kepler Giants Hosting Planetary Candidates: Kepler-91 and KOI-1894

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Bun'ei; Hirano, Teruyuki; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Ryo; Takarada, Takuya; Kawauchi, Kiyoe; Masuda, Kento

    2015-03-01

    We present results of radial-velocity follow-up observations for the two Kepler evolved stars Kepler-91 (KOI-2133) and KOI-1894, which had been announced as candidates to host transiting giant planets, with the Subaru 8.2 m telescope and the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS). By global modeling of the high-precision radial-velocity data taken with Subaru/HDS and photometric data taken by the Kepler mission accounting for orbital brightness modulations (ellipsoidal variations, reflected/emitted light, etc.) of the host stars, we independently confirmed that Kepler-91 hosts a transiting planet with a mass of 0.66 {{M}Jup}(Kepler-91b), and newly detected an offset of ˜20 m s-1 between the radial velocities taken at ˜1 yr interval, suggesting the existence of an additional companion in the system. As for KOI-1894, we detected possible phased variations in the radial velocities and light curves with 2-3σ confidence level, which could be explained as a reflex motion and ellipsoidal variation of the star caused by a transiting sub-Saturn-mass (˜0.18 {{M}Jup}) planet.

  7. RUNAWAY STARS, HYPERVELOCITY STARS, AND RADIAL VELOCITY SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Bromley, Benjamin C.; Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J. E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.ed E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.ed

    2009-12-01

    Runaway stars ejected from the Galactic disk populate the halo of the Milky Way. To predict the spatial and kinematic properties of runaways, we inject stars into a Galactic potential, compute their trajectories through the Galaxy, and derive simulated catalogs for comparison with observations. Runaways have a flattened spatial distribution, with higher velocity stars at Galactic latitudes less than 30{sup 0}. Due to their shorter stellar lifetimes, massive runaway stars are more concentrated toward the disk than low mass runaways. Bound (unbound) runaways that reach the halo probably originate from distances of 6-12 kpc (10-15 kpc) from the Galactic center, close to the estimated origin of the unbound runaway star HD 271791. Because runaways are brighter and have smaller velocities than hypervelocity stars (HVSs), radial velocity surveys are unlikely to confuse runaway stars with HVSs. We estimate that at most one runaway star contaminates the current sample. We place an upper limit of 2% on the fraction of A-type main-sequence stars ejected as runaways.

  8. Comparison of CME radial velocities from a flux rope model and an ice cream cone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Moon, Y.; Na, H.

    2011-12-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) on the Sun are the largest energy release process in the solar system and act as the primary driver of geomagnetic storms and other space weather phenomena on the Earth. So it is very important to infer their directions, velocities and three-dimensional structures. In this study, we choose two different models to infer radial velocities of halo CMEs since 2008 : (1) an ice cream cone model by Xue et al (2005) using SOHO/LASCO data, (2) a flux rope model by Thernisien et al. (2009) using the STEREO/SECCHI data. In addition, we use another flux rope model in which the separation angle of flux rope is zero, which is morphologically similar to the ice cream cone model. The comparison shows that the CME radial velocities from among each model have very good correlations (R>0.9). We will extending this comparison to other partial CMEs observed by STEREO and SOHO.

  9. The Radial Velocity of OGLE-2015-BLG-0966S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Samson A.; Yee, Jennifer C.

    2017-07-01

    The distance to the planetary system OGLE-2015-BLG-0966L and the separation between the planet and its host star are ambiguous due to an ambiguity in the distance to the source star. We attempt to break this degeneracy by measuring the systemic radial velocity of the source star measured from a spectrum taken while the source was highly magnified. Our measurement of {v}{LSR}=54.2+/- 0.3 {{km s}}-1 does not definitively resolve the nature of the source, but supports the general conclusion that the source is in the bulge. This work demonstrates that even a low signal-to-noise spectrum has the potential to provide useful information for characterizing microlensing source stars.

  10. Monolithic interferometer for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Wang, Ji; Lee, Brian

    2009-08-01

    In high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies, a stable wide field Michelson interferometer is very critical in Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instruments. Adopting a new design, monolithic interferometers are homogenous and continuous in thermal expansion, and field compensation and thermal compensation are both satisfied. Interferometer design and fabrication are decrypted in details. In performance evaluations, field angle is typically 22° and thermal sensitivity is typically -1.7 x 10-6/°C, which corresponds to ~500 m/s /°C in RV scale. In interferometer stability monitoring using a wavelength stabilized laser source, phase shift data was continuously recorded for nearly seven days. Appling a frequent calibration every 30 minutes as in typical star observations, the interferometer instability contributes less than 1.4 m/s in RV error, in a conservative estimation.

  11. The symbiosis of photometry and radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.

    1994-01-01

    The FRESIP mission is optimized to detect the inner planets of a planetary system. According to the current paradigm of planet formation, these planets will probably be small Earth-sized objects. Ground-based radial-velocity programs now have the sensitivity to detect Jovian-mass planets in orbit around bright solar-type stars. We expect the more massive planets to form in the outer regions of a proto-stellar nebula. These two types of measurements will very nicely complement each other, as they have highest detection probability for very different types of planets. The combination of FRESIP photometry and ground-based spectra will provide independent confirmation of the existence of planetary systems in orbit around other stars. Such detection of both terrestrial and Jovian planets in orbit around the same star is essential to test our understanding of planet formation.

  12. Extinction, ejecta masses, and radial velocities of novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Interstellar reddening is determined for a number of recent novae based upon emission-line ratios which are generally observable using CCDs. Large values of extinction are found for most systems, possibly indicative of an intrinsic component of reddening in postoutburst novae. The unusual characteristics of the (O I) lines in novae, which are strong and optically thick, require a large population of very dense globules which are the likely sites of dust formation. These pyroclasts must be ejected from the white dwarf. The total mass of the neutral gas in the globules in some of the objects is substantially larger than the masses normally derived for the ionized ejecta of novae. The distribution of radial velocities of Galactic novae in the Tololo sample, although uncertain, shows an asymmetry in having predominantly negative values. Either high internal absorption in the expanding ejecta skews the emission lines to bluer wavelengths, or most of the novae are moving out from the center of the Galaxy.

  13. Extinction, ejecta masses, and radial velocities of novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Interstellar reddening is determined for a number of recent novae based upon emission-line ratios which are generally observable using CCDs. Large values of extinction are found for most systems, possibly indicative of an intrinsic component of reddening in postoutburst novae. The unusual characteristics of the (O I) lines in novae, which are strong and optically thick, require a large population of very dense globules which are the likely sites of dust formation. These pyroclasts must be ejected from the white dwarf. The total mass of the neutral gas in the globules in some of the objects is substantially larger than the masses normally derived for the ionized ejecta of novae. The distribution of radial velocities of Galactic novae in the Tololo sample, although uncertain, shows an asymmetry in having predominantly negative values. Either high internal absorption in the expanding ejecta skews the emission lines to bluer wavelengths, or most of the novae are moving out from the center of the Galaxy.

  14. Eclipsing binary UU Cas: Radial-velocity curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorda, S. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports the results of spectroscopic observations of UUCas obtained with the highresolution ( R = 15 000) fiber-fed echelle spectrometer of the 1.2-m telescope of Kourovka Astronomical Observatory of Ural Federal University. The radial velocities of the secondary, more massive and fainter component are measured for the first time. The component mass ratio is found to be q = M 1/ M 2 = 0.54. The component masses, M 1 = 9.5 M ⊙ and M 2 = 17.7 M ⊙, and the radius of the or bit, A = 52.7 R ⊙, are computed for the published orbital inclination of i 69°. Evidence is presented for a disk surrounding the more massive component and a common expanding envelope.

  15. Lyman-Alpha Observations of High Radial Velocity Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1990-12-01

    H I LYMAN -ALPHA (LY-A) IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT LINES EMITTED BY PLASMA IN THE TEMPERATURE RANGE OF 7000 TO 10 TO THE FIFTH POWER K IN LATE-TYPE STARS. IT IS A MAJOR COMPONENT OF THE TOTAL RADIATIVE LOSS RATE, AND IT PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN DETERMINING THE ATMOSPHERIC STRUCTURE AND IN FLUORESCING OTHER UV LINES. YET IT IS ALSO THE LEAST STUDIED MAJOR LINE IN THE FAR UV, BECAUSE MOST OF THE LINE FLUX IS ABSORBED BY THE ISM ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT AND BECAUSE IT IS STRONGLY COMTAMINATED BY THE GEOCORONAL BACKGROUND. A KNOWLEDGE OF THE Ly-A PROFILE IS ALSO IMPORTANT FOR STUDIES OF DEUTERIUM IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM. BY OBSERVING HIGH RADIAL VELOCITY STARS WE WILL OBTAIN FOR THE FIRST TIME HIGH RESOLUTION SPECTRA OF THE CORE OF A STELLAR H I LYMAN-A EMISSION LINE PROFILE.

  16. The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio of the Sculptor dwarf galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armandroff, T. E.; Da Costa, G. S.

    1986-01-01

    The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio for 16 K giants in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy are calculated. Spectra at the Ca II triplet are analyzed using cross-correlation techniques in order to obtain the mean velocity of + 107.4 + or - 2.0 km/s. The dimensional velocity dispersion estimated as 6.3 (+1.1, -1.3) km/s is combined with the calculated core radius and observed central surface brightness to produce a mass-to-light ratio of 6.0 in solar units. It is noted that the data indicate that the Sculptor contains a large amount of mass not found in globular clusters, and the mass is either in the form of remnant stars or low-mass dwarfs.

  17. The radial velocities and physical parameters of ER Vul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duemmler, R.; Doucet, C.; Formanek, F.; Ilyin, I.; Tuominen, I.

    2003-05-01

    ER Vul is an eclipsing binary consisting of two solar type stars in a very close orbit with a period of 0fd7 . Accordingly, the two stars rotate very fast, leading to a blending of many spectral features at all phases. Therefore, measuring the radial velocity curve without systematic errors is not trivial. Here, we use a two-dimensional cross-correlation method applied to 137 high quality spectra, collected over 3 years, in order to obtain the radial velocity curve and determine the orbital and some physical parameters of the system from it. Primarily, we improve the binary period to 0fd69809458 +/-0fd00000014 , and find that the two amplitudes are slightly smaller than those measured by others, while the mass ratio is still similar. While at least the primary almost fills its Roche lobe, the system is still detached, i.e. not yet a fully fledged W UMa-system. The behaviour of the Ca Ii IRT line at 8662 Å confirms that the secondary is the more active component, and that the chromospheric emission is not symmetrically distributed over the surfaces of either star. Based on observations made with the SOFIN échelle spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto Astrofisica de Canarias; and the coudé spectrograph at the 2 m-RCC-telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory at Rozhen, Bulgaria. Full Table \\ref{T-RV} is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/402/745

  18. The Galactic Bulge Radial Velocity/Abundance Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, R. M.

    2012-08-01

    The Bulge Radial Velocity Assay (BRAVA) measured radial velocities for ˜ 9500 late-type giants in the Galactic bulge, predominantly from -10° < l < +10° and -2° < b < -10°. The project has discovered that the bulge exhibits cylindrical rotation characteristic of bars, and two studies of dynamics (Shen et al. 2010; Wang et al. 2012 MNRAS sub.) find that bar models- either N-body formed from an instability in a preexisting disk, or a self-consistent model- can account for the observed kinematics. Studies of the Plaut field at (l,b) = 0°, -8° show that alpha enhancement is found in bulge giants even 1 kpc from the nucleus. New infrared studies extending to within 0.25° = 35 pc of the Galactic Center find no iron or alpha gradient from Baade's Window (l,b) = 0.9°, -3.9° to our innermost field, in contrast to the marked gradient observed in the outer bulge. We consider the case of the remarkable globular cluster Terzan 5, which has a strongly bimodal iron and rm [α/Fe] within its members, and we consider evidence pro and con that the bulge was assembled from dissolved clusters. The Subaru telescope has the potential to contribute to study of the Galactic bulge, especially using the Hyper Superime-Cam and planned spectroscopic modes, as well as the high resolution spectrograph. The planned Jasmine satellite series may deliver a comprehensive survey of distances and proper motions of bulge stars, and insight into the origin and importance of the X-shaped bulge.

  19. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Fifth Data Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunder, Andrea; Kordopatis, Georges; Steinmetz, Matthias; Zwitter, Tomaž; McMillan, Paul J.; Casagrande, Luca; Enke, Harry; Wojno, Jennifer; Valentini, Marica; Chiappini, Cristina; Matijevič, Gal; Siviero, Alessandro; de Laverny, Patrick; Recio-Blanco, Alejandra; Bijaoui, Albert; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Binney, James; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, Amina; Jofre, Paula; Antoja, Teresa; Gilmore, Gerard; Siebert, Arnaud; Famaey, Benoit; Bienaymé, Olivier; Gibson, Brad K.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Navarro, Julio F.; Munari, Ulisse; Seabroke, George; Anguiano, Borja; Žerjal, Maruša; Minchev, Ivan; Reid, Warren; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Kos, Janez; Sharma, Sanjib; Watson, Fred; Parker, Quentin A.; Scholz, Ralf-Dieter; Burton, Donna; Cass, Paul; Hartley, Malcolm; Fiegert, Kristin; Stupar, Milorad; Ritter, Andreas; Hawkins, Keith; Gerhard, Ortwin; Chaplin, W. J.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Lund, M. N.; Miglio, A.; Mosser, B.

    2017-02-01

    Data Release 5 (DR5) of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is the fifth data release from a magnitude-limited (9< I< 12) survey of stars randomly selected in the Southern Hemisphere. The RAVE medium-resolution spectra (R˜ 7500) covering the Ca-triplet region (8410-8795 Å) span the complete time frame from the start of RAVE observations in 2003 to their completion in 2013. Radial velocities from 520,781 spectra of 457,588 unique stars are presented, of which 255,922 stellar observations have parallaxes and proper motions from the Tycho-Gaia astrometric solution in Gaia DR1. For our main DR5 catalog, stellar parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and overall metallicity) are computed using the RAVE DR4 stellar pipeline, but calibrated using recent K2 Campaign 1 seismic gravities and Gaia benchmark stars, as well as results obtained from high-resolution studies. Also included are temperatures from the Infrared Flux Method, and we provide a catalog of red giant stars in the dereddened color {(J-{Ks})}0 interval (0.50, 0.85) for which the gravities were calibrated based only on seismology. Further data products for subsamples of the RAVE stars include individual abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, and distances found using isochrones. Each RAVE spectrum is complemented by an error spectrum, which has been used to determine uncertainties on the parameters. The data can be accessed via the RAVE Web site or the VizieR database.

  20. MARVELS Radial Velocity Solutions to Seven Kepler Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, Michael Francis; Thomas, Neil B.; Ge, Jian; Ma, Bo; Herczeg, Alec; Reyes, Alan; SDSS-III MARVELS Team

    2016-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries serve momentous purposes to improve the basis of understanding aspects of stellar astrophysics, such as the accurate calculation of the physical parameters of stars and the enigmatic mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. We report the investigation results of 7 eclipsing binary candidates, initially identified by the Kepler mission, overlapped with the radial velocity observations from the SDSS-III Multi-Object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS). The RV extractions and spectroscopic solutions of these eclipsing binaries were generated by the University of Florida's 1D data pipeline with a median RV precision of ~60-100 m/s, which was utilized for the DR12 data release. We performed the cross-reference fitting of the MARVELS RV data and the Kepler photometric fluxes obtained from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (V2) and modelled the 7 eclipsing binaries in the BinaryMaker3 and PHOEBE programs. This analysis accurately determined the absolute physical and orbital parameters of each binary. Most of the companion stars were determined to have masses of K and M dwarf stars (0.3-0.8 M⊙), and allowed for an investigation into the mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. Among the cases are KIC 9163796, a 122.2 day period "heartbeat star", a recently-discovered class of eccentric binaries known for tidal distortions and pulsations, with a high eccentricity (e~0.75) and KIC 11244501, a 0.29 day period, contact binary with a double-lined spectrum and mass ratio (q~0.45). We also report on the possible reclassification of 2 Kepler eclipsing binary candidates as background eclipsing binaries based on the analysis of the flux measurements, flux ratios of the spectroscopic and photometric solutions, the differences in the FOVs, the image processing of Kepler, and RV and spectral analysis of MARVELS.

  1. KECK NIRSPEC RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS OF LATE-M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Angelle; White, Russel; Bailey, John; Blake, Cullen; Blake, Geoffrey; Cruz, Kelle; Burgasser, Adam J.; Kraus, Adam

    2012-11-15

    We present the results of an infrared spectroscopic survey of 23 late-M dwarfs with the NIRSPEC echelle spectrometer on the Keck II telescope. Using telluric lines for wavelength calibration, we are able to achieve measurement precisions of down to 45 m s{sup -1} for our late-M dwarfs over a one- to four-year long baseline. Our sample contains two stars with radial velocity (RV) variations of >1000 m s{sup -1}. While we require more measurements to determine whether these RV variations are due to unseen planetary or stellar companions or are the result of starspots known to plague the surface of M dwarfs, we can place upper limits of <40 M{sub J} sin i on the masses of any companions around those two M dwarfs with RV variations of <160 m s{sup -1} at orbital periods of 10-100 days. We have also measured the rotational velocities for all the stars in our late-M dwarf sample and offer our multi-order, high-resolution spectra over 2.0-2.4 {mu}m to the atmospheric modeling community to better understand the atmospheres of late-M dwarfs.

  2. Correcting Radial Velocities for Long-Term Magnetic Activity Variations.

    PubMed

    Saar; Fischer

    2000-05-01

    We study stars in the Lick planetary survey for correlations between simultaneous measurements of high-precision radial velocities vr and magnetic activity (as measured in an SIR emission index from Ca ii lambda8662). We find significant correlations in approximately 30% of the stars. After removing linear trends between SIR and vr, we find that the dispersion in vr in these stars is decreased by an average of 17%, or approximately 45% of the dispersion above the measurement noise. F stars and less active stars with variable Ca ii H and K lines are the most successfully corrected. The magnitude of the slope of the SIR versus vr relations increases proportional to vsini and (excepting M dwarfs) tends to decrease with decreasing Teff. We argue that the main cause of these effects is modification of the mean line bisector shape brought on by long-term, magnetic activity-induced changes in the surface brightness and convective patterns. The correlations can be used to partially correct vr data for the effects of long-term activity variations, potentially permitting study of planets around some (higher mass) younger stars and planets producing smaller stellar reflex velocities.

  3. A radial velocity study of the intermediate polar EX Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, J.; Ramírez-Torres, A.; Michel, R.; Hernández Santisteban, J. V.

    2016-09-01

    A study on the intermediate polar EX Hya is presented, based on simultaneous photometry and high-dispersion spectroscopic observations, during four consecutive nights. The strong photometric modulation related to the 67-min spin period of the primary star is clearly present, as well as the narrow eclipses associated with the orbital modulation. Since our eclipse timings have been obtained almost 91 000 cycles since the last reported observations, we present new linear ephemeris, although we cannot rule out a sinusoidal variation suggested by previous authors. The system shows double-peaked H α, H β and He I λ5876 Å emission lines, with almost no other lines present. As H α is the only line with enough S/N ratio in our observations, we have concentrated our efforts in its study, in order to obtain a reliable radial velocity semi-amplitude. From the profile of this line, we find two important components; one with a steep rise and velocities not larger than ˜1000 km s-1 and another broader component extending up to ˜2000 km s-1, which we interpret as coming mainly from the inner disc. A strong and variable hotspot is found and a stream-like structure is seen at times. We show that the best solution correspond to K1 = 58 ± 5 km s-1 from H α, from the two emission components, which are both in phase with the orbital modulation. We remark on a peculiar effect in the radial velocity curve around phase zero, which could be interpreted as a Rositter-MacLaughlin-like effect, which has been taken into account before deriving K1. This value is compatible with the values found in high resolution both in the ultraviolet and X-ray. Using the published inclination angle of i =78° ± 1° and semi-amplitude K2 = 432 ± 5 km s-1, we find: M1 = 0.78 ± 0.03 M⊙, M2 = 0.10 ± 0.02 M⊙ and a = 0.67 ± 0.01 R⊙. Doppler Tomography has been applied, to construct six Doppler tomograms for single orbital cycles spanning the four days of observations to support our conclusions

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Abell 3733 radial velocities (Solanes+ 1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanes, J. M.; Stein, P.

    1998-03-01

    Cross-correlation and emission-line heliocentric radial velocities for 112 galaxies observed with the MEFOS and OPTOPUS spectrographs in the field of the galaxy cluster A3733. The last column lists the final radial velocities which result form a weighted average of the velocity data in the previous columns. (1 data file).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Extrasolar planets. Radial velocities of eight stars (Diaz+ 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, R. F.; Santerne, A.; Sahlmann, J.; Hebrard, G.; Eggenberger, A.; Santos, N. C.; Moutou, C.; Arnold, L.; Boisse, I.; Bonfils, X.; Bouchy, F.; Delfosse, X.; Desort, M.; Ehrenreich, D.; Forveille, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Perrier, C.; Queloz; D.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    2011-11-01

    The catalogue is composed of eight radial velocity timeseries, one for each target listed above. The radial velocities were obtained with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. Addtional information for each star include the estimated uncertainty in the radial velocity, the bissector slope of the cross-correlation function, the exposure time, and the signal-to-noise ratio per pixel. (2 data files).

  6. Searching for Radial Velocity Variations in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Gull, T. R.; Ivarsson, S.; Nielsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (see poster by Sonneborn et al.). Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. The N II 1084-86 emission feature indicates that the star may be nitrogen rich. The FUV continuum and the S IV 1073 P-Cygni wind line suggest that the effective temperature of eta Car B is at least 25,000 K. FUV spectra of eta Carinae were obtained with the FUSE satellite at 9 epochs between 2000 February and 2005 July. The data consists of 12 observations taken with the LWRS aperture (30x30 arcsec), three with the HIRS aperture (1.25x20 arcsec), and one MRDS aperture (4x20 arcsec). In this paper we discuss the analysis of these spectra to search for radial velocity variations associated with the 5.54-year binary orbit of Eta Car AB.

  7. A GUI for the IRAF Radial Velocity Task FXCOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, M.

    A graphical user interface to the IRAF Radial Velocity task, it FXCOR , is presented. The GUI allows users to make plot selections literally at the touch of a button, analysis of data is also greatly simplified since the user can now interact with the task in an intuitive manner rather than through the 172 possible commands that can be issued from the keyboard. The various sub-modes of the task each have a unique GUI optimized for the use of that particular mode. The use of a GUI means that the user can not only control the algorithm parameters more efficiently, but the results can be presented in a way that gives the user a better understanding of the correlation. The design choices for the GUI, as well as problems encountered, are also discussed. The interface uses the prototype IRAF widget server which provides not only the familiar menus and buttons, but also custom widgets for scientific graphics and image display. Since the GUI is driven by a text file that is downloaded to the widget server and interpreted, it can be customized by the user to meet a particular preference or to streamline it for a particular application of the task. A demonstration of the new software is available at the NOAO/IRAF demo table.

  8. Searching for Radial Velocity Variations in eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iping, R. C.; Sonneborn, G.; Gull, T. R.; Ivarsson, S.; Nielsen, K.

    2006-01-01

    A hot companion of eta Carinae has been detected using high resolution spectra (905 - 1180 A) obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite (see poster by Sonneborn et al.). Analysis of the far-UV spectrum shows that eta Car B is a luminous hot star. The N II 1084-86 emission feature indicates that the star may be nitrogen rich. The FUV continuum and the S IV 1073 P-Cygni wind line suggest that the effective temperature of eta Car B is at least 25,000 K. FUV spectra of eta Carinae were obtained with the FUSE satellite at 9 epochs between 2000 February and 2005 July. The data consists of 12 observations taken with the LWRS aperture (30x30 arcsec), three with the HIRS aperture (1.25x20 arcsec), and one MRDS aperture (4x20 arcsec). In this paper we discuss the analysis of these spectra to search for radial velocity variations associated with the 5.54-year binary orbit of Eta Car AB.

  9. Stellar Radial Velocities with IGRINS at McDonald Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Gregory; Jaffe, Daniel; Park, Chan; Lee, Jae-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Exoplanet searches with dedicated instrumentation have made 1 m/s radial velocity (RV) precision routine.Yet, RVs for large samples of stars generally remain at the 1km/s level.TheImmersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a revolutionary instrument that exploits broad spectral coverage at high-resolution in the near-infrared.IGRINS on the 2.7 meter Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory is nearly as sensitive as CRIRES at the 8 meter Very Large Telescope. However, IGRINS at R=45,000 has more than 30 times the spectral grasp of CRIRES.The use of a silicon immersion grating facilitates a compact cryostat while providing simultaneous wavelength coverage from 1.45 - 2.45 microns. Wehave developed a pipeline to cross-correlate the more than 20,000 resolution elements in two IGRINS exposures and provide relative RVs with uncertainties of 50m/s (<1% of a resolution element). Absolute RVs are limited by thezero point uncertainty, which is 150m/s.IGRINS RVs will be provided for thousands of objects per year as a default procedure of the data reduction pipeline, creating a legacy product for multi-epoch studies of low-mass, stellar and substellar multiplicity.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: General Catalogue of Stellar Radial Velocities (Wilson, 1953)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    2010-01-01

    The General Catalogue of Stellar Radial Velocity is a compilation of the radial velocities for about 15,000 stars, available to the author up to January 1951. Systematic differences were carefully studied and removed, providing therefore velocities in an homogenized system. The electronic version of the catalog is not identical to the printed version: notes and designations from "Personal lists" are not included and galactic coordinates were added. The velocities computed here can also be found in the "WEB Catalog of Radial Velocities" (Duflot et al. 1995, Cat. III/190) (1 data file).

  11. Uncovering the planets and stellar activity of CoRoT-7 using only radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, J. P.; Haywood, R. D.; Brewer, B. J.; Figueira, P.; Oshagh, M.; Santerne, A.; Santos, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    Stellar activity can induce signals in the radial velocities of stars, complicating the detection of orbiting low-mass planets. We present a method to determine the number of planetary signals present in radial-velocity datasets of active stars, using only radial-velocity observations. Instead of considering separate fits with different number of planets, we use a birth-death Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to infer the posterior distribution for the number of planets in a single run. In a natural way, the marginal distributions for the orbital parameters of all planets are also inferred. This method is applied to HARPS data of CoRoT-7. We confidently recover the orbits of both CoRoT-7b and CoRoT-7c although the data show evidence for the presence of additional signals. All data and software presented in this article are available online at http://https://github.com/j-faria/exoBD-CoRoT7

  12. Estimating stellar radial velocity variability from Kepler and GALEX: Implications for the radial velocity confirmation of exoplanets

    SciTech Connect

    Cegla, H. M.; Watson, C. A.; Stassun, K. G.; Bastien, F. A.; Pepper, J.

    2014-01-01

    We cross match the GALEX and Kepler surveys to create a unique dataset with both ultraviolet (UV) measurements and highly precise photometric variability measurements in the visible light spectrum. As stellar activity is driven by magnetic field modulations, we have used UV emission from the magnetically heated gas in the stellar atmosphere to serve as our proxy for the more well-known stellar activity indicator, R' {sub HK}. The R' {sub HK} approximations were in turn used to estimate the level of astrophysical noise expected in radial velocity (RV) measurements and these were then searched for correlations with photometric variability. We find significant scatter in our attempts to estimate RV noise for magnetically active stars, which we attribute to variations in the phase and strength of the stellar magnetic cycle that drives the activity of these targets. However, for stars we deem to be magnetically quiet, we do find a clear correlation between photometric variability and estimated levels of RV noise (with variability up to ∼10 m s{sup –1}). We conclude that for these quiet stars, we can use photometric measurements as a proxy to estimate the RV noise expected. As a result, the procedure outlined in this paper may help select targets best-suited for RV follow-up necessary for planet confirmation.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HD20794 HARPS radial velocities (Feng+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, F.; Tuomi, M.; Jones, H. R. A.

    2017-05-01

    HARPS radial velocities, activity indices and differential radial velocities for HD 20794. The HARPS spectra are available in the European Southern Observatory archive, and are processed using the TERRA algorithm (Anglada-Escude and Butler, 2012, Cat. J/ApJS/200/15). (1 data file).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Bibliography of stellar radial velocities (Abt+ 1972)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, H. A.; Biggs, E. S.

    2015-09-01

    The data file contains a bibliography of 44,000 radial velocities for about 25,000 stars, from a compilation of about 2340 publications (see the "Note (3)" below). The authors estimate that 99% of stellar radial velocities published by June 1970 are contained in the surveyed volumes. (1 data file).

  15. Advanced structural design for precision radial velocity instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Dan; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Barnes, Stuart; Bean, Jacob; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Brennan, Patricia; Budynkiewicz, Jamie; Chun, Moo-Young; Conroy, Charlie; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Epps, Harland; Evans, Ian; Evans, Janet; Foster, Jeff; Frebel, Anna; Gauron, Thomas; Guzman, Dani; Hare, Tyson; Jang, Bi-Ho; Jang, Jeong-Gyun; Jordan, Andres; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Kang-Min; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; McCracken, Kenneth; McMuldroch, Stuart; Miller, Joseph; Mueller, Mark; Oh, Jae Sok; Ordway, Mark; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Park, Sung-Joon; Paxson, Charles; Phillips, David; Plummer, David; Podgorski, William; Seifahrt, Andreas; Stark, Daniel; Steiner, Joao; Uomoto, Alan; Walsworth, Ronald; Yu, Young-Sam

    2016-07-01

    The GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is an echelle spectrograph with precision radial velocity (PRV) capability that will be a first light instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). G-CLEF has a PRV precision goal of 40 cm/sec (10 cm/s for multiple measurements) to enable detection of Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zones of sun-like stars1. This precision is a primary driver of G-CLEF's structural design. Extreme stability is necessary to minimize image motions at the CCD detectors. Minute changes in temperature, pressure, and acceleration environments cause structural deformations, inducing image motions which degrade PRV precision. The instrument's structural design will ensure that the PRV goal is achieved under the environments G-CLEF will be subjected to as installed on the GMT azimuth platform, including: Millikelvin (0.001 °K) thermal soaks and gradients 10 millibar changes in ambient pressure Changes in acceleration due to instrument tip/tilt and telescope slewing Carbon fiber/cyanate composite was selected for the optical bench structure in order to meet performance goals. Low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and high stiffness-to-weight are key features of the composite optical bench design. Manufacturability and serviceability of the instrument are also drivers of the design. In this paper, we discuss analyses leading to technical choices made to minimize G-CLEF's sensitivity to changing environments. Finite element analysis (FEA) and image motion sensitivity studies were conducted to determine PRV performance under operational environments. We discuss the design of the optical bench structure to optimize stiffness-to-weight and minimize deformations due to inertial and pressure effects. We also discuss quasi-kinematic mounting of optical elements and assemblies, and optimization of these to ensure minimal image motion under thermal, pressure, and inertial loads expected during PRV observations.

  16. Extreme Precision Environmental Control for Next Generation Radial Velocity Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, Gudmundur K.; Hearty, Fred; Levi, Eric; Robertson, Paul; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Bender, Chad; Nelson, Matt; Halverson, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Extreme radial velocity precisions of order 10cm/s will enable the discoveries of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. Temperature and pressure variations inside a spectrograph can lead to thermomechanical instabilities in the optics and mounts, and refractive index variations in both the optical elements as well as the surrounding air. Together, these variations can easily induce instrumental drifts of several tens to hundreds of meters per second. Enclosing the full optical train in thermally stabilized high-vacuum environments minimizes such errors. In this talk, I will discuss the Environmental Control System (ECS) for the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF) spectrograph: a near infrared (NIR) facility class instrument we will commission at the Hobby Eberly Telescope in 2016. The ECS will maintain the HPF optical bench stable at 180K at the sub milli-Kelvin level on the timescale of days, and at the few milli-Kelvin level over months to years. The entire spectrograph is kept under high-quality vacuum (<10-6 Torr), and environmental temperature fluctuations are compensated for with an actively controlled radiation shield outfitted with custom feedback electronics. High efficiency Multi-Layer Insulation (MLI) blankets, and a passive external thermal enclosure further isolate the optics from ambient perturbations. This environmental control scheme is versatile, suitable to stabilize both next generation NIR, and optical spectrographs. I will show how we are currently testing this control system for use with our design concept of the Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrograph (EPDS), the next generation optical spectrograph for the WIYN 3.5m telescope. Our most recent results from full-scale stability tests will be presented.

  17. WHICH RADIAL VELOCITY EXOPLANETS HAVE UNDETECTED OUTER COMPANIONS?

    SciTech Connect

    Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2009-09-01

    The observed radial velocity (RV) eccentricity distribution for extrasolar planets in single-planet systems shows that a significant fraction of planets are eccentric (e > 0.1). However, an RV planet's eccentricity, which comes from the Keplerian fitting, can be biased by low signal-to-noise ratio and poor sampling. Here, we investigate the effects on eccentricity produced by undetected outer companions. We have carried out Monte Carlo simulations of mock RV data to understand this effect and predict its impact on the observed distribution. We first quantify the statistical bias of known RV planets' eccentricities produced by undetected zero-eccentricity wide-separation companions and show that this effect alone cannot explain the observed distribution. We then modify the simulations to consist of two populations, one of zero-eccentricity planets in double-planet systems and the other of single planets drawn from an eccentric distribution. Our simulations show that a good fit to the observed distribution is obtained with 45% zero-eccentricity double planets and 55% single eccentric planets. Assuming that our two simulated populations of planets are a good approximation for the true RV population, matching the observed distribution allows us to determine the probability that a known RV planet's orbital eccentricity has been biased by an undetected wide-separation companion. Averaged over eccentricity we calculate this probability to be {approx}4%, suggesting that a small fraction of systems may have a yet to be discovered outer companion. Our simulations show that moderately eccentric planets, with 0.1 < e < 0.3 and 0.1 < e < 0.2, have a {approx}13% and {approx}19% probability, respectively, of having an undetected outer companion. We encourage both high-contrast direct imaging and RV follow-up surveys of known RV planets with moderate eccentricities to test our predictions and look for previously undetected outer companions.

  18. Long-lived, long-period radial velocity variations in Aldebaran: A planetary companion and stellar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Guenther, E. W.; MacQueen, P.; Hartmann, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Han, I.; Lee, B.-C.; Walker, G. A. H.; Yang, S.; Larson, A. M.; Kim, K.-M.; Mkrtichian, , D. E.; Döllinger, M.; Simon, , A. E.; Girardi, L.

    2015-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the nature of the long-period radial velocity variations in α Tau first reported over 20 yr ago. Methods: We analyzed precise stellar radial velocity measurements for α Tau spanning over 30 yr. An examination of the Hα and Ca II λ8662 spectral lines, and Hipparcos photometry was also done to help discern the nature of the long-period radial velocity variations. Results: Our radial velocity data show that the long-period, low amplitude radial velocity variations are long-lived and coherent. Furthermore, Hα equivalent width measurements and Hipparcos photometry show no significant variations with this period. Another investigation of this star established that there was no variability in the spectral line shapes with the radial velocity period. An orbital solution results in a period of P = 628.96 ± 0.90 d, eccentricity, e = 0.10 ± 0.05, and a radial velocity amplitude, K = 142.1 ± 7.2 m s-1. Evolutionary tracks yield a stellar mass of 1.13 ± 0.11 M⊙, which corresponds to a minimum companion mass of 6.47 ± 0.53 MJup with an orbital semi-major axis of a = 1.46 ± 0.27 AU. After removing the orbital motion of the companion, an additional period of ≈520 d is found in the radial velocity data, but only in some time spans. A similar period is found in the variations in the equivalent width of Hα and Ca II. Variations at one-third of this period are also found in the spectral line bisector measurements. The ~520 d period is interpreted as the rotation modulation by stellar surface structure. Its presence, however, may not be long-lived, and it only appears in epochs of the radial velocity data separated by ~10 yr. This might be due to an activity cycle. Conclusions: The data presented here provide further evidence of a planetary companion to α Tau, as well as activity-related radial velocity variations. Based in part on observations obtained at the 2-m-Alfred Jensch Telescope at the Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg and the

  19. Kepler beaming binaries radial velocity follow-up with WIYN/Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Stassun, Keivan; Faigler, Simchon; Boyajian, Tabetha; Mazeh, Tsevi; Tal-Or, Lev; Prsa, Andrej

    2015-12-01

    High-quality space-based time series photometry reveals the minute photometric modulations induced by orbital motion in short-period binary systems with stellar and substellar secondaries. Those modulations are induced by both gravitational and atmospheric processes. Gravitational processes include the beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and the atmospheric processes include reflected light and thermal emission by the secondary atmosphere. Therefore, non-eclipsing (non-transiting) systems are detectable using photometry alone. The availability of Kepler data for a large sample of stars combined with the sensitivity to non-eclipsing systems (which are at least an order of magnitude more common than eclipsing systems) has the potential of transforming the Kepler survey into the equivalent of a radial velocity survey of a large sample of stars. This allows detecting intrinsically rare systems, where traditional approaches, e.g., radial velocity and transit surveys, are highly inefficient. Those include systems where the companion is a brown-dwarf or a massive planet, or even a white dwarf. As this approach is still in its infancy, we are carrying out radial velocity follow-up of Kepler photometric detections, to confirm the nature of the system and accurately measure the orbit and the companion’s mass. Here we present our results from an radial velocity campaign with the WIYN/Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph, where we used 26 nights during the 2014 and 2015 Kepler observing seasons to observe five Hydra one-degree diameter fields within the Kepler field. Our list of targets includes 131 Kepler beaming binaries, and we used additional fibers to observe 85 Kepler eclipsing binaries and 31 Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs). A detailed comparison between the photometrically predicted companion’s mass and the mass measured through radial velocities will improve our understanding of this young approach, and will support similar projects

  20. Photonic systems for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel P.

    The discovery of Earth-like exoplanets has profound implications for our understanding of the origins and diversity of life in our universe. As such, developing new and improved Doppler radial velocity (RV) spectrometers capable of discovering and characterizing these planets is a high priority in the astronomical community. However, detection of true Earth-analogs remains beyond the technical reach of current Doppler RV instruments. This thesis discusses a number of technological developments designed specifically to overcome classical instrumental limitations of high precision Doppler RV measurements. These technologies are essential components of next generation instruments that aim to achieve the RV precision necessary to detect low-mass planets. This instrumentation research is driven by the development of the Habitable-zone Planet Finder (HPF), a near-infrared (NIR) Doppler spectrograph currently under development at Penn State that will detect terrestrial-mass planets orbiting nearby M-dwarfs. Furthermore, many technologies discussed will also be applied to the NASA-NSF Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer concept NEID, a Doppler RV instrument for the 3.5 meter WIYN telescope, slated for delivery in 2019. NEID is an ultra-stable, high resolution optical spectrometer also under development at Penn State. This thesis describes new specialized optical fiber delivery systems, designed to significantly improve instrument illumination stability, modal noise suppression systems, which suppress mode interference in optical fibers and allow spectrometers to fully realize the exquisite precision of modern wavelength calibration sources, and new photonic calibration sources, which show significant promise as potential Doppler wavelength references. These technologies represent important steps in enabling next generation instruments to reach precisions sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets orbiting in the Habitable-zones of nearby stars. Improving measurement

  1. Developing gradient metal alloys through radial deposition additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Douglas C; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-06-19

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels.

  2. Developing Gradient Metal Alloys through Radial Deposition Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Roberts, Scott; Otis, Richard; Kolodziejska, Joanna; Dillon, R. Peter; Suh, Jong-ook; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Borgonia, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Interest in additive manufacturing (AM) has dramatically expanded in the last several years, owing to the paradigm shift that the process provides over conventional manufacturing. Although the vast majority of recent work in AM has focused on three-dimensional printing in polymers, AM techniques for fabricating metal alloys have been available for more than a decade. Here, laser deposition (LD) is used to fabricate multifunctional metal alloys that have a strategically graded composition to alter their mechanical and physical properties. Using the technique in combination with rotational deposition enables fabrication of compositional gradients radially from the center of a sample. A roadmap for developing gradient alloys is presented that uses multi-component phase diagrams as maps for composition selection so as to avoid unwanted phases. Practical applications for the new technology are demonstrated in low-coefficient of thermal expansion radially graded metal inserts for carbon-fiber spacecraft panels. PMID:24942329

  3. A new infrared Fabry-Pérot-based radial-velocity-reference module for the SPIRou radial-velocity spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cersullo, Federica; Wildi, François; Chazelas, Bruno; Pepe, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Context. The field of exoplanet research is moving towards the detection and characterization of habitable planets. These exo-Earths can be easily found around low-mass stars by using either photometric transit or radial-velocity (RV) techniques. In the latter case the gain is twofold because the signal induced by the planet of a given mass is higher due to the more favourable planet-star mass ratio and because the habitable zone lies closer to the star. However, late-type stars emit mainly in the infrared (IR) wavelength range, which calls for IR instruments. Aims: SPIRou is a stable RV IR spectrograph addressing these ambitious scientific objectives. As with any other spectrograph, calibration and drift monitoring is fundamental to achieve high precision. However, the IR domain suffers from a lack of suitable reference spectral sources. Our goal was to build, test and finally operate a Fabry-Pérot-based RV-reference module able to provide the needed spectral information over the full wavelength range of SPIRou. Methods: We adapted the existing HARPS Fabry-Pérot calibrator for operation in the IR domain. After manufacturing and assembly, we characterized the FP RV-module in the laboratory before delivering it to the SPIRou integration site. In particular, we measured finesse, transmittance, and spectral flux of the system. Results: The measured finesse value of F = 12.8 corresponds perfectly to the theoretical value. The total transmittance at peak is of the order of 0.5%, mainly limited by fibre-connectors and interfaces. Nevertheless, the provided flux is in line with the the requirements set by the SPIRou instrument. Although we could test the stability of the system, we estimated it by comparing the SPIRou Fabry-Pérot with the already operating HARPS system and demonstrated a stability of better than 1 m s-1 during a night. Conclusions: Once installed on SPIRou, we will test the full spectral characteristics and stability of the RV-reference module. The

  4. Radial velocity variations in the young eruptive star EX Lupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kóspál, Á.; Mohler-Fischer, M.; Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Curé, M.; Henning, Th.; Kiss, Cs.; Launhardt, R.; Moór, A.; Müller, A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. EX Lup-type objects (EXors) are low-mass pre-main sequence objects characterized by optical and near-infrared outbursts attributed to highly enhanced accretion from the circumstellar disk onto the star. Aims: The trigger mechanism of EXor outbursts is still debated. One type of theory requires a close (sub)stellar companion that perturbs the inner part of the disk and triggers the onset of the enhanced accretion. Here, we study the radial velocity (RV) variations of EX Lup, the prototype of the EXor class, and test whether they can be related to a close companion. Methods: We conducted a five-year RV survey, collecting 54 observations with HARPS and FEROS. We analyzed the activity of EX Lup by checking the bisector, the equivalent width of the Ca 8662 Å line, the asymmetry of the Ca II K line, the activity indicator SFEROS, the asymmetry of the cross-correlation function, the line depth ratio of the VI/FeI lines, and the TiO, CaH 2, CaH 3, CaOH, and Hα indices. We complemented the RV measurements with a 14-day optical/infrared photometric monitoring to look for signatures of activity or varying accretion. Results: We found that the RV of EX Lup is periodic (P = 7.417 d), with stable period, semi-amplitude (2.2 km s-1), and phase over at least four years of observations. This period is not present in any of the above-mentioned activity indicators. However, the RVs of narrow metallic emission lines suggest the same period, but with an anti-correlating phase. The observed absorption line RVs can be fitted with a Keplerian solution around a 0.6 M⊙ central star with msini = (14.7 ± 0.7) MJup and eccentricity of e = 0.24. Alternatively, we attempted to model the observations with a cold or hot stellar spot as well. We found that in our simple model, the spot parameters needed to reproduce the RV semi-amplitude are in contradiction with the photometric variability, making the spot scenario unlikely. Conclusions: We qualitatively discuss two possibilities to

  5. Quasilinear model for energetic particle diffusion in radial and velocity space

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Bass, E. M.

    2013-04-15

    A quasilinear model for passive energetic particle (EP) turbulent diffusion in radial and velocity space is fitted and tested against nonlinear gyrokinetic tokamak simulations with the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 045001 (2003)]. Off diagonal elements of a symmetric positive definite 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 EP diffusion matrix account for fluxes up radial (energy) gradients driven by energy (radial) gradients of the EP velocity space distribution function. The quasilinear ratio kernel of the model is provided by a simple analytic formula for the EP radial and velocity space EP diffusivity relative to radial thermal ion energy diffusivity at each linear mode of the turbulence driven by the thermal plasma. The TGLF [G. M. Staebler, J. E. Kinsey, and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Plasmas 14, 0055909 (2007); ibid. 15, 0055908 (2008)] tokamak transport model provides the linear mode frequency and growth rates to the kernel as well as the nonlinear spectral weight for each mode.

  6. Quasilinear model for energetic particle diffusion in radial and velocity space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Bass, E. M.; Staebler, G. M.

    2013-04-01

    A quasilinear model for passive energetic particle (EP) turbulent diffusion in radial and velocity space is fitted and tested against nonlinear gyrokinetic tokamak simulations with the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 045001 (2003)]. Off diagonal elements of a symmetric positive definite 2×2 EP diffusion matrix account for fluxes up radial (energy) gradients driven by energy (radial) gradients of the EP velocity space distribution function. The quasilinear ratio kernel of the model is provided by a simple analytic formula for the EP radial and velocity space EP diffusivity relative to radial thermal ion energy diffusivity at each linear mode of the turbulence driven by the thermal plasma. The TGLF [G. M. Staebler, J. E. Kinsey, and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Plasmas 14, 0055909 (2007); ibid. 15, 0055908 (2008)] tokamak transport model provides the linear mode frequency and growth rates to the kernel as well as the nonlinear spectral weight for each mode.

  7. Precise radial velocities. II - A possible detection of oscillations or running waves in Aldebaran and Arcturus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. A.

    1983-02-01

    Reticon observations of Aldebaran and Arcturus were performed to detect any minute radial velocity modulations which could characterize the convective stellar envelopes. The observing procedure consisted of referencing small apparent shifts of the detected stellar lines near the 6300 A wavelength to telluric O2 lines in the stellar spectrum. Only radial velocity changes were sought, rather than absolute radial velocities. Measurements for the radial velocities of both stars were calculated to an accuracy within 7 m/sec. A quasiperiodicity within 16 minutes of 110 minutes was found for Aldebaran, and within 28 minutes of 97 minutes for Arcturus. The possibility of the observed global oscillations being similar to the 5-min oscillations present in the solar system sun are discussed, and further measurements are recommended.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: YZ Ceti radial velocity curve (Astudillo-Defru+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astudillo-Defru, N.; Diaz, R. F.; Bonfils, X.; Almenara, J. M.; Delisle, J.-B.; Bouchy, F.; Delfosse, X.; Forveille, T.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Murgas, F.; Pepe, F.; Santos, N. C.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Wunsche, A.

    2017-08-01

    We acquired spectra with HARPS, a stabilized high-resolution spectrograph specifically designed to compute precise radial velocities. It is an ESO instrument installed at La Silla observatory. (1 data file).

  9. Detecting exoplanets: jointly modeling radial velocity and stellar activity time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David Edward; Stenning, David; Ford, Eric B.; Wolpert, Robert L.; Loredo, Thomas J.

    2017-06-01

    The radial velocity method is one of the most successful techniques for detecting exoplanets, but stellar activity often corrupts the radial velocity signal. This corruption can make it difficult to detect low mass planets and planets orbiting more active stars. A principled approach to recovering planet radial velocity signals in the presence of stellar activity was proposed by Rajpaul et al. (2015) and involves the use of dependent Gaussian processes to jointly model the corrupted radial velocity signal and multiple proxies for stellar activity. We build on this work in two ways: (i) we propose using dimension reduction techniques to construct more informative stellar activity proxies; (ii) we extend the Rajpaul et al. (2015) model to a larger class of models and use a model comparison procedure to select the best model for the particular stellar activity proxies at hand. Our framework enables us to compare the performance of various proxies in terms of the resulting statistical power for planet detection.

  10. A RAVE investigation on Galactic open clusters. I. Radial velocities and metallicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, C.; Scholz, R.-D.; Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Schilbach, E.; Röser, S.; Boeche, C.; Kordopatis, G.; Siebert, A.; Williams, M.; Munari, U.; Matijevič, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Zwitter, T.; de Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M.; Gilmore, G.; Seabroke, G.; Freeman, K.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W.; Watson, F.; Gibson, B. K.; Bienaymé, O.; Wyse, R.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Siviero, A.

    2014-02-01

    Context. Galactic open clusters (OCs) mainly belong to the young stellar population in the Milky Way disk, but are there groups and complexes of OCs that possibly define an additional level in hierarchical star formation? Current compilations are too incomplete to address this question, especially regarding radial velocities (RVs) and metallicities ([M/H]). Aims: Here we provide and discuss newly obtained RV and [M/H] data, which will enable us to reinvestigate potential groupings of open clusters and associations. Methods: We extracted additional RVs and [M/H] from the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) via a cross-match with the Catalogue of Stars in Open Cluster Areas (CSOCA). For the identified OCs in RAVE we derived overlineRV and overline{[M/H]} from a cleaned working sample and compared the results with previous findings. Results: Although our RAVE sample does not show the same accuracy as the entire survey, we were able to derive reliable overlineRV for 110 Galactic open clusters. For 37 OCs we publish overlineRV for the first time. Moreover, we determined overline{[M/H]} for 81 open clusters, extending the number of OCs with overline{[M/H]} by 69. Tables 8 and 9 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/562/A54

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-80 photometric and radial velocity data (Triaud+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier, Cameron A.; Doyle, A. P.; Fumel, A.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Lovis, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Segransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.; West, R. G.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    The data is composed of one WASP photometric timeseries in a band similar to V+R, of two TRAPPIST photometric timeseries in the z band, and of one series from the EulerCam, in the Gunn r' filter. There is also one set of CORALIE radial velocities and one set of HARPS radial velocities. They give evidence of a planet orbiting and transiting WASP-80. (6 data files).

  12. The discovery of 51 Pegasi at Haute-Provence Observatory -- The quest for precise radial velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, M.; Queloz, D.

    2006-02-01

    The discovery of 51 Pegasi at OHP is part of the continuous improvements of correlation spectrographs, in order to measure more and more precise radial velocities. Three generations of instruments developed over 30 years have allowed to increase the radial-velocity precision by a factor 500, from 250 m/s in the seventies to better than 0.5 m/s at present times.

  13. The M 4 Core Project with HST - IV. Internal kinematics from accurate radial velocities of 2771 cluster members★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, L.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Sneden, C.; Nascimbeni, V.; Sommariva, V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a detailed study of the internal kinematics of the Galactic globular cluster M 4 (NGC 6121), by deriving the radial velocities from 7250 spectra for 2771 stars distributed from the upper part of the red giant branch down to the main sequence. We describe new approaches to determine the wavelength solution from day-time calibrations and to determine the radial velocity drifts that can occur between calibration and science observations when observing with the GIRAFFE spectrograph at Very Large Telescope. Two techniques to determine the radial velocity are compared, after a qualitative description of their advantages with respect to other commonly used algorithm, and a new approach to remove the sky contribution from the spectra obtained with fibre-fed spectrograph and further improve the radial velocity precision is presented. The average radial velocity of the cluster is = 71.08 ± 0.08 km s-1 with an average dispersion of μ _{v_c} = 3.97 km s-1. Using the same data set and the same statistical approach of previous analyses, 20 additional binary candidates are found, for a total of 87 candidates. A new determination of the internal radial velocity dispersion as a function of cluster distance is presented, resulting in a dispersion of 4.5 km s-1 within 2 arcmin from the centre of cluster and steadily decreasing outward. We statistically confirm the small amplitude of the cluster rotation, as suggested in the past by several authors. This new analysis represents a significant improvement with respect to previous results in literature and provides a fundamental observational input for the modelling of the cluster dynamics.

  14. A test field for Gaia. Radial velocity catalogue of stars in the South Ecliptic Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frémat, Y.; Altmann, M.; Pancino, E.; Soubiran, C.; Jofré, P.; Damerdji, Y.; Heiter, U.; Royer, F.; Seabroke, G.; Sordo, R.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Jasniewicz, G.; Martayan, C.; Thévenin, F.; Vallenari, A.; Blomme, R.; David, M.; Gosset, E.; Katz, D.; Viala, Y.; Boudreault, S.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Lobel, A.; Meisenheimer, K.; Nordlander, T.; Raskin, G.; Royer, P.; Zorec, J.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Gaia is a space mission that is currently measuring the five astrometric parameters, as well as spectrophotometry of at least 1 billion stars to G = 20.7 mag with unprecedented precision. The sixth parameter in phase space (i.e., radial velocity) is also measured thanks to medium-resolution spectroscopy that is being obtained for the 150 million brightest stars. During the commissioning phase, two fields, one around each ecliptic pole, have been repeatedly observed to assess and to improve the overall satellite performances, as well as the associated reduction and analysis software. A ground-based photometric and spectroscopic survey was therefore initiated in 2007, and is still running to gather as much information as possible about the stars in these fields. This work is of particular interest to the validation of the radial velocity spectrometer outputs. Aims: The paper presents the radial velocity measurements performed for the Southern targets in the 12-17 R magnitude range on high- to mid-resolution spectra obtained with the GIRAFFE and UVES spectrographs. Methods: Comparison of the South Ecliptic Pole (SEP) GIRAFFE data to spectroscopic templates observed with the HERMES (Mercator in La Palma, Spain) spectrograph enabled a first coarse characterisation of the 747 SEP targets. Radial velocities were then obtained by comparing the results of three different methods. Results: In this paper, we present an initial overview of the targets to be found in the 1 sq. deg SEP region that was observed repeatedly by Gaia ever since its commissioning. In our representative sample, we identified one galaxy, six LMC S-stars, nine candidate chromospherically active stars, and confirmed the status of 18 LMC Carbon stars. A careful study of the 3471 epoch radial velocity measurements led us to identify 145 RV constant stars with radial velocities varying by less than 1 km s-1. Seventy-eight stars show significant RV scatter, while nine stars show a composite spectrum

  15. Shear-velocity structure, radial anisotropy and dynamics of the Tibetan crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agius, Matthew R.; Lebedev, Sergei

    2014-12-01

    of radial anisotropy in the crust does not correlate with isotropic-average shear speed (and, by inference, with crustal rock viscosity) or with surface elevation. Instead, radial anisotropy is related to the deformation pattern and is the strongest in regions experiencing extension (crustal flattening), as noted previously. The growth of Tibet by the addition of Indian crustal rocks into its crust from the south is reflected in the higher crustal seismic velocities (and, thus, lower temperatures) in the southern compared to northern parts of the plateau (more recently added rocks having had less time to undergo radioactive heating within the thickened Tibetan crust). Gravity-driven flattening-the basic cause of extension and normal faulting in the southern, western and central Tibet-is evidenced by pervasive radial anisotropy in the middle crust beneath the regions undergoing extension; the overall eastward flow of the crust is directed by the boundaries and motions of the lithospheric blocks that surround Tibet.

  16. Characterization of the radial velocity signal induced by rotation in late-type dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez Mascareño, A.; Rebolo, R.; González Hernández, J. I.; Esposito, M.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the activity-induced signals related to rotation and magnetic cycles in late-type stars (FGKM) and analyse the Ca II H&K, the H α and the radial velocity time series of 55 stars using the spectra from the HARPS public data base and the light curves provided by the All Sky Automated Survey. We search for short-term and long-term periodic signals in the time series of activity indicators as well as in the photometric light curves. Radial velocity data sets are then analysed to determine the presence of activity-induced signals. We measure a radial velocity signal induced by rotational modulation of stellar surface features in 37 stars, from late-F-type to mid-M-type stars. We report an empirical relationship, with some degree of spectral type dependency, between the mean level of chromospheric emission measured by the log _{10}(R^' }_{HK}) and the measured radial velocity semi-amplitude. We also report a relationship between the semi-amplitude of the chromospheric measured signal and the semi-amplitude of the radial velocity-induced signal, which strongly depends on the spectral type. We find that for a given strength of chromospheric activity (i.e. a given rotation period), M-type stars tend to induce larger rotation-related radial velocity signals than G- and K-type stars.

  17. Improving Radial Velocity Precision for Faint Star Extra-Solar Planet Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderburg, Andrew; Johnson, J. A.; Muirhead, P.

    2013-01-01

    Measuring precise radial velocities of stars requires exquisite knowledge of the spectrograph's Line Spread Function (LSF) as both a function of time and position on the detector. Currently, the LSF of the Keck HIRES spectrograph is modeled by a fifteen parameter function, and fit using a non-linear least squares algorithm. While this technique is good enough to measure radial velocities with a precision of 1 meter per second, the LSF model is known to be a major source of systematic error, especially in low signal-to-noise regimes. We perform exploratory data analysis and use the conclusions to improve the way the LSF fitting routine. We present an improvement in radial velocity precision of 40 percent on low signal-to-noise observations of a radial velocity standard star. Improved precision in low signal-to noise situations is of particular importance to radial velocity follow up of stars with Kepler planet candidates, which are typically much fainter than the stars normally observed in radial velocity planet surveys.

  18. Effect of rotor meridional velocity ratio on response to inlet radial and circumferential distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, N. L.

    1979-01-01

    Three single transonic fan stages, each having a different meridional velocity ratio across its rotor, were tested with two magnitudes of tip radial distortion and with a 90 deg circumferential distortion imposed on the inlet flow. The rotor with the lowest meridional velocity ratio (less than 0.9 at the tip) demonstrated the least degradation of performance due to these distortions. Loss and deviation angle data (as needed for performance prediction with radial distortion) calculated along actual streamlines for radially distorted flow and correlated against diffusion factor, showed consistent agreement with data calculated along design streamlines for undistorted flow.

  19. Origins of Solar Systems: Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise to Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We have continued the super high resolution (R is approximately 200,000), high S/N (> 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D coude. A long observing run in October 2002 was quite successful (8 clear nights). We now have close to three years of data, which begins to sample a good fraction of the magnetic cycle timescales for some of our targets (e.g., K Ceti; P(sub cyc)=5.6 yrs). This will be very helpful in unraveling the complex relationships between plage and v(sub r), changes which we have uncovered. A preliminary analysis of the limited data in hand, and find some tantalizing evidence for correlations between median line bisector displacement and radial velocity v(sub r). The correlation appears to be specific to the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate. Additional information regarding progress on the grant is included.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity curve of 51 Peg (Birkby+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, J. L.; de Kok, R. J.; Brogi, M.; Schwarz, H.; Snellen, I. A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Table 1 and span observing dates from 1994 September 15 to 2014 July 9, resulting in 639 radial velocity measurements over 20 years. The table includes the discovery measurements from the ELODIE spectrograph at Observatoire Haute Provence and subsequent additional monitoring. We took these radial velocity measurements from the Naef et al. 2004 (Cat. J/A+A/414/351) compilation. We also included the legacy data set from Lick Observatory observed with the Hamilton spectrograph, taking measurements from the self-consistent reprocessing of all the Lick spectra presented by Fischer et al. 2014 (Cat. J/ApJS/210/5). Finally, we included more recent additional monitoring from the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) at the Keck Observatory, and extracted RVs from observations with the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) at the ESO-3.6m telescope in 2013 (ESO program ID 091.C-0271, PI: Santos). The reduced HARPS spectra were obtained from the ESO Science Archive (http://archive.eso.org/wdb/wdb/adp/phase3_spectral/query). (1 data file).

  1. Radial gradient of solar wind velocity from 1 to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, H. R.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Solar wind velocity measurements made by Pioneers 10 and 11 are compared to investigate radial variations in the velocity at heliocentric distances of 1 to 5 AU. Two hundred days of corresponding Pioneer 10 and 11 data are plotted, the velocity profiles for 25-day segments are compared, and the same general pattern of peaks and troughs is found in the corresponding profiles. A comparison of the relative smoothness of the profiles clearly shows that velocity amplitudes in the solar wind stream structure decrease dramatically with increasing radial distance from the sun, although the rate of decrease is not as clear. It is hypothesized that stream-stream interactions play a dominant part in inhibiting the classical radial expansion process in the solar wind and produce scattering centers which prevent the observation of a significant galactic cosmic ray gradient in this region of space.

  2. Shear wave velocity and radial anisotropy beneath the Wyoming craton: craton destruction and lithospheric layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, R.; Li, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Wyoming craton has evolved under an intriguing geological history with suture zones, accreted margins, flat-slab subduction, orogeny and an encroaching hotspot. Whether and how the cratonic root has been widely destroyed by the series of tectonic events remain controversial. Aiming to address these questions using a craton-wide model, we have analyzed Rayleigh and Love wave data from 75 earthquakes recorded by 103 USArray TA stations in the Wyoming craton. 2-D phase velocity maps are constructed for 18 periods from 20 s to 166 s using the two-plane-wave tomography. The Yellowstone hotspot and the Cheyenne belt are characterized by low velocity anomalies at all periods in both Rayleigh and Love wave models. The northern craton in Montana is broadly fast at periods < 70 s and is relatively slow at longer periods, suggesting a shallower lithosphere. The fast anomaly in Wyoming has a NE-SW trend and extends to more than 200 km in the VSV model. However, such a fast anomaly is largely absent in the Love wave images at long periods. The association of VSV>VSH with this deep fast anomaly indicates mantle downwelling beneath south-central Wyoming. Mantle upwelling likely happens in slow regions at the hotspot, the Cheyenne belt, and the northeastern craton. The overall pattern of velocity anomaly and radial anisotropy suggests that small-scale mantle convection is vigorously acting beneath the Wyoming craton and continuously destructing the cratonic lithosphere. In addition, the average VSV and VSH models show a strong positive radial anisotropy of 5% (VSH>VSV) above 100 km and a weak negative anisotropy (VSV>VSH) below 120 km. Such a significant change in radial anisotropy could contribute to the observed mid-lithosphere discontinuity (MLD) from receiver functions. Both VSV and VSH reveal a fast lid above 100 km and a large velocity reduction at the depths of 115-190 km, corresponding with a lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) at 150 km. These observations

  3. Detection of a radial velocity gradient in the extended local disc with RAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, A.; Famaey, B.; Minchev, I.; Seabroke, G. M.; Binney, J.; Burnett, B.; Freeman, K. C.; Williams, M.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Campbell, R.; Fulbright, J. P.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. A.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.

    2011-04-01

    Using a sample of 213 713 stars from the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey, limited to a distance of 2 kpc from the Sun and to |z| < 1 kpc, we report the detection of a velocity gradient of disc stars in the fourth quadrant, directed radially from the Galactic Centre. In the direction of the Galactic Centre, we apply a simple method independent of stellar proper motions and of Galactic parameters to assess the existence of this gradient in the RAVE data. This velocity gradient corresponds to |K+C| > rsim 3 km s-1 kpc-1, where K and C are the Oort constants measuring the local divergence and radial shear of the velocity field, respectively. In order to illustrate the effect, assuming a zero radial velocity of the local standard of rest we then reconstruct the two-dimensional Galactocentric velocity maps using two different sets of proper motions and photometric distances based either on isochrone fitting or on K-band magnitudes, and considering two sets of values for the Galactocentric radius of the Sun and local circular speed. Further observational confirmation of our finding with line-of-sight velocities of stars at low latitudes, together with further modelling, should help constrain the non-axisymmetric components of the Galactic potential, including the bar, the spiral arms and possibly the ellipticity of the dark halo.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of wide doubles (Halbwachs+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J. L.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S.

    2012-04-01

    Wide binaries are tracers of the gravity field of the Galaxy, but their study requires some caution. A large list of common proper motion stars selected from the third Astronomischen Gesellschaft Katalog (AGK3) was monitored with the CORAVEL (for COrrelation RAdial VELocities) spectrovelocimeter, in order to prepare a sample of physical binaries with very wide separations. 66 stars received special attention, since their radial velocities (RV) seemed to be variable. These stars were monitored over several years in order to derive the elements of their spectroscopic orbits. In addition, 10 of them received accurate RV measurements from the SOPHIE spectrograph of the T193 telescope at the Observatory of Haute-Provence. For deriving the orbital elements of double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2), a new method was applied, which assumed that the RV of blended measurements are linear combinations of the RV of the components. 13 SB2 orbits were thus calculated. The orbital elements were eventually obtained for 52 spectroscopic binaries (SB), two of them making a triple system. 40 SB received their first orbit and the orbital elements were improved for 10 others. In addition, 11 SB were discovered with very long periods for which the orbital parameters were not found. The median period of the 40 first orbits is 1yr, and several SB should be resolved or should receive an astrometric orbit in future, providing the masses of the components. In addition, it appeared that HD 153252 has a close companion, which is a candidate brown dwarf with a minimum mass of 50 Jupiter masses. (4 data files).

  5. Limitations of Precise Radial-Velocity Measurements in Pulsating Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinkó, J.; Kaszás, G.; Kiss, L. L.

    We have studied the velocities of specific stellar absorption lines emerging from the atmospheres of Cepheid-type variable stars using newly obtained high-resolution echelle spectra. The spectra covered the interval 5860 - 6660 Angstroms with a resolution of 40,000. Both the cross-correlation method and the line bisector method using individual lines with specific excitation potential were applied to derive radial velocities. Our tests showed that these methods have internal accuracy of better than 100 m/s. Typical velocity differences of 3 - 5 km/s were found between photospheric lines having low- and high-excitation potentials in the case of long-period (P > 10 days) Cepheids. These differences are smaller, about 1 km/s or less, for the shorter period Cepheids. Furthermore, we have compared two very accurate techniques (Coravel and iodine-cell method) using recently published radial velocities. Systematic differences have been found between the shapes of these velocity curves, especially around the phase of velocity reversal. We conclude that these velocity differences could cause a few km/s ambiguity even in the best-quality Cepheid radial velocity curves that were obtained averaging the velocities of many lines. This may result in an uncertainty of Cepheid radii derived from Baade-Wesselink methods.

  6. Radial gradient of solar wind velocity from 1 to 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, H. R.; Wolfe, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Solar wind velocities have been measured on a daily basis from data obtained by the Ames Research Center plasma analyzers on both Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11. A comparison between the time profiles of the solar wind velocities observed at the two spacecraft shows that the solar wind has the same major features, such as high velocity streams, out to at least 5 astronomical units (AU) from the sun. Major features in the velocity time profile observed first at Pioneer 11 are seen later at Pioneer 10 with a delay consistent with the respective heliocentric longitudes of the two spacecraft, their radial distances from the sun, and the solar wind velocity. A more detailed comparison between the velocity measurements made at Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 shows that the range of solar wind velocities decreases with increasing radial distance from the sun. Although the average value of the solar wind velocity as measured over a sufficiently long period is approximately the same at both spacecraft, the deviations to higher and lower velocities are less at a greater radial distance from the sun.

  7. Radial velocity curves of ellipsoidal red giant binaries in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R. E-mail: peter.wood@anu.edu.au

    2014-12-01

    Ellipsoidal red giant binaries are close binary systems where an unseen, relatively close companion distorts the red giant, leading to light variations as the red giant moves around its orbit. These binaries are likely to be the immediate evolutionary precursors of close binary planetary nebula and post-asymptotic giant branch and post-red giant branch stars. Due to the MACHO and OGLE photometric monitoring projects, the light variability nature of these ellipsoidal variables has been well studied. However, due to the lack of radial velocity curves, the nature of their masses, separations, and other orbital details has so far remained largely unknown. In order to improve this situation, we have carried out spectral monitoring observations of a large sample of 80 ellipsoidal variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud and we have derived radial velocity curves. At least 12 radial velocity points with good quality were obtained for most of the ellipsoidal variables. The radial velocity data are provided with this paper. Combining the photometric and radial velocity data, we present some statistical results related to the binary properties of these ellipsoidal variables.

  8. Transit and radial velocity survey efficiency comparison for a habitable zone Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, Christopher J.

    2014-09-01

    Transit and radial velocity searches are two techniques for identifying nearby extrasolar planets to Earth that transit bright stars. Identifying a robust sample of these exoplanets around bright stars for detailed atmospheric characterization is a major observational undertaking. In this study we describe a framework that answers the question of whether a transit or radial velocity survey is more efficient at finding transiting exoplanets given the same amount of observing time. Within the framework we show that a transit survey's window function can be approximated using the hypergeometric probability distribution. We estimate the observing time required for a transit survey to find a transiting Earth-sized exoplanet in the habitable zone (HZ) with an emphasis on late-type stars. We also estimate the radial velocity precision necessary to detect the equivalent HZ Earth-mass exoplanet that also transits when using an equal amount of observing time as the transit survey. We find that a radial velocity survey with σ{sub rv} ∼ 0.6 m s{sup –1} precision has comparable efficiency in terms of observing time to a transit survey with the requisite photometric precision σ{sub phot} ∼ 300 ppm to find a transiting Earth-sized exoplanet in the HZ of late M dwarfs. For super-Earths, a σ{sub rv} ∼ 2.0 m s{sup –1} precision radial velocity survey has comparable efficiency to a transit survey with σ{sub phot} ∼ 2300 ppm.

  9. Flow Visualization and Radial Velocity Measurements of Entrainment in an Axisymmetric Turbulent Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcone, Anthony M.; Cataldo, Joseph C.

    1998-11-01

    A submerged, axisymmetric turbulent jet of water was studied using a laser Doppler anemometer (LDA). Mean radial and turbulent radial velocity profiles within the irrotational ambient region (external to the jet) and rotational region (within the jet) were measured up to 40 jet diameters. Flow visualization studies (photographs and video) were conducted using incandescent light sheets with LDA tracer particles. These visual observations reveal detailed turbulent flow structure. Trailing ends of turbulent eddies at the jet edge travel opposite to the mean axial flow. The intermittency surface undulates irregularly and resembles a violently perturbed boundary layer between two immiscible liquids. Irrotational ambient fluid follows parabolic streamlines into the jet, but only when perceived as a time average. Mean radial velocity profiles, measured with an LDA, followed typical "Double S" curves. The mean radial velocity in the irrotational region of the jet was found to be an inverse function of radial distance measured from the jet axis, for any given axial location. This evidence proves there is no entrainment velocity that is directly proportional to the local axial velocity: the key assumption to jet entrainment theory.

  10. Long-term radial-velocity variations of the Sun as a star: The HARPS view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.; Molaro, P.; Monaco, L.; Haywood, R. D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Stellar radial velocities play a fundamental role in the discovery of extrasolar planets and the measurement of their physical parameters as well as in the study of stellar physical properties. Aims: We investigate the impact of the solar activity on the radial velocity of the Sun using the HARPS spectrograph to obtain measurements that can be directly compared with those acquired in the extrasolar planet search programmes. Methods: We used the Moon, the Galilean satellites, and several asteroids as reflectors to measure the radial velocity of the Sun as a star and correlated this velocity with disc-integrated chromospheric and magnetic indexes of solar activity that are similar to stellar activity indexes. We discuss in detail the systematic effects that affect our measurements and the methods to account for them. Results: We find that the radial velocity of the Sun as a star is positively correlated with the level of its chromospheric activity at ~95 percent significance level. The amplitude of the long-term variation measured in the 2006-2014 period is 4.98 ± 1.44 m/s, which is in good agreement with model predictions. The standard deviation of the residuals obtained by subtracting a linear best fit is 2.82 m/s and is due to the rotation of the reflecting bodies and the intrinsic variability of the Sun on timescales shorter than the activity cycle. A correlation with a lower significance is detected between the radial velocity and the mean absolute value of the line-of-sight photospheric magnetic field flux density. Conclusions: Our results confirm similar correlations found in other late-type main-sequence stars and provide support to the predictions of radial velocity variations induced by stellar activity based on current models.

  11. Bayesian Planet Searches for the 10 cm/s Radial Velocity Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Philip C.

    2016-10-01

    A new apodized Keplerian model is proposed for the analysis of precision radial velocity (RV) data to model both planetary and stellar activity (SA) induced RV signals. A symmetrical Gaussian apodization function with unknown width and center can distinguish planetary signals from SA signals on the basis of the width of the apodization function. The general model for m apodized Keplerian signals also includes a linear regression term between RV and the stellar activity diagnostic In (R'hk), as well as an extra Gaussian noise term with unknown standard deviation. The model parameters are explored using a Bayesian fusion MCMC code. A differential version of the Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodogram provides an additional way of distinguishing SA signals and helps guide the choice of new periods. Sample results are reported for a recent international RV blind challenge which included multiple state of the art simulated data sets supported by a variety of stellar activity diagnostics.

  12. RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM VLT-KMOS SPECTRA OF GIANT STARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER NGC 6388

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Valenti, E.; Cirasuolo, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present new radial velocity measurements for 82 stars, members of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6388, obtained from ESO-VLT K-band Multi Object Spectrograph (KMOS) spectra acquired during the instrument Science Verification. The accuracy of the wavelength calibration is discussed and a number of tests of the KMOS response are presented. The cluster systemic velocity obtained (81.3 ± 1.5 km s{sup –1}) is in very good agreement with previous determinations. While a hint of ordered rotation is found between 9'' and 20'' from the cluster center, where the distribution of radial velocities is clearly bimodal, more data are needed before drawing any firm conclusions. The acquired sample of radial velocities has also been used to determine the cluster velocity dispersion (VD) profile between ∼9'' and 70'', supplementing previous measurements at r < 2'' and r > 60'' obtained with ESO-SINFONI and ESO-FLAMES spectroscopy, respectively. The new portion of the VD profile nicely matches the previous ones, better defining the knee of the distribution. The present work clearly shows the effectiveness of a deployable integral field unit in measuring the radial velocities of individual stars for determining the VD profile of Galactic GCs. It represents the pilot project for an ongoing large program with KMOS and FLAMES at the ESO-VLT, aimed at determining the next generation of VD and rotation profiles for a representative sample of GCs.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of K-M dwarfs (Sperauskas+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperauskas, J.; Bartasiute, S.; Boyle, R. P.; Deveikis, V.; Raudeliunas, S.; Upgren, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    We analyzed nearly 3300 measurements of radial velocities for 1049 K-M dwarfs, that we obtained during the past decade with a CORAVEL-type instrument, with a primary emphasis on detecting and eliminating from kinematic calculations the spectroscopic binaries and binary candidates. We present the catalog of our observations of radial velocities for 959 stars which are not suspected of velocity variability. Of these, 776 stars are from the MCC sample and 173 stars are K-M dwarfs from the CNS4. The catalog consists of two parts: Table 2 lists the mean radial velocities, and Table 2a contains individual measurements. Our radial velocities agree with the best published standard stars to within 0.7km/s in precision. Combining these and supplementary radial-velocity data with Hipparcos/Tycho-2 astrometry (Table 4 summarizes input observational data) we calculated the space velocity components and parameters of the galactic orbits in a three-component model potential by Johnston K.V. et al. (1995ApJ...451..598J) for a total of 1088 K-M dwarfs (Table 5), that we use for kinematical analysis and for the identification of possible candidate members of nearby stellar kinematic groups. We identified 146 stars as possible candidate members of the classical moving groups and known or suspected subgroups (Table 7). We show that the distributions of space-velocity components, orbital eccentricities, and maximum distances from the Galactic plane for nearby K-M dwarfs are consistent with the presence of young, intermediate-age and old populations of the thin disk and a small fraction (3%) of stars with the thick disk kinematics. (7 data files).

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in Omega Cen (NGC5139) (Reijns+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijns, R. A.; Seitzer, P.; Arnold, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Ingerson, T.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; van de Ven, G.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    2005-11-01

    List of 1966 radial velocity measurements of stars in globular cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) taken with the ARGUS multi-object spectrometer at the CTIO 4m Blanco telescope. All the stars have a B magnitude brighter than 16.5. The median error is less than 2km/s. The stars are numbered using their LID (Leiden Identification Number) from van Leeuwen et.al. (2000, Cat. ). In a companion paper by van de Ven et al. (2006A&A...445..513V), we correct these radial velocities for the perspective rotation caused by the space motion of the cluster. Additionaly 339 stars where measured. These consist of (i) 87 stars with B-V<0.4, (ii) 252 stars not in the van Leeuwen et al. catalog. We suspect that that many of these stars have an erroneous value for their radial velocity. (2 data files).

  15. The OCCASO survey: presentation and radial velocities of 12 Milky Way open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamiquela, L.; Carrera, R.; Jordi, C.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Pancino, E.; Hidalgo, S. L.; Martínez-Vázquez, C. E.; Murabito, S.; del Pino, A.; Aparicio, A.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Gallart, C.

    2016-05-01

    Open clusters (OCs) are crucial for studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, the lack of a large number of OCs analysed homogeneously hampers the investigations about chemical patterns and the existence of Galactocentric radial and vertical gradients, or an age-metallicity relation. To overcome this, we have designed the Open Cluster Chemical Abundances from Spanish Observatories (OCCASO) survey. We aim to provide homogeneous radial velocities, physical parameters and individual chemical abundances of six or more red clump stars for a sample of 25 old and intermediate-age OCs visible from the Northern hemisphere. To do so, we use high-resolution spectroscopic facilities (R ≥ 62 000) available at Spanish observatories. We present the motivation, design and current status of the survey, together with the first data release of radial velocities for 77 stars in 12 OCs, which represents about 50 per cent of the survey. We include clusters never studied with high-resolution spectroscopy before (NGC 1907, NGC 6991, NGC 7762), and clusters in common with other large spectroscopic surveys like the Gaia-ESO Survey (NGC 6705) and Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (NGC 2682 and NGC 6819). We perform internal comparisons between instruments to evaluate and correct internal systematics of the results, and compare our radial velocities with previous determinations in the literature, when available. Finally, radial velocities for each cluster are used to perform a preliminary kinematic study in relation with the Galactic disc.

  16. Cortisone injection with anesthetic additives for radial epicondylalgia (tennis elbow).

    PubMed

    Sölveborn, S A; Buch, F; Mallmin, H; Adalberth, G

    1995-07-01

    In a prospective, randomized, double-blind study of radial epicondylalgia (tennis elbow), 109 patients with an average symptom duration of 8 months were considered for treatment with a single 1-mL injection of the steroid triamcinolone combined with either lidocaine or bupivacaine. The patients received clinical examinations at regular intervals for 1 year, and followup included visual analog pain scale and questionnaires. The 2 groups were comparable and for many factors distributed completely evenly with respect to gender, age, symptom duration, side dominance, type of pain onset, earlier treatment, and occupational loading. The only difference between the groups receiving lidocaine or bupivacaine was found at 2 weeks, when the bupivacaine additive yielded a better outcome for patients who had not been treated in any way before, for those with a short history of epicondylalgia, or both. The steroid injection treatment, regardless of which local anesthetic was given, presented a typical pattern, with symptoms relieved quickly by 2 weeks and then deterioration for many patients at 3 months, indicating a tendency to recurrence. A considerable loss of patients to other treatments at the 1-year followup indicated an equivocal long-term result. Patients who had not been treated earlier in any way had a more favorable prognosis, as did those with a history of epicondylalgia to 3 months.

  17. A demonstration device to simulate the radial velocity method for exoplanet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choopan, W.; Liewrian, W.; Ketpichainarong, W.; Panijpan, B.

    2016-07-01

    A device for simulating exoplanet detection by the radial method based on the Doppler principle has been constructed. The spectral shift of light from a distant star, mutually revolving with the exoplanet, is simulated by the spectral shift of the sound wave emitted by the device’s star approaching and receding relative to the static frequency detector. The detected sound frequency shift reflects the relative velocity of the ‘star’ very well. Both teachers and students benefit from the radial velocity method and the transit method (published by us previously) provided by this device.

  18. The Radial Velocity Variability of alpha Persei: A Low-Amplitude Cepheid outside the Instability Strip?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Cochran, William D.

    1995-10-01

    Precise radial velocity measurements (σ ˜ 35 m s-1) are presented for the F5 supergiant alpha Per. Low-amplitude variations with a 2K amplitude of 300 m s-1 and a period of 87.7 days, or a possible (but less likely) period of 9.80 days, are detected. The favored period of 87.7 days most likely arises from rotational modulation by surface features or nonradial pulsations. If the radial velocity variations of α Per result from pulsations, then this star may represent a case for Cepheid-like pulsations in a star just outside of the known boundary of the Cepheid instability strip.

  19. Frequentist and Bayesian Orbital Parameter Estimaton from Radial Velocity Data Using RVLIN, BOOTTRAN, and RUN DMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Benjamin Earl; Wright, Jason Thomas; Wang, Sharon

    2015-08-01

    For this hack session, we will present three tools used in analyses of radial velocity exoplanet systems. RVLIN is a set of IDL routines used to quickly fit an arbitrary number of Keplerian curves to radial velocity data to find adequate parameter point estimates. BOOTTRAN is an IDL-based extension of RVLIN to provide orbital parameter uncertainties using bootstrap based on a Keplerian model. RUN DMC is a highly parallelized Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm that employs an n-body model, primarily used for dynamically complex or poorly constrained exoplanet systems. We will compare the performance of these tools and their applications to various exoplanet systems.

  20. Radial velocities of blue stragglers in the old open cluster NGC 7789

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drilling, J. S.; Schoenberner, D.

    NGC 7789 is a populous, old galactic cluster with a large number of blue stragglers. In an attempt to determine the stellar parameters of as many of these objects as possible in order to unravel their origin, the brighter blue stragglers of NGC 7789 were observed with the 4-meter echelle spectrograph at Kitt Peak and the 2.2-meter coude spectrograph at Calar Alto. This paper reports on the determination of radial velocities from these high resolution spectra. The results are compared with the previous radial velocity studies of Strom and Strom (1970) and Stryker and Hrivnak (1984).

  1. Radial Velocities and Binarity of Southern SIM Grid Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    up of the in- strument and the observing technique are similar to those used for the exoplanet search programme (Queloz et al. 2000). Additional...principle, even giant exoplanets can be detected with three observations. The range of confidence levels between 0.993 and 0.999 99 corresponds to

  2. Mapping surface currents from HF radar radial velocity measurements using optimal interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Yong; Terrill, Eric J.; Cornuelle, Bruce D.

    2008-10-01

    An optimal interpolation (OI) method to compute surface vector current fields from radial velocity measurements derived from high-frequency (HF) radars is presented. The method assumes a smooth spatial covariance relationship between neighboring vector currents, in contrast to the more commonly used un-weighted least-squares fitting (UWLS) method, which assumes a constant vector velocity within a defined search radius. This OI method can directly compute any quantities linearly related to the radial velocities, such as vector currents and dynamic quantities (divergence and vorticity) as well as the uncertainties of those respective fields. The OI method is found to be more stable than the UWLS method and reduces spurious vector solutions near the baselines between HF radar installations. The OI method produces a covariance of the uncertainty of the estimated vector current fields. Three nondimensional uncertainty indices are introduced to characterize the uncertainty of the vector current at a point, representing an ellipse with directional characteristics. The vector current estimation using the OI method eliminates the need for multiple mapping steps and optimally fills intermittent coverage gaps. The effects of angular interpolation of radial velocities, a commonly used step in the preprocessing of radial velocity data prior to vector current computation in the UWLS method, are presented.

  3. An Inexpensive Field-Widened Monolithic Michelson Interferometer for Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ge, Jian; Fleming, Scott W.; Wan, Xiaoke; DeWitt, Curtis; van Eyken, Julian C.; McDavitt, Dan

    2008-09-01

    We have constructed a thermally compensated field-widened monolithic Michelson interferometer that can be used with a medium-resolution spectrograph to measure precise Doppler radial velocities of stars. Our prototype monolithic fixed-delay interferometer is constructed with off-the-shelf components and assembled using a hydrolysis bonding technique. We installed and tested this interferometer in the Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instrument at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope, an instrument built to demonstrate the principles of dispersed fixed-delay interferometry. An iodine cell allows the interferometer drift to be accurately calibrated, relaxing the stability requirements on the interferometer itself. When using our monolithic interferometer, the ET instrument has no moving parts (except the iodine cell), greatly simplifying its operation. We demonstrate differential radial velocity precision of a few m s-1 on well known radial velocity standards and planet bearing stars when using this interferometer. Such monolithic interferometers will make it possible to build relatively inexpensive instruments that are easy to operate and capable of precision radial velocity measurements. A larger multiobject version of the Exoplanet Tracker will be used to conduct a large scale survey for planetary systems as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III). Variants of the techniques and principles discussed in this paper can be directly applied to build large monolithic interferometers for such applications, enabling the construction of instruments capable of efficiently observing many stars simultaneously at high velocity precision.

  4. THE BULGE RADIAL VELOCITY ASSAY (BRAVA). II. COMPLETE SAMPLE AND DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Kunder, Andrea; De Propris, Roberto; Stubbs, Scott A.; Koch, Andreas; Michael Rich, R.; Johnson, Christian I.; Reitzel, David B.; Howard, Christian D.; Shen Juntai; Wang Yougang; Robin, Annie C.; Kormendy, John; Soto, Mario; Frinchaboy, Peter; Zhao Hongsheng; Origlia, Livia

    2012-03-15

    We present new radial velocity measurements from the Bulge Radial Velocity Assay, a large-scale spectroscopic survey of M-type giants in the Galactic bulge/bar region. The sample of {approx}4500 new radial velocities, mostly in the region -10 Degree-Sign < l < +10 Degree-Sign and b Almost-Equal-To -6 Degree-Sign , more than doubles the existent published data set. Our new data extend our rotation curve and velocity dispersion profile to +20 Degree-Sign , which is {approx}2.8 kpc from the Galactic center. The new data confirm the cylindrical rotation observed at -6 Degree-Sign and -8 Degree-Sign and are an excellent fit to the Shen et al. N-body bar model. We measure the strength of the TiO{epsilon} molecular band as a first step toward a metallicity ranking of the stellar sample, from which we confirm the presence of a vertical abundance gradient. Our survey finds no strong evidence of previously unknown kinematic streams. We also publish our complete catalog of radial velocities, photometry, TiO band strengths, and spectra, which is available at the Infrared Science Archive as well as at UCLA.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-117b photometry and radial velocities (Lendl+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendl, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Doyle, A. P.; Gillon, M.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Neveu-Vanmalle, M.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Segransan, D.; Smalley, B.; Smith, A. M. S.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R.

    2014-08-01

    We present photometric time-series obtained with EulerCam and TRAPPIST during one and four transits of WASP-117, respectively. We also present radial velocity data from CORALIE and HARPS used to characterize the planetary orbit. (4 data files).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Coralie radial velocities for l Car (Anderson+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. I.; Merand, A.; Kervella, P.; Breitfelder, J.; Lebouquin, J.-B.; Eyer, L.; Gallenne, A.; Palaversa, L.; Semaan, T.; Saesen, S.; Mowlavi, N.

    2016-07-01

    360 radial velocity measurements (RVs) of {ell} Carinae are made publicly available. These RVs were measured using optical spectra observed with the Coralie spectrograph mounted to the 1.2m Swiss Euler telescope situated at La Silla Observatory, Chile. (1 data file).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial Velocities along Southern Galactic Equator (Denoyelle 1987)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoyelle, J.

    1996-08-01

    This catalog contains a list of radial velocities, obtained from "Grand Prisme Objectif" (GPO) plates from La Silla, for 764 stars in three fields in the Vela-Carina region of the galaxy. The method of reduction is described in Duflot and Fehrenbach (1955) and Duflot et al. (1958). (1 data file).

  8. Daily variability of Ceres' albedo detected by means of radial velocities changes of the reflected sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, P.; Lanza, A. F.; Monaco, L.; Tosi, F.; Lo Curto, G.; Fulle, M.; Pasquini, L.

    2016-05-01

    Bright features have been recently discovered by Dawn on Ceres, which extend previous photometric and Space Telescope observations. These features should produce distortions of the line profiles of the reflected solar spectrum and therefore an apparent radial velocity variation modulated by the rotation of the dwarf planet. Here we report on two sequences of observations of Ceres performed in the nights of 2015 July 31, August 26 and 27 by means of the high-precision High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectrograph at the 3.6 m La Silla European Southern Observatory (ESO) telescope. The observations revealed a quite complex behaviour which likely combines a radial velocity modulation due to the rotation with an amplitude of ≈±6 m s-1 and an unexpected diurnal effect. The latter changes imply changes in the albedo of Occator's bright features due to the blaze produced by the exposure to solar radiation. The short-term variability of Ceres' albedo is on time-scales ranging from hours to months and can both be confirmed and followed by means of dedicated radial velocity observations.

  9. PlanetPack: Radial-velocity time-series analysis tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2013-11-01

    PlanetPack facilitates and standardizes the advanced analysis of radial velocity (RV) data for the goal of exoplanets detection, characterization, and basic dynamical N-body simulations. PlanetPack is a command-line interpreter that can run either in an interactive mode or in a batch mode of automatic script interpretation.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SEP stars radial velocities (Fremat+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremat, Y.; Altmann, M.; Pancino, E.; Soubiran, C.; Jofre, P.; Damerdji, Y.; Heiter, U.; Royer, F.; Seabroke, G.; Sordo, R.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Jasniewicz, G.; Martayan, C.; Thevenin, F.; Vallenari, A.; Blomme, R.; David, M.; Gosset, E.; Katz, D.; Viala, Y.; Boudreault, S.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Lobel, A.; Meisenheimer, K.; Nordlander, T.; Raskin, G.; Royer, P.; Zorec, J.

    2016-10-01

    The tables contain a description of the observations we performed with the GIRAFFE and UVES spectrographs of a sample of targets found in the South Ecliptic Pole. Radial velocities and astrophysical parameters were derived, and the variability of the RVs was assessed. (7 data files).

  11. High-Resolution Radial Velocity Mapping of Optical Filaments in Evolved Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greidanus, H.; Strom, R. G.

    The authors report on observations of the kinematical structure of optical filaments in evolved supernova remnants, using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. The radial velocity characteristics as seen in [O III] λ5007 emission in one area in the Cygnus Loop are described, where four kinematically different components contributing to the emission can be recognized.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity monitoring of 5 FGK stars (Endl+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, M.; Brugamyer, E. J.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Robertson, P.; Meschiari, S.; Ramirez, I.; Shetrone, M.; Gullikson, K.; Johnson, M. C.; Wittenmyer, R.; Horner, J.; Ciardi, D. R.; Horch, E.; Simon, A. E.; Howell, S. B.; Everett, M.; Caldwell, C.; Castanheira, B. G.

    2016-04-01

    Our radial velocity (RV) measurements were obtained using the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith Telescope (HJST; R=60000, 3750-10200Å). For HD 95872, we also obtained 10 precise RV measurements using the 10m Keck I and its HIRES spectrograph (R=50000). (6 data files).

  13. Calculating the Orbit of a Double Star with Visual; Interferometric; and Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branham, R. L., Jr.

    Double, or binary, stars are of vital importance to astronomy because visual or interferometric observations of the system permit one to determine the sum of the masses of the components if we also know the star's parallax. If radial velocities are also available, one can independently calculate the distance of the system and the individual masses. A new method, based on semi-definite programming (SDP), calculates the apparent orbit of a binary star using visual/interferometric observations and radial velocities. SDP offers advantages over other methods: the calculated ellipse is unique, it represents a global minimum of the reduction criterion if that criterion is the robust L1 norm, and allows mixing different norms for the visual and for the radial velocity data. SDP is compared with alternative methods such as use of a linear reduction model and use of nonlinear least squares. An orbit for Capella (Alpha Aurigae), based on 169 interferometric observations made between 1919 and 1999 and 221 radial velocities made between 1896 and 1991, is calculated.

  14. Modeling the Radial Velocity Curve of the Water Vapor Maser in VX UMa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, D. M.; Benson, P. J.; Strelnitski, V. S.

    1999-12-01

    VX UMa is a unique Mira-type star that demonstrates a triple-peaked spectrum of its 1.35-cm H2O maser emission. We used the high-precision curves of radial velocities of the spectral peaks, obtained by Benson & Little-Marenin from 1988 to 1992, as probes of the kinematics of the masing region. The pronounced periodicity of the radial velocity of the central component, with a period equal to the pulsational period of the optical variations, suggests the involvement of pulsations in the observed excursions of radial velocity. However, the radial velocity of the central spectral component produced by a symmetrical, pulsating spherical layer should be constantly zero. Rotation seems to be the most obvious mechanism to impart a small non-zero component to the central feature. We assume that the bulk of maser radiation originates in the equatorial "belt" around the star and approximate this region as a two-dimensional, rotating and pulsating ring. We found that any combination of rotation and pulsation produces a quadruple peaked, not a triple peaked spectrum. Therefore, some asymmetry in the disk or unequal absorption of the two central peaks by ionized gas (e.g. in the shock responsible for the maser emission) is needed. We demonstrate that one of the central peaks can then undergo periodic changes of its radial velocity with the period of pulsation, as observed. A VLBA experiment that may verify our model is under way. This project was supported by the NSF/REU grant AST-9820555.

  15. The first radial velocity measurements of a microlensing event: no evidence for the predicted binary⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Santerne, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Fakhardji, W.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S. G.; Ranc, C.

    2015-10-01

    The gravitational microlensing technique allows the discovery of exoplanets around stars distributed in the disk of the galaxy towards the bulge. The alignment of two stars that led to the discovery is unique over the timescale of a human life, however, and cannot be re-observed. Moreover, the target host is often very faint and located in a crowded region. These difficulties hamper and often make impossible the follow up of the target and study of its possible companions. A radial-velocity curve was predicted for the binary system, OGLE-2011-BLG-0417, discovered and characterised from a microlensing event. We used the UVES spectrograph mounted at the VLT, ESO to derive precise radial-velocity measurements of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. To gather high-precision radial velocities on faint targets of microlensing events, we proposed to use the source star as a reference to measure the lens radial velocities. We obtained ten radial velocities on the putative V = 18 lens with a dispersion of ~100 m s-1, spread over one year. Our measurements do not confirm the microlensing prediction for this binary system. The most likely scenario is that the putative V = 18 mag lens is actually a blend and not the primary lens which is 2 mag fainter. Further observations and analyses are needed to understand the microlensing observation and infer on the nature and characteristics of the lens itself. Based on observations made with ESO Telescope at the Paranal Observatory under program ID 092.C-0763(A) and 093.C-0532(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Eclipsing binaries and fast rotators in the Kepler sample. Characterization via radial velocity analysis from Calar Alto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Mancini, L.; Henning, Th.; Figueira, P.; Ciceri, S.; Santos, N.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The Kepler mission has searched for planetary transits in more than two hundred thousand stars by obtaining very accurate photometric data over a long period of time. Among the thousands of detected candidates, the planetary nature of around 15% has been established or validated by different techniques. But additional data are needed to characterize the rest of the candidates and reject other possible configurations. Aims: We started a follow-up program to validate, confirm, and characterize some of the planet candidates. In this paper we present the radial velocity analysis of those that present large variations, which are compatible with being eclipsing binaries. We also study those showing high rotational velocities, which prevents us from reaching the necessary precision to detect planetary-like objects. Methods: We present new radial velocity results for 13 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) obtained with the CAFE spectrograph at the Calar Alto Observatory and analyze their high-spatial resolution (lucky) images obtained with AstraLux and the Kepler light curves of some interesting cases. Results: We have found five spectroscopic and eclipsing binaries (group A). Among them, the case of KOI-3853 is of particular interest. This system is a new example of the so-called heartbeat stars, showing dynamic tidal distortions in the Kepler light curve. We have also detected duration and depth variations of the eclipse. We suggest possible scenarios to explain such an effect, including the presence of a third substellar body possibly detected in our radial velocity analysis. We also provide upper mass limits to the transiting companions of six other KOIs with high rotational velocities (group B). This property prevents the radial velocity method from achieving the necessary precision to detect planetary-like masses. Finally, we analyze the large radial velocity variations of two other KOIs, which are incompatible with the presence of planetary-mass objects

  17. Radial-velocity variations in Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco, and Alpha Her

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.; Patten, B.M.; Goldberg, L. Computer Sciences Corp., Seabrook, MD Iowa State Univ., Ames )

    1989-12-01

    Radial-velocity observations of Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco A, and Alpha Her A are used to study radial-velocity periodicities in M supergiants. The data refer to several metallic lines in the H-alpha region and to H-alpha itself. It is shown that Alpha Ori and Alpha Sco A have cycle lengths of about 1 yr and semiamplitudes of 2 km/s. It is suggested that many semiregular red supergiant varibles such as Alpha Ori may be heading toward chaos. All three stars show short-term stochastic flucutations with an amplitude of 1-2 km/s. It is found that the long-term variability of H-alpha velocities may be a consequence of intermittent failed ejections. 58 refs.

  18. A catalog of rotational and radial velocities for evolved stars. V. Southern stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Medeiros, J. R.; Alves, S.; Udry, S.; Andersen, J.; Nordström, B.; Mayor, M.

    2014-01-01

    Rotational and radial velocities have been measured for 1589 evolved stars of spectral types F, G, and K and luminosity classes IV, III, II, and Ib, based on observations carried out with the CORAVEL spectrometers. The precision in radial velocity is better than 0.30 km s-1 per observation, whereas rotational velocity uncertainties are typically 1.0 km s-1 for subgiants and giants and 2.0 km s-1 for class II giants and Ib supergiants. Based on observations collected at the Haute-Provence Observatory, Saint-Michel, France, and at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A126

  19. Laser Frequency Comb Supported Stellar Radial Velocity Determination in the NIR: Initial Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Steve; Diddams, S.; Quinlan, F.; Ycas, G.; Mahadevan, S.; Ramsey, L.; Bender, C.; Terrien, R.; Botzer, B.; Redman, S.

    2011-09-01

    The laser frequency comb presents the potential for a revolutionary increase in radial velocity precision by providing a calibration reference of unprecedented quality in terms of wavelength knowledge, repeatability, number, density and regularity of lines. Promising first steps have been taken leading to the derivation of stellar radial velocities in the NIR H band, a wavelength range well suited to the observation of M dwarfs. These stars, with low mass and low luminosity, are the most prevalent class of stars within 10 parsecs and can be expected to yield a higher reflex velocity for a terrestrial mass planet in the liquid water habitable zone than would be the case with a more massive star such as our own. We present the design and both laboratory and on-sky performance of an H-band laser frequency comb used in conjunction with the Penn State Pathfinder testbed spectrograph and discuss lessons learned and plans for follow on testing.

  20. A new convergent point and distance modulus for the Hyades from radial velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, James E.; Griffin, R. F.; Griffin, R. E. M.; Zimmerman, Barbara A.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamics of the Hyades open star cluster is investigated analytically on the basis of the photoelectric radial velocities reported by Griffin et al. (1988). The methods used to determine the radial-velocity gradient, convergent point, and distance modulus are described, and the results are presented in tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Findings reported include convergent-point alpha = 98.2 + or - 1.1 deg and delta = 6.1 + or - 1.0 deg, space motion 48.0 + or - 0.27 km/s, distance to cluster center 45.4 + or - 2.1 pc, distance modulus 3.28 + or - 0.10, and cluster velocity dispersion 230 m/s.

  1. Radial velocities for the HIPPARCOS-Gaia Hundred-Thousand-Proper-Motion project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bruijne, J. H. J.; Eilers, A.-C.

    2012-10-01

    Context. The Hundred-Thousand-Proper-Motion (HTPM) project will determine the proper motions of ~113 500 stars using a ~23-year baseline. The proper motions will be based on space-based measurements exclusively, with the Hipparcos data, with epoch 1991.25, as first epoch and with the first intermediate-release Gaia astrometry, with epoch ~2014.5, as second epoch. The expected HTPM proper-motion standard errors are 30-190 μas yr-1, depending on stellar magnitude. Aims: Depending on the astrometric characteristics of an object, in particular its distance and velocity, its radial velocity can have a significant impact on the determination of its proper motion. The impact of this perspective acceleration is largest for fast-moving, nearby stars. Our goal is to determine, for each star in the Hipparcos catalogue, the radial-velocity standard error that is required to guarantee a negligible contribution of perspective acceleration to the HTPM proper-motion precision. Methods: We employ two evaluation criteria, both based on Monte-Carlo simulations, with which we determine which stars need to be spectroscopically (re-)measured. Both criteria take the Hipparcos measurement errors into account. The first criterion, the Gaussian criterion, is applicable to nearby stars. For distant stars, this criterion works but returns overly pessimistic results. We therefore use a second criterion, the robust criterion, which is equivalent to the Gaussian criterion for nearby stars but avoids biases for distant stars and/or objects without literature radial velocity. The robust criterion is hence our prefered choice for all stars, regardless of distance. Results: For each star in the Hipparcos catalogue, we determine the confidence level with which the available radial velocity and its standard error, taken from the XHIP compilation catalogue, are acceptable. We find that for 97 stars, the radial velocities available in the literature are insufficiently precise for a 68.27% confidence

  2. Celestial-mechanical interpretation of the two-way radio measurements of radial velocity of spacecraft for scientific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komovkin, S. V.; Lavrenov, S. M.; Tuchin, A. G.; Tuchin, D. A.; Yaroshevsky, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    The article describes a model of the two-way measurements of radial velocity based on the Doppler effect. The relations are presented for the instantaneous value of the increment range at the time of measurement and the radial velocity of the mid-dimensional interval. The compensation of methodological errors of interpretation of the two-way Doppler measurements is considered.

  3. Measurement of the Radial Velocity of Vega and SAO 104807 by high resolution spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, F.; Ordoñez, J.; Suarez, W.; Quijano, A.

    2017-07-01

    The radial velocity is the component of the velocity with which a celestial object approaches (blueshift) or go away (redshift) of the observer. The precise measurement of the redshift allowed to Humason and Hubble discover the expansion of the Universe. In 1998 two research teams simultaneously discovered that this expansion is accelerated, for that reason the hypothesis of the dark energy has been raised to explain the existing repulsion. The present work shows the measurement of the radial velocity of Vega and SAO104807 by high resolution spectrometry. Using the instruments of the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Nariño, located in the south of Colombia, was measured the displacement that the spectral lines of both celestial objects suffer due to the Doppler effect. The results obtained were quite close to those recorded in databases such as SIMBAD, according to the used equipment. The instruments used were: Celestron CGE Pro 1400 Telescope, Shelyak LHIRES III High Resolution Spectrometer and SBIG ST-8300 CCD Camera. The characteristics of the spectrometer are: Diffraction grating: 2400 lines/mm, Spectral dispersion (H alpha): 0:012 nm/pixel, Radial velocity resolution: 5 km/s.

  4. RADIAL VELOCITY ALONG THE VOYAGER 1 TRAJECTORY: THE EFFECT OF SOLAR CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Zank, G. P.; Borovikov, S. N.; Burlaga, L. F.; Decker, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2012-05-01

    As Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 are approaching the heliopause (HP)-the boundary between the solar wind (SW) and the local interstellar medium (LISM)-we expect new, unknown features of the heliospheric interface to be revealed. A seeming puzzle reported recently by Krimigis et al. concerns the unusually low, even negative, radial velocity components derived from the energetic ion distribution. Steady-state plasma models of the inner heliosheath (IHS) show that the radial velocity should not be equal to zero even at the surface of the HP. Here we demonstrate that the velocity distributions observed by Voyager 1 are consistent with time-dependent simulations of the SW-LISM interaction. In this Letter, we analyze the results from a numerical model of the large-scale heliosphere that includes solar cycle effects. Our simulations show that prolonged periods of low to negative radial velocity can exist in the IHS at substantial distances from the HP. It is also shown that Voyager 1 was more likely to observe such regions than Voyager 2.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial Velocities for 889 late-type stars (Nidever+, 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidever, D. L.; Marcy, G. W.; Butler, R. P.; Fischer, D. A.; Vogt, S. S.

    2002-04-01

    We report radial velocities for 844 FGKM-type main sequence and subgiant stars and 45 K giants, most of which had either low-precision velocity measurements or none at all. These velocities differ from the standard stars of Udry et al. (1999IAUCo.170..354U) by 0.035km/s (RMS) for the 26 FGK standard stars in common. The zero-point of our velocities differs from that of Udry et al.: =+0.053km/s. Thus these new velocities agree with the best known standard stars both in precision and zero-point, to well within 0.1km/s. Nonetheless, both these velocities and the standards suffer from three sources of systematic error, namely, convective blueshift, gravitational redshift, and spectral type mismatch of the reference spectrum. These systematic errors are here forced to be zero for G2V stars by using the Sun as reference, with Vesta and day sky as proxies. But for spectral types departing from solar, the systematic errors reach 0.3km/s in the F and K stars and 0.4km/s in M dwarfs. Multiple spectra were obtained for all 889 stars during four years, with the HIRES echelle spectrometer (Vogt et al., 1994, , Proc. Soc. Photo-Opt. Instr. Eng., 2198, 362) on the 10m Keck I telescope and with the "Hamilton" echelle spectrometer fed by either the 3m Shane or the 0.6m Coude Auxilliary (CAT) Telescopes (Vogt, 1987PASP...99.1214V), and 782 of them exhibit velocity scatter less than 0.1km/s. These stars may serve as radial velocity standards if they remain constant in velocity. We found 11 new spectroscopic binaries and report orbital parameters for them. (4 data files).

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of HD 6434 (Hinkel+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, N. R.; Kane, S. R.; Pilyavsky, G.; Boyajian, T. S.; James, D. J.; Naef, D.; Fischer, D. A.; Udry, S.

    2016-04-01

    Previous radial velocity observations of HD6434 (Mayor et al. 2004, cat. J/A+A/415/391) were undertaken with the CORALIE spectrometer mounted on the 1.2m Euler Swiss telescope at La Silla. Those observations were conducted as part of the CORALIE exoplanet search program (Udry et al. 2000, cat. J/A+A/356/590). We continued to monitor HD6434 using CORALIE to improve the Keplerian orbital solution and provide an accurate transit ephemeris. The complete data set of 137 measurements is shown in Table2 including previously acquired measurements and 59 new measurements. These new measurements extend the overall time baseline for the radial velocity observations by a factor of ~3.6, for a total baseline of ~15 years. (1 data file).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity curves of LMC ellipsoidal variables (Nie+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, J. D.; Wood, P. R.

    2014-11-01

    We initially selected 86 sequence E candidates from those given in Soszynski et al. 2004 (cat. J/AcA/54/347). The radial velocity observations were taken using the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) mounted on the Australian National University 2.3m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory. WiFes has six gratings. For our observations, the gratings B7000 (wavelength coverage of 4184-5580Å) and I7000 (wavelength coverage of 6832-9120Å) were chosen for the blue and red CCD, respectively. These two gratings give a two-pixel resolution R=7000. We carried out 18 weeks of radial velocity monitoring, from 2010 September to 2012 March. (2 data files).

  8. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), a preview to what to expect from the Gaia RVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a large wide-field spectroscopic stellar survey of the Milky Way. Over the period 2003-2013, 574,630 spectra for 483,330 stars have been amassed at a resolution of R=7500 in the Ca-triplet region of 8410-8795 Å. Wavelength coverage and resolution are thus comparable to that anticipated from the Gaia RVS. Derived data products of RAVE include radial velocities, stellar parameters, chemicals abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, and absorption measured based on the DIB at 8620 Å. Since more than 290000 RAVE targets are drawn from the Tycho-2 catalogue, RAVE will be interesting prototype for the anticipated full Gaia data releases, in particular when combined with the first Gaia data releases, in particular when combined with the early Gaia data releases, which contain astrometry but not yet stellar parameters and abundances.

  9. Investigation of the Pleiades cluster. I - Radial velocities of corona stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosvick, J. M.; Mermilliod, J.-C.; Mayor, M.

    1992-02-01

    Coravel radial velocities of 83 stars ranging in spectral types from F5 to K0 selected frozen van Leeuwen's et al. (1986) survey of the corona of the Pleiades show that only 56 are actually members. Six spectroscopic binaries among the members and two among the nonmembers have been found. The large extent of the cluster over the sky also induces a radial-velocity gradient from which a convergent point has been determined. Since the cluster's depth is so large, the width of the main sequence is increased. The present results lead to a star density of 1.1 stars per sq deg for r between 2.5 and 3.5 deg. However, we stress that this is only a preliminary result, since the sample of stars in the corona is incomplete.

  10. CARMENES: A New Visible/Near-IR Radial-Velocity Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirrenbach, Andreas; Carmenes Consortium

    2016-07-01

    CARMENES is a next-generation radial-velocity instrument that has been constructed for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory by a consortium of eleven Spanish and German institutions. It consists of two separate échelle spectrographs covering the wavelength range from 0.55 to 1.7μm at a spectral resolution of R = 82,000, fed by fibers from the Cassegrain focus of the telescope. CARMENES saw "First Light" on Nov 9, 2015. We report on results from the commissioning and the first months of operation, and discuss the plans for the large M dwarf survey that is the core science program of CARMENES. With a bit of luck, CARMENES may find a few planets that are very well suited for characterization by JWST. In the longer run, CARMENES will be an excellent instrument for radial-velocity follow-up of transit survey missions such as TESS and PLATO.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity and photometry in NGC 4372 (Kacharov+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacharov, N.; Bianchini, P.; Koch, A.; Frank, M. J.; Martin, N. F.; van de Ven, G.; Puzia, T. H.; McDonald, I.; Johnson, C. I.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present the radial velocities of 220 stars in the field of the globular cluster NGC 4372 measured from high resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra. We have confirm 131 cluster member stars from radial velocity and metallicity constraints. The rest are foreground contaminants. We also present a BVI photometric catalogue in a field of view covering 30x30arcmin, centred on NGC 4372. We used archival imaging obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) at the 2.2m MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla. We used the 2MASS point source catalog as astrometric reference. Photometric zero points were fixed to standard stars in the same field from the standard star database of Stetson (2000PASP..112..925S, 2005PASP..117..563S). We have estimated individual reddening for each star in the catalogue. (2 data files).

  12. Radial velocity distributions of molecular ions produced by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenzhu; Chait, Brian T.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the radial velocity distributions of protonated intact dynorphin 1-13 ions, produced during matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) (close to the threshold for ion production), and of the protonated dimer of the MALDI matrix [alpha]-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. For both ion species, the radial component of the velocity was found to be considerably smaller than the axial component, implying angular distributions for both matrix and polypeptide ions that are strongly forward peaked. This extreme forward peaking (cos28 for the peptide ions and cos12 for the matrix ions) lends support to the earlier proposals of a jet expansion model for MALDI. Our observation that the peptide ions exhibit a considerably higher degree of forward peaking than ions arising from the matrix awaits detailed explanation. The present results should prove useful for the design of highly efficient MALDI mass spectrometers.

  13. Radial velocity measurements of a sample of northern metal-deficient stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasniewicz, G.; Mayor, M.

    1988-09-01

    Observations of 41 northern stars with Fe/H between -1.1 and -0.3, obtained with the Coravel radial-velocity scanner on the 1-m Swiss telescope at the Observatoire de Haute Provence during 1977-1986, are reported. The data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Seven stars are identified as spectroscopic binaries, and their distribution as a function of period is shown to be similar to that for a sample of metal-rich G stars. The present radial velocities are found to be in relatively good agreement with those of Carney and Latham (1987), but not with those of Stryker et al. (1985).

  14. Origins of Solar Systems: Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise To Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven

    2002-01-01

    We have continued the super high resolution (R is approximately 200,000), high S/N ((greater than) 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D (two dimensional) coude. Observing runs in October 2000 and March 2001 were plagued by poor weather, but runs in June and October 2001 were good. We have made a preliminary analysis of the limited data in hand, and find some tantalizing evidence for correlations between median line bisector displacement and radial velocity v (sub r). The correlation appears to be specific to the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate.

  15. The Joker: A custom Monte Carlo sampler for binary-star and exoplanet radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2017-01-01

    Given sparse or low-quality radial-velocity measurements of a star, there are often many qualitatively different stellar or exoplanet companion orbit models that are consistent with the data. The consequent multimodality of the likelihood function leads to extremely challenging search, optimization, and MCMC posterior sampling over the orbital parameters. The Joker is a custom-built Monte Carlo sampler that can produce a posterior sampling for orbital parameters given sparse or noisy radial-velocity measurements, even when the likelihood function is poorly behaved. The method produces correct samplings in orbital parameters for data that include as few as three epochs. The Joker can therefore be used to produce proper samplings of multimodal pdfs, which are still highly informative and can be used in hierarchical (population) modeling.

  16. Simulating a Radial Velocity Precurser Survey for Target Yield Optimization for a Future Direct Imaging Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Patrick; Plavchan, Peter; Crepp, Justin R.; Dulz, Shannon; Stark, Chris; Kane, Stephen R.

    2017-01-01

    Future direct imaging mission concepts such as HabEx and LUVOIR aim to directly image and characterize Earth-analogs around nearby stars. With the scope and expense of these missions, the exoplanet yield is strongly dependent on the frequency of Earth-like planets and the a priori knowledge of which stars specifically host suitable planetary systems. Ground-based radial velocity surveys can potentially perform the pre-selection of direct imaging missions at a fraction of the cost of a blind direct imaging survey. We present a simulation of such a survey. We consider both the WIYN and Large Binocular Telescope, including weather conditions and limitations in telescope time, fitted with spectrometers of varying sensitivities including iLocator and NEID. We recover simulated planets and their orbital parameters, estimating the effectiveness of a pre-cursor radial velocity survey.

  17. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING STELLAR RADIAL VELOCITY JITTER AS A FUNCTION OF WAVELENGTH: THE SUN AS A PROXY

    SciTech Connect

    Marchwinski, Robert C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Robertson, Paul; Ramsey, Lawrence; Harder, Jerald E-mail: suvrath@astro.psu.edu E-mail: lwr@psu.edu

    2015-01-01

    Using solar spectral irradiance measurements from the SORCE spacecraft and the F/F' technique, we have estimated the radial velocity (RV) scatter induced on the Sun by stellar activity as a function of wavelength. Our goal was to evaluate the potential advantages of using new near-infrared (NIR) spectrographs to search for low-mass planets around bright F, G, and K stars by beating down activity effects. Unlike M dwarfs, which have higher fluxes and therefore greater RV information content in the NIR, solar-type stars are brightest at visible wavelengths, and, based solely on information content, are better suited to traditional optical RV surveys. However, we find that the F/F' estimated RV noise induced by stellar activity is diminished by up to a factor of four in the NIR versus the visible. Observations with the upcoming future generation of NIR instruments can be a valuable addition to the search for low-mass planets around bright FGK stars in reducing the amount of stellar noise affecting RV measurements.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Small Kepler planets radial velocities (Marcy+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, G. W.; Isaacson, H.; Howard, A. W.; Rowe, J. F.; Jenkins, J. M.; Bryson, S. T.; Latham, D. W.; Howell, S. B.; Gautier, T. N., III; Batalha, N. M.; Rogers, L.; Ciardi, D.; Fischer, D. A.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kjeldsen, H.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Huber, D.; Chaplin, W. J.; Basu, S.; Buchhave, L. A.; Quinn, S. N.; Borucki, W. J.; Koch, D. G.; Hunter, R.; Caldwell, D. A.; van Cleve, J.; Kolbl, R.; Weiss, L. M.; Petigura, E.; Seager, S.; Morton, T.; Johnson, J. A.; Ballard, S.; Burke, C.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; MacQueen, P.; Everett, M. E.; Lissauer, J. J.; Ford, E. B.; Torres, G.; Fressin, F.; Brown, T. M.; Steffen, J. H.; Charbonneau, D.; Basri, G. S.; Sasselov, D. D.; Winn, J.; Sanchis-Ojeda, R.; Christiansen, J.; Adams, E.; Henze, C.; Dupree, A.; Fabrycky, D. C.; Fortney, J. J.; Tarter, J.; Holman, M. J.; Tenenbaum, P.; Shporer, A.; Lucas, P. W.; Welsh, W. F.; Orosz, J. A.; Bedding, T. R.; Campante, T. L.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Karoff, C.; Kawaler, S. D.; Lund, M. N.; Lundkvist, M.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Stello, D.; White, T. R.; Boss, A.; Devore, E.; Gould, A.; Prsa, A.; Agol, E.; Barclay, T.; Coughlin, J.; Brugamyer, E.; Mullally, F.; Quintana, E. V.; Still, M.; Thompson, S. E.; Morrison, D.; Twicken, J. D.; Desert, J.-M.; Carter, J.; Crepp, J. R.; Hebrard, G.; Santerne, A.; Moutou, C.; Sobeck, C.; Hudgins, D.; Haas, M. R.; Robertson, P.; Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.

    2014-04-01

    Here we report measured masses, radii, and densities (or upper limits on those values) for 42 transiting planet candidates contained within 22 bright Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Batalha et al. (2013, Cat. J/ApJS/204/24). We carried out multiple Doppler-shift measurements of the host stars using the Keck 1 telescope. From the spectroscopy and Doppler measurements, we compute self-consistent measurements of stellar and planet radii, employing either stellar structure models or asteroseismology measurements from the Kepler photometry. We also search for (and report) 7 additional non-transiting planets revealed by the precise radial velocities (RVs), for a total of 49 planets. We carried out "reconnaissance" high-resolution spectroscopy on ~1000 KOIs with spectral resolution, R~50000, and S/N=20-100 per pixel. The dual goals were searching for false positives and refining the stellar parameters. We obtained one or two such reconnaissance spectra using one of four facilities: the McDonald Observatory 2.7m, the Tillinghast 1.5m on Mt. Hopkins, the Lick Observatory 3m, and the 2.6m Nordic Optical Telescope. Speckle imaging of each of the selected 22 KOIs was obtained using the two-color DSSI speckle camera at the WIYN 3.5m telescope on Kitt Peak. All 22 KOIs were observed with the Keck NIRC2-AO system. (3 data files).

  19. Radial-velocity measures and the existence of astrophysical binaries in late-type dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.; Meredith, R.

    1986-01-01

    Radial velocities with errors of 1-2 km/s are presented based on CCD scans obtained with the Kitt Peak National Observatory coude feed telescope between 1982 and 1985 of 48 dK-M stars that lack Balmer emission. Comparison with Gliese's (1969) values shows only two stars to be spectroscopic binary candidates with small velocity amplitudes. No evidence for any short period (less than 10 days) binaries is found, supporting the conclusions of Young et al. (1986) that there are no astrophysical binaries among these chromosherically inactive dM stars.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in A2163 (Maurogordato+, 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurogordato, S.; Cappi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Benoist, C.; Mars, G.; Soucail, G.; Arnaud, M.; Pratt, G. W.; Bourdin, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.

    2008-04-01

    Velocity measurements for 512 objects obtained by multiobject spectroscopy in a field of 30'x30' centered on the galaxy cluster Abell 2163 are presented. For each object, table1.dat provides the spectroscopic identification number, right ascension and declination (J2000.0); radial velocity and the associated error, RTR parameter (Tonry and Davis, 1981ApJ...246..680T) as an indicator of the goodness of the cross-correlation redshift, a quality flag for the redshift, a flag indicating the presence of emission lines, and a flag corresponding to the instrument used. Objects are sorted by increasing Right Ascension. (1 data file).

  1. ELODIE & SOPHIE spectrographs: 20 years of continuous improvements in radial velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchy, F.

    2015-10-01

    From the first light of ELODIE spectrograph in 1993 up to the recent upgrade of SOPHIE, the radial-velocity precision was improved by an order of magnitude. The different steps of instrumental refinement are described and their impact on the detection and characterization of giant exoplanets are highlighted. Synergies of these two instruments with other detection technics like photometric transit and astrometry are presented with a special focus on the incoming space missions GAIA, CHEOPS, TESS and PLATO.

  2. Obtaining accurate radial velocities for Cepheid companions using the STIS echelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proffitt, C. R.; Evans, N. R.; Winston, E. M.; Gallenne, A.; Kervella, P.

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the high dispersion echelle observations of the hot binary companions of six Cepheids with known radial-velocity orbits that we have obtained with the STIS FUV E140H mode on board the Hubble Space Telescope, with the goal of determining the masses of these Cepheids. We discuss the stability and repeatability of the STIS echelle wavelength scale and other issues that may limit the final accuracy of our mass determinations.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Kepler heartbeat star radial velocities (Shporer+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, A.; Fuller, J.; Isaacson, H.; Hambleton, K.; Thompson, S. E.; Prsa, A.; Kurtz, D. W.; Howard, A. W.; O'Leary, R. M.

    2016-11-01

    The Keck/HIRES data analyzed and presented here includes 218 exposures obtained during 43 nights from May to October 2015 (R~60000). For each of the systems presented here we have obtained at least 7 radial velocity measurements, in order to fit a Keplerian orbital model that in our case includes 5 fitted parameters, since the orbital period is already precisely known from Kepler photometry (see more details in Section 2.3). (8 data files).

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity data of HD 59686 A (Ortiz+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, M.; Reffert, S.; Trifonov, T.; Quirrenbach, A.; Mitchell, D. S.; Nowak, G.; Buenzli, E.; Zimmerman, N.; Bonnefoy, M.; Skemer, A.; Defrere, D.; Lee, M. H.; Fischer, D. A.; Hinz, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    Precise radial velocities of the giant star HD 59686 A are presented. The observations were taken with the Hamilton spectrograph at the Lick Observatory. The data were acquired and reduced using the iodine cell approach. In total, we have 88 RV measurements for HD 59686 A spanning a period of time of around 12 years. Typical exposure times were 20-min, and the signal-to-noise ratios for these observations are about 120-150. (1 data file).

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HU Vir radial velocities and VI light curves (Harutyunyan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Kuenstler, A.; Carroll, T. A.; Weber, M.

    2016-07-01

    We present two tables with the new STELLA radial velocity data set and the APT Johnson-Cousins V and I photometric data set for HU Virginis. RVs from STELLA-SES spectra were derived from an order-by-order cross correlation with a synthetic template spectrum and then averaged. The photometric measurements were always made differentially with respect to HD 106270 and HD 106332 as a comparison and check star, respectively. (2 data files).

  6. Ground-based follow-up of the Gaia-RVS radial velocity standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soubiran, C.; Jasniewicz, G.; Zurbach, C.; Crifo, F.; Sartoretti, P.; Katz, D.; Marchal, O.; Panuzzo, P.; Udry, S.

    2016-12-01

    The RVS spectrograph on board of Gaia having no calibration device, radial velocity standards are needed to calibrate the zero-point of the instrument. We have prepared a list of 2798 such stars, well distributed over the sky, and compiled ˜25 000 individual RV measurements from ground-based velocimeters. For a fraction of these stars, their stability at the 300 ms level during the Gaia mission has still to be assessed. The catalogue and follow-up programme are presented.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 76 M31 candidate clusters (Galleti+, 2006)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleti, S.; Federici, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2006-06-01

    We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of globular clusters and candidate globular clusters in the nearby M31 galaxy. The survey is aimed at the classification of known candidate M31 clusters and at the study of their kinematic properties. We obtained low-resolution spectroscopy for 133 targets, including 76 yet-to-be-confirmed candidate clusters (i.e. with no previous spectroscopic information), 55 already-confirmed genuine M31 clusters, and 2 uncertain candidates. Our observations allowed a reliable estimate of the target radial velocity, within a typical accuracy of ~+/-20Km/s. The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and shape parameters that allowed us to confidently discriminate between point sources and extended objects even from low-spatial-resolution imagery. In our set of 76 candidate clusters we found: 42 newly-confirmed bona-fide M31 clusters, 12 background galaxies, 17 foreground Galactic stars, 2 HII regions belonging to M31 and 3 unclassified (possibly M31 clusters or foreground stars) objects. The classification of a few other candidates not included in our survey has been also reassessed on various observational bases. All the sources of radial velocity estimates for M31 known globular clusters available in the literature have been compared and checked, and a homogeneous general list has been obtained for 349 confirmed clusters with radial velocity. Our results suggest that a significant number of genuine clusters (~>100) is still hidden among the plethora of known candidates proposed by various authors. Hence our knowledge of the globular cluster system of the M31 galaxy is still far from complete even in terms of simple membership. (1 data file).

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometric and radial velocity of RRLyr stars (Carrillo+ 1995)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, D.; Burki, G.; Mayor, M.; Burnet, M.; Lampens, P.; Nicolet, B.

    1995-06-01

    Almost simultaneous measurements in the Geneva seven-colour photometric system and in radial velocities with the spectrometer CORAVEL for five RR Lyrae field stars were obtained in order to apply the Baade-Wesselink method to this kind of variable stars. In this paper the observational data on these stars are presented; the analysis of their physical parameters will be published in the forthcoming paper of the series. (7 data files).

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-23 photometric and radial velocity data (Triaud+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Queloz, D.; Hellier, C.; Gillon, M.; Smalley, B.; Hebb, L.; Collier, Cameron A.; Anderson, D.; Boisse, I.; Hebrard, G.; Jehin, E.; Lister, T.; Lovis, C.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Segransan, D.; Simpson, E.; Udry, S.; West, R.

    2011-03-01

    The data is composed of 7 photometric timeseries and 2 set of radial velocities. 2 photometric timeseries originate from the WASP-South instrument, 2 from the Euler Telescope, 1 from the FTS telescope, 2 from the TRAPPIST telescope. The RVs come from the CORALIE spectrograph on the Euler Telescope, and from HARPS, on the ESO 3.6m They give evidence for the presence of a planet around WASP-23. (9 data files).

  10. Line-profile variations in radial-velocity measurements. Two alternative indicators for planetary searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Pepe, F.; Lovis, C.; Nardetto, N.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: We introduce two methods to identify false-positive planetary signals in the context of radial-velocity exoplanet searches. The first is the bi-Gaussian cross-correlation function fitting (and monitoring of the parameters derived from it), and the second is the measurement of asymmetry in radial-velocity spectral line information content, Vasy. We assess the usefulness of each of these methods by comparing their results with those delivered by current indicators. Methods: We make a systematic analysis of the most used common line profile diagnosis, Bisector Inverse Slope and Velocity Span, along with the two proposed ones. We evaluate all these diagnosis methods following a set of well-defined common criteria and using both simulated and real data. We apply them to simulated cross-correlation functions that are created with the program SOAP and which are affected by the presence of stellar spots. We consider different spot properties on stars with different rotation profiles and simulate observations as obtained with high-resolution spectrographs. We then apply our methodology to real cross-correlation functions, which are computed from HARPS spectra, for stars with a signal originating in activity (thus spots) and for those with a signal rooted on a planet. Results: We demonstrate that the bi-Gaussian method allows a more precise characterization of the deformation of line profiles than the standard bisector inverse slope. The calculation of the deformation indicator is simpler and its interpretation more straightforward. More importantly, its amplitude can be up to 30% larger than that of the bisector span, allowing the detection of smaller-amplitude correlations with radial-velocity variations. However, a particular parametrization of the bisector inverse slope is shown to be more efficient on high-signal-to-noise data than both the standard bisector and the bi-Gaussian. The results of the Vasy method show that this indicator is more effective than any of

  11. Miniature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) I. Design, Commissioning, and First Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Jonathan J.; Bottom, Michael; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason T.; McCrady, Nate; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Plavchan, Peter; Riddle, Reed; Muirhead, Philip S.; Herzig, Erich; Myles, Justin; Blake, Cullen H.; Eastman, Jason; Beatty, Thomas G.; Barnes, Stuart I.; Gibson, Steven R.; Lin, Brian; Zhao, Ming; Gardner, Paul; Falco, Emilio; Criswell, Stephen; Nava, Chantanelle; Robinson, Connor; Sliski, David H.; Hedrick, Richard; Ivarsen, Kevin; Hjelstrom, Annie; de Vera, Jon; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The Miniature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) is a U.S.-based observational facility dedicated to the discovery and characterization of exoplanets around a nearby sample of bright stars. MINERVA employs a robotic array of four 0.7-m telescopes outfitted for both high-resolution spectroscopy and photometry, and is designed for completely autonomous operation. The primary science program is a dedicated radial velocity survey and the secondary science objective is to obtain high-precision transit light curves. The modular design of the facility and the flexibility of our hardware allows for both science programs to be pursued simultaneously, while the robotic control software provides a robust and efficient means to carry out nightly observations. We describe the design of MINERVA, including major hardware components, software, and science goals. The telescopes and photometry cameras are characterized at our test facility on the Caltech campus in Pasadena, California, and their on-sky performance is validated. The design and simulated performance of the spectrograph is briefly discussed as we await its completion. New observations from our test facility demonstrate sub-mmag photometric precision of one of our radial velocity survey targets, and we present new transit observations and fits of WASP-52b-a known hot-Jupiter with an inflated radius and misaligned orbit. The process of relocating the MINERVA hardware to its final destination at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona has begun, and science operations are expected to commence in 2015.

  12. AN AFFINE-INVARIANT SAMPLER FOR EXOPLANET FITTING AND DISCOVERY IN RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Fengji; Hogg, David W.; Goodman, Jonathan; Weare, Jonathan; Schwab, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proves to be powerful for Bayesian inference and in particular for exoplanet radial velocity fitting because MCMC provides more statistical information and makes better use of data than common approaches like chi-square fitting. However, the nonlinear density functions encountered in these problems can make MCMC time-consuming. In this paper, we apply an ensemble sampler respecting affine invariance to orbital parameter extraction from radial velocity data. This new sampler has only one free parameter, and does not require much tuning for good performance, which is important for automatization. The autocorrelation time of this sampler is approximately the same for all parameters and far smaller than Metropolis-Hastings, which means it requires many fewer function calls to produce the same number of independent samples. The affine-invariant sampler speeds up MCMC by hundreds of times compared with Metropolis-Hastings in the same computing situation. This novel sampler would be ideal for projects involving large data sets such as statistical investigations of planet distribution. The biggest obstacle to ensemble samplers is the existence of multiple local optima; we present a clustering technique to deal with local optima by clustering based on the likelihood of the walkers in the ensemble. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the sampler on real radial velocity data.

  13. Radial Velocity Searches for Other Planetary Systems: Current Status and Future Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, W. D.; Hatzes, A. P.

    1996-03-01

    Measurement of variations in the radial velocities of stars due to the reflex orbital motion of the star around the planetary-system barycenter constitutes a powerful method of searching for substellar or planetary mass companions. After several years of patient data acquisition, radial-velocity searches for planetary systems around other stars are now beginning to bear fruit. In late 1995 and early 1996, three candidate systems were announced with Jovian-mass planets around solar-type stars. The current paradigm for low-mass star formation suggests that planetary systems should be able to form in the circumstellar disks surrounding young stellar objects. These newly discovered systems, and other discoveries which will soon follow them, will test critically our understanding of the processes of star- and planet-formation. We review the techniques used in these radial-velocity searches and their results to date. We then discuss planned improvements in the surveys, and the prospects for the next 20 years.

  14. Disentangling Time-series Spectra with Gaussian Processes: Applications to Radial Velocity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czekala, Ian; Mandel, Kaisey S.; Andrews, Sean M.; Dittmann, Jason A.; Ghosh, Sujit K.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2017-05-01

    Measurements of radial velocity variations from the spectroscopic monitoring of stars and their companions are essential for a broad swath of astrophysics; these measurements provide access to the fundamental physical properties that dictate all phases of stellar evolution and facilitate the quantitative study of planetary systems. The conversion of those measurements into both constraints on the orbital architecture and individual component spectra can be a serious challenge, however, especially for extreme flux ratio systems and observations with relatively low sensitivity. Gaussian processes define sampling distributions of flexible, continuous functions that are well-motivated for modeling stellar spectra, enabling proficient searches for companion lines in time-series spectra. We introduce a new technique for spectral disentangling, where the posterior distributions of the orbital parameters and intrinsic, rest-frame stellar spectra are explored simultaneously without needing to invoke cross-correlation templates. To demonstrate its potential, this technique is deployed on red-optical time-series spectra of the mid-M-dwarf binary LP661-13. We report orbital parameters with improved precision compared to traditional radial velocity analysis and successfully reconstruct the primary and secondary spectra. We discuss potential applications for other stellar and exoplanet radial velocity techniques and extensions to time-variable spectra. The code used in this analysis is freely available as an open-source Python package.

  15. An Affine-invariant Sampler for Exoplanet Fitting and Discovery in Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Fengji; Goodman, Jonathan; Hogg, David W.; Weare, Jonathan; Schwab, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) proves to be powerful for Bayesian inference and in particular for exoplanet radial velocity fitting because MCMC provides more statistical information and makes better use of data than common approaches like chi-square fitting. However, the nonlinear density functions encountered in these problems can make MCMC time-consuming. In this paper, we apply an ensemble sampler respecting affine invariance to orbital parameter extraction from radial velocity data. This new sampler has only one free parameter, and does not require much tuning for good performance, which is important for automatization. The autocorrelation time of this sampler is approximately the same for all parameters and far smaller than Metropolis-Hastings, which means it requires many fewer function calls to produce the same number of independent samples. The affine-invariant sampler speeds up MCMC by hundreds of times compared with Metropolis-Hastings in the same computing situation. This novel sampler would be ideal for projects involving large data sets such as statistical investigations of planet distribution. The biggest obstacle to ensemble samplers is the existence of multiple local optima; we present a clustering technique to deal with local optima by clustering based on the likelihood of the walkers in the ensemble. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the sampler on real radial velocity data.

  16. The rotation of the halo of NGC 6822 from the radial velocities of carbon stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Graham P.; Ryan, Sean G.; Sibbons, Lisette F.

    2016-11-01

    Using spectra taken with the AAOmega spectrograph, we measure the radial velocities of over 100 stars, many of which are intermediate age carbon stars, in the direction of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 6822. Kinematic analysis suggests that the carbon stars in the sample are associated with NGC 6822, and estimates of its radial velocity and galactic rotation are made from a star-by-star analysis of its carbon star population. We calculate a heliocentric radial velocity for NGC 6822 of -51 ± 3 km s-1 and show that the population rotates with a mean rotation speed of 11.2 ± 2.1 km s-1 at a mean distance of 1.1 kpc from the galactic centre, about a rotation axis with a position angle of 26° ± 13°, as projected on the sky. This is close to the rotation axis of the H I gas disc and suggests that NGC 6822 is not a polar ring galaxy, but is dynamically closer to a late-type galaxy. However, the rotation axis is not aligned with the minor axis of the AGB isodensity profiles and this remains a mystery.

  17. A spectroscopic study of the radial velocity variations and accretion disks found in four dwarf novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, R. J.

    Time resolved spectroscopic observations of the four dwarf novae SS Cyg, EM Cyg, U Gem, and RU Peg are presented. Although these systems were studied previously, all of the spectroscopic studies were done photographically. A linear response, digital detector is employed. Analytic techniques to the study of the radial velocity variations and emission line profiles found in dwarf novae are applied. In the study of SS Cyg cross-correlation techniques were used for the first time to measure the radial velocity variations of the secondary star absorption lines. In the study of U Gem, analysis of the accretion disk emission lines showed that the motion of the material in the disk cannot be described accurately by orbits defined within the three-body approximation. The observations of EM Cyg reveal an unstable accretion disk, with emission lines that vary erratically on timescales of minutes to days. New measurements of the radial velocity variations of the emission and absorption lines found in the spectrum of RU Peg agree with previous measurements but have a higher accuracy.

  18. Removing Activity-Related Radial Velocity Noise to Improve Extrasolar Planet Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saar, Steven; Lindstrom, David M. (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    We have made significant progress towards the proposal goals of understanding the causes and effects of magnetic activity-induced radial velocity (v_r) jitter and developing methods for correcting it. In the process, we have also made some significant discoveries in the fields of planet-induced stellar activity, planet detection methods, M dwarf convection, starspot properties, and magnetic dynamo cycles. We have obtained super high resolution (R approximately 200,000), high S / N (greater than 300) echelle study of joint line bisector and radial velocity variations using the McDonald 2-D coude. A long observing run in October 2002 in particular was quite successful (8 clear nights). We now have close to three years of data, which begins to sample a good fraction of the magnetic cycle timescales for some of our targets (e.g., kappa Ceti; P_cyc = 5.6 yrs). This will be very helpful in unraveling the complex relationships between plage and radial velocity (v-r) changes which we have uncovered. Preliminary analysis (Saar et al. 2003) of the data in hand, reveals correlations between median line bisector displacement and v_r. The correlation appears to be specific the the particular star being considered, probably since it is a function of both spectral type and rotation rate. Further analysis and interpretation will be in the context of evolving plage models and is in progress.

  19. CAESAR: Companion Assessment of Equatorial Stars with Astrometry and Radial Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, C.; White, R.; Henry, T.; Bailey, J.; Jao, W.-C.; Riedel, A.; Cantrell, J.

    2011-12-01

    We would like to introduce our new program, CAESAR, a Companion Assessment of Equatorial Stars with both Astrometry and Radial velocity. With our dual method program, we are narrowing the prospective hiding places for companions around mid M dwarfs (0.35-0.15 solar masses) within 10 parsecs. To study these inherently faint stars, we are using CSHELL at NASA's IRTF to obtain high precision infrared radial velocity measurements to search for planets with short periods, close-in to their parent star. As a complement to our radial velocity (RV) program, we will are working in conjunction with the SMARTS CTIO Parallax Investigation program to search for more massive planets and brown dwarfs at distances out to 2 AU from the majority of our stars, which is past the snowline (where the massive planets formed in our Solar System). The combination of using both methods on the first-ever mid M-dwarf volume-limited survey, will allow us to place the strictest constraints on the companion frequency around these very low mass stars and will help differentiate between the most probable formation scenarios for planets to form.

  20. Radial velocities of K-M dwarfs and local stellar kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperauskas, J.; Bartašiūtė, S.; Boyle, R. P.; Deveikis, V.; Raudeliūnas, S.; Upgren, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Aims: The goal of this paper is to present complete radial-velocity data for the spectroscopically selected McCormick sample of nearby K-M dwarfs and, based on these and supplementary data, to determine the space-velocity distributions of late-type stars in the solar neighborhood. Methods: We analyzed nearly 3300 measurements of radial velocities for 1049 K-M dwarfs, that we obtained during the past decade with a CORAVEL-type instrument, with a primary emphasis on detecting and eliminating from kinematic calculations the spectroscopic binaries and binary candidates. Combining radial-velocity data with Hipparcos/Tycho-2 astrometry we calculated the space-velocity components and parameters of the galactic orbits in a three-component model potential for the stars in the sample, that we use for kinematical analysis and for the identification of possible candidate members of nearby stellar kinematic groups. Results: We present the catalog of our observations of radial velocities for 959 stars which are not suspected of velocity variability, along with the catalog of U,V,W velocities and Galactic orbital parameters for a total of 1088 K-M stars which are used in the present kinematic analysis. Of these, 146 stars were identified as possible candidate members of the known nearby kinematic groups and suspected subgroups. The distributions of space-velocity components, orbital eccentricities, and maximum distances from the Galactic plane are consistent with the presence of young, intermediate-age and old populations of the thin disk and a small fraction ( 3%) of stars with the thick disk kinematics. The kinematic structure gives evidence that the bulk of K-M type stars in the immediate solar vicinity represents a dynamically relaxed stellar population. The star MCC 869 is found to be on a retrograde Galactic orbit (V = -262 km s-1) of low inclination (4°) and can be a member of stellar stream of some dissolved structure. The Sun's velocity with respect to the Local

  1. Radial velocities of stars in the globular cluster M4 and the cluster distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. C.; Rees, Richard F.; Cudworth, Kyle M.

    1995-01-01

    The internal stellar velocity distribution of the globular cluster M4 is evaluated from nearly 200 new radial velocity measurements good to 1 km/s and a rederivation of existing proper motions. The mean radial velocity of the cluster is 70.9 +/- 0.6 km/s. The velocity dispersion is 3.5 +/- 0.3 km/s at the core, dropping marginally towards the outskirts. Such a low internal dispersion is somewhat at odds with the cluster's orbit, for which the perigalacticon is sufficiently close to the galactic center that the probability of cluster disruption is high; a tidal radius two-thirds the currently accepted value would eliminate the discrepancy. The cluster mass-to-light ratio is also small, M/L(sub V) = 1.0 +/- 0.4 in solar units. M4 thus joins M22 as a cluster of moderate and concentration with a mass-to-light ratio among the lowest known. The astrometric distance to the cluster is also smaller than expected, 1.72 +/- 0.14 kpc. This is only consistent with conventional estimates of the luminosity of horizontal branch stars provided an extinction law R = A(sub V)/E(B-V) approximately 4 is adopted, as has been suggested recently by several authors.

  2. Radial velocity discriminated coronal photometric measurements at the July 11, 1991 total eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavers, Willet I.; Eitter, Joseph J.

    2009-03-01

    The results from a set of 12 solar corona radial velocity measurements in the 400-440 nm spectral band during the total solar eclipse of July 11, 1991 are reported. The measurements show that the orbital motion of the F-corona material near the sun in the ecliptic plane is consistent with Keplerian motion and predominantly, but not exclusively, prograde, as is usually assumed. This work demonstrates a method of using the measured radial velocities to sort out the relative amounts of K-corona, near-earth F-corona, near-solar F-corona, and scattered light in each measurement for each observation point W and E of the sun between 2.5 Ro(solar radii) and 5 Ro along the celestial equator and at three points north of the sun. The near-solar F-corona component is quite weak, contributing only 7-14% of the total signal in each case. The stronger diffraction component from near-earth F-corona is estimated to have been produced by particles with radii of about 11μ. In contrast, the scattered light component appears as strong zero-velocity features dominating all the measurements. The measurements W and E of the sun and near the ecliptic plane also show evidence of a red-shift velocity of at least 330 km s -1, suggestive of a high-speed dust outflow from the sun.

  3. [Velocity estimation of aortic propagation based on radial pulse wave analysis].

    PubMed

    Clara, Fernando; Blanco, Gustavo; Casarini, Alfredo; Corral, Pablo; Meschino, Gustavo; Scandurra, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the possibility of using the radial pulse wave morphology, obtained by a movement transducer, to evaluate the aortic pulse wave velocity. The radial pulse wave signals were obtained by using a transducer, located on the pulse palpation area, in 167 healthy normotensive male volunteers, ages 20 to 70. The reflected wave was identified in every case. Also, a speed coefficient was defined as the ratio between the individual's height and the time between the maximum systolic wave and the arrival time of the reflected wave. We found that the specified coefficient in normotensive individuals increased linearly with age, in a similar way to the increase in aortic propagation velocity measured by other methods. The procedure was repeated on another set of 125 individuals with hypertension, without other risk factors, aged between the 3rd and 7th decade. This time we found similar values to normotensive individuals only on the 3th decade, and a pronounced increase on the velocity coefficient at advanced ages was observed. These findings support the feasibility of using this type of signals to indirectly evaluate the propagation velocity together with the increase index, a parameter commonly used in pulse wave analysis.

  4. Radial velocities of stars in the globular cluster M4 and the cluster distance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. C.; Rees, Richard F.; Cudworth, Kyle M.

    1995-01-01

    The internal stellar velocity distribution of the globular cluster M4 is evaluated from nearly 200 new radial velocity measurements good to 1 km/s and a rederivation of existing proper motions. The mean radial velocity of the cluster is 70.9 +/- 0.6 km/s. The velocity dispersion is 3.5 +/- 0.3 km/s at the core, dropping marginally towards the outskirts. Such a low internal dispersion is somewhat at odds with the cluster's orbit, for which the perigalacticon is sufficiently close to the galactic center that the probability of cluster disruption is high; a tidal radius two-thirds the currently accepted value would eliminate the discrepancy. The cluster mass-to-light ratio is also small, M/L(sub V) = 1.0 +/- 0.4 in solar units. M4 thus joins M22 as a cluster of moderate and concentration with a mass-to-light ratio among the lowest known. The astrometric distance to the cluster is also smaller than expected, 1.72 +/- 0.14 kpc. This is only consistent with conventional estimates of the luminosity of horizontal branch stars provided an extinction law R = A(sub V)/E(B-V) approximately 4 is adopted, as has been suggested recently by several authors.

  5. Radial Velocities, Binarity, and Kinematic Membership in the Open Cluster NGC 2516

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Jorge Federico; Lapasset, Emilio

    2000-05-01

    We present echelle spectroscopic observations for 36 bright (V<9.6) stars in the open cluster NGC 2516, including several blue straggler candidates and four red giants. Radial velocities are derived by cross-correlations using high signal-to-noise ratio standard spectra as templates. From 22 cluster members a mean cluster velocity of +22.0+/-0.2 km s-1 was derived. Membership probabilities of the observed stars are computed on the basis of their distance to the cluster center and kinematic criteria. We report the discovery of three double-lined spectroscopic binaries and several probable binaries among main-sequence stars. A binary frequency of more than 26% is found among the high-mass main-sequence stars. The blue straggler HD 66341 is a slowly rotating cluster member with constant velocity, while HD 66194 is a fast-rotating Be star with probable variations in radial velocity. Other blue straggler candidates, such as HD 65663, 65950, 66066, and 65987, must be considered turnoff stars. The observations presented here were obtained at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET) and the national universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  6. Radial velocity determination by CCF using a synthetic spectrum as the template and detecting component spectra in SB1 binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverko, J.; Žižňovský, J.; Mikulášek, Z.; Iliev, I. Kh.

    2007-02-01

    Radial velocity determination is one of the basic methods of learning on stars and their systems. We aim at utilizing a computerized method for radial velocity measurements from spectra on electronic and photographic media. We compute the crosscorrelation function of an observed and synthetic spectrum. Applicability of the method is documented on electronic spectra of the double star V624 Her as well as photographic spectra of the binary AR Aur. The feasibility of the method for detecting of component spectra is demonstrated on systems HD 861 and HD 71973. We also show a possible way of using wide features such as hydrogen lines in early type stars in radial velocity determination.

  7. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF GALACTIC O-TYPE STARS. II. SINGLE-LINED SPECTROSCOPIC BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S. J.; Gies, D. R.; Hillwig, T. C.; McSwain, M. V.; Huang, W. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: mcswain@lehigh.edu

    2013-02-01

    We report on new radial velocity measurements of massive stars that are either suspected binaries or lacking prior observations. This is part of a survey to identify and characterize spectroscopic binaries among O-type stars with the goal of comparing the binary fraction of field and runaway stars with those in clusters and associations. We present orbits for HDE 308813, HD 152147, HD 164536, BD-16 Degree-Sign 4826, and HDE 229232, Galactic O-type stars exhibiting single-lined spectroscopic variation. By fitting model spectra to our observed spectra, we obtain estimates for effective temperature, surface gravity, and rotational velocity. We compute orbital periods and velocity semiamplitudes for each system and note the lack of photometric variation for any system. These binaries probably appear single-lined because the companions are faint and because their orbital Doppler shifts are small compared to the width of the rotationally broadened lines of the primary.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 7 cataclysmic binaries (Halpern+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, J. P.; Thorstensen, J. R.

    2016-04-01

    Our instrumentation, and reduction and analysis procedures are essentially identical to those described in Paper I (Thorstensen et al. 2013, cat. J/AJ/146/107). All of our optical data are from the MDM Observatory (http://mdm.kpno.noao.edu/index/Instrumentation.html), which comprises the 1.3m McGraw-Hill telescope and the 2.4m Hiltner telescope, both on the southwest ridge of Kitt Peak, Arizona. With a single exception, the radial velocity studies to search for the orbital periods were done on the 2.4m, while high-cadence photometry sensitive to spin periods was carried out on the 1.3m. All of our radial velocity studies used the modular spectrograph, as described in Paper I (Thorstensen et al. 2013, cat. J/AJ/146/107). Most of our velocities are from the the 2.4m telescope. Some spectra of Swift J2124.6+0500, and all the data we used for Swift J0939.7-3224, are from the McGraw-Hill 1.3m telescope, again with the modular spectrograph. For four newly identified objects we have only single spectra that were obtained on two observing runs on the 2.4m. These used the Boller and Chivens CCD spectrograph (CCDS) and the Ohio State Multi-Object Spectrograph (OSMOS). Descriptions of these instruments can be found on the MDM Observatory web page (http://mdm.kpno.noao.edu/index/Instrumentation.html). The objects observed are listed in Table1. Table2 lists the radial velocity data, and Table3 gives parameters of the best-fit sinusoids. (3 data files).

  9. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study.

  10. Radial and Azimuthal Velocity Profiles in Gas-Puff Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Sophia; Engelbrecht, Joseph; Banasek, Jacob; de Grouchy, Philip; Qi, Niansheng; Hammer, David

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of neon, argon, and krypton (either singly or in combination) gas puff z-pinch plasmas are studied on Cornell's 1MA, 100-200ns rise-time COBRA pulsed power generator. The triple-nozzle gas puff valve, consisting of two annular gas puffs and a central jet, allows radial tailoring of the gas puff mass-density profile and the use of 1, 2 or 3 different gases at different pressures. Interferometry supplies information on sheath thickness and electron density, variously filtered PCDs and silicon diodes measure hard and soft x-ray production, and multi frame visible and extreme UV imaging systems allow tracking of the morphology of the plasma. A 527nm, 10J Thomson scattering diagnostic system is used to determine radial and azimuthal velocities. Implosion velocities of 170km/s (Kr) and 300km/s (Ne/Ar) are observed. We are investigating the correlations between instability growth, plasma density profile, velocity partitioning as a function of radius, and radiation production. Research supported by the NNSA Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836.

  11. Stellar radial velocities using a laser frequency comb: Application and observations in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, Steve

    2011-04-01

    The laser frequency comb presents the potential for a revolutionary increase in radial velocity precision by providing a calibration reference of unprecedented quality in terms of wavelength knowledge, repeatability, number, density, and regularity of lines. However, implementation has proven challenging, particularly in the near infrared. Nevertheless, with the right combination of comb and instrument, promising first steps have been taken, allowing for the derivation of stellar radial velocities in a wavelength range which is well suited to the observation of M dwarfs. These stars, with low mass and low luminosity, are the most prevalent class of stars within 10 parsecs and can be expected to yield a higher reflex velocity for a terrestrial mass planet in the liquid water habitable zone than would be the case with a more massive star such as our own. We present the design and both laboratory and on-sky performance of an H-band laser frequency comb used in conjunction with the Penn State Pathfinder testbed spectrograph and discuss lessons learned and plans for follow on testing with both the Pathfinder and the CSHELL instruments.

  12. A high-precision radial-velocity survey for other planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.; Hatzes, Artie P.

    1994-01-01

    The precise measurement of variations in stellar radial velocities provides one of several promising methods of surveying a large sample of nearby solar type stars to detect planetary systems in orbit around them. The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search (MOPS) was started in 1987 September with the goal of detecting other nearby planetary systems. A stabilized I2 gas absorption cell placed in front of the entrance slit to the McDonald Observatory 2.7 m telescope coude spectrograph serves as the velocity metric. With this I2 cell we can achieve radial velocity measurement precision better than 10 m/s in an individual measurement. At this level we can detect a Jupiter-like planet around a solar-type star, and have some hope of detecting Saturn-like planets in a long-term survey. The detectability of planets is ultimately limited by stellar pulsation modes and photospheric motions. Monthly MOPS observing runs allow us to obtain at least 5 independent observations per year of the 33 solar-type (F5-K7) stars on our observing list. We present representative results from the first five years of the survey.

  13. Multiple-planet Orbit-fitting with Joint Radial Velocity and Astrometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanzarite, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Astrometry alone does not constrain the direction of circulation of the star in its reflex motion orbit. Practically, this means that astrometry cannot distinguish between the ascending and descending nodes in the reflex motion orbit. Consequently, Omega (the longitude of ascending node) and omega (the longitude of periastron, which is measured with respect to Omega in the direction of the orbit) can only be determined modulo 180 degrees. Radial velocity data can provide the information needed to break this degeneracy. When combining RV and astrometric data to fit an orbit, one must check that the fitted orbit is physically consistent with both data sets. The astrometric orbit problem can be partially linearized via transformation to four Thiele-Innes parameters plus three nonlinear parameters: eccentricity, period and periastron time. On the other hand, the RV orbit problem can be partially linearized via transformation to two additional Thiele-Innes parameters plus the same three nonlinear parameters. Unfortunately, the two RV Thiele-Innes parameters are not linearly related to the four astrometric ones. Because of this difficulty, currently available algorithms for jointly fitting RV and astrometric data to multiple-planet systems employ five nonlinear parameters per planet. We have developed an algorithm that satisfies the RV-astrometry consistency requirement, while using only three nonlinear parameters per planet. We have successfully tested this algorithm in the context of a recent double-blind planet detection simulation study. We expect the reduction in nonlinearity to give the algorithm a significant advantage in computation speed over existing algorithms, making it ideally suited to carry out further simulation studies of joint astrometric and RV orbit-fitting for multiple-planet systems via application of computation-intensive Bayesian methods based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Aldebaran radial velocity variations (Hatzes+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Cochran, W. D.; Endl, M.; Guenther, E. W.; MacQueen, P.; Hartmann, M.; Zechmeister, M.; Han, I.; Lee, B.-C.; Walker, G. A. H.; Yang, S.; Larson, A. M.; Kim, K.-M.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Dollinger, M.; Simon, A. E.; Girardi, L.

    2015-07-01

    Seven independent data sets of high precision radial velocity data were used for our analysis. Precise RV measurements were also made with a Hydrogen-Fluoride (H-F) cell as part of the CFHT survey (hereafter the "CFHT" data set) of Walker et al. (1989ApJ...343L..21W) as well as additional measurements from the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (hereafter "DAO" data set) using the same technique. See Campbell & Walker (1979PASP...91..540C) and Larson et al. (1993PASP..105..825L) for a description of the H-F measurements. For the remaining five RV data sets an iodine (I2) cell provided the wave- length reference. These include the original measurements using the McDonald Observatory 2.1m telescope (here-after "McD-2.1m" data set) and the coude spectrograph in the so-called "cs11" focus (hereafter "McD-CS11" data set) of the 2.7m telescope at McDonald Observatory. We should note that the we did not include the McDonald data that were used for the bisector measurements of Hatzes & Cochran (1998MNRAS.293..469H). These were taken using telluric lines as a wavelength reference which had a lower precision than the iodine wavelength calibration or H-F methods. The latest McDonald measurements were taken using the Tull Spectrograph at the so-called "cs23" focus (here-after the "McD-Tull" data set) as part of a long-term planet search program (e.g. Cochran et al., 1997ApJ...483..457C; Endl et al., 2004ApJ...611.1121E; Robertson et al., 2012ApJ...749...39R). (7 data files).

  15. Hide and Seek: Radial-Velocity Searches for Planets around Active Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Raphaëlle Dawn

    2015-11-01

    The detection of low-mass extra-solar planets through radial-velocity searches is currently limited by the intrinsic magnetic activity of the host stars. The correlated noise that arises from their natural radial-velocity variability can easily mimic or conceal the orbital signals of super-Earth and Earth-mass extra-solar planets. I developed an intuitive and robust data analysis framework in which the activity-induced variations are modelled with a Gaussian process that has the frequency structure of the photometric variations of the star, thus allowing me to determine precise and reliable planetary masses. I applied this technique to three recently discovered planetary systems: CoRoT-7, Kepler-78 and Kepler-10. I determined the masses of the transiting super-Earth CoRoT-7b and the small Neptune CoRoT-7c to be 4.73 ± 0.95 M⊕ and 13.56 ± 1.08 M⊕, respectively. The density of CoRoT-7b is 6.61 ± 1.72 g.cm-3, which is compatible with a rocky composition. I carried out Bayesian model selection to assess the nature of a previously identified signal at 9 days, and found that it is best interpreted as stellar activity. Despite the high levels of activity of its host star, I determined the mass of the Earth-sized planet Kepler-78b to be 1.76 ± 0.18 M⊕. With a density of 6.2(+1.8:-1.4) g.cm-3, it is also a rocky planet. I found the masses of Kepler-10b and Kepler-10c to be 3.31 ± 0.32 M⊕ and 16.25 ± 3.66 M⊕, respectively. Their densities, of 6.4(+1.1:-0.7) g.cm-3 and 8.1 ± 1.8 g.cm-3, imply that they are both of rocky composition - even the 2 Earth-radius planet Kepler-10c! In parallel, I deepened our understanding of the physical origin of stellar radial-velocity variability through the study of the Sun, which is the only star whose surface can be imaged at high resolution. I found that the full-disc magnetic flux is an excellent proxy for activity-induced radial-velocity variations; this result may become key to breaking the activity barrier in coming

  16. A RADIAL VELOCITY AND CALCIUM TRIPLET ABUNDANCE SURVEY OF FIELD SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    De Propris, Roberto; Rich, R. Michael; Mallery, Ryan C.; Howard, Christian D.

    2010-05-10

    We present the results of a pilot wide-field radial velocity and metal abundance survey of red giants in 10 fields in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The targets lie at projected distances of 0.9 and 1.9 kpc from the SMC center (m - M = 18.79) to the north, east, south, and west. Two more fields are to the east at distances of 3.9 and 5.1 kpc. In this last field, we find only a few to no SMC giants, suggesting that the edge of the SMC in this direction lies approximately at 6 kpc from its center. In all eastern fields, we observe a double peak in the radial velocities of stars, with a component at the classical SMC recession velocity of {approx}160 km s{sup -1} and a high-velocity component at about 200 km s{sup -1}, similar to observations in H I. In the most distant field (3.9 kpc), the low-velocity component is at 106 km s{sup -1}. The metal abundance distribution in all fields is broad and centered at about [Fe/H] {approx}-1.25, reaching to solar and possibly slightly supersolar values and down to [Fe/H] of about -2.5. In the two innermost (0.9 kpc) northern and southern fields, we observe a secondary peak at metallicities of about {approx}-0.6. This may be evidence of a second episode of star formation in the center, possibly triggered by the interactions that created the Stream and Bridge.

  17. The Radial Variation of H I Velocity Dispersions in Dwarfs and Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianjamasimanana, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, Fabian; Heald, George H.; Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Jarrett, Thomas H.

    2015-08-01

    Gas velocity dispersions provide important diagnostics of the forces counteracting gravity to prevent collapse of the gas. We use the 21 cm line of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) to study H i velocity dispersion ({σ }{{H} {{I}}}) and H i phases as a function of galaxy morphology in 22 galaxies from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We stack individual H i velocity profiles and decompose them into broad and narrow Gaussian components. We study the H i velocity dispersion and the H i surface density, {{{Σ }}}{{H} {{I}}}, as a function of radius. For spirals, the velocity dispersions of the narrow and broad components decline with radius and their radial profiles are well described by an exponential function. For dwarfs, however, the profiles are much flatter. The single Gaussian dispersion profiles are, in general, flatter than those of the narrow and broad components. In most cases, the dispersion profiles in the outer disks do not drop as fast as the star formation profiles derived in the literature. This indicates the importance of other energy sources in driving {σ }{{H} {{I}}} in the outer disks. The radial surface density profiles of spirals and dwarfs are similar. The surface density profiles of the narrow component decline more steeply than those of the broad component, but not as steep as what was found previously for the molecular component. As a consequence, the surface density ratio between the narrow and broad components, an estimate of the mass ratio between cold H i and warm H i, tends to decrease with radius. On average, this ratio is lower in dwarfs than in spirals. This lack of a narrow, cold H i component in dwarfs may explain their low star formation activity.

  18. Results of interferometric observations of the F-corona radial velocity field at the distances (3 - 7) R_sun;.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, P. V.; Shestakova, L. I.; Ajmanov, A. K.

    The results of observations of the F-corona radial velocity field during July 31, 1981 are briefly given. The prograde and retrograde Keplerian motion of the circumsolar dust, the radial motion directed to the Sun and some ejections were obtained.

  19. Study on a multi-delay spectral interferometry for stellar radial velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Jiang, Haijiao; Tang, Jin; Ji, Hangxin; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Liang

    2014-08-01

    High accuracy radial velocity measurement isn't only one of the most important methods for detecting earth-like Exoplanets, but also one of the main developing fields of astronomical observation technologies in future. Externally dispersed interferometry (EDI) generates a kind of particular interference spectrum through combining a fixed-delay interferometer with a medium-resolution spectrograph. It effectively enhances radial velocity measuring accuracy by several times. Another further study on multi-delay interferometry was gradually developed after observation success with only a fixed-delay, and its relative instrumentation makes more impressive performance in near Infrared band. Multi-delay is capable of giving wider coverage from low to high frequency in Fourier field so that gives a higher accuracy in radial velocity measurement. To study on this new technology and verify its feasibility at Guo Shoujing telescope (LAMOST), an experimental instrumentation with single fixed-delay named MESSI has been built and tested at our lab. Another experimental study on multi-delay spectral interferometry given here is being done as well. Basically, this multi-delay experimental system is designed in according to the similar instrument named TEDI at Palomar observatory and the preliminary test result of MESSI. Due to existence of LAMOST spectrograph at lab, a multi-delay interferometer design actually dominates our work. It's generally composed of three parts, respectively science optics, phase-stabilizing optics and delay-calibrating optics. To switch different fixed delays smoothly during observation, the delay-calibrating optics is possibly useful to get high repeatability during switching motion through polychromatic interferometry. Although this metrology is based on white light interferometry in theory, it's different that integrates all of interference signals independently obtained by different monochromatic light in order to avoid dispersion error caused by

  20. Dynamics and Multiplicity of Young Star Clusters: Getting the Most Out of Single Epoch Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaar, Michiel

    The velocity distribution of stellar systems in a cluster and its binary population provide powerful constraints on theories concerning the formation and subsequent evolution of these clusters. Unfortunately radial velocity variations due to binary orbits tend to mask the underlying velocity distribution for clusters with a small velocity dispersion. One possibility to solve this is to identify the spectroscopic binaries through multi-epoch observations. Here we present an alternative procedure. Even with only a single epoch of data, the radial velocity distribution due to the binary orbital motions is expected to be significantly different to the underlying velocity distribution, so it is possible to separate these distributions. This allows the underlying velocity distribution of a cluster, as well as the binary fraction, to be estimated from a single epoch of radial velocity data. We show that the measured velocity distribution depends only weakly on assumptions made about the binary properties. The procedure successfully reproduces the radial velocity dispersion of ˜ 0. 5 km/s in the open cluster NGC 188. A more complete discussion on the mechanics of this procedure, its accuracy, and the test run on NGC 188 can be found in Cottaar et al. (A&A 547:A35, 2012).

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WASP-103b radial velocities and light curves (Gillon+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, M.; Anderson, D. R.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Delrez, L.; Hellier, C.; Jehin, E.; Lendl, M.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Segransan, D.; Smith, A. M. S.; Smalley, B.; Southworth, J.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Udry, S.; Van Grootel, V.; West, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    The host star WASP-103 (1SWASPJ163715.59+071100.0 = 2MASS16371556+0711000; V=12.1, K=10.8) was observed by the southern station of the WASP survey during the 2010, 2011, and 2012 observing seasons, covering the intervals 2010 May 15 to Aug. 16, 2011 Mar. 26 to Aug. 20, and 2012 Mar. 25 to Jun. 28. Files wasp.dat, trappist.dat, euler.dat contain the photometric time-series presented in the paper. File rv.dat contains the radial velocity time-series presented in the paper. (4 data files).

  2. An astro-comb calibrated solar telescope to search for the radial velocity signature of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David F.; Glenday, Alex G.; Dumusque, Xavier; Buchschacher, Nicolas; Cameron, Andrew Collier; Cecconi, Massimo; Charbonneau, David; Cosentino, Rosario; Ghedina, Adriano; Haywood, Raphäelle; Latham, David W.; Li, Chih-Hao; Lodi, Marcello; Lovis, Christophe; Molinari, Emilio; Pepe, Francesco; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Udry, Stephane; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated sub-m/s sensitivity in measuring the radial velocity (RV) between the Earth and Sun using a simple solar telescope feeding the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Italian National Telescope, which is calibrated with a green astro-comb. We are using the solar telescope to characterize the effects of stellar (solar) RV jitter due to activity on the solar surface with the goal of detecting the solar RV signal from Venus, thereby demonstrating the sensitivity of these instruments to detect true Earth-twin exoplanets.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LCES HIRES/Keck radial velocity Exoplanet Survey (Butler+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, R. P.; Vogt, S. S.; Laughlin, G.; Burt, J. A.; Rivera, E. J.; Tuomi, M.; Teske, J.; Arriagada, P.; Diaz, M.; Holden, B.; Keiser, S.

    2017-08-01

    We present 60949 precision radial velocities of 1624 stars obtained over the past 20 years from the Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet Survey Team (LCES) survey with the HIgh-Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) spectrometer on the Keck I telescope. We tabulate a list of 357 significant periodic signals that are of constant period and phase, and not coincident in period and/or phase with stellar activity indices. For this survey, the HIRES spectrometer was configured to operate at a nominal spectral resolving power of R~60000 and wavelength range of 3700-8000Å. (4 data files).

  4. Near-infrared metallicities, radial velocities, and spectral types for 447 nearby M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Charbonneau, David; Irwin, Jonathan; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin; Lloyd, James P.

    2014-01-01

    We present metallicities, radial velocities, and near-infrared (NIR) spectral types for 447 M dwarfs determined from moderate resolution (R ≈ 2000) NIR spectra obtained with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF)/SpeX. These M dwarfs are primarily targets of the MEarth Survey, a transiting planet survey searching for super Earths around mid-to-late M dwarfs within 33 pc. We present NIR spectral types for each star and new spectral templates for the IRTF in the Y, J, H, and K-bands, created using M dwarfs with near-solar metallicities. We developed two spectroscopic distance calibrations that use NIR spectral type or an index based on the curvature of the K-band continuum. Our distance calibration has a scatter of 14%. We searched 27 NIR spectral lines and 10 spectral indices for metallicity sensitive features, taking into account correlated noise in our estimates of the errors on these parameters. We calibrated our relation using 36 M dwarfs in common proper pairs with an F-, G-, or K-type star of known metallicity. We validated the physical association of these pairs using proper motions, radial velocities, and spectroscopic distance estimates. Our resulting metallicity calibration uses the sodium doublet at 2.2 μm as the sole indicator for metallicity. It has an accuracy of 0.12 dex inferred from the scatter between the metallicities of the primaries and the estimated metallicities of the secondaries. Our relation is valid for NIR spectral types from M1V to M5V and for –1.0 dex < [Fe/H] < +0.35 dex. We present a new color-color metallicity relation using J – H and J – K colors that directly relates two observables: the distance from the M dwarf main sequence and equivalent width of the sodium line at 2.2 μm. We used radial velocities of M dwarf binaries, observations at different epochs, and comparison between our measurements and precisely measured radial velocities to demonstrate a 4 km s{sup –1} accuracy.

  5. PHASES Differential Astrometry and Iodine Cell Radial Velocities of the κ Pegasi Triple Star System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Konacki, Maciej; Wiktorowicz, Sloane; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Shao, M.

    2006-01-01

    κ Pegasi is a well-known, nearby triple star system. It consists of a ``wide'' pair with semimajor axis=235 mas, one component of which is a single-line spectroscopic binary (semimajor axis= 2.5 mas). Using high-precision differential astrometry and radial velocity observations, the masses for all three components are determined and the relative inclination between the wide and narrow pairs' orbits is found to be 43.8d+/-3.0d, just over the threshold for the three-body Kozai resonance. The system distance is determined to be 34.60+/-0.21 pc and is consistent with trigonometric parallax measurements.

  6. Observations of the dust radial velocity field in the F-corona on March 29, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, L. I.; Demchenko, B. I.; Rspaev, F. K.; Chalabaev, A.

    2011-12-01

    The results of interferometer observations of the dust radial velocity field in the F-corona during the total solar eclipse of March 29, 2006, are presented. The observations were performed in the Mugalzhar settlement, Aqtobe region, Kazakhstan. The observation results indicated that the dust orbital motion is opposite to the planetary motion and is inclined at an angle of about 105° with respect to the ecliptic plane. It is assumed that the observed dust is genetically related to Kreutz comets falling on the Sun and registered with the SOHO spacecraft on March 28 and 31, 2006.

  7. Relativistic Velocity Addition Law from Machine Gun Analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Popescu, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Many derivations of the relativistic addition law of parallel velocities without use of the Lorentz transformations (LT) are known.1-5 Some of them are based on thought experiments that require knowledge of the time dilation and the length contraction effects.1,4,5 Other derivations involve the Doppler effect in the optic domain considered from three inertial reference frames in relative motion.6 A few derivations simply involve only the principle of constancy of the light velocity.2 Such derivations are interesting for the teaching of special relativity theory since the relativistic addition of velocities leads directly to the LT.7 The derivation we propose is based on a machine gun-target analogy8 of the acoustic Doppler effect, considered from the rest frame of the machine gun and from the rest frame of the target.

  8. Relativistic Velocity Addition Law from Machine Gun Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Popescu, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Many derivations of the relativistic addition law of parallel velocities without use of the Lorentz transformations (LT) are known. Some of them are based on thought experiments that require knowledge of the time dilation and the length contraction effects. Other derivations involve the Doppler effect in the optic domain considered from three…

  9. A More Intuitive Version of the Lorentz Velocity Addition Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz velocity addition formula for one-dimensional motion presents a number of problems for beginning students of special relativity. In this paper we suggest a simple rewrite of the formula that is easier for students to memorize and manipulate, and furthermore is more intuitive in understanding the correction necessary when adding…

  10. A More Intuitive Version of the Lorentz Velocity Addition Formula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The Lorentz velocity addition formula for one-dimensional motion presents a number of problems for beginning students of special relativity. In this paper we suggest a simple rewrite of the formula that is easier for students to memorize and manipulate, and furthermore is more intuitive in understanding the correction necessary when adding…

  11. Relativistic Velocity Addition Law from Machine Gun Analogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenstein, Bernhard; Popescu, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Many derivations of the relativistic addition law of parallel velocities without use of the Lorentz transformations (LT) are known. Some of them are based on thought experiments that require knowledge of the time dilation and the length contraction effects. Other derivations involve the Doppler effect in the optic domain considered from three…

  12. Searching for IMBHs in Galactic globular clusters through radial velocities of individual stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzoni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    I present an overview of our ongoing project aimed at building a new generation of velocity dispersion profiles ad rotation curves for a representative sample of Galactic globular clusters, from the the radial velocity of hundreds of individual stars distributed at different distances from the cluster center. The innermost portion of the profiles will be used to constrain the possible presence of intermediate-mass black holes. The adopted methodology consists of combining spectroscopic observations acquired with three different instruments at the ESO-VLT: the adaptive-optics assisted, integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph SINFONI for the innermost and highly crowded cluster cores, the multi-IFU spectrograph KMOS for the intermediate regions, and the multi-fiber instrument FLAMES/GIRAFFE-MEDUSA for the outskirts. The case of NGC 6388, representing the pilot project that motivated the entire program, is described in some details.

  13. Radial velocities, proper motions and the determination of the orbital structure of a spherical star cluster.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wybo, M.; Dejonghe, H.

    1996-08-01

    In how far does the presence of both radial velocities and proper motions constrain the orbital structure and the dynamical distance of a spherical star cluster? To investigate this question, we create artificial stellar systems of various sizes and orbital structure, and use a Quadratic Programming technique for the modeling. This technique turns out to be a very fast and dependable method. We find that, if the observational errors are small (25% or less), 500 data points are no luxury in order to reach reliable conclusions. Larger errors will lead to an overestimation of the mass and will tend to isotropise the orbital structure. By comparing the line of sight velocity dispersions with the proper motion dispersions we find that an accuracy of 10-15% on the dynamical distance is obtainable for good quality data.

  14. Inversion of Surface Wave Phase Velocities for Radial Anisotropy to an Depth of 1200 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Z.; Beghein, C.; Yuan, K.

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate three dimensional radial anisotropy to an depth of 1200 km. Radial anisotropy describes the difference in velocity between horizontally polarized Rayleigh waves and vertically polarized Love waves. Its presence in the uppermost 200 km mantle has well been documented by different groups, and has been regarded as an indicator of mantle convection which aligns the intrinsically anisotropic minerals, largely olivine, to form large scale anisotropy. However, there is no global agreement on whether anisotropy exists in the region below 200 km. Recent models also associate a fast vertically polarized shear wave with vertical upwelling mantle flow. The data used in this study is the globally isotropic phase velocity models of fundamental and higher mode Love and Rayleigh waves (Visser, 2008). The inclusion of higher mode surface wave phase velocity provides sensitivities to structure at depth that extends to below the transition zone. While the data is the same as used by Visser (2008), a quite different parameterization is applied. All the six parameters - five elastic parameters A, C, F, L, N and density - are now regarded as independent, which rules out possible biased conclusions induced by scaling relation method used in several previous studies to reduce the number of parameters partly due to limited computing resources. The data need to be modified by crustal corrections (Crust2.0) as we want to look at the mantle structure only. We do this by eliminating the perturbation in surface wave phase velocity caused by the difference in crustal structure with respect to the referent model PREM. Sambridge's Neighborhood Algorithm is used to search the parameter space. The introduction of such a direct search technique pales the traditional inversion method, which requires regularization or some unnecessary priori restriction on the model space. On the contrary, the new method will search the full model space, providing probability density

  15. The Joker: A Custom Monte Carlo Sampler for Binary-star and Exoplanet Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2017-03-01

    Given sparse or low-quality radial velocity measurements of a star, there are often many qualitatively different stellar or exoplanet companion orbit models that are consistent with the data. The consequent multimodality of the likelihood function leads to extremely challenging search, optimization, and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) posterior sampling over the orbital parameters. Here we create a custom Monte Carlo sampler for sparse or noisy radial velocity measurements of two-body systems that can produce posterior samples for orbital parameters even when the likelihood function is poorly behaved. The six standard orbital parameters for a binary system can be split into four nonlinear parameters (period, eccentricity, argument of pericenter, phase) and two linear parameters (velocity amplitude, barycenter velocity). We capitalize on this by building a sampling method in which we densely sample the prior probability density function (pdf) in the nonlinear parameters and perform rejection sampling using a likelihood function marginalized over the linear parameters. With sparse or uninformative data, the sampling obtained by this rejection sampling is generally multimodal and dense. With informative data, the sampling becomes effectively unimodal but too sparse: in these cases we follow the rejection sampling with standard MCMC. The method produces correct samplings in orbital parameters for data that include as few as three epochs. The Joker can therefore be used to produce proper samplings of multimodal pdfs, which are still informative and can be used in hierarchical (population) modeling. We give some examples that show how the posterior pdf depends sensitively on the number and time coverage of the observations and their uncertainties.

  16. Detection of radial velocity shifts due to black hole binaries near merger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKernan, B.; Ford, K. E. S.

    2015-09-01

    The barycenter of a massive black hole binary will lie outside the event horizon of the primary black hole for modest values of mass ratio and binary separation. Analogous to radial velocity shifts in stellar emission lines caused by the tug of planets, the radial velocity of the primary black hole around the barycenter can leave a tell-tale oscillation in the broad component of FeKα emission from accreting gas. Near-future X-ray telescopes such as Astro-H and Athena will have the energy resolution (δE/E ≲ 10-3) to search nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN) for the presence of binaries with mass ratios q ≳ 0.01, separated by several hundred gravitational radii. The general-relativistic and Lense-Thirring precession of the periapse of the secondary orbit imprints a detectable modulation on the oscillations. The lowest mass binaries in AGN will oscillate many times within typical X-ray exposures, leading to a broadening of the line wings and an overestimate of black hole spin in these sources. Detection of periodic oscillations in the AGN line centroid energy will reveal a massive black hole binary close to merger and will provide an early warning of gravitational radiation emission.

  17. Recovering planet radial velocity signals in the presence of starspot activity in fully convective stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Jeffers, S. V.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Haswell, C. A.; Jones, H. R. A.; Tuomi, M.; Feng, F.; Jenkins, J. S.; Petit, P.

    2017-04-01

    Accounting for stellar activity is a crucial component of the search for ever-smaller planets orbiting stars of all spectral types. We use Doppler imaging methods to demonstrate that starspot-induced radial velocity variability can be effectively reduced for moderately rotating, fully convective stars. Using starspot distributions extrapolated from sunspot observations, we adopt typical M dwarf starspot distributions with low contrast spots to synthesize line profile distortions. The distortions are recovered using maximum entropy regularized fitting and the corresponding stellar radial velocities are measured. The procedure is demonstrated that for a late-M star harbouring an orbiting planet in the habitable zone. The technique is effective for stars with v sin i = 1-10km s-1, reducing the stellar noise contribution by factors of nearly an order of magnitude. With a carefully chosen observing strategy, the technique can be used to determine the stellar rotation period and is robust to uncertainties such as unknown stellar inclination. While demonstrated for late-type M stars, the procedure is applicable to all spectral types.

  18. The Milky Way's halo in 6D: Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seabroke, George; Cropper, Mark; Katz, David; Sartoretti, Paola; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Marchal, Olivier; Gueguen, Alain; Benson, Kevin; Dolding, Chris; Huckle, Howard; Smith, Mike; Baker, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrometer (RVS) has been operating in routine phase for over one year since initial commissioning. RVS continues to work well but the higher than expected levels of straylight reduce the limiting magnitude. The end-of-mission radial-velocity (RV) performance requirement for G2V stars was 15 km s-1 at V = 16.5 mag. Instead, 15 km s-1 precision is achieved at 15 < V < 16 mag, consistent with simulations that predict a loss of 1.4 mag. Simulations also suggest that changes to Gaia's onboard software could recover ~0.14 mag of this loss. Consequently Gaia's onboard software was upgraded in April 2015. The status of this new commissioning period is presented, as well as the latest scientific performance of the on-ground processing of RVS spectra. We illustrate the implications of the RVS limiting magnitude on Gaia's view of the Milky Way's halo in 6D using the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS).

  19. The radial velocity precision possible with a fiber-fed spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, G.; Shkolnik, E.; Bohlender, D.; Yang, S.

    2002-12-01

    The best radial velocity precision possible in conventional coudé spectroscopy used to be several hundreds of m/s. Guiding and collimation errors contributing the major uncertainties. As a by-product of Ca II H&K spectroscopy of certain 51 Peg-type stars, we regularly measure differential radial velocities between nights to a precision of 20 m/s - this allows us to update and improve the ephemerides of their planetary companions. The spectra are of high signal to noise ( ~500/pixel) and high resolution ( ~ 110,000) taken with the fiber-fed Gecko echellette spectrograph on the Canada France Hawaii 3.6-m Telescope. The fiber is continuously agitated and comparison arcs are taken before and after each stellar exposure. The arcs are sufficient to track spectrograph drift and the agitated fiber eliminates collimation and guiding errors. While we are not advocating this combination for Doppler planet searches, the precision is more than adequate for other programs. This research was supported by the Canadian NSERC.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of TYC 4110-01037-1 (Wisniewski+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, J. P.; Ge, J.; Crepp, J. R.; de, Lee N.; Eastman, J.; Esposito, M.; Fleming, S. W.; Gaudi, B. S.; Ghezzi, L.; Gonzalez Hernandez, J. I.; Lee, B. L.; Stassun, K. G.; Agol, E.; Prieto, C. A.; Barnes, R.; Bizyaev, D.; Cargile, P.; Chang, L.; da Costa, L. N.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Femenia, B.; Ferreira, L. D.; Gary, B.; Hebb, L.; Holtzman, J.; Liu, J.; Ma, B.; Mack, C. E.; Mahadevan, S.; Maia, M. A. G.; Nguyen, D. C.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Oravetz, D. J.; Paegert, M.; Pan, K.; Pepper, J.; Rebolo, R.; Santiago, B.; Schneider, D. P.; Shelden, A. C.; Simmons, A.; Tofflemire, B. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, J.; Zhao, B.

    2013-06-01

    The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS), one of the three surveys being executed during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III (Eisenstein et al., 2011AJ....142...72E), is a four-year program which is monitoring the radial velocities of ~3300 V=7.6-12 FGK-type dwarfs and subgiants. Our primary RV observations of TYC 4110-01037-1 were obtained during the first two years of the SDSS-III MARVELS survey, which uses a dispersed fixed-delay interferometer on the SDSS 2.5m telescope. A total of 32 observations were obtained over the course of ~2 years. Each 50minute observation yielded two fringing spectra from the interferometer spanning the wavelength regime ~500-570nm with R~12000. Supporting RV observations were obtained with the 3.6m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) using its SARG spectrograph. The 0.8"*5.3" slit provided R~57000 spectroscopy between 462-792nm. (1 data file).

  1. Update from the ongoing precision radial velocity campaign to characterize the HD 3167 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jessie; CHAI Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    HD 3167 is a bright (V=8.9, K=7.0), nearby (46pc) K0-type star in K2 campaign 8, which was recently announced to host two transiting planets - a 1.7 REarth super-Earth on a 0.95-day orbit, and a 3.0 REarth mini-Neptune on a 29.8-day orbit. The super-Earth planet is very close to the putative divide between rocky and volatile-rich planets, and joins a relatively small number of super-Earth planets with accurate masses obtainable with current precision radial velocity measurements. Both targets are particularly compelling for HST and JWST characterization, given the brightness of the host star, however accurate masses will be needed in order to interpret the observations. Here we present the latest results from our multi-instrument (Keck/HIRES, TNG/HARPS-N, and Lick/APF) precision radial velocity campaign to measure the masses of the planets in the HD 3167 system.

  2. No Evidence for Activity Correlations in the Radial Velocities of Kapteyn’s Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada-Escudé, G.; Tuomi, M.; Arriagada, P.; Zechmeister, M.; Jenkins, J. S.; Ofir, A.; Dreizler, S.; Gerlach, E.; Marvin, C. J.; Reiners, A.; Jeffers, S. V.; Butler, R. Paul; Vogt, S. S.; Amado, P. J.; Rodríguez-López, C.; Berdiñas, Z. M.; Morin, J.; Crane, J. D.; Shectman, S. A.; Díaz, M. R.; Sarmiento, L. F.; Jones, H. R. A.

    2016-10-01

    Stellar activity may induce Doppler variability at the level of a few m s-1 which can then be confused by the Doppler signal of an exoplanet orbiting the star. To first order, linear correlations between radial velocity measurements and activity indices have been proposed to account for any such correlation. The likely presence of two super-Earths orbiting Kapteyn’s star was reported in Anglada-Escudé et al., but this claim was recently challenged by Robertson et al., who argued for evidence of a rotation period (143 days) at three times the orbital period of one of the proposed planets (Kapteyn’s b, P = 48.6 days) and the existence of strong linear correlations between its Doppler signal and activity data. By re-analyzing the data using global statistics and model comparison, we show that such a claim is incorrect given that (1) the choice of a rotation period at 143 days is unjustified, and (2) the presence of linear correlations is not supported by the data. We conclude that the radial velocity signals of Kapteyn’s star remain more simply explained by the presence of two super-Earth candidates orbiting it. We note that analysis of time series of activity indices must be executed with the same care as Doppler time series. We also advocate for the use of global optimization procedures and objective arguments, instead of claims based on residual analyses which are prone to biases and incorrect interpretations.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 1 Gem (Lane+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, B. F.; Muterspaugh, M. W.; Griffin, R. F.; Scarfe, C. D.; Fekel, F. C.; Williamson, M. H.; Eaton, J. A.; Shao, M.; Colavita, M. M.; Konacki, M.

    2016-05-01

    Extensive radial-velocity measurements of the 1 Gem system have been obtained in four separate campaigns spanning 40yr, including data from eight different instruments. Between 1969 and 2009 R.F.G. acquired a total of 128 observations of 1 Gem using the original radial-velocity spectrometer at Cambridge; a second-generation, computerized instrument at Palomar; the CORAVEL spectrometer at Haute Provence Observatory (OHP), and most recently, the Cambridge CORAVEL. The "Cambridge CORAVEL" operates at the Coude focus of the 36inch reflector on the home site of the Cambridge Observatories, Madingley Road, Cambridge, England. The Cambridge and Palomar data are referred to as data set A, while the OHP data are labeled set B. The data for components A and Ba are provided in Table1. A series of observations of 1 Gem has been obtained by C.D.S. with the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (DAO) radial-velocity spectrometer. Observations were begun early in 1980 and continued until the end of 2003. The DAO velocities of components A and Ba are listed in Table2. The total number of acceptable velocities from DAO radial-velocity scanner observations is 123 of the primary star and 107 of the brighter component of the close pair. The third component was not detectable in the DAO traces. We identify the DAO observations as data set C. >From 1983 through 2009 F.C.F. obtained observations at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) with the 0.9m coude feed telescope, coude spectrograph, and several different CCD detectors. All of the spectrograms were acquired with a Texas Instruments (TI) CCD except for five that were obtained in 1983 with an RCA CCD and a single observation in 2008 September with a Tektronix CCD. All those observations were centered near 6430Å and had typical signal-to-noise ratios of about 250. The numerous TI CCD spectra have a wavelength range of just 84Å and a resolution of 0.21Å. The 86 velocities of component A and 80 of component Ba are listed in Table3

  4. Reassessing the radial-velocity evidence for planets around CoRoT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pont, Frédéric; Aigrain, Suzanne; Zucker, Shay

    2011-03-01

    CoRoT-7 is an 11 th magnitude K-star whose light curve shows transits with a depth of 0.3 mmag and a period of 0.854 d, superimposed on variability at the 1 per cent level, due to the modulation of evolving active regions with the star's 23-d rotation period. In this paper, we revisit the published HARPS radial-velocity (RV) measurements of the object, which were previously used to estimate the companion mass, but have been the subject of ongoing debate. We build a realistic model of the star's activity during the HARPS observations, by fitting simultaneously the linewidth (as measured by the width of the cross-correlation function) and the line bisector, and use it to evaluate the contribution of activity to the RV variations. The data show clear evidence of errors above the level of the formal uncertainties, which are accounted for neither by activity nor by any plausible planet model and which increase rapidly with a decreasing signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the spectra. We cite evidence of similar systematics in mid-S/N spectra of other targets obtained with HARPS and other high-precision RV spectrographs, and discuss possible sources. Allowing for these, we re-evaluate the semi-amplitude of the CoRoT-7b signal, finding Kb= 1.6 ± 1.3 m s-1, a tentative detection with a much reduced significance (1.2σ) compared to previous estimates. We also argue that the combined presence of activity and additional errors precludes a meaningful search for additional low-mass companions, despite previous claims to the contrary. Taken at face value, our analysis points to a lower density for CoRoT-7b, the 1σ mass range spanning 1-4 M ⊕ and allowing for a wide range of bulk compositions. In particular, an ice-rich composition is compatible with the RV constraints. More generally, this study highlights the importance of a realistic treatment of both activity and uncertainties, particularly in the medium S/N regime, which applies to most small planet candidates from CoRoT and

  5. CHARACTERIZING THE GALACTIC WHITE DWARF BINARY POPULATION WITH SPARSELY SAMPLED RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Maoz, Dan; Badenes, Carles; Bickerton, Steven J. E-mail: badenes@pitt.edu

    2012-06-01

    We present a method to characterize statistically the parameters of a detached binary sample-binary fraction, separation distribution, and mass-ratio distribution-using noisy radial velocity data with as few as two, randomly spaced, epochs per object. To do this, we analyze the distribution of {Delta}RV{sub max}, the maximum radial velocity difference between any two epochs for the same object. At low values, the core of this distribution is dominated by measurement errors, but for large enough samples there is a high-velocity tail that can effectively constrain the parameters of the binary population. We discuss our approach for the case of a population of detached white dwarf (WD) binaries with separations that are decaying via gravitational wave emission. We derive analytic expressions for the present-day distribution of separations, integrated over the star formation history of the Galaxy, for parameterized initial WD separation distributions at the end of the common-envelope phase. We use Monte Carlo techniques to produce grids of simulated {Delta}RV{sub max} distributions with specific binary population parameters, and the same sampling cadences and radial velocity errors as the observations, and we compare them to the real {Delta}RV{sub max} distribution to constrain the properties of the binary population. We illustrate the sensitivity of the method to both the model and observational parameters. In the particular case of binary WDs, every model population predicts a merger rate per star which can easily be compared to specific Type Ia supernova rates. In a companion paper, we apply the method to a sample of {approx}4000 WDs from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The binary fractions and separation distribution parameters allowed by the data indicate a rate of WD-WD mergers per unit stellar mass in the Galactic disk, {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} mergers yr{sup -1} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }, remarkably similar to the rate per unit mass of Type Ia

  6. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yue; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Chen, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS) has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth. PMID:26694393

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yue; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Chen, Cheng

    2015-12-15

    The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS) has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth.

  8. Radial-velocity fitting challenge. II. First results of the analysis of the data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, X.; Borsa, F.; Damasso, M.; Díaz, R. F.; Gregory, P. C.; Hara, N. C.; Hatzes, A.; Rajpaul, V.; Tuomi, M.; Aigrain, S.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; Bonomo, A. S.; Boué, G.; Dauvergne, F.; Frustagli, G.; Giacobbe, P.; Haywood, R. D.; Jones, H. R. A.; Laskar, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Poretti, E.; Rainer, M.; Ségransan, D.; Sozzetti, A.; Udry, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Radial-velocity (RV) signals arising from stellar photospheric phenomena are the main limitation for precise RV measurements. Those signals induce RV variations an order of magnitude larger than the signal created by the orbit of Earth-twins, thus preventing their detection. Aims: Different methods have been developed to mitigate the impact of stellar RV signals. The goal of this paper is to compare the efficiency of these different methods to recover extremely low-mass planets despite stellar RV signals. However, because observed RV variations at the meter-per-second precision level or below is a combination of signals induced by unresolved orbiting planets, by the star, and by the instrument, performing such a comparison using real data is extremely challenging. Methods: To circumvent this problem, we generated simulated RV measurements including realistic stellar and planetary signals. Different teams analyzed blindly those simulated RV measurements, using their own method to recover planetary signals despite stellar RV signals. By comparing the results obtained by the different teams with the planetary and stellar parameters used to generate the simulated RVs, it is therefore possible to compare the efficiency of these different methods. Results: The most efficient methods to recover planetary signals take into account the different activity indicators, use red-noise models to account for stellar RV signals and a Bayesian framework to provide model comparison in a robust statistical approach. Using the most efficient methodology, planets can be found down to K/N= Kpl/RV_{rms×√{Nobs}=5} with a threshold of K/N = 7.5 at the level of 80-90% recovery rate found for a number of methods. These recovery rates drop dramatically for K/N smaller than this threshold. In addition, for the best teams, no false positives with K/N > 7.5 were detected, while a non-negligible fraction of them appear for smaller K/N. A limit of K/N = 7.5 seems therefore a safe

  9. Kepler beaming binaries radial velocity follow-up with WIYN/Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Stassun, Keivan; Faigler, Simchon; Mazeh, Tsevi; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Tal-Or, Lev; Prsa, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    High-quality space-based time series photometry reveals the minute photometric modulations induced by orbital motion in short-period binary systems with stellar and substellar secondaries. Those modulations are induced by both gravitational and atmospheric processes. Gravitational processes include the beaming effect (aka Doppler boosting) and tidal ellipsoidal distortion, and the atmospheric processes include reflected light and thermal emission by the secondary atmosphere. Therefore, non-eclipsing systems are detectable using photometry alone. The availability of Kepler data for a large sample of stars combined with the sensitivity to non-eclipsing systems has the potential of transforming the Kepler survey into the equivalent of a radial velocity (RV) survey of a large sample of stars with a wide range of spectral type. This allows detecting intrinsically rare systems, where traditional approaches, e.g., RV and transit surveys, are highly inefficient. Those include systems where the companion is a brown-dwarf or a massive planet, or even a white dwarf. As this approach is still in its infancy, we are carrying out RV follow-up of Kepler photometric detections, to confirm the nature of the system and measure the orbit and the companion's mass. Here we present our results from an RV campaign with the WIYN/Hydra multi-fiber spectrograph, where we used 26 nights so far during the 2014 and 2015 Kepler observing seasons to observe 5 Hydra one-degree diameter fields within the Kepler field. Our list of targets includes 131 Kepler beaming binary candidates, and we used additional fibers to observe 85 Kepler eclipsing binaries and 31 KOIs. A detailed comparison between the photometrically predicted companion's mass and the mass measured through RVs will improve our understanding of this young approach, and will support similar projects using data from current and future space-based time series photometry missions including K2, TESS, and PLATO. Our primary long term goal

  10. Radial Velocities and Kinematic Membership in the Open Cluster NGC 3114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Jorge Federico; Lapasset, Emilio

    2001-05-01

    Echelle spectroscopic observations for 30 bright stars in the field of the sparse open cluster NGC 3114 are presented. The sample includes main-sequence stars, yellow and red giants, and blue straggler candidates. Radial velocities are derived by cross-correlations using high signal-to-noise ratio standard spectra as templates. The cluster mean velocity is well defined from eight giants and several main-sequence stars whose average is =-3.52+/-0.25 km s-1. The membership probabilities of the observed stars are computed on the basis of the velocity distributions of the cluster and field stars, and the expected percentage of contamination at each position. We classified 19 cluster members and 10 nonmembers; the remaining star is a known spectroscopic binary for which no membership probability was assigned. Among the members, there is a bright yellow giant, seven red giants, and four blue straggler candidates, although they should be considered as turn-off stars. The location of two of them in the color-magnitude diagram (slightly blueward of the turn-off) can be explained by their low rotational velocities. No velocity variations were detected in the 16 stars measured more than once, which indicates that NGC 3114 possess an abnormally low binary frequency. From spectral types of cluster members, a distance modulus (V-Mv)=9.8+/-0.2 mag and a reddening E(B-V)=0.07+/-0.01 mag are derived. The cluster age is estimated to be 1.6×108 yr. The observations presented here were obtained at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET) and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan.

  11. Radial Velocity of the Phoenix Dwarf Galaxy: Linking Stars and H I Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallart, C.; Martínez-Delgado, D.; Gómez-Flechoso, M. A.; Mateo, M.

    2001-05-01

    We present the first radial velocity measurement of the stellar component of the Local Group dwarf galaxy Phoenix, using the FORS1 instrument at the VLT's Unit Telescope 1 (Antu). From the spectra of 31 red giant branch stars, we derive a heliocentric optical radial velocity for Phoenix of Vsolar=-52+/-6 km s-1. On the basis of this velocity, and taking into account the results of a series of semianalytical and numerical simulations, we discuss the possible association of the H I clouds observed in the Phoenix vicinity. We conclude that the characteristics of the H I cloud with heliocentric velocity -23 km s-1 are consistent with this gas having been associated with Phoenix in the past and being lost by the galaxy after the last event of star formation in the galaxy, about 100 Myr ago. Two possible scenarios are discussed: the ejection of the gas by the energy released by the supernovae (SNe) produced in that last event of star formation and a ram pressure stripping scenario. We derive that the kinetic energy necessary to eject the gas is ESNe~2×1051 ergs and that the number of SNe necessary to transfer this amount of kinetic energy to the gas cloud is ~20. This is consistent with the number of SNe expected for the last event of star formation in Phoenix, according to the star formation history derived by Martínez-Delgado, Gallart, & Aparicio. The drawback of this scenario is the regular appearance of the H I cloud and its anisotropic distribution with respect to the stellar component. Another possibility is that the H I gas was stripped as a consequence of ram pressure by the intergalactic medium. In our simulations, the structure of the gas remains quite smooth as it is stripped from Phoenix, keeping a distribution similar to that of the observed H I cloud. Both in the SNe ejection case and in the ram pressure sweeping scenario, the distances and relative velocities imply that the H I cloud is not gravitationally bound to Phoenix, since this would require a

  12. RADIAL VELOCITY OFFSETS DUE TO MASS OUTFLOWS AND EXTINCTION IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Crenshaw, D. M.; Schmitt, H. R.; Kraemer, S. B.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the radial velocity offsets between narrow emission lines and host galaxy lines (stellar absorption and H I 21 cm emission) in Seyfert galaxies with observed redshifts less than 0.043. We find that 35% of the Seyferts in the sample show [O III] emission lines with blueshifts with respect to their host galaxies exceeding 50 km s{sup -1}, whereas only 6% show redshifts this large, in qualitative agreement with most previous studies. We also find that a greater percentage of Seyfert 1 galaxies show blueshifts than Seyfert 2 galaxies. Using Hubble Spce Talescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spatially resolved spectra of the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 and the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151, we generate geometric models of their narrow-line regions (NLRs) and inner galactic disks, and show how these models can explain the blueshifted [O III] emission lines in collapsed STIS spectra of these two Seyferts. We conclude that the combination of mass outflow of ionized gas in the NLR and extinction by dust in the inner disk (primarily in the form of dust spirals) is primarily responsible for the velocity offsets in Seyfert galaxies. More exotic explanations are not needed. We discuss the implications of this result for the velocity offsets found in higher redshift active galactic nuclei.

  13. Interferometric observation of the F-corona radial velocities fields between 3 and 7 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, P. V.; Shestakova, L. I.; Aimanov, A. K.

    During the July 31, 1981 solar eclipse, F-corona interferograms near Mg I 5184 A were obtained using a Fabry-Perot etalon with an FWHM of 0.5 A (corresponding to 30 km/sec) and an image tube. Radial velocities V(r) of the interplanetary dust (ID) were measured in different directions. Both prograde and retrograde motions of ID in the ecliptic region is discovered. Most of velocity values do not exceed 50 km/sec. A negative velocity component appears after averaging all V(r) for all directions. Its average increases to -20 km/sec toward the sun. Some ejections are observed. The strongest (+130 km/sec) is located at the north ecliptic pole at a distance of 6 to 7 solar radii. From the lack of unshifted Fraunhofer lines in the scattered sky light, it is concluded that the sky brigntness continuous component is predominant and its source is K-corona scattered light in the earth's atmosphere.

  14. Radial velocities of very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarf members of the Hyades and Pleiades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.; Liebert, James; Giampapa, Mark; Macintosh, Bruce; Reid, Neill; Hamilton, Donald

    1994-01-01

    We have determined H alpha equivalent widths and radial velocities with 1 sigma accuracies of approximately 5 km s(exp -1) for approximately 20 candidate very low mass members of the Hyades and Pleiades clusters. The radial velocities for the Hyades sample suggest that nearly all of these stars are indeed highly probable members of the Hyades. The faintest stars in the Hyades sample have masses of order 0.1 solar mass. We also obtained radial velocities for four candidate very low mass members of the Pleiades and two objects that are candidate BD Pleiads. All of these stars have apparent V magnitudes fainter than the Hyades stars we observed, and the resultant radial velocity accuracy is worse. We believe that the three brighter stars are indeed likely very low mass stellar members of the Pleiades, whereas the status of the two brown dwarf candidates is uncertain. The Hyades stars we have observed and the three Pleiades very low mass stars are the lowest mass members of any open cluster whose membership has been confirmed by radial velocities and whose chromospheric activity has been measured. We see no change in chromospheric activity at the boundary where stars are expected to become fully convective (M approximately equals 0.3 solar mass) in either cluster. In the Pleiades, however, there may be a decrease in chromospheric activity for stars with (V-I)(sub K) greater than 3.5 (M less than or equal to 0.1 solar mass).

  15. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. XVIII. Classifications and radial velocities of the B-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, C. J.; Kennedy, M. B.; Dufton, P. L.; Howarth, I. D.; Walborn, N. R.; Markova, N.; Clark, J. S.; de Mink, S. E.; de Koter, A.; Dunstall, P. R.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Maíz Apellániz, J.; McEvoy, C. M.; Sana, H.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Taylor, W. D.; Vink, J. S.

    2015-02-01

    We present spectral classifications for 438 B-type stars observed as part of the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS) in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Radial velocities are provided for 307 apparently single stars, and for 99 targets with radial-velocity variations which are consistent with them being spectroscopic binaries. We investigate the spatial distribution of the radial velocities across the 30 Dor region, and use the results to identify candidate runaway stars. Excluding potential runaways and members of two older clusters in the survey region (SL 639 and Hodge 301), we determine a systemic velocity for 30 Dor of 271.6 ± 12.2 kms-1 from 273 presumed single stars. Employing a 3σ criterion we identify nine candidate runaway stars (2.9% of the single stars with radial-velocity estimates). The projected rotational velocities of the candidate runaways appear to be significantly different to those of the full B-type sample, with a strong preference for either large (≥345 kms-1) or small (≤65 kms-1) rotational velocities. Of the candidate runaways, VFTS 358 (classified B0.5: V) has the largest differential radial velocity (-106.9 ± 16.2 kms-1), and a preliminary atmospheric analysis finds a significantly enriched nitrogen abundance of 12 + log (N/H) ≳ 8.5. Combined with a large rotational velocity (vesini = 345 ± 22 kms-1), this is suggestive of past binary interaction for this star. Table 7 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 51 Peg (Martins+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. H. C.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Faria, J. P.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Melo, C.; Pepe, F.; Sousa, S.; Udry, S.; Cunha, D.

    2015-04-01

    The table contains the radial velocity data for HARPS observations of 51 Peg. This data was collected with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO's 3.6-m Telescope at La Silla-Paranal Observatory, as part of ESO programme 091.C-0271. It consists of 91 spectra observed in seven different nights (2013-06-08, 2013-06-25, 2013-08-02, 2013-08-04, 2013-09-05, 2013-09-09 and 2013-09-30) totalling around 12.5h of observing time. The obtained spectra have a S/N on the 50th order (~5560Å) that varies between 122 and 388. The spectra cover the wavelengths range from roughly 3781Å to 6910Å. (1 data file).

  17. Detectability of quasi-circular co-orbital planets. Application to the radial velocity technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leleu, Adrien; Robutel, Philippe; Correia, Alexandre C. M.

    2015-09-01

    Several celestial bodies in co-orbital configurations exist in the solar system. However, co-orbital exoplanets have not yet been discovered. This lack may result from a degeneracy between the signal induced by co-orbital planets and other orbital configurations. Here we determine a criterion for the detectability of quasi-circular co-orbital planets and develop a demodulation method to bring out their signature from the observational data. We show that the precision required to identify a pair of co-orbital planets depends only on the libration amplitude and on the planet's mass ratio. We apply our method to synthetic radial velocity data, and show that for tadpole orbits we are able to determine the inclination of the system to the line of sight. Our method is also valid for planets detected through the transit and astrometry techniques.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of southern SIM grid stars (Makarov+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, V. V.; Unwin, S. C.

    2015-06-01

    We present analysis of precision radial velocities (RV) of 1134 mostly red giant stars in the southern sky, selected as candidate astrometric grid objects for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). Only a few (typically, two or three) spectroscopic observations per star have been collected, with the main goal of screening binary systems. The estimated rate of spectroscopic binarity in this sample of red giants is 32 per cent at the 0.95 confidence level, and 46 per cent at the 0.75 confidence. The true binarity rate is likely to be higher, because our method is not quite sensitive to very wide binaries and low-mass companions. The estimated lower and upper bounds of stellar RV jitter for the entire sample are 24 and 51m/s, respectively; the adopted mean value is 37m/s. A few objects of interest are identified with large variations of RV, implying abnormally high mass ratios. (1 data file).

  19. Red Optical Planet Survey: A radial velocity search for low mass M dwarf planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Jenkins, J. S.; Jones, H. R. A.; Rojo, P.; Arriagada, P.; Jordán, A.; Minniti, D.; Tuomi, M.; Jeffers, S. V.; Pinfield, D.

    2013-04-01

    We present radial velocity results from our Red Optical Planet Survey (ROPS), aimed at detecting low-mass planets orbiting mid-late M dwarfs. The ˜10 ms-1 precision achieved over 2 consecutive nights with the MIKE spectrograph at Magellan Clay is also found on week long timescales with UVES at VLT. Since we find that UVES is expected to attain photon limited precision of order 2 ms-1 using our novel deconvolution technique, we are limited only by the (≤10 ms-1) stability of atmospheric lines. Rocky planet frequencies of η⊕ = 0.3-0.7 lead us to expect high planet yields, enabling determination of η⊕ for the uncharted mid-late M dwarfs with modest surveys.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of the Be star HR 2142 (Peters+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, G. J.; Wang, L.; Gies, D. R.; Grundstrom, E. D.

    2016-11-01

    Radial velocity measurements were made using the set of spectra summarized in Table 1. The main focus of this work is a set of 88 high resolution, SWP HIRES FUV spectra acquired over the lifetime of the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observatory. These were downloaded from MAST and resampled. We also collected a set of 49 LWR and LWP near-UV spectra that were used to inspect the orbital variations in the MgII2796,2803 feature. The UV spectra were supplemented with a large collection of Hα spectra that we secured with the KPNO Coude Feed telescope and that were obtained by amateur astronomers participating in the Be Star Spectra database project (Pollmann 2007IBVS.5778....1P; Neiner et al. 2011AJ....142..149N). (2 data files).

  1. Analytical determination of orbital elements using Fourier analysis. I. The radial velocity case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delisle, J.-B.; Ségransan, D.; Buchschacher, N.; Alesina, F.

    2016-05-01

    We describe an analytical method for computing the orbital parameters of a planet from the periodogram of a radial velocity signal. The method is very efficient and provides a good approximation of the orbital parameters. The accuracy is mainly limited by the accuracy of the computation of the Fourier decomposition of the signal which is sensitive to sampling and noise. Our method is complementary with more accurate (and more expensive in computer time) numerical algorithms (e.g. Levenberg-Marquardt, Markov chain Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms). Indeed, the analytical approximation can be used as an initial condition to accelerate the convergence of these numerical methods. Our method can be applied iteratively to search for multiple planets in the same system.

  2. The Keck I/HIRES and TNG/SARG Radial Velocity Survey of Speckle Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Milena; Konacki, Maciej; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.

    2012-04-01

    A sample of about 160 speckle binary stars was observed with the Keck I telescope and its Échelle HIRES spectrograph over the years 2003-2007 in an effort to detect substellar and planetary companions to components of binary and multiple star systems. This data set was supplemented with the data obtained at the TNG telescope equipped with the SARG Échelle spectrograph over the years 2006-2007. The high-resolution (R = 65000 for HIRES and R = 86000 for SARG) and high signal-to-noise (typically 75-150) spectra were used to derive radial velocities of the components of the observed speckle binaries. Here, we present a summary of this effort, which includes the discovery of new triple star systems and improved orbital solutions of a few known binaries.

  3. EFFICIENT FITTING OF MULTIPLANET KEPLERIAN MODELS TO RADIAL VELOCITY AND ASTROMETRY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J. T.; Howard, A. W.

    2009-05-15

    We describe a technique for solving for the orbital elements of multiple planets from radial velocity (RV) and/or astrometric data taken with 1 m s{sup -1} and {mu}as precision, appropriate for efforts to detect Earth-massed planets in their stars' habitable zones, such as NASA's proposed Space Interferometry Mission. We include details of calculating analytic derivatives for use in the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm for the problems of fitting RV and astrometric data separately and jointly. We also explicate the general method of separating the linear and nonlinear components of a model fit in the context of an LM fit, show how explicit derivatives can be calculated in such a model, and demonstrate the speed up and convergence improvements of such a scheme in the case of a five-planet fit to published RV data for 55 Cnc.

  4. SKARPS: The Search for Kuiper Belts around Radial-Velocity Planet Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryden, Geoffrey; Marshall, Jonathan; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Su, Kate; Wyatt, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Search for Kuiper belts Around Radial-velocity Planet Stars - SKARPS -is a Herschel survey of solar-type stars known to have orbiting planets. When complete, the 100-star SKARPS sample will be large enough for a meaningful statistical comparison against stars not known to have planets. (This control sample has already been observed by Herschel's DUst around NEarby Stars - DUNES - key program). Initial results include previously known disks that are resolved for the first time and newly discovered disks that are fainter and colder than those typically detected by Spitzer. So far, with only half of the sample in hand, there is no measured correlation between inner RV planets and cold outer debris. While this is consistent with the results from Spitzer, it is in contrast with the relationship suggested by the prominent debris disks in imaged-planet systems.

  5. Reanalysis of radial velocity data from the resonant planetary system HD128311

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Hanno

    2015-03-01

    The multiplanetary system HD128311 hosts at least two planets. Its dynamical formation history has been studied extensively in the literature. We reanalyse the latest radial velocity data for this system with the affine-invariant Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler EMCEE. Using the high-order integrator IAS15, we perform a fully dynamical fit, allowing the planets to interact during the sampling process. A stability analysis using the Mean Exponential Growth of Nearby Orbits indicator reveals that the system is located in a stable island of the parameter space. In contrast to a previous study, we find that the system is locked in a 2:1 mean motion resonance. The resonant angle ϕ1 is librating with a libration amplitude of approximately 37°. The existence of mean motion resonances has important implication for planet formation theories. Our results confirm predictions of models involving planet migration and stochastic forces.

  6. The Search for Extrasolar Planets by Means of the Radial-Velocity Spectral Method and Astrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksanfomaliti, L. V.

    The discovery of companion planets of alien stars (exoplanets) commands the interest of the scientific community all over the world. The factual data in the paper appearing below should help to draw the attention of Russian specialists to this fascinating problem. The data make it possible to assess the feasibility of identifying exoplanets, using available instruments, by detecting indications of Keplerian Doppler shifts in stellar motion. Consideration is given to the effects produced by the gravitational pull exerted on a star by companion planets similar to the main planets of the Solar System. The signatures of companion planets observed from a distance of 10 pc are evaluated. Some specific experimental results, together with the corresponding radial velocities and angular wobbles of the star, are given. Information about achieved thresholds and the techniques by which they were reached is summarized.

  7. On the Determination of Transiting Planet Properties from Light and Radial Velocity Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2017-02-01

    A recent publication has suggested a method to determine the masses and radii of the components of an eclipsing system using only a light curve and radial velocities of one component. If true, this would have immediate impact in expediting the study of transiting extrasolar planet and brown dwarf systems. The method is intended for situations where the mass ratio is significantly different from zero, but implicitly also requires the assumption that the mass ratio is negligible. We investigate both cases, finding that when the mass ratio is significant the method is mathematically identical to existing approaches, and when the mass ratio is negligible the equations become undefined. We therefore conclude that the method cannot be used to measure the physical properties of such systems from observations alone.

  8. A WEAVE Radial Velocity Survey to Unravel the Nature of the Milky Way's Spiral Arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monguió, M.; Figueras, F.; Grosbøl, P.

    2016-10-01

    The nature of the spiral arms of our Milky Way Galaxy is still a matter of debate. Different theories have been suggested (density waves, swing amplification, invariant manifolds...) which impose several constraints on the observables. For the first time it will be possible to disentangle these theories by combining Gaia and WEAVE data. Great advantage comes from the fact that WEAVE is in the Northern Hemisphere, that is with good coverage towards the galactic anticenter. We plan to quantify the kinematic perturbation induced by the Perseus spiral arm through radial velocity measurements. We show how, for the first time, we have detected the stellar overdensity associated with the Perseus arm using a Strömgren photometric survey with the Wide Field Camera on the Isaac Newton Telescope. This survey has allowed us to perform first tests on WEAVE capabilities.

  9. Radial velocity measurements of the chromospherically-active stars (2): HD 28591 = V492 Per

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadonas, V.; Sperauskas, J.; Fekel, F. C.; Morton, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    From two sets of the spectroscopic observations covering a ten year period we have obtained 59 radial velocities of the chromospherically-active star HD 28591 = V492 Per. It is a G9III single-lined spectroscopic binary with a period of 21.2910 days and a circular orbit. The upsilon sin i of 24.6 km/sec, results in a minimum radius 10.3 solar radii. We estimate a distance of 165 +/- 40 pc and an orbital inclination of 65 +/- 25 degrees. The secondary is probably a mid to late-type K dwarf. The star is brighter than the limiting magnitude of the Bright Star Catalogue. The mean photometric and the orbital periods are identical within their uncertainties. Since the star fills a significant fraction of its Roche lobe, about 62%, the photometric light curve may be the result of starspots and a modest ellipticity effect.

  10. Extracting kinetic freeze-out temperature and radial flow velocity from an improved Tsallis distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Hai-Ling; Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A.

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the transverse-momentum (pT) spectra of identified particles (π^{±}, K^{±}, p, and \\bar{p}) produced in gold-gold (Au-Au) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions over a √{s_{NN}} (center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair) range from 14.5 GeV (one of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energies) to 2.76 TeV (one of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies). For the spectra with a narrow pT range, an improved Tsallis distribution which is in fact the Tsallis distribution with radial flow is used. For the spectra with a wide pT range, a superposition of the improved Tsallis distribution and an inverse power law is used. Both the extracted kinetic freeze-out temperature (T0) and radial flow velocity (βT) increase with the increase of √{s_{NN}}, which indicates a higher excitation and larger expansion of the interesting system at the LHC. Both the values of T0 and βT in central collisions are slightly larger than those in peripheral collisions, and they are independent of isospin and slightly dependent on mass.

  11. Radial-Velocity Analysis of the Post-AGB Star, HD101584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, F.; Hearnshaw, J.; Rosenzweig, P.; Guzman, E.; Sivarani, T.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2007-08-01

    This project concerns the analysis of the periodicity of the radial velocity of the peculiar emission-line supergiant star HD 101584 (F0 Ia), and also we propose a physical model to account for the observations. From its peculiarities, HD 101584 is a star that is in the post-AGB phase. This study is considered as a key to clarify the multiple aspects related with the evolution of the circum-stellar layer associated with this star's last phase. The star shows many lines with P Cygni profiles, including H-alpha, Na D lines in the IR Ca triplet, indicating a mass outflow. For HD 101584 we have performed a detailed study of its radial-velocity variations, using both emission and absorption lines over a wide range of wavelength. We have analyzed the variability and found a periodicity for all types of lines of 144 days, which must arise from the star's membership in a binary system. The data span a period of five consecutive years and were obtained using the 1-m telescope of Mt John Observatory, in New Zealand., with the echelle and Hercules high resolution spectrographs and CCD camera. HD101584 is known to be an IRAS source, and our model suggests it is a proto-planetary nebula, probably with a bipolar outflow and surrounded by a dusty disk as part of a binary system. We have found no evidence for HD101584 to contain a B9 star as found by Bakker et al (1996). A low resolution IUE spectrum shows the absence of any strong UV continuum that would be expected for a B star to be in this system.

  12. A multi-method approach to radial-velocity measurement for single-object spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, M.; Blomme, R.; Frémat, Y.; Damerdji, Y.; Delle Luche, C.; Gosset, E.; Katz, D.; Viala, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The derivation of radial velocities from large numbers of spectra that typically result from survey work, requires automation. However, except for the classical cases of slowly rotating late-type spectra, existing methods of measuring Doppler shifts require fine-tuning to avoid a loss of accuracy due to the idiosyncrasies of individual spectra. The radial velocity spectrometer (RVS) on the Gaia mission, which will start operating very soon, prompted a new attempt at creating a measurement pipeline to handle a wide variety of spectral types. Aims: The present paper describes the theoretical background on which this software is based. However, apart from the assumption that only synthetic templates are used, we do not rely on any of the characteristics of this instrument, so our results should be relevant for most telescope-detector combinations. Methods: We propose an approach based on the simultaneous use of several alternative measurement methods, each having its own merits and drawbacks, and conveying the spectral information in a different way, leading to different values for the measurement. A comparison or a combination of the various results either leads to a "best estimate" or indicates to the user that the observed spectrum is problematic and should be analysed manually. Results: We selected three methods and analysed the relationships and differences between them from a unified point of view; with each method an appropriate estimator for the individual random error is chosen. We also develop a procedure for tackling the problem of template mismatch in a systematic way. Furthermore, we propose several tests for studying and comparing the performance of the various methods as a function of the atmospheric parameters of the observed objects. Finally, we describe a procedure for obtaining a knowledge-based combination of the various Doppler-shift measurements.

  13. Technology for radial velocity search and characterisation of exoplanets in the 2020s and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael; Feger, Tobias; Bento, Joao; Rains, Adam

    2015-12-01

    In the past 20 years, radial velocity exoplanet instrumentation has been focussed on a small number of moderate sized (or moderate efficiency) telescopes. I will argue that there are two very different uses for radial velocity in the near future: transit follow-up and low-mass exoplanet detection around relatively nearby stars. For the first of these science goals, targets are relatively distant, and a high eficiency spectrograph on a large telescope is needed, for example the Gemini High-resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST): a stabilised spectrograph fed by an array of multi-mode fibers at the final design stage. For the second of these goals, stellar noise due to pulsations, convective cells and activity provide a lower limit to the noise floor achievable for any given temporal sampling. I will argue through simple simulations that an array of small telescopes with precise spectrographs making a very large number of measurements is a much more effective way to detect the smallest exoplanets than instrumentation on large telescopes. I will describe the first results from the Replicable High-Resoluition Exoplanet and Asteroseismology (RHEA) spectrograph designed for 0.25 to 0.5m telescopes, which has single-epoch measurement uncertainties at the 1 m/s level and a total whole cost for detecting the smallest exoplanets that is significantly lower than medium to large telescope concepts. RHEA has an eyepiece-sized fast tip/tilt and mode reformatting system that efficiently injects a small array of single-mode fibers, feeding a <0.5m sized stabilised inexpensive spectrograph. I will show preliminary performance results from both stars and laboratory tests that verify the precision, and will discuss pathways to turn this into a broader community project.

  14. CHROMOSPHERICALLY ACTIVE STARS IN THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT (RAVE) SURVEY. I. THE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Žerjal, M.; Zwitter, T.; Matijevič, G.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Freeman, K. C.; Kordopatis, G.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2013-10-20

    RAVE, the unbiased magnitude limited survey of southern sky stars, contained 456,676 medium-resolution spectra at the time of our analysis. Spectra cover the Ca II infrared triplet (IRT) range, which is a known indicator of chromospheric activity. Our previous work classified all spectra using locally linear embedding. It identified 53,347 cases with a suggested emission component in calcium lines. Here, we use a spectral subtraction technique to measure the properties of this emission. Synthetic templates are replaced by the observed spectra of non-active stars to bypass the difficult computations of non-local thermal equilibrium profiles of the line cores and stellar parameter dependence. We derive both the equivalent width of the excess emission for each calcium line on a 5 Å wide interval and their sum EW{sub IRT} for ∼44,000 candidate active dwarf stars with signal-to-noise ratio >20, with no cuts on the basis of the source of their emission flux. From these, ∼14,000 show a detectable chromospheric flux with at least a 2σ confidence level. Our set of active stars vastly enlarges previously known samples. Atmospheric parameters and, in some cases, radial velocities of active stars derived from automatic pipelines suffer from systematic shifts due to their shallower calcium lines. We re-estimate the effective temperature, metallicity, and radial velocities for candidate active stars. The overall distribution of activity levels shows a bimodal shape, with the first peak coinciding with non-active stars and the second with the pre-main-sequence cases. The catalog will be made publicly available with the next RAVE public data releases.

  15. The Orbits of the Quadruple Star System 88 Tauri A from PHASES Differential Astrometry and Radial Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Benjamin F.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Fekel, Francis C.; Williamson, Michael; Browne, Stanley; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Shao, M.

    2007-11-01

    We have used high-precision differential astrometry from the Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) project and radial velocity measurements covering a time span of 20 years to determine the orbital parameters of the 88 Tau A system. 88 Tau is a complex hierarchical multiple system comprising a total of six stars; we have studied the brightest four, consisting of two short-period pairs orbiting each other with an ~18 yr period. We present the first orbital solution for one of the short-period pairs, and determine the masses of the components and distance to the system to the level of a few percent. In addition, our astrometric measurements allow us to make the first determination of the mutual inclinations of the orbits. We find that the subsystems are not coplanar.

  16. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W.; Blake, C. H.; Carlberg, J. K.; Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F.; Crepp, J.; Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C.; Nidever, D. L.; Prieto, C. Allende; Hernández, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Ebelke, G.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Ge, J.; and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ∼2 km s{sup –1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup –1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ∼100-200 m s{sup –1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we

  17. The SLUGGS Survey: A Catalog of Over 4000 Globular Cluster Radial Velocities in 27 Nearby Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Duncan A.; Alabi, Adebusola; Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Strader, Jay; Foster, Caroline; Usher, Christopher; Spitler, Lee; Bellstedt, Sabine; Pastorello, Nicola; Villaume, Alexa; Wasserman, Asher; Pota, Vincenzo

    2017-03-01

    Here, we present positions and radial velocities for over 4000 globular clusters (GCs) in 27 nearby early-type galaxies from the SLUGGS survey. The SLUGGS survey is designed to be representative of elliptical and lenticular galaxies in the stellar mass range 10 < log {M}* /M ⊙ < 11.7. The data have been obtained over many years, mostly using the very stable multi-object spectrograph DEIMOS on the Keck II 10 m telescope. Radial velocities are measured using the calcium triplet lines, with a velocity accuracy of ±10–15 km s‑1. We use phase space diagrams (i.e., velocity–position diagrams) to identify contaminants such as foreground stars and background galaxies, and to show that the contribution of GCs from neighboring galaxies is generally insignificant. Likely ultra-compact dwarfs are tabulated separately. We find that the mean velocity of the GC system is close to that of the host galaxy systemic velocity, indicating that the GC system is in overall dynamical equilibrium within the galaxy potential. We also find that the GC system velocity dispersion scales with host galaxy stellar mass, in a similar manner to the Faber–Jackson relation for the stellar velocity dispersion. Publication of these GC radial velocity catalogs should enable further studies in many areas, such as GC system substructure, kinematics, and host galaxy mass measurements.

  18. 3-D shear wave radially and azimuthally anisotropic velocity model of the North American upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huaiyu; Romanowicz, Barbara; Fischer, Karen M.; Abt, David

    2011-03-01

    Using a combination of long period seismic waveforms and SKS splitting measurements, we have developed a 3-D upper-mantle model (SAWum_NA2) of North America that includes isotropic shear velocity, with a lateral resolution of ˜250 km, as well as radial and azimuthal anisotropy, with a lateral resolution of ˜500 km. Combining these results, we infer several key features of lithosphere and asthenosphere structure. A rapid change from thin (˜70-80 km) lithosphere in the western United States (WUS) to thick lithosphere (˜200 km) in the central, cratonic part of the continent closely follows the Rocky Mountain Front (RMF). Changes with depth of the fast axis direction of azimuthal anisotropy reveal the presence of two layers in the cratonic lithosphere, corresponding to the fast-to-slow discontinuity found in receiver functions. Below the lithosphere, azimuthal anisotropy manifests a maximum, stronger in the WUS than under the craton, and the fast axis of anisotropy aligns with the absolute plate motion, as described in the hotspot reference frame (HS3-NUVEL 1A). In the WUS, this zone is confined between 70 and 150 km, decreasing in strength with depth from the top, from the RMF to the San Andreas Fault system and the Juan de Fuca/Gorda ridges. This result suggests that shear associated with lithosphere-asthenosphere coupling dominates mantle deformation down to this depth in the western part of the continent. The depth extent of the zone of increased azimuthal anisotropy below the cratonic lithosphere is not well resolved in our study, although it is peaked around 270 km, a robust result. Radial anisotropy is such that, predominantly, ξ > 1, where ξ= (Vsh/Vsv)2, under the continent and its borders down to ˜200 km, with stronger ξ in the bordering oceanic regions. Across the continent and below 200 km, alternating zones of weaker and stronger radial anisotropy, with predominantly ξ < 1, correlate with zones of small lateral changes in the fast axis direction of

  19. Binaries at Birth: Stellar multiplicity in embedded clusters from radial velocity variations in the IN-SYNC survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskar Jaehnig, Karl; Stassun, Keivan; Tan, Jonathan C.; Covey, Kevin R.; Da Rio, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of stellar multiplicity in young stellar systems using the INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC) survey, carried out in SDSS III with the APOGEE spectrograph. Multi-epoch observations of thousands of low-mass stars in Orion A, NGC2264, NGC1333 and IC348 have been carried out, yielding H-band spectra with R=22,500 for sources with H<12 mag. Radial velocity sensitivities ~0.3 km/s can be achieved, depending on the spectral type of the star. We search the IN-SYNC radial velocity catalog to identify sources with radial velocity variations indicative of spectroscopically undetected companions, analyze their spectral properties and discuss the implications for the overall multiplicity of stellar populations in young, embedded star clusters.

  20. On the nature of the radial velocity variability of Aldebaran - A search for spectral line bisector variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, Artie P.; Cochran, William D.

    1998-02-01

    The shape of the Ti I 6303.8-A spectral line of Aldebaran as measured by the line bisector was investigated using high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution data. The goal of this study was to understand the nature of the 643-d period in the radial velocity for this star reported by Hatzes & Cochran. Variations in the line bisector with the radial velocity period would provide strong evidence in support of rotational modulation or stellar pulsations as the cause of the 643-d period. A lack of any bisector variability at this period would support the planet hypothesis. Variations in the line asymmetries are found with a period of 49.93 d. These variations are uncorrelated with the 643-d period found previously in the radial velocity measurements. It is demonstrated that this 50-d period is consistent with an m = 4 non-radial sectoral g-mode oscillation. The lack of spectral variability with the radial velocity period of 643 d may provide strong evidence in support of the hypothesis that this variability stems from the reflex motion of the central star due to a planetary companion having a mass of 11 Jupiter masses. However, this long-period variability may still be the result of a low-order (m = 2) pulsation mode as these would cause bisector variations of less than the error measurement.

  1. Radial Velocity and Metallicity Determinations for Remote Globular Clusters in M31 and M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Annette; Barmby, Pauline; Cote, Pat; Harris, Bill; Huxor, Avon; Mackey, Dougal; Puzia, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    We propose to determine radial velocities and metallicities for a sample of ~ 20 remote globular clusters (GCs) which we have discovered in the outer halos of the Local Group galaxies M31 and M33. Most of these objects have been uncovered in the course of the PAndAs survey, an international collaboration which is using CFHT/MegaPrime to map more than 300 square degrees in the g and i bands around M31 and M33. The target clusters, all of which have been identified from high- quality imaging (typically ≲ 0.8'' seeing), lie at projected radii of up to 130 kpc from M31 and 30 kpc from M33 and thus lie significantly beyond all previously-known GCs in these systems. Rather intriguingly, many of the new discoveries exhibit either possible associations with halo tidal streams, or show unusual spatial anisotropies with respect to their host galaxy. Velocity and metallicity data for these objects will provide a detailed characterization of the ensemble properties of the outer halo GC populations, and, through the search for kinematic and metallicity correlations within groups of GCs, help determine what fraction of these objects can be attributed to either late or ongoing accretion events. Ultimately, these data will also provide a basis for improved dynamical mass estimates of both galaxies.

  2. A Radial Velocity Study of Hot Subdwarf B Stars with Cool Main Sequence Companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Brad; Wade, R. A.; Liss, S. E.; Stark, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Many hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars show composite spectra and energy distributions indicative of G- or K-type main sequence companions. Binary population synthesis (BPS) models demonstrate such systems can be formed by Roche lobe overflow but disagree on whether the resulting orbital periods will be long (years) or short (days). Few studies have been carried out to assess the orbital parameters of these composite binaries; what little observations there are suggest the periods are long. To help address this problem, we selected fifteen moderately-bright (V 13) sdB stars with composite spectra for synoptic radial velocity (RV) monitoring. From January 2005 to July 2008, we acquired between 4 and 14 observations of each target using the bench-mounted Medium Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Cross-correlation techniques were used to measure RVs from the cool companion lines with 700 m/s precision. Here we present RV measurements and orbital parameter estimates (when appropriate) for all systems in our sample and discuss the constraints they place on BPS models. Preliminary measurements of PG 1701+359, the most well-studied object in our sample, indicate the orbit has neither a short period nor a high velocity amplitude. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908642.

  3. Suppression of fiber modal noise induced radial velocity errors for bright emission-line calibration sources

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Halverson, Samuel; Ramsey, Lawrence; Venditti, Nick

    2014-05-01

    Modal noise in optical fibers imposes limits on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and velocity precision achievable with the next generation of astronomical spectrographs. This is an increasingly pressing problem for precision radial velocity spectrographs in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical that require both high stability of the observed line profiles and high S/N. Many of these spectrographs plan to use highly coherent emission-line calibration sources like laser frequency combs and Fabry-Perot etalons to achieve precision sufficient to detect terrestrial-mass planets. These high-precision calibration sources often use single-mode fibers or highly coherent sources. Coupling light from single-mode fibers to multi-mode fibers leads to only a very low number of modes being excited, thereby exacerbating the modal noise measured by the spectrograph. We present a commercial off-the-shelf solution that significantly mitigates modal noise at all optical and NIR wavelengths, and which can be applied to spectrograph calibration systems. Our solution uses an integrating sphere in conjunction with a diffuser that is moved rapidly using electrostrictive polymers, and is generally superior to most tested forms of mechanical fiber agitation. We demonstrate a high level of modal noise reduction with a narrow bandwidth 1550 nm laser. Our relatively inexpensive solution immediately enables spectrographs to take advantage of the innate precision of bright state-of-the art calibration sources by removing a major source of systematic noise.

  4. Radial velocity measurements of a sample of northern metal-deficient stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasniewicz, G.; Mayor, M.

    A sample of 41 northern metal-deficient stars composed of 14 stars with Fe/H less than -1.1, 11 stars with -1.1 less than or equal to Fe/H less than -0.6 and 16 stars with -0.6 less than or equal to Fe/H less than -0.3 was observed with the radial velocity scanner CORAVEL. Seven stars were discovered as certain or possible spectroscopic binaries (SBs). The measurements are in fair agreement with those of Carney and Latham (1987), but in disagreement with those of Stryker et al (1985). Spectroscopic orbits are determined for HD 108754 (period: 26d) and HD 153847 (period: 5d). The distribution of SBs as a function of period between this sample of metal-deficient stars and a sample of metal-rich G-type stars (Fe/H greater than or equal to -0.3) is proved to be statistically similar. For high-velocity and/or metal-deficient SBs, the distribution of orbital eccentricities versus logarithm of period is discussed in terms of tidal circularization.

  5. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IN-SYNC. III. Radial velocities of IC348 stars (Cottaar+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaar, M.; Covey, K. R.; Foster, J. B.; Meyer, M. R.; Tan, J. C.; Nidever, D. L.; Drew Chojnowski, S.; da Rio, N.; Flaherty, K. M.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Majewski, S.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Wilson, J. C.; Zasowski, G.

    2015-11-01

    Cottaar et al. (Paper I, 2014, J/ApJ/794/125) describes the analysis of the high-resolution near-infrared spectra obtained by the APOGEE multi-object spectrograph from stars in IC 348, NGC 1333, NGC 2264, and Orion A as part of the INfrared Spectroscopy of Young Nebulous Clusters (IN-SYNC) ancillary program. Using radial velocities determined from APOGEE spectra of 380 likely cluster members, we have measured the radial velocity distribution of the young (2-6Myr) cluster IC 348. (2 data files).

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HD17674, HD29021, and HD42012 radial velocities (Rey+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, J.; Hebrard, G.; Bouchy, F.; Bourrier, V.; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.; Arnold, L.; Astudillo-Defru, N.; Bonfils, X.; Borgniet, S.; Courcol, B.; Deleuil, M.; Delfosse, X.; Demangeon, O.; Diaz, R. F.; Ehrenreich, D.; Forveille, T.; Marmier, M.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Santerne, A.; Sahlmann, J.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Wilson, P. A.

    2017-04-01

    HD17674, HD29021 and HD42012 were observed with the ELODIE and SOPHIE spectrographs mounted on the 193cm telescope of Haute Provence Observatory, in the south of France. Data include the epoch of observation, radial velocities, uncertainties on the radial velocities and the corresponding spectrograph used for the observations. Data were acquired in 101, 66 and 32 epochs spread over 18, 4 and 8 years for HD17674, HD29021 and HD42012 respectively. Tables 5, 6, and 7 list all RVs in the barycentric reference frame of the Solar System. (3 data files).

  8. Astrometry, radial velocity, and photometry: the HD 128311 system remixed with data from HST, HET, and APT

    SciTech Connect

    McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz.; Cochran, William D.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hatzes, Artie; Harrison, Tom E.; Johns-Krull, Chris; Nelan, Ed

    2014-11-01

    We have used high-cadence radial velocity measurements from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with published velocities from the Lick 3 m Shane Telescope, combined with astrometric data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Fine Guidance Sensors to refine the orbital parameters of the HD 128311 system, and determine an inclination of 55.°95 ± 14.°55 and true mass of 3.789 {sub −0.432}{sup +0.924} M {sub JUP} for HD 128311 c. The combined radial velocity data also reveal a short period signal which could indicate a third planet in the system with an Msin i of 0.133 ± 0.005 M {sub JUP} or stellar phenomena. Photometry from the T12 0.8 m automatic photometric telescope at the Fairborn Observatory and HST are used to determine a photometric period close to, but not within the errors of the radial velocity signal. We performed a cross-correlation bisector analysis of the radial velocity data to look for correlations with the photometric period and found none. Dynamical integrations of the proposed system show long-term stability with the new orbital parameters of over 10 million years. Our new orbital elements do not support the claims of HD 128311 b and c being in mean motion resonance.

  9. Long-term classical and general relativistic effects on the radial velocities of the stars orbiting Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2011-02-01

    We analytically work out the cumulative, i.e. averaged over one orbital revolution, time variations ? of the radial velocity vρ of a typical S star orbiting the supermassive (M•≈ 106 M⊙) black hole (SBH) hosted by the Galactic Centre (GC) in Sgr A* caused by several dynamical effects. They are the general relativistic gravitoelectromagnetic (GEM) fields of the SBH, its quadrupole mass moment Q2 and a diffuse dark matter distribution around the SBH. All of them induce non-zero long-term radial accelerations proportional to the eccentricity e of the orbit. By taking the S2 star, orbiting the SBH along a highly eccentric (e= 0.8831) ellipse with a period Pb= 15.9 yr and semimajor axis a= 1031.69 au, we numerically compute the magnitudes of its radial accelerations. The largest effects are due to the general relativistic Schwarzschild-like gravitoelectric (GE) field, with ?, and the diffuse material distribution, modelled with a Plummer-type mass density profile, with ?. The effects caused by the general relativistic Kerr-type gravitomagnetic (GM) field and by Q2 are smaller by orders of magnitude. By assuming an uncertainty in measuring the radial velocities of about 15 km s-1, the future accuracy in measuring ? can be evaluated to be of the order of 2.4 × 10-5 m s-2 over an observational time-span Δt= 20 yr. Currently, the available radial velocity measurements cover just 7 yr.

  10. WIYN open cluster study. LIX. Radial velocity membership of the evolved population of the old open cluster NGC 6791

    SciTech Connect

    Tofflemire, Benjamin M.; Gosnell, Natalie M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Platais, Imants E-mail: imants@pha.jhu.edu

    2014-10-01

    The open cluster NGC 6791 has been the focus of much recent study due to its intriguing combination of old age and high metallicity (∼8 Gyr, [Fe/H] = +0.30), as well as its location within the Kepler field. As part of the WIYN Open Cluster Study, we present precise (σ = 0.38 km s{sup –1}) radial velocities for proper motion candidate members of NGC 6791 from Platais et al. Our survey, extending down to g' ∼ 16.8, is comprised of the evolved cluster population, including blue stragglers, giants, and horizontal branch stars. Of the 280 proper-motion-selected stars above our magnitude limit, 93% have at least one radial velocity measurement and 79% have three measurements over the course of at least 200 days, sufficient for secure radial-velocity-determined membership of non-velocity-variable stars. The Platais et al. proper motion catalog includes 12 anomalous horizontal branch candidates blueward of the red clump, of which we find only 4 to be cluster members. Three fall slightly blueward of the red clump and the fourth is consistent with being a blue straggler. The cleaned color-magnitude diagram shows a richly populated red giant branch and a blue straggler population. Half of the blue stragglers are in binaries. From our radial velocity measurement distribution, we find the cluster's radial velocity dispersion to be σ {sub c} = 0.62 ± 0.10 km s{sup –1}. This corresponds to a dynamical mass of ∼4600 M {sub ☉}.

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HIP binaries with radial velocities (Frankowski+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, A.; Jancart, S.; Jorissen, A.

    2006-11-01

    The comparison of the proper motions constructed from positions spanning a short (Hipparcos) or long time (Tycho-2) makes it possible to uncover binaries with periods of the order of or somewhat larger than the short time span (in this case, the 3 yr duration of the Hipparcos mission), since the unrecognised orbital motion will then add to the proper motion. A list of candidate proper motion binaries is constructed from a chi-square test evaluating the statistical significance of the difference between the Tycho-2 and Hipparcos proper motions for 103134 stars in common between the two catalogues (excluding components of visual systems). The present paper focuses on the evaluation of the detection efficiency of proper-motion binaries, using different kinds of control data (mostly radial velocities). The detection rate for entries from the Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits (SB9) is evaluated, as well as for stars like barium stars, which are known to be all binaries, and finally for spectroscopic binaries identified from radial velocity data in the Geneva-Copenhagen survey of F and G dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood. Proper motion binaries are efficiently detected for systems with parallaxes in excess of 20mas, and periods in the range 1000-30000d. The shortest periods in this range (1000-2000d, i.e., once to twice the duration of the Hipparcos mission) may appear only as DMSA/G binaries (accelerated proper motion in the Hipparcos Double and Multiple System Annex). Proper motion binaries detected among SB9 systems having periods shorter than about 400d hint at triple systems, the proper-motion binary involving a component with a longer orbital period. A list of 19 candidate triple systems is provided. Binaries suspected of having low-mass (brown-dwarf-like) companions are listed as well. Among the 37 barium stars with parallaxes larger than 5mas, only 7 exhibit no evidence for duplicity whatsoever (be it spectroscopic or astrometric). Finally, the

  12. Proper-motion binaries in the Hipparcos catalogue. Comparison with radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankowski, A.; Jancart, S.; Jorissen, A.

    2007-03-01

    Context: This paper is the last in a series devoted to the analysis of the binary content of the Hipparcos Catalogue. Aims: The comparison of the proper motions constructed from positions spanning a short (Hipparcos) or long time (Tycho-2) makes it possible to uncover binaries with periods of the order of or somewhat larger than the short time span (in this case, the 3 yr duration of the Hipparcos mission), since the unrecognised orbital motion will then add to the proper motion. Methods: A list of candidate proper motion binaries is constructed from a carefully designed χ2 test evaluating the statistical significance of the difference between the Tycho-2 and Hipparcos proper motions for 103 134 stars in common between the two catalogues (excluding components of visual systems). Since similar lists of proper-motion binaries have already been constructed, the present paper focuses on the evaluation of the detection efficiency of proper-motion binaries, using different kinds of control data (mostly radial velocities). The detection rate for entries from the Ninth Catalogue of Spectroscopic Binary Orbits (S_B^9) is evaluated, as well as for stars like barium stars, which are known to be all binaries, and finally for spectroscopic binaries identified from radial velocity data in the Geneva-Copenhagen survey of F and G dwarfs in the solar neighbourhood. Results: Proper motion binaries are efficiently detected for systems with parallaxes in excess of ~20 mas, and periods in the range 1000-30 000 d. The shortest periods in this range (1000-2000 d, i.e., once to twice the duration of the Hipparcos mission) may appear only as DMSA/G binaries (accelerated proper motion in the Hipparcos Double and Multiple System Annex). Proper motion binaries detected among S_B9 systems having periods shorter than about 400 d hint at triple systems, the proper-motion binary involving a component with a longer orbital period. A list of 19 candidate triple systems is provided. Binaries

  13. Rotational and radial velocities of 1.3-2.2 M {sub ☉} red giants in open clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ∼1.6M {sub ☉} arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  14. Rotational and Radial Velocities of 1.3-2.2 M ⊙ Red Giants in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.

    2014-06-01

    This study presents the rotational distribution of red giant (RG) stars in 11 old to intermediate age open clusters. The masses of these stars are all above the Kraft break, so they lose negligible amounts of their birth angular momentum (AM) during the main-sequence (MS) evolution. However, they do span a mass range with quite different AM distributions imparted during formation, with the stars less massive than ~1.6M ⊙ arriving on the MS with lower rotation rates than the more massive stars. The majority of RGs in this study are slow rotators across the entire red giant branch regardless of mass, supporting the picture that intermediate-mass stars rapidly spin down when they evolve off the MS and develop convection zones capable of driving a magnetic dynamo. Nevertheless, a small fraction of RGs in open clusters show some level of enhanced rotation, and faster rotators are as common in these clusters as in the field RG population. Most of these enhanced rotators appear to be red clump stars, which is also true of the underlying stellar sample, while others are clearly RGs that are above or below the clump. In addition to rotational velocities, the radial velocities (RVs) and membership probabilities of individual stars are also presented. Cluster heliocentric RVs for NGC 6005 and Pismis 18 are reported for the first time.

  15. High-contrast Imaging of Intermediate-mass Giants with Long-term Radial Velocity Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Tsuguru; Sato, Bun'ei; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Uyama, Taichi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Abe, Lyu; Ando, Hiroyasu; Brandner, Wolfgang; Brandt, Timothy D.; Carson, Joseph C.; Currie, Thayne; Egner, Sebastian; Feldt, Markus; Goto, Miwa; Grady, Carol A.; Guyon, Olivier; Hayano, Yutaka; Hayashi, Masahiko; Hayashi, Saeko S.; Hełminiak, Krzysztof G.; Henning, Thomas; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Ida, Shigeru; Ishii, Miki; Itoh, Yoichi; Iye, Masanori; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Janson, Markus; Kambe, Eiji; Kandori, Ryo; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Kwon, Jungmi; Matsuo, Taro; Mayama, Satoshi; McElwain, Michael W.; Mede, Kyle; Miyama, Shoken; Morino, Jun-Ichi; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Serabyn, Eugene; Suenaga, Takuya; Suto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takami, Michihiro; Takato, Naruhisa; Takeda, Yoichi; Terada, Hiroshi; Thalmann, Christian; Turner, Edwin L.; Watanabe, Makoto; Wisniewski, John; Yamada, Toru; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Takami, Hideki; Usuda, Tomonori; Tamura, Motohide

    2016-07-01

    A radial velocity (RV) survey for intermediate-mass giants has been in operation for over a decade at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO). The OAO survey has revealed that some giants show long-term linear RV accelerations (RV trends), indicating the presence of outer companions. Direct-imaging observations can help clarify what objects generate these RV trends. We present the results of high-contrast imaging observations of six intermediate-mass giants with long-term RV trends using the Subaru Telescope and HiCIAO camera. We detected co-moving companions to γ Hya B ({0.61}-0.14+0.12{M}⊙ ), HD 5608 B (0.10+/- 0.01{M}⊙ ), and HD 109272 B (0.28+/- 0.06{M}⊙ ). For the remaining targets (ι Dra, 18 Del, and HD 14067), we exclude companions more massive than 30-60 M Jup at projected separations of 1″-7″. We examine whether these directly imaged companions or unidentified long-period companions can account for the RV trends observed around the six giants. We find that the Kozai mechanism can explain the high eccentricity of the inner planets ι Dra b, HD 5608 b, and HD 14067 b.

  16. The Latest Results from Project NIRRVS: Precise Near Infrared Radial Velocity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; NIRRVS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We will present the latest results from a prototype PRV survey with CSHELL. With CSHELL at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility atop Mauna Kea (R~46,000), we have completed a PRV 2.3 micron survey to detect exoplanets around ~30 red, low mass, and young stars. We are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~30 m/s on our survey targets. We are following up candidate RV variables, and have confirmed other previously known RV variables. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm at 2.3 microns, this performance with CSHELL is limited by detector artifacts, and fringing in the data and flatfields. iSHELL will replace CSHELL at IRTF, with first light expected in April 2016. iSHELL is a 1.15-5.4 micron high spectral resolution (R~70,000) immersion grating, cross-dispersed, white pupil spectrograph. With iSHELL we should be able to obtain a precision of less than 5 m/s in the NIR with iSHELL from the improvements in spectral grasp alone.

  17. The Latest Results from Project NIRRVS: Precise Near Infrared Radial Velocity Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; NIRRVS Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We will present the latest results from a prototype PRV survey with CSHELL. With CSHELL at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility atop Mauna Kea (R~46,000), we have completed a PRV 2.3 micron survey to detect exoplanets around ~30 red, low mass, and young stars. We are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~30 m/s on our survey targets. We are following up candidate RV variables, and have confirmed other previously known RV variables. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm at 2.3 microns, this performance with CSHELL is limited by detector artifacts, and fringing in the data and flatfields. iSHELL will replace CSHELL at IRTF, with first light expected in May 2016. iSHELL is a 1.15-5.4 micron high spectral resolution (R~70,000) immersion grating, cross-dispersed, white pupil spectrograph. With iSHELL we should be able to obtain a precision of less than 5 m/s in the NIR with iSHELL from the improvements in spectral grasp alone.

  18. AN EFFICIENT, COMPACT, AND VERSATILE FIBER DOUBLE SCRAMBLER FOR HIGH PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITY INSTRUMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, Samuel; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence; Levi, Eric; Schwab, Christian; Hearty, Fred; MacDonald, Nick E-mail: aur17@psu.edu

    2015-06-10

    We present the design and test results of a compact optical fiber double-scrambler for high-resolution Doppler radial velocity instruments. This device consists of a single optic: a high-index n ∼ 2 ball lens that exchanges the near and far fields between two fibers. When used in conjunction with octagonal fibers, this device yields very high scrambling gains (SGs) and greatly desensitizes the fiber output from any input illumination variations, thereby stabilizing the instrument profile of the spectrograph and improving the Doppler measurement precision. The system is also highly insensitive to input pupil variations, isolating the spectrograph from telescope illumination variations and seeing changes. By selecting the appropriate glass and lens diameter the highest efficiency is achieved when the fibers are practically in contact with the lens surface, greatly simplifying the alignment process when compared to classical double-scrambler systems. This prototype double-scrambler has demonstrated significant performance gains over previous systems, achieving SGs in excess of 10,000 with a throughput of ∼87% using uncoated Polymicro octagonal fibers. Adding a circular fiber to the fiber train further increases the SG to >20,000, limited by laboratory measurement error. While this fiber system is designed for the Habitable-zone Planet Finder spectrograph, it is more generally applicable to other instruments in the visible and near-infrared. Given the simplicity and low cost, this fiber scrambler could also easily be multiplexed for large multi-object instruments.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HIRES radial velocity measurements (Knutson+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, H. A.; Fulton, B. J.; Montet, B. T.; Kao, M.; Ngo, H.; Howard, A. W.; Crepp, J. R.; Hinkley, S.; Bakos, G. A.; Batygin, K.; Johnson, J. A.; Morton, T. D.; Muirhead, P. S.

    2017-06-01

    We observed our target stars using the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) (Vogt et al. 1994SPIE.2198..362V) on the 10 m Keck I telescope over a period of two years beginning in 2011; many of our targets also had existing HIRES observations taken prior to 2011 by other programs. We used the standard HIRES setup and reduction pipeline employed by the California Planet Search (CPS) consortium (Wright et al. 2004, J/ApJS/152/261; Howard et al. 2009ApJ...696...75H; Johnson et al. 2010PASP..122..149J). Observations were typically obtained with a slit width of 0.86" with integration times optimized to obtain typical signal to noise ratios of 70 per pixel. An iodine cell mounted in front of the spectrometer entrance slit provided a wavelength scale and instrumental profile for the observations (Marcy & Butler, 1992PASP..104..270M; Valenti et al. 1995PASP..107..966V). We obtained a total of approximately 270 new radial velocity measurements for our target sample, with a minimum of four observations per target separated by at least six months. (3 data files).

  20. GIARPS: the unique VIS-NIR high precision radial velocity facility in this world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudi, R.; Benatti, S.; Carleo, I.; Ghedina, A.; Molinari, E.; Oliva, E.; Tozzi, A.; Baruffolo, A.; Cecconi, M.; Cosentino, R.; Fantinel, D.; Fini, L.; Ghinassi, F.; Gonzalez, M.; Gratton, R.; Guerra, J.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hernandez, N.; Iuzzolino, M.; Lodi, M.; Malavolta, L.; Maldonado, J.; Micela, G.; Sanna, N.; Sanjuan, J.; Scuderi, S.; Sozzetti, A.; Pérez Ventura, H.; Diaz Marcos, H.; Galli, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Riverol, L.; Riverol, C.

    2016-08-01

    GIARPS (GIAno and haRPS) is a project devoted to have on the same focal station of the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) both the high resolution spectrographs HARPS-N (VIS) and GIANO (NIR) working simultaneously. This could be considered the first and unique worldwide instrument providing cross-dispersed echelle spectroscopy at a high resolution (R=115,000 in the visual and R=50,000 in the IR) and over in a wide spectral range (0.383 - 2.45 μm) in a single exposure. The science case is very broad, given the versatility of such an instrument and the large wavelength range. A number of outstanding science cases encompassing mainly extra-solar planet science starting from rocky planet search and hot Jupiters, atmosphere characterization can be considered. Furthermore both instrument can measure high precision radial velocity by means the simultaneous thorium technique (HARPS - N) and absorbing cell technique (GIANO) in a single exposure. Other science cases are also possible. Young stars and proto- planetary disks, cool stars and stellar populations, moving minor bodies in the solar system, bursting young stellar objects, cataclysmic variables and X-ray binary transients in our Galaxy, supernovae up to gamma-ray bursts in the very distant and young Universe, can take advantage of the unicity of this facility both in terms of contemporaneous wide wavelength range and high resolution spectroscopy.

  1. Constraining the Masses of the Kepler-11 Planets through Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard T.

    2015-01-01

    The six transiting planets of Kepler-11 have all been found to have ultra-low densities through N-body dynamical analysis of the transit timing variations (TTVs) of the six planets. Numerically reproducing TTVs has become a new method for solving the masses of planets, but this method is susceptible to certain dynamic degeneracies: the planet eccentricity is degenerate with the planet mass, and perturbations caused by non-transiting planets could be misattributed to the transiting planets. Furthermore, the masses of planets characterized by TTV analysis are systematically 2x lower than the masses (including non-detections) reported by radial velocity (RV) analysis for planets of the same radius. We address the discrepancy between the TTV- and RV-determined planet masses by measuring the RVs of Kepler-11 at opportunistic times, as determined by the ephemerides of the transiting planets. We place an upper limit on the masses of the Kepler-11 planets using RVs and preliminarily show that the RVs are consistent with the ultra-low mass scenario determined by the TTVs. The lack of disagreement between the TTVs and RVs in the Kepler-11 system bodes well for N-body simulations of TTVs for other Kepler systems that are too faint for RV follow-up.

  2. Sensitivity bias in the mass-radius distribution from transit timing variations and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Jason H.

    2016-04-01

    Motivated by recent discussions, both in private and in the literature, we use a Monte Carlo simulation of planetary systems to investigate sources of bias in determining the mass-radius distribution of exoplanets for the two primary techniques used to measure planetary masses - radial velocities (RVs) and transit timing variations (TTVs). We assert that mass measurements derived from these two methods are comparably reliable - as the physics underlying their respective signals is well understood. Nevertheless, their sensitivity to planet mass varies with the properties of the planets themselves. We find that for a given planet size, the RV method tends to find planets with higher mass while the sensitivity of TTVs is more uniform. This `sensitivity bias' implies that a complete census of TTV systems is likely to yield a more robust estimate of the mass-radius distribution provided there are not important physical differences between planets near and far from mean-motion resonance. We discuss differences in the sensitivity of the two methods with orbital period and system architecture, which may compound the discrepancies between them (e.g. short-period planets detectable by RVs may be more dense due to atmospheric loss). We advocate for continued mass measurements using both approaches as a means both to measure the masses of more planets and to identify potential differences in planet structure that may result from their dynamical and environmental histories.

  3. Light Curves as Predictors of Good Radial Velocity Planet Search Targets in New Stellar Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Wright, Jason; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Dumusque, Xavier; Luhn, Jacob K.; Howard, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    As Kepler and K2 have collectively found thousands of exoplanet candidates, their discoveries have strained ground-based radial velocity (RV) follow-up resources, which are unable to simultaneously keep up with the pace of transit discoveries by measuring masses for all of the candidates and maintain vigorous RV searches for planets that do not transit their parent star. The burden to the RV community is expected to worsen with the upcoming TESS mission, even as new RV instruments are slated to come online in the coming years. Observations that can enable the RV community to prioritize targets on the basis of their stellar RV variability in advance and, ideally, independently of the RV instruments themselves, can therefore permit us to reserve our RV resources for the stars most likely to yield the highest payoff. We show that the light curves from space-based transit surveys may not only be used as predictors of good RV search targets for the stars predominantly targeted by the exoplanet community but also for stars usually avoided by both RV and transit surveys due to their high intrinsic levels of stellar variability. We also briefly present recommendations to the RV planet search community on how to improve prospects for finding Earth analogs from the recent workshop at the Aspen Center for Physics, “Approaching the Stellar Astrophysical Limits of Exoplanet Detection: Getting to 10cm/s.”

  4. Retrieval of Precise Radial Velocities from High Resolution Near-Infrared Spectra of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Plavchan, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Bottom, Michael; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; White, Russel J.; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Charles A.; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Johnson, John; Ciardi, David R.; Wallace, J. Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; von Braun, Kaspar; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa A.; Kane, Stephen R.; Tanner, Angelle M.; Walp, Bernie; Crawford, Sam; Lin, Sean

    2015-01-01

    We present a data analysis pipeline focused on obtaining precision radial velocities (RV) of M Dwarfs from spectra taken between 2.309 and 2.316 microns by the CSHELL spectrograph (R~46,000) at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility with the aid of a methane isotopologue gas cell (see poster by Plavchan et al. at this meeting). The pipeline compares the observed spectra with a forward model defined by parameters that are optimized using a simplex amoeba algorithm. The stellar template is optimized simultaneously with the fit parameters in an iterative process. The pipeline accounts for temporal variations in the spectral wavelength solution, line spread function, and interference fringes due to instrumental effects. We apply our pipeline to the M Dwarfs GJ 15 A and GJ 876 and the M Giant SV Peg. For GJ 15 A, we are able to obtain 30 m/s RV precision. For the planet host GJ 876, the two most massive planets are easily retrievable from our RV curve. For SV Peg, the single night RV precision can be as low as 15 m/s, with < 5 m/s obtainable through data stacking.

  5. Asymmetric orbital distribution near mean motion resonance: Application to planets observed by Kepler and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ji-Wei E-mail: jwxie@astro.utoronto.ca

    2014-05-10

    Many multiple-planet systems have been found by the Kepler transit survey and various radial velocity (RV) surveys. Kepler planets show an asymmetric feature, namely, there are small but significant deficits/excesses of planet pairs with orbital period spacing slightly narrow/wide of the exact resonance, particularly near the first order mean motion resonance (MMR), such as 2:1 and 3:2 MMR. Similarly, if not exactly the same, an asymmetric feature (pileup wide of 2:1 MMR) is also seen in RV planets, but only for massive ones. We analytically and numerically study planets' orbital evolutions near and in the MMR. We find that their orbital period ratios could be asymmetrically distributed around the MMR center regardless of dissipation. In the case of no dissipation, Kepler planets' asymmetric orbital distribution could be partly reproduced for 3:2 MMR but not for 2:1 MMR, implying that dissipation might be more important to the latter. The pileup of massive RV planets just wide of 2:1 MMR is found to be consistent with the scenario that planets formed separately then migrated toward the MMR. The location of the pileup infers a K value of 1-100 on the order of magnitude for massive planets, where K is the damping rate ratio between orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis during planet migration.

  6. High-Contrast Imaging of Intermediate-Mass Giants with Long-Term Radial Velocity Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Tsuguru; Sato, Bun'ei; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Narita, Norio; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Uyama, Taichi; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Omiya, Masashi; hide

    2016-01-01

    A radial velocity (RV) survey for intermediate-mass giants has been operated for over a decade at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO). The OAO survey has revealed that some giants show long-term linear RV accelerations (RV trends), indicating the presence of outer companions. Direct imaging observations can help clarify what objects generate these RV trends. We present the results of high-contrast imaging observations of six intermediate-mass giants with long-term RV trends using the Subaru Telescope and HiCIAO camera. We detected co-moving companions to gamma Hya B (0.61+0.12 -0.14 Stellar Mass), HD 5608 B (0.10 +/- 0.01 Stellar Mass), and HD 109272 B (0.28 +/- 0.06 Stellar Mass). For the remaining targets( Dra, 18 Del, and HD 14067) we exclude companions more massive than 30-60 M(sub Jup) at projected separations of 1''-7''. We examine whether these directly imaged companions or unidentified long-period companions can account for the RV trends observed around the six giants. We find that the Kozai mechanism can explain the high eccentricity of the inner planets Dra b, HD 5608 b, and HD 14067 b.

  7. A stable and inexpensive wavelength reference for precise wavelength calibration of radial velocity spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feger, Tobias; Ireland, Michael J.; Bento, Joao; Bacigalupo, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    We present a stable, inexpensive wavelength reference, based on a white-light interferometer for the use on current and future (arrays of) diffraction-limited radial velocity (RV) spectrographs. The primary aim of using an interferometer is to obtain a dense sinusoidal wavelength reference with spectral coverage between 450-650 nm. Its basic setup consists of an unbalanced fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (FMZI) that creates an interference pattern in the spectral domain due to superposition of phase delayed light, set by a fixed optical path-length difference (OPD). To achieve long-term stability, the interferometer is actively locked to a stable atomic line. The system operates in closed-loop using a thermo-optic modulator as the phase feedback component. We conducted stability measurements by superimposing the wavelength reference with thorium-argon (ThAr) emission lines and found the differential RMS shift to be ~5 m s-1 within 30 minute bins in an experiment lasting 5 hours.

  8. A Comprehensive Radial Velocity Error Budget for Next Generation Doppler Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halverson, Samuel; Ryan, Terrien; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Roy, Arpita; Bender, Chad; Stefansson, Guomundur Kari; Monson, Andrew; Levi, Eric; Hearty, Fred; Blake, Cullen; hide

    2016-01-01

    We describe a detailed radial velocity error budget for the NASA-NSF Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer instrument concept NEID (NN-explore Exoplanet Investigations with Doppler spectroscopy). Such an instrument performance budget is a necessity for both identifying the variety of noise sources currently limiting Doppler measurements, and estimating the achievable performance of next generation exoplanet hunting Doppler spectrometers. For these instruments, no single source of instrumental error is expected to set the overall measurement floor. Rather, the overall instrumental measurement precision is set by the contribution of many individual error sources. We use a combination of numerical simulations, educated estimates based on published materials, extrapolations of physical models, results from laboratory measurements of spectroscopic subsystems, and informed upper limits for a variety of error sources to identify likely sources of systematic error and construct our global instrument performance error budget. While natively focused on the performance of the NEID instrument, this modular performance budget is immediately adaptable to a number of current and future instruments. Such an approach is an important step in charting a path towards improving Doppler measurement precisions to the levels necessary for discovering Earth-like planets.

  9. Extracting Radial Velocities of A- and B-type Stars from Echelle Spectrograph Calibration Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Juliette C.; Johnson, John Asher; Vanderburg, Andrew; Morton, Timothy D.

    2015-04-01

    We present a technique to extract radial velocity (RV) measurements from echelle spectrograph observations of rapidly rotating stars (V sin i≳ 50 km s-1). This type of measurement is difficult because the line widths of such stars are often comparable to the width of a single echelle order. To compensate for the scarcity of lines and Doppler information content, we have developed a process that forward-models the observations, fitting the RV shift of the star for all echelle orders simultaneously with the echelle blaze function. We use our technique to extract RV measurements from a sample of rapidly rotating A- and B-type stars used as calibrator stars observed by the California Planet Survey observations. We measure absolute RVs with a precision ranging from 0.5-2.0 km s-1 per epoch for more than 100 A- and B-type stars. In our sample of 10 well-sampled stars with RV scatter in excess of their measurement uncertainties, three of these are single-lined binaries with long observational baselines. From this subsample, we present detections of two previously unknown spectroscopic binaries and one known astrometric system. Our technique will be useful in measuring or placing upper limits on the masses of sub-stellar companions discovered by wide-field transit surveys, and conducting future spectroscopic binarity surveys and Galactic space-motion studies of massive and/or young, rapidly rotating stars.

  10. Radial Velocities, Metallicities, and Improved Fundamental Parameters of Outer Disk Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasowski, Gail; Hamm, K.; Beaton, R.; Damke, G.; Carlberg, J. K.; Majewski, S. R.; Frinchaboy, P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Open stellar clusters have proven to be powerful tools for understanding the structure and stellar evolution of our Galaxy. Using photometry from 2MASS and the new Spitzer-IRAC GLIMPSE-360 surveys, Zasowski et al. (2013) identified and characterized more than a dozen new or poorly studied, heavily reddened open clusters in the outer Galactic disk. Here, we present follow-up spectroscopy for 11 of the clusters. Low resolution optical spectra were obtained with the DIS spectrograph on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-meter telescope (R˜1200) for candidate members of seven clusters (GLM-CYGX 16, GLM-G360 18, GLM-G360 105, SAI 24, Berkeley 14, Berkeley 14a, and Czernik 20), and with the B&C spectrograph on the Las Campanas Observatory duPont telescope (R˜5400) for three clusters (GLM-G360 50, GLM-G360 75, and GLM-G360 79). High resolution (R˜22,500) infrared (H-band) spectra were also obtained for one cluster (GLM-G360 90) as part of an ancillary program for the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey. We use the mean chemical abundances and radial velocities (RVs) to identify likely cluster members and then revisit our previous isochrone fits. With reddening constrained by the Rayleigh-Jeans Color Excess method and mean metallicities by spectroscopy, the cluster distances and ages are estimated from improved isochrone fits to the stellar overdensity, weighted by confirmed RV and/or abundance members.

  11. Double-lined Spectroscopic Binary Stars in the Radial Velocity Experiment Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matijevič, G.; Zwitter, T.; Munari, U.; Bienaymé, O.; Binney, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Boeche, C.; Campbell, R.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B.; Gilmore, G.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F. G.; Williams, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2010-07-01

    We devise a new method for the detection of double-lined binary stars in a sample of the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) survey spectra. The method is both tested against extensive simulations based on synthetic spectra and compared to direct visual inspection of all RAVE spectra. It is based on the properties and shape of the cross-correlation function, and is able to recover ~80% of all binaries with an orbital period of order 1 day. Systems with periods up to 1 yr are still within the detection reach. We have applied the method to 25,850 spectra of the RAVE second data release and found 123 double-lined binary candidates, only eight of which are already marked as binaries in the SIMBAD database. Among the candidates, there are seven that show spectral features consistent with the RS CVn type (solar type with active chromosphere) and seven that might be of W UMa type (over-contact binaries). One star, HD 101167, seems to be a triple system composed of three nearly identical G-type dwarfs. The tested classification method could also be applicable to the data of the upcoming Gaia mission.

  12. Detecting planets around active stars: impact of magnetic fields on radial velocities and line bisectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard, É. M.; Donati, J.-F.; Delfosse, X.; Morin, J.; Boisse, I.; Moutou, C.; Hébrard, G.

    2014-09-01

    Although technically challenging, detecting Earth-like planets around very low mass stars is in principle accessible to the existing velocimeters of highest radial-velocity (RV) precision. However, low-mass stars being active, they often feature dark spots and magnetic regions at their surfaces generating a noise level in RV curves (called activity jitter) that can severely limit our practical ability at detecting Earth-like planets. Whereas the impact of dark spots on RV data has been extensively studied in the literature, that of magnetic features only received little attention up to now. In this paper, we aim at quantifying the impact of magnetic fields (and the Zeeman broadening they induce) on line profiles, line bisectors and RV data. With a simple model, we quantitatively study the RV signals and bisector distortions that small magnetic regions or global magnetic dipoles can generate, especially at infrared wavelengths where the Zeeman broadening is much larger than that in the visible. We report in particular that the impact of magnetic features on line bisectors can be different from that of cool spots when the rotational broadening is comparable to or larger than the Zeeman broadening; more specifically, we find in this case that the top and bottom sections of the bisectors are anticorrelated, i.e. the opposite behaviour of what is observed for cool spots. We finally suggest new options to show and ultimately filter the impact of the magnetic activity on RV curves.

  13. Detection of co-orbital planets by combining transit and radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leleu, A.; Robutel, P.; Correia, A. C. M.; Lillo-Box, J.

    2017-03-01

    Co-orbital planets have not yet been discovered, although they constitute a frequent by-product of planetary formation and evolution models. This lack may be due to observational biases, since the main detection methods are unable to spot co-orbital companions when they are small or near the Lagrangian equilibrium points. However, for a system with one known transiting planet (with mass m1), we can detect a co-orbital companion (with mass m2) by combining the time of mid-transit with the radial-velocity data of the star. Here, we propose a simple method that allows the detection of co-orbital companions, valid for eccentric orbits, that relies on a single parameter α, which is proportional to the mass ratio m2/m1. Therefore, when α is statistically different from zero, we have a strong candidate to harbour a co-orbital companion. We also discuss the relevance of false positives generated by different planetary configurations.

  14. Radial Velocity Monitoring of Composite-Spectra Hot Subdwarf Stars with the HET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Brad; Wade, R. A.; Liss, S.

    2014-01-01

    The enigmatic hot subdwarf B (sdB) stars represent one of the least-understood stages of stellar evolution. Theory shows that they likely formed from red giant branch stars that lost their outer envelopes due to Roche lobe overflow and common envelope interactions with a companion. Binary population synthesis models are generally successful at reproducing the observed orbital periods of sdB binaries with M dwarf and white dwarf companions; the story for sdB+F/G/K binaries, however, is still being written. Relatively few observational constraints have been published for these composite-spectra systems. We have been monitoring the radial velocities (RVs) of 15 sdB binaries with F-K dwarf companions since 2005 using the Medium and High Resolution Spectrographs on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Here we present RV measurements and orbital parameter estimates for selected systems in our sample. We also present an up-to-date orbital period histogram for all known sdB binaries, including both short- and long-period systems. Our results suggest that those with F-K main sequence companions have periods on the order of 1.5 to 3 years. Several of the long-period binaries show strong evidence for non-circular orbits, challenging the conventional Roche Lobe overflow formation channel for hot subdwarf stars. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. AST-0908642.

  15. Radial velocity curve of the spectroscopic binary HD 25639 (ADS 2984A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorda, S. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of the reduction of our observations for the spectroscopic binary ADS 2984A (B0 II-B0 III), which along with its visual component ADS 2984B (SZ Cam) are the brightest members of the open star cluster NGC 1502. The spectroscopic data were obtained with a fiber-fed echelle spectrograph ( R = 15 000) at the 1.2-m telescope of the Astronomical Observatory of the Ural Federal University. The period of ADS 2984A ( P orb = 57.24 ± 0.05 days) has been found for the first time. This spectroscopic binary is shown to belong to the SB1 type. We have determined the parameters of the radial velocity curve for the visible spectroscopic component, V 0 = -5.5 ± 1.2 km s-1 and K = 41.5 ± 1.7 km s-1. The lower mass limit for the invisible spectroscopic component has been estimated to be 5M_ ⊙ . Evidence for the presence of a stellar wind outflowing from the surface of this blue giant is presented.

  16. Near-infrared calibration systems for precise radial-velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.; Kerber, Florian; Nave, Gillian; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Smoker, Jonathan; Käufl, Hans-Ulrich; Figueira, P. R. L.

    2012-09-01

    We present work done to prepare two new near-infrared calibration sources for use on high-precision astrophysical spectrographs. Uranium-neon is an atomic calibration source, commercially available as a hollow-cathode lamp, with over 10 000 known emission lines between 0.85 and 4 μm. Four gas cells — containing C2H2, H13CN, 12CO, and 13CO, respectively—are available as National Institute of Standards and Technology (nist) Standard Reference Materials (SRMs), and provide narrow absorption lines between 1.5 and 1.65 μm. These calibration sources may prove useful for wavelength-calibrating the future near-infrared high-precision radial-velocity spectrometers, including the Calar Alto high-Resolution search for M dwarfs with Exo-earths with a Near-infrared Echelle Spectrograph (CARMENES),1 the SpectroPolarimetre InfraROUge (SPIRou)∗, and the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HPF).2

  17. A comprehensive radial velocity error budget for next generation Doppler spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel; Terrien, Ryan; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Roy, Arpita; Bender, Chad; Stefánsson, Gudmundur K.; Monson, Andrew; Levi, Eric; Hearty, Fred; Blake, Cullen; McElwain, Michael; Schwab, Christian; Ramsey, Lawrence; Wright, Jason; Wang, Sharon; Gong, Qian; Roberston, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We describe a detailed radial velocity error budget for the NASA-NSF Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer instrument concept NEID (NN-explore Exoplanet Investigations with Doppler spectroscopy). Such an instrument performance budget is a necessity for both identifying the variety of noise sources currently limiting Doppler measurements, and estimating the achievable performance of next generation exoplanet hunting Doppler spectrometers. For these instruments, no single source of instrumental error is expected to set the overall measurement floor. Rather, the overall instrumental measurement precision is set by the contribution of many individual error sources. We use a combination of numerical simulations, educated estimates based on published materials, extrapolations of physical models, results from laboratory measurements of spectroscopic subsystems, and informed upper limits for a variety of error sources to identify likely sources of systematic error and construct our global instrument performance error budget. While natively focused on the performance of the NEID instrument, this modular performance budget is immediately adaptable to a number of current and future instruments. Such an approach is an important step in charting a path towards improving Doppler measurement precisions to the levels necessary for discovering Earth-like planets.

  18. Determination of U, V, and W from single station Doppler radar radial velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. L.; Green, J. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The ST/MST (stratosphere troposphere/mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) clear air Doppler radar, or wind profiler, is an important tool in observational meteorology because of its capability to remote observe dynamic parameters of the atmosphere. There are difficulties in transforming the observed radial velocities into meteorological wind components. How this problem has been treated in the past is reviewed, and some of the analysis is recast to a form more suited to the high diagnostic abilities of a number of fixed beam configurations with reference to a linear wind field. The results, in conjunction with other works which treats problems such as the effects of finite sample volumes in the presence of nonhomogeneous atmospheric reflectivity, have implications important to the design of both individual MST/ST radars and MST/ST radar networks. The key parameters to uncoupling terms in the scaling equations are w sub x and w sub y. Whenever the stratiform condition, which states that these two parameters are negligible, is satisfied, a five beam ST radar may determine unbiased values of u, v, and w for sample volumes directly above the radar. The divergence and partial deformation of the flow may also be determined. Three beam systems can determine w and w sub z, but are unable to obtain u and v wind components uncontaminated by vertical sheer terms, even when the stratiform condition is satisfied.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HARPS-N radial velocities of KOI-70 (Buchhave+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchhave, L. A.; Dressing, C. D.; Dumusque, X.; Rice, K.; Vanderburg, A.; Mortier, A.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Lopez, E.; Lundkvist, M. S.; Kjeldsen, H.; Affer, L.; Bonomo, A. S.; Charbonneau, D.; Collier, Cameron A.; Cosentino, R.; Figueira, P.; Fiorenzano, A. F. M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Haywood, R. D.; Johnson, J. A.; Latham, D. W.; Lovis, C.; Malavolta, L.; Mayor, M.; Micela, G.; Molinari, E.; Motalebi, F.; Nascimbeni, V.; Pepe, F.; Phillips, D. F.; Piotto, G.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Sasselov, D.; Segransan, D.; Sozzetti, A.; Udry, S.; Watson, C.

    2017-01-01

    We obtained 125 observations of Kepler-20 (KOI-70, KIC 6850504, 2MASS J19104752+4220194) with the HARPS-N spectrograph on the 3.58m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) located at Roque de Los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Spain. HARPS-N is an updated version of the original HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6m telescope at the European Southern Observatory on La Silla, Chile. HARPS-N is an ultra-stable fiber-fed high-resolution (R=115000) spectrograph with an optical wavelength coverage from 383 to 693nm. We obtained 61 and 64 observations of Kepler-20 in the 2014 and 2015 observing seasons, respectively (125 observations in total). We rejected 21 observations obtained under poor observing conditions where the internal error estimate exceeded 5m/s leaving a total of 104 observations. Kepler-20 has a mV=12.5 and required 30 minute exposure times to build up an adequate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). The average S/N per pixel of the observations at 550nm is 30, yielding an average internal uncertainty estimate of 3.66m/s. The radial velocities and their 1σ errors are shows in Table1. (1 data file).

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of systems hosting sub-Saturns (Petigura+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petigura, E. A.; Sinukoff, E.; Lopez, E. D.; Crossfield, I. J. M.; Howard, A. W.; Brewer, J. M.; Fulton, B. J.; Isaacson, H. T.; Ciardi, D. R.; Howell, S. B.; Everett, M. E.; Horch, E. P.; Hirsch, L. A.; Weiss, L. M.; Schlieder, J. E.

    2017-07-01

    We observed K2-27, K2-32, K2-39, and K2-108 using the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) on the 10 m Keck Telescope I. K2-27 hosts a single transiting sub-Saturn, K2-27b, with P=6.77 days that was first confirmed in Van Eylen et al. (2016ApJ...820...56V) using RVs. We obtained 15 spectra of K2-27 with HIRES between 2015 February 5 and 2016 July 17. Van Eylen et al. (2016ApJ...820...56V) observed this star with HARPS, HARPS-N, and FIES. We included 6 and 19 measurements from HARPS and HARPS-N, respectively in our radial velocity analysis. K2-32 hosts three planets, K2-32b, K2-32c, and K2-32d, having orbital periods of P=8.99 days, 20.66 days, and 31.7 days, respectively, which are near the 3:2:1 period commensurability. The planets were first confirmed in Sinukoff et al. (2016ApJ...827...78S) using multiplicity arguments (Lissauer et al. 2012ApJ...750..112L). We obtained 31 spectra of K2-32 with HIRES between 2015 June 06 and 2016 August 20. Dai et al. (2016ApJ...823..115D) obtained 43 spectra with HARPS and 6 with PFS, which we included in our radial velocity analysis. K2-39 hosts a single transiting planet, K2-39b, with P=4.60 days, which was first confirmed by Van Eylen et al. (2016AJ....152..143V). We obtained 42 spectra of K2-39 with HIRES between 2015 August 10 and 2016 August 21. Van Eylen et al. (2016AJ....152..143V) obtained 7 spectra with HARPS, 6 with PFS, and 17 with FIES. K2-108, listed as EPIC-211736671 in the Ecliptic Planet Input Catalog (Huber et al. 2016, Cat. J/ApJS/224/2), is a V=12.3mag star observed during K2 Campaign 5. We identified K2-108 as a likely planet according to our team's standard methodology, described in detail in Crossfield et al. 2016 (Cat. J/ApJS/226/7). In brief, we identified a set of transits having P=4.73 days and elevated K2-108 to the status of "planet candidate". We obtained 20 spectra of K2-108 with HIRES between 2015 December 23 and 2016 November 25. (2 data files).

  1. A Spitzer search for transits of radial velocity detected super-Earths

    SciTech Connect

    Kammer, J. A.; Knutson, H. A.; Desert, J.-M.; Howard, A. W.; Laughlin, G. P.; Fortney, J. J.; Deming, D.; Todorov, K. O.; Agol, E.; Burrows, A.; Showman, A. P.; Lewis, N. K.

    2014-02-01

    Unlike hot Jupiters or other gas giants, super-Earths are expected to have a wide variety of compositions, ranging from terrestrial bodies like our own to more gaseous planets like Neptune. Observations of transiting systems, which allow us to directly measure planet masses and radii and constrain atmospheric properties, are key to understanding the compositional diversity of the planets in this mass range. Although Kepler has discovered hundreds of transiting super-Earth candidates over the past 4 yr, the majority of these planets orbit stars that are too far away and too faint to allow for detailed atmospheric characterization and reliable mass estimates. Ground-based transit surveys focus on much brighter stars, but most lack the sensitivity to detect planets in this size range. One way to get around the difficulty of finding these smaller planets in transit is to start by choosing targets that are already known to host super-Earth sized bodies detected using the radial velocity (RV) technique. Here we present results from a Spitzer program to observe six of the most favorable RV-detected super-Earth systems, including HD 1461, HD 7924, HD 156668, HIP 57274, and GJ 876. We find no evidence for transits in any of their 4.5 μm flux light curves, and place limits on the allowed transit depths and corresponding planet radii that rule out even the most dense and iron-rich compositions for these objects. We also observed HD 97658, but the observation window was based on a possible ground-based transit detection that was later ruled out; thus the window did not include the predicted time for the transit detection recently made by the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars space telescope.

  2. Synthesizing exoplanet demographics from radial velocity and microlensing surveys. I. Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2014-08-20

    Motivated by the order of magnitude difference in the frequency of giant planets orbiting M dwarfs inferred by microlensing and radial velocity (RV) surveys, we present a method for comparing the statistical constraints on exoplanet demographics inferred from these methods. We first derive the mapping from the observable parameters of a microlensing-detected planet to those of an analogous planet orbiting an RV-monitored star. Using this mapping, we predict the distribution of RV observables for the planet population inferred from microlensing surveys, taking care to adopt reasonable priors for, and properly marginalize over, the unknown physical parameters of microlensing-detected systems. Finally, we use simple estimates of the detection limits for a fiducial RV survey to predict the number and properties of analogs of the microlensing planet population such an RV survey should detect. We find that RV and microlensing surveys have some overlap, specifically for super-Jupiter mass planets (m{sub p} ≳ 1 M {sub Jup}) with periods between ∼3-10 yr. However, the steeply falling planetary mass function inferred from microlensing implies that, in this region of overlap, RV surveys should infer a much smaller frequency than the overall giant planet frequency (m{sub p} ≳ 0.1 M {sub Jup}) inferred by microlensing. Our analysis demonstrates that it is possible to statistically compare and synthesize data sets from multiple exoplanet detection techniques in order to infer exoplanet demographics over wider regions of parameter space than are accessible to individual methods. In a companion paper, we apply our methodology to several representative microlensing and RV surveys to derive the frequency of planets around M dwarfs with orbits of ≲ 30 yr.

  3. A NEW MULTI-BAND RADIAL VELOCITY TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING EXOPLANETS AROUND ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Bo; Ge Jian E-mail: jge@astrto.ufl.edu

    2012-05-10

    The radial velocity (RV) technique is one of the most efficient ways of detecting exoplanets. However, large RV jitters induced by starspots on an active star can inhibit detection of any exoplanet present or even lead to a false positive detection. This paper presents a new multi-band RV technique capable of substantially reducing starspot-induced RV jitters from stellar RV measurements to allow efficient and accurate extraction of RV signals caused by exoplanets. It takes full advantage of the correlation of RV jitters at different spectral bands and the independence of exoplanet signals at the corresponding bands. Simulations with a single-spot model and a multi-spot model have been conducted to investigate the RV jitter reduction capability of this method. The results show that this method can reduce the RV jitter amplitude by at least an order of magnitude, allowing detection of weaker exoplanet signals without significantly increasing RV observation time and cadence. This method can greatly reduce the observation time required to detect Earth-like planets around solar type stars with {approx}0.1 m s{sup -1} long term Doppler precision if spot-induced jitter is the dominant astrophysical noise source for RV measurements. This method can work efficiently for RV jitter removal if: (1) all the spots on a target star have approximately the same temperature during RV observations; (2) the RV jitter amplitude changes with wavelength, i.e., the RV jitter amplitude ratio, {alpha}, between two different spectral bands is not close to one; (3) the spot-induced RV jitter dominates the RV measurement error.

  4. The iLocater cryostat: design and thermal control strategy for precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; Fantano, Louis G.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Crepp, Justin R.; Nelson, Matthew J.; Wall, Sheila M.; Cavalieri, David A.; Koca, Corina; King, David L.; Reynolds, Robert O.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.

    2016-08-01

    The current generation of precision radial velocity (RV) spectrographs are seeing-limited instruments. In order to achieve high spectral resolution on 8m class telescopes, these spectrographs require large optics and in turn, large instrument volumes. Achieving milli-Kelvin thermal stability for these systems is challenging but is vital in order to obtain a single measurement RV precision of better than 1m/s. This precision is crucial to study Earth-like exoplanets within the habitable zone. iLocater is a next generation RV instrument being developed for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). Unlike seeinglimited RV instruments, iLocater uses adaptive optics (AO) to inject a diffraction-limited beam into single-mode fibers. These fibers illuminate the instrument spectrograph, facilitating a diffraction-limited design and a small instrument volume compared to present-day instruments. This enables intrinsic instrument stability and facilitates precision thermal control. We present the current design of the iLocater cryostat which houses the instrument spectrograph and the strategy for its thermal control. The spectrograph is situated within a pair of radiation shields mounted inside an MLI lined vacuum chamber. The outer radiation shield is actively controlled to maintain instrument stability at the sub-mK level and minimize effects of thermal changes from the external environment. An inner shield passively dampens any residual temperature fluctuations and is radiatively coupled to the optical board. To provide intrinsic stability, the optical board and optic mounts will be made from Invar and cooled to 58K to benefit from a zero coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value at this temperature. Combined, the small footprint of the instrument spectrograph, the use of Invar, and precision thermal control will allow long-term sub-milliKelvin stability to facilitate precision RV measurements.

  5. Efficient scheduling of astronomical observations. Application to the CARMENES radial-velocity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Piquer, A.; Morales, J. C.; Ribas, I.; Colomé, J.; Guàrdia, J.; Perger, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Jeffers, S. V.; Reiners, A.; Amado, P. J.; Quirrenbach, A.; Seifert, W.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Targeted spectroscopic exoplanet surveys face the challenge of maximizing their planet detection rates by means of careful planning. For a large planet survey, the number of possible observation combinations, i.e., the sequence of observations night after night, both in total time and amount of targets, is enormous. Aims: Sophisticated scheduling tools and the improved understanding of the exoplanet population are employed to investigate an efficient and optimal way to plan the execution of observations. This is applied to the CARMENES instrument, which is an optical and infrared high-resolution spectrograph that has started a survey of about 300 M-dwarf stars in search of terrestrial exoplanets. Methods: We used evolutionary computation techniques to create an automatic scheduler that minimizes the idle periods of the telescope and distributes the observations among all the targets using configurable criteria. We simulated the case of the CARMENES survey with a realistic sample of targets, and we estimated the efficiency of the planning tool both in terms of telescope operations and planet detection. Results: Our scheduling simulations produce plans that use about 99% of the available telescope time (including overheads) and optimally distribute the observations among the different targets. Under such conditions, and using current planet statistics, the optimized plan using this tool should allow the CARMENES survey to discover about 65% of the planets with radial-velocity semi-amplitudes greater than 1 ms-1 when considering only photon noise. Conclusions: The simulations using our scheduling tool show that it is possible to optimize the survey planning by minimizing idle instrument periods and fulfilling the science objectives in an efficient manner to maximize the scientific return.

  6. Radial velocities of a sample of ob stars in the Sco-Cen association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilinski, E.; de La Reza, R.; Cunha, K.

    2003-08-01

    Radial velocities (RV) were derived for a sample of OB stars belonging to Lower Centaurus Crux (LCC), Upper Centaurus Lupus (UCL) and Upper Scorpius (US) sub-groups of the Sco-Cen OB association. The knowledge of RV of OB stars of these sub-groups is important for membership determinations and the study of the past evolution and formation of these sub-groups. To measure RV of some stars belonging to the above mentioned sub-groups, 67 exposures of 56 stars were obtained between May 17, 2002 and July 7, 2002 with the 1.52 m ESO telescope equipped with FEROS echelle spectrograph (resolving power 48000 and spectral range 3550 - 9210 Å). RV were measured line by line. The cross-correlation technique is usually used for precise RV determinations of late type stars. Its application for the measurements of RV of OB stars can be problematical. On the one hand, spectra of early type stars show few absorption lines and these lines are intrinsically broad (up to a few hundreds km/sec). They are often broadened by stellar rotation and sometimes they also show variability. On the other hand, the cross-correlation peak is very broad and contains important sub-structures caused by the mixing of spectral lines of different widths. Moreover, a lot of OB stars are binaries and their broadened lines do not permit to observe them as double-lined binaries. The resulting mean values were compared with other observations in order to find new binary systems or to obtain more accurate RV for single stars. The values of the internal and external precisions of line by line measured RV are estimated as +/- 3.1 km/sec and +/- 5 km/sec. The results of these observations permitted us to recognize some stars (HD 120307, HD 116087, HD 139365 and HD 142990) as being probable spectral binaries due to their significant RV variations.

  7. METAL-POOR LITHIUM-RICH GIANTS IN THE RADIAL VELOCITY EXPERIMENT SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Ruchti, Gregory R.; Fulbright, Jon P.; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Gilmore, Gerard F.; Grebel, Eva K.; Bienayme, Olivier; Siebert, Arnaud; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Freeman, Ken C.; Gibson, Brad K.; Munari, Ulisse; Navarro, Julio F.; Parker, Quentin A.; Watson, Fred G.; Reid, Warren; Seabroke, George M.; Siviero, Alessandro; Steinmetz, Matthias; Williams, Mary; Zwitter, Tomaz

    2011-12-20

    We report the discovery of eight lithium-rich field giants found in a high-resolution spectroscopic sample of over 700 metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] < -0.5) selected from the Radial Velocity Experiment survey. The majority of the Li-rich giants in our sample are very metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -1.9), and have a Li abundance (in the form of {sup 7}Li), A(Li) = log (n(Li)/n(H)) + 12, between 2.30 and 3.63, well above the typical upper red giant branch (RGB) limit, A(Li) < 0.5, while two stars, with A(Li) {approx} 1.7-1.8, show similar lithium abundances to normal giants at the same gravity. We further included two metal-poor, Li-rich globular cluster giants in our sample, namely the previously discovered M3-IV101 and newly discovered (in this work) M68-A96. This comprises the largest sample of metal-poor Li-rich giants to date. We performed a detailed abundance analysis of all stars, finding that the majority of our sample stars have elemental abundances similar to that of Li-normal halo giants. Although the evolutionary phase of each Li-rich giant cannot be definitively determined, the Li-rich phase is likely connected to extra mixing at the RGB bump or early asymptotic giant branch that triggers cool bottom processing in which the bottom of the outer convective envelope is connected to the H-burning shell in the star. The surface of a star becomes Li-enhanced as {sup 7}Be (which burns to {sup 7}Li) is transported to the stellar surface via the Cameron-Fowler mechanism. We discuss and discriminate among several models for the extra mixing that can cause Li production, given the detailed abundances of the Li-rich giants in our sample.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity curve of γ Peg (Butkovskaya+, 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkovskaya, V.; Plachinda, S.

    2007-04-01

    With this work we provide observational material to study magnetic field variability of the classical beta Cep-type star gamma Peg. The observations were carried out in the HeI 6678 line in the course of 23 observing nights from 1997 to 2005 with using coude spectrograph in spectropolarimetric mode at the Crimean 2.6m telescope. The behavior of stellar wind was studied in the UV region using data from the IUE satellite (the INES database). It is shown that the UV stellar wind exhibits a variability. A variation of the wind due to stellar pulsations has been detected. In the HeI 6678 line the abnormally blueshifted radial velocities (gamma=-60.57+/-0.29km/s) were detected during a single night in 2005. We do not confirm the 370.5-day orbital period. The most probable orbital period was estimated as Porb=6.81608+/-0.00012d. The ratio Porb/Ppuls=44.92 appeared to be very close to integer. We have detected the presence of weak magnetic field on the star. The longitudinal component of the field varies from -10G to 30G with the stellar rotation. The most probable rotational period is Prot=6.6538+/-0.0016d. Both the orbital and the rotational periods are integral multiple of the difference between them: Porb/|Porb-Prot|=42.002, and Prot/|Porb-Prot|=41.002. Variation of the longitudinal magnetic field during pulsation period with an amplitude about 7G has been detected. (1 data file).

  9. DETECTING PLANETS AROUND VERY LOW MASS STARS WITH THE RADIAL VELOCITY METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, A.; Bean, J. L.; Dreizler, S.; Seifahrt, A.; Huber, K. F.; Czesla, S.

    2010-02-10

    The detection of planets around very low-mass stars with the radial velocity (RV) method is hampered by the fact that these stars are very faint at optical wavelengths where the most high-precision spectrometers operate. We investigate the precision that can be achieved in RV measurements of low mass stars in the near-infrared (NIR) Y-, J-, and H-bands, and we compare it to the precision achievable in the optical assuming comparable telescope and instrument efficiencies. For early-M stars, RV measurements in the NIR offer no or only marginal advantage in comparison with optical measurements. Although they emit more flux in the NIR, the richness of spectral features in the optical outweighs the flux difference. We find that NIR measurement can be as precise as optical measurements in stars of spectral type {approx}M4, and from there the NIR gains in precision toward cooler objects. We studied potential calibration strategies in the NIR finding that a stable spectrograph with a ThAr calibration can offer enough wavelength stability for m s{sup -1} precision. Furthermore, we simulate the wavelength-dependent influence of activity (cool spots) on RV measurements from optical to NIR wavelengths. Our spot simulations reveal that the RV jitter does not decrease as dramatically toward longer wavelengths as often thought. The jitter strongly depends on the details of the spots, i.e., on spot temperature and the spectral appearance of the spot. At low temperature contrast ({approx}200 K), the jitter shows a decrease toward the NIR up to a factor of 10, but it decreases substantially less for larger temperature contrasts. Forthcoming NIR spectrographs will allow the search for planets with a particular advantage in mid- and late-M stars. Activity will remain an issue, but simultaneous observations at optical and NIR wavelengths can provide strong constraints on spot properties in active stars.

  10. THEORY OF DISPERSED FIXED-DELAY INTERFEROMETRY FOR RADIAL VELOCITY EXOPLANET SEARCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eyken, Julian C.; Ge Jian; Mahadevan, Suvrath E-mail: jge@astro.ufl.ed

    2010-07-15

    The dispersed fixed-delay interferometer (DFDI) represents a new instrument concept for high-precision radial velocity (RV) surveys for extrasolar planets. A combination of a Michelson interferometer and a medium-resolution spectrograph, it has the potential for performing multi-object surveys, where most previous RV techniques have been limited to observing only one target at a time. Because of the large sample of extrasolar planets needed to better understand planetary formation, evolution, and prevalence, this new technique represents a logical next step in instrumentation for RV extrasolar planet searches, and has been proven with the single-object Exoplanet Tracker (ET) at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and the multi-object W. M. Keck/MARVELS Exoplanet Tracker at Apache Point Observatory. The development of the ET instruments has necessitated fleshing out a detailed understanding of the physical principles of the DFDI technique. Here we summarize the fundamental theoretical material needed to understand the technique and provide an overview of the physics underlying the instrument's working. We also derive some useful analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the level of various sources of error generic to the technique, such as photon shot noise when using a fiducial reference spectrum, contamination by secondary spectra (e.g., crowded sources, spectroscopic binaries, or moonlight contamination), residual interferometer comb, and reference cross-talk error. Following this, we show that the use of a traditional gas absorption fiducial reference with a DFDI can incur significant systematic errors that must be taken into account at the precision levels required to detect extrasolar planets.

  11. Mass Constraints of the WASP-47 Planetary System from Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinukoff, Evan; Howard, Andrew W.; Petigura, Erik A.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Isaacson, Howard; Weiss, Lauren M.; Brewer, John M.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Hirsch, Lea; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Crepp, Justin R.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Ciardi, David R.; Beichman, Charles A.; Knutson, Heather A.; Benneke, Bjoern; Dressing, Courtney D.; Livingston, John H.; Deck, Katherine M.; Lépine, Sébastien; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2017-02-01

    We report precise radial velocity (RV) measurements of WASP-47, a G star that hosts three transiting planets in close proximity (a hot Jupiter, a super-Earth, and a Neptune-sized planet) and a non-transiting planet at 1.4 au. Through a joint analysis of previously published RVs and our own Keck-HIRES RVs, we significantly improve the planet mass and bulk density measurements. For the super-Earth WASP-47e (P = 0.79 days), we measure a mass of 9.11+/- 1.17 M⊕, and a bulk density of 7.63+/- 1.90 g cm-3, consistent with a rocky composition. For the hot Jupiter WASP-47b (P = 4.2 days), we measure a mass of 356+/- 12 M⊕ (1.12 ± 0.04 MJup) and constrain its eccentricity to < 0.021 at 3σ confidence. For the Neptune-size planet WASP-47d (P = 9.0 days), we measure a mass of 12.75+/- 2.70 M⊕ and a bulk density of 1.36+/- 0.42 g cm-3, suggesting that it has a thick H/He envelope. For the outer non-transiting planet, we measure a minimum mass of 411+/- 18 M⊕ (1.29 ± 0.06 MJup), an orbital period of 595.7+/- 5.0 days, and an orbital eccentricity of 0.27+/- 0.04. Our new measurements are consistent with but two to four times more precise than previous mass measurements.

  12. Structure and dynamics of the Milky Way disk as revealed from the radial velocity distributions of APOGEE red clump stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyouchi, Daisuke; Chiba, Masashi

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of the Milky Way (MW) disk stars based on the analysis of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) data, to infer the past evolution histories of the MW disk component(s) possibly affected by radial migration and/or satellite accretions. APOGEE is the first near-infrared spectroscopic survey for a large number of the MW disk stars, providing their radial velocities and chemical abundances without significant dust extinction effects. We here adopt red-clump (RC) stars (Bovy et al. 2014), for which the distances from the Sun are determined precisely, and analyze their radial velocities and chemical abundances in the MW disk regions covering from the Galactocentric distance, R, of 5 kpc to 14 kpc. We investigate their dynamical properties, such as mean rotational velocities, and velocity dispersions, as a function of R, based on the MCMC Bayesian method. We find that at all radii, the dynamics of alpha-poor stars, which are candidates of young disk stars, is much different from that of alpha-rich stars, which are candidates of old disk stars. We find that our Jeans analysis for our sample stars reveals characteristic spatial and dynamical properties of the MW disk, which are generally in agreement with the recent independent work by Bovy et al. (2015) but with a different method from ours.

  13. A Hectochelle Radial Velocity Survey of Cep OB3b: An ONC like cluster at late gas dispersal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnath, Nicole; Allen, Thomas; Prchlik, Jakub; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Megeath, Samuel Thomas; Pipher, Judith; Wolk, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Cep OB3b is a young (~3-5 Myr), late gas dispersal cluster of roughly 3000 members broken into two sub-clusters (Eastern and Western) at a distance of 700pc; it is a rare example of nearby cluster in the late stages of gas dispersal and appears to be a more evolved analog to the Orion Nebular Cluster. As part of an ongoing multi wavelength study, we focus on Hectochelle data from the MMT to measure the radial velocities of 499 stars. After removing binaries, outliers, and imposing a minimum R value to the cross correlation, we obtain radial velocities of 57 previously identified members, with an average error of 1.7 km/s. There is no observed variation in radial velocity across the cluster in right ascension or declination. The preferred mechanism for this type of kinematic evolution is that any initial kinematic structure from formation may have been erased and that minimal or no rotation is present in the cluster. However, the Eastern sub-cluster, containing the most massive star in the field, an O7 star, has a higher velocity dispersion than the Western sub-cluster, which contains several B stars. We will compare these results to CO maps of the residual gas in the cluster and discuss possible reasons for this difference. Finally, we will assess whether the cluster is bound or in a state of expansion.

  14. SGLOBE-rani: a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic shear-wave velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, A.; Chang, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new global whole-mantle model of isotropic and radially anisotropic S velocity structure (SGLOBE-rani) based on ~43,000,000 surface-wave and ~420,000 bodywave travel time measurements, which is expanded in spherical harmonic basis functions up to degree 35. We incorporate crustal thickness perturbations as model parameters in the inversions to properly consider crustal effects and suppress the leakage of crustal structure into mantle structure. This is possible since we utilize short-period group velocity data with a period range down to 16 s, which are strongly sensitive to the crust. The isotropic S-velocity model shares common features with previous global S-velocity models and shows excellent consistency with several high-resolution upper mantle models. Our anisotropic model also agrees well with previous regional studies. Nevertheless, our new model of 3-D radial anisotropy shows some features not seen in previous whole-mantle models, such as faster SV velocity anomalies along subduction zones at transition zone depths and faster SH velocity beneath slabs in the lower mantle. The derived crustal thickness perturbations also bring potentially important information about the crustal thickness beneath oceanic crusts, which has been difficult to constrain due to poor access compared with continental crusts. We interpret our results in terms of mineralogy and geodynamical processes in the transition zone and uppermost lower mantle.

  15. Radial variation in sap velocity as a function of stem diameter and sapwood thickness in yellow-poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; King, Anthony W.

    2000-04-01

    Canopy transpiration and forest water use are frequently estimated as the product of sap velocity and cross-sectional sapwood area. Few studies, however, have considered whether radial variation in sap velocity and the proportion of sapwood active in water transport are significant sources of uncertainty in the extrapolation process. Therefore, radial profiles of sap velocity were examined as a function of stem diameter and sapwood thickness for yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) trees growing on two adjacent watersheds in eastern Tennessee. The compensation heat pulse velocity technique was used to quantify sap velocity at four equal-area depths in 20 trees that ranged in stem diameter from 15 to 69 cm, and in sapwood thickness from 2.1 to 14.8 cm. Sap velocity was highly dependent on the depth of probe insertion into the sapwood. Rates of sap velocity were greatest for probes located in the two outer sapwood annuli (P1 and P2) and lowest for probes in closest proximity to the heartwood (P3 and P4). Relative sap velocities averaged 0.98 at P1, 0.66 at P2, 0.41 at P3 and 0.35 at P4. Tree-specific sap velocities measured at each of the four probe positions, divided by the maximum sap velocity measured (usually at P1 or P2), indicated that the fraction of sapwood functional in water transport (f(S)) varied between 0.49 and 0.96. There was no relationship between f(S) and sapwood thickness, or between f(S) and stem diameter. The fraction of functional sapwood averaged 0.66 +/- 0.13 for trees on which radial profiles were determined. No significant depth-related differences were observed for sapwood density, which averaged 469 kg m(-3) across all four probe positions. There was, however, a significant decline in sapwood water content between the two outer probe positions (1.04 versus 0.89 kg kg(-1)). This difference was not sufficient to account for the observed radial variation in sap velocity. A Monte-Carlo analysis indicated that the standard error in

  16. An investigation into the radial velocity variability of GJ 581: On the significance of GJ 581g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the radial velocity variations of GJ 581 based on measurements from the HARPS and Keck HIRES spectrographs. A Fourier pre-whitening procedure is able to extract four planetary signals in the HARPS data and two from the Keck data. Combining both data sets increases the significance of the four planet signals found by HARPS. This indicates that the Keck data also supports the presence of four planets. A periodogram analysis of the residual radial velocity measurements after removal of the four planetary signals shows several periodic signals that are significant when assessing the false alarm probability via a bootstrap. However, it is demonstrated that these are not due to planetary companions. This analysis is able to confirm the presence of four planets around GJ 581, but not the presence of GJ 581g.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in 2006-2014 for HD 89758 (Lee+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B.-C.; Han, I.; Park, M.-G.; Mkrtichian, D. E.; Hatzes, A. P.; Jeong, G.; Kim, K.-M.

    2016-07-01

    Observations were carried out using the fiber-fed high-resolution Bohyunsan Observatory Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) attached to the 1.8m telescope at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO) in Korea. One exposure with the BOES has a wavelength coverage 3500-10500Å distributed over ~80 spectral orders. In order to provide precise radial velocity measurements, we used the 80μm diameter fiber which yields a resolving power R=90000. Over the eight-year period from 2006 November to 2014 November (56 nights in total), 112 spectra for μ UMa were collected. The estimated signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in the I2 region was about 250 with a typical exposure time ranging from 60 to 480s. We report our radial velocity data for μ UMa in Table2. (1 data file).

  18. ARE PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULAE SHAPED BY A BINARY? RESULTS OF A LONG-TERM RADIAL VELOCITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Lu Wenxian; Bohlender, David; Morris, S. C.; Woodsworth, Andrew W.; Scarfe, C. D. E-mail: wen.lu@valpo.edu E-mail: David.Bohlender@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2011-06-10

    The shaping of the nebula is currently one of the outstanding unsolved problems in planetary nebula (PN) research. Several mechanisms have been proposed, most of which require a binary companion. However, direct evidence for a binary companion is lacking in most PNs. We have addressed this problem by obtaining precise radial velocities of seven bright proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs), objects in transition from the asymptotic giant branch to the PN phases of stellar evolution. These have F-G spectral types and have the advantage over PNs of having more and sharper spectral lines, leading to better precision. Our observations were made in two observing intervals, 1991-1995 and 2007-2010, and we have included in our analysis some additional published and unpublished data. Only one of the PPNs, IRAS 22272+5435, shows a long-term variation that might tentatively be attributed to a binary companion, with P > 22 yr, and from this, limiting binary parameters are calculated. Selection effects are also discussed. These results set significant restrictions on the range of possible physical and orbital properties of any binary companions: they have periods greater than 25 yr or masses of brown dwarfs or super-Jupiters. While not ruling out the binary hypothesis, it seems fair to say that these results do not support it.

  19. Method of radial velocities for the estimation of aircraft wake vortex parameters from data measured by coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Smalikho, I N; Banakh, V A; Holzäpfel, F; Rahm, S

    2015-09-21

    The method of radial velocities (RV) is applied to estimate aircraft wake vortex parameters from measurements conducted with pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (PCDL). Operations of the Stream Line lidar and the 2-µm PCDL are simulated numerically to analyze the accuracy of the estimated wake vortex parameters with the RV method. The RV method is also used to estimate wake vortex trajectories and circulation from lidar measurements at Tomsk and Munich airports. The method of velocity envelopes and the RV method are compared employing data gathered with the 2-µm PCDL. The domain of applicability of the RV method is determined.

  20. Radial velocities of galaxies in the cluster Klemola 22 from observations with OPTOPUS, the ESO multiple object spectroscopy facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.; de Souza, R.; Lund, G.; Quintana, H.

    1987-06-01

    This paper presents the first results obtained with the ESO multiple fiber spectroscopic facility (OPTOPUS). Radial velocities and magnitudes are given for 44 galaxies in the cluster Klemola 22. The average redshift is 16160 km s-1 and the velocity dispersion 742 km s-1. The galaxy Kle 22/17 shows strong emission lines of [O III], with a FWHM of 850 km s-1, and is classified as a type 2 Seyfert. From these observations, the average efficiency of OPTOPUS, including telescope, spectrograph and detector, is computed as 1 detected photoelectron Å-1s-1 for an object of 15 B magnitude.

  1. Finding proto-spectroscopic binaries: Precise multi-epoch radial velocities of 7 protostars in ρ Ophiuchus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana Almeida, P.; Melo, C.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Sterzik, M.; Gameiro, J. F.

    2014-10-01

    Stars in the solar neighborhood are mostly found in multiple systems. While the existence of stellar companions at visual distances can be easily explained as a normal outcome of the star formation process itself, it is still unclear how spectroscopic companions are actually formed. If they are a by-product of the initial fragmentation of molecular clouds, or resultant from dynamical evolution within pristine multiple systems is still an open question in star formation. To uncover a young spectroscopic binary would be therefore an invaluable clue for understanding the mechanisms and the time scales involved in their formation. Aiming at finding such young spectroscopic companions, we present a near-IR high resolution (R ˜ 60000) multi-epoch radial velocity survey of 7 young stellar objects in the star forming region ρ Ophiuchus. The radial velocities of each source were derived using a 2-D cross-correlation function designed to deliver the radial velocity of the target relative to the zero-point established by the earth's atmosphere. We found that the spectra of the protostars in our sample agree reasonably well with predicted stellar photospheric profiles indicating that the radial velocities uncovered are of stellar nature. Three of the targets analyzed give us hints that the first proto-spectroscopic binaries might have been found. If confirmed, it will bring an important piece into the (binary) star-formation puzzle, namely, that multiplicity at sub-AU scale starts (or not) at birth. Our preliminary binary fraction of ˜71% is also in line with the notion that multiplicity is very high at young ages and therefore it might be a product of star-formation.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Keck/HIRES radial velocity obs. of HD32963 (Rowan+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, D.; Meschiari, S.; Laughlin, G.; Vogt, S. S.; Butler, R. P.; Burt, J.; Wang, S.; Holden, B.; Hanson, R.; Arriagada, P.; Keiser, S.; Teske, J.; Diaz, M.

    2016-04-01

    The Lick-Carnegie Exoplanet Survey (LCES) is a search for exoplanets using the Keck I optical telescope of the W. M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii. We used the HIRES spectrometer telescope for all the radial velocity (RV) observations presented in this paper. Table 2 shows the complete set of our RV observations for HD 32963. Our data set comprises 109 measurements over approximately 16 years (5838 days); between 1998 January 24 and 2014 January 18. (1 data file).

  3. An updated survey of globular clusters in M 31. I. Classification and radial velocity for 76 candidate clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galleti, S.; Federici, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; Fusi Pecci, F.

    2006-09-01

    Aims.We present the first results of a large spectroscopic survey of globular clusters and candidate globular clusters in the nearby M 31 galaxy. The survey is aimed at the classification of known candidate M 31 clusters and at the study of their kinematic properties. Methods: .We obtained low-resolution spectroscopy (λ/Δλ ≃ 800-1300) for 133 targets, including 76 yet-to-be-confirmed candidate clusters (i.e. with no previous spectroscopic information), 55 already-confirmed genuine M 31 clusters, and 2 uncertain candidates. Our observations allowed a reliable estimate of the target radial velocity, within a typical accuracy of ~± 20 km s-1. The observed candidates have been robustly classified according to their radial velocity and shape parameters that allowed us to confidently discriminate between point sources and extended objects even from low-spatial-resolution imagery. Results: .In our set of 76 candidate clusters we found: 42 newly-confirmed bona-fide M 31 clusters, 12 background galaxies, 17 foreground Galactic stars, 2 Hii regions belonging to M 31 and 3 unclassified (possibly M 31 clusters or foreground stars) objects. The classification of a few other candidates not included in our survey has been also reassessed on various observational bases. All the sources of radial velocity estimates for M 31 known globular clusters available in the literature have been compared and checked, and a homogeneous general list has been obtained for 349 confirmed clusters with radial velocity. Conclusions: .Our results suggest that a significant number of genuine clusters (≳100) is still hidden among the plethora of known candidates proposed by various authors. Hence our knowledge of the globular cluster system of the M 31 galaxy is still far from complete even in terms of simple membership.

  4. McDonald Observatory Planetary Search - A high precision stellar radial velocity survey for other planetary systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, William D.; Hatzes, Artie P.

    1993-01-01

    The McDonald Observatory Planetary Search program surveyed a sample of 33 nearby F, G, and K stars since September 1987 to search for substellar companion objects. Measurements of stellar radial velocity variations to a precision of better than 10 m/s were performed as routine observations to detect Jovian planets in orbit around solar type stars. Results confirm the detection of a companion object to HD114762.

  5. The disk-halo interface of the Milky Way as observed with the Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is the largest wide-field spectroscopic stellar survey of the Milky Way in the pre-Gaia era. Over the period of 2003-2013, 574,630 spectra for 483,330 stars have been amassed in the Ca triplet region at 8410-8795 Å with resolving power R ~ 7500. Spectral range and resolution are comparable to the RVS unit of the Gaia Satellite. Radial velocities at 2km/s accuracy have been derived as well as stellar parameters and chemical abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni. Furthermore, distances have been derived by combining RAVE data with 2MASS and APASS photometry.RAVE data have been applied to a multitude of questions regarding the dynamical and chemical evolution of the Milky Way. In this presentation I will focus on the interface between the thin and thick disk(s) and the Galactic halo, respectively, presenting data on systematic changes in abundence and alpha enrichment of the respectice stellar population with their kinematical properties (rotation velocity, velocity dispersion) out to distances of several kpc from the Sun. Furthermore, systematic changes in the chemical gradients will be presented. An analysis of high velocity stars reveals that while most have abundance properties typical for halo stars, a few stars have more disk-like chemical abundance pattern indicative of that these stars were formed in the disk but later on ejected into the stellar halo.

  6. Investigation of Ultrasound-Measured Flow Velocity, Flow Rate and Wall Shear Rate in Radial and Ulnar Arteries Using Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Xia, Chunming; Stephen, Gandy; Khan, Faisel; Corner, George A; Hoskins, Peter R; Huang, Zhihong

    2017-05-01

    Parameters of blood flow measured by ultrasound in radial and ulnar arteries, such as flow velocity, flow rate and wall shear rate, are widely used in clinical practice and clinical research. Investigation of these measurements is useful for evaluating accuracy and providing knowledge of error sources. A method for simulating the spectral Doppler ultrasound measurement process was developed with computational fluid dynamics providing flow-field data. Specific scanning factors were adjusted to investigate their influence on estimation of the maximum velocity waveform, and flow rate and wall shear rate were derived using the Womersley equation. The overestimation in maximum velocity increases greatly (peak systolic from about 10% to 30%, time-averaged from about 30% to 50%) when the beam-vessel angle is changed from 30° to 70°. The Womersley equation was able to estimate flow rate in both arteries with less than 3% error, but performed better in the radial artery (2.3% overestimation) than the ulnar artery (15.4% underestimation) in estimating wall shear rate. It is concluded that measurements of flow parameters in the radial and ulnar arteries with clinical ultrasound scanners are prone to clinically significant errors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The Mass of HD 38529c from Hubble Space Telescope Astrometry and High-precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, G. Fritz; McArthur, Barbara E.; Bean, Jacob L.; Barnes, Rory; Harrison, Thomas E.; Hatzes, Artie; Martioli, Eder; Nelan, Edmund P.

    2010-05-01

    Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor astrometric observations of the G4 IV star HD 38529 are combined with the results of the analysis of extensive ground-based radial velocity (RV) data to determine the mass of the outermost of two previously known companions. Our new RVs obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and velocities from the Carnegie-California group now span over 11 yr. With these data we obtain improved RV orbital elements for both the inner companion, HD 38529b, and the outer companion, HD 38529c. We identify a rotational period of HD 38529 (P rot = 31.65 ± 0fd17) with Fine Guidance Sensor photometry. The inferred star spot fraction is consistent with the remaining scatter in velocities being caused by spot-related stellar activity. We then model the combined astrometric and RV measurements to obtain the parallax, proper motion, perturbation period, perturbation inclination, and perturbation size due to HD 38529c. For HD 38529c we find P = 2136.1 ± 0.3 d, perturbation semimajor axis α = 1.05 ± 0.06 mas, and inclination i = 48fdg3 ± 3fdg7. Assuming a primary mass M * = 1.48 M sun, we obtain a companion mass Mc = 17.6+1.5 -1.2 M Jup, 3σ above a 13 M Jup deuterium burning, brown dwarf lower limit. Dynamical simulations incorporating this accurate mass for HD 38529c indicate that a near-Saturn mass planet could exist between the two known companions. We find weak evidence of an additional low amplitude signal that can be modeled as a planetary-mass (~0.17 M Jup) companion at P ~194 days. Including this component in our modeling lowers the error of the mass determined for HD 38529c. Additional observations (RVs and/or Gaia astrometry) are required to validate an interpretation of HD 38529d as a planetary-mass companion. If confirmed, the resulting HD 38529 planetary system may be an example of a "Packed Planetary System." Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute

  8. Effects of Data Sampling on the Results of Fourier Analysis of Radial-Velocity Fields in Spiral-Galaxy Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlak, A. N.; Zasov, A. V.; Fridman, A. M.; Khoruzhi, O. V.

    2000-12-01

    Our main goal is to investigate the effects of data incompleteness on the results of Fourier analysis of line-of-sight velocity fields in the disks of spiral galaxies. We have carried out a number of numerical experiments, first with an artificially created simple velocity field and then with the velocity fields of two real galaxies, which qualitatively differ in data filling: NGC 157 and NGC 3631 with good and bad data filling, respectively. The field of purely circular velocities is chosen as the simplest artificial velocity field, because the circular velocities of spiral galaxies are much high than the residual (noncircular) velocities. Superimposing a "mask" simulating blank spots (holes) in the map of observational data on this artificial field has no effect on the results of Fourier analysis of this simplest field. A similar result is obtained for real galaxies with good data filling of the observed velocity fields. Superimposing arbitrarily shaped masks on the observed velocity field of NGC 157 in such a way that the field was filled by a mere 50% (at each radius) could not change appreciably the radial variations of large-scale Fourier harmonics. The situation qualitatively changes in attempting to fill the holes in the observed velocity field of NGC 3631 in some way. When missing velocities are artificially introduced by using the simplest model of purely circular gas rotation, the amplitudes and phases of the principal Fourier harmonics are distorted. In particular, a substantial distortion of the third harmonic also causes an increase in the error when determining the corotation radius from data of the filled field. When the filling of the velocity field is increased by degrading the spatial resolution, the amplitudes of most harmonics decrease throughout the entire disk region; as a result, their radial variations are smoothed out and the behavior of harmonic phases in the range of moderately high initial amplitudes can be distorted. An abnormal

  9. PRECISE INFRARED RADIAL VELOCITIES FROM KECK/NIRSPEC AND THE SEARCH FOR YOUNG PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, John I. III; White, Russel J.; Tanner, Angelle M.; Blake, Cullen H.; Charbonneau, Dave; Torres, Guillermo; Barman, Travis S. E-mail: white@chara.gsu.edu

    2012-04-10

    We present a high-precision infrared radial velocity (RV) study of late-type stars using spectra obtained with NIRSPEC at the W. M. Keck Observatory. RV precisions of 50 m s{sup -1} are achieved for old field mid-M dwarfs using telluric features for wavelength calibration. Using this technique, 20 young stars in the {beta} Pic (age {approx} 12 Myr) and TW Hya (age {approx} 8 Myr) Associations were monitored over several years to search for low-mass companions; we also included the chromospherically active field star GJ 873 (EV Lac) in this survey. Based on comparisons with previous optical observations of these young active stars, RV measurements at infrared wavelengths mitigate the RV noise caused by star spots by a factor of {approx}3. Nevertheless, star spot noise is still the dominant source of measurement error for young stars at 2.3 {mu}m, and limits the precision to {approx}77 m s{sup -1} for the slowest rotating stars (v sin i < 6 km s{sup -1}), increasing to {approx}168 m s{sup -1} for rapidly rotating stars (v sin i > 12 km s{sup -1}). The observations reveal both GJ 3305 and TWA 23 to be single-lined spectroscopic binaries; in the case of GJ 3305, the motion is likely caused by its 0.''09 companion, identified after this survey began. The large amplitude, short-timescale variations of TWA 13A are indicative of a hot Jupiter-like companion, but the available data are insufficient to confirm this. We label it as a candidate RV variable. For the remainder of the sample, these observations exclude the presence of any 'hot' (P < 3 days) companions more massive than 8 M{sub Jup} and any 'warm' (P < 30 days) companions more massive than 17 M{sub Jup}, on average. Assuming an edge-on orbit for the edge-on disk system AU Mic, these observations exclude the presence of any hot Jupiters more massive than 1.8 M{sub Jup} or warm Jupiters more massive than 3.9 M{sub Jup}.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities of 35 cataclysmic variables (Thorstensen+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorstensen, J. R.; Alper, E. H.; Weil, K. E.

    2017-02-01

    We present spectroscopic follow-up observations of 35 newly discovered cataclysmic variables (CVs), 32 of which were found by the Catalina Real Time Transient Surveys (CRTS; Drake et al. 2009, Cat. J/ApJ/696/870; Drake et al. 2014, Cat. J/MNRAS/441/1186; Breedt et al. 2014, Cat. J/MNRAS/443/3174), ASAS-SN (Shappee et al. 2014ApJ...788...48S), and/or MASTER (Lipunov et al. 2010AdAst2010E..30L). All our observations are from Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT (MDM) Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona. For nearly all the spectra, we used the "modspec" spectrograph (a description of the modspec can be found at http://mdm.kpno.noao.edu/Manuals/ModSpec/modspec_man.html) with a 600line/mm grating. We mostly used a SITe 20482 CCD detector, which yielded 2Å/pixel from 4210 to 7500Å, with declining throughput toward the ends of the spectral range. When this detector was unavailable, we used a very similar 10242 SITe detector ("Templeton"), which covered 4660 to 6730Å. The modspec was mounted mostly on the 2.4m Hiltner telescope, but for some of the brighter objects, we used the 1.3m McGraw-Hill telescope. For a few of the 1.3m spectra, we used the Mark III grism spectrograph, which covered 4580 to 6850Å at 2.3Å/pixel. On both telescopes and with both spectrographs, we used an Andor Ikon camera to view the reflective slit jaws through a microscope and guided the telescope with a separate off-axis guider. With this arrangement we could place any object that was bright enough for a usable spectrum in the slit and track it accurately even if the portion of the light spilling onto the slit jaws was invisible. Our emission-line radial velocities are almost entirely of Hα, since it almost always gives the best signal-to-noise ratio with our instrument. (3 data files).

  11. Orbital characterization of multi-object exoplanetary systems with radial velocity observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng-Cheng

    Exoplanets are the planets around stars other than the sun. The detection and characterization of exoplanetary systems nowadays is one of the fields of the greatest interest in astronomy and planetary science. As various exoplanets detection programs have been keeping delivering observations of potential exoplanets, their database is growing rapidly in terms of the size and the detection precision. It is crucial to make the best use of these data, not only for discovering the exoplanets, but also for determining the most appropriate model for describing the data set and measuring the model parameters (e.g. masses and orbital parameters) more accurately. One of the most productive detection methods is the Radial Velocity (RV) method. It measures the Doppler shift of a stellar spectrum caused by the gravity perturbation of the orbiting planet(s). Dispersed Fixed-delay Interferometry (DFDI) is a technique to economically implement the RV detection. Chapter 2 describes my involvement in two instrumentation projects based on this technique and focus on a method of increasing the short-term stability of the instruments. When interpreting the reduced RV data, people usually use a Keplerian model to describe the orbits of exoplanets. However, if there is more than one planet in the system, the Keplerian model neglects the interaction between planets. Theoretically, an n-body simulation should be used for describing the system in terms of accuracy. However, the N-body model is much more computationally expensive. In an attempt to determine when a full N-body model is important, I compare the Keplerian model with N-body model for characterizing the orbits of a set of simulated interacting two planet systems, which is described in Chapter 3. Given a RV data, Markov Chain Monte Carlo provides a convenient tool to sample from the posterior distribution of the model parameters. One challenge that remains is computing the Marginal Likelihood of the Posterior or the Bayesian

  12. Radial velocity information content of M dwarf spectra in the near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, P.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Oshagh, M.; Neal, J. J.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Lovis, C.; Melo, C.; Pepe, F.; Santos, N. C.; Tsantaki, M.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: We evaluate the radial velocity (RV) information content and achievable precision on M0-M9 spectra covering the ZYJHK bands. We do so while considering both a perfect atmospheric transmission correction and discarding areas polluted by deep telluric features, as done in previous works. Methods: To simulate the M-dwarf spectra, PHOENIX-ACES model spectra were employed; they were convolved with rotational kernels and instrumental profiles to reproduce stars with a v sin i of 1.0, 5.0, and 10.0 km s-1 when observed at resolutions of 60 000, 80 000, and 100 000. We considered the RV precision as calculated on the whole spectra, after discarding strongly polluted areas, and after applying a perfect telluric correction. In the latter option, we took into account the reduction in the number of recorded photons due to a transmittance lower than unity and considered its effect on the noise of the recorded spectra. In our simulations we paid particular attention to the details of the convolution and sampling of the spectra, and we discuss their impact on the final spectra. Results: Our simulations show that the most important parameter ruling the difference in attainable precision between the considered bands is the spectral type. For M0-M3 stars, the bands that deliver the most precise RV measurements are the Z, Y, and H band, with relative merits depending on the parameters of the simulation. For M6-M9 stars, the bands show a difference in precision that is within a factor of ~2 and does not clearly depend on the band; this difference is reduced to a factor smaller than ~1.5 if we consider a non-rotating star seen at high resolution. We also show that an M6-M9 spectrum will deliver a precision about two times better as an M0-M3 spectra with the same signal-to-noise ratio. Finally, we note that the details of modeling the Earth atmosphere and interpreting the results have a significant impact on which wavelength regions are discarded when setting a limit threshold at

  13. Hide and Seek: Radial-velocity searches for planets around active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, Raphaelle

    2017-01-01

    The ultimate obstacle to determining the masses of small, rocky exoplanets through radial-velocity (RV) monitoring is the intrinsic variability of the host stars themselves. For my PhD, I developed an intuitive and robust data analysis framework in which the activity-induced variations are modelled with a Gaussian process that has the frequency structure of the stellar magnetic activity. This allowed me to determine precise and accurate masses of the planets in the CoRoT-7, Kepler-78 and Kepler-10 systems. In parallel, I explored the physical origin of activity-induced RV variations of our best-known star: the Sun. I conducted the first systematic RV campaign of the Sun seen as an exoplanet host star using the 3.6m/HARPS spectrograph, by observing sunlight reflected off the bright asteroid 4/Vesta. I used images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory to reconstruct the RV signals incurred by individual surface features such as sunspots, faculae and granulation. I found that the activity-induced RV variations are driven by the suppression of convective blueshift arising dominantly from the presence of faculae. I also identified the full-disc magnetic flux as an excellent proxy for activity-induced RV variations.I am now pursuing my solar investigations using Sun-as-a-star RV observations acquired with the new solar telescope feed at HARPS-N. In particular, I am investigating the impact of magnetic surface features on the shapes of the spectral line profiles, rather than on the RVs themselves (which are a single moment of these lines). This work is key to developing physically-driven, better-tailored models for activity-induced RV variations, in preparation for the potentially habitable, Earth-like planets to be discovered and characterised in the coming years with TESS and GMT/G-CLEF.This work was funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council in the United Kingdom and the John Templeton Foundation.

  14. An Improvement of the Radial Velocity Measurement Method for Subaru/HDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harakawa, Hiroki; Sato, B.

    2011-09-01

    Now extra solar planet surveys have been transitioning to the next stage: to clarify the correlation between planet parameters and stellar parameters such as stellar metallicity, mass and age, or occurrence frequency of the habitable Super-Earths with high accuracy RV observations. In such a trend, an improvement of the RV measurement accuracy is crucial for the detection of exoplanets. It requires that a high dispersion spectrograph and excellent wavelength scaling for stellar templates to measure radial velocities (RV) precisely. And such a good wavelength scale is provided by I2 spectrum for the HDS at the Subaru telescope. Previously, we obtained stellar templates by deconvolution of IP from the observed star+I2 spectra described in Sato et al. (2002). However, for HDS, it have been reported that the long-term precision of RV measurements was higher than 10ms-1. En route to improvement trials, we found that the method of obtaining the intrinsic stellar spectrum (a stellar template) can be one of the main sources of uncertainty. Compared with the intrinsic stellar spectrum, because of its low resolution, the deconvolved spectra tend to be noisy. In order to avoid the calculation of deconvolution, we took the target star’s spectrum of extremely high resolution of R=160,000 without the I2 spectrum as the stellar template. Those templates would not be affected by IP, and its wavelength scale is approximately collected. By using our new stellar template, we have achieved the long-term precision of about 3ms-1 for over four years. The precision we have achieved indicates that the Subaru/HDS have been extended detection levels into the range of planets with masses about 6 MEarth around 7 days orbit to M-dwarfs with the mass of 0.5MSUN. Suppressing internal errors of

  15. Pulsation in the atmosphere of the roAp star HD 24712. I. Spectroscopic observations and radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikova, T.; Sachkov, M.; Weiss, W. W.; Kallinger, T.; Kochukhov, O.; Bagnulo, S.; Ilyin, I.; Landstreet, J. D.; Leone, F.; Lo Curto, G.; Lüftinger, T.; Lyashko, D.; Magazzù, A.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:We have investigated the structure of the pulsating atmosphere of one of the best studied rapidly oscillating Ap stars, HD 24712. Methods: For this purpose we analyzed spectra collected during 2001-2004. An extensive data set was obtained in 2004 simultaneously with the photometry of the Canadian MOST mini-satellite. This allows us to connect directly atmospheric dynamics observed as radial velocity variations with light variations seen in photometry. Results: We directly derived for the first time and for different chemical elements, respectively ions, phase shifts between photometric and radial velocity pulsation maxima indicating, as we suggest, different line formation depths in the atmosphere. This allowed us to estimate for the first time the propagation velocity of a pulsation wave in the outer stellar atmosphere of a roAp star to be slightly lower than the sound speed. We confirm large pulsation amplitudes (150-400 m s-1) for REE lines and the Hα core, while spectral lines of the other elements (Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe-peak elements) have nearly constant velocities. We did not find different pulsation amplitudes and phases for the lines of rare-earth elements before and after the Balmer jump, which supports the hypothesis of REE concentration in the upper atmosphere above the hydrogen line-forming layers. We also discuss radial velocity amplitudes and phases measured for individual spectral lines as tools for a 3D tomography of the atmosphere of HD 24712. Based on observations collected at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, (DDT-274.D-5011), at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), and from MOST, a Canadian Space Agency mission operated jointly by Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute of Aerospace Studies, and the University of British Columbia, with assistance from the University of Vienna. Tables 4, 5 and Fig. 9 are only available in

  16. A large systematic search for close supermassive binary and rapidly recoiling black holes - III. Radial velocity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnoe, Jessie C.; Eracleous, Michael; Pennell, Alison; Mathes, Gavin; Boroson, Todd; Sigurðsson, Steinn; Bogdanović, Tamara; Halpern, Jules P.; Liu, Jia; Brown, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    We have been spectroscopically monitoring 88 quasars selected to have broad Hβ emission lines offset from their systemic redshift by thousands of km s-1. By analogy with single-lined spectroscopic binary stars, we consider these quasars to be candidates for hosting supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs). In this work, we present new radial velocity measurements, typically three to four per object over a time period of up to 12 yr in the observer's frame. In 29/88 of the SBHB candidates, no variability of the shape of the broad Hβ profile is observed, which allows us to make reliable measurements of radial velocity changes. Among these, we identify three objects that have displayed systematic and monotonic velocity changes by several hundred km s-1 and are prime targets for further monitoring. Because the periods of the hypothetical binaries are expected to be long, we cannot hope to observe many orbital cycles during our lifetimes. Instead, we seek to evaluate the credentials of the SBHB candidates by attempting to rule out the SBHB hypothesis. In this spirit, we present a method for placing a lower limit on the period, and thus the mass, of the SBHBs under the assumption that the velocity changes we observe are due to orbital motion. Given the duration of our monitoring campaign and the uncertainties in the radial velocities, we were able to place a lower limit on the total mass in the range 4.7 × 104-3.8 × 108 M⊙, which does not yet allow us to rule out the SBHB hypothesis for any candidates.

  17. SOAP 2.0: A Tool to Estimate the Photometric and Radial Velocity Variations Induced by Stellar Spots and Plages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumusque, X.; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents SOAP 2.0, a new version of the Spot Oscillation And Planet (SOAP) code that estimates in a simple way the photometric and radial velocity (RV) variations induced by active regions. The inhibition of the convective blueshift (CB) inside active regions is considered, as well as the limb brightening effect of plages, a quadratic limb darkening law, and a realistic spot and plage contrast ratio. SOAP 2.0 shows that the activity-induced variation of plages is dominated by the inhibition of the CB effect. For spots, this effect becomes significant only for slow rotators. In addition, in the case of a major active region dominating the activity-induced signal, the ratio between the FWHM and the RV peak-to-peak amplitudes of the cross correlation function can be used to infer the type of active region responsible for the signal for stars with v sin i <=8 km s-1. A ratio smaller than three implies a spot, while a larger ratio implies a plage. Using the observation of HD 189733, we show that SOAP 2.0 manages to reproduce the activity variation as well as previous simulations when a spot is dominating the activity-induced variation. In addition, SOAP 2.0 also reproduces the activity variation induced by a plage on the slowly rotating star α Cen B, which is not possible using previous simulations. Following these results, SOAP 2.0 can be used to estimate the signal induced by spots and plages, but also to correct for it when a major active region is dominating the RV variation. . The work in this paper is based on observations made with the MOST satellite, the HARPS instrument on the ESO 3.6 m telescope at La Silla Observatory (Chile), and the SOPHIE instrument at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (France).

  18. SOAP 2.0: a tool to estimate the photometric and radial velocity variations induced by stellar spots and plages

    SciTech Connect

    Dumusque, X.; Boisse, I.; Santos, N. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents SOAP 2.0, a new version of the Spot Oscillation And Planet (SOAP) code that estimates in a simple way the photometric and radial velocity (RV) variations induced by active regions. The inhibition of the convective blueshift (CB) inside active regions is considered, as well as the limb brightening effect of plages, a quadratic limb darkening law, and a realistic spot and plage contrast ratio. SOAP 2.0 shows that the activity-induced variation of plages is dominated by the inhibition of the CB effect. For spots, this effect becomes significant only for slow rotators. In addition, in the case of a major active region dominating the activity-induced signal, the ratio between the FWHM and the RV peak-to-peak amplitudes of the cross correlation function can be used to infer the type of active region responsible for the signal for stars with v sin i ≤8 km s{sup –1}. A ratio smaller than three implies a spot, while a larger ratio implies a plage. Using the observation of HD 189733, we show that SOAP 2.0 manages to reproduce the activity variation as well as previous simulations when a spot is dominating the activity-induced variation. In addition, SOAP 2.0 also reproduces the activity variation induced by a plage on the slowly rotating star α Cen B, which is not possible using previous simulations. Following these results, SOAP 2.0 can be used to estimate the signal induced by spots and plages, but also to correct for it when a major active region is dominating the RV variation.

  19. ON THE COMPETITION BETWEEN RADIAL EXPANSION AND COULOMB COLLISIONS IN SHAPING THE ELECTRON VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION: KINETIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, S.; Matteini, L.; Pantellini, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present numerical simulations of the solar wind using a fully kinetic model which takes into account the effects of particle's binary collisions in a quasi-neutral plasma in spherical expansion. Starting from an isotropic Maxwellian velocity distribution function for the electrons, we show that the combined effect of expansion and Coulomb collisions leads to the formation of two populations: a collision-dominated cold and dense population almost isotropic in velocity space and a weakly collisional, tenuous field-aligned and antisunward drifting population generated by mirror force focusing in the radially decreasing magnetic field. The relative weights and drift velocities for the two populations observed in our simulations are in excellent agreement with the relative weights and drift velocities for both core and strahl populations observed in the real solar wind. The radial evolution of the main moments of the electron velocity distribution function is in the range observed in the solar wind. The electron temperature anisotropy with respect to the magnetic field direction is found to be related to the ratio between the collisional time and the solar wind expansion time. Even though collisions are found to shape the electron velocity distributions and regulate the properties of the strahl, it is found that the heat flux is conveniently described by a collisionless model where a fraction of the electron thermal energy is advected at the solar wind speed. This reinforces the currently largely admitted fact that collisions in the solar wind are clearly insufficient to force the electron heat flux obey the classical Spitzer-Haerm expression where heat flux and temperature gradient are proportional to each other. The presented results show that the electron dynamics in the solar wind cannot be understood without considering the role of collisions.

  20. The Mass of the Candidate Exoplanet Companion to HD 33636 from Hubble Space Telescope Astrometry and High-Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Jacob L.; McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz; Harrison, Thomas E.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Nelan, Edmund; Smith, Verne V.

    2007-08-01

    We have determined a dynamical mass for the companion to HD 33636 that indicates it is a low-mass star instead of an exoplanet. Our result is based on an analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) astrometry and ground-based radial velocity data. We have obtained high-cadence radial velocity measurements spanning 1.3 yr of HD 33636 with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We combined these data with previously published velocities to create a data set that spans 9 yr. We used this data set to search for, and place mass limits on, the existence of additional companions in the HD 33636 system. Our high-precision astrometric observations of the system with the HST Fine Guidance Sensor 1r span 1.2 yr. We simultaneously modeled the radial velocity and astrometry data to determine the parallax, proper motion, and perturbation orbit parameters of HD 33636. Our derived parallax, πabs=35.6+/-0.2 mas, agrees within the uncertainties with the Hipparcos value. We find a perturbation period P=2117.3+/-0.8 days, semimajor axis aA=14.2+/-0.2 mas, and system inclination i=4.1deg+/-0.1deg. Assuming the mass of the primary star to be MA=1.02+/-0.03 Msolar, we obtain a companion mass MB=142+/-11 MJup=0.14+/-0.01 Msolar. The much larger true mass of the companion relative to its minimum mass estimated from the spectroscopic orbit parameters (Msini=9.3 MJup) is due to the nearly face-on orbit orientation. This result demonstrates the value of follow-up astrometric observations to determine the true masses of exoplanet candidates detected with the radial velocity method. Based on data obtained with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). The HST observations were obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. The HET is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, Pennsylvania State University, Stanford

  1. Radial distribution functions of non-additive hard sphere mixtures via Percus' test particle route.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Paul; Schmidt, Matthias

    2011-08-17

    Using fundamental density functional theory we calculate the partial radial distribution functions, g(ij)(r), of a binary non-additive hard sphere mixture using either Percus' test particle approach or inversion of the analytic structure factor obtained via the Ornstein-Zernike route. We find good agreement between the theoretical results and Monte Carlo simulation data for both positive and moderate negative non-additivities. We investigate the asymptotic, [Formula: see text], decay of the g(ij)(r) and show that this agrees with the analytic analysis of the contributions to the partial structure factors in the plane of complex wavevectors. We find the test particle density profiles to be free of unphysical artefacts, contrary to earlier reports.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in seven globular clusters (Lardo+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lardo, C.; Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Bragaglia, A.; Donati, P.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Feltzing, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Allende Prieto, C.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bergemann, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hourihane, A.; Jofree, P.; de Laverny, P.; Marconi, G.; Masseron, T.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C. C.

    2014-11-01

    Velocities are given for 1826 stars in the field of the globular clusters NGC 1851, NGC 2808, NGC 4372, NGC 4833, NGC 5927, NGC 6752, and NGC 7078 observed with FLAMES/GIRAFFE@VLT. The table provides the individual identifications, coordinates, V magnitudes, velocities and their associated uncertainties for each star. (2 data files).

  3. Stress wave velocity patterns in the longitudinal-radial plane of trees for defect diagnosis

    Treesearch

    Guanghui Li; Xiang Weng; Xiaocheng Du; Xiping Wang; Hailin Feng

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic tomography for urban tree inspection typically uses stress wave data to reconstruct tomographic images for the trunk cross section using interpolation algorithm. This traditional technique does not take into account the stress wave velocity patterns along tree height. In this study, we proposed an analytical model for the wave velocity in the longitudinal–...

  4. METAL ABUNDANCES, RADIAL VELOCITIES, AND OTHER PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS FOR THE RR LYRAE STARS IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Nemec, James M.; Cohen, Judith G.; Sesar, Branimir; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans E-mail: jmn@isr.bc.ca E-mail: bsesar@astro.caltech.edu E-mail: derekas@konkoly.hu E-mail: chadid@marseille.fr

    2013-08-20

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude {delta} Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 {+-} 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 {+-} 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] {approx}-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-{phi}{sub 31}{sup s}-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on {approx}970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg)

  5. Why the Canis Major overdensity is not due to the Warp: analysis of its radial profile and velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, N. F.; Ibata, R. A.; Conn, B. C.; Lewis, G. F.; Bellazzini, M.; Irwin, M. J.; McConnachie, A. W.

    2004-12-01

    In response to recent criticism by Momany et al., that the recently identified Canis Major (CMa) overdensity could be simply explained by the Galactic warp, we present proof of the existence of a stellar population in the direction of CMa that cannot be explained by known Galactic components. By analysing the radial distribution of counts of M-giant stars in this direction, we show that the Momany et al. warp model overestimates the number of stars in the Northern hemisphere, hence hiding the CMa feature in the South. The use of a better model of the warp has little influence on the morphology of the overdensity and clearly displays an excess of stars grouped at a distance of D= 7.2 +/- 0.3 kpc. To lend further support to the existence of a population that does not belong to the Galactic disc, we present radial velocities of M-giant stars in the centre of the CMa structure that were obtained with the 2dF spectrograph at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The extra population shows a radial velocity of vr= 109 +/- 4 km s-1, which is significantly higher than the typical velocity of the disc at the distance of CMa. This population also has a low dispersion (13 +/- 4 kms-1). The Canis Major overdensity is therefore highly unlikely to be due to the Galactic warp, adding weight to the hypothesis that we are observing a disrupting dwarf galaxy or its remnants. This leads to questions on what part of CMa was previously identified as the Warp and how possibly to disentangle the two structures.

  6. Metallicities and radial velocities of two stellar clusters located in the outer regions of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramajo, L. V.; Parisi, M. C.; Clariá, J. J.; Geisler, D.; Vásquez, S.; Da Costa, G.; Grebel, E. K.

    2016-08-01

    We studied near-infrared spectra of red giant stars in two Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) clusters. We used the Caii lines to measure radial velocities as well as the equivalent widths of these lines to determine metallicity. The two studied clusters (L32 and L38) are projected on the outer regions of the SMC so they are particularly interesting to examine the possible existence of a change of sign in the metallicity gradient in the outer regions, as suggested by a recent study.

  7. The Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project: Sub-m s-1 Doppler Precision from FTS Observations of the Sun as a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, U.; Reiners, A.

    2016-09-01

    Radial velocity observations of stars are entering the sub-m s-1 domain revealing fundamental barriers for Doppler precision experiments. Observations of the Sun as a star can easily overcome the m s-1 photon limit but face other obstacles. We introduce the Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project with the goal of obtaining high-precision (cm s-1) radial velocity measurements of the Sun as a star with a Fourier Transform Spectrograph. In this first paper, we present the project and first results. The photon limit of our 2 minute observations is at the 2 cm s-1 level but is currently limited by strong instrumental systematics. A drift of a few m s-1 hr-1 is visible in all observing days, probably caused by vignetting of the solar disk in our fiber-coupled setup, and imperfections of our guiding system add further offsets in our data. Binning the data into 30 minute groups shows m s-1 stability after correcting for a daily and linear instrumental trend. Our results show the potential of Sun-as-a-star radial velocity measurements that can possibly be achieved after a substantial upgrade of our spectrograph coupling strategy. Sun-as-a-star observations can provide crucial empirical information about the radial velocity signal of convective motion and stellar activity and on the wavelength dependence of radial velocity signals caused by stellar line profile variations.

  8. Southern Milky Way carbon stars - New candidates, JHK photometry, and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, V.M.; Cook, K.H.; Schechter, P.L.; Aaronson, M.; Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ; Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA )

    1989-07-01

    Data are presented for low-latitude southern Milky Way carbon stars. Coordinates and cross identifications are given for carbon stars (67 of which are confirmed new discoveries) in seven fields deemed to be unusually transparent. JHK photometry is presented for 520 stars. Velocities are presented for 393 stars. Improved coordinates are presented for selected stars in Westerlund's catalog. Averaged photometry and velocities are presented for a sample of 336 stars. 26 refs.

  9. Northern Milky Way carbon stars - New candidates, JHK photometry, and radial velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco, V.M.; Cook, K.H.; Olszewski, E.W.; Schechter, P.L.; Aaronson, M. Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA MIT, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-08-01

    Data are presented for low-latitude northern Milky Way carbon stars. Coordinates and cross identifications are given for carbon stars in nine fields thought to be unusually transparent. Of these, 142 are confirmed new discoveries. Five hundred thirty-eight JHK photometric observations are reported for 480 stars. Six hundred twenty velocity measurements are presented for 424 stars. Improved coordinates are given for many previously discovered stars. Averaged JHK photometry and velocities are summarized for a sample of 400 stars. 25 refs.

  10. THE M31 VELOCITY VECTOR. II. RADIAL ORBIT TOWARD THE MILKY WAY AND IMPLIED LOCAL GROUP MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Anderson, Jay; Brown, Tom; Fardal, Mark; Besla, Gurtina; Beaton, Rachael L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-07-01

    We determine the velocity vector of M31 with respect to the Milky Way and use this to constrain the mass of the Local Group, based on Hubble Space Telescope proper-motion measurements of three fields presented in Paper I. We construct N-body models for M31 to correct the measurements for the contributions from stellar motions internal to M31. This yields an unbiased estimate for the M31 center-of-mass motion. We also estimate the center-of-mass motion independently, using the kinematics of satellite galaxies of M31 and the Local Group, following previous work but with an expanded satellite sample. All estimates are mutually consistent, and imply a weighted average M31 heliocentric transverse velocity of (v{sub W} , v{sub N} ) = (- 125.2 {+-} 30.8, -73.8 {+-} 28.4) km s{sup -1}. We correct for the reflex motion of the Sun using the most recent insights into the solar motion within the Milky Way, which imply a larger azimuthal velocity than previously believed. This implies a radial velocity of M31 with respect to the Milky Way of V{sub rad,M31} = -109.3 {+-} 4.4 km s{sup -1}, and a tangential velocity of V{sub tan,M31} = 17.0 km s{sup -1}, with a 1{sigma} confidence region of V{sub tan,M31} {<=} 34.3 km s{sup -1}. Hence, the velocity vector of M31 is statistically consistent with a radial (head-on collision) orbit toward the Milky Way. We revise prior estimates for the Local Group timing mass, including corrections for cosmic bias and scatter, and obtain M{sub LG} {identical_to} M{sub MW,vir} + M{sub M31,vir} = (4.93 {+-} 1.63) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun }. Summing known estimates for the individual masses of M31 and the Milky Way obtained from other dynamical methods yields smaller uncertainties. Bayesian combination of the different estimates demonstrates that the timing argument has too much (cosmic) scatter to help much in reducing uncertainties on the Local Group mass, but its inclusion does tend to increase other estimates by {approx}10%. We

  11. Bayesian analysis of exoplanet and binary orbits. Demonstrated using astrometric and radial-velocity data of Mizar A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Hartung, T.; Launhardt, R.; Henning, T.

    2012-09-01

    Aims: We introduce BASE (Bayesian astrometric and spectroscopic exoplanet detection and characterisation tool), a novel program for the combined or separate Bayesian analysis of astrometric and radial-velocity measurements of potential exoplanet hosts and binary stars. The capabilities of BASE are demonstrated using all publicly available data of the binary Mizar A. Methods: With the Bayesian approach to data analysis we can incorporate prior knowledge and draw extensive posterior inferences about model parameters and derived quantities. This was implemented in BASE by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling, using a combination of the Metropolis-Hastings, hit-and-run, and parallel-tempering algorithms to explore the whole parameter space. Nonconvergence to the posterior was tested by means of the Gelman-Rubin statistic (potential scale reduction). The samples were used directly and transformed into marginal densities by means of kernel density estimation, a "smooth" alternative to histograms. We derived the relevant observable models from Newton's law of gravitation, showing that the motion of Earth and the target can be neglected. Results: With our methods we can provide more detailed information about the parameters than a frequentist analysis does. Still, a comparison with the Mizar A literature shows that both approaches are compatible within the uncertainties. Conclusions: We show that the Bayesian approach to inference has been implemented successfully in BASE, a flexible tool for analysing astrometric and radial-velocity data. BASE, the computer program introduced in this article, can be downloaded at http://www.mpia.de/homes/schulze/base.html.

  12. Rubidium-traced white-light etalon calibrator for radial velocity measurements at the cm s-1 level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stürmer, Julian; Seifahrt, Andreas; Schwab, Christian; Bean, Jacob L.

    2017-04-01

    We report on the construction and testing of a vacuum-gap Fabry-Pérot etalon calibrator for high precision radial velocity spectrographs. Our etalon is traced against a rubidium frequency standard to provide a cost effective, yet ultra precise wavelength reference. We describe here a turn-key system working at 500 to 900 nm, ready to be installed at any current and next-generation radial velocity spectrograph that requires calibration over a wide spectral bandpass. Where appropriate, we have used off-the-shelf, commercial components with demonstrated long-term performance to accelerate the development timescale of this instrument. Our system combines for the first time the advantages of passively stabilized etalons for optical and near-infrared wavelengths with the laser-locking technique demonstrated for single-mode fiber etalons. We realize uncertainties in the position of one etalon line at the 10 cm s-1 level in individual measurements taken at 4 Hz. When binning the data over 10 s, we are able to trace the etalon line with a precision of better than 3 cm s-1. We present data obtained during a week of continuous operation where we detect (and correct for) the predicted, but previously unobserved shrinking of the etalon Zerodur spacer corresponding to a shift of 13 cm s-1 per day.

  13. The Exoplanet Simple Orbit Fitting Toolbox (ExoSOFT): An Open-source Tool for Efficient Fitting of Astrometric and Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mede, Kyle; Brandt, Timothy D.

    2017-03-01

    We present the Exoplanet Simple Orbit Fitting Toolbox (ExoSOFT), a new, open-source suite to fit the orbital elements of planetary or stellar-mass companions to any combination of radial velocity and astrometric data. To explore the parameter space of Keplerian models, ExoSOFT may be operated with its own multistage sampling approach or interfaced with third-party tools such as emcee. In addition, ExoSOFT is packaged with a collection of post-processing tools to analyze and summarize the results. Although only a few systems have been observed with both radial velocity and direct imaging techniques, this number will increase, thanks to upcoming spacecraft and ground-based surveys. Providing both forms of data enables simultaneous fitting that can help break degeneracies in the orbital elements that arise when only one data type is available. The dynamical mass estimates this approach can produce are important when investigating the formation mechanisms and subsequent evolution of substellar companions. ExoSOFT was verified through fitting to artificial data and was implemented using the Python and Cython programming languages; it is available for public download at https://github.com/kylemede/ExoSOFT under GNU General Public License v3.

  14. The SDSS-III DR12 MARVELS radial velocity data release: the first data release from the multiple object Doppler exoplanet survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil B.; Li, Rui; Senan Seieroe Grieves, Nolan; Ma, Bo; de Lee, Nathan M.; Lee, Brian C.; Liu, Jian; Bolton, Adam S.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Weaver, Benjamin; SDSS-Iii Marvels Team

    2015-01-01

    We present the first data release from the SDSS-III Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) through the SDSS-III DR12. The data include 181,198 radial velocity (RV) measurements for a total of 5520 different FGK stars with V~7.6-12, of which more than 80% are dwarfs and subdwarfs while remainders are GK giants, among a total of 92 fields nearly randomly spread out over the entire northern sky taken with a 60-object MARVELS dispersed fixed-delay interferometer instrument over four years (2008-2012). There were 55 fields with a total of 3300 FGK stars which had 14 or more observations over about 2-year survey window. The median number of observations for these plates is 27 RV measurements. This represents the largest homogeneous sample of precision RV measurements of relatively bright stars. In this first released data, a total of 18 giant planet candidates, 16 brown dwarfs, and over 500 binaries with additional 96 targets having RV variability indicative of a giant planet companion are reported. The released data were produced by the MARVELS finalized 1D pipeline. We will also report preliminary statistical results from the MARVELS 2D data pipeline which has produced a median RV precision of ~30 m/s for stable stars.

  15. Data reduction, radial velocities and stellar parameters from spectra in the very low signal-to-noise domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, Luca

    2013-10-01

    Large astronomical facilities usually provide data reduction pipeline designed to deliver ready-to-use scientific data, and too often as- tronomers are relying on this to avoid the most difficult part of an astronomer job Standard data reduction pipelines however are usu- ally designed and tested to have good performance on data with av- erage Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) data, and the issues that are related with the reduction of data in the very low SNR domain are not taken int account properly. As a result, informations in data with low SNR are not optimally exploited. During the last decade our group has collected thousands of spec- tra using the GIRAFFE spectrograph at Very Large Telescope (Chile) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) to determine the ge- ometrical distance and dynamical state of several Galactic Globular Clusters but ultimately the analysis has been hampered by system- atics in data reduction, calibration and radial velocity measurements. Moreover these data has never been exploited to get other informa- tions like temperature and metallicity of stars, because considered too noisy for these kind of analyses. In this thesis we focus our attention on data reduction and analysis of spectra with very low SNR. The dataset we analyze in this thesis comprises 7250 spectra for 2771 stars of the Globular Cluster M 4 (NGC 6121) in the wavelength region 5145-5360Å obtained with GIRAFFE. Stars from the upper Red Giant Branch down to the Main Sequence have been observed in very different conditions, including nights close to full moon, and reaching SNR - 10 for many spectra in the dataset. We will first review the basic steps of data reduction and spec- tral extraction, adapting techniques well tested in other field (like photometry) but still under-developed in spectroscopy. We improve the wavelength dispersion solution and the correction of radial veloc- ity shift between day-time calibrations and science observations by following a completely

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocities in M67. I. 1278 candidate members (Geller+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, A. M.; Latham, D. W.; Mathieu, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    This is the first in a series of papers studying the dynamical state of the old open cluster M67 through precise radial velocities. This is also the paper LXVII of the WIYN Open Cluster Study. Our radial velocity survey of M67 began as part of the dissertation work of Mathieu (1983PhDT.........8M), taking advantage of the CfA Digital Speedometers (DS). Three nearly identical instruments were used, initially on the MMT (from HJD2445337 to HJD2450830) and 1.5m Tillinghast Reflector (from HJD2444184 to HJD2454958) at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopins, Arizona, and then later on the 1.5m Wyeth Reflector (from HJD2445722 to HJD2453433) at the Oak Ridge Observatory in the Town of Harvard, Massachusetts. Subsequently the M67 target samples were expanded several times. Radial velocities measurements from other programs were integrated into the database, and our observational facilities were extended to include Hydra Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) at the WIYN Observatory (from HJD2453386 to HJD2456709) and the new Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) on the Tillinghast Reflector (from HJD2455143 to HJD2456801). Details about the telescopes, observing procedures, and data reductions of spectra obtained with the CfA DS can be found in Latham (1985srv..conf...21L, 1992ASPC...32..110L). The corresponding information for spectra obtained with Hydra at the WIYN Observatory can be found in Geller et al. 2008 (cat. J/AJ/135/2264), Geller et al. 2010 (cat. J/AJ/139/1383) and Hole et al. (2009). TRES is a stabilized fiber-fed echelle spectrograph with a CCD detector and resolution of 44000. The initial CfA sample was defined in 1982. The last surviving CfA Digital Speedometer, on the 1.5m Tillinghast Reflector, was retired in the summer of 2009. Over the following five observing seasons, TRES was used to continue the radial velocity observations of targets (mostly binaries) from both the CfA and the WIYN samples. Importantly, Roger Griffin and James

  17. The Radial Velocity and Mass of the White Dwarf of EX Hydrae Measured with Chandra

    SciTech Connect

    Mauche, C W; Hoogerwerf, R; Brickhouse, N S

    2004-03-01

    We present the first detection of orbital motion in the cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae based on X-ray data from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The large collecting area of the telescope and the high resolution of the HETG spectrometers allow for an unprecedented velocity accuracy of {approx}km s{sup -1} in the X-ray wavelength regime. We find an emission line velocity amplitude of 58.2{+-}3.7 km s{sup -1} and infer a white dwarf mass of 0.49{+-}0.13 M{sub {circle_dot}}, in good agreement with previous studies using optical, ultraviolet, and far ultraviolet data.

  18. The Radial Velocity and Mass of the White Dwarf of EX Hydrae Measured with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogerwerf, R.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Mauche, C. W.

    2004-07-01

    We present the first detection of orbital motion in the cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae based on X-ray data from Chandra. The large collecting area of the telescope and the high resolution of the HETG spectrometers allow for an unprecedented velocity accuracy of ~15 km s-1 in the X-ray wavelength regime. We find an emission line velocity amplitude of 58.2+/-3.7 km s-1 and infer a white dwarf mass of 0.49+/-0.13 Msolar, in good agreement with previous studies using optical, ultraviolet, and far-ultraviolet data.

  19. Simulation based optimized beam velocity in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignat, Frédéric; Béraud, Nicolas; Villeneuve, François

    2017-08-01

    Manufacturing good parts with additive technologies rely on melt pool dimension and temperature and are controlled by manufacturing strategies often decided on machine side. Strategies are built on beam path and variable energy input. Beam path are often a mix of contour and hatching strategies filling the contours at each slice. Energy input depend on beam intensity and speed and is determined from simple thermal models to control melt pool dimensions and temperature and ensure porosity free material. These models take into account variation in thermal environment such as overhanging surfaces or back and forth hatching path. However not all the situations are correctly handled and precision is limited. This paper proposes new method to determine energy input from full built chamber 3D thermal simulation. Using the results of the simulation, energy is modified to keep melt pool temperature in a predetermined range. The paper present first an experimental method to determine the optimal range of temperature. In a second part the method to optimize the beam speed from the simulation results is presented. Finally, the optimized beam path is tested in the EBM machine and built part are compared with part built with ordinary beam path.

  20. Where are the Binaries? Results of a Long-term Search for Radial Velocity Binaries in Proto-planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.; Van de Steene, Griet; Van Winckel, Hans; Sperauskas, Julius; Bohlender, David; Lu, Wenxian

    2017-09-01

    We present the results of an expanded, long-term radial velocity search (25 years) for evidence of binarity in a sample of seven bright proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). The goal is to investigate the widely held view that the bipolar or point-symmetric shapes of planetary nebulae (PNe) and PPNe are due to binary interactions. Observations from three observatories were combined from 2007 to 2015 to search for variations on the order of a few years and then combined with earlier observations from 1991 to 1995 to search for variations on the order of decades. All seven show velocity variations due to periodic pulsation in the range of 35–135 days. However, in only one PPN, IRAS 22272+5435, did we find even marginal evidence for multi-year variations that might be due to a binary companion. This object shows marginally significant evidence of a two-year period of low semi-amplitude, which could be due to a low-mass companion, and it also displays some evidence of a much longer period of >30 years. The absence of evidence in the other six objects for long-period radial velocity variations due to a binary companion sets significant constraints on the properties of any undetected binary companions: they must be of low mass, ≤0.2 M ⊙, or long period, >30 years. Thus the present observations do not provide direct support for the binary hypothesis to explain the shapes of PNe and PPNe and severely constrains the properties of any such undetected companions.

  1. High-resolution spectroscopy of RGB stars in the Sagittarius streams. I. Radial velocities and chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, L.; Bellazzini, M.; Bonifacio, P.; Buzzoni, A.; Ferraro, F. R.; Marconi, G.; Sbordone, L.; Zaggia, S.

    2007-03-01

    Context: The Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal galaxy is currently being disrupted under the strain of the Milky Way. A reliable reconstruction of Sgr star formation history can only be obtained by combining core and stream information. Aims: We present radial velocities for 67 stars belonging to the Sgr Stream. For 12 stars in the sample we also present iron (Fe) and α-element (Mg, Ca) abundances. Methods: Spectra were secured using different high resolution facilities: UVES@VLT, HARPS@3.6 m, and SARG@TNG. Radial velocities are obtained through cross correlation with a template spectra. Concerning chemical analysis, for the various elements, selected line equivalent widths were measured and abundances computed using the WIDTH code and ATLAS model atmospheres. Results: The velocity dispersion of the trailing tail is found to be σ = 8.3 ± 0.9 km s-1, i.e., significantly lower than in the core of the Sgr galaxy and marginally lower than previous estimates in the same portion of the stream. Stream stars follow the same trend as Sgr main body stars in the [ α/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane. However, stars are, on average, more metal poor in the stream than in the main body. This effect is slightly stronger in stars belonging to more ancient wraps of the stream, according to currently accepted models of Sgr disruption. Based on observations taken at ESO VLT Kueyen telescope (Cerro Paranal, Chile, program: 075.B-0127(A)) and 3.6 m telescope (La Silla, Chile). Also based on spectroscopic observations taken at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, operated by the Fundación G. Galilei of INAF at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the IAC (La Palma, Spain). Appendix A and Table [see full text] are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Effects of radial and circumferential inlet velocity profile distortions on performance of a short-length double-annular ram induction combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, D. F.; Perkins, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Inlet air velocity profile tests were conducted on a full-scale short-length 102-centimeter-diameter annual combustor designed for advanced gas turbine engine applications. The inlet profiles studied include radial distortions that were center peaked, and tip peaked, as well as a circumferential distortion which was center peaked for one-third of the circumference and flat for the other two-thirds. An increase in combustor pressure loss was the most significant effect of the radial air velocity distortions. With the circumferential distortion, exit temperature pattern factor doubled when compared to a flat velocity profile.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: M4 Core Project with HST. Radial velocities (Malavolta+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, L.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Sneden, C.; Nascimbeni, V.; Sommariva, V.

    2016-07-01

    The spectra for our project were originally used by Sommariva et al. (2009A&A...493..947S) to study the internal velocity dispersion of M4 and to search for spectroscopic binaries. A total of 2771 stars covering colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) positions from the upper RGB to about 1mag fainter than the main-sequence turnoff (TO) luminosity were observed between 2003 and 2009, including 306 new spectra obtained in 2009 and targeting MS stars already observed in the previous epochs. Determination of the M 4 velocity dispersion and binary star fraction were the prime motivators for obtaining these data. Therefore nearly all stars were observed at least twice, and three or more spectra were obtained for nearly 40 per cent of the sample. (2 data files).

  4. Metal Abundances, Radial Velocities, and Other Physical Characteristics for the RR Lyrae Stars in The Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, James M.; Cohen, Judith G.; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Derekas, Aliz; Moskalik, Pawel; Sesar, Branimir; Chadid, Merieme; Bruntt, Hans

    2013-08-01

    Spectroscopic iron-to-hydrogen ratios, radial velocities, atmospheric parameters, and new photometric analyses are presented for 41 RR Lyrae stars (and one probable high-amplitude δ Sct star) located in the field-of-view of the Kepler space telescope. Thirty-seven of the RR Lyrae stars are fundamental-mode pulsators (i.e., RRab stars) of which sixteen exhibit the Blazhko effect. Four of the stars are multiperiodic RRc pulsators oscillating primarily in the first-overtone mode. Spectroscopic [Fe/H] values for the 34 stars for which we were able to derive estimates range from -2.54 ± 0.13 (NR Lyr) to -0.05 ± 0.13 dex (V784 Cyg), and for the 19 Kepler-field non-Blazhko stars studied by Nemec et al. the abundances agree will with their photometric [Fe/H] values. Four non-Blazhko RR Lyrae stars that they identified as metal-rich (KIC 6100702, V2470 Cyg, V782 Cyg and V784 Cyg) are confirmed as such, and four additional stars (V839 Cyg, KIC 5520878, KIC 8832417, KIC 3868420) are also shown here to be metal-rich. Five of the non-Blazhko RRab stars are found to be more metal-rich than [Fe/H] ~-0.9 dex while all of the 16 Blazhko stars are more metal-poor than this value. New P-\\phi _31^s-[Fe/H] relationships are derived based on ~970 days of quasi-continuous high-precision Q0-Q11 long- and short-cadence Kepler photometry. With the exception of some Blazhko stars, the spectroscopic and photometric [Fe/H] values are in good agreement. Several stars with unique photometric characteristics are identified, including a Blazhko variable with the smallest known amplitude and frequency modulations (V838 Cyg). Based in part on observations made at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Keck Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation. Also, based in part on

  5. Chromospheric activity and rotation of FGK stars in the solar vicinity. An estimation of the radial velocity jitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Arnáiz, R.; Maldonado, J.; Montes, D.; Eiroa, C.; Montesinos, B.

    2010-09-01

    Context. Chromospheric activity produces both photometric and spectroscopic variations that can be mistaken as planets. Large spots crossing the stellar disc can produce planet-like periodic variations in the light curve of a star. These spots clearly affect the spectral line profiles, and their perturbations alter the line centroids creating a radial velocity jitter that might “contaminate” the variations induced by a planet. Precise chromospheric activity measurements are needed to estimate the activity-induced noise that should be expected for a given star. Aims: We obtain precise chromospheric activity measurements and projected rotational velocities for nearby (d ≤ 25 pc) cool (spectral types F to K) stars, to estimate their expected activity-related jitter. As a complementary objective, we attempt to obtain relationships between fluxes in different activity indicator lines, that permit a transformation of traditional activity indicators, i.e., Ca ii H & K lines, to others that hold noteworthy advantages. Methods: We used high resolution (~50 000) echelle optical spectra. Standard data reduction was performed using the IRAF echelle package. To determine the chromospheric emission of the stars in the sample, we used the spectral subtraction technique. We measured the equivalent widths of the chromospheric emission lines in the subtracted spectrum and transformed them into fluxes by applying empirical equivalent width and flux relationships. Rotational velocities were determined using the cross-correlation technique. To infer activity-related radial velocity (RV) jitter, we used empirical relationships between this jitter and the R'_HK index. Results: We measured chromospheric activity, as given by different indicators throughout the optical spectra, and projected rotational velocities for 371 nearby cool stars. We have built empirical relationships among the most important chromospheric emission lines. Finally, we used the measured chromospheric activity

  6. BANYAN. III. Radial velocity, rotation, and X-ray emission of low-mass star candidates in nearby young kinematic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca

    2014-06-10

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in Malo et al., taking into account only the position, proper motion, and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in β Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus, and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at 3 or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 25%, consistent with values in the literature. Of the stars in our sample, 20% show projected rotational velocities (vsin i) higher than 30 km s{sup –1} and therefore are considered as fast rotators. A parallax and other youth indicators are still needed to fully confirm the 130 highly probable candidates identified here as new bona fide members. Finally, based on the X-ray emission of bona fide and highly probable group members, we show that for low-mass stars in the 12-120 Myr age range, the X-ray luminosity is an excellent indicator of youth and better than the more traditionally used R {sub X} parameter, the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity.

  7. BANYAN. III. Radial Velocity, Rotation, and X-Ray Emission of Low-mass Star Candidates in Nearby Young Kinematic Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in Malo et al., taking into account only the position, proper motion, and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in β Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus, and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at 3 or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 25%, consistent with values in the literature. Of the stars in our sample, 20% show projected rotational velocities (vsin i) higher than 30 km s-1 and therefore are considered as fast rotators. A parallax and other youth indicators are still needed to fully confirm the 130 highly probable candidates identified here as new bona fide members. Finally, based on the X-ray emission of bona fide and highly probable group members, we show that for low-mass stars in the 12-120 Myr age range, the X-ray luminosity is an excellent indicator of youth and better than the more traditionally used R X parameter, the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity.

  8. An astro-comb calibrated solar telescope to study solar activity and search for the radial velocity signature of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, David; HARPS-N Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We recently demonstrated sub-m/s sensitivity in measuring the radial velocity (RV) between the Earth and Sun using a simple solar telescope feeding the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Italian National Telescope, which is calibrated with a laser frequency comb calibrator optimized for calibrating high resolution spectrographs and referred to as an astro-comb. We are using the solar telescope to characterize the effects of stellar (solar) RV jitter due to activity on the solar surface over the course of many hours every clear day. With the help of solar satellites such as the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we are characterizing the correlation between observed RV and detailed imaging of the solar photosphere. We plan to use these tools to mitigate the effects of stellar jitter with the goal of the detection of Venus from its solar RV signature, thus showing the potential of the RV technique to detect true Earth-twins.

  9. Predicted space motions for hypervelocity and runaway stars: proper motions and radial velocities for the Gaia Era

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Bromley, Benjamin C. E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: bromley@physics.utah.edu

    2014-10-01

    We predict the distinctive three-dimensional space motions of hypervelocity stars (HVSs) and runaway stars moving in a realistic Galactic potential. For nearby stars with distances less than 10 kpc, unbound stars are rare; proper motions alone rarely isolate bound HVSs and runaways from indigenous halo stars. At large distances of 20-100 kpc, unbound HVSs are much more common than runaways; radial velocities easily distinguish both from indigenous halo stars. Comparisons of the predictions with existing observations are encouraging. Although the models fail to match observations of solar-type HVS candidates from SEGUE, they agree well with data for B-type HVS and runaways from other surveys. Complete samples of g ≲ 20 stars with Gaia should provide clear tests of formation models for HVSs and runaways and will enable accurate probes of the shape of the Galactic potential.

  10. On the detectability of quasi-circular co-orbital planets. Application to the radial velocity technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leleu, A.; Robutel, P.; Correia, A. C. M.

    2015-10-01

    Several celestial bodies in co-orbital configurations exist in the Solar System. However, co-orbital exoplanets are yet to be discovered. This lack may result from a degeneracy between the signal induced by coorbital planets and other orbital configurations. Here we determine a criterion for the detectability of quasicircular co-orbital planets and develop a demodulation method to bring out their signature from the observational data. We show that the precision required to identify a pair of co-orbital planets depends only on the libration amplitude and on the planet's mass ratio. We apply our method to synthetic radial velocity data, and show that for tadpole orbits we are able to determine the inclination of the system to the line-of-sight. Our method is also valid for planets detected through the transits or astrometry techniques.

  11. Fishing in Tidal Streams: New Radial Velocity and Proper Motion Constraints on the Orbit of the Anticenter Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillmair, C. J.; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Majewski, Steven R.

    2008-12-01

    We have obtained radial velocity measurements for stars in two widely separated fields in the Anticenter Stream. Combined with SDSS/USNO-B proper motions, the new measurements allow us to establish that the stream is on a nearly circular, somewhat inclined, prograde orbit around the Galaxy. While the orbital eccentricity is similar to that previously determined for the Monoceros stream, the sizes, inclinations, and positions of the orbits for the two systems differ significantly. Integrating our best-fitting Anticenter Stream orbit forward, we find that it is closely aligned along and lies almost on top of a streamlike feature previously designated the "Eastern Banded Structure." The position of this feature coincides with the apogalacticon of the orbit. We tentatively conclude that this feature is the next wrap of the Anticenter Stream.

  12. “MODAL NOISE” IN SINGLE-MODE FIBERS: A CAUTIONARY NOTE FOR HIGH PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITY INSTRUMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, Samuel; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Schwab, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the use of single-mode fibers (SMFs) in high precision Doppler spectrometers has become increasingly attractive since the advent of diffraction-limited adaptive optics systems on large-aperture telescopes. Spectrometers fed with these fibers can be made significantly smaller than typical “seeing-limited” instruments, greatly reducing cost and overall complexity. Importantly, classical mode interference and speckle issues associated with multi-mode fibers, also known as “modal noise,” are mitigated when using SMFs, which also provide perfect radial and azimuthal image scrambling. However, SMFs do support multiple polarization modes, an issue that is generally ignored for larger-core fibers given the large number of propagation modes. Since diffraction gratings used in most high resolution astronomical instruments have dispersive properties that are sensitive to incident polarization changes, any birefringence variations in the fiber can cause variations in the efficiency profile, degrading illumination stability. Here we present a cautionary note outlining how the polarization properties of SMFs can affect the radial velocity (RV) measurement precision of high resolution spectrographs. This work is immediately relevant to the rapidly expanding field of diffraction-limited, extreme precision RV spectrographs that are currently being designed and built by a number of groups.

  13. First Results From The SDSS-III Multi-object APO Radial-velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Mahadevan, S.; Lee, B.; Wan, X.; Groot, J.; Zhao, B.; Hearty, F.; van Eyken, J.; Chang, L.; Hanna, K.; Varosi, F.; Chen, Z.; Fleming, S.; Kane, S.; Malik, M.; Guo, P.; Leger, F.; Liu, J.; Ford, E. B.; Agol, E.; Gaudi, S.; Ford, H.; Schneider, D.; Holtzman, J.; Sivarani, T.; Walszczan, A.; Niedzielski, A.; Martin, E.; Snedden, S.; Pan, K.

    2008-09-01

    We present the first light results from the Multi-object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). MARVELS is part of the on-going Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III survey which started in July 2008 and will end in July 2014. The data are taken with a multi-object fixed delay interferometer coupled to a R=11,000 spectrograph capable of acquiring precision radial velocities (3-20 m/s depending on V magnitudes) for 60 objects simultaneously in the 3 degree field of view of the SDSS telescope. MARVELS is to monitor a total of 11,000 V=8-12 relatively bright survey stars over 800 square degrees over the 6 years. The survey stars include about 90% F8 and later type main sequence stars and subgiants, and 10% G and K giants with V=7.6-12. MARVELS will produce the largest statistically well defined sample of giant planets drawn from a large of host stars with a diverse set of masses, compositions, and ages which will be used to study exoplanet diversity and planet formation, migration & dynamical evolution. It will also possibly discover rare planet systems and identify signposts for lower-mass or more distant planets. The first two year survey data will be released to the public in 2011. A new planet in a spectroscopic binary system discovered in the MARVELS pilot program will also be reported. We would like to thank the W.M. Keck Foundation, Sloan Foundation, NSF, NASA and UF for support.

  14. RADIAL VELOCITY PLANETS DE-ALIASED: A NEW, SHORT PERIOD FOR SUPER-EARTH 55 Cnc e

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Rebekah I.; Fabrycky, Daniel C. E-mail: daniel.fabrycky@gmail.co

    2010-10-10

    Radial velocity measurements of stellar reflex motion have revealed many extrasolar planets, but gaps in the observations produce aliases, spurious frequencies that are frequently confused with the planets' orbital frequencies. In the case of Gl 581 d, the distinction between an alias and the true frequency was the distinction between a frozen, dead planet and a planet possibly hospitable to life. To improve the characterization of planetary systems, we describe how aliases originate and present a new approach for distinguishing between orbital frequencies and their aliases. Our approach harnesses features in the spectral window function to compare the amplitude and phase of predicted aliases with peaks present in the data. We apply it to confirm prior alias distinctions for the planets GJ 876 d and HD 75898 b. We find that the true periods of Gl 581 d and HD 73526 b/c remain ambiguous. We revise the periods of HD 156668 b and 55 Cnc e, which were afflicted by daily aliases. For HD 156668 b, the correct period is 1.2699 days and the minimum mass is (3.1 {+-} 0.4) M{sub +}. For 55 Cnc e, the correct period is 0.7365 days-the shortest of any known planet-and the minimum mass is (8.3 {+-} 0.3) M{sub +}. This revision produces a significantly improved five-planet Keplerian fit for 55 Cnc, and a self-consistent dynamical fit describes the data just as well. As radial velocity techniques push to ever-smaller planets, often found in systems of multiple planets, distinguishing true periods from aliases will become increasingly important.

  15. The VMC survey - XXIII. Model fitting of light and radial velocity curves of Small Magellanic Cloud classical Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M.; Molinaro, R.; Ripepi, V.; Cioni, M.-R. L.; Clementini, G.; Moretti, M. I.; Ragosta, F.; de Grijs, R.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Ivanov, V. D.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of the χ2 minimization model fitting technique applied to optical and near-infrared photometric and radial velocity data for a sample of nine fundamental and three first overtone classical Cepheids in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). The near-infrared photometry (JK filters) was obtained by the European Southern Observatory (ESO) public survey 'VISTA near-infrared Y, J, Ks survey of the Magellanic Clouds system' (VMC). For each pulsator, isoperiodic model sequences have been computed by adopting a non-linear convective hydrodynamical code in order to reproduce the multifilter light and (when available) radial velocity curve amplitudes and morphological details. The inferred individual distances provide an intrinsic mean value for the SMC distance modulus of 19.01 mag and a standard deviation of 0.08 mag, in agreement with the literature. Moreover, the intrinsic masses and luminosities of the best-fitting model show that all these pulsators are brighter than the canonical evolutionary mass-luminosity relation (MLR), suggesting a significant efficiency of core overshooting and/or mass-loss. Assuming that the inferred deviation from the canonical MLR is only due to mass-loss, we derive the expected distribution of percentage mass-loss as a function of both the pulsation period and the canonical stellar mass. Finally, a good agreement is found between the predicted mean radii and current period-radius (PR) relations in the SMC available in the literature. The results of this investigation support the predictive capabilities of the adopted theoretical scenario and pave the way for the application to other extensive data bases at various chemical compositions, including the VMC Large Magellanic Cloud pulsators and Galactic Cepheids with Gaia parallaxes.

  16. Precision velocimetry planet hunting with PARAS: current performance and lessons to inform future extreme precision radial velocity instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Chaturvedi, Priyanka; Prasad, Neelam J. S. S. V.; Shah, Vishal; Pathan, F. M.; Anandarao, B. G.

    2016-08-01

    The PRL Advanced Radial-velocity Abu-sky Search (PARAS) instrument is a fiber-fed stabilized high-resolution cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph, located on the 1.2 m telescope in Mt. Abu India. Designed for exoplanet detection, PARAS is capable of single-shot spectral coverage of 3800 - 9600 Å, and currently achieving radial velocity (RV) precisions approaching 1 m s-1 over several months using simultaneous ThAr calibration. As such, it is one of the few dedicated stabilized fiber-fed spectrographs on small (1-2 m) telescopes that are able to fill an important niche in RV follow-up and stellar characterization. The success of ground-based RV surveys is motivating the push into extreme precisions, with goals of 10 cm s-1 in the optical and <1 m s-1 in the near-infrared (NIR). Lessons from existing instruments like PARAS are invaluable in informing hardware design, providing pipeline prototypes, and guiding scientific surveys. Here we present our current precision estimates of PARAS based on observations of bright RV standard stars, and describe the evolution of the data reduction and RV analysis pipeline as instrument characterization progresses and we gather longer baselines of data. Secondly, we discuss how our experience with PARAS is a critical component in the development of future cutting edge instruments like (1) the Habitable Zone Planet Finder (HPF), a near-infrared spectrograph optimized to look for planets around M dwarfs, scheduled to be commissioned on the Hobby Eberly Telescope in 2017, and (2) the NEID optical spectrograph, designed in response to the NN-EXPLORE call for an extreme precision Doppler spectrometer (EPDS) for the WIYN telescope. In anticipation of instruments like TESS and GAIA, the ground-based RV support system is being reinforced. We emphasize that instruments like PARAS will play an intrinsic role in providing both complementary follow-up and battlefront experience for these next generation of precision velocimeters.

  17. IN-SYNC VI. Identification and Radial Velocity Extraction for 100+ Double-Lined Spectroscopic Binaries in the APOGEE/IN-SYNC Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, M. A.; Covey, Kevin R.; De Lee, Nathan; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Nidever, David; Ballantyne, Richard; Cottaar, Michiel; Da Rio, Nicola; Foster, Jonathan B.; Majewski, Steven R.; Meyer, Michael R.; Reyna, A. M.; Roberts, G. W.; Skinner, Jacob; Stassun, Keivan; Tan, Jonathan C.; Troup, Nicholas; Zasowski, Gail

    2017-08-01

    We present radial velocity measurements for 70 high confidence, and 34 potential binary systems in fields containing the Perseus Molecular Cloud, Pleiades, NGC 2264, and the Orion A star-forming region. Eighteen of these systems have been previously identified as binaries in the literature. Candidate double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) are identified by analyzing the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) computed during the reduction of each APOGEE spectrum. We identify sources whose CCFs are well fit as the sum of two Lorentzians as likely binaries, and provide an initial characterization of the system based on the radial velocities indicated by that dual fit. For systems observed over several epochs, we present mass ratios and systemic velocities; for two systems with observations on eight or more epochs, and which meet our criteria for robust orbital coverage, we derive initial orbital parameters. The distribution of mass ratios for multi-epoch sources in our sample peaks at q = 1, but with a significant tail toward lower q values. Tables reporting radial velocities, systemic velocities, and mass ratios are provided online. We discuss future improvements to the radial velocity extraction method we employ, as well as limitations imposed by the number of epochs currently available in the APOGEE database. The Appendix contains brief notes from the literature on each system in the sample, and more extensive notes for select sources of interest.

  18. Results of interferometric observations of the F-corona radial velocity field between 3 and 7 solar radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglov, P. V.; Shestakova, L. I.; Aimanov, A. K.

    1987-02-01

    During the July 31, 1981 eclipse, F-corona interferograms were obtained near the 5184-A Mg I line covering the 3-7 solar radius region. A Fabry-Perot etalon in the exit pupil and a contact fiber-optic intensifier were used, the instrumental FWHM being 0.5 A = about 30 km/s. Radial velocities of interplanetary dust were obtained measuring Doppler shift of absorption lines. A prograde Keplerian velocity component was found, giving after averaging Vr = (5.4 + or - 0.7)R/solar radius + (5 + or - 4) km/s, as well as a retrograde motion. At 6-7 solar radius near the north coronal hole, a local stream with Vr = +130 km/s was observed. Although at large distances from the sun the sky brightness exceeds that of the F-corona, absorption lines are absent, so the sky brightness continuous component is predominant, and the K-corona scattered light may be its main source.

  19. An Economical High Resolution Spectrograph Optimized for Radial Velocity Measurements at 5000 Angstroms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, D.; Arion, D. N.

    2004-12-01

    A high resolution spectrometer was built and calibrated on an optical bench. The target resolution of the instrument was designed to allow accurate measurement of the Doppler shifts of the 5007 Angstrom O III line in planetary nebulae due to their expansion. The optical components of the instrument include two Meade ETX 90 Maksutov-Cassegrain telescopes, a Richardson Grating Laboratory reflection diffraction grating, nickel-plated glass slides used as slit apertures, and an SBIG ST-8E CCD imaging camera. The mounts for each of the optical components were machined out of aluminum bar and plate stock. The instrument was calibrated using He and Hg gas discharge tubes generating spectra of known wavelengths. A total of four sets of lines were imaged and analyzed to calibrate the instrument. The line shapes in the images were manually fit with functions approximating the pressure and Doppler broadening of the lines, as expected for the behavior of the lines emitted by the spectrum tubes. These fits were used to identify the line peak positions, which were then compared to standard line wavelengths to determine the instrument calibration. The He I line at 5015.678 Angstrom line was carefully analyzed to determine the system wavelength uncertainty, which determines the smallest resolvable difference in wavelength that the instrument can determine. The resulting operating resolution at 5007 Angstroms was found to be 206474, making the instrument capable of resolving Doppler shifts at 5007 Angstroms corresponding to +/- 1.4 kilometers per second. The program was thus successful in developing an instrument suitable for a variety of relatively low velocity Doppler measurements, especially those associated with planetary nebula expansions. Future work entails developing a mounting system to rigidly hold the instrument on a suitable telescope, while maintaining the necessary precision to retain the instrumental resolution. This work was supported in part by Carthage College

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Radial velocity curves of 3 Cepheids (Szabados+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabados, L.; Anderson, R. I.; Derekas, A.; Kiss, L. L.; Szalai, T.; Szekely, P.; Christiansen, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    We performed an RV survey of Cepheids with the 2.3-m ANU telescope located at the Siding Spring Observatory (SSO), Australia. In 64 nights between 2004 October and 2006 March we monitored 40 Cepheids with pulsation periods between 2 and 30d. Additional spectra of some targets were obtained in 2007 August. (7 data files).

  1. Radial velocity observations of the 2015 Mar. 20 eclipse. A benchmark Rossiter-McLaughlin curve with zero free parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, A.; Lemke, U.; Bauer, F.; Beeck, B.; Huke, P.

    2016-10-01

    Spectroscopic observations of a solar eclipse can provide unique information for solar and exoplanet research; the huge amplitude of the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect during solar eclipse and the high precision of solar radial velocities (RVs) allow detailed comparison between observations and RV models, and they provide information about the solar surface and about spectral line formation that are otherwise difficult to obtain. On March 20, 2015, we obtained 159 spectra of the Sun as a star with the solar telescope and the Fourier Transform Spectrograph at the Institut für Astrophysik Göttingen, 76 spectra were taken during partial solar eclipse. We obtained RVs using I2 as wavelength reference and determined the RM curve with a peak-to-peak amplitude of almost 1.4 km s-1 at typical RV precision better than 1 m s-1. We modeled the disk-integrated solar RVs using well-determined parameterizations of solar surface velocities, limb darkening, and information about convective blueshift from 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We confirm that convective blueshift is crucial to understand solar RVs during eclipse. Our best model reproduced the observations to within a relative precision of 10% with residuals lower than 30 m s-1. We cross-checked parameterizations of velocity fields using a Dopplergram from the Solar Dynamics Observatory and conclude that disk-integration of the Dopplergram does not provide correct information about convective blueshift necessary for m s-1 RV work. As main limitation for modeling RVs during eclipses, we identified limited knowledge about convective blueshift and line shape as functions of solar limb angle. We suspect that our model line profiles are too shallow at limb angles larger than μ = 0.6, resulting in incorrect weighting of the velocities across the solar disk. Alternative explanations cannot be excluded, such as suppression of convection in magnetic areas and undiscovered systematics during eclipse observations. To make

  2. Spectroscopic binary orbits from ultraviolet radial velocities. X - CW Cephei (HD 218066)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickland, D. J.; Koch, R. H.; Pfeiffer, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of CW Cephei were carried out repeatedly in the course of three days in December 1991, using the high-resolution, short-wavelength spectrograph of IUE, with an additional spectrum taken on February 6, 1992. The paper presents a log of these observations, which represent the only high-resolution observations of this star in the archive. The observations have an advantage of Popper's (1974) optical observations that they do not stretch out over a significant part of the apsidal cycle and can thus be treated with the value of omega taken as fixed.

  3. Multiplexing Precision Radial Velocities with the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System: Searching for Hot Jupiters in Southern Open Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, John Ira; Mateo, Mario L.; White, Russel J.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; M2FS Instrument Team

    2017-01-01

    The Michigan/Magellan Fiber System enables multiplexed, precision radial velocity surveys of open star clusters for warm- and hot-Jupiter exoplanetary companions while simultaneously allowing detailed study of stellar properties to V~17. To create this capability, we developed a novel mechanism to improve its maximum resolving power from ~20,000 to ~60,000 along with an automated control system that enables users to rapidly reconfigure M2FS for different scientific programs. We report the results of a survey of 126 photometric FGK members of the young (141 Myr), nearby (346 pc) open star cluster NGC 2516 and 100 photometric FGK members plus 25 candidate members of the young (72 Myr), nearby (491 pc) open cluster NGC 2422 (M 47). Our results show M2FS can achieve RV precisions in the 20-60 m/s range for up to 128 stars simultaneously while our median RV precision of 80 m/s on individual epochs, which span a temporal baseline of 1.1 yrs, enables us to investigate membership and stellar binarity and search for sub-stellar companions. We also report the methods developed to make precise spectroscopic measurements of Teff (±30 K), [Fe/H] and [α/Fe] (±0.02 dex), and vr sin(i) (±0.3 km/s). We determine membership probabilities and RV variability probabilities for our sample along with candidate companion orbital periods for a select subset of stars. We identify 81 RV members in NGC 2516, 27 spectroscopic binaries (17 previously identified as photometric binaries), and 16 other stars that show significant RV variability after accounting for average stellar jitter found to be at the 74 m/s level. In NGC 2422 we identify 57 members, 11 spectroscopic binaries, and 3 other stars that show significant RV variability after accounting for an average jitter of 138 m/s. We use Monte Carlo simulations to verify our stellar jitter measurements, determine the proportion of exoplanets and stellar companions to which we are sensitive, and estimate companion mass limits for our

  4. High S/N Spectroscopy and Radial Velocities of Field BHB Tip Stars Similar to KIC 1718290

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, E.; O'Connell, C.; Fontaine, G.

    2014-04-01

    In a followup to Östensen et al.'s (2012) discovery of the first g-mode pulsator found on the classical blue horizontal branch (BHB), we present atmospheric parameters for ten blue field stars known to have similar effective temperatures and gravities, plus radial velocities for seven of them, as a first step towards investigating the overall properties of these stars. All of the field BHB tip stars have temperatures and gravities that place them in a narrow region below the main sequence and above the gap separating them from the hotter and more compact sdB stars. Interestingly, half of the ten BHB tip stars exhibit higher metallicities and greater than solar He abundances similar to, although not quite as high as, the BHB pulsator KIC 1718290, while the other half have much lower metallicities and He abundances, more typical of those observed in sdB stars. RV's determined from five or more MMT spectra each for KIC 1718290 and seven of the other BHB tip stars show that none exhibit significant RV variations at the 2 to 3 km s-1 level on time scales shorter than a day or two; the variations were no larger for two stars reobserved after an interval of two months nor for one star that was observed over two years. Such velocity variations are comparable to those we have measured previously for sdB stars with MS companions, several of which are now known to have orbital periods of the order of a couple of years. The magnitudes and galactic latitudes of the stars in our BHB tip sample are consistent with membership in the galactic disk, rather than the halo.

  5. Finding binaries from phase modulation of pulsating stars with Kepler - IV. Detection limits and radial velocity verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Simon J.; Shibahashi, Hiromoto; Bedding, Timothy R.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the detection limits of the phase modulation (PM) method of finding binary systems among multiperiodic pulsating stars. The method is an attractive way of finding non-transiting planets in the habitable zones of intermediate-mass stars, whose rapid rotation inhibits detections via the radial velocity (RV) method. While oscillation amplitudes of a few mmag are required to find planets, many δ Scuti stars have these amplitudes. In suboptimal cases where the signal to noise of the oscillations is lower, low-mass brown dwarfs (˜13MJup) are detectable at orbital periods longer than about 1 yr, and the lowest mass main-sequence stars (0.1-0.2 M⊙) are detectable at all orbital periods where the PM method can be applied. We use purpose-written Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) software for the calculation of the PM orbits, which offers robust uncertainties for comparison with RV solutions. Using Kepler data and ground-based RVs, we verify that these two methods are in agreement, even at short orbital periods where the PM method undersamples the orbit. We develop new theory to account for the undersampling of the time delays, which is also necessary for the inclusion of RVs as observational data in the MCMC software. We show that combining RVs with time delays substantially refines the orbits because of the complementarity of working in both the spatial (PM) and velocity (RV) domains simultaneously. Software outputs were tested through an extensive hare-and-hounds exercise, covering a wide range of orbital configurations including binaries containing two pulsators.

  6. Detection of the 128-day radial velocity variations in the supergiant α Persei. Rotational modulations, pulsations, or a planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B.-C.; Han, I.; Park, M.-G.; Kim, K.-M.; Mkrtichian, D. E.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: In order to search for and study the nature of the low-amplitude and long-periodic radial velocity (RV) variations of massive stars, we have been carrying out a precise RV survey for supergiants that lie near or inside the Cepheid instability strip. Methods: We have obtained high-resolution spectra of α Per (F5 Ib) from November 2005 to September 2011 using the fiber-fed Bohyunsan Observatory Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO). Results: Our measurements reveal that α Per shows a periodic RV variation of 128 days and a semi-amplitude of 70 m s-1. We find no strong correlation between RV variations and bisector velocity span (BVS), but the 128-d peak is indeed present in the BVS variations among several other significant peaks in periodogram. Conclusions.α Per may have an exoplanet, but the combined data spanning over 20 years seem to suggest that the 128-d RV variations have not been stable on a long-term scale, which is somewhat difficult to reconcile with the exoplanet explanation. We do not exclude the pulsational nature of the 128-d variations in α Per. Although we do not find clear evidence for surface activity or rotational modulations by spots, coupled with the fact that the expected rotation period is ~130 days the rotational modulation seems to be the most likely cause of the RV variations. More observational data and research are needed to clearly determine the origin of the RV variations in α Per. Table 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  7. Photometric and radial-velocity time series of RR Lyrae stars in M3: analysis of single-mode variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurcsik, J.; Smitola, P.; Hajdu, G.; Sódor, Á.; Nuspl, J.; Kolenberg, K.; Fűrész, G.; Balázs, L. G.; Pilachowski, C.; Saha, A.; Moór, A.; Kun, E.; Pál, A.; Bakos, J.; Kelemen, J.; Kovács, T.; Kriskovics, L.; Sárneczky, K.; Szalai, T.; Szing, A.; Vida, K.

    2017-06-01

    We present the first simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic investigation of a large set of RR Lyrae variables in a globular cluster. The radial-velocity (RV) data presented comprise the largest sample of RVs of RR Lyrae stars ever obtained. The target is M3; BVIC time series of 111 and b flux data of further 64 RRab stars and RV data of 79 RR Lyrae stars are published. Blazhko modulation of the light curves of 47 per cent of the RRab stars is detected. The mean value of the centre-of-mass velocities of RR Lyrae stars is -146.8 km s-1 with 4.52 km s-1 standard deviation, which is in good agreement with the results obtained for the red giants of the cluster. The Φ21RV phase difference of the RV curves of RRab stars is found to be uniformly constant both for the M3 and for Galactic field RRab stars; no period or metallicity dependence of the Φ21RV is detected. The Baade-Wesselink distances of 26 non-Blazhko variables with the best phase-coverage RV curves are determined; the corresponding distance of the cluster, 10 480 ± 210 pc, agrees with the previous literature information. A quadratic formula for the Apuls - AV relation of RRab stars is given, which is valid for both OoI and OoII variables. We also show that (V - I)0 of RRab stars measured at light minimum is period dependent; there is at least 0.1 mag difference between the colours at minimum light of the shortest and longest period variables.

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HARPS and HARPS-N 55 Cnc radial velocities (Lopez-Morales+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Morales, M.; Triaud, A. H. M. J.; Rodler, F.; Dumusque, X.; Buchhave, L. A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hoyer, S.; Alonso, R.; Gillon, M.; Kaib, N. A.; Latham, D. W.; Lovis, C.; Pepe, F.; Queloz, D.; Raymond, S. N.; Segransan, D.; Waldmann, I. P.; Udry, S.

    2017-04-01

    Shortly after the detection of 55 Cnc e's transit was announced, we requested four spectroscopic time series on HARPS (Prog. ID 288.C-5010; PI: Triaud) as Director Discretionary Time. HARPS is installed on the 3.6 m telescope at the European Southern Observatory on La Silla, Chile (Mayor et al. 2003Msngr.114...20M). The position of 55 Cnc in the sky-RA(J2000)=08:52:35.81, DE(J2000)=+28:10:50.95-is low as seen from La Silla. The target remains at a zenith distance of z<2 for only ~2.5 hr per night, with a transit duration of about 1.5 hr having to fit within this tight window. This constraint on the airmass, essential to obtain precise radial velocities (RVs), is set by the instrumental atmospheric dispersion corrector. We used the ephemeris by Gillon et al. (2012, J/A+A/539/A28), then at an advanced stage of preparation, to schedule our observations. In total, we gathered 179 spectra on the nights starting on 2012 January 27, 2012 February 13, 2012 February 27, and 2012 March 15 UT. (1 data file).

  9. Measuring Masses and Densities of Small Planets found by NASA's Kepler Spacecraft with Radial Velocity Measurements from Keck/HIRES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, Howard T.; Marcy, G.; Rowe, J.; Kepler Team

    2013-06-01

    We use the Keck telescope and HIRES spectrometer to measure the masses of Kepler planet candidates. Analysis of 22 Kepler-identified planetary systems, holding 42 transiting planets (candidates) and 8 newly discovered non-transiting planets are presented herein. Combining the planet radius measurements from Kepler with mass measurements from Keck, we constrain the bulk density of short period planets that range in size from 1.0 to 3.0 Earth radii. Extensive ground based observations made by the Kepler Follow-up Program (KFOP) have provided extensive details about each KOI. Reconnaissance spectroscopy was used to refine the stellar and planet properties of each KOI at an early stage. SME spectral analysis and asteroseismology, when available, are used to obtain the final stellar properties. Adaptive Optics and speckle imaging constrain the presence of background eclipsing binaries that could masquerade as transiting planets. By combining ground based follow-up observations with Kepler photometry, a false positive probability is calculated for each KOI. An MCMC analysis that combines both Kepler photometry and Keck radial velocity measurements determines the final orbital parameters and planet properties for each system. The resulting mass vs. radius diagram for the planets reveals that radii increase with mass monotonically, well represented by a power law for the smallest planets. This M-R relationship offers key insights about the internal composition of the planets and the division between rocky and gaseous planets.

  10. SEVEN NEW BINARIES DISCOVERED IN THE KEPLER LIGHT CURVES THROUGH THE BEER METHOD CONFIRMED BY RADIAL-VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.; Tal-Or, L.; Quinn, S. N.; Latham, D. W.

    2012-02-20

    We present seven newly discovered non-eclipsing short-period binary systems with low-mass companions, identified by the recently introduced BEER algorithm, applied to the publicly available 138-day photometric light curves obtained by the Kepler mission. The detection is based on the beaming effect (sometimes called Doppler boosting), which increases (decreases) the brightness of any light source approaching (receding from) the observer, enabling a prediction of the stellar Doppler radial-velocity (RV) modulation from its precise photometry. The BEER algorithm identifies the BEaming periodic modulation, with a combination of the well-known Ellipsoidal and Reflection/heating periodic effects, induced by short-period companions. The seven detections were confirmed by spectroscopic RV follow-up observations, indicating minimum secondary masses in the range 0.07-0.4 M{sub Sun }. The binaries discovered establish for the first time the feasibility of the BEER algorithm as a new detection method for short-period non-eclipsing binaries, with the potential to detect in the near future non-transiting brown-dwarf secondaries, or even massive planets.

  11. How eclipse time variations, eclipse duration variations, and radial velocities can reveal S-type planets in close eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshagh, M.; Heller, R.; Dreizler, S.

    2016-12-01

    While about a dozen transiting planets have been found in wide orbits around an inner, close stellar binary (so-called "P-type planets"), no planet has yet been detected orbiting only one star (a so-called "S-type planet") in an eclipsing binary. This is despite a large number of eclipsing binary systems discovered with the Kepler telescope. Here we propose a new detection method for these S-type planets, which uses a correlation between the stellar radial velocities (RVs), eclipse timing variations (ETVs), and eclipse duration variations (EDVs). We test the capability of this technique by simulating a realistic benchmark system and demonstrate its detectability with existing high-accuracy RV and photometry instruments. We illustrate that, with a small number of RV observations, the RV-ETV diagrams allows us to distinguish between prograde and retrograde planetary orbits and also the planetary mass can be estimated if the stellar cross-correlation functions can be disentangled. We also identify a new (though minimal) contribution of S-type planets to the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect in eclipsing stellar binaries. We finally explore possible detection of exomoons around transiting luminous giant planets and find that the precision required to detect moons in the RV curves of their host planets is of the order of cm s-1 and therefore not accessible with current instruments.

  12. Seven New Binaries Discovered in the Kepler Light Curves through the BEER Method Confirmed by Radial-velocity Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faigler, S.; Mazeh, T.; Quinn, S. N.; Latham, D. W.; Tal-Or, L.

    2012-02-01

    We present seven newly discovered non-eclipsing short-period binary systems with low-mass companions, identified by the recently introduced BEER algorithm, applied to the publicly available 138-day photometric light curves obtained by the Kepler mission. The detection is based on the beaming effect (sometimes called Doppler boosting), which increases (decreases) the brightness of any light source approaching (receding from) the observer, enabling a prediction of the stellar Doppler radial-velocity (RV) modulation from its precise photometry. The BEER algorithm identifies the BEaming periodic modulation, with a combination of the well-known Ellipsoidal and Reflection/heating periodic effects, induced by short-period companions. The seven detections were confirmed by spectroscopic RV follow-up observations, indicating minimum secondary masses in the range 0.07-0.4 M ⊙. The binaries discovered establish for the first time the feasibility of the BEER algorithm as a new detection method for short-period non-eclipsing binaries, with the potential to detect in the near future non-transiting brown-dwarf secondaries, or even massive planets.

  13. Search for Close-in Planets around Evolved Stars with Phase-curve variations and Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sato, Bun'ei; Masuda, Kento; Benomar, Othman Michel; Takeda, Yoichi; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    Tidal interactions are a key process to understand the evolution history of close-in exoplanets. But tidals still have a large uncertainty in their prediction for the damping timescales of stellar obliquity and semi-major axis. We have worked on a search for transiting giant planets around evolved stars, for which few close-in planets were discovered. It has been reported that evolved stars lack close-in planets, which is often attributed to the tidal evolution and/or engulfment of close-in planets by the hosts. Meanwhile, Kepler has detected a certain fraction of transiting planet candidates around evolved stars. Confirming the planetary nature for these candidates is especially important since the comparison between the occurrence rates of close-in planets around main sequence stars and evolved stars provides a unique opportunity to discuss the final stage of close-in planets. With the aim of confirming KOI planet candidates around evolved stars, we measured precision radial velocities (RVs) for evolved stars with transiting planet candidates using Subaru/HDS. We also developed a new code which simultaneously models and fits the observed RVs and phase-curve variations in the Kepler data (e.g., transits, stellar ellipsoidal variations, and planet emission/reflected light). As a result of applying the global fit to KOI giants/subgiants, we confirmed two giant planets around evolved stars (Kepler-91 and KOI-1894), as well as revealed that KOI-977 is more likely a false positive.

  14. On the potential of transit surveys in star clusters: impact of correlated noise and radial velocity follow-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, Suzanne; Pont, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    We present an extension of the formalism recently proposed by Pepper and Gaudi to evaluate the yield of transit surveys in homogeneous stellar systems, incorporating the impact of correlated noise on transit time-scales on the detectability of transits, and simultaneously incorporating the magnitude limits imposed by the need for radial velocity (RV) follow-up of transit candidates. New expressions are derived for the different contributions to the noise budget on transit time-scales and the least-squares detection statistic for box-shaped transits, and their behaviour as a function of stellar mass is re-examined. Correlated noise that is constant with apparent stellar magnitude implies a steep decrease in detection probability at the high-mass end which, when considered jointly with the RV requirements, can severely limit the potential of otherwise promising surveys in star clusters. However, we find that small-aperture, wide-field surveys may detect hot Neptunes whose RV signal can be measured with present-day instrumentation in very nearby (<100pc) clusters.

  15. How eclipse time variations, eclipse duration variations, and radial velocities can reveal S-type planets in close eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshagh, M.; Heller, R.; Dreizler, S.

    2017-04-01

    While about a dozen transiting planets have been found in wide orbits around an inner, close stellar binary (so-called P-type planets), no planet has yet been detected orbiting only one star (a so-called S-type planet) in an eclipsing binary. This is despite a large number of eclipsing binary systems discovered with the Kepler telescope. Here we propose a new detection method for these S-type planets, which uses a correlation between the stellar radial velocities (RVs), eclipse timing variations (ETVs) and eclipse duration variations (EDVs). We test the capability of this technique by simulating a realistic benchmark system and demonstrate its detectability with existing high-accuracy RV and photometry instruments. We illustrate that with a small number of RV observations, the RV-ETV diagrams allows us to distinguish between prograde and retrograde planetary orbits and also the planetary mass can be estimated if the stellar cross-correlation functions can be disentangled. We also identify a new (though minimal) contribution of S-type planets to the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect in eclipsing stellar binaries. We finally explore possible detection of exomoons around transiting luminous giant planets and find that the precision required to detect moons in the RV curves of their host planets is of the order of cm s-1 and therefore not accessible with current instruments.

  16. The precision radial velocity error budget for the Gemini High-resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael J.; Artigau, Étienne; Burley, Greg; Edgar, Michael; Margheim, Steve; Robertson, Gordon; Pazder, John; McDermid, Richard; Zhelem, Ross

    2016-08-01

    The Gemini High-resolution Optical SpecTrograph (GHOST) is a fiber fed spectrograph primarily designed for high efficiency and broad wavelength coverage (363 -1000nm), with an anticipated commissioning early in 2018. The primary scientific goal of the Precision Radial Velocity (PRV) mode will be follow-up of relatively faint (R>12) transiting exoplanet targets, especially from the TESS mission. In the PRV mode, the 1.2 arcsec diameter stellar image will be split 19 ways, combined in a single slit with a simultaneous Th/Xe reference source, dispersed at a resolving power of 80,000 and imaged onto two detectors. The spectrograph will be thermally stabilized in the Gemini pier laboratory, and modal noise will be reduced below other sources through the use of a fiber agitator. Unlike other precision high resolution spectrographs, GHOST will not be pressure controlled (although pressure will be monitored precisely), and there will be no double scrambler or shaped (e.g. octagonal) fibers. Instead, GHOST will have to rely on simultaneous two-color imaging of the slit and the simultaneous Th/Xe fiber to correct for variable fiber illumination and focal-ratio degradation. This configuration presents unique challenges in estimating a PRV error budget.

  17. A laser frequency comb that enables radial velocity measurements with a precision of 1 cm s(-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Chih-Hao; Benedick, Andrew J; Fendel, Peter; Glenday, Alexander G; Kärtner, Franz X; Phillips, David F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2008-04-03

    Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar spectral lines have recently achieved a precision of 60 cm s(-1) (ref. 1), which is sufficient to find a 5-Earth-mass planet in a Mercury-like orbit around a Sun-like star. To find a 1-Earth-mass planet in an Earth-like orbit, a precision of approximately 5 cm s(-1) is necessary. The combination of a laser frequency comb with a Fabry-Pérot filtering cavity has been suggested as a promising approach to achieve such Doppler shift resolution via improved spectrograph wavelength calibration, with recent encouraging results. Here we report the fabrication of such a filtered laser comb with up to 40-GHz (approximately 1-A) line spacing, generated from a 1-GHz repetition-rate source, without compromising long-term stability, reproducibility or spectral resolution. This wide-line-spacing comb, or 'astro-comb', is well matched to the resolving power of high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs. The astro-comb should allow a precision as high as 1 cm s(-1) in astronomical radial velocity measurements.

  18. Stellar Radial Velocities in the Old Open Cluster M67 (NGC 2682). I. Memberships, Binaries, and Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Latham, David W.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2015-09-01

    We present results from 13776 radial-velocity (RV) measurements of 1278 candidate members of the old (4 Gyr) open cluster M67 (NGC 2682). The measurements are the results of a long-term survey that includes data from seven telescopes with observations for some stars spanning over 40 years. For narrow-lined stars, RVs are measured with precisions ranging from about 0.1 to 0.8 km s-1. The combined stellar sample reaches from the brightest giants in the cluster down to about 4 mag below the main-sequence turnoff (V=16.5), covering a mass range of about 1.34 {M}⊙ to 0.76 {M}⊙ . Spatially, the sample extends to a radus of 30 arcmin (7.4 pc in projection at a distance of 850 pc or 6-7 core radii). We find M67 to have a mean RV of +33.64 km s-1 (with an internal precision of ±0.03 km s-1) well separated from the mean velocity of the field. For stars with ≥slant 3 measurements, we derive RV membership probabilities and identify RV variables, finding 562 cluster members, 142 of which show significant RV variability. We use these cluster members to construct a color-magnitude diagram and identify a rich sample of stars that lie far from the standard single star isochrone, including the well-known blue stragglers, sub-subgiants and yellow giants. These exotic stars have a binary frequency of (at least) 80%, more than three times that detected for stars in the remainder of the sample. We confirm that the cluster is mass segregated, finding the binaries to be more centrally concentrated than the single stars in our sample at the 99.8% confidence level (and at the 98.7% confidence level when only considering main-sequence stars). The blue stragglers are centrally concentrated as compared to the solar-type main-sequence single stars in the cluster at the 99.7% confidence level. Accounting for measurement precision, we derive an RV dispersion in M67 of 0.80 ± 0.04 km s-1 for our sample of single main-sequence stars, subgiants and giants with V≤slant 15.5. When corrected

  19. CHARACTERIZING THE ORBITAL AND DYNAMICAL STATE OF THE HD 82943 PLANETARY SYSTEM WITH KECK RADIAL VELOCITY DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Xianyu; Lee, Man Hoi; Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.; Howard, Andrew W.; Johnson, John A.; Marcy, Geoff W.; Wright, Jason T.

    2013-11-10

    We present an updated analysis of radial velocity data of the HD 82943 planetary system based on 10 yr of measurements obtained with the Keck telescope. Previous studies have shown that the HD 82943 system has two planets that are likely in 2:1 mean-motion resonance (MMR), with orbital periods about 220 and 440 days. However, alternative fits that are qualitatively different have also been suggested, with two planets in a 1:1 resonance or three planets in a Laplace 4:2:1 resonance. Here we use χ{sup 2} minimization combined with a parameter grid search to investigate the orbital parameters and dynamical states of the qualitatively different types of fits, and we compare the results to those obtained with the differential evolution Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Our results support the coplanar 2:1 MMR configuration for the HD 82943 system, and show no evidence for either the 1:1 or three-planet Laplace resonance fits. The inclination of the system with respect to the sky plane is well constrained at 20{sup +4.9}{sub -5.5} degrees, and the system contains two planets with masses of about 4.78 M{sub J} and 4.80 M{sub J} (where M{sub J} is the mass of Jupiter) and orbital periods of about 219 and 442 days for the inner and outer planet, respectively. The best fit is dynamically stable with both eccentricity-type resonant angles θ{sub 1} and θ{sub 2} librating around 0°.

  20. Radial Velocity Fiber-Fed Spectrographs Towards the Discovery of Compact Planets and Pulsations on M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiñas, Zaira M.

    2016-11-01

    This thesis is developed in the framework of the paradigm that seeks for the discovery of an Earth analog. Nowadays, low mass stars, and in particular M dwarf stars, are key targets towards achieving this goal. In this thesis, I focus on the study of the short-time domain of M dwarf stars with the aim of searching for short period planets, but also for the first detection of stellar pulsations on this spectral type. Both science goals are the primary objectives of the “Cool Tiny Beats” (CTB) survey, which has produced most of the data used in this thesis. CTB data consist in high resolution and high-cadence spectroscopic Doppler measurements taken either with HARPS or HARPS-N spectrographs. First of all, a thorough understanding of the spectrographs response in the short time domain was performed to characterize the sources of noise in our range of study. Our first approach to the goals of this thesis consisted in the design of an observational experiment to delve into the HARPS-N sub-night performance. Results unveiled variability of the spectra continuum correlated with instabilities of the spectrograph illumination associated to the airmass. Such distortions, which are wavelength and time dependent, are also present in at least one of the data-products given by the HARPS-N reduction software: the width of the mean-line profiles (i.e. the so-called FWHM index), an index commonly used as a proxy of the stellar activity. As a consequence, we searched for an alternative approach to measure the width index. In particular, we calculated the mean-line profile of the spectrum with a least-squares-deconvolution technique and we obtained the profile indices as the moments of the profile distribution. As part of this study, we also corroborated that the radial velocities calculated with our template matching algorithm TERRA are not affected by the illumination stability. This work unveiled a possible failure of the HARPS-N atmospheric dispersion corrector (or ADC) and

  1. Search for Close-in Planets around Evoloved Stars with Phase-curve variations and Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Teruyuki; Sato, Bun'ei; Masuda, Kento; Benomar, Othman Michel; Takeda, Yoichi; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki

    2015-08-01

    Tidal interactions are a key process to understand the evolution history of close-in exoplanets. But tidal interactions still have a large uncertainty in their prediction for the damping timescales of stellar obliquity and semi-major axis (e.g., Winn et al. 2010). In the past year, we have worked on a search for (transiting) giant planets around evolved stars, for which few close-in planets were discovered. It has been reported that evolved stars lack close-in planets, which is often attributed to the tidal evolution and/or engulfment of close-in planets by the hosts. Meanwhile, Kepler spacecraft has detected a significant fraction of transiting planet candidates around evolved stars. Confirming the planetary nature for these candidates is especially important in the sense that the comparion between the occurence rates of close-in planets around main sequence stars and evolved stars provides a unique opportunity to discuss the final stage of close-in planets, including tidal evolutions.In this presentation, we review our effort to search for close-in planets around evolved stars. With the aim of confirming KOI planet candidates around evolved stars, we measured precision radial velocities (RVs) for evoloved stars with transiting planet candidates using Subaru/HDS. We also developed a new code which simultaneously models and fits the observed RVs and phase-curve variations in the Kepler light curve data (e.g., transits, stellar ellipsoidal variations, and planet emission/reflected light). As a result of applying the global fit to KOI giants/subgiants, we confirmed a few giant planets around evolved stars (Kepler-91 and KOI-1894), as well as revealed that KOI-977 is more likely a false positive.

  2. PlanetPack: A radial-velocity time-series analysis tool facilitating exoplanets detection, characterization, and dynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2013-08-01

    We present PlanetPack, a new software tool that we developed to facilitate and standardize the advanced analysis of radial velocity (RV) data for the goal of exoplanets detection, characterization, and basic dynamical N-body simulations. PlanetPack is a command-line interpreter, that can run either in an interactive mode or in a batch mode of automatic script interpretation. Its major abilities include: (i) advanced RV curve fitting with the proper maximum-likelihood treatment of unknown RV jitter; (ii) user-friendly multi-Keplerian as well as Newtonian N-body RV fits; (iii) use of more efficient maximum-likelihood periodograms that involve the full multi-planet fitting (sometimes called as “residual” or “recursive” periodograms); (iv) easily calculatable parametric 2D likelihood function level contours, reflecting the asymptotic confidence regions; (v) fitting under some useful functional constraints is user-friendly; (vi) basic tasks of short- and long-term planetary dynamical simulation using a fast Everhart-type integrator based on Gauss-Legendre spacings; (vii) fitting the data with red noise (auto-correlated errors); (viii) various analytical and numerical methods for the tasks of determining the statistical significance. It is planned that further functionality may be added to PlanetPack in the future. During the development of this software, a lot of effort was made to improve the calculational speed, especially for CPU-demanding tasks. PlanetPack was written in pure C++ (standard of 1998/2003), and is expected to be compilable and useable on a wide range of platforms.

  3. Radial velocity variations of photometrically quiet, chromospherically inactive Kepler stars: A link between RV jitter and photometric flicker

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Wright, Jason T.; Aigrain, Suzanne; Basri, Gibor; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2014-02-01

    We compare stellar photometric variability, as measured from Kepler light curves by Basri et al., with measurements of radial velocity (RV) rms variations of all California Planet Search overlap stars. We newly derive rotation periods from the Kepler light curves for all of the stars in our study sample. The RV variations reported herein range from less than 4 to 135 m s{sup –1}, yet the stars all have amplitudes of photometric variability less than 3 mmag, reflecting the preference of the RV program for chromospherically 'quiet' stars. Despite the small size of our sample, we find with high statistical significance that the RV rms manifests strongly in the Fourier power spectrum of the light curve: stars that are noisier in RV have a greater number of frequency components in the light curve. We also find that spot models of the observed light curves systematically underpredict the observed RV variations by factors of ∼2-1000, likely because the low-level photometric variations in our sample are driven by processes not included in simple spot models. The stars best fit by these models tend to have simpler light curves, dominated by a single relatively high-amplitude component of variability. Finally, we demonstrate that the RV rms behavior of our sample can be explained in the context of the photometric variability evolutionary diagram introduced by Bastien et al. We use this diagram to derive the surface gravities of the stars in our sample, revealing many of them to have moved off the main sequence. More generally, we find that the stars with the largest RV rms are those that have evolved onto the 'flicker floor' sequence in that diagram, characterized by relatively low amplitude but highly complex photometric variations which grow as the stars evolve to become subgiants.

  4. Radial velocity variable, hot post-AGB stars from the MUCHFUSS project. Classification, atmospheric parameters, formation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reindl, N.; Geier, S.; Kupfer, T.; Bloemen, S.; Schaffenroth, V.; Heber, U.; Barlow, B. N.; Østensen, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    In the course of the MUCHFUSS project we recently discovered four radial velocity (RV) variable, hot (Teff≈ 80 000-110 000 K) post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. Among them, we found the first known RV variable O(He) star, the only second known RV variable PG 1159 close binary candidate, as well as the first two naked (i.e., without planetary nebula (PN)) H-rich post-AGB stars of spectral type O(H) that show significant RV variations. We present a non-LTE spectral analysis of these stars along with one further O(H)-type star whose RV variations were found to be not significant. We also report the discovery of a far-infrared excess in the case of the PG 1159 star. None of the stars in our sample displays nebular emission lines, which can be explained well in terms of a very late thermal pulse evolution in the case of the PG 1159 star. The "missing" PNe around the O(H)-type stars seems strange, since we find that several central stars of PNe have much longer post-AGB times. Besides the non-ejection of a PN, the occurrence of a late thermal pulse, or the re-accretion of the PN in the previous post-AGB evolution offer possible explanations for those stars not harbouring a PN (anymore). In the case of the O(He) star J0757, we speculate that it might have been previously part of a compact He transferring binary system. In this scenario, the mass transfer must have stopped after a certain time, leaving behind a low-mass close companion that may be responsible for the extreme RV shift of 107.0 ± 22.0 km s-1 that was measured within only 31 min.

  5. Retrieval of Precise Radial Velocities from Near-infrared High-resolution Spectra of Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peter; Plavchan, P.; Gagné, J.; Furlan, E.; Bottom, M.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; White, R.; Davison, C. L.; Beichman, C.; Brinkworth, C.; Johnson, J.; Ciardi, D.; Wallace, K.; Mennesson, B.; von Braun, K.; Vasisht, G.; Prato, L.; Kane, S. R.; Tanner, A.; Crawford, T. J.; Latham, D.; Rougeot, R.; Geneser, C. S.; Catanzarite, J.

    2016-10-01

    Given that low-mass stars have intrinsically low luminosities at optical wavelengths and a propensity for stellar activity, it is advantageous for radial velocity (RV) surveys of these objects to use near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. In this work, we describe and test a novel RV extraction pipeline dedicated to retrieving RVs from low-mass stars using NIR spectra taken by the CSHELL spectrograph at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, where a methane isotopologue gas cell is used for wavelength calibration. The pipeline minimizes the residuals between the observations and a spectral model composed of templates for the target star, the gas cell, and atmospheric telluric absorption; models of the line-spread function, continuum curvature, and sinusoidal fringing; and a parameterization of the wavelength solution. The stellar template is derived iteratively from the science observations themselves without a need for separate observations dedicated to retrieving it. Despite limitations from CSHELL’s narrow wavelength range and instrumental systematics, we are able to (1) obtain an RV precision of 35 m s-1 for the RV standard star GJ 15 A over a time baseline of 817 days, reaching the photon noise limit for our attained signal-to-noise ratio; (2) achieve ˜3 m s-1 RV precision for the M giant SV Peg over a baseline of several days and confirm its long-term RV trend due to stellar pulsations, as well as obtain nightly noise floors of ˜2-6 m s-1 and (3) show that our data are consistent with the known masses, periods, and orbital eccentricities of the two most massive planets orbiting GJ 876. Future applications of our pipeline to RV surveys using the next generation of NIR spectrographs, such as iSHELL, will enable the potential detection of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes in the habitable zones of M dwarfs.

  6. Radial velocities of very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarf members of the Hyades and Pleiades, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.; Liebert, James; Giampapa, Mark

    1995-01-01

    We have determined H alpha equivalent widths and radial velocities with 1 sigma accuracies of approximately 5 km/s for approximately 20 candidate very low mass members of the Pleiades cluster and for a few proposed very low mass members of the Hyades. Most of the Pleiades targets were selected from the recent Hambly, Hawkins, and Jameson proper motion survey, where they were identified as probable Pleiades brown dwarfs with an age spread from 3 to 70 Myr. Our spectroscopic data and a reinterpretation of the photometric data confirm that these objects are indeed likely Pleiades members; however, we believe that they more likely have masses slightly above the hydrogen burning mass limit and that there is no firm evidence for an age spread amongst these stars. All of the very low mass Pleiades and Hyades members show H alpha in emission. However, the ratio of H alpha flux to biometric flux in the Pleiades shows a maximum near M(sub Bol) approximately equal to 9.5 (M approximately equal to 0.3 solar mass) and a sharp decrease to lower masses. This break occurs at the approximate mass where low mass stars are expected to become fully convective, and it is tempting to assume that the decrease in H alpha flux is caused by some change in the behavior of stellar dynamos at this mass. We do not see a similar break in activity at this mass in the Hyades. We discuss possible evolutionary explanations for this difference in the H alpha activity between the two clusters.

  7. Development of a Data Reduction Pipeline to Measure Stellar Radial Velocities Using Kutztown University's On-Campus Research Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Odysseus; Reed, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    The Kutztown University Observatory (KUO) houses a 0.6m Ritchey-Chrétien telescope with a focal ratio of f/8. It is a dedicated observatory collecting data every clear night using the eShel model (Shelyak Instruments) echelle spectrograph. The spectral resolution is R = 11,000 and the final dispersion is 0.050 Å/pixel over the range of 4300 Å to 8100 Å.It is paramount to ensure accurate radial velocity (RV) measurements when conducting projects for research and education. RV measurements at KUO are used to determine the masses of spectroscopic binary stars, study pulsations of stellar photospheres (Cepheid variables), and to perform reconnaissance RV measurements of exoplanet candidates (reflex motion of host star).We present a data reduction pipeline program that produces RV measurements from observed spectra. After using the eShel's built in ThAr lamp for wavelength calibration, the program continuum normalizes the spectrum, creates a non-moving template (synthetic and/or observed spectrum), and corrects for barycentric motion. Finally, the program performs a cross correlation of the data and template to produce accurate RV measurements.Examples of completed and on-going projects at KUO are presented. We also demonstrate our ability to observe stellar RV's with uncertainties as good as 0.13 km/s. The eShel spectrograph is commercially available and is becoming popular among users of smaller telescopes. This data reduction pipeline will be useful to the increasing number of researchers utilizing the eShel spectrograph.

  8. New Insights on Planet Formation in WASP-47 from a Simultaneous Analysis of Radial Velocities and Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Lauren M.; Deck, Katherine M.; Sinukoff, Evan; Petigura, Erik A.; Agol, Eric; Lee, Eve J.; Becker, Juliette C.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Hirsch, Lea; Benneke, Björn

    2017-06-01

    Measuring precise planet masses, densities, and orbital dynamics in individual planetary systems is an important pathway toward understanding planet formation. The WASP-47 system has an unusual architecture that motivates a complex formation theory. The system includes a hot Jupiter (“b”) neighbored by interior (“e”) and exterior (“d”) sub-Neptunes, and a long-period eccentric giant planet (“c”). We simultaneously modeled transit times from the Kepler K2 mission and 118 radial velocities to determine the precise masses, densities, and Keplerian orbital elements of the WASP-47 planets. Combining RVs and TTVs provides a better estimate of the mass of planet d (13.6+/- 2.0 {M}\\oplus ) than that obtained with only RVs (12.75+/- 2.70 {M}\\oplus ) or TTVs (16.1+/- 3.8 {M}\\oplus ). Planets e and d have high densities for their size, consistent with a history of photoevaporation and/or formation in a volatile-poor environment. Through our RV and TTV analysis, we find that the planetary orbits have eccentricities similar to the solar system planets. The WASP-47 system has three similarities to our own solar system: (1) the planetary orbits are nearly circular and coplanar, (2) the planets are not trapped in mean motion resonances, and (3) the planets have diverse compositions. None of the current single-process exoplanet formation theories adequately reproduce these three characteristics of the WASP-47 system (or our solar system). We propose that WASP-47, like the solar system, formed in two stages: first, the giant planets formed in a gas-rich disk and migrated to their present locations, and second, the high-density sub-Neptunes formed in situ in a gas-poor environment.

  9. Radial velocities and metallicities from infrared Ca ii triplet spectroscopy of open clusters. II. Berkeley 23, King 1, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, R.; Casamiquela, L.; Ospina, N.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Jordi, C.; Monteagudo, L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Open clusters are key to studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, there is a deficiency of radial velocity and chemical abundance determinations for open clusters in the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the number of determinations of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for open clusters. Methods: We acquired medium-resolution spectra (R ~ 8000) in the infrared region Ca ii triplet lines (~8500 Å) for several stars in five open clusters with the long-slit IDS spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain). Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation fitting techniques. The relationships available in the literature between the strength of infrared Ca ii lines and metallicity were also used to derive the metallicity for each cluster. Results: We obtain ⟨Vr⟩ = 48.6 ± 3.4, -58.4 ± 6.8, 26.0 ± 4.3, and -65.3 ± 3.2 km s-1 for Berkeley 23, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245, respectively. We found [ Fe/H ] = -0.25 ± 0.14 and -0.15 ± 0.18 for NGC 559 and NGC 7245, respectively. Berkeley 23 has low metallicity, [ Fe/H ] = -0.42 ± 0.13, which is similar to other open clusters in the outskirts of the Galactic disc. In contrast, we derived high metallicity ([ Fe/H ] = +0.43 ± 0.15) for NGC 6603, which places this system among the most metal-rich known open clusters. To our knowledge, this is the first determination of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for these clusters, except NGC 6603, for which radial velocities had been previously determined. We have also analysed ten stars in the line of sight to King 1. Because of the large dispersion obtained in both radial velocity and metallicity, we cannot be sure that we have sampled true cluster members. Based on observations made with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the

  10. The CRIRES Search for Planets Around the Lowest-Mass Stars: High-Precision nIR Radial Velocities with a New Gas Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifahrt, Andreas; Bean, J.; Hartman, H.; Nilsson, H.; Wiedemann, G.; Reiners, A.; Dreizler, S.; Henry, T.

    2010-01-01

    We are currently carrying out a search for planets around the lowest-mass stars using the CRIRES instrument at the VLT under the auspices of an ESO Large Programme. The main purposes of this work are to illuminate the correlation between stellar mass and planet formation, improve the census of planets, and identify new planets that can be followed-up for detailed study. We have developed, and are utilizing a new type of gas cell for obtaining high-precision radial velocities of late-type stars in the nIR spectral region. Observations in the nIR offer the advantages in that the targeted stars are bright enough for high-precision spectroscopy, and that the noise contribution from stellar activity is significantly reduced. We will describe the new gas cell and our radial velocity measurement algorithm, and present extensive tests of the obtained precision.

  11. THE MASS OF THE CANDIDATE EXOPLANET COMPANION TO HD 136118 FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ASTROMETRY AND HIGH-PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Martioli, Eder; McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz; Armstrong, Amber; Bean, Jacob L.; Harrison, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensor astrometry and high-cadence radial velocities for HD 136118 from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with archival data from Lick to determine the complete set of orbital parameters for HD 136118 b. We find an orbital inclination for the candidate exoplanet of i{sub b} = 163.{sup 0}1 +- 3.{sup 0}0. This establishes the actual mass of the object, M{sub b} = 42{sup +11}{sub -18} M{sub J} , in contrast to the minimum mass determined from the radial velocity data only, M{sub b} sin i approx 12 M{sub J} . Therefore, the low-mass companion to HD 136118 is now identified as a likely brown dwarf residing in the 'brown dwarf desert'.

  12. Stellar population of the Small Magellanic Cloud near NGC 121. I - The mean metallicity, metallicity spread, and radial velocity of SMC halo giants

    SciTech Connect

    Suntzeff, N.B.; Friel, E.; Klemola, A.; Kraft, R.P.; Graham, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    Technological advances make it now possible to conduct CCD photometry studies of stars in the halo of the Magellanic Clouds, taking into account the age and chemical composition of the oldest stars, the star-formation rate, and the age-metallicity relations. Recent reserch demonstrates that these relationships are different in the Clouds and in the Galaxy. The present paper is concerned with an examination of the giant stars of the SMC halo in the vicinity of the SMC cluster NGC 121, giving attention to the chemical composition and radial velocity of these objects. Astrometry and photometry based on direct photographs are considered along with spectroscopic observations, taking into account reduction techniques, sample spectra, radial velocities, and spectrophotometric indices and metallicity spread of giants. 69 references.

  13. The α CrB binary system: A new radial velocity curve, apsidal motion, and the alignment of rotation and orbit axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schröder, K.-P.; Rauw, G.; Hempelmann, A.; Mittag, M.; González-Pérez, J. N.; Czesla, S.; Wolter, U.; Jack, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new radial velocity curve for the two components of the eclipsing spectroscopic binary α CrB. This binary consists of two main-sequence stars of types A and G in a 17.3599-day orbit, according to the data from our robotic TIGRE facility that is located in Guanajuato, Mexico. We used a high-resolution solar spectrum to determine the radial velocities of the weak secondary component by cross-correlation and wavelength referencing with telluric lines for the strongly rotationally broadened primary lines (v sin(i) = 138 km s-1) to obtain radial velocities with an accuracy of a few hundred m/s. We combined our new RV data with older measurements, dating back to 1908 in the case of the primary, to search for evidence of apsidal motion. We find an apsidal motion period between 6600 and 10 600 yr. This value is consistent with the available data for both the primary and secondary and is also consistent with the assumption that the system has aligned orbit and rotation axes.

  14. Some features of the radial-velocity variations of lines of different intensity in the spectrum of HD 93521. Variability of the stellar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzaev, A. Kh.

    2007-12-01

    CCD spectra taken with the PFES echelle spectrograph of the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences are used to perform a detailed study of the variability of the profiles of Hell, H β, and H α lines in the spectrum of HD 93521. The pattern and nature of the variability of the Hell lines are similar to those of weak HeI lines and are due to nonradial pulsations. The period and amplitude of the radial-velocity variations are the same for the blue and red halves of the absorption profile but their phases are opposite. The behavior of the variations of H β and H α hydrogen lines relative to their mean profiles is the same as that of strong HeI line and is due to nonradial pulsations. The period and phase of the radial-velocity oscillations are the same for the blue and red halves of the absorption profile but their amplitude are different. The behavior of the radial-velocity variations of the absorption and emission components of the H α line indicates that the latter also are caused by nonradial pulsations. All this is indicative of the complex structure of the stellar wind in the region of its origin. The behavior of variability and wind kinematics differ in different directions and for different regions of the atmosphere and/or envelope.

  15. Synthesizing exoplanet demographics from radial velocity and microlensing surveys. II. The frequency of planets orbiting M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2014-08-20

    In contrast to radial velocity (RV) surveys, results from microlensing surveys indicate that giant planets with masses greater than the critical mass for core accretion (∼0.1 M {sub Jup}) are relatively common around low-mass stars. Using the methodology developed in the first paper, we predict the sensitivity of M-dwarf RV surveys to analogs of the population of planets inferred by microlensing. We find that RV surveys should detect a handful of super-Jovian (>M {sub Jup}) planets at the longest periods being probed. These planets are indeed found by RV surveys, implying that the demographic constraints inferred from these two methods are consistent. Finally, we combine the results from both methods to estimate planet frequencies spanning wide regions of parameter space. We find that the frequency of Jupiters and super-Jupiters (1 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub Jup} ≲ 13) with periods 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} is f{sub J}=0.029{sub −0.015}{sup +0.013}, a median factor of 4.3 (1.5-14 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets around FGK stars of 0.11 ± 0.02. However, we find the frequency of all giant planets with 30 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub G}=0.15{sub −0.07}{sup +0.06}, only a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-5.9 at 95% confidence) smaller than the inferred frequency of such planets orbiting FGK stars of 0.31 ± 0.07. For a more conservative definition of giant planets (50 ≲ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≲ 10{sup 4}), we find f{sub G{sup ′}}=0.11±0.05, a median factor of 2.2 (0.73-6.7 at 95% confidence) smaller than that inferred for FGK stars of 0.25 ± 0.05. Finally, we find the frequency of all planets with 1 ≤ m{sub p} sin i/M {sub ⊕} ≤ 10{sup 4} and 1 ≤ P/days ≤ 10{sup 4} to be f{sub p} = 1.9 ± 0.5.

  16. Constraining the Frequency of Free-floating Planets from a Synthesis of Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Survey Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2017-01-01

    A microlensing survey by Sumi et al. exhibits an overabundance of short-timescale events (STEs; tE < 2 days) relative to what is expected from known stellar populations and a smooth power-law extrapolation down to the brown dwarf regime. This excess has been interpreted as a population of approximately Jupiter-mass objects that outnumber main-sequence stars nearly twofold; however the microlensing data alone cannot distinguish between events due to wide-separation (a ≳ 10 au) and free-floating planets. Assuming these STEs are indeed due to planetary-mass objects, we aim to constrain the fraction of these events that can be explained by bound but wide-separation planets. We fit the observed timescale distribution with a lens mass function comprised of brown dwarfs, main-sequence stars, and stellar remnants, finding and thus corroborating the initial identification of an excess of STEs. We then include a population of bound planets that are expected not to show signatures of the primary lens (host) in their microlensing light curves and that are also consistent with results from representative microlensing, radial velocity, and direct imaging surveys. We find that bound planets alone cannot explain the entire STE excess without violating the constraints from the surveys we consider and thus some fraction of these events must be due to free-floating planets, if our model for bound planets holds. We estimate a median fraction of STEs due to free-floating planets to be f = 0.67 (0.23 ≤ f ≤ 0.85 at 95% confidence) when assuming “hot-start” planet evolutionary models and f = 0.58 (0.14 ≤ f ≤ 0.83 at 95% confidence) for “cold-start” models. Assuming a delta-function distribution of free-floating planets of mass {m}p=2 {M}{Jup} yields a number of free-floating planets per main-sequence star of N = 1.4 (0.48 ≤ N ≤ 1.8 at 95% confidence) in the “hot-start” case and N = 1.2 (0.29 ≤ N ≤ 1.8 at 95% confidence) in the “cold-start” case.

  17. ASTROMETRY AND RADIAL VELOCITIES OF THE PLANET HOST M DWARF GJ 317: NEW TRIGONOMETRIC DISTANCE, METALLICITY, AND UPPER LIMIT TO THE MASS OF GJ 317b

    SciTech Connect

    Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Boss, Alan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Butler, R. Paul; Thompson, Ian B.; Vogt, Steven S.; Rivera, Eugenio J.

    2012-02-10

    We have obtained precision astrometry of the planet host M dwarf GJ 317 in the framework of the Carnegie Astrometric Planet Search project. The new astrometric measurements give a distance determination of 15.3 pc, 65% further than previous estimates. The resulting absolute magnitudes suggest that it is metal-rich and more massive than previously assumed. This result strengthens the correlation between high metallicity and the presence of gas giants around low-mass stars. At 15.3 pc, the minimal astrometric amplitude for planet candidate GJ 317b is 0.3 mas (edge-on orbit), just below our astrometric sensitivity. However, given the relatively large number of observations and good astrometric precision, a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis indicates that the mass of planet b has to be smaller than twice the minimum mass with a 99% confidence level, with a most likely value of 2.5 M{sub Jup}. Additional radial velocity (RV) measurements obtained with Keck by the Lick-Carnegie Planet search program confirm the presence of an additional very long period planet candidate, with a period of 20 years or more. Even though such an object will imprint a large astrometric wobble on the star, its curvature is yet not evident in the astrometry. Given high metallicity, and the trend indicating that multiple systems are rich in low-mass companions, this system is likely to host additional low-mass planets in its habitable zone that can be readily detected with state-of-the-art optical and near-infrared RV measurements.

  18. Precise radial velocities of giant stars. IX. HD 59686 Ab: a massive circumstellar planet orbiting a giant star in a 13.6 au eccentric binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Mauricio; Reffert, Sabine; Trifonov, Trifon; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Mitchell, David S.; Nowak, Grzegorz; Buenzli, Esther; Zimmerman, Neil; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Skemer, Andy; Defrère, Denis; Lee, Man Hoi; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinz, Philip M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. For over 12 yr, we have carried out a precise radial velocity (RV) survey of a sample of 373 G- and K-giant stars using the Hamilton Échelle Spectrograph at the Lick Observatory. There are, among others, a number of multiple planetary systems in our sample as well as several planetary candidates in stellar binaries. Aims: We aim at detecting and characterizing substellar and stellar companions to the giant star HD 59686 A (HR 2877, HIP 36616). Methods: We obtained high-precision RV measurements of the star HD 59686 A. By fitting a Keplerian model to the periodic changes in the RVs, we can assess the nature of companions in the system. To distinguish between RV variations that are due to non-radial pulsation or stellar spots, we used infrared RVs taken with the CRIRES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. Additionally, to characterize the system in more detail, we obtained high-resolution images with LMIRCam at the Large Binocular Telescope. Results: We report the probable discovery of a giant planet with a mass of mp sin i = 6.92-0.24+0.18 MJup orbiting at ap = 1.0860-0.0007+0.0006 au from the giant star HD 59686 A. In addition to the planetary signal, we discovered an eccentric (eB = 0.729-0.003+0.004) binary companion with a mass of mB sin i = 0.5296-0.0008+0.0011 M⊙ orbiting at a close separation from the giant primary with a semi-major axis of aB = 13.56-0.14+0.18 au. Conclusions: The existence of the planet HD 59686 Ab in a tight eccentric binary system severely challenges standard giant planet formation theories and requires substantial improvements to such theories in tight binaries. Otherwise, alternative planet formation scenarios such as second-generation planets or dynamical interactions in an early phase of the system's lifetime need to be seriously considered to better understand the origin of this enigmatic planet. Based on observations collected at the Lick Observatory, University of California.Based on observations collected at the

  19. The Demographics of Exoplanetary Companions to M Dwarfs: Synthesizing Results from Microlensing, Radial Velocity, and Direct Imaging Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanton, Christian Dwain

    Over the past 20 years, we have learned that exoplanets are ubiquitous throughout our Galaxy and show a diverse set of demographics, yet there is much work to be done to understand this diversity. Determining the distributions of the fundamental properties of exoplanets will provide vital clues regarding their formation and evolution. This is a difficult task, as exoplanet surveys are not uniformly sensitive to the full range of planet parameter space. Various observational biases and selection effects intrinsic to each of the different discovery techniques constrain the types of planets to which they are sensitive. Herein, I record a collection of the first studies to develop and apply the methodology of synthesizing results from multiple detection techniques to construct a statistically-complete census of planetary companions to M dwarfs that samples a wide region of their parameter space. I present a robust comparison of exoplanet discoveries from microlensing and radial velocity (RV) surveys of M dwarfs which infer giant planet frequencies that differ by more than an order of magnitude and are, prima facie, in direct conflict. I demonstrate that current, state-of-the-art RV surveys are capable of detecting only the high-mass tail of the population of planets beyond the ice line inferred by microlensing studies, engendering a large, apparent difference in giant planet frequency. This comparison further establishes that results from these types of surveys are, in fact, consistent over the region of parameter space wherein their sensitivities overlap. A synthesis of results from microlensing and RV surveys yields planet occurrence rates for M dwarfs that span several orders of magnitude in mass and orbital period. On average, each M dwarf hosts about two planets, and while Jupiter and super-Jupiter companions are relatively rare ( 3%), gas giants, in general, are quite common ( 15%). These occurrence rates are significantly lower than those inferred around FGK

  20. Friends of Hot Jupiters. I. A Radial Velocity Search for Massive, Long-period Companions to Close-in Gas Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, Heather A.; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Kao, Melodie; Ngo, Henry; Howard, Andrew W.; Crepp, Justin R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Bakos, Gaspar Á.; Batygin, Konstantin; Johnson, John Asher; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting gas giant planets that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 planets obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and find statistically significant accelerations in fifteen systems. Six of these systems have no previously reported accelerations in the published literature: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions responsible for the detected accelerations. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M Jup, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the transiting planets in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolution of the inner gas giant. We estimate a total occurrence rate of 51% ± 10% for companions with masses between 1-13 M Jup and orbital semi-major axes between 1-20 AU in our sample. We find no statistically significant difference between the frequency of companions to transiting planets with misaligned or eccentric orbits and those with well-aligned, circular orbits. We combine our expanded sample of radial velocity measurements with constraints from transit and secondary eclipse observations to provide improved measurements of the physical and orbital characteristics of all of the planets included in our survey.

  1. Friends of hot Jupiters. I. A radial velocity search for massive, long-period companions to close-in gas giant planets

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Ngo, Henry; Johnson, John Asher; Fulton, Benjamin J.; Howard, Andrew W.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Kao, Melodie; Hinkley, Sasha; Morton, Timothy D.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Crepp, Justin R.; Bakos, Gaspar Á.; Batygin, Konstantin

    2014-04-20

    In this paper we search for distant massive companions to known transiting gas giant planets that may have influenced the dynamical evolution of these systems. We present new radial velocity observations for a sample of 51 planets obtained using the Keck HIRES instrument, and find statistically significant accelerations in fifteen systems. Six of these systems have no previously reported accelerations in the published literature: HAT-P-10, HAT-P-22, HAT-P-29, HAT-P-32, WASP-10, and XO-2. We combine our radial velocity fits with Keck NIRC2 adaptive optics (AO) imaging data to place constraints on the allowed masses and orbital periods of the companions responsible for the detected accelerations. The estimated masses of the companions range between 1-500 M {sub Jup}, with orbital semi-major axes typically between 1-75 AU. A significant majority of the companions detected by our survey are constrained to have minimum masses comparable to or larger than those of the transiting planets in these systems, making them candidates for influencing the orbital evolution of the inner gas giant. We estimate a total occurrence rate of 51% ± 10% for companions with masses between 1-13 M {sub Jup} and orbital semi-major axes between 1-20 AU in our sample. We find no statistically significant difference between the frequency of companions to transiting planets with misaligned or eccentric orbits and those with well-aligned, circular orbits. We combine our expanded sample of radial velocity measurements with constraints from transit and secondary eclipse observations to provide improved measurements of the physical and orbital characteristics of all of the planets included in our survey.

  2. EnKF OSSE Experiments Assessing the Impact of HIRAD Wind Speed and HIWRAP Radial Velocity Data on Analysis of Hurricane Karl (2010)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, Cerese; Sippel, Jason A.; Braun, Scott A.; Miller, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies (e.g., Zhang et al. 2009, Weng et al. 2011) have shown that radial velocity data from airborne and ground-based radars can be assimilated into ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) systems to produce accurate analyses of tropical cyclone vortices, which can reduce forecast intensity error. Recently, wind speed data from SFMR technology has also been assimilated into the same types of systems and has been shown to improve the forecast intensity of mature tropical cyclones. Two instruments that measure these properties were present during the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) field experiment in 2010 which sampled Hurricane Karl, and will next be co-located on the same aircraft for the subsequent NASA HS3 experiment. The High Altitude Wind and Rain Profiling Radar (HIWRAP) is a conically scanning Doppler radar mounted upon NASAs Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, and the usefulness of its radial velocity data for assimilation has not been previously examined. Since the radar scans from above with a fairly large fixed elevation angle, it observes a large component of the vertical wind, which could degrade EnKF analyses compared to analyses with data taken from lesser elevation angles. The NASA Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a passive microwave radiometer similar to SFMR, and measures emissivity and retrieves hurricane surface wind speeds and rain rates over a much wider swath. Thus, this study examines the impact of assimilating simulated HIWRAP radial velocity data into an EnKF system, simulated HIRAD wind speed, and HIWRAP+HIRAD with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and compares the results to no data assimilation and also to the Truth from which the data was simulated for both instruments.

  3. Frequency-modulated continuous-wave laser radar using dual vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes for real-time measurements of distance and radial velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuma, Seiichi

    2017-02-01

    A frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) laser radar capable of real-time displaying the distance to a target object and its radial velocity as their corresponding frequency spectra is developed. The system employs a pair of oppositely frequency-swept vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes (VCSELs). This makes possible simultaneous detection of beat signals induced by the increment (up-ramp) and decrement (down-ramp) in laser frequencies. By mixing these two beat signals, their sum and difference frequencies are directly obtained without arithmetic processing such as averaging and subtraction. Results of the test experiments adopting axially moving block gauges as target objects show that both the distance and given velocities are accurately determined from the spectrum of the frequency mixer.

  4. Additional Constraints on the Shallow Seismic Velocity Structure of the Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henig, A. S.; Blackman, D. K.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.; Canales, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    We investigate the detailed structure of the uppermost ~km of Atlantis Massif, an oceanic core complex at 30°N on the Mid Atlantic Ridge, using pre-existing multichannel seismic data. The Synthetic On- Bottom Experiment (SOBE) method that we employ downward continues both the shots and receivers to a depth just above the seafloor. This allows us to pick refracted arrivals recorded on the streamer at very-near offset, providing constraints from rays that are received within the 300-2000 m range that was unavailable to earlier studies where standard shot gathers had been analyzed. Thus, we can better model the upper few hundred meters of the section which, in turn, adds confidence for determining the deeper (400-1500 m) structure. New work on a ridge-parallel line has been added to last year's work on a cross-axis line over the Central Dome of the massif. Tomographic results are similar for these crossing lines: a thin (100-150 m) low velocity (< 3 km/s) layer caps the dome; high horizontal gradients (>1.25 s-1) occur in local (1-2 km wide) regions within these 6-8 km long subsections of the MCS lines analyzed to date; and very high vertical velocity gradients, greater than 3.75 s-1, occur within the km just below the exposed detachment in these areas. We obtain general agreement with Canales et al., 2008, results over the Central Dome but our models suggest a finer scale lateral heterogeneity. We have begun analysis of additional and extended MCS lines over the domal core of the massif and our priority for this presentation is to assess the detailed structure of the Southern Ridge. In at least some areas the thin, low velocity layer contrasts sufficiently with underlying material that a clear refracted arrival is visible in supergathers. We will determine whether the low velocity layer persists over the whole dome or if it is restricted to the Central Dome. An important question is whether its thickness on the Southern Ridge, if it exists there, differs from that

  5. RADIAL VELOCITY OBSERVATIONS AND LIGHT CURVE NOISE MODELING CONFIRM THAT KEPLER-91b IS A GIANT PLANET ORBITING A GIANT STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, Thomas; Huber, Daniel; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel

    2015-02-10

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box et al., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box et al. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ± 0.13 M {sub Jup} planet orbiting a red giant star.

  6. Mass determination of K2-19b and K2-19c from radial velocities and transit timing variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nespral, D.; Gandolfi, D.; Deeg, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present FIES@NOT and HARPS-N@TNG radial velocity follow-up observations of K2-19, a compact planetary system hosting three planets, of which the two larger ones, namely K2-19b and K2-19c, are close to the 3:2 mean motion resonance. The masses of these larger planets have previously been derived from transit timing only. An analysis considering only the radial velocity measurements is able to detect only K2-19b, the largest and more massive planet in the system, with a mass of 71.7 ± 6.3 M_{Jupiter}. We also used the TRADES code to simultaneously model both our RV measurements and the existing transit-timing measurements. We derived a mass of K2-19b of 59.5^{+7.2} _{‑11.4} M_{Jupiter} and of K2-19c of 9.7 ^{+3.9} _{‑2.0} M_{oplus}. A prior K2-19b mass estimated by Barros et al. (2015), based exclusively on transit timing measurements, is only consistent with our combined TTV and RV analysis, but not with our analysis based purely on RV measurements. K2-19b supports the suspicion that planet masses and densities involving TTV data are systematically lower than those based purely on RV measurements.

  7. Radial Velocity Observations and Light Curve Noise Modeling Confirm that Kepler-91b is a Giant Planet Orbiting a Giant Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, Thomas; Endl, Michael; Huber, Daniel; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Quintana, Elisa V.

    2015-02-01

    Kepler-91b is a rare example of a transiting hot Jupiter around a red giant star, providing the possibility to study the formation and composition of hot Jupiters under different conditions compared to main-sequence stars. However, the planetary nature of Kepler-91b, which was confirmed using phase-curve variations by Lillo-Box et al., was recently called into question based on a re-analysis of Kepler data. We have obtained ground-based radial velocity observations from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and unambiguously confirm the planetary nature of Kepler-91b by simultaneously modeling the Kepler and radial velocity data. The star exhibits temporally correlated noise due to stellar granulation which we model as a Gaussian Process. We hypothesize that it is this noise component that led previous studies to suspect Kepler-91b to be a false positive. Our work confirms the conclusions presented by Lillo-Box et al. that Kepler-91b is a 0.73 ± 0.13 M Jup planet orbiting a red giant star. Based partly on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  8. The Mass of the Candidate Exoplanet Companion to HD 136118 from Hubble Space Telescope Astrometry and High-Precision Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martioli, Eder; McArthur, Barbara E.; Benedict, G. Fritz; Bean, Jacob L.; Harrison, Thomas E.; Armstrong, Amber

    2010-01-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensor astrometry and high-cadence radial velocities for HD 136118 from the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with archival data from Lick to determine the complete set of orbital parameters for HD 136118 b. We find an orbital inclination for the candidate exoplanet of ib = 163fdg1 ± 3fdg0. This establishes the actual mass of the object, Mb = 42+11 -18 MJ , in contrast to the minimum mass determined from the radial velocity data only, Mb sin i ~ 12 MJ . Therefore, the low-mass companion to HD 136118 is now identified as a likely brown dwarf residing in the "brown dwarf desert." Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitt München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.

  9. SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS AND ACTIVITY IN PROCYON: A COMPARISON OF THE 2007 MOST AND GROUND-BASED RADIAL VELOCITY CAMPAIGNS

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Daniel; Bedding, Timothy R.; Stello, Dennis; Arentoft, Torben; Kjeldsen, Hans; Gruberbauer, Michael; Guenther, David B.; Houdek, Guenter; Kallinger, Thomas; Weiss, Werner W.; Matthews, Jaymie M.

    2011-04-20

    We compare the simultaneous 2007 space-based MOST photometry and ground-based radial velocity (RV) observations of the F5 star Procyon. We identify slow variations in the MOST data that are similar to those reported in the RV time series and confirm by comparison with the Sun that these variations are likely the signature of stellar activity. The MOST power spectrum yields clear evidence for individual oscillation frequencies that match those found in the RV data by Bedding et al. We identify the same ridges due to modes of different spherical degree in both data sets, but are not able to confirm a definite ridge identification using the MOST data. We measure the luminosity amplitude per radial mode A{sub l=0,phot} = 9.1 {+-} 0.5 ppm. Combined with the estimate for the RV data by Arentoft et al., this gives a mean amplitude ratio of A{sub l=0,phot}/A{sub l=0,RV} = 0.24 {+-} 0.02 ppm cm{sup -1} s, considerably higher than expected from scaling relations but in reasonable agreement with theoretical models by Houdek. We also compare the amplitude ratio as a function of frequency and find that the maximum of the oscillation envelope is shifted to higher frequencies in photometry than in velocity.

  10. THE ECLIPSING BINARY CEPHEID OGLE-LMC-CEP-0227 IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD: PULSATION MODELING OF LIGHT AND RADIAL VELOCITY CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Marconi, M.; Molinaro, R.; Bono, G. E-mail: molinaro@oacn.inaf.it; and others

    2013-05-01

    We performed a new and accurate fit of light and radial velocity curves of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Cepheid-OGLE-LMC-CEP-0227-belonging to a detached double-lined eclipsing binary system. We computed several sets of nonlinear, convective models covering a broad range in stellar mass, effective temperature, and chemical composition. The comparison between theory and observations indicates that current theoretical framework accounts for luminosity-V and I band-and radial velocity variations over the entire pulsation cycle. Predicted pulsation mass-M = 4.14 {+-} 0.06 M{sub Sun }-and mean effective temperature-T{sub e} = 6100 {+-} 50 K-do agree with observed estimates with an accuracy better than 1{sigma}. The same outcome applies, on average, to the luminosity amplitudes and to the mean radius. We find that the best-fit solution requires a chemical composition that is more metal-poor than typical LMC Cepheids (Z = 0.004 versus 0.008) and slightly helium enhanced (Y = 0.27 versus 0.25), but the sensitivity to He abundance is quite limited. Finally, the best-fit model reddening-E(V - I) = 0.171 {+-} 0.015 mag-and the true distance modulus corrected for the barycenter of the LMC-{mu}{sub 0,LMC} = 18.50 {+-} 0.02 {+-} 0.10 (syst) mag-agree quite well with similar estimates in the recent literature.

  11. The Eclipsing Binary Cepheid OGLE-LMC-CEP-0227 in the Large Magellanic Cloud: Pulsation Modeling of Light and Radial Velocity Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, M.; Molinaro, R.; Bono, G.; Pietrzyński, G.; Gieren, W.; Pilecki, B.; Stellingwerf, R. F.; Graczyk, D.; Smolec, R.; Konorski, P.; Suchomska, K.; Górski, M.; Karczmarek, P.

    2013-05-01

    We performed a new and accurate fit of light and radial velocity curves of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Cepheid—OGLE-LMC-CEP-0227—belonging to a detached double-lined eclipsing binary system. We computed several sets of nonlinear, convective models covering a broad range in stellar mass, effective temperature, and chemical composition. The comparison between theory and observations indicates that current theoretical framework accounts for luminosity—V and I band—and radial velocity variations over the entire pulsation cycle. Predicted pulsation mass—M = 4.14 ± 0.06 M ⊙—and mean effective temperature—Te = 6100 ± 50 K—do agree with observed estimates with an accuracy better than 1σ. The same outcome applies, on average, to the luminosity amplitudes and to the mean radius. We find that the best-fit solution requires a chemical composition that is more metal-poor than typical LMC Cepheids (Z = 0.004 versus 0.008) and slightly helium enhanced (Y = 0.27 versus 0.25), but the sensitivity to He abundance is quite limited. Finally, the best-fit model reddening—E(V - I) = 0.171 ± 0.015 mag—and the true distance modulus corrected for the barycenter of the LMC—μ0, LMC = 18.50 ± 0.02 ± 0.10 (syst) mag—agree quite well with similar estimates in the recent literature.

  12. Mass determination of K2-19b and K2-19c from radial velocities and transit timing variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nespral, D.; Gandolfi, D.; Deeg, H. J.; Borsato, L.; Fridlund, M. C. V.; Barragán, O.; Alonso, R.; Grziwa, S.; Korth, J.; Albrecht, S.; Cabrera, J.; Csizmadia, Sz.; Nowak, G.; Kuutma, T.; Saario, J.; Eigmüller, P.; Erikson, A.; Guenther, E. W.; Hatzes, A. P.; Montañés Rodríguez, P.; Palle, E.; Pätzold, M.; Prieto-Arranz, J.; Rauer, H.; Sebastian, D.

    2017-05-01

    We present radial velocity follow-up observations of K2-19, a compact planetary system hosting three planets, of which the two larger ones, K2-19b and K2-19c, are close to the 3:2 mean motion resonance. An analysis considering only the radial velocity measurements detects K2-19b, the larger and more massive planet in the system, with a mass of 54.8 ± 7.5M⊕ and provides a marginal detection of K2-19c, with a mass of Mc = M⊕. We also used the TRADES code to simultaneously model both our RV measurements and the existing transit timing measurements. We derived a mass of 54.4 ± 8.9M⊕ for K2-19b and of M⊕ for K2-19c. For K2-19b, these masses are consistent with a previous determination that was principally based on a photodynamical analysis of the K2-19 light curve. Differences remain mainly in the mass determination of the more lightweight planet, driven likely by the limited precision of the RV measurements and possibly some as yet unrecognized systematics. RV data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A128

  13. A numerical study of fixed frequency reflectometry measurements of plasma filaments with radial and poloidal velocity components.

    PubMed

    Vicente, J; da Silva, F; Heuraux, S; Manso, M E; Conway, G D; Silva, C

    2014-11-01

    A 2D finite-differences time-domain full-wave code is used to simulate the measurements of plasma filaments with fixed frequency O-mode reflectometry. The plasma is modeled by a linear slab plasma plus a Gaussian perturbation propagating in a direction that can vary from poloidal to radial. The plasma background density gradient is chosen in agreement with the steep edge transport barrier of H-modes in the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak. Illustrative results are presented and different types of reflectometry responses are observed depending on filament sizes and propagation directions. The reflectometry signatures obtained here with numerical simulations support previous experimental findings on filament measurements.

  14. A RADIAL VELOCITY TEST FOR SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE BINARIES AS AN EXPLANATION FOR BROAD, DOUBLE-PEAKED EMISSION LINES IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jia; Halpern, Jules P.; Eracleous, Michael

    2016-01-20

    One of the proposed explanations for the broad, double-peaked Balmer emission lines observed in the spectra of some active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is that they are associated with sub-parsec supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. Here, we test the binary broad-line region hypothesis through several decades of monitoring of the velocity structure of double-peaked Hα emission lines in 13 low-redshift, mostly radio-loud AGNs. This is a much larger set of objects compared to an earlier test by Eracleous et al. and we use much longer time series for the three objects studied in that paper. Although systematic changes in radial velocity can be traced in many of their lines, they are demonstrably not like those of a spectroscopic binary in a circular orbit. Any spectroscopic binary period must therefore be much longer than the span of the monitoring (assuming a circular orbit), which in turn would require black hole masses that exceed by 1–2 orders of magnitude the values obtained for these objects using techniques such as reverberation mapping and stellar velocity dispersion. Moreover, the response of the double-peaked Balmer line profiles to fluctuations of the ionizing continuum and the shape of the Lyα profiles are incompatible with an SMBH binary. The binary broad-line region hypothesis is therefore disfavored. Other processes evidently shape these line profiles and cause the long-term velocity variations of the double peaks.

  15. The Magellan PFS Planet Search Program: Radial Velocity and Stellar Abundance Analyses of the 360 au, Metal-poor Binary “Twins” HD 133131A & B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teske, Johanna K.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Vogt, Steve S.; Díaz, Matías; Butler, R. Paul; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Ian B.; Arriagada, Pamela

    2016-12-01

    We present a new precision radial velocity (RV) data set that reveals multiple planets orbiting the stars in the ˜360 au, G2+G2 “twin” binary HD 133131AB. Our six years of high-resolution echelle observations from MIKE and five years from the Planet Finder Spectrograph (PFS) on the Magellan telescopes indicate the presence of two eccentric planets around HD 133131A with minimum masses of 1.43 ± 0.03 and 0.63 ± 0.15 {{ M }}{{J}} at 1.44 ± 0.005 and 4.79 ± 0.92 au, respectively. Additional PFS observations of HD 133131B spanning five years indicate the presence of one eccentric planet of minimum mass 2.50 ± 0.05 {{ M }}{{J}} at 6.40 ± 0.59 au, making it one of the longest-period planets detected with RV to date. These planets are the first to be reported primarily based on data taken with the PFS on Magellan, demonstrating the instrument’s precision and the advantage of long-baseline RV observations. We perform a differential analysis between the Sun and each star, and between the stars themselves, to derive stellar parameters and measure a suite of 21 abundances across a wide range of condensation temperatures. The host stars are old (likely ˜9.5 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H] ˜ -0.30), and we detect a ˜0.03 dex depletion in refractory elements in HD 133131A versus B (with standard errors ˜0.017). This detection and analysis adds to a small but growing sample of binary “twin” exoplanet host stars with precise abundances measured, and represents the most metal-poor and likely oldest in that sample. Overall, the planets around HD 133131A and B fall in an unexpected regime in planet mass-host star metallicity space and will serve as an important benchmark for the study of long-period giant planets. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  16. THE BROWN DWARF KINEMATICS PROJECT (BDKP). IV. RADIAL VELOCITIES OF 85 LATE-M AND L DWARFS WITH MagE

    SciTech Connect

    Burgasser, Adam J.; Logsdon, Sarah E.; Gagné, Jonathan; Bochanski, John J.; Faherty, Jaqueline K.; West, Andrew A.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cruz, Kelle L.

    2015-09-15

    Radial velocity measurements are presented for 85 late M- and L-type very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs obtained with the Magellan Echellette spectrograph. Targets primarily have distances within 20 pc of the Sun, with more distant sources selected for their unusual spectral energy distributions. We achieved precisions of 2–3 km s{sup −1}, and combined these with astrometric and spectrophotometric data to calculate UVW velocities. Most are members of the thin disk of the Galaxy, and velocity dispersions indicate a mean age of 5.2 ± 0.2 Gyr for sources within 20 pc. We find signficantly different kinematic ages between late-M dwarfs (4.0 ± 0.2 Gyr) and L dwarfs (6.5 ± 0.4 Gyr) in our sample that are contrary to predictions from prior simulations. This difference appears to be driven by a dispersed population of unusually blue L dwarfs which may be more prevalent in our local volume-limited sample than in deeper magnitude-limited surveys. The L dwarfs exhibit an asymmetric U velocity distribution with a net inward flow, similar to gradients recently detected in local stellar samples. Simulations incorporating brown dwarf evolution and Galactic orbital dynamics are unable to reproduce the velocity asymmetry, suggesting non-axisymmetric perturbations or two distinct L dwarf populations. We also find the L dwarfs to have a kinematic age-activity correlation similar to more massive stars. We identify several sources with low surface gravities, and two new substellar candidate members of nearby young moving groups: the astrometric binary DENIS J08230313–4912012AB, a low-probability member of the β Pictoris Moving Group; and 2MASS J15104786–2818174, a moderate-probability member of the 30–50 Myr Argus Association.

  17. Poloidally and radially resolved parallel D(+) velocity measurements in the DIII-D boundary and comparison to neoclassical computations

    SciTech Connect

    Boedo, J.A.; Belli, E. A.; Hollmann, E. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Rudakov, D. L.; Watkins, J. G.; Prater, R.; Candy, J.; Groebner, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.; DeGrassie, J. S.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Moyer, R.A.; Porter, G. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Muller, S.; Tynan, G.; Unterberg, Ezekial A

    2011-01-01

    First measurements of the D(+) parallel velocity, V(parallel to)(D+), in L-mode discharges in the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] tokamak boundary region at two poloidal locations, 0 similar to 0 degrees and 0 similar to 255 degrees, made using Mach probes, feature a peak with velocities of up to 80 km/s at the midplane last closed flux surface (LCFS), as high as ten times the charge exchange recombination C(6+) toroidal velocity, V(phi)(C6+), in the same location. The V(parallel to)(D+) profiles are very asymmetric poloidally, by a factor of 8-10, and feature a local peak at the midplane. This peak, 1-2 cm wide, is located at or just inside the LCFS, and it suggests a large source of momentum in that location. This momentum source is quantified at similar to 0.31 N m by using a simple momentum transport model. This is the most accurate measurement of the effects of so called "intrinsic" edge momentum source to date. The V(parallel to)(D+) measurements are quantitatively consistent with a purely neoclassical computational modeling of V(parallel to)(D+) by the code NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095010 (2008)], using V(phi)(C6+) as input, for rho similar to 0.7-0.95 at the two poloidal locations, where V(parallel to)(D+) measurements exist. The midplane NEO-calculated V(parallel to)(D+) grows larger than V(phi)(C6+) in the steeper edge gradient region and trends to agreement with the probe-measured V(parallel to)(D+) data near rho similar to 1, where the local V(parallel to)(D+) velocity peak exists. The measurements and computations were made in OH and L-mode discharges on an upper single null, with ion del B(T) drift away from the divertor. The rotating layer finding is similar in auxiliary heated discharges with and without external momentum input, except that at higher density the edge velocity weakens.

  18. Poloidally and radially resolved parallel D+ velocity measurements in the DIII-D boundary and comparison to neoclassical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boedo, J. A.; Belli, E. A.; Hollmann, E.; Solomon, W. M.; Rudakov, D. L.; Watkins, J. G.; Prater, R.; Candy, J.; Groebner, R. J.; Burrell, K. H.; deGrassie, J. S.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Moyer, R. A.; Porter, G. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Muller, S.; Tynan, G.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2011-03-01

    First measurements of the D+ parallel velocity, V∥D +, in L-mode discharges in the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] tokamak boundary region at two poloidal locations, θ ˜0° and θ ˜255°, made using Mach probes, feature a peak with velocities of up to 80 km/s at the midplane last closed flux surface (LCFS), as high as ten times the charge exchange recombination C6+ toroidal velocity, VϕC6+, in the same location. The V∥D + profiles are very asymmetric poloidally, by a factor of 8-10, and feature a local peak at the midplane. This peak, 1-2 cm wide, is located at or just inside the LCFS, and it suggests a large source of momentum in that location. This momentum source is quantified at ˜0.31 N m by using a simple momentum transport model. This is the most accurate measurement of the effects of so called "intrinsic" edge momentum source to date. The V∥D + measurements are quantitatively consistent with a purely neoclassical computational modeling of V∥D + by the code NEO [E. A. Belli and J. Candy, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 095010 (2008)], using VϕC6+ as input, for ρ