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Sample records for additional radiative forcing

  1. Radiative Forcing by Contrails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerkoetter, R.; Schumann, U.; Doelling, D. R.; Nakajima, T.; Tsushima, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric study of the instantaneous radiative impact of contrails is presented using three different radiative transfer models for a series of model atmospheres and cloud parameters. Contrails are treated as geometrically and optically thin plane parallel homogeneous cirrus layers in a static atmospheres The ice water content is varied as a function of ambient temperature. The model atmospheres include tropical, mid-latitude, and subarctic summer and winter atmospheres Optically thin contrails cause a positive net forcing at top of the atmosphere. At the surface the radiative forcing is negative during daytime. The forcing increases with the optical depth and the amount of contrail cover. At the top of the atmosphere a mean contrail cover of 0.1% with average optical depth of 0.2 to 0.5 causes about 0.01 to 0.03 W/m(exp 2)a daily mean instantaneous radiative forcing. Contrails cool the surface during the day and heat the surface during the night, and hence reduce the daily temperature amplitude The net effect depends strongly on the daily variation of contrail cloud cover. The indirect radiative forcing due to particle changes in natural cirrus clouds may be of the same magnitude as the direct one due to additional cover.

  2. Resonance scattering and radiation force calculations for an elastic cylinder using the translational addition theorem for cylindrical wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-09-15

    The standard Resonance Scattering Theory (RST) of plane waves is extended for the case of any two-dimensional (2D) arbitrarily-shaped monochromatic beam incident upon an elastic cylinder with arbitrary location using an exact methodology based on Graf’s translational addition theorem for the cylindrical wave functions. The analysis is exact as it does not require numerical integration procedures. The formulation is valid for any cylinder of finite size and material that is immersed in a nonviscous fluid. Partial-wave series expansions (PWSEs) for the incident, internal and scattered linear pressure fields are derived, and the analysis is further extended to obtain generalized expressions for the on-axis and off-axis acoustic radiation force components. The wave-fields are expressed using generalized PWSEs involving the beam-shape coefficients (BSCs) and the scattering coefficients of the cylinder. The off-axial BSCs are expressed analytically in terms of an infinite PWSE with emphasis on the translational offset distance d. Numerical computations are considered for a zeroth-order quasi-Gaussian beam chosen as an example to illustrate the analysis. Acoustic resonance scattering directivity diagrams are calculated by subtracting an appropriate background from the expression of the scattered pressure field. In addition, computations for the radiation force exerted on an elastic cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of the beam, and shifted off-axially are analyzed and discussed.

  3. Radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramanswamy, V.; Shine, Keith; Leovy, Conway; Wang, Wei-Chyung; Rodhe, Henning; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Ding, M.; Lelieveld, Joseph; Edmonds, Jae A.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    An update of the scientific discussions presented in Chapter 2 of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report is presented. The update discusses the atmospheric radiative and chemical species of significance for climate change. There are two major objectives of the present update. The first is an extension of the discussion on the Global Warming Potentials (GWP's), including a reevaluation in view of the updates in the lifetimes of the radiatively active species. The second important objective is to underscore major developments in the radiative forcing of climate due to the observed stratospheric ozone losses occurring between 1979 and 1990.

  4. Radiative Forcing of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

  5. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... SNIPEND SNIPSTART Find A Radiation Oncologist SNIPEND Additional Treatment Options SNIPSTART A A SNIPEND Chemotherapy Medicines prescribed ... such as antibodies, to fight cancer. Novel Targeted Therapies Cancer doctors now know much more about how ...

  6. Simulated 2050 aviation radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. C.; Gettelman, A.

    2015-12-01

    The radiative forcing from aviation is investigated by using a comprehensive general circulation model in the present (2006) and the future (2050). Global flight distance is projected to increase by a factor of 4 between 2006 and 2050. However, simulated contrail cirrus radiative forcing can increase by a factor of 7, and thus does not scale linearly with fuel emission mass. Simulations indicate negative radiative forcing induced by the indirect effect of aviation sulfate aerosols on liquid clouds that increasesby a factor of 4 in 2050. As a result, the net 2050 aviation radiative forcing is a cooling. Aviation sulfates emitted at cruise altitude canbe transported down to the lowest troposphere, increasing the aerosolconcentration, thus increasing the cloud drop number concentration and persistenceof low-level clouds. Aviation black carbon aerosols produce a negligible forcing.

  7. Force approach to radiation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    López, Gustavo V.

    2016-02-15

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  8. Force approach to radiation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Gustavo V.

    2016-02-01

    The difficulty of the usual approach to deal with the radiation reaction is pointed out, and under the condition that the radiation force must be a function of the external force and is zero whenever the external force be zero, a new and straightforward approach to radiation reaction force and damping is proposed. Starting from the Larmor formula for the power radiated by an accelerated charged particle, written in terms of the applied force instead of the acceleration, an expression for the radiation force is established in general, and applied to the examples for the linear and circular motion of a charged particle. This expression is quadratic in the magnitude of the applied force, inversely proportional to the speed of the charged particle, and directed opposite to the velocity vector. This force approach may contribute to the solution of the very old problem of incorporating the radiation reaction to the motion of the charged particles, and future experiments may tell us whether or not this approach point is in the right direction.

  9. Radiation Therapy: Additional Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Upper GI What is Radiation Therapy? Find a Radiation Oncologist Last Name: Facility: City: State: Zip Code: ... infections. This is refered to as immunotherapy . Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy given during surgery is called ...

  10. Technical Note: Estimating Aerosol Effects on Cloud Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.

    2013-10-09

    Estimating anthropogenic aerosol effects on the planetary energy balance through the aerosol influence on clouds using the difference in cloud radiative forcing from simulations with and without anthropogenic emissions produces estimates that are positively biased. A more representative method is suggested using the difference in cloud radiative forcing calculated with aerosol radiative effects neglected. The method also yields an aerosol radiative forcing decomposition that includes a term quantifying the impact of changes in surface albedo. The method requires only two additional diagnostic calculations: the whole-sky and clear-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative flux with aerosol radiative effects neglected.

  11. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingxu; Lin, Jintai; Ni, Ruijing

    2016-04-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant a large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RF of aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissions per unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size. South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions, its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency. The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is lowered by a small per capita GDP. Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The

  12. Risk stratification of thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology: The additional value of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chong-Ke; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Jun-Mei; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Wei; Liu, Bo-Ji; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Dan; Qu, Shen

    2017-01-01

    To assess the value of conventional ultrasound, conventional strain elastography (CSE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in differentiating likelihood of malignancy for Bethesda category III thyroid nodules. 103 thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in 103 patients were included and all were pathologically confirmed after surgery. Conventional ultrasound, CSE and ARFI elastography including ARFI imaging and point shear wave speed (SWS) measurement were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent factors associated with malignancy. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) was calculated to assess the diagnostic performance. Pathologically, 65 nodules were benign and 38 were malignant. Significant differences were found between benign and malignant nodules in ARFI. The cut-off points were ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4, SWS > 2.94 m/s and SWS ratio > 1.09, respectively. ARFI imaging (Az: 0.861) had the highest diagnostic performance to differentiate malignant from benign nodules, following by conventional ultrasound (Az: 0.606 - 0.744), CSE (Az: 0.660) and point SWS measurement (Az: 0.725 - 0.735). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4 was the most significant independent predictor. The combination of ARFI imaging with point SWS measurement significantly improved the specificity (100% vs. 80.0%) and positive predictive value (100 % vs. 72.9%) in comparison with ARFI imaging alone. ARFI elastography is a useful tool in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on FNAC. PMID:27906671

  13. Risk stratification of thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology: The additional value of acoustic radiation force impulse elastography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chong-Ke; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Xu, Jun-Mei; Sun, Cheng-Yu; Chen, Wei; Liu, Bo-Ji; Bo, Xiao-Wan; Wang, Dan; Qu, Shen

    2017-01-03

    To assess the value of conventional ultrasound, conventional strain elastography (CSE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) elastography in differentiating likelihood of malignancy for Bethesda category III thyroid nodules. 103 thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in 103 patients were included and all were pathologically confirmed after surgery. Conventional ultrasound, CSE and ARFI elastography including ARFI imaging and point shear wave speed (SWS) measurement were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent factors associated with malignancy. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) was calculated to assess the diagnostic performance. Pathologically, 65 nodules were benign and 38 were malignant. Significant differences were found between benign and malignant nodules in ARFI. The cut-off points were ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4, SWS > 2.94 m/s and SWS ratio > 1.09, respectively. ARFI imaging (Az: 0.861) had the highest diagnostic performance to differentiate malignant from benign nodules, following by conventional ultrasound (Az: 0.606 - 0.744), CSE (Az: 0.660) and point SWS measurement (Az: 0.725 - 0.735). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that ARFI imaging grade ≥ 4 was the most significant independent predictor. The combination of ARFI imaging with point SWS measurement significantly improved the specificity (100% vs. 80.0%) and positive predictive value (100 % vs. 72.9%) in comparison with ARFI imaging alone. ARFI elastography is a useful tool in differentiating malignant from benign thyroid nodules with Bethesda category III results on FNAC.

  14. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary...

  15. The Radiation Magnetic Force (FmR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    The detection of Circular Magnetic Field (CMF), associated with electrons movement, not incorporated in theoretical works; is introduced as elements of attraction and repulsion for magnetic force between two conductors carrying electric currents; it also created magnetic force between charged particles and magnetic field, or Lorentz force; CMF contain energy of Electromagnetic Radiation (EM-R); a relationship has been established between the magnetic part of the EM-R, and radiation force, showing the magnetic force as a frequency controlled entity, in which a Radiation Magnetic Force formula is derived, the force embedded EM-Wave, similar to Electromagnetic Radiation Energy given by Planck's formula; the force is accountable for electron removal from atom in the Photoelectric Effects, stabilizing orbital atoms, excitation and ionization atoms, initiating production of secondary EM-R in Compton Effect mechanism; the paper aimed at reviving the wave nature of EM-R, which could reflects in a better understanding of the microscopic-world.

  16. Radiation Forces and Torques without Stress (Tensors)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2011-01-01

    To understand radiation forces and torques or to calculate them does not require invoking photon or electromagnetic field momentum transfer or stress tensors. According to continuum electromagnetic theory, forces and torques exerted by radiation are a consequence of electric and magnetic fields acting on charges and currents that the fields induce…

  17. Radiation damping forces and radiation from charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepikov, N. P.

    1985-06-01

    In the present evaluation of reported results on the radiation reaction force to which a charged particle is subject, the expression obtained for this force by Lorentz (1909), Abraham (1904), and Dirac (1938) is noted to be in physically reasonable agreement with the radiation of energy, momentum and angular momentum; it has, moreover, been successfully used in investigations of the motion of particles in a field. A theory is presented for the losses of energy, momentum, and angular momentum by a system of charged particles as they move together, taking the external field, the radiation damping forces, and the retarded Lienard-Wiechert forces into account. Formulas are given for the spectral and angular distribution of the radiation from a system of particles, and a system of equations is constructed for finding the angular momenta of EM waves radiated by particles of the system.

  18. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: Radiation damping forces and radiation from charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepikov, N. P.

    1985-06-01

    A review of the literature on the radiation reaction force on a charged particle shows that the expression given for this force obtained by Lorentz, Abraham, and Dirac is in physically reasonable agreement with the radiation of energy, momentum, and angular momentum, and is successfully used in investigating the motion of particles in a field. A selection of physical solutions by the methods presented herein guarantees that the conservation laws are satisfied. In the first approximation, which is the only one utilized in the majority of physical situations, radiation damping does not depend on assumptions concerning the structure of the charge of the particle. A theory is presented of the losses of energy, momentum and angular momentum by a system of charged particles in the course of their moving together taking into account the external field, the radiation damping forces, and the retarded Lienard-Wiechert forces. Formulas are given for the spectral and angular distribution of the radiation from a system of particles. The concept of a center of a system of events with relativistic particles is utilized in constructing a system of equations for finding the angular momenta of the electromagnetic waves radiated by particles of the system. The angular distribution and the total intensity of the radiation from a system of particles at an arbitrary instant of time is obtained. Using the example of the joint synchrotron radiation from two particles the consistency of all three approaches to the radiation from a system of particles is demonstrated.

  19. Radiative Screening of Fifth Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Copeland, Edmund J.; Millington, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We describe a symmetron model in which the screening of fifth forces arises at the one-loop level through the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We show that such a theory can avoid current constraints on the existence of fifth forces but still has the potential to give rise to observable deviations from general relativity, which could be seen in cold atom experiments.

  20. Simulation of the global contrail radiative forcing: A sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Minnis, Patrick; Penner, Joyce E.

    2012-12-01

    The contrail radiative forcing induced by human aviation activity is one of the most uncertain contributions to climate forcing. An accurate estimation of global contrail radiative forcing is imperative, and the modeling approach is an effective and prominent method to investigate the sensitivity of contrail forcing to various potential factors. We use a simple offline model framework that is particularly useful for sensitivity studies. The most-up-to-date Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) is employed to simulate the atmosphere and cloud conditions during the year 2006. With updated natural cirrus and additional contrail optical property parameterizations, the RRTMG Model (RRTM-GCM application) is used to simulate the global contrail radiative forcing. Global contrail coverage and optical depth derived from the literature for the year 2002 is used. The 2006 global annual averaged contrail net (shortwave + longwave) radiative forcing is estimated to be 11.3 mW m-2. Regional contrail radiative forcing over dense air traffic areas can be more than ten times stronger than the global average. A series of sensitivity tests are implemented and show that contrail particle effective size, contrail layer height, the model cloud overlap assumption, and contrail optical properties are among the most important factors. The difference between the contrail forcing under all and clear skies is also shown.

  1. Radiation force and balance of electromagnetic momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, I.; Jiménez, J. L.; Roa-Neri, J. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Some force densities can be expressed as a divergence of a stress tensor, as is the case with the electromagnetic force density. We have shown elsewhere that from the Maxwell equations several balance equations of electromagnetic momentum can be derived, depending on the form these equations are expressed in terms of fields E, D, B, H, and polarisations P and M. These balance equations imply different force densities and different stress tensors, providing a great flexibility to solve particular problems. Among these force densities we have found some proposed in the past with plausibility arguments, like the Einstein-Laub force density, while other proposed force densities appear as particular or limit cases of these general force densities, like the Helmholtz force density. We calculate the radiation force of an electromagnetic wave incident on a semi-infinite negligibly absorbing material using these balance equations, corroborating in this way that the surface integration of the stress tensor gives the same result that the calculation made through a volume integration of the force density, as done by Bohren. As is usual in applications of Gauss’s theorem, the surface on which the surface integral is to be performed must be chosen judiciously, and due care of discontinuities on the boundary conditions must be taken. Advanced undergraduates and graduate students will find a different approach to new aspects of the interaction of radiation with matter.

  2. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    The work mainly focuses on the study of thermal infrared (IR) properties of atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the estimation of the aerosol-induced direct longwave (LW) radiative forcing in the spectral region 5-20 mum at the Earth's surface (BOA; bottom of the atmosphere) and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in cloud-free atmospheric conditions. These objectives were accomplished by conducting case studies on clear sky, smoky, and dusty conditions that took place in the Great Basin of the USA in 2013. Both the solar and thermal IR measurements and a state-of-the-science radiative transfer model, the LBLDIS, a combination of the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model and the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) solver were employed for the study. The LW aerosol forcing is often not included in climate models because the aerosol effect on the LW is often assumed to be negligible. We lack knowledge of aerosol characteristics in the LW region, and aerosol properties exhibit high variability. We have found that the LW TOA radiative forcing due to fine mode aerosols, mainly associated with small biomass burning smoke particles, is + 0.4 W/m2 which seems to be small, but it is similar to the LW radiative forcing due to increase in CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere since the preindustrial era of 1750 (+ 1.6 W/m 2). The LW radiative forcing due to coarse mode aerosols, associated with large airborne mineral dust particles, was found to be as much as + 5.02 W/m2 at the surface and + 1.71 W/m2 at the TOA. All of these significant positive values of the aerosol radiative forcing both at the BOA and TOA indicate that the aerosols have a heating effect in the LW range, which contributes to counterbalancing the cooling effect associated with the aerosol radiative forcing in the shortwave (SW) spectral region. In the meantime, we have found that LW radiative forcing by aerosols is highly sensitive to particle size and complex refractive indices of

  3. Precipitation Response to Regional Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, D. T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Faluvegi, G.; Milly, G.

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation shifts can have large impacts on human society and ecosystems. Many aspects of how inhomogeneous radiative forcings influence precipitation remain unclear, however. Here we investigate regional precipitation responses to various forcings imposed in different latitude bands in a climate model. We find that several regions show strong, significant responses to most forcings, but that the magnitude and even the sign depends upon the forcing location and type. Aerosol and ozone forcings typically induce larger responses than equivalent carbon dioxide (CO2) forcing, and the influence of remote forcings often outweighs that of local forcings. Consistent with this, ozone and especially aerosols contribute greatly to precipitation changes over the Sahel and South and East Asia in historical simulations, and inclusion of aerosols greatly increases the agreement with observed trends in these areas, which cannot be attributed to either greenhouse gases or natural forcings. Estimates of precipitation responses derived from multiplying our Regional Precipitation Potentials (RPP; the response per unit forcing relationships) by historical forcings typically capture the actual response in full transient climate simulations fairly well, suggesting that these relationships may provide useful metrics. The strong sensitivity to aerosol and ozone forcing suggests that although some air quality improvements may unmask greenhouse gas-induced warming, they have large benefits for reducing regional disruption of the hydrologic cycle.

  4. Radiative forcing due to trends in stratospheric water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Claire A.; Haigh, Joanna D.; Toumi, Ralf

    Trends derived from the latest version of Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) data are used in a two-dimensional atmospheric model to estimate their radiative effects over the last decade. The results show a stratospheric cooling in regions of H2O increase, of magnitude similar to that due to stratospheric ozone loss indicating a significant additional cause of observed stratospheric temperature decreases. Radiative forcings are derived and it is found that global average radiative forcing due to stratospheric water vapour changes probably lies in the range 0.12 to 0.20 Wm-2 decade-1. This could have more than compensated for the negative radiative forcing due to decadal ozone loss.

  5. Radiative Forcing Over Ocean by Ship Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -0.00014 plus or minus 53% Watts per square meter assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size of greater than or equal to 100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Watts per square meter), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

  6. Simulated 2050 aviation radiative forcing from contrails and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Chieh; Gettelman, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    The radiative forcing from aviation-induced cloudiness is investigated by using the Community Atmosphere Model Version 5 (CAM5) in the present (2006) and the future (through 2050). Global flight distance is projected to increase by a factor of 4 between 2006 and 2050. However, simulated contrail cirrus radiative forcing in 2050 can reach 87 mW m-2, an increase by a factor of 7 from 2006, and thus does not scale linearly with fuel emission mass. This is due to non-uniform regional increase in air traffic and different sensitivities for contrail radiative forcing in different regions. CAM5 simulations indicate that negative radiative forcing induced by the indirect effect of aviation sulfate aerosols on liquid clouds in 2050 can be as large as -160 mW m-2, an increase by a factor of 4 from 2006. As a result, the net 2050 radiative forcing of contrail cirrus and aviation aerosols may have a cooling effect on the planet. Aviation sulfate aerosols emitted at cruise altitude can be transported down to the lower troposphere, increasing the aerosol concentration, thus increasing the cloud drop number concentration and persistence of low-level clouds. Aviation black carbon aerosols produce a negligible net forcing globally in 2006 and 2050 in this model study. Uncertainties in the methodology and the modeling are significant and discussed in detail. Nevertheless, the projected percentage increase in contrail radiative forcing is important for future aviation impacts. In addition, the role of aviation aerosols in the cloud nucleation processes can greatly influence on the simulated radiative forcing from aircraft-induced cloudiness and even change its sign. Future research to confirm these results is necessary.

  7. Transthoracic Cardiac Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson

    heart function. Presented is the first use of transthoracic ARFI imaging in a serial study of heart failure in a porcine model. Results demonstrate the ability of transthoracic ARFI to image cyclically-varying stiffness changes in healthy and infarcted myocardium under good B-mode imaging conditions at depths in the range of 3-5 cm. Challenging imaging scenarios such as deep regions of interest, vigorous lateral motion and stable, reverberant clutter are analyzed and discussed. Results are then presented from the first study of clinical feasibility of transthoracic cardiac ARFI imaging. At the Duke University Medical Center, healthy volunteers and patients having magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed apical infarcts were enrolled for the study. The number of patients who met the inclusion criteria in this preliminary clinical trial was low, but results showed that the limitations seen in animal studies were not overcome by allowing transmit power levels to exceed the FDA mechanical index (MI) limit. The results suggested the primary source of image degradation was clutter rather than lack of radiation force. Additionally, the transthoracic method applied in its present form was not shown capable of tracking propagating ARFI-induced shear waves in the myocardium. Under current instrumentation and processing methods, results of these studies support feasibility for transthoracic ARFI in high-quality B-Mode imaging conditions. Transthoracic ARFI was not shown sensitive to infarct or to tracking heart failure in the presence of clutter and signal decorrelation. This work does provide evidence that transthoracic ARFI imaging is a safe non-invasive tool, but clinical efficacy as a diagnostic tool will need to be addressed by further development to overcome current challenges and increase robustness to sources of image degradation.

  8. Estimation of additive forces and moments for supersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Stanley C., Jr.; Dillenius, Marnix F. E.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for estimating the additive forces and moments associated with supersonic, external compression inlets as a function of mass flow ratio has been developed. The technique makes use of a low order supersonic paneling method for calculating minimum additive forces at maximum mass flow conditions. A linear relationship between the minimum additive forces and the maximum values for fully blocked flow is employed to obtain the additive forces at a specified mass flow ratio. The method is applicable to two-dimensional inlets at zero or nonzero angle of attack, and to axisymmetric inlets at zero angle of attack. Comparisons with limited available additive drag data indicate fair to good agreement.

  9. Liquid lens using acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Isago, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2011-03-01

    A liquid lens is proposed that uses acoustic radiation force with no mechanical moving parts. It consists of a cylindrical acrylic cell filled with two immiscible liquids (degassed water and silicone oil) and a concave ultrasound transducer. The focal point of the transducer is located on the oil-water interface, which functions as a lens. The acoustic radiation force is generated when there is a difference in the acoustic energy densities of different media. An acoustic standing wave was generated in the axial direction of the lens and the variation of the shape of the oil-water interface was observed by optical coherence tomography (OCT). The lens profile can be rapidly changed by varying the acoustic radiation force from the transducer. The kinematic viscosity of silicone oil was optimized to minimize the response times of the lens. Response times of 40 and 80 ms when switching ultrasonic radiation on and off were obtained with a kinematic viscosity of 200 cSt. The path of a laser beam transmitted through the lens was calculated by ray-tracing simulations based on the experimental results obtained by OCT. The transmitted laser beam could be focused by applying an input voltage. The liquid lens could be operated as a variable-focus lens by varying the input voltage.

  10. Mariner Venus/Mercury 1973 solar radiation force and torques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgevic, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The need for an improvement of the mathematical model of the solar radiation force and torques for the Mariner Venus/Mercury spacecraft arises from the fact that this spacecraft will be steering toward the inner planets (Venus and Mercury), where, due to the proximity of the Sun, the effect of the solar radiation pressure is much larger than it was on the antecedent Mariner spacecraft, steering in the opposite direction. Therefore, although the model yielded excellent results in the case of the Mariner 9 Mars Orbiter, additional effects of negligible magnitudes for the previous missions of the Mariner spacecraft should now be included in the model. This study examines all such effects and incorporates them into the already existing model, as well as using the improved model for calculation of the solar radiation force and torques acting on the Mariner Venus/Mercury spacecraft.

  11. Radiative Forcing and Climate Response: From Paleoclimate to Future Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.; Cao, L.

    2011-12-01

    The concept of radiative forcing was introduced to allow comparison of climate effects of different greenhouse gases. In the classic view, radiative forcing is applied to the climate system and the climate responds to this forcing, approaching some equilibrium temperature change that is the product of the radiative forcing times the 'climate sensitivity' to radiative forcing. However, this classic view is oversimplified in several respects. Climate forcing and response often cannot be clearly separated. When carbon dioxide is added to the atmosphere, within days, the increased absorption of longwave radiation begins to warm the interior of the troposphere, affecting various tropospheric properties. Especially in the case of aerosols, it has been found that considering rapid tropospheric adjustment gives a better predictor of "equilibrium" climate change than does the classic definition of radiative forcing. Biogeochemistry also provides additional feedbacks on the climate system. It is generally thought that biogeochemistry helps diminish climate sensitivity to a carbon dioxide emission, since carbon dioxide tends to stimulate carbon dioxide uptake by land plants and the ocean. However, there is potential to destabilize carbon locked up in permafrost and at least some possibility to destabilize methane in continental shelf sediments. Furthermore, wetlands may provide a significant methane feedback. These and other possible biogeochemical feedbacks have the potential to greatly increase the sensitivity of the climate system to carbon dioxide emissions. As time scales extend out to millennia, the large ice sheets can begin to play an important role. In addition to affecting atmospheric flows by their sheer bulk, ice sheets tend to reflect a lot of energy to space. If carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere long enough, there is potential to melt back the large ice sheets, which would add additional warming to the climate system. It is likely that these millennial

  12. Spatially Refined Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing Efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, Daven K.; Shindell, Drew Todd; Akhtar, Farhan; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Pinder, Robert W.; Loughlin, Dan; Kopacz, Monika; Singh, Kumaresh; Shim, Changsub

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is an important metric for assessing potential climate impacts of future emissions changes. However, the radiative consequences of emissions perturbations are not readily quantified nor well understood at the level of detail necessary to assess realistic policy options. To address this challenge, here we show how adjoint model sensitivities can be used to provide highly spatially resolved estimates of the DRF from emissions of black carbon (BC), primary organic carbon (OC), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ammonia (NH3), using the example of emissions from each sector and country following multiple Representative Concentration Pathway (RCPs). The radiative forcing efficiencies of many individual emissions are found to differ considerably from regional or sectoral averages for NH3, SO2 from the power sector, and BC from domestic, industrial, transportation and biomass burning sources. Consequently, the amount of emissions controls required to attain a specific DRF varies at intracontinental scales by up to a factor of 4. These results thus demonstrate both a need and means for incorporating spatially refined aerosol DRF into analysis of future emissions scenario and design of air quality and climate change mitigation policies.

  13. Longwave radiative forcing by aqueous aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of interest has been focused on the role of aerosols in climatic change because of their potential cooling impacts due to light scattering. Recent advances in infrared spectroscopy using cylindrical internal reflectance have allowed the longwave absorption of dissolved aerosol species and the associated liquid water to be accurately determined and evaluated. Experimental measurements using these techniques have shown that dissolved sulfate, nitrate, and numerous other aerosol species will act to cause greenhouse effects. Preliminary calculations indicate that the longwave climate forcing (i.e., heating) for sulfate aerosol will be comparable in magnitude to the cooling effect produced by light scattering. However, more detailed modeling will clearly be needed to address the impact of the longwave forcing due to aerosols as a function of atmospheric height and composition. Their work has shown that aerosol composition will be important in determining longwave forcing, while shortwave forcing will be more related to the physical size of the aerosol droplets. On the basis of these studies, it is increasingly apparent that aerosols, fogs, and clouds play a key role in determining the radiative balance of the atmosphere and in controlling regional and global climates.

  14. Material fabrication using acoustic radiation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Naveen N.; Sinha, Dipen N.; Goddard, Gregory Russ

    2015-12-01

    Apparatus and methods for using acoustic radiation forces to order particles suspended in a host liquid are described. The particles may range in size from nanometers to millimeters, and may have any shape. The suspension is placed in an acoustic resonator cavity, and acoustical energy is supplied thereto using acoustic transducers. The resulting pattern may be fixed by using a solidifiable host liquid, forming thereby a solid material. Patterns may be quickly generated; typical times ranging from a few seconds to a few minutes. In a one-dimensional arrangement, parallel layers of particles are formed. With two and three dimensional transducer arrangements, more complex particle configurations are possible since different standing-wave patterns may be generated in the resonator. Fabrication of periodic structures, such as metamaterials, having periods tunable by varying the frequency of the acoustic waves, on surfaces or in bulk volume using acoustic radiation forces, provides great flexibility in the creation of new materials. Periodicities may range from millimeters to sub-micron distances, covering a large portion of the range for optical and acoustical metamaterials.

  15. Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging.

    PubMed

    McDannold, Nathan; Maier, Stephan E

    2008-08-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging is an elastography method developed for ultrasound imaging that maps displacements produced by focused ultrasound pulses systematically applied to different locations. The resulting images are "stiffness weighted" and yield information about local mechanical tissue properties. Here, the feasibility of magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) was tested. Quasistatic MR elastography was used to measure focal displacements using a one-dimensional MRI pulse sequence. A 1.63 or 1.5 MHz transducer supplied ultrasound pulses which were triggered by the magnetic resonance imaging hardware to occur before a displacement-encoding gradient. Displacements in and around the focus were mapped in a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an ex vivo bovine kidney. They were readily observed and increased linearly with acoustic power in the phantom (R2=0.99). At higher acoustic power levels, the displacement substantially increased and was associated with irreversible changes in the phantom. At these levels, transverse displacement components could also be detected. Displacements in the kidney were also observed and increased after thermal ablation. While the measurements need validation, the authors have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting small displacements induced by low-power ultrasound pulses using an efficient magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequence that is compatible with tracking of a dynamically steered ultrasound focal spot, and that the displacement increases with acoustic power. MR-ARFI has potential for elastography or to guide ultrasound therapies that use low-power pulsed ultrasound exposures, such as drug delivery.

  16. Radiative forcing under mixed aerosol conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GarcíA, O. E.; Expósito, F. J.; DíAz, J. P.; DíAz, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The mixture of mineral dust with biomass burning or urban-industrial aerosols presents significant differences in optical properties when compared to those of the individual constituents, leading to different impacts on solar radiation levels. This effect is assessed by estimating the direct radiative forcing (ΔF) of these aerosols from solar flux models using the radiative parameters derived from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). These data reveal that, in oceanic and vegetative covers (surface albedo (SA) < 0.30), the aerosol effect at the top of atmosphere (TOA) is always cooling the Earth-atmosphere system, regardless of the aerosol type. The obtained average values of ΔF range between -27 ± 15 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 0.55 μm, 0.3 ± 0.3) for mineral dust mixed with urban-industrial aerosols, registered in the East Asia region, and -34 ± 18 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.8 ± 0.4) for the mixture of the mineral dust and biomass burning particles, observed in the Central Africa region. In the intermediate SA range (0.30-0.50) the TOA radiative effect depends on the aerosol absorption properties. Thus, aerosols with single scattering albedo at 0.55 μm lower than ˜0.88 lead to a warming of the system, with ΔF of 10 ± 11 Wm-2 for the mixture of mineral dust and biomass burning. Cases with SA > 0.30 are not present in East Asia region. At the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) the maximum ΔF values are associated with the highest AOD levels obtained for the mixture of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols (-130 ± 44 Wm-2 with AOD = 0.8 ± 0.4 for SA < 0.30).

  17. Rectified Motion of Microparticles: Generalizing Streaming and Radiation Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, David; Agarwal, Siddhansh; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that a wide variety of oscillating flows gives rise to steady streaming, i.e., rectified motion of fluid elements. Small spherical particles introduced into such a flow have been shown to experience an additional lift force that ultimately leads to particle trajectories that differ systematically from the fluid element pathlines. We demonstrate a systematic derivation of this differential particle motion on the steady streaming time scale, so that time-averaged particle trajectories can be directly predicted without computation on the fast, oscillatory time scale. The resulting dynamics can be interpreted as a generalization of streaming flow, while the closed-form lift force provides a generalization of the secondary radiation force, to which it reduces in appropriate limiting cases. These very general results are validated by comparison with experiments in the context of bubble streaming, but apply to a large class of other flows as well.

  18. Strong enhancement of dispersion forces from microwave radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sernelius, B. E.

    2002-11-01

    We have studied non-thermal effects of microwave radiation on the forces between objects. This is the first step in a study of possible effects of microwave radiation from cellular phones on biological tissue. We have used a simplified model for human blood cells in blood. We find for the normal radiation level of cellular phones an enhancement of the attractive force with ten orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding effect at thermal radiation.

  19. Assigning a Price to Radiative Forcing: Methods, Results, and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D. A.; Howarth, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change mitigation frameworks have increasingly begun to include components that involve active management of the land surface. Predominantly, these programs focus on the sequestration of greenhouse gasses in vegetation and soils, generating offset credits for projects which demonstrate considerable storage. However, it is widely known that biogeophysical interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, such as latent and sensible heat flux, albedo radiative forcing, and surface roughness, can in many cases outweigh the influence of greenhouse gas storage on global and local climate. Surface albedo, in particular, has attracted attention in the context of these frameworks because it has been shown to influence the overall climate benefits of high-latitude forest growth through tradeoffs between carbon sequestration and radiative forcing from seasonal snow cover albedo. Here we review a methodology for pricing albedo-related radiative forcing through the use of an integrated assessment model, present the results under several emissions and social preference scenarios, and describe the implications that this pricing methodology may have on forest land management in the Northeastern United States. Additionally, we investigate the consequences of projected decreased winter precipitation on the net climate benefits of snow albedo throughout the state of New Hampshire, USA.

  20. Spectral aerosol direct radiative forcing from airborne radiative measurements during CalNex and ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Samuel E.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Redemann, J.; Hostetler, C.; Ferrare, R.; Hair, J.; Langridge, J. M.; Lack, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    This study presents the aerosol radiative forcing derived from airborne measurements of shortwave spectral irradiance during the 2010 Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex). Relative forcing efficiency, the radiative forcing normalized by aerosol optical thickness and incident irradiance, is a means of comparing the aerosol radiative forcing for different conditions. In this study, it is used to put the aerosol radiative effects of an air mass in the Los Angeles basin in context with case studies from three field missions that targeted other regions and aerosol types, including a case study from the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS). For CalNex, we relied on irradiance measurements onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during a flight on 19 May 2010 over a ground station. CalNex presented a difficulty for determining forcing efficiency since one of the input parameters, optical thickness, was not available from the same aircraft. However, extinction profiles were available from a nearby aircraft. An existing retrieval algorithm was modified to use those measurements as initial estimate for the missing optical thickness. In addition, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (secondary products of the method), were compared with CalNex in situ measurements. The CalNex relative forcing efficiency spectra agreed with earlier studies that found this parameter to be constrained at each wavelength within 20% per unit of aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm regardless of aerosol type and experiment, except for highly absorbing aerosols sampled near Mexico City. The diurnally averaged below-layer forcing efficiency integrated over the wavelength range of 350-700 nm for CalNex is estimated to be -58.6 ± 13.8 W/m2, whereas for the ARCTAS case it is -48.7 ± 11.5 W/m2.

  1. Radiation force modeling for ICESat precision orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Charles Edward

    2007-12-01

    Precision orbit determination (POD) for the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) relies on an epoch-state batch filter, in which the dynamic models play a central role. Its implementation in the Multi-Satellite Orbit Determination Program (MSODP) originally included a box-and-wing model, representing the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite, to compute solar radiation forces. This "macro-model" has been adapted to the ICESat geometry, and additionally, extended to the calculation of forces induced by radiation reflected and emitted from the Earth. To determine the area and reflectivity parameters of the ICESat macro-model surfaces, a high-fidelity simulation of the radiation forces in low-Earth orbit was first developed, using a detailed model of the satellite, called the "micro-model". In this effort, new algorithms to compute such forces were adapted from a Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method originally designed to determine incident heating rates. After working with the vendor of the Thermal Synthesizer System (TSS) to implement these algorithms, a modified version of this software was employed to generate solar and Earth radiation forces for all ICESat orbit and attitude geometries. Estimates of the macro-model parameters were then obtained from a least-squares fit to these micro-model forces, applying an algorithm that also incorporated linear equality and inequality constraints to ensure feasible solutions. Three of these fitted solutions were selected for post-launch evaluation. Two represented conditions at the start and at the end of the mission, while the third comprised four separate solutions, one for each of the nominal satellite attitudes. In addition, three other sets of macro-model parameters were derived from area-weighted averaging of the micro-model reflectivities. They included solar-only and infrared-only spectral parameters, as well as a set combining these parameters. Daily POD solutions were generated with each of these macro-model sets

  2. The radiative forcing potential of different climate geoengineering options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenton, T. M.; Vaughan, N. E.

    2009-08-01

    Climate geoengineering proposals seek to rectify the Earth's current and potential future radiative imbalance, either by reducing the absorption of incoming solar (shortwave) radiation, or by removing CO2 from the atmosphere and transferring it to long-lived reservoirs, thus increasing outgoing longwave radiation. A fundamental criterion for evaluating geoengineering options is their climate cooling effectiveness, which we quantify here in terms of radiative forcing potential. We use a simple analytical approach, based on energy balance considerations and pulse response functions for the decay of CO2 perturbations. This aids transparency compared to calculations with complex numerical models, but is not intended to be definitive. It allows us to compare the relative effectiveness of a range of proposals. We consider geoengineering options as additional to large reductions in CO2 emissions. By 2050, some land carbon cycle geoengineering options could be of comparable magnitude to mitigation "wedges", but only stratospheric aerosol injections, albedo enhancement of marine stratocumulus clouds, or sunshades in space have the potential to cool the climate back toward its pre-industrial state. Strong mitigation, combined with global-scale air capture and storage, afforestation, and bio-char production, i.e. enhanced CO2 sinks, might be able to bring CO2 back to its pre-industrial level by 2100, thus removing the need for other geoengineering. Alternatively, strong mitigation stabilising CO2 at 500 ppm, combined with geoengineered increases in the albedo of marine stratiform clouds, grasslands, croplands and human settlements might achieve a patchy cancellation of radiative forcing. Ocean fertilisation options are only worthwhile if sustained on a millennial timescale and phosphorus addition may have greater long-term potential than iron or nitrogen fertilisation. Enhancing ocean upwelling or downwelling have trivial effects on any meaningful timescale. Our approach

  3. Estimates of the direct and indirect radiative forcing due to tropospheric aerosols: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, James; Boucher, Olivier

    2000-11-01

    This paper reviews the many developments in estimates of the direct and indirect global annual mean radiative forcing due to present-day concentrations of anthropogenic tropospheric aerosols since Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [1996]. The range of estimates of the global mean direct radiative forcing due to six distinct aerosol types is presented. Additionally, the indirect effect is split into two components corresponding to the radiative forcing due to modification of the radiative properties of clouds (cloud albedo effect) and the effects of anthropogenic aerosols upon the lifetime of clouds (cloud lifetime effect). The radiative forcing for anthropogenic sulphate aerosol ranges from -0.26 to -0.82 W m-2. For fossil fuel black carbon the radiative forcing ranges from +0.16 W m-2 for an external mixture to +0.42 W m-2 for where the black carbon is modeled as internally mixed with sulphate aerosol. For fossil fuel organic carbon the two estimates of the likely weakest limit of the direct radiative forcing are -0.02 and -0.04 W m-2. For biomass-burning sources of black carbon and organic carbon the combined radiative forcing ranges from -0.14 to -0.74 W m-2. Estimates of the radiative forcing due to mineral dust vary widely from +0.09 to -0.46 W m-2; even the sign of the radiative forcing is not well established due to the competing effects of solar and terrestrial radiative forcings. A single study provides a very tentative estimate of the radiative forcing of nitrates to be -0.03 W m-2. Estimates of the cloud albedo indirect radiative forcing range from -0.3 to approximately -1.8 W m-2. Although the cloud lifetime effect is identified as a potentially important climate forcing mechanism, it is difficult to quantify in the context of the present definition of radiative forcing of climate change and current model simulations. This is because its estimation by general circulation models necessarily includes some level of cloud and water vapor feedbacks

  4. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect Its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Penner, J. E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, K.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  5. Black Carbon Vertical Profiles Strongly Affect its Radiative Forcing Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Samset, B. H.; Myhre, G.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, Susanne E.; Berntsen, T.; Bian, Huisheng; Bellouin, N.; Diehl, T.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, Stefan; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Zhang, Kai

    2013-03-01

    The impact of black carbon (BC) aerosols on the global radiation balance is not well constrained. Here twelve global aerosol models are used to show that at least 20% of the present uncertainty in modeled BC direct radiative forcing (RF) is due to diversity in the simulated vertical profile of BC mass. Results are from phases 1 and 2 of the global aerosol model intercomparison project (AeroCom). Additionally, a significant fraction of the variability is shown to come from high altitudes, as, globally, more than 40% of the total BC RF is exerted above 5 km. BC emission regions and areas with transported BC are found to have differing characteristics. These insights into the importance of the vertical profile of BC lead us to suggest that observational studies are needed to better characterize the global distribution of BC, including in the upper troposphere.

  6. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D; Nilsson, Lennart

    2016-04-15

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all-atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs.

  7. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all‐atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26841080

  8. The radiative forcing potential of different climate geoengineering options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenton, T. M.; Vaughan, N. E.

    2009-01-01

    Climate geoengineering proposals seek to rectify the Earth's current radiative imbalance, either by reducing the absorption of incoming solar (shortwave) radiation, or by removing CO2 from the atmosphere and transferring it to long-lived reservoirs, thus increasing outgoing longwave radiation. A fundamental criterion for evaluating geoengineering options is their climate cooling effectiveness, which we quantify here in terms of radiative forcing potential. We use a simple analytical approach, based on the global energy balance and pulse response functions for the decay of CO2 perturbations. This aids transparency compared to calculations with complex numerical models, but is not intended to be definitive. Already it reveals some significant errors in existing calculations, and it allows us to compare the relative effectiveness of a range of proposals. By 2050, only stratospheric aerosol injections or sunshades in space have the potential to cool the climate back toward its pre-industrial state, but some land carbon cycle geoengineering options are of comparable magnitude to mitigation "wedges". Strong mitigation, i.e. large reductions in CO2 emissions, combined with global-scale air capture and storage, afforestation, and bio-char production, i.e. enhanced CO2 sinks, might be able to bring CO2 back to its pre-industrial level by 2100, thus removing the need for other geoengineering. Alternatively, strong mitigation stabilising CO2 at 500 ppm, combined with geoengineered increases in the albedo of marine stratiform clouds, grasslands, croplands and human settlements might achieve a patchy cancellation of radiative forcing. Ocean fertilisation options are only worthwhile if sustained on a millennial timescale and phosphorus addition probably has greater long-term potential than iron or nitrogen fertilisation. Enhancing ocean upwelling or downwelling have trivial effects on any meaningful timescale. Our approach provides a common framework for the evaluation of

  9. Total aerosol effect: forcing or radiative flux perturbation?

    SciTech Connect

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andy; Rotstayn, Leon; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto

    2009-09-25

    Uncertainties in aerosol forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of rain formation. Traditionally these feedbacks were not included in estimates of total aerosol forcing. Here we argue that they should be included because these feedbacks act quickly compared with the time scale of global warming. We show that for different forcing agents (aerosols and greenhouse gases) the radiative forcings as traditionally defined agree rather well with estimates from a method, here referred to as radiative flux perturbations (RFP), that takes these fast feedbacks and interactions into account. Thus we propose replacing the direct and indirect aerosol forcing in the IPCC forcing chart with RFP estimates. This implies that it is better to evaluate the total anthropogenic aerosol effect as a whole.

  10. Ultrasonic Radiation Force for Emboli Removal from Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we investigate the removal of emboli from cardiopulmonary bypass circuits via acoustic radiation force. Unless removed, emboli can be a significant source of cognitive deficit after cardiac surgery. We have implemented both inviscid linear and viscous non-linear models for radiation force on a sphere immersed in a fluid. The importance of viscosity is a lingering question in the literature. These models allow for prediction of radiation force as a function of embolus size and can identify the optimal frequency for clinical use.

  11. A novel motion compensation algorithm for acoustic radiation force elastography.

    PubMed

    Fahey, B J; Hsu, S J; Trahey, G E

    2008-05-01

    A novel method of physiological motion compensation for use with radiation force elasticity imaging has been developed. The method utilizes a priori information from finite element method models of the response of soft tissue to impulsive radiation force to isolate physiological motion artifacts from radiation force-induced displacement fields. The new algorithmis evaluated in a series of clinically realistic imaging scenarios, and its performance is compared to that achieved with previously described motion compensation algorithms. Though not without limitations, the new model-based motion compensation algorithm performs favorably in many circumstances and may be a logical choice for use with in vivo abdominal imaging.

  12. Radiative forcing from household fuel burning in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aunan, Kristin; Berntsen, Terje K.; Myhre, Gunnar; Rypdal, Kristin; Streets, David G.; Woo, Jung-Hun; Smith, Kirk R.

    Household fuel use in developing countries, particularly as biomass and coal, is a major source of carbonaceous aerosols and other air pollutants affecting health and climate. Using state-of-the-art emission inventories, a global three-dimensional photochemical tracer/transport model of the troposphere, and a global radiative transfer model based on methods presented in the latest IPCC Assessment Report (2007-AR4), we estimate the radiative forcing (RF) attributable to household fuel combustion in Asia in terms of current global annual-mean RF and future global integrated RF for a one-year pulse of emissions (2000) over two time horizons (100 and 20 years). Despite the significant emissions of black carbon (BC) aerosols, these estimates indicate that shorter-lived (non-Kyoto) air pollutants from household fuel use in the region overall seem to exert a small net negative RF because of the strong influence of reflective aerosols. There are, however, major uncertainties in emission estimates for solid fuel burning, and about the sustainability of household fuel wood harvesting in Asia (the carbon neutrality of harvesting). In addition, there is still substantial uncertainty associated with the BC radiative forcing. As a result we find that the sign of the RF from household biomass burning in the region cannot be established. While recognizing the value of integrating climate change and air pollution policies, we are concerned that for a 'Kyoto style' post-Kyoto treaty (with global cap-and-trade and the Global Warming Potential as the metric) expanding the basket of components with a selection of short-lived species without also including the wider range of co-emitted species may lead to unintended consequences for global-scale climate. Additional measurement, modelling, and policy research is urgently needed to reduce the uncertainties so that the net impact on climate of emissions and mitigation measures in this sector can be accurately assessed.

  13. Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing: Calculations and Measurements from the Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Hignett, P.; Stowe, L. L.; Livingston, J. M.; Kinne, S.; Wong, J.; Chan, K. Roland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Radiative forcing is defined as the change in the net (downwelling minus upwelling) radiative flux at a given level in the atmosphere. This net flux is the radiative power density available to drive climatic processes in the earth-atmosphere system below that level. Recent research shows that radiative forcing by aerosol particles is a major source of uncertainty in climate predictions. To reduce those uncertainties, TARFOX was designed to determine direct (cloud-free) radiative forcing by the aerosols in one of the world's major industrial pollution plumes--that flowing from the east coast of the US over the Atlantic Ocean. TARFOX measured a variety of aerosol radiative effects (including direct forcing) while simultaneously measuring the chemical, physical, and optical properties of the aerosol particles causing those effects. The resulting data sets permit a wide variety of tests of the consistency, or closure, among the measurements and the models that link them. Because climate predictions use the same or similar model components, closure tests help to assess and reduce prediction uncertainties. In this work we use the TARFOX-determined aerosol, gas, and surface properties to compute radiative forcing for a variety of aerosol episodes, with inadvisable optical depths ranging from 0.07 to 0.6. We calculate forcing by several techniques with varying degrees of sophistication, in part to test the range of applicability of simplified techniques--which are often the only ones feasible in climate predictions by general circulation models (GCMs). We then compare computed forcing to that determined from: (1) Upwelling and downwelling fluxes (0.3-0.7 mm and 0.7-3.0 mm) measured by radiometers on the UK MRF C-130. and (2) Daily average cloud-free absorbed solar and emitted thermal radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere derived from the AVHRR radiometer on the NOAA- 14 satellite. The calculations and measurements all yield aerosol direct radiative forcing in the

  14. Diversity of biomedical applications of acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen

    2010-02-01

    This manuscript is a summary of the paper presented at the ICU'2009 on biomedical applications of acoustic radiation force with emphasis on emerging applications in microfluidics, biotechnology, biosensors and assessment of the skeletal system. In this brief overview of current and projected applications of radiation force, no detailed description of the experiments illustrating particular applications are given as this would result in a far different and longer paper. Various mechanisms of acoustic radiation force generations and their biomedical applications are considered. These mechanisms include: (a) change in the density of energy of the propagating wave due to absorption and scattering; (b) spatial variations of energy density in standing acoustic waves; (c) reflection from inclusions, walls or other interfaces; and (d) spatial variations in propagation velocity. The widest area of biomedical applications of radiation force is related to medical diagnostics, to assessing viscoelastic properties of biological tissues and fluids, and specifically to elasticity imaging. Another actively explored area is related to manipulation of biological cells and particles in standing ultrasonic wave fields. There are several poorly explored areas of potential biomedical applications of ultrasound radiation force. A promising area of biomedical application of ultrasound radiation force is stirring and mixing of microvolumes of liquids in microfluidics and in various biotechnological application where diffusion rate is the main factor limiting the efficiency of the process of interest. A new technique, called "swept frequency method", based on the use of radiation force in the standing acoustic wave for microstirring of liquids is described. The potential applications of the ultrasound radiation force for assessment of skeletal system, where conventional bone ultrasonometry are inapplicable are considered.

  15. Surface radiation budget and cloud radiative forcing from pan-Arctic Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, C. J.; Long, C. N.; Crepinsek, S.; Maturilli, M.; McComiskey, A. C.; Miller, N.; Konopleva-Akish, E.; Kustov, V. Y.; Shupe, M.; Steffen, K.; Stanitski, D.; Starkweather, S.; Stone, R. S.; Uttal, T.; Walden, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring and forecasting of the seasonal melt of snow and ice in the Arctic is a priority need as Arctic climate changes and the number of stakeholders increases. Seasonal snow and ice melt represent the largest annual perturbation to the surface net radiation budget. Radiative interactions between clouds, the surface and the atmosphere play an important role on scales of minutes to decades, but models insufficiently represent cloud properties. Furthermore, the surface radiation budget is not directly observed from satellite platforms. Direct observations from the surface must therefore be used to document the physical and correlative relationships between variables, and to provide a baseline target for data sets with more comprehensive spatial representation. High-quality, continuous, long-term observations of radiative fluxes are collected from land stations surrounding the Arctic Basin as part of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). The International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) facilitates international collaboration amongst station scientists and other topic experts for the purposes of streamlining pan-Arctic synthesis studies. The IASOA Radiation Working Group is currently analyzing the data acquired from Barrow, Alaska (1993-2015), Alert, Canada (2004-2014), Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard (1993-2015), Eureka, Canada (2007-2015), and Tiksi, Russia (2011-2015). The measurements include upwelling and downwelling longwave and shortwave fluxes, as well as direct and diffuse shortwave flux components, and surface meteorology. The observations are post-processed using the Radiative Flux Analysis (RFA) method, which, in addition to basic quality control, provides value-added metrics such as cloud radiative forcing (CRF), optical depth, and fractional sky cover. Here, we present a spatial and temporal analysis of the surface radiation budget and calculated variables from the pan-Arctic BSRN stations. Particular attention is given to inter

  16. Black carbon radiative forcing at TOA decreased during aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-12-01

    During aging processing, black carbon (also called soot) particles may tend to be mixed with other aerosols, and highly influence their radiative forcing. In this study, freshly emitted soot particles were simulated as fractal aggregates composed of small spherical primary monomers. After aging in the atmosphere, soot monomers were coated by a thinly layer of sulfate as thinly coated soot particles. These soot particles were entirely embedded into large sulfate particle by further aging, and becoming heavily coated soot particles. In clear-sky conditions, black carbon radiative forcing with different aging states were investigated for the bottom and top of atmosphere (BOA and TOA). The simulations showed that black carbon radiative forcing increased at BOA and decreased at TOA after their aging processes. Thinly and heavily coated states increased up to ~12% and ~35% black carbon radiative forcing at BOA, and black carbon radiative forcing at TOA can reach to ~20% and ~100% smaller for thinly and heavily coated states than those of freshly emitted states, respectively. The effect of aging states of black carbon radiative forcing was varied with surface albedo, aerosol optical depth and solar zenith angles. These findings would be helpful for the assessments of climate change.

  17. Radiative forcing from the 1991 Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Kirchner, Ingo; Robock, Alan; Graf, Hans-F.; AntuñA, Juan Carlos; Grainger, R. G.; Lambert, Alyn; Thomason, Larry

    1998-06-01

    Volcanic sulfate aerosols in the stratosphere produce significant long-term solar and infrared radiative perturbations in the Earth's atmosphere and at the surface, which cause a response of the climate system. Here we study the fundamental process of the development of this volcanic radiative forcing, focusing on the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines on June 15, 1991. We develop a spectral-, space-, and time-dependent set of aerosol parameters for 2 years after the Pinatubo eruption using a combination of SAGE II aerosol extinctions and UARS-retrieved effective radii, supported by SAM II, AVHRR, lidar and balloon observations. Using these data, we calculate the aerosol radiative forcing with the ECHAM4 general circulation model (GCM) for cases with climatological and observed sea surface temperature (SST), as well as with and without climate response. We find that the aerosol radiative forcing is not sensitive to the climate variations caused by SST or the atmospheric response to the aerosols, except in regions with varying dense cloudiness. The solar forcing in the near infrared contributes substantially to the total stratospheric heating. A complete formulation of radiative forcing should include not only changes of net fluxes at the tropopause but also the vertical distribution of atmospheric heating rates and the change of downward thermal and net solar radiative fluxes at the surface. These forcing and aerosol data are available for GCM experiments with any spatial and spectral resolution.

  18. Black carbon radiative forcing at TOA decreased during aging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-01-01

    During aging processing, black carbon (also called soot) particles may tend to be mixed with other aerosols, and highly influence their radiative forcing. In this study, freshly emitted soot particles were simulated as fractal aggregates composed of small spherical primary monomers. After aging in the atmosphere, soot monomers were coated by a thinly layer of sulfate as thinly coated soot particles. These soot particles were entirely embedded into large sulfate particle by further aging, and becoming heavily coated soot particles. In clear-sky conditions, black carbon radiative forcing with different aging states were investigated for the bottom and top of atmosphere (BOA and TOA). The simulations showed that black carbon radiative forcing increased at BOA and decreased at TOA after their aging processes. Thinly and heavily coated states increased up to ~12% and ~35% black carbon radiative forcing at BOA, and black carbon radiative forcing at TOA can reach to ~20% and ~100% smaller for thinly and heavily coated states than those of freshly emitted states, respectively. The effect of aging states of black carbon radiative forcing was varied with surface albedo, aerosol optical depth and solar zenith angles. These findings would be helpful for the assessments of climate change. PMID:27917943

  19. Black carbon radiative forcing at TOA decreased during aging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Cheng, Tianhai; Zheng, Lijuan; Chen, Hao

    2016-12-05

    During aging processing, black carbon (also called soot) particles may tend to be mixed with other aerosols, and highly influence their radiative forcing. In this study, freshly emitted soot particles were simulated as fractal aggregates composed of small spherical primary monomers. After aging in the atmosphere, soot monomers were coated by a thinly layer of sulfate as thinly coated soot particles. These soot particles were entirely embedded into large sulfate particle by further aging, and becoming heavily coated soot particles. In clear-sky conditions, black carbon radiative forcing with different aging states were investigated for the bottom and top of atmosphere (BOA and TOA). The simulations showed that black carbon radiative forcing increased at BOA and decreased at TOA after their aging processes. Thinly and heavily coated states increased up to ~12% and ~35% black carbon radiative forcing at BOA, and black carbon radiative forcing at TOA can reach to ~20% and ~100% smaller for thinly and heavily coated states than those of freshly emitted states, respectively. The effect of aging states of black carbon radiative forcing was varied with surface albedo, aerosol optical depth and solar zenith angles. These findings would be helpful for the assessments of climate change.

  20. Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar Anand

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the role of clouds is one of the highest priority science objectives in the global climate change program. In particular there has been a renewed interest in understanding the cloud radiative interactions in the tropical regions. Although a number of studies have emphasized the importance of cloud optical properties on the earth's radiative energy balance, information concerning cloud optical depth and particle size as a function of cloud type is lacking.

  1. The Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project (RFMIP): experimental protocol for CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincus, Robert; Forster, Piers M.; Stevens, Bjorn

    2016-09-01

    The phrasing of the first of three questions motivating CMIP6 - "How does the Earth system respond to forcing?" - suggests that forcing is always well-known, yet the radiative forcing to which this question refers has historically been uncertain in coordinated experiments even as understanding of how best to infer radiative forcing has evolved. The Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project (RFMIP) endorsed by CMIP6 seeks to provide a foundation for answering the question through three related activities: (i) accurate characterization of the effective radiative forcing relative to a near-preindustrial baseline and careful diagnosis of the components of this forcing; (ii) assessment of the absolute accuracy of clear-sky radiative transfer parameterizations against reference models on the global scales relevant for climate modeling; and (iii) identification of robust model responses to tightly specified aerosol radiative forcing from 1850 to present. Complete characterization of effective radiative forcing can be accomplished with 180 years (Tier 1) of atmosphere-only simulation using a sea-surface temperature and sea ice concentration climatology derived from the host model's preindustrial control simulation. Assessment of parameterization error requires trivial amounts of computation but the development of small amounts of infrastructure: new, spectrally detailed diagnostic output requested as two snapshots at present-day and preindustrial conditions, and results from the model's radiation code applied to specified atmospheric conditions. The search for robust responses to aerosol changes relies on the CMIP6 specification of anthropogenic aerosol properties; models using this specification can contribute to RFMIP with no additional simulation, while those using a full aerosol model are requested to perform at least one and up to four 165-year coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations at Tier 1.

  2. Direct radiative forcing by smoke from biomass burning

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, P.V.; Reid, J.S.; Kotchenruther, R.A.

    1997-03-21

    Airborne measurements in smoke from biomass burning in Brazil have yielded optical parameters that permit an improved assessment of the effects of smoke on Earth`s radiation balance. The global-mean direct radiative forcing due to smoke from biomass burning worldwide is estimated to be no more than about -0.3 watt per square meter (cooling), compared with +2.45 watts per square meter (warming) due to anthropogenic greenhouse gases. On regional scales, direct radiative forcing due to smoke can be large and might indirectly affect global climate. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Surface energy budget responses to radiative forcing at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathaniel B.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Cox, Christopher J.; Noone, David; Persson, P. Ola G.; Steffen, Konrad

    2017-02-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface temperatures are controlled by an exchange of energy at the surface, which includes radiative, turbulent, and ground heat fluxes. Data collected by multiple projects are leveraged to calculate all surface energy budget (SEB) terms at Summit, Greenland, for the full annual cycle from July 2013 to June 2014 and extend to longer periods for the radiative and turbulent SEB terms. Radiative fluxes are measured directly by a suite of broadband radiometers. Turbulent sensible heat flux is estimated via the bulk aerodynamic and eddy correlation methods, and the turbulent latent heat flux is calculated via a two-level approach using measurements at 10 and 2 m. The subsurface heat flux is calculated using a string of thermistors buried in the snow pack. Extensive quality-control data processing produced a data set in which all terms of the SEB are present 75 % of the full annual cycle, despite the harsh conditions. By including a storage term for a near-surface layer, the SEB is balanced in this data set to within the aggregated uncertainties for the individual terms. November and August case studies illustrate that surface radiative forcing is driven by synoptically forced cloud characteristics, especially by low-level, liquid-bearing clouds. The annual cycle and seasonal diurnal cycles of all SEB components indicate that the non-radiative terms are anticorrelated to changes in the total radiative flux and are hence responding to cloud radiative forcing. Generally, the non-radiative SEB terms and the upwelling longwave radiation component compensate for changes in downwelling radiation, although exact partitioning of energy in the response terms varies with season and near-surface characteristics such as stability and moisture availability. Substantial surface warming from low-level clouds typically leads to a change from a very stable to a weakly stable near-surface regime with no solar radiation or from a weakly stable to neutral

  4. Additive Manufacturing Materials Study for Gaseous Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Steer, C.A.; Durose, A.; Boakes, J.

    2015-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques may lead to improvements in many areas of radiation detector construction; notably the rapid manufacturing time allows for a reduced time between prototype iterations. The additive nature of the technique results in a granular microstructure which may be permeable to ingress by atmospheric gases and make it unsuitable for gaseous radiation detector development. In this study we consider the application of AM to the construction of enclosures and frames for wire-based gaseous radiation tracking detectors. We have focussed on oxygen impurity ingress as a measure of the permeability of the enclosure, and the gas charging and discharging curves of several simplistic enclosure shapes are reported. A prototype wire-frame is also presented to examine structural strength and positional accuracy of an AM produced frame. We lastly discuss the implications of this study for AM based radiation detection technology as a diagnostic tool for incident response scenarios, such as the interrogation of a suspect radiation-emitting package. (authors)

  5. Observationally constrained estimates of carbonaceous aerosol radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chul E; Ramanathan, V; Decremer, Damien

    2012-07-17

    Carbonaceous aerosols (CA) emitted by fossil and biomass fuels consist of black carbon (BC), a strong absorber of solar radiation, and organic matter (OM). OM scatters as well as absorbs solar radiation. The absorbing component of OM, which is ignored in most climate models, is referred to as brown carbon (BrC). Model estimates of the global CA radiative forcing range from 0 to 0.7 Wm(-2), to be compared with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's estimate for the pre-Industrial to the present net radiative forcing of about 1.6 Wm(-2). This study provides a model-independent, observationally based estimate of the CA direct radiative forcing. Ground-based aerosol network data is integrated with field data and satellite-based aerosol observations to provide a decadal (2001 through 2009) global view of the CA optical properties and direct radiative forcing. The estimated global CA direct radiative effect is about 0.75 Wm(-2) (0.5 to 1.0). This study identifies the global importance of BrC, which is shown to contribute about 20% to 550-nm CA solar absorption globally. Because of the inclusion of BrC, the net effect of OM is close to zero and the CA forcing is nearly equal to that of BC. The CA direct radiative forcing is estimated to be about 0.65 (0.5 to about 0.8) Wm(-2), thus comparable to or exceeding that by methane. Caused in part by BrC absorption, CAs have a net warming effect even over open biomass-burning regions in Africa and the Amazon.

  6. Observationally constrained estimates of carbonaceous aerosol radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chul E.; Ramanathan, V.; Decremer, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols (CA) emitted by fossil and biomass fuels consist of black carbon (BC), a strong absorber of solar radiation, and organic matter (OM). OM scatters as well as absorbs solar radiation. The absorbing component of OM, which is ignored in most climate models, is referred to as brown carbon (BrC). Model estimates of the global CA radiative forcing range from 0 to 0.7 Wm-2, to be compared with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s estimate for the pre-Industrial to the present net radiative forcing of about 1.6 Wm-2. This study provides a model-independent, observationally based estimate of the CA direct radiative forcing. Ground-based aerosol network data is integrated with field data and satellite-based aerosol observations to provide a decadal (2001 through 2009) global view of the CA optical properties and direct radiative forcing. The estimated global CA direct radiative effect is about 0.75 Wm-2 (0.5 to 1.0). This study identifies the global importance of BrC, which is shown to contribute about 20% to 550-nm CA solar absorption globally. Because of the inclusion of BrC, the net effect of OM is close to zero and the CA forcing is nearly equal to that of BC. The CA direct radiative forcing is estimated to be about 0.65 (0.5 to about 0.8) Wm-2, thus comparable to or exceeding that by methane. Caused in part by BrC absorption, CAs have a net warming effect even over open biomass-burning regions in Africa and the Amazon. PMID:22753522

  7. Radiation forces on small particles in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Lamy, P. L.; Soter, S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar radiation forces on small particles in the solar system are examined, and the resulting orbital evolution of interplanetary and circumplanetary dust is considered. An expression is derived for the effects of radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag on small, spherical particles using the energy and momentum transformation laws of special relativity, and numerical examples are presented to illustrate that radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag are only important for particles within a narrow size range. The orbital consequences of these radiation forces are considered both for heliocentric and planetocentric orbiting particles, and the coupling between particle sizes and dynamics is discussed. A qualitative derivation is presented for the differential Doppler effect, which is due to the differential Doppler shifting of radiation from approaching and receding solar hemispheres, and the Yarkovsky effect, which is important for rotating meter-to kilometer-sized particles, is briefly described.

  8. Annual Cycle of Cloud Forcing of Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Smith, G. Louis; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Gupta, Shashi K.

    2006-01-01

    The climate of the Earth is determined by its balance of radiation. The incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes are strongly modulated by clouds, which are not well understood. The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (Barkstrom and Smith, 1986) provided data from which the effects of clouds on radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) could be computed (Ramanathan, 1987). At TOA, clouds increase the reflected solar radiation, tending to cool the planet, and decrease the OLR, causing the planet to retain its heat (Ramanathan et al., 1989; Harrison et al., 1990). The effects of clouds on radiation fluxes are denoted cloud forcing. These shortwave and longwave forcings counter each other to various degrees, so that in the tropics the result is a near balance. Over mid and polar latitude oceans, cloud forcing at TOA results in large net loss of radiation. Here, there are large areas of stratus clouds and cloud systems associated with storms. These systems are sensitive to surface temperatures and vary strongly with the annual cycle. During winter, anticyclones form over the continents and move to the oceans during summer. This movement of major cloud systems causes large changes of surface radiation, which in turn drives the surface temperature and sensible and latent heat released to the atmosphere.

  9. The Potential Radiative Forcing of Global Land Use and Land Cover Change Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Kloster, S.

    2014-12-01

    Given the expected increase in pressure on land resources over the next century, there is a need to understand the total impacts of activities associated with land use and land cover change (LULCC). Here we quantify these impacts using the radiative forcing metric, including forcings from changes in long-lived greenhouse gases, tropospheric ozone, aerosol effects, and land surface albedo. We estimate radiative forcings from the different agents for historical LULCC and for six future projections using simulations from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Land Model and Community Atmosphere Models and additional offline analyses. When all forcing agents are considered together we show that 45% (+30%, -20%) of the present-day (2010) anthropogenic radiative forcing can be attributed to LULCC. Changes in the emission of non-CO2 greenhouse gases and aerosols from LULCC enhance the total LULCC radiative forcing by a factor of 2 to 3 with respect to the forcing from CO2 alone. In contrast, the non-CO2 forcings from fossil fuel burning are roughly neutral, due largely to the negative (cooling) impact of aerosols from these sources. We partition the global LULCC radiative forcing into three major sources: direct modification of land cover (e.g. deforestation), agricultural activities, and fire regime changes. Contributions from deforestation and agriculture are roughly equal in the present day, while changes to wildfire activity impose a small negative forcing globally. In 2100, deforestation activities comprise the majority of the LULCC radiative forcing for all projections except one (Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5). This suggests that realistic scenarios of future forest area change are essential for projecting the contribution of LULCC to climate change. However, the commonly used RCP land cover change projections all include decreases in global deforestation rates over the next 85 years. To place an upper bound on the potential

  10. Evaluation of Aerosol Indirect Radiative Forcing in MIRAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Hudson, J D.; Breon, Francois

    2001-04-01

    We evaluate aerosol indirect radiative forcing simulated by the Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges (MIRAGE). Although explicit measurements of aerosol indirect radiative forcing do not exist, measurements of many of the links between aerosols and indirect radiative forcing are available and can be used for evaluation. These links include the cloud condensation nuclei concentration, the ratio of droplet number to aerosol number, the droplet number concentration, the column droplet number, the column cloud water, the droplet effective radius, the cloud optical depth, the correlation between cloud albedo and droplet effective radius, and the cloud radiative forcing. The CCN concentration simulated by MIRAGE agrees with measurements for supersaturations larger than 0.1%, but not for smaller supersaturations. Simulated droplet number concentrations are too low in most, but not all, locations with available measurements, even when normalized by aerosol number. MIRA GE correctly simulates the higher droplet numbers and smaller droplet sizes over continents and in the Northern Hemisphere. Biases in column cloud water, cloud optical depth, and shortwave cloud radiative forcing are evident in the Intertropical Convergence Zone and in the subtropical oceans. MIRAGE correctly simulates a negative correlation between cloud albedo and droplet size over remote oceans for cloud optical depths greater than 15 and a positive correlation for cloud optical depths less than 15, but fails to simulate a negative correlation over land.

  11. Radiative forcing calculations for CH3C1

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A. S.; Grant, K.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Methyl chloride (MC) is the major natural source of chlorine in the stratosphere. The production of MC is dominated by biological sources from the oceans but it also has smaller anthropogenic sources, such as biomass burning. Production has a seasonal cycle which couples with the shorter lifetime of tropospheric MC to produce nonuniform global mixing. As an absorber of infrared radiation, MC, is of interest for its potential affect on the trospheric energy balance as well as for its chemical interactions. In this study, we estimate the radiative forcing and global warming potential (GWP) of MC. Our calculations use an infrared radiative transfer model based on the correlated k-distribution algorithm for band absorption. A radiative forcing value of 0.0053 W/m2/ppbv was obtained for MC and is approximately linear in the background abundance. The value is about 3% of the forcing of CFC-11 and about 300 times the forcing of CO2. The radiative forcing calculation for MC is used to estimate the GWP of MC. The results give GWPs for MC of about 30 at a time of 20 years. This result indicated that while MC has a GWP similar to methane, the emission rates are too low to meaningfully contribute to atmospheric greenhouse heating effects.

  12. Models for stellar coronae - Thin coronae with radiative forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearn, A. G.

    1987-10-01

    Models are calculated for small coronae heated by saw tooth waves with radiative forces acting in the cool region above the corona. The radiative forces are introduced in a parameterized form. The mass loss rates obtained in the models are orders of magnitude lower than the mass loss rates observed in OB supergiants. Attempts to produce models with higher mass loss rates failed. It is not known whether the difficulty is numerical or physical. Given the large difference between the mass loss rate produced in these models and the observed mass loss rates in OB supergiants, it seems likely that these models do not exist at the observed mass loss rates. The results illustrate the main properties of small coronal models with radiative forces. For a given mechanical heating the mass loss up to a limit is almost independent of the radiative forces. Beyond that limit the solution suddenly disappears and the small corona is blown away by the radiative forces. Then presumably a Castor, Abbott, and Klein solution would be formed. This would provide a mechanism for establishing that solution in a star. The models have a two stage velocity distribution which cannot be represented by the parameterized velocity distribution used in interpreting the ultraviolet and infrared observations.

  13. Calculation of Acoustic Radiation Force and Moment in Microfluidic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kian-Meng; Rahnama, Shahrokh Sepehri

    2014-11-01

    The ability to compute the acoustic radiation force and torque acting on a particle is critical to the design of microfluidic devices and the operating conditions for separation of different species of particles or biological cells using this force field. Closed-form formulae had been reported in the literature for calculating the acoustic radiation force acting on simple geometries such as spheres and ellipsoids. Also, these analytical formulae are limited to objects that are small compared to the wavelength of sound in the surrounding fluid. Numerical methods provide a more flexible way to calculate the acoustic radiation force and torque on suspended objects of arbitrary shape and size. In this paper, we will present results of using the finite element method and the multipole expansion method to calculate the acoustic radiation force and moment. For harmonic excitation, the Helmholtz equation is solved for the velocity potential of the acoustic field with the appropriate boundary conditions imposed on the surface of the spherical or ellipsoidal objects. The resultant force and torque were then calculated by performing a surface integral of the second order, time-averaged Brillouin stress over the object. The numerical results show good agreement with the analytical results for small size spheres and ellipsoids. When the object size is comparable to the wavelength of the acoustic field, the analytical results breakdown and numerical methods are necessary to obtain accurate results.

  14. Megacity Radiative Forcing: A Mexico City Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, M.; Olsen, S.; Mazzoleni, C.; Chylek, P.; Zhang, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Horowitz, L.

    2007-05-01

    We assess the radiative forcing of the largest megacity in North America, Mexico City. While particular aspects of the regional environmental impacts of cities on their surroundings have been thoroughly investigated, e.g., air quality and acid rain, relatively little effort has been focused on the net radiative impact of a megacity on global climate. The range of radiative impacts from a megacity covers many spatial and temporal scales from short-term regional-scale effects due to aerosols and relatively short-lived gases (ozone) to long-term global-scale impacts due to longer-lived trace gases (e.g., carbon dioxide, methane). In this study we combine chemistry-transport model simulations from the Model for Ozone And Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART-2) with in situ and satellite observations from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to calculate the global radiative forcing of megacity emissions. We also explore the radiative impact of various emission control strategies that focus on improving regional air quality. Our results suggest that the warming by greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and ozone can be moderated or exacerbated by aerosols depending on their optical properties. As the size and number of megacities increase and clean air regulations are implemented, metrics such as the net radiative forcing may become increasingly important in comparing the impact of urban centers and assessing the trade-offs between improving local air quality and minimizing global radiative impacts.

  15. Recent and future trends in synthetic greenhouse gas radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigby, M.; Prinn, R. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Miller, B. R.; Ivy, D.; Mühle, J.; Harth, C. M.; Salameh, P. K.; Arnold, T.; Weiss, R. F.; Krummel, P. B.; Steele, L. P.; Fraser, P. J.; Young, D.; Simmonds, P. G.

    2014-04-01

    Atmospheric measurements show that emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons are now the primary drivers of the positive growth in synthetic greenhouse gas (SGHG) radiative forcing. We infer recent SGHG emissions and examine the impact of future emissions scenarios, with a particular focus on proposals to reduce HFC use under the Montreal Protocol. If these proposals are implemented, overall SGHG radiative forcing could peak at around 355 mW m-2 in 2020, before declining by approximately 26% by 2050, despite continued growth of fully fluorinated greenhouse gas emissions. Compared to "no HFC policy" projections, this amounts to a reduction in radiative forcing of between 50 and 240 mW m-2 by 2050 or a cumulative emissions saving equivalent to 0.5 to 2.8 years of CO2 emissions at current levels. However, more complete reporting of global HFC emissions is required, as less than half of global emissions are currently accounted for.

  16. Acoustic radiation force elasticity imaging in diagnostic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Joshua R; Trahey, Gregg E; Nightingale, Kathryn R; Palmeri, Mark L

    2013-04-01

    The development of ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods has been the focus of intense research activity since the mid-1990s. In characterizing the mechanical properties of soft tissues, these techniques image an entirely new subset of tissue properties that cannot be derived with conventional ultrasound techniques. Clinically, tissue elasticity is known to be associated with pathological condition and with the ability to image these features in vivo; elasticity imaging methods may prove to be invaluable tools for the diagnosis and/or monitoring of disease. This review focuses on ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods that generate an acoustic radiation force to induce tissue displacements. These methods can be performed noninvasively during routine exams to provide either qualitative or quantitative metrics of tissue elasticity. A brief overview of soft tissue mechanics relevant to elasticity imaging is provided, including a derivation of acoustic radiation force, and an overview of the various acoustic radiation force elasticity imaging methods.

  17. Uncertainty requirements in radiative forcing of climate change.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen E

    2004-11-01

    The continuing increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) makes it essential that climate sensitivity, the equilibrium change in global mean surface temperature that would result from a given radiative forcing, be quantified with known uncertainty. Present estimates are quite uncertain, 3 +/- 1.5 K for doubling of CO2. Model studies examining climate response to forcing by greenhouse gases and aerosols exhibit large differences in sensitivities and imposed aerosol forcings that raise questions regarding claims of their having reproduced observed large-scale changes in surface temperature over the 20th century. Present uncertainty in forcing, caused largely by uncertainty in forcing by aerosols, precludes meaningful model evaluation by comparison with observed global temperature change or empirical determination of climate sensitivity. Uncertainty in aerosol forcing must be reduced at least three-fold for uncertainty in climate sensitivity to be meaningfully reduced and bounded.

  18. Tropospheric radiative forcing of CH{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A.S.; Grant, K.E.

    1994-04-01

    We have evaluated the tropospheric radiative forcing of CH{sub 4} in the 0-3000 cm{sup {minus}1} wavenumber range and compared this with prior published calculations. The atmospheric test cases involved perturbed methane scenarios in both a McClatchey mid latitude, summer, clear sky approximation, model atmosphere, as well as a globally and seasonally averaged model atmosphere containing a representative cloud distribution. The scenarios involved pure CH{sub 4} radiative forcing and CH{sub 4} plus a mixture of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and N{sub 2}O. The IR radiative forcing was calculated using a correlated k-distribution transmission model. The major purposes of this paper are to first, use the correlated k-distribution model to calculate the tropospheric radiative forcing for CH{sub 4}, as the only radiatively active gas, and in a mixture with H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and N{sub 2}O, for a McClatchey mid-latitude summer, clear-sky model atmosphere, and to compare the results to those obtained in the studies mentioned above. Second, we will calculate the tropospheric methane forcing in a globally and annually averaged atmosphere with and without a representative cloud distribution in order to validate the conjecture given in IPCC (1990) that the inclusion of clouds in the forcing calculations results in forcing values which are approximately 20 percent less than those obtained using clear sky approximations.

  19. Image reconstruction with acoustic radiation force induced shear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleavey, Stephen A.; Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Stutz, Deborah L.; Hsu, Stephen J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2003-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force may be used to induce localized displacements within tissue. This phenomenon is used in Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI), where short bursts of ultrasound deliver an impulsive force to a small region. The application of this transient force launches shear waves which propagate normally to the ultrasound beam axis. Measurements of the displacements induced by the propagating shear wave allow reconstruction of the local shear modulus, by wave tracking and inversion techniques. Here we present in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo measurements and images of shear modulus. Data were obtained with a single transducer, a conventional ultrasound scanner and specialized pulse sequences. Young's modulus values of 4 kPa, 13 kPa and 14 kPa were observed for fat, breast fibroadenoma, and skin. Shear modulus anisotropy in beef muscle was observed.

  20. Competition between radiative and strong force decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabor, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    For nuclear states unbound to neutron decay, radiative emission is often assumed to not dominate over neutron decay mediated by the far stronger strong interaction, except for very low neutron energies and high angular momentum barriers. Recent experimental investigations of 19O and 27 Mg populated in heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions have revealed predominantly gamma decays from a number of states unbound to neutron decay by up to 2 MeV. In most cases the angular momentum barrier is not sufficient to inhibit neutron decay enough to allow E-M decay with widths of up to an eV or so to win. Other inhibitions to particle decay, including low spectroscopic factors, will be discussed. Supported in part by NSF Grant No. 1401574.

  1. Dynamic Response of Model Lipid Membranes to Ultrasonic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Martin Loynaz; Oralkan, Ömer; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Maduke, Merritt C.

    2013-01-01

    Low-intensity ultrasound can modulate action potential firing in neurons in vitro and in vivo. It has been suggested that this effect is mediated by mechanical interactions of ultrasound with neural cell membranes. We investigated whether these proposed interactions could be reproduced for further study in a synthetic lipid bilayer system. We measured the response of protein-free model membranes to low-intensity ultrasound using electrophysiology and laser Doppler vibrometry. We find that ultrasonic radiation force causes oscillation and displacement of lipid membranes, resulting in small (<1%) changes in membrane area and capacitance. Under voltage-clamp, the changes in capacitance manifest as capacitive currents with an exponentially decaying sinusoidal time course. The membrane oscillation can be modeled as a fluid dynamic response to a step change in pressure caused by ultrasonic radiation force, which disrupts the balance of forces between bilayer tension and hydrostatic pressure. We also investigated the origin of the radiation force acting on the bilayer. Part of the radiation force results from the reflection of the ultrasound from the solution/air interface above the bilayer (an effect that is specific to our experimental configuration) but part appears to reflect a direct interaction of ultrasound with the bilayer, related to either acoustic streaming or scattering of sound by the bilayer. Based on these results, we conclude that synthetic lipid bilayers can be used to study the effects of ultrasound on cell membranes and membrane proteins. PMID:24194863

  2. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  3. TRADEOFFs in climate effects through aircraft routing: forcing due to radiatively active gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stordal, F.; Gauss, M.; Myhre, G.; Mancini, E.; Hauglustaine, D. A.; Köhler, M. O.; Berntsen, T.; . G Stordal, E. J.; Iachetti, D.; Pitari, G.; Isaksen, I. S. A.

    2006-10-01

    We have estimated impacts of alternative aviation routings on the radiative forcing. Changes in ozone and OH have been estimated in four Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) participating in the TRADEOFF project. Radiative forcings due to ozone and methane have been calculated accordingly. In addition radiative forcing due to CO2 is estimated based on fuel consumption. Three alternative routing cases are investigated; one scenario assuming additional polar routes and two scenarios assuming aircraft cruising at higher (+2000 ft) and lower (-6000 ft) altitudes. Results from the base case in year 2000 are included as a reference. Taking first a steady state backward looking approach, adding the changes in the forcing from ozone, CO2 and CH4, the ranges of the models used in this work are -0.8 to -1.8 and 0.3 to 0.6 m Wm-2 in the lower (-6000 ft) and higher (+2000 ft) cruise levels, respectively. In relative terms, flying 6000ft lower reduces the forcing by 5-10% compared to the current flight pattern, whereas flying higher, while saving fuel and presumably flying time, increases the forcing by about 2-3%. Taking next a forward looking approach we have estimated the integrated forcing (m Wm-2 yr) over 20 and 100 years time horizons. The relative contributions from each of the three climate gases are somewhat different from the backward looking approach. The differences are moderate adopting 100 year time horizon, whereas under the 20 year horizon CO2 naturally becomes less important relatively. Thus the forcing agents impact climate differently on various time scales. Also, we have found significant differences between the models for ozone and methane. We conclude that we are not yet at a point where we can include non-CO2 effects of aviation in emission trading schemes. Nevertheless, the rerouting cases that have been studied here yield relatively small changes in the radiative forcing due to the radiatively active gases.

  4. A study of the acoustical radiation force considering attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, RongRong; Liu, XiaoZhou; Gong, XiuFen

    2013-07-01

    Acoustical tweezer is a primary application of the radiation force of a sound field. When an ultrasound focused beam passes through a micro-particle, like a cell or living biological specimens, the particle will be manipulated accurately without physical contact and invasion, due to the three-dimensional acoustical trapping force. Based on the Ray acoustics approach in the Mie regime, this work discusses the effects on the particle caused by Gaussian focused ultrasound, studies the acoustical trapping force of spherical Mie particles by ultrasound in any position, and analyzes the numerical calculation on the two-dimensional acoustical radiation force. This article also analyzes the conditions for the acoustical trapping phenomenon, and discusses the impact of the initial position and size of the particle on the magnitude of the acoustical radiation force. Furthermore, this paper considers the ultrasonic attenuation in a particle in the case of two-dimension, studies the attenuation's effects on the acoustical trapping force, and amends the calculation to the ordinary case with attenuation.

  5. Net radiative forcing responses to regional CO and NMVOC reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, M. M.; Schwarzkopf, M. D.; Adelman, Z.; Naik, V.; West, J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that short-lived pollutants and their precursors be considered in near-term climate mitigation strategies, in addition to national air quality programs, but their associated forcings vary based on the region of emissions. Here we quantify the net radiative forcing (RF) impacts of regional anthropogenic carbon monoxide (CO) and non-methane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) emissions due to changes in the tropospheric concentrations of ozone (O3), methane (CH4), and aerosols (carbonaceous and sulfate), to inform future coordinated actions addressing air quality and climate forcing. We present the RF from CO and NMVOC emission reductions from 10 regions (North America, South America, Europe, Former Soviet Union, Southern Africa, India, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Australia and New Zealand, and Middle East and Northern Africa). The global chemical transport model MOZART-4 is used to simulate tropospheric concentration changes, using the IPCC AR5 Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (RCP 8.5) emissions inventory for 2005 and global meteorology from the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) for the years 2004-2005. We utilize the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory standalone radiative transfer model to calculate the stratospheric-adjusted net RF for each regional CO and NMVOC reduction, relative to the base. We find that global annual net RF per unit change in emissions ranges from -0.115 to -0.131 mW m-2 / Tg CO for CO reductions, and -0.0035 to -0.436 mW m-2 / Tg C for NMVOC reductions, with the regions in the tropics providing the greatest improvements (Middle East, Southeast Asia, and India CO reductions, and Middle East, Africa, and India NMVOC reductions). The net RF distributions for the CO and NMVOC reductions show widespread cooling across the northern and southern hemispheres corresponding to the patterns of O3 and CH4 decreases, and localized positive and negative net RFs due to increases and decreases in

  6. Comparison of the electron-spin force and radiation reaction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Asenjo, Felipe A.; Hazeltine, Richard D.

    2015-02-01

    It is shown that the forces that originate from the electron-spin interacting with the electromagnetic field can play, along with the Lorentz force, a fundamentally important role in determining the electron motion in a high energy density plasma embedded in strong high-frequency radiation, a situation that pertains to both laser-produced and astrophysical systems. These forces, for instance, dominate the standard radiation reaction force as long as there is a `sufficiently' strong ambient magnetic field for affecting spin alignment. The inclusion of spin forces in any advanced modelling of electron dynamics pertaining to high energy density systems (for instance in particle-in-cell codes), therefore, is a must.

  7. Climate Impacts of Inter-hemispherically Asymmetric Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S.; Ming, Y.; Held, I.

    2015-12-01

    It has been demonstrated in a number of modeling studies that the tropical circulation of the atmosphere is sensitive to changes in the inter-hemispheric energy budget. Examples of perturbations to the inter-hemispheric energy budget include changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation or spatially heterogeneous changes in the distribution of radiatively active aerosols. Whether aspects of the response of the circulation to the forcing are dependent on the forcing's latitudinal position is the subject of this study. Here we investigate the impact of the location of the asymmetric perturbation on the tropical circulation in the context of the gross moist stability framework using simulations from both an idealized moist model and a comprehensive GCM. In each model we artificially impose a negative radiative forcing between 0 and 30 degrees North and 30 and 90 degrees North, and discuss changes in precipitation patterns, meridional moist static energy transport, zonal mean mass streamfunction, and gross moist stability. In the idealized moist model, for a given asymmetric negative radiative forcing, the ITCZ shift is greater when the forcing is placed in the tropics instead of the extratropics. This difference in behavior can partially be explained by the fact that in the tropical case we decrease the net shortwave radiation at the equator, while in the extratropical case it is left unchanged. From Bischoff and Schneider (2014), decreasing the shortwave radiation at the equator increases the sensitivity of the ITCZ position to the moist static energy flux there. However we show that this increase in sensitivity cannot fully explain the differences seen between the idealized tropical and extratropical cases. In the full GCM, due to zonal asymmetries, the response in the tropical and extratropical cases is more complicated; an interesting result from those cases in the full GCM is that over the Sahel and Maritime Continent we see opposing precipitation

  8. Acoustic radiation force on a particle in a temperature gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collas, P.; Barmatz, M.

    1987-01-01

    After deriving a general expression for the acoustic radiation force on a small spherical particle of radius R in a standing wave field in a temperature gradient, attention is given to the case of a particle in a long tube chamber having a temperature gradient along the axis of symmetry. A simplification of the analysis is obtained through the introduction of the mass flux density potential. A general expression is presented for the time-averaged acoustic force; results of the new sample positions and restoring forces for a plane-wave mode are compared to the homogeneous case.

  9. Cloud Radiation Forcings and Feedbacks: General Circulation Model Tests and Observational Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee,Wan-Ho; Iacobellis, Sam F.; Somerville, Richard C. J.

    1997-01-01

    Using an atmospheric general circulation model (the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model: CCM2), the effects on climate sensitivity of several different cloud radiation parameterizations have been investigated. In addition to the original cloud radiation scheme of CCM2, four parameterizations incorporating prognostic cloud water were tested: one version with prescribed cloud radiative properties and three other versions with interactive cloud radiative properties. The authors' numerical experiments employ perpetual July integrations driven by globally constant sea surface temperature forcings of two degrees, both positive and negative. A diagnostic radiation calculation has been applied to investigate the partial contributions of high, middle, and low cloud to the total cloud radiative forcing, as well as the contributions of water vapor, temperature, and cloud to the net climate feedback. The high cloud net radiative forcing is positive, and the middle and low cloud net radiative forcings are negative. The total net cloud forcing is negative in all of the model versions. The effect of interactive cloud radiative properties on global climate sensitivity is significant. The net cloud radiative feedbacks consist of quite different shortwave and longwave components between the schemes with interactive cloud radiative properties and the schemes with specified properties. The increase in cloud water content in the warmer climate leads to optically thicker middle- and low-level clouds and in turn to negative shortwave feedbacks for the interactive radiative schemes, while the decrease in cloud amount simply produces a positive shortwave feedback for the schemes with a specified cloud water path. For the longwave feedbacks, the decrease in high effective cloudiness for the schemes without interactive radiative properties leads to a negative feedback, while for the other cases, the longwave feedback is positive. These cloud radiation

  10. High Resolution Aerosol Modeling: Decadal Changes in Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, D J; Chuang, C C; Govindasamy, B; Cameron-Smith, P J; Rotman, D A

    2005-02-01

    The Atmospheric Science Division of LLNL has performed high-resolution calculations of direct sulfate forcing using a DOE-provided computer resource at NERSC. We integrated our global chemistry-aerosol model (IMPACT) with the LLNL high-resolution global climate model (horizontal resolution as high as 100 km) to examine the temporal evolution of sulfate forcing since 1950. We note that all previous assessments of sulfate forcing reported in IPCC (2001) were based on global models with coarse spatial resolutions ({approx} 300 km or even coarser). However, the short lifetime of aerosols ({approx} days) results in large spatial and temporal variations of radiative forcing by sulfate. As a result, global climate models with coarse resolutions do not accurately simulate sulfate forcing on regional scales. It requires much finer spatial resolutions in order to address the effects of regional anthropogenic SO{sub 2} emissions on the global atmosphere as well as the effects of long-range transport of sulfate aerosols on the regional climate forcing. By taking advantage of the tera-scale computer resources at NERSC, we simulated the historic direct sulfate forcing at much finer spatial resolutions than ever attempted before. Furthermore, we performed high-resolution chemistry simulations and saved monthly averaged oxidant fields, which will be used in subsequent simulations of sulfate aerosol formation and their radiative impact.

  11. Black Carbon Radiative Forcing over the Tibetan Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    He, Cenlin; Li, Qinbin; Liou, K. N.; Takano, Y.; Gu, Yu; Qi, L.; Mao, Yuhao; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2014-11-28

    We estimate the snow albedo forcing and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in the Tibetan Plateau using a global chemical transport model in conjunction with a stochastic snow model and a radiative transfer model. Our best estimate of the annual BC snow albedo forcing in the Plateau is 2.9 W m-2 (uncertainty: 1.5–5.0 W m-226 ). We find that BC-snow internal mixing increases the albedo forcing by 40-60% compared with external mixing and coated BC increases the forcing by 30-50% compared with uncoated BC, whereas Koch snowflakes reduce the forcing by 20-40% relative to spherical snow grains. Our best estimate of the annual BC DRF at the top of the atmosphere is 2.3 W m-2 (uncertainty: 0.7–4.3 W m-230 ) in the Plateau after scaling the modeled BC absorption optical depth to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations. The BC forcings are attributed to emissions from different regions.

  12. Model-based optical coherence elastography using acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglyamov, Salavat; Wang, Shang; Karpiouk, Andrei; Li, Jiasong; Emelianov, Stanislav; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-02-01

    Acoustic Radiation Force (ARF) stimulation is actively used in ultrasound elastography to estimate mechanical properties of tissue. Compared with ultrasound imaging, OCT provides advantage in both spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, a combination of ARF and OCT technologies can provide a unique opportunity to measure viscoelastic properties of tissue, especially when the use of high intensity radiation pressure is limited for safety reasons. In this presentation we discuss a newly developed theoretical model of the deformation of a layered viscoelastic medium in response to an acoustic radiation force of short duration. An acoustic impulse was considered as an axisymmetric force generated on the upper surface of the medium. An analytical solution of this problem was obtained using the Hankel transform in frequency domain. It was demonstrated that layers at different depths introduce different frequency responses. To verify the developed model, experiments were performed using tissue-simulating, inhomogeneous phantoms of varying mechanical properties. The Young's modulus of the phantoms was varied from 5 to 50 kPa. A single-element focused ultrasound transducer (3.5 MHz) was used to apply the radiation force with various durations on the surface of phantoms. Displacements on the phantom surface were measured using a phase-sensitive OCT at 25 kHz repetition frequency. The experimental results were in good agreement with the modeling results. Therefore, the proposed theoretical model can be used to reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue based on ARF/OCT measurements.

  13. Rates of change in natural and anthropogenic radiative forcing over the past 20,000 years.

    PubMed

    Joos, Fortunat; Spahni, Renato

    2008-02-05

    The rate of change of climate codetermines the global warming impacts on natural and socioeconomic systems and their capabilities to adapt. Establishing past rates of climate change from temperature proxy data remains difficult given their limited spatiotemporal resolution. In contrast, past greenhouse gas radiative forcing, causing climate to change, is well known from ice cores. We compare rates of change of anthropogenic forcing with rates of natural greenhouse gas forcing since the Last Glacial Maximum and of solar and volcanic forcing of the last millennium. The smoothing of atmospheric variations by the enclosure process of air into ice is computed with a firn diffusion and enclosure model. The 20th century increase in CO(2) and its radiative forcing occurred more than an order of magnitude faster than any sustained change during the past 22,000 years. The average rate of increase in the radiative forcing not just from CO(2) but from the combination of CO(2), CH(4), and N(2)O is larger during the Industrial Era than during any comparable period of at least the past 16,000 years. In addition, the decadal-to-century scale rate of change in anthropogenic forcing is unusually high in the context of the natural forcing variations (solar and volcanoes) of the past millennium. Our analysis implies that global climate change, which is anthropogenic in origin, is progressing at a speed that is unprecedented at least during the last 22,000 years.

  14. Radiation force on a relativistic plasma and the Eddington limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    Calculations of the radiation force due to Thomson scattering on a relativistic plasma are presented and discussed in relation to certain astronomical objects which operate within a few orders of magnitude of their Eddington luminosity. The radiation force on a hot isotropic plasma is shown to exceed that on a cold plasma by a factor depending on the electron Lorentz factor, which can be substantial in a relativistic plasma. In such a plasma, radiative bulk acceleration is found to occur through the anisotropic loss of internal energy during the Thomson scattering, resulting in an effect termed a Compton rocket. The Compton rocket is shown to be a relevant acceleration mechanism in situations where a relativistic electron plasma lies in the vicinity of a luminous source operating near the classical Eddington limit, including compact galactic X-ray sources and objects associated with active galactic nuclei (quasars, blazars, and Seyfert nuclei).

  15. Radiation force imaging of viscoelastic properties with reduced artifacts.

    PubMed

    Viola, Francesco; Walker, William F

    2003-06-01

    It is well-known that changes in the mechanical properties of tissues are correlated with the presence of disease. In the eye, for example, the vitreous body undergoes dramatic changes in mechanical properties during age-related degradation. These changes may play a significant role in the formation of retinal detachment or other vitreoretinal diseases. We previously presented a noninvasive method called kinetic acoustic vitreoretial examination (KAVE), which may be used to detect these mechanical changes. KAVE uses acoustic radiation force as a means to produce small, localized displacements within the tissues. Returning echoes are processed using ultrasonic motion tracking so that the response of the tissue to the induced force can be evaluated. By repeating this process at a number of locations, images depicting viscoelastic properties of tissues can be formed. Through the combination of appropriate mechanical modeling and signal processing, we are able to generate images of parameters such as relative mass, relative elasticity, and relative viscosity. These parameters are called relative because they depend on the force applied, which is typically unknown. In this paper, we present new force-free images depicting the time constant tau, the damping ratio xi, and the natural frequency omega of the phantom material. These images are significant in that they lack the artifacts common in the relative property images. Experiments were conducted on a set of three acrylamide-based phantoms with varying gel concentrations. We present images depicting B-mode echogenicity, maximum radiation force-induced displacement, relative material parameters, and force-free characteristics of the series of phantoms. The presented force-free images depict mechanical properties without artifacts from local force variation due to acoustic reflection, refraction, and attenuation. Force-free images should prove particularly useful for in vivo imaging through inhomogeneous tissues.

  16. Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Mills Jr., David L.

    2011-01-08

    Although shallow cumuli are common over large areas of the globe, their impact on the surface radiative forcing has not been carefully evaluated. This study addresses this shortcoming by analyzing data from days with shallow cumuli collected over eight summers (2000-2007) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (collectively ACRF) Southern Great Plains site. During periods with clouds, the average shortwave and longwave radiative forcings are 45.5 W m-2 and +11.6 W m-2, respectively. The forcing has been defined so that a negative (positive) forcing indicates a surface cooling (warming). On average, the shortwave forcing is negative, however, instances with positive shortwave forcing are observed approximately 20% of the time. These positive values of shortwave forcing are associated with three-dimensional radiative effects of the clouds. The three-dimensional effects are shown to be largest for intermediate cloud amounts. The magnitude of the three-dimensional effects decreased with averaging time, but it is not negligibly small even for large averaging times as long as four hours.

  17. Optical Verification of Microbubble Response to Acoustic Radiation Force in Large Vessels with In Vivo Results

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiying; Wang, Claudia Y.; Unnikrishnan, Sunil; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hossack, John A.; Mauldin, F. William

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To optically verify the dynamic behaviors of adherent microbubbles in large blood vessel environments in response to a new ultrasound technique using modulated acoustic radiation force. Materials and Methods Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) flow channels coated with streptavidin were used in targeted groups to mimic large blood vessels. The custom modulated acoustic radiation force beam sequence was programmed on a Verasonics research scanner. In vitro experiments were performed by injecting a biotinylated lipid-perfluorobutane microbubble dispersion through flow channels. The dynamic response of adherent microbubbles was detected acoustically and simultaneously visualized using a video camera connected to a microscope. In vivo verification was performed in a large abdominal blood vessel of a murine model for inflammation with injection of biotinylated microbubbles conjugated with P-selectin antibody. Results Aggregates of adherent microbubbles were observed optically under the influence of acoustic radiation force. Large microbubble aggregates were observed solely in control groups without targeted adhesion. Additionally, the dispersion of microbubble aggregates were demonstrated to lead to a transient acoustic signal enhancement in control groups (a new phenomenon we refer to as “control peak”). In agreement with in vitro results, the “control peak” phenomenon was observed in vivo in a murine model. Conclusions This study provides the first optical observation of microbubble binding dynamics in large blood vessel environments with application of a modulated acoustic radiation force beam sequence. With targeted adhesion, secondary radiation forces were unable to produce large aggregates of adherent microbubbles. Additionally, the new phenomenon called “control peak” was observed both in vitro and in vivo in a murine model for the first time. The findings in this study provide us with a better understanding of microbubble behaviors in large blood

  18. Radiation reaction as a non-conservative force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aashish, Sandeep; Haque, Asrarul

    2016-09-01

    We study a system of a finite size charged particle interacting with a radiation field by exploiting Hamilton’s principle for a non-conservative system recently introduced by Galley [1]. This formulation leads to the equation of motion of the charged particle that turns out to be the same as that obtained by Jackson [2]. We show that the radiation reaction stems from the non-conservative part of the effective action for a charged particle. We notice that a charge interacting with a radiation field modeled as a heat bath affords a way to justify that the radiation reaction is a non-conservative force. The topic is suitable for graduate courses on advanced electrodynamics and classical theory of fields.

  19. Net radiative forcing from widespread deployment of photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Nemet, Gregory F

    2009-03-15

    If photovoltaics (PV) are to contribute significantly to stabilizing the climate, they will need to be deployed on the scale of multiple terawatts. Installation of that much PV would cover substantial portions of the Earth's surface with dark-colored, sunlight-absorbing panels, reducing the Earth's albedo. How much radiative forcing would result from this change in land use? How does this amount compare to the radiative forcing avoided by substituting PV for fossil fuels? This analysis uses a series of simple equations to compare the two effects and finds that substitution dominates; the avoided radiative forcing due to substitution of PV for fossil fuels is approximately 30 times largerthan the forcing due to albedo modification. Sensitivity analysis, including discounting of future costs and benefits, identifies unfavorable yet plausible configurations in which the albedo effect substantially reduces the climatic benefits of PV. The value of PV as a climate mitigation option depends on how it is deployed, not just how much it is deployed--efficiency of PV systems and the carbon intensity of the substituted energy are particularly important

  20. Axial acoustic radiation force on a sphere in Gaussian field

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Liu, Xiaozhou Gong, Xiufen

    2015-10-28

    Based on the finite series method, the acoustical radiation force resulting from a Gaussian beam incident on a spherical object is investigated analytically. When the position of the particles deviating from the center of the beam, the Gaussian beam is expanded as a spherical function at the center of the particles and the expanded coefficients of the Gaussian beam is calculated. The analytical expression of the acoustic radiation force on spherical particles deviating from the Gaussian beam center is deduced. The acoustic radiation force affected by the acoustic frequency and the offset distance from the Gaussian beam center is investigated. Results have been presented for Gaussian beams with different wavelengths and it has been shown that the interaction of a Gaussian beam with a sphere can result in attractive axial force under specific operational conditions. Results indicate the capability of manipulating and separating spherical spheres based on their mechanical and acoustical properties, the results provided here may provide a theoretical basis for development of single-beam acoustical tweezers.

  1. Net radiative forcing due to changes in regional emissions of tropospheric ozone precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Vaishali; Mauzerall, Denise; Horowitz, Larry; Schwarzkopf, M. Daniel; Ramaswamy, V.; Oppenheimer, Michael

    2005-12-01

    The global distribution of tropospheric ozone (O3) depends on the emission of precursors, chemistry, and transport. For small perturbations to emissions, the global radiative forcing resulting from changes in O3 can be expressed as a sum of forcings from emission changes in different regions. Tropospheric O3 is considered in present climate policies only through the inclusion of indirect effect of CH4 on radiative forcing through its impact on O3 concentrations. The short-lived O3 precursors (NOx, CO, and NMHCs) are not directly included in the Kyoto Protocol or any similar climate mitigation agreement. In this study, we quantify the global radiative forcing resulting from a marginal reduction (10%) in anthropogenic emissions of NOx alone from nine geographic regions and a combined marginal reduction in NOx, CO, and NMHCs emissions from three regions. We simulate, using the global chemistry transport model MOZART-2, the change in the distribution of global O3 resulting from these emission reductions. In addition to the short-term reduction in O3, these emission reductions also increase CH4 concentrations (by decreasing OH); this increase in CH4 in turn counteracts part of the initial reduction in O3 concentrations. We calculate the global radiative forcing resulting from the regional emission reductions, accounting for changes in both O3 and CH4. Our results show that changes in O3 production and resulting distribution depend strongly on the geographical location of the reduction in precursor emissions. We find that the global O3 distribution and radiative forcing are most sensitive to changes in precursor emissions from tropical regions and least sensitive to changes from midlatitude and high-latitude regions. Changes in CH4 and O3 concentrations resulting from NOx emission reductions alone produce offsetting changes in radiative forcing, leaving a small positive residual forcing (warming) for all regions. In contrast, for combined reductions of anthropogenic

  2. Megacity Radiative Forcing: A Mexico City Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, S. C.; Dubey, M. K.; Chylek, P.; Mazzoleni, C.; Zhang, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Horowitz, L.

    2006-12-01

    We assess the radiative forcing budget of the largest megacity in North America, Mexico City. While particular aspects of the regional environmental impacts of cities on their surroundings have been thoroughly investigated, e.g., air quality and acid rain, relatively little effort has been focused on the net radiative impact of a megacity on global climate. The range of radiative impacts from a megacity covers many spatial and temporal scales from short-term regional-scale effects due to aerosols and relatively short-lived gases (O3) to long-term global-scale impacts due to long-lived trace gases (e.g., CH4, CO2). In this study we use both bottom-up and top-down approaches to evaluate these radiative forcings. From the bottom up we utilize emission inventories and the Model for Ozone And Related Chemical Tracers (MOZART-2) chemistry-aerosol model. From the top down we use observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), and in situ aerosol single scattering albedo measurements collected during the Megacity Initiative-Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. We also explore the radiative impact of various emission control strategies that focus on improving urban air quality. We show that the warming by greenhouse gases like CO2 and ozone can be moderated or exacerbated by aerosols depending on their optical properties. As the size and number of megacities increase and clean air regulations are implemented, metrics such as the net radiative forcing may become increasingly important in comparing the impact of urban centers and assessing pollution abatement policies.

  3. Cloud radiative forcing effects on observed and simulated global energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Robertson, Franklin

    1993-01-01

    The research objectives are the following: (1) to examine how cloud-radiation processes generate/destroy available potential energy by altering both meridional and zonal temperature gradient; (2) to investigate how the atmospheric dynamic fields respond to the cloud-altered mass distributions through the energy conversion circuit; and (3) to examine how the improved version of CCM1 simulates observationally obtained cloud-radiative forcing and its associated energetics and circulations. Significant accomplishments in the past year towards obtaining these objectives and the focus of current research and plans for next year are discussed.

  4. Lorentz force and radiation pressure on a spherical cloak

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hongsheng; Wu, B.-I.; Zhang Baile; Luo Yu; Zhang Jingjing; Ran Lixin; Kemp, Brandon A.

    2009-07-15

    The mechanical behavior of a transformation based spherical cloak under wave illumination is derived. We show that the equatorial region of the cloak is subject to much higher stress than the polar regions, where the polar axis is defined along the wave propagation direction. These forces do not exist before transformation but stem from the squeezed electromagnetic space. The trajectory of the ray can be interpreted as a result of the recoil force that the cloak exerts upon the ray. The total radiation pressure on an ideal cloak is shown to be exactly zero, effecting a stationary cloak.

  5. Monitoring Method of Cutting Force by Using Additional Spindle Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarhan, Ahmed Aly Diaa; Matsubara, Atsushi; Sugihara, Motoyuki; Saraie, Hidenori; Ibaraki, Soichi; Kakino, Yoshiaki

    This paper describes a monitoring method of cutting forces for end milling process by using displacement sensors. Four eddy-current displacement sensors are installed on the spindle housing of a machining center so that they can detect the radial motion of the rotating spindle. Thermocouples are also attached to the spindle structure in order to examine the thermal effect in the displacement sensing. The change in the spindle stiffness due to the spindle temperature and the speed is investigated as well. Finally, the estimation performance of cutting forces using the spindle displacement sensors is experimentally investigated by machining tests on carbon steel in end milling operations under different cutting conditions. It is found that the monitoring errors are attributable to the thermal displacement of the spindle, the time lag of the sensing system, and the modeling error of the spindle stiffness. It is also shown that the root mean square errors between estimated and measured amplitudes of cutting forces are reduced to be less than 20N with proper selection of the linear stiffness.

  6. Mechanically resolving noncovalent bonds using acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Lashan; Yao, Li; Xu, Shoujun

    2014-09-25

    The resolution of molecular bonds and subsequent selective control of their binding are of great significance in chemistry and biology. We have developed a method based on the use of acoustic radiation force to precisely dissociate noncovalent molecular bonds. The acoustic radiation force is produced by extremely low-power ultrasound waves and is mediated by magnetic particles. We successfully distinguished the binding of antibodies of different subclasses and the binding of DNA duplexes with a single-base-pair difference. In contrast to most ultrasound applications in chemistry, the sonication probe is noninvasive and requires a sample volume of only a few microliters. Our method is thus viable for noninvasive and accurate control of molecular bonds that are widely encountered in biochemistry.

  7. Tissue deformation induced by radiation force from Gaussian transducers.

    PubMed

    Myers, Matthew R

    2006-05-01

    Imaging techniques based upon the tissue mechanical response to an acoustic radiation force are being actively researched. In this paper a model for predicting steady-state tissue displacement induced by a radiation force arising from the absorption of Gaussian ultrasound beams is presented. A simple analytic expression is derived that agrees closely with the numerical quadrature of the displacement convolution integrals. The analytic result reveals the dependence of the steady-state axial displacement upon the operational parameters, e.g., an inverse proportional relationship to the tissue shear modulus. The derivation requires that the transducer radius be small compared to the focal length, but accurate results were obtained for transducer radii comparable to the focal length. Favorable comparisons with displacement predictions for non-Gaussian transducers indicate that the theory is also useful for a broader range of transducer intensity profiles.

  8. Observational constraints on ozone radiative forcing from the Atmospheric Chemistry Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, K.; Shindell, D.; Worden, H.; Lamarque, J. F.; Young, P. J.; Stevenson, D.; Qu, Z.; de la Torre, M.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Collins, W. J.; Doherty, R.; Dalsøren, S.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G.; Horowitz, L. W.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, V.; Plummer, D.; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R.; Strode, S.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Voulgarakis, A.; Zeng, G.; Kulawik, S.; Worden, J.

    2012-09-01

    We use simultaneous observations of ozone and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) to evaluate ozone distributions and radiative forcing simulated by a suite of chemistry-climate models that participated in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The ensemble mean of ACCMIP models show a persistent but modest tropospheric ozone low bias (5-20 ppb) in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and modest high bias (5-10 ppb) in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) relative to TES for 2005-2010. These biases lead to substantial differences in ozone instantaneous radiative forcing between TES and the ACCMIP simulations. Using TES instantaneous radiative kernels (IRK), we show that the ACCMIP ensemble mean has a low bias in the SH tropics of up to 100 m W m-2 locally and a global low bias of 35 ± 44 m W m-2 relative to TES. Combining ACCMIP preindustrial ozone and the TES present-day ozone, we calculate an observationally constrained estimate of tropospheric ozone radiative forcing (RF) of 399 ± 70 m W m-2, which is about 7% higher than using the ACCMIP models alone but with the same standard deviation (Stevenson et al., 2012). In addition, we explore an alternate approach to constraining radiative forcing estimates by choosing a subset of models that best match TES ozone, which leads to an ozone RF of 369 ± 42 m W m-2. This estimate is closer to the ACCMIP ensemble mean RF but about a 40% reduction in standard deviation. These results point towards a profitable direction of combining observations and chemistry-climate model simulations to reduce uncertainty in ozone radiative forcing.

  9. Enhanced shortwave cloud radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.; Slingo, A.

    1995-05-01

    It has been suggested that anthropogenic aerosols in the troposphere can influence the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their reflectivity, thereby exerting a radiative influence on climate. This article presents the theoretical basis for of this so-called indirect forcing and reviews pertinent observational evidence and climate model calculations of its magnitude and geographical distribution. We restrict consideration to liquid-water clouds.

  10. Distribution and Radiative Forcing of Tropical Thin Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Joonsuk; Yang, Ping; Dessler, Andrew E.; Gao, Bo-Cai; Platnick, Steven

    2009-01-01

    To understand the radiative impact of tropical thin cirrus clouds, the frequency of occurrence and optical depths of these clouds have been derived. Thin cirrus clouds are defined here as being those that are not detected by the operational Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud mask, corresponding to an optical depth value of approximately 0.3 or smaller, but that are detectable in terms of the cirrus reflectance product based on the MODIS 1.375-micron channel. With such a definition, thin cirrus clouds were present in more than 40% of the pixels flagged as clear sky by the operational MODIS cloud mask algorithm. It is shown that these thin cirrus clouds are frequently observed in deep convective regions in the western Pacific. Thin cirrus optical depths were derived from the cirrus reflectance product. Regions of significant cloud fraction and large optical depths were observed in the Northern Hemisphere during the boreal spring and summer and moved southward during the boreal autumn and winter. The radiative effects of tropical thin cirrus clouds were studied on the basis of the retrieved cirrus optical depths, the atmospheric profiles derived from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) observations, and a radiative transfer model in conjunction with a parameterization of ice cloud spectral optical properties. To understand how these clouds regulate the radiation field in the atmosphere, the instantaneous net fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface were calculated. The present study shows positive and negative net forcings at the TOA and at the surface, respectively. The positive (negative) net forcing at the TOA (surface) is due to the dominance of longwave (shortwave) forcing. Both the TOA and surface forcings are in a range of 0-20 W/sq m, depending on the optical depths of thin cirrus clouds.

  11. Distribution and Radiative Forcing of Tropical Thin Cirrus Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Distribution and Radiative Forcing of Tropical Thin Cirrus Clouds JOONSUK LEE Cooperative Institute for Climate Studies, and Earth System Science... cirrus clouds , the frequency of occurrence and optical depths of these clouds have been derived. ‘‘Thin’’ cirrus clouds are defined here as being those...definition, thin cirrus clouds were present in more than 40% of the pixels flagged as ‘‘clear sky’’ by the operational MODIS cloud mask algorithm. It is

  12. Quantifying immediate radiative forcing by black carbon and organic matter with the Specific Forcing Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, T. C.; Zarzycki, C.; Flanner, M. G.; Koch, D. M.

    2011-02-01

    Climatic effects of short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs) differ from those of long-lived greenhouse gases, because they occur rapidly after emission and because they depend upon the region of emission. The distinctive temporal and spatial nature of these impacts is not captured by measures that rely on global averages or long time integrations. Here, we propose a simple measure, the Specific Forcing Pulse (SFP), to quantify climate warming or cooling by these pollutants, where we define "immediate" as occurring primarily within the first year after emission. SFP is the amount of energy added to or removed from a receptor region in the Earth-atmosphere system by a chemical species, per mass of emission in a source region. We limit the application of SFP to species that remain in the atmosphere for less than one year. Metrics used in policy discussions, such as total forcing or global warming potential, are easily derived from SFP. However, SFP conveys purely physical information without incurring the policy implications of choosing a time horizon for the global warming potential. Using one model (Community Atmosphere Model, or CAM), we calculate values of SFP for black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM) emitted from 23 source-region combinations. Global SFP for both atmosphere and cryosphere impacts is divided among receptor latitudes. SFP is usually greater for open-burning emissions than for energy-related (fossil-fuel and biofuel) emissions because of the timing of emission. Global SFP for BC varies by about 45% for energy-related emissions from different regions. This variation would be larger except for compensating effects. When emitted aerosol has larger cryosphere forcing, it often has lower atmosphere forcing because of less deep convection and a shorter atmospheric lifetime. A single model result is insufficient to capture uncertainty. We develop a best estimate and uncertainties for SFP by combining forcing results from 12 additional models. We outline a

  13. Halogen chemistry reduces tropospheric O3 radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwen, Tomás; Evans, Mat J.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Schmidt, Johan A.; Mickley, Loretta J.

    2017-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a global warming gas, but the lack of a firm observational record since the preindustrial period means that estimates of its radiative forcing (RFTO3) rely on model calculations. Recent observational evidence shows that halogens are pervasive in the troposphere and need to be represented in chemistry-transport models for an accurate simulation of present-day O3. Using the GEOS-Chem model we show that tropospheric halogen chemistry is likely more active in the present day than in the preindustrial. This is due to increased oceanic iodine emissions driven by increased surface O3, higher anthropogenic emissions of bromo-carbons, and an increased flux of bromine from the stratosphere. We calculate preindustrial to present-day increases in the tropospheric O3 burden of 113 Tg without halogens but only 90 Tg with, leading to a reduction in RFTO3 from 0.43 to 0.35 Wm-2. We attribute ˜ 50 % of this reduction to increased bromine flux from the stratosphere, ˜ 35 % to the ocean-atmosphere iodine feedback, and ˜ 15 % to increased tropospheric sources of anthropogenic halogens. This reduction of tropospheric O3 radiative forcing due to halogens (0.087 Wm-2) is greater than that from the radiative forcing of stratospheric O3 (˜ 0.05 Wm-2). Estimates of RFTO3 that fail to consider halogen chemistry are likely overestimates (˜ 25 %).

  14. How cloud radiative forcing could allow Snowball Earth deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbot, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Neoproterozoic, and possibly Paleoproterozoic, glaciations represent the most extreme climate events in post-Hadean Earth, and may link closely with the evolution of the atmosphere and life. According to the Snowball Earth hypothesis, the entire ocean was covered with ice during these events for a few million years, during which time volcanic CO2 increased enough to cause deglaciation. Geochemical proxy data and geochemical model calculations suggest that the maximum CO2 was 0.01-0.1 by volume, but early climate modeling suggested that the Snowball was not even close to deglaciation at CO2=0.2. Unless resolved, this discrepancy would be problematic for the Snowball Earth hypothesis. First, I will present results from six GCMs suggesting that positive cloud radiative forcing would likely have warmed a Snowball Earth enough to reduce the CO2 required for deglaciation by a factor of 10-100. Next, I will present results from a cloud resolving model run on a small domain that are consistent with the GCM results and allow us to understand the GCM behavior better. The cloud resolving model produces convection that extends vertically to a similar temperature as modern tropical convection. This convection produces clouds that resemble stratocumulus clouds under an inversion on modern Earth, which slowly dissipate by sedimentation of cloud ice. There is enough cloud ice for the clouds to be optically thick in the longwave, and the resulting cloud radiative forcing is similar to that produced in GCMs run in Snowball conditions. This result is robust to large changes in the cloud microphysics scheme because the cloud longwave forcing, which dominates the total forcing, is relatively insensitive to cloud amount and particle size. Taken together, these results from a hierarchy of models suggest that positive cloud radiative forcing would warm a Snowball Earth enough to allow deglaciation at a CO2 consistent with geochemical data.

  15. Shortwave Spectral Radiative Forcing of Cumulus Clouds from Surface Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Long, Charles N.; Flynn, Connor J.

    2011-04-02

    The spectral changes of the total cloud radiative forcing (CRF) and its diffuse and direct components are examined by using spectrally resolved (visible spectral range) all-sky surface irradiances measured by Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer. We demonstrate: (i) the substantial contribution of the diffuse component to the total CRF, (ii) the well-defined spectral variations of total CRF in the visible spectral region, and (iii) the strong statistical relationship between spectral (500 nm) and shortwave broadband values of total CRF. Our results suggest that the framework based on the visible narrowband fluxes can provide important radiative quantities for rigorous evaluation of radiative transfer parameterizations and can be applied for estimation of the shortwave total CRF.

  16. Radiation safety attached to radioactive sources management - additional aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Kositsyn, V.F.

    1993-12-31

    Radiation sources are used in many scientific areas. Safety management requirements are determined for them with guarantee of the international and national dose limits unexceeding. As a rule, such dose limits are being developed concerning the type, energy, and flux of main radiation. Lack of knowledge of these attendant radiations can put personnel in danger. The study of the attendant neutron and gamma-radiations for plutonium 128 alpha sources was made.

  17. Small global-mean cooling due to volcanic radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, J. M.; Andrews, T.; Good, P.; Mauritsen, T.; Forster, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    In both the observational record and atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) simulations of the last ˜150 years, short-lived negative radiative forcing due to volcanic aerosol, following explosive eruptions, causes sudden global-mean cooling of up to ˜0.3 K. This is about five times smaller than expected from the transient climate response parameter (TCRP, K of global-mean surface air temperature change per W m-2 of radiative forcing increase) evaluated under atmospheric CO2 concentration increasing at 1 % yr-1. Using the step model (Good et al. in Geophys Res Lett 38:L01703, 2011. doi: 10.1029/2010GL045208), we confirm the previous finding (Held et al. in J Clim 23:2418-2427, 2010. doi: 10.1175/2009JCLI3466.1) that the main reason for the discrepancy is the damping of the response to short-lived forcing by the thermal inertia of the upper ocean. Although the step model includes this effect, it still overestimates the volcanic cooling simulated by AOGCMs by about 60 %. We show that this remaining discrepancy can be explained by the magnitude of the volcanic forcing, which may be smaller in AOGCMs (by 30 % for the HadCM3 AOGCM) than in off-line calculations that do not account for rapid cloud adjustment, and the climate sensitivity parameter, which may be smaller than for increasing CO2 (40 % smaller than for 4 × CO2 in HadCM3).

  18. Relating work, change in internal energy, and heat radiated for dispersion force situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Daniel C.

    2000-01-01

    This article describes how Casimir-like forces can be calculated for quasistatic situations of macroscopic bodies composed of different materials. The framework of stochastic electrodynamics (SED) is used for much of this discussion in an attempt to provide a very clear physical picture when considering quantities like forces, work done, changes in internal energy, and heat flow. By relating these quantities, one can readily understand why the different methods of calculating dispersion forces agree, such as when obtaining forces via changes in electromagnetic zero-point energy versus computing the average of the Maxwell stress tensor. In addition, a number of physical subtleties involving dispersion forces are discussed, that were certainly not recognized in early work on blackbody radiation, and that still may not be fully appreciated. .

  19. Anthropogenic Aerosols in Asia, Radiative Forcing, and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Bollasina, M. A.; Ming, Y.; Ocko, I.; Persad, G.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols arising as a result of human-induced emissions in Asia form a key 'driver' in causing pollution and in the forcing of anthropogenic climate change. The manner of the forced climate change is sensitive to the scattering and absorption properties of the aerosols and the aerosol-cloud microphysical interactions. Using the NOAA/ GFDL global climate models and observations from multiple platforms, we investigate the radiative perturbations due to the 20th Century sulfate and carbonaceous aerosol emissions and the resultant impacts on surface temperature, tropical precipitation, Indian monsoon, hemispheric circulation, and atmospheric and oceanic heat transports. The influence of the aerosol species has many contrasts with that due to the anthropogenic well-mixed greenhouse gas emissions e.g., the asymmetry in the hemispheric climate response, but is subject to larger uncertainties. The aerosol forcing expected in the future indicates a significant control on the 21st Century anthropogenic climate change in Asia.

  20. Effective radiative forcing from historical land use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Timothy; Betts, Richard A.; Booth, Ben B. B.; Jones, Chris D.; Jones, Gareth S.

    2016-08-01

    The effective radiative forcing (ERF) from the biogeophysical effects of historical land use change is quantified using the atmospheric component of the Met Office Hadley Centre Earth System model HadGEM2-ES. The global ERF at 2005 relative to 1860 (1700) is -0.4 (-0.5) Wm-2, making it the fourth most important anthropogenic driver of climate change over the historical period (1860-2005) in this model and larger than most other published values. The land use ERF is found to be dominated by increases in the land surface albedo, particularly in North America and Eurasia, and occurs most strongly in the northern hemisphere winter and spring when the effect of unmasking underlying snow, as well as increasing the amount of snow, is at its largest. Increased bare soil fraction enhances the seasonal cycle of atmospheric dust and further enhances the ERF. Clouds are shown to substantially mask the radiative effect of changes in the underlying surface albedo. Coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations forced only with time-varying historical land use change shows substantial global cooling (dT = -0.35 K by 2005) and the climate resistance (ERF/dT = 1.2 Wm-2 K-1) is consistent with the response of the model to increases in CO2 alone. The regional variation in land surface temperature change, in both fixed-SST and coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations, is found to be well correlated with the spatial pattern of the forced change in surface albedo. The forcing-response concept is found to work well for historical land use forcing—at least in our model and when the forcing is quantified by ERF. Our results suggest that land-use changes over the past century may represent a more important driver of historical climate change then previously recognised and an underappreciated source of uncertainty in global forcings and temperature trends over the historical period.

  1. 47 CFR 15.215 - Additional provisions to the general radiated emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.215... 15.257 provide alternatives to the general radiated emission limits for intentional radiators... § 15.209. In no case shall the level of the unwanted emissions from an intentional radiator...

  2. 47 CFR 15.215 - Additional provisions to the general radiated emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.215... 15.257 provide alternatives to the general radiated emission limits for intentional radiators... § 15.209. In no case shall the level of the unwanted emissions from an intentional radiator...

  3. 47 CFR 15.215 - Additional provisions to the general radiated emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.215... 15.257 provide alternatives to the general radiated emission limits for intentional radiators... § 15.209. In no case shall the level of the unwanted emissions from an intentional radiator...

  4. 47 CFR 15.215 - Additional provisions to the general radiated emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.215... 15.257 provide alternatives to the general radiated emission limits for intentional radiators... § 15.209. In no case shall the level of the unwanted emissions from an intentional radiator...

  5. CHARMM additive and polarizable force fields for biophysics and computer-aided drug design

    PubMed Central

    Vanommeslaeghe, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Mechanics (MM) is the method of choice for computational studies of biomolecular systems owing to its modest computational cost, which makes it possible to routinely perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on chemical systems of biophysical and biomedical relevance. Scope of Review As one of the main factors limiting the accuracy of MD results is the empirical force field used, the present paper offers a review of recent developments in the CHARMM additive force field, one of the most popular bimolecular force fields. Additionally, we present a detailed discussion of the CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, anticipating a growth in the importance and utilization of polarizable force fields in the near future. Throughout the discussion emphasis is placed on the force fields’ parametrization philosophy and methodology. Major Conclusions Recent improvements in the CHARMM additive force field are mostly related to newly found weaknesses in the previous generation of additive force fields. Beyond the additive approximation is the newly available CHARMM Drude polarizable force field, which allows for MD simulations of up to 1 microsecond on proteins, DNA, lipids and carbohydrates. General Significance Addressing the limitations ensures the reliability of the new CHARMM36 additive force field for the types of calculations that are presently coming into routine computational reach while the availability of the Drude polarizable force fields offers a model that is an inherently more accurate model of the underlying physical forces driving macromolecular structures and dynamics. PMID:25149274

  6. RCP4.5: A Pathway for Stabilization of Radiative Forcing by 2100

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page; Volke, April C.; Patel, Pralit L.; Delgado Arias, Sabrina; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2011-07-29

    Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 is a scenario that stabilizes radiative forcing at 4.5 W m{sup -2} in the year 2100 without ever exceeding that value. Simulated with the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), RCP4.5 includes long-term, global emissions of greenhouse gases, short-lived species, and land-use-land-cover in a global economic framework. RCP4.5 was updated from earlier GCAM scenarios to incorporate historical emissions and land cover information common to the RCP process and follows a cost-minimizing pathway to reach the target radiative forcing. The imperative to limit emissions in order to reach this target drives changes in the energy system, including shifts to electricity, to lower emissions energy technologies and to the deployment of carbon capture and geologic storage technology. In addition, the RCP4.5 emissions price also applies to land use emissions; as a result, forest lands expand from their present day extent. The simulated future emissions and land use were downscaled from the regional simulation to a grid to facilitate transfer to climate models. While there are many alternative pathways to achieve a radiative forcing level of 4.5 W m{sup -2}, the application of the RCP4.5 provides a common platform for climate models to explore the climate system response to stabilizing the anthropogenic components of radiative forcing.

  7. Accounting for radiative forcing from albedo change in future global land-use scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Andrew D.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of a new method for quantifying radiative forcing from land use and land cover change (LULCC) within an integrated assessment model, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The method relies on geographically differentiated estimates of radiative forcing from albedo change associated with major land cover transitions derived from the Community Earth System Model. We find that conversion of 1 km² of woody vegetation (forest and shrublands) to non-woody vegetation (crops and grassland) yields between 0 and –0.71 nW/m² of globally averaged radiative forcing determined by the vegetation characteristics, snow dynamics, and atmospheric radiation environment characteristic within each of 151 regions we consider globally. Across a set of scenarios designed to span a range of potential future LULCC, we find LULCC forcing ranging from –0.06 to –0.29 W/m² by 2070 depending on assumptions regarding future crop yield growth and whether climate policy favors afforestation or bioenergy crops. Inclusion of this previously uncounted forcing in the policy targets driving future climate mitigation efforts leads to changes in fossil fuel emissions on the order of 1.5 PgC/yr by 2070 for a climate forcing limit of 4.5 Wm–2, corresponding to a 12–67 % change in fossil fuel emissions depending on the scenario. Scenarios with significant afforestation must compensate for albedo-induced warming through additional emissions reductions, and scenarios with significant deforestation need not mitigate as aggressively due to albedo-induced cooling. In all scenarios considered, inclusion of albedo forcing in policy targets increases forest and shrub cover globally.

  8. Importance of instantaneous radiative forcing for rapid tropospheric adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Tomoo; Webb, Mark J.; Watanabe, Masahiro; Lambert, F. Hugo; Tsushima, Yoko; Sekiguchi, Miho

    2014-09-01

    To better understand CFMIP/CMIP inter-model differences in rapid low cloud responses to CO2 increases and their associated effective radiative forcings, we examined the tropospheric adjustment of the lower tropospheric stability (LTS) in three general circulation models (GCMs): HadGEM2-A, MIROC3.2 medres, and MIROC5. MIROC3.2 medres showed a reduction in LTS over the sub-tropical ocean, in contrast to the other two models. This reduction was consistent with a temperature decrease in the mid-troposphere. The temperature decrease was mainly driven by instantaneous radiative forcing (RF) caused by an increase in CO2. Reductions in radiative and latent heating, due to clouds, and in adiabatic and advective heating, also contribute to the temperature decrease. The instantaneous RF in the mid-troposphere in MIROC3.2 medres is inconsistent with the results of line-by-line (LBL) calculations, and thus it is considered questionable. These results illustrate the importance of evaluating the vertical profile of instantaneous RF with LBL calculations; improved future model performance in this regard should help to increase our confidence in the tropospheric adjustment in GCMs.

  9. Climate Response of Direct Radiative Forcing of Anthropogenic Black Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Serena H.; Seinfeld,John H.

    2008-01-01

    The equilibrium climate effect of direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) is examined by 100-year simulations in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model II-prime coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model. Anthropogenic BC is predicted to raise globally and annually averaged equilibrium surface air temperature by 0.20 K if BC is assumed to be externally mixed. The predicted increase is significantly greater in the Northern Hemisphere (0.29 K) than in the Southern Hemisphere (0.11 K). If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with the present day level of sulfate aerosol, the predicted annual mean surface temperature increase rises to 0.37 K globally, 0.54 K for the Northern Hemisphere, and 0.20 K for the Southern Hemisphere. The climate sensitivity of BC direct radiative forcing is calculated to be 0.6 K W (sup -1) square meters, which is about 70% of that of CO2, independent of the assumption of BC mixing state. The largest surface temperature response occurs over the northern high latitudes during winter and early spring. In the tropics and midlatitudes, the largest temperature increase is predicted to occur in the upper troposphere. Direct radiative forcing of anthropogenic BC is also predicted to lead to a change of precipitation patterns in the tropics; precipitation is predicted to increase between 0 and 20 N and decrease between 0 and 20 S, shifting the intertropical convergence zone northward. If BC is assumed to be internally mixed with sulfate instead of externally mixed, the change in precipitation pattern is enhanced. The change in precipitation pattern is not predicted to alter the global burden of BC significantly because the change occurs predominantly in regions removed from BC sources.

  10. The effects of atmospheric cloud radiative forcing on climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David A.

    1989-01-01

    In order to isolate the effects of atmospheric cloud radiative forcing (ACRF) on climate, the general circulation of an ocean-covered earth called 'Seaworld' was simulated using the Colorado State University GCM. Most current climate models, however, do not include an interactive ocean. The key simplifications in 'Seaworld' are the fixed boundary temperature with no land points, the lack of mountains and the zonal uniformity of the boundary conditions. Two 90-day 'perpetual July' simulations were performed and analyzed the last sixty days of each. The first run included all the model's physical parameterizations, while the second omitted the effects of clouds in both the solar and terrestrial radiation parameterizations. Fixed and identical boundary temperatures were set for the two runs, and resulted in differences revealing the direct and indirect effects of the ACRF on the large-scale circulation and the parameterized hydrologic processes.

  11. Do Diurnal Aerosol Changes Affect Daily Average Radiative Forcing?

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-06-17

    Strong diurnal variability of aerosol has been observed frequently for many urban/industrial regions. How this variability may alter the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF), however, is largely unknown. To quantify changes in the time-averaged DARF, we perform an assessment of 29 days of high temporal resolution ground-based data collected during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) on Cape Cod, which is downwind of metropolitan areas. We demonstrate that strong diurnal changes of aerosol loading (about 20% on average) have a negligible impact on the 24-h average DARF, when daily averaged optical properties are used to find this quantity. However, when there is a sparse temporal sampling of aerosol properties, which may preclude the calculation of daily averaged optical properties, large errors (up to 100%) in the computed DARF may occur. We describe a simple way of reducing these errors, which suggests the minimal temporal sampling needed to accurately find the forcing.

  12. Historical anthropogenic radiative forcing of changes in biogenic secondary aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta Navarro, Juan; D'Andrea, Stephen; Pierce, Jeffrey; Ekman, Annica; Struthers, Hamish; Zorita, Eduardo; Guenther, Alex; Arneth, Almut; Smolander, Sampo; Kaplan, Jed; Farina, Salvatore; Scott, Catherine; Rap, Alexandru; Farmer, Delphine; Spracklen, Domink; Riipinen, Ilona

    2016-04-01

    Human activities have lead to changes in the energy balance of the Earth and the global climate. Changes in atmospheric aerosols are the second largest contributor to climate change after greenhouse gases since 1750 A.D. Land-use practices and other environmental drivers have caused changes in the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) well before 1750 A.D, possibly causing climate effects through aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions. Two numerical emission models LPJ-GUESS and MEGAN were used to quantify the changes in aerosol forming BVOC emissions in the past millennium. A chemical transport model of the atmosphere (GEOS-Chem-TOMAS) was driven with those BVOC emissions to quantify the effects on radiation caused by millennial changes in SOA. We found that global isoprene emissions decreased after 1800 A.D. by about 12% - 15%. This decrease was dominated by losses of natural vegetation, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions increased by about 2% - 10%, driven mostly by rising surface air temperatures. From 1000 A.D. to 1800 A.D, isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene emissions decline by 3% - 8% driven by both, natural vegetation losses, and the moderate global cooling between the medieval climate anomaly and the little ice age. The millennial reduction in BVOC emissions lead to a 0.5% to 2% reduction in climatically relevant aerosol particles (> 80 nm) and cause a direct radiative forcing between +0.02 W/m² and +0.07 W/m², and an indirect radiative forcing between -0.02 W/m² and +0.02 W/m².

  13. Nonlinear aspects of acoustic radiation force in biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, Lev; Tsyuryupa, Sergey; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2015-10-28

    In the past decade acoustic radiation force (ARF) became a powerful tool in numerous biomedical applications. ARF from a focused ultrasound beam acts as a virtual “finger” for remote probing of internal anatomical structures and obtaining diagnostic information. This presentation deals with generation of shear waves by nonlinear focused beams. Albeit the ARF has intrinsically nonlinear origin, in most cases the primary ultrasonic wave was considered in the linear approximation. In this presentation, we consider the effects of nonlinearly distorted beams on generation of shear waves by such beams.

  14. Radiation Force Caused by Scattering, Absorption, and Emission of Light by Nonspherical Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    General formulas for computing the radiation force exerted on arbitrarily oriented and arbitrarily shaped nonspherical particles due to scattering, absorption, and emission of electromagnetic radiation are derived. For randomly oriented particles with a plane of symmetry, the formula for the average radiation force caused by the particle response to external illumination reduces to the standard Debye formula derived from the Lorenz-Mie theory, whereas the average radiation force caused by emission vanishes.

  15. Contrasting regional versus global radiative forcing by megacity pollution emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Unger, N.

    2015-10-01

    We assess the regional and global integrated radiative forcing on 20- and 100-year time horizons caused by a one-year pulse of present day pollution emissions from 10 megacity areas: Los Angeles, Mexico City, New York City, Sao Paulo, Lagos, Cairo, New Delhi, Beijing, Shanghai and Manila. The assessment includes well-mixed greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4); and short-lived climate forcers: tropospheric ozone (O3) and fine mode aerosol particles (sulfate, nitrate, black carbon, primary and secondary organic aerosol). All megacities contribute net global warming on both time horizons. Most of the 10 megacity areas exert a net negative effect on their own regional radiation budget that is 10-100 times larger in magnitude than their global radiative effects. Of the cities examined, Beijing, New Delhi, Shanghai and New York contribute most to global warming with values ranging from +0.03 to 0.05 Wm-2yr on short timescales and +0.07-0.10 Wm-2yr on long timescales. Regional net 20-year radiative effects are largest for Mexico City (-0.84 Wm-2yr) and Beijing (-0.78 Wm-2yr). Megacity reduction of non-CH4 O3 precursors to improve air quality offers zero co-benefits to global climate. Megacity reduction of aerosols to improve air quality offers co-benefits to the regional radiative budget but minimal or no co-benefits to global climate with the exception of black carbon reductions in a few cities, especially Beijing and New Delhi. Results suggest that air pollution and global climate change mitigation can be treated as separate environmental issues in policy at the megacity level with the exception of CH4 action. Individual megacity reduction of CO2 and CH4 emissions can mitigate global warming and therefore offers climate safety improvements to the entire planet.

  16. Phase-resolved acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenjuan; Chen, Ruimin; Chou, Lidek; Liu, Gangjun; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-11-01

    Many diseases involve changes in the biomechanical properties of tissue, and there is a close correlation between tissue elasticity and pathology. We report on the development of a phase-resolved acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography method (ARF-OCE) to evaluate the elastic properties of tissue. This method utilizes chirped acoustic radiation force to produce excitation along the sample's axial direction, and it uses phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) to measure the vibration of the sample. Under 500-Hz square wave modulated ARF signal excitation, phase change maps of tissue mimicking phantoms are generated by the ARF-OCE method, and the resulting Young's modulus ratio is correlated with a standard compression test. The results verify that this technique could efficiently measure sample elastic properties accurately and quantitatively. Furthermore, a three-dimensional ARF-OCE image of the human atherosclerotic coronary artery is obtained. The result indicates that our dynamic phase-resolved ARF-OCE method can delineate tissues with different mechanical properties.

  17. Spectral Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing as Observed by AIRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaisdell, John M.; Susskind, Joel; Lee, Jae N.; Iredell, Lena

    2016-01-01

    AIRS V6 products contain the spectral contributions to Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), clear-sky OLR (OLR(sub CLR)), and Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing (LWCRF) in 16 bands from 100 cm(exp -1) to 3260 cm(exp -1). We show climatologies of selected spectrally resolved AIRS V6 products over the period of September 2002 through August 2016. Spectrally resolved LWCRF can better describe the response of the Earth system to cloud and cloud feedback processes. The spectral LWCRF enables us to estimate the fraction of each contributing factor to cloud forcing, i.e.: surface temperature, mid to upper tropospheric water vapor, and tropospheric temperature. This presentation also compares the spatial characteristics of LWCRF from AIRS, CERES_EBAF Edition-2.8, and MERRA-2. AIRS and CERES LWCRF products show good agreement. The OLR bias between AIRS and CERES is very close to that of OLR(sub CLR). This implies that both AIRS and CERES OLR products accurately account for the effect of clouds on OLR.

  18. Simultaneously Constraining Climate Sensitivity and Aerosol Radiative Forcing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, L. D. Danny; Kaufmann, Robert K.

    2002-10-01

    An energy balance climate model with latitudinal, surface-air, and land-sea resolution is coupled to a two-dimensional (latitude-depth) ocean model and used to simulate changes in surface and surface air temperature since 1765. The climate model sensitivity can be prescribed by adjusting the parameterization of infrared radiation to space, and sensitivities corresponding to an equilibrium, global average warming to a CO2 doubling (T2×) of 1.0° to 5.0°C are used here. The model is driven with various combinations of greenhouse gas (GHG), fossil fuel aerosol, biomass aerosol, solar, and volcanic forcings. The fossil fuel aerosol forcing is concentrated in the NH, while the biomass aerosol forcing is centered near the equator. The variation in the global mean air temperature, and in the NH minus SH temperature, is examined over the period 1856-2000, in order to simultaneously constrain both climate sensitivity and aerosol forcing. The model performance, compared to observations, is evaluated using three statistical measures. It is possible to identify a group of experiments that performs better than other experiments, but it cannot be claimed that any member of the group is better than any other member in a statistically rigorous manner. The different statistical measures and temperature variables (global mean, NH SH, NH, or SH temperature) give slightly different groups of `more accurate' experiments.Based on the statistical measures and examination of the time series of model-simulated global mean and NH SH temperature variation, the following conclusions can be drawn: (i) The most likely T2× is around 2°C, which is at the lower end of the range of 2.1°-4.8°C obtained by recent general circulation models; (ii) the fossil fuel aerosol forcing is unlikely to have exceeded 1.0 W m2 in the global mean by 1990; and (iii) the net biomass plus soil dust aerosol forcing is unlikely to have exceeded 0.5 W m2 in the global mean by 1990. As an independent check of these

  19. Evaluation of Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in MIRAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Easter, Richard C.; Wagener, Richard; Nemesure, Seth; Chapman, Elaine G.; Zhang, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2001-04-01

    A variety of measurements have been used to evaluate the treatment of aerosol radiative properties and radiative impacts of aerosols simulated by the Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges (MIRAGE). The treatment of water uptake in MIRAGE agrees with laboratory measurements for the aerosol components that have been measured. The simulated frequency of relative humidity near 100% is about twice that of European Center for Medium-range Weather Forecasts analyzed relative humidity. When the analyzed relative humidity is used to calculate aerosol water uptake in MIRAGE, the simulated aerosol optical depth agrees with most surface measurements after cloudy conditions are filtered out and differences between model and station elevations are accounted for. Simulated optical depths are low over sites in Brazil during the biomass burning season and over sites in central Canada during the wildfire season, which can be attributed to limitations in the organic and black car bon emissions data used by MIRAGE. The simulated aerosol optical depths are mostly within a factor of two of satellite estimates, but MIRAGE simulates excessively high aerosol optical depths off the east coast of the US and China, and too little dust off the coast of West Africa and in the Arabian Sea. The simulated distribution of single-scatter albedo is consistent with the available in situ surface measurements. The simulated sensitivity of radiative forcing to aerosol optical depth is consistent with estimates from measurements where available. The simulated spatial distribution of aerosol radiance is broadly consistent with estimates from satellite measurements, but with the same errors as the aerosol optical depth. The simulated direct forcing is within the uncertainty of estimates from measurements in the North Atlantic.

  20. 47 CFR 15.215 - Additional provisions to the general radiated emission limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.215 Additional provisions to the general radiated emission limitations. (a) The regulations in §§ 15.217 through... frequency bands shown in these alternative provisions must be attenuated to the emission limits shown...

  1. Aerosol and ozone radiative forcing 1990-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Myhre, Gunnar; Samset, Bjørn H.; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The regional changes in economic growth and pollution regulations have caused large changes in the geographical distribution of emissions of precursors and components affecting the radiation balance. Here we use recently updated emission data over the 1990-2015 period in eight global aerosol models to simulate aerosol and ozone changes and their radiative forcing. The models reproduce the general large-scale changes in aerosol and ozone changes over this period. The surface particle mass changes is simulated to 2-3 %/yr for the total fine particle concentration over main industrialized regions. Six models simulated changes in PM2.5 (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less 2.5 μm) over the 1990-2015 period. Observations of changes in PM2.5 are available for selected regions and time periods. The available PM2.5 trends from observations and model mean results are compared and for Europe the observed trend is 20% stronger than the model-mean over the 2000-2010 period. Over the 1990-2010 period the US observed changes are 13% lower than the simulated changes. Despite this relatively promising result, the agreement over US for the 2000-2010 period is poor. The reasons for this will be further explored. The forcing for ozone and aerosols increase over the 1990-2015 period and more positive relative to results in IPCC AR5. The main reason for a positive aerosol forcing over this period is explained by a substantial reduction of global mean SO2 emissions, in parallel with increasing black carbon emissions.

  2. Radiative forcing in the ACCMIP historical and future climate simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Shindell, D. T.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Schulz, M.; Flanner, M.; Jiao, C.; Chin, M.; Young, P. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Rotstayn, L.; Mahowald, N.; Milly, G.; Faluvegi, G.; Balkanski, Y.; Collins, W. J.; Conley, A. J.; Dalsoren, S.; Easter, R.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L.; Liu, X.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, V.; Rumbold, S. T.; Skeie, R.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Takemura, T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Yoon, J. -H.; Lo, F.

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) examined the short-lived drivers of climate change in current climate models. Here we evaluate the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of which also participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The models reproduce present-day total aerosol optical depth (AOD) relatively well, though many are biased low. Contributions from individual aerosol components are quite different, however, and most models underestimate east Asian AOD. The models capture most 1980-2000 AOD trends well, but underpredict increases over the Yellow/Eastern Sea. They strongly underestimate absorbing AOD in many regions. We examine both the direct radiative forcing (RF) and the forcing including rapid adjustments (effective radiative forcing; ERF, including direct and indirect effects). The models’ all-sky 1850 to 2000 global mean annual average total aerosol RF is (mean; range) -0.26Wm-2-2. Screening based on model skill in capturing observed AOD yields a best estimate of -0.42Wm-2-2-2-2forcing than direct RF. Despite this, the multi-model spread relative to the mean is typically the same for ERF as it is for RF, or even smaller, over areas with substantial forcing. The largest 1850 to 2000 negative aerosol RF and ERF values are over and near Europe, south and east Asia and North America. ERF, however, is positive over the Sahara, the Karakoram, high Southern latitudes and especially the Arctic. Global

  3. Radiative Forcing in the ACCMIP Historical and Future Climate Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, Drew Todd; Lamarque, J.-F.; Schulz, M.; Flanner, M.; Jiao, C.; Chin, M.; Young, P. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Rotstayn, L.; Mahowald, N.; Milly, G.; Faluvegi, G.; Balkanski, Y.; Collins, W. J.; Conley, A. J.; Dalsoren, S.; Easter, R.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L.; Liu, X.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, V.; Rumbold, S. T.; Skeie, R.; Voulgarakis, A.

    2013-01-01

    A primary goal of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model IntercomparisonProject (ACCMIP) was to characterize the short-lived drivers of preindustrial to 2100climate change in the current generation of climate models. Here we evaluate historicaland 5 future radiative forcing in the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of whichalso participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5).The models generally reproduce present-day climatological total aerosol opticaldepth (AOD) relatively well. components to this total, however, and most appear to underestimate AOD over East10 Asia. The models generally capture 1980-2000 AOD trends fairly well, though theyunderpredict AOD increases over the YellowEastern Sea. They appear to strongly underestimate absorbing AOD, especially in East Asia, South and Southeast Asia, SouthAmerica and Southern Hemisphere Africa.We examined both the conventional direct radiative forcing at the tropopause (RF) and the forcing including rapid adjustments (adjusted forcing AF, including direct andindirect effects). The models calculated all aerosol all-sky 1850 to 2000 global meanannual average RF ranges from 0.06 to 0.49 W m(sup -2), with a mean of 0.26 W m(sup -2) and a median of 0.27 W m(sup -2. Adjusting for missing aerosol components in some modelsbrings the range to 0.12 to 0.62W m(sup -2), with a mean of 0.39W m(sup -2). Screen20ing the models based on their ability to capture spatial patterns and magnitudes ofAOD and AOD trends yields a quality-controlled mean of 0.42W m(sup -2) and range of0.33 to 0.50 W m(sup -2) (accounting for missing components). The CMIP5 subset of ACCMIPmodels spans 0.06 to 0.49W m(sup -2), suggesting some CMIP5 simulations likelyhave too little aerosol RF. A substantial, but not well quantified, contribution to histori25cal aerosol RF may come from climate feedbacks (35 to 58). The mean aerosol AF during this period is 1.12W m(sup -2) (median value 1.16W m(sup -2), range 0.72 to1.44W m

  4. Implications of Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 Methane Emissions to Stabilize Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel, William R.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-01

    Increases in the abundance of methane (CH4) in the Earth’s atmosphere are responsible for significant radiative forcing of climate change (Forster et al., 2007; Wuebbles and Hayhoe, 2002). Since 1750, a 2.5 fold increase in atmospheric CH4 contributed 0.5 W/m2 to direct radiative forcing and an additional 0.2 W/m2 indirectly through changes in atmospheric chemistry. Next to water and carbon dioxide (CO2), methane is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Additionally, CH4 is significantly more effective as a greenhouse gas on a per molecule basis than is CO2, and increasing atmospheric CH4 has been second only to CO2 in radiative forcing (Forster et al., 2007). The chemical reactivity of CH4 is important to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Along with carbon monoxide, methane helps control the amount of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the troposphere where oxidation of CH4 by OH leads to the formation of formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and ozone.

  5. Analysis of clot formation with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Longo, Diane M.; Lawrence, Michael B.; Walker, William F.

    2002-04-01

    Inappropriate blood coagulation plays an important role in diseases including stroke, heart attack, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT arises when a blood clot forms in a large vein of the leg. DVT is detrimental because the blood flow may be partially or completely obstructed. More importantly, a potentially fatal situation may arise if part of the clot travels to the arteries in the lungs, forming a pulmonary embolism (PE). Characterization of the mechanical properties of DVT could improve diagnosis and suggest appropriate treatment. We are developing a technique to assess mechanical properties of forming thrombi. The technique uses acoustic radiation force as a means to produce small, localized displacements within the sample. Returned ultrasound echoes are processed to estimate the time dependent displacement of the sample. Appropriate mechanical modeling and signal processing produce plots depicting relative mechanical properties (relative elasticity and relative viscosity) and force-free parameters (time constant, damping ratio, and natural frequency). We present time displacement curves of blood samples obtained during coagulation, and show associated relative and force-free parameter plots. These results show that the Voigt model with added mass accurately characterizes blood behavior during clot formation.

  6. Aerosol Radiative Effects on Deep Convective Clouds and Associated Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, J.; Zhang, R.; Tao, W.-K.; Mohr, I.

    2007-01-01

    The aerosol radiative effects (ARE) on the deep convective clouds are investigated by using a spectral-bin cloud-resolving model (CRM) coupled with a radiation scheme and an explicit land surface model. The sensitivity of cloud properties and the associated radiative forcing to aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA) are examined. The ARE on cloud properties is pronounced for mid-visible SSA of 0.85. Relative to the case excluding the ARE, cloud fraction and optical depth decrease by about 18% and 20%, respectively. Cloud droplet and ice particle number concentrations, liquid water path (LWP), ice water path (IWP), and droplet size decrease significantly when the ARE is introduced. The ARE causes a surface cooling of about 0.35 K and significantly high heating rates in the lower troposphere (about 0.6K/day higher at 2 km), both of which lead to a more stable atmosphere and hence weaker convection. The weaker convection and the more desiccation of cloud layers explain the less cloudiness, lower cloud optical depth, LWP and IWP, smaller droplet size, and less precipitation. The daytime-mean direct forcing induced by black carbon is about 2.2 W/sq m at the top of atmosphere (TOA) and -17.4 W/sq m at the surface for SSA of 0.85. The semi-direct forcing is positive, about 10 and 11.2 W/sq m at the TOA and surface, respectively. Both the TOA and surface total radiative forcing values are strongly negative for the deep convective clouds, attributed mostly to aerosol indirect forcing. Aerosol direct and semi-direct effects are very sensitive to SSA. Because the positive semi-direct forcing compensates the negative direct forcing at the surface, the surface temperature and heat fluxes decrease less significantly with the increase of aerosol absorption (decreasing SSA). The cloud fraction, optical depth, convective strength, and precipitation decrease with the increase of absorption, resulting from a more stable and dryer atmosphere due to enhanced surface cooling and

  7. Pairwise-additive force fields for selected aqueous monovalent ions from adaptive force matching

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Simple non-polarizable potentials were developed for Na+, K+, Cl−, and Br− using the adaptive force matching (AFM) method with ab initio MP2 method as reference. Our MP2-AFM force field predicts the solvation free energies of the four salts formed by the ions with an error of no more than 5%. Other properties such as the ion-water radial distribution functions, first solvation shell water tilt angle distributions, ion diffusion constants, concentration dependent diffusion constant of water, and concentration dependent surface tension of the solutions were calculated with this potential. Very good agreement was achieved for these properties. In particular, the diffusion constants of the ions are within 6% of experimental measurements. The model predicts bromide to be enriched at the interface in the 1.6M KBr solution but predicts the ion to be repelled for the surface at lower concentration. PMID:26590540

  8. Sufficient conditions for the additivity of stall forces generated by multiple filaments or motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bameta, Tripti; Das, Dipjyoti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments work collectively most of the time under opposing forces. This opposing force may be due to cargo carried by motors or resistance coming from the cell membrane pressing against the cytoskeletal filaments. Some recent studies have shown that the collective maximum force (stall force) generated by multiple cytoskeletal filaments or molecular motors may not always be just a simple sum of the stall forces of the individual filaments or motors. To understand this excess or deficit in the collective force, we study a broad class of models of both cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. We argue that the stall force generated by a group of filaments or motors is additive, that is, the stall force of N number of filaments (motors) is N times the stall force of one filament (motor), when the system is reversible at stall. Conversely, we show that this additive property typically does not hold true when the system is irreversible at stall. We thus present a novel and unified understanding of the existing models exhibiting such non-addivity, and generalise our arguments by developing new models that demonstrate this phenomena. We also propose a quantity similar to thermodynamic efficiency to easily predict this deviation from stall-force additivity for filament and motor collectives.

  9. Identifying Vulnerable Plaques with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Joshua Ryan

    The rupture of arterial plaques is the most common cause of ischemic complications including stroke, the fourth leading cause of death and number one cause of long term disability in the United States. Unfortunately, because conventional diagnostic tools fail to identify plaques that confer the highest risk, often a disabling stroke and/or sudden death is the first sign of disease. A diagnostic method capable of characterizing plaque vulnerability would likely enhance the predictive ability and ultimately the treatment of stroke before the onset of clinical events. This dissertation evaluates the hypothesis that Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging can noninvasively identify lipid regions, that have been shown to increase a plaque's propensity to rupture, within carotid artery plaques in vivo. The work detailed herein describes development efforts and results from simulations and experiments that were performed to evaluate this hypothesis. To first demonstrate feasibility and evaluate potential safety concerns, finite- element method simulations are used to model the response of carotid artery plaques to an acoustic radiation force excitation. Lipid pool visualization is shown to vary as a function of lipid pool geometry and stiffness. A comparison of the resulting Von Mises stresses indicates that stresses induced by an ARFI excitation are three orders of magnitude lower than those induced by blood pressure. This thesis also presents the development of a novel pulse inversion harmonic tracking method to reduce clutter-imposed errors in ultrasound-based tissue displacement estimates. This method is validated in phantoms and was found to reduce bias and jitter displacement errors for a marked improvement in image quality in vivo. Lastly, this dissertation presents results from a preliminary in vivo study that compares ARFI imaging derived plaque stiffness with spatially registered composition determined by a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) gold standard

  10. Radiative forcing of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide: A significant revision of the methane radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etminan, M.; Myhre, G.; Highwood, E. J.; Shine, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    New calculations of the radiative forcing (RF) are presented for the three main well-mixed greenhouse gases, methane, nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide. Methane's RF is particularly impacted because of the inclusion of the shortwave forcing; the 1750-2011 RF is about 25% higher (increasing from 0.48 W m-2 to 0.61 W m-2) compared to the value in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2013 assessment; the 100 year global warming potential is 14% higher than the IPCC value. We present new simplified expressions to calculate RF. Unlike previous expressions used by IPCC, the new ones include the overlap between CO2 and N2O; for N2O forcing, the CO2 overlap can be as important as the CH4 overlap. The 1750-2011 CO2 RF is within 1% of IPCC's value but is about 10% higher when CO2 amounts reach 2000 ppm, a value projected to be possible under the extended RCP8.5 scenario.

  11. A Strategy to Assess Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing of Climate Using Satellite Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a complex internal chemical composition and optical properties. Therefore it is difficult to model their impact on redistribution and absorption of solar radiation, and the consequent impact on atmospheric dynamics and climate. The use in climate models of isolated aerosol parameters retrieved from satellite data (e.g. optical thickness) may result in inconsistent calculations, if the model assumptions differ from these of the satellite retrieval schemes. Here we suggest a strategy to assess the direct impact of aerosol on the radiation budget at the top and bottom of the atmosphere using satellite and ground based measurements of the spectral solar radiation scattered by the aerosol. This method ensures consistent use of the satellite data and increases its accuracy. For Kaufman and Tanre: Strategy for aerosol direct forcing anthropogenic aerosol in the fine mode (e.g. biomass burning smoke and urban pollution) consistent use of satellite derived optical thickness can yield the aerosol impact on the spectral solar flux with accuracy an order of magnitude better than the optical thickness itself. For example, a simulated monthly average smoke optical thickness of 0.5 at 0.55 microns (forcing of 40-50 W/sq m) derived with an error of 20%, while the forcing can be measured directly with an error of only 0-2 W/sq m. Another example, the effect of large dust particles on reflection of solar flux can be derived three times better than retrievals of optical thickness. Since aerosol impacts not only the top of the atmosphere but also the surface irradiation, a combination of satellite and ground based measurements of the spectral flux, can be the most direct mechanism to evaluate the aerosol effect on climate and assimilate it in climate models. The strategy is applied to measurements from SCAR-B and the Tarfox experiments. In SCAR-B aircraft spectral data are used to derive the 24 hour radiative forcing of smoke at the top of the atmosphere of

  12. Gamma radiation effects on siloxane-based additive manufactured structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzer, Andrew M.; Cady, Carl M.; Geller, Drew; Ortiz-Acosta, Denisse; Zocco, Adam T.; Stull, Jamie; Labouriau, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Siloxane-basedadditive manufactured structures prepared by the direct ink write (DIW) technology were exposed to ionizing irradiation in order to gauge radiolysis effects on structure-property relationships. These well-defined 3-D structures were subjected to moderate doses of gamma irradiation in an inert atmosphere and characterized by a suite of experimental methods. Changes in thermal, chemical, microstructure, and mechanical properties were evaluated by DSC, TGA, FT-IR, mass spectroscopy, EPR, solvent swelling, SEM, and uniaxial compressive load techniques. Our results demonstrated that 3-D structures made from aromatic-free siloxane resins exhibited hardening after being exposed to gamma radiation. This effect was accompanied by gas evolution, decreasing in crystallization levels, decreasing in solvent swelling and damage to the microstructure. Furthermore, long-lived radiation-induced radicals were not detected by EPR methods. Our results are consistent with cross-link formation being the dominant degradation mechanism over chain scission reactions. On the other hand, 3-D structures made from high phenyl content siloxane resins showed little radiation damage as evidenced by low off gassing.

  13. Solar Radiation as Driving Force In Early Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has provided an evolutionary challenge to life on Earth in that it is both an agent of mutation and as well as a selective force. Today surface fluxes of UVR vary diurnally, seasonally, etc. Still, the UVR flux was probably substantially higher during the early phases of evolution, suggesting that its role in evolution was even more prominent during this time. In this presentation, the creative role of UVR in evolution is discussed, specifically in connection with the role that UVR may have played in the evolution of early microbial ecosystems. The presentation will include discussions of the direct influence of UVR on such processes as photosynthesis and genetic damage, as well as the indirect influence of UVR as mediated through the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological effects of UVR will be viewed against the backdrop of the physical nature of the early Earth, surely a very different place then than now.

  14. Uncertainty in Model Forcing : An Assessment of Solar Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, A. G.

    2012-12-01

    In order to move to more innovative and advanced modeling frameworks such as physically based energy balance models, appropriate inputs of meteorological forcings are required to produce viable simulations as well as test the ability of the model over a spatial domain. Temperature and precipitation are observed at a large number of stations and are routinely interpolated for use in hydrometeorology, yet they still inject uncertainty into simple modeling methods. Energy fluxes such as solar radiation are central to energy balance models but observations are available at very few locations, meaning that alternative sources are required for use within retrospective or operational hydrologic systems. In this work the skill of several recent reanalysis radiation products (CFSRR, ERA-I, JRA, MERRA & NARR) are assessed along with that of satellite products (GOES) and empirical methods such as the MTCLIM algorithm. A particular focus is given to higher elevation locations, such as would be useful in forecasting for snow dominated catchments of the US West. One limitation of comparisons between station (point) and reanalyses (grid-box areas) is the scale mis-match, thus where available attention is paid to variability observed within grid-boxes. Particularly critical periods, such as the snowmelt months of April-June are also investigated in more detail; preliminary assessments in Colorado show biases of more than 20Wm-2 exist in these data. The trade-offs between uncertainty contained within model forcing and uncertainty inherent in other parts of the forecasting problem are discussed (e.g. model structural uncertainty, parameter uncertainty and initial conditions uncertainty).

  15. Arctic stratospheric sulphur injections: radiative forcings and cloud responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, U.; Gasparini, B.; Miriam, K.; Kravitz, B.; Rasch, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and climate projections show a high sensitivity of the Arctic climate to the increase in greenhouse gas emissions, known as the polar amplification. This study evaluates the options of counteracting the rising polar temperatures by stratospheric sulphur injections in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes.10 Mt of sulphur dioxide are emitted in a point emission source setup centred at the 100 hPa pressure level over Svalbard island (80°N,15°E). We perform simulations with the general circulation models ECHAM5, ECHAM6, and GISS ModelE. We study pulsed emission simulations that differ among themselves by the injection starting date (March-September), injection length (1, 30, or 90 day emission period), and the vertical resolution of the model (for ECHAM6). We find injections in April to be the most efficient in terms of the shortwave radiative forcing at the top-of-the atmosphere over the Arctic region. The distribution of sulphate aerosol spreads out beyond the injection region, with a significant share reaching the Southern Hemisphere. Results from ModelE show high latitude injections could counteract the spring and summer temperature increase due to higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Preliminary results with a more realistic description of clouds in ECHAM-HAM reveal a complex pattern of responses, most notably: a decrease in Northern Hemisphere cirrus clouds strengthening the effect of stratospheric aerosols in ECHAM5 a decrease in low-level clouds over the Arctic increasing the incoming solar radiation and causing a net positive radiative balance cirrus clouds are resilient to stratospheric sulphur injections in the absence of sulphate warming

  16. Placement and efficiency effects on radiative forcing of solar installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Brian R.; Ruch, Patrick; Paredes, Stephan; Michel, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    The promise for harnessing solar energy being hampered by cost, triggered efforts to reduce them. As a consequence low-efficiency, low-cost photovoltaics (PV) panels prevail. Conversely, in the traditional energy sector efficiency is extremely important due to the direct costs associated to fuels. This also affects solar energy due to the radiative forcing caused by the dark solar panels. In this paper we extend the concept of energy payback time by including the effect of albedo change, which gives a better assessment of the system sustainability. We present an analysis on the short and medium term climate forcing effects of different solar collectors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and demonstrate that efficiency is important to reduce the collector area and cost. This also influences the embodied energy and the global warming potential. We show that a placement of a high concentration photovoltaic thermal solar power station outside of the city using a district cooling system has a double beneficial effect since it improves the solar conversion efficiency and reduces the energy demand for cooling in the city. We also explain the mechanisms of the current economic development of solar technologies and anticipate changes.

  17. Placement and efficiency effects on radiative forcing of solar installations

    SciTech Connect

    Burg, Brian R.; Ruch, Patrick; Paredes, Stephan; Michel, Bruno

    2015-09-28

    The promise for harnessing solar energy being hampered by cost, triggered efforts to reduce them. As a consequence low-efficiency, low-cost photovoltaics (PV) panels prevail. Conversely, in the traditional energy sector efficiency is extremely important due to the direct costs associated to fuels. This also affects solar energy due to the radiative forcing caused by the dark solar panels. In this paper we extend the concept of energy payback time by including the effect of albedo change, which gives a better assessment of the system sustainability. We present an analysis on the short and medium term climate forcing effects of different solar collectors in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and demonstrate that efficiency is important to reduce the collector area and cost. This also influences the embodied energy and the global warming potential. We show that a placement of a high concentration photovoltaic thermal solar power station outside of the city using a district cooling system has a double beneficial effect since it improves the solar conversion efficiency and reduces the energy demand for cooling in the city. We also explain the mechanisms of the current economic development of solar technologies and anticipate changes.

  18. Direct radiative forcing from black carbon aerosols over urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavi Latha, K.; Badarinath, K. V. S.

    There is growing evidence that the earth's climate is changing and will likely continue to change in the future. It is still debated whether these changes are due to natural variability of the climate system or a result of increases in the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Black carbon (BC) has become the subject of interest for a variety of reasons. BC aerosol may cause environmental as well as harmful health effects in densely inhabited regions. BC is a strong absorber of radiation in the visible and near-infrared part of the spectrum, where most of the solar energy is distributed. Black carbon is emitted into the atmosphere as a byproduct of all combustion processes viz., vegetation burning, industrial effluents and motor vehicle exhausts etc. In this paper, we present results from our measurements on black carbon aerosols, total aerosol mass concentration and aerosol optical depth over an urban environment namely Hyderabad during January to May, 2003. Diurnal variations of BC suggests that high BC concentrations observed during 6:00-9:00hrs and 19:00-23:00hrs. Weekday variations of BC suggest that the day average BC concentrations increases gradually from Monday to Wednesday and gradually decreased from Thursday to Sunday. Analysis of traffic density along with meteorological parameters suggests that the primary determinant for BC concentration levels and patterns is traffic density. Seasonal variations of BC suggest that the BC concentrations are high during dry season compared to rainy season due to scavenging effects of BC during rainy season. Fraction of BC to total mass concentration has been observed to be 7% during January to May. BC showed positive correlation with total mass concentration and aerosol optical depth at 500nm. Radiative transfer calculations suggests that during January to May, diurnal averaged aerosol forcing at the surface calculated to be -33Wm -2 and at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) it is observed to +9 Wm -2. The

  19. Characteristics of Cloud Radiation Forcing over East China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chyung; Gong, Wei; Kau, Wen-Shung; Chen, Cheng-Ta; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung; Tu, Chia-Hsiu

    2004-02-01

    Observations indicate that the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) exhibits distinctive characteristics of large cloud amounts with associated heavy and persistent rainfall, although short breaks for clear sky usually occur. Consequently, the effects of cloud radiation interactions can play an important role in the general circulation of the atmosphere and, thus, the evolution of the EASM. In this note, as a first step toward studying the topic, the 5-yr (January 1985 December 1989) Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) dataset is used to show the spatial and temporal patterns of both shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) cloud radiative forcing (CRF) at the top of the atmosphere over east China, and to compare the observed features with Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project-II (AMIP-II) simulations with the University at Albany, State University of New York (SUNYA) Community Climate Model 3 (CCM3) and the ECHAM4 general circulation models.The observations indicate that the net CRF provides a cooling effect to the atmosphere surface climate system, dominated by the SW CRF cooling (albedo effect) with partial compensation from the LW CRF warming (greenhouse effect). The SW CRF shows a strong seasonal cycle, and its peak magnitude is particularly large, 110 W m-2, for south China and the Yangtze Huai River valley (YHRV) during May and June, while the LW CRF is about 50 W m-2 for the same months with a weak dependence on the latitudes and seasons. These characteristics are in sharp contrast to the Northern Hemispheric zonal means of the same latitude bands and seasons, thus implying a unique role for cloud radiation interaction in east China. Both model simulations show similar observed characteristics, although biases exist. For example, in May, the ECHAM4 underestimates the SW CRF while the SUNYA CCM3 simulates a significantly larger value, both attributed to the respective biases in the simulated total cloud cover. Model-to-observation comparisons of the association

  20. Land dominates the regional response to CO2 direct radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Tiffany A.; Voigt, Aiko

    2016-11-01

    In Atmospheric General Circulation Models (AGCMs) direct radiative forcing (increased CO2 with fixed sea surface temperature) is an imperfect concept because land temperatures are not fixed. Here the response to direct radiative forcing is decomposed into increased CO2 over ocean and land using an AGCM with spatially dependent CO2. The land versus ocean response is mostly linear. Consistent with previous work, ocean direct radiative forcing decreases ocean-averaged outgoing longwave radiation, precipitation, and tropical circulation intensity; however, it cannot explain the regional response to direct radiative forcing. Increased CO2 over land dominates the regional response via energy input over land, e.g., over deserts where there is no cloud and water vapor masking and a Rossby wave teleconnection. This mechanism operates across a range of climate perturbations, including decreased CO2. Previous AGCM decompositions involving direct radiative forcing and indirect sea surface temperature warming must be reinterpreted to include the importance of increased CO2 over land.

  1. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  2. Experimental Study of Acoustic Radiation Force of an Ultrasound Beam on Absorbing and Scattering Objects

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V.; Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter. PMID:27147775

  3. Experimental study of acoustic radiation force of an ultrasound beam on absorbing and scattering objects

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaeva, Anastasiia V. Kryzhanovsky, Maxim A.; Tsysar, Sergey A.; Kreider, Wayne; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is a nonlinear acoustic effect caused by the transfer of wave momentum to absorbing or scattering objects. This phenomenon is exploited in modern ultrasound metrology for measurement of the acoustic power radiated by a source and is used for both therapeutic and diagnostic sources in medical applications. To calculate radiation force an acoustic hologram can be used in conjunction with analytical expressions based on the angular spectrum of the measured field. The results of an experimental investigation of radiation forces in two different cases are presented in this paper. In one case, the radiation force of an obliquely incident ultrasound beam on a large absorber (which completely absorbs the beam) is considered. The second case concerns measurement of the radiation force on a spherical target that is small compared to the beam diameter.

  4. Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Patrinos, A.A. ); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. ); Ellingson, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

  5. Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Patrinos, A.A.; Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M.; Ellingson, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

  6. Influence of X-ray radiation on the hot star wind ionization state and on the radiative force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krtička, Jiří; Kubát, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Hot stars emit large amounts of X-rays, which are assumed to originate in the supersonic stellar wind. Part of the emitted X-rays is subsequently absorbed in the wind and influences its ionization state. Because hot star winds are driven radiatively, the modified ionization equilibrium affects the radiative force. We review the recent progress in modeling the influence of X-rays on the radiative equilibrium and on the radiative force. We focus particularly on single stars with X-rays produced in wind shocks and on binaries with massive components, which belong to the most luminous objects in X-rays.

  7. Direct radiative forcing from black carbon aerosols over urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badarinath, K. V. S.; Madhavi Latha, K.

    There is growing evidence that the earth’s climate is changing and will likely continue to change in the future. It is still debated whether these changes are due to natural variability of the climate system or a result of increases in the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Black carbon (BC) has become the subject of interest for a variety of reasons. BC aerosol may cause environmental as well as harmful health effects in densely inhabited regions. BC is a strong absorber of radiation in the visible and near-infrared part of the spectrum, where most of the solar energy is distributed. Black carbon is emitted into the atmosphere as a byproduct of all combustion processes, viz., vegetation burning, industrial effluents and motor vehicle exhausts, etc. In this paper, we present results from our measurements on black carbon aerosols, total aerosol mass concentration and aerosol optical depth over an urban environment namely Hyderabad during January to May, 2003. Diurnal variations of BC indicate high BC concentrations during 6:00 9:00 and 19:00 23:00 h. Weekday variations of BC concentrations increase gradually from Monday to Wednesday and gradually decrease from Thursday to Sunday. Analysis of traffic density along with meteorological parameters suggests that the primary determinant for BC concentration levels and patterns is traffic density. Seasonal variations of BC suggest that the BC concentrations are high during dry season compared to rainy season due to the scavenging by air. The fraction of BC to total mass concentration has been observed to be 7% during January to May. BC showed positive correlation with total mass concentration and aerosol optical depth at 500 nm. Radiative transfer calculations suggests that during January to May, diurnal averaged aerosol forcing at the surface is -33 Wm2 and at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) above 100 km it is observed to be +9 Wm-2. The results have been discussed in detail in the paper.

  8. Harmonic tracking of acoustic radiation force-induced displacements.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Joshua R; Dahl, Jeremy J; Trahey, Gregg E

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods rely upon accurate estimates of tissue deformation to characterize the mechanical properties of soft tissues. These methods are corrupted by clutter, which can bias and/or increase variance in displacement estimates. Harmonic imaging methods are routinely used for clutter suppression and improved image quality in conventional B-mode ultrasound, but have not been utilized in ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods. We introduce a novel, fully-sampled pulse-inversion harmonic method for tracking tissue displacements that corrects the loss in temporal sampling frequency associated with conventional pulse-inversion techniques. The method is implemented with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging to monitor the displacements induced by an impulsive acoustic radiation force excitation. Custom pulse sequences were implemented on a diagnostic ultrasound scanner to collect spatially-matched fundamental and harmonic information within a single acquisition. B-mode and ARFI images created from fundamental data collected at 4 MHz and 8 MHz are compared with 8-MHz harmonic images created using a band-pass filter approach and the fully sampled pulse-inversion method. In homogeneous, tissue-mimicking phantoms, where no visible clutter was observed, there was little difference in the axial displacements, estimated jitter, and normalized cross-correlation among the fundamental and harmonic tracking methods. The similarity of the lower- and higher-frequency methods suggests that any improvement resulting from the increased frequency of the harmonic components is negligible. The harmonic tracking methods demonstrated a marked improvement in B-mode and ARFI image quality of in vivo carotid arteries. Improved feature detection and decreased variance in estimated displacements were observed in the arterial walls of harmonic ARFI images, especially in the pulse-inversion harmonic ARFI images. Within the lumen, the harmonic tracking

  9. Harmonic Tracking of Acoustic Radiation Force Induced Displacements

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods rely upon accurate estimates of tissue deformation to characterize the mechanical properties of soft tissues. These methods are corrupted by clutter, which can bias and/or increase variance in displacement estimates. Harmonic imaging methods are routinely used for clutter suppression and improved image quality in conventional B-mode ultrasound, but have not been utilized in ultrasound-based elasticity imaging methods. We introduce a novel, fully-sampled pulse inversion harmonic method for tracking tissue displacements that corrects the loss in temporal sampling frequency associated with conventional pulse inversion techniques. The method is implemented with Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging to monitor the displacements induced by an impulsive acoustic radiation force excitation. Custom pulse sequences were implemented on a diagnostic ultrasound scanner to collect spatially-matched fundamental and harmonic information within a single acquisition. B-mode and ARFI images created from fundamental data collected at 4 MHz and 8 MHz are compared with 8 MHz harmonic images created using a bandpass filter approach and the fully sampled pulse inversion method. In homogeneous, tissue-mimicking phantoms, where no visible clutter was observed, there was little difference in the axial displacements, estimated jitter, and normalized cross-correlation among the fundamental and harmonic tracking methods. The similarity of the lower and higher frequency methods suggests that any improvement due to the increased frequency of the harmonic components is negligible. The harmonic tracking methods demonstrated a marked improvement in B-mode and ARFI image quality of in vivo carotid arteries. Improved feature detection and decreased variance in estimated displacements were observed in the arterial walls of harmonic ARFI images, especially in the pulse inversion harmonic ARFI images. Within the lumen, the harmonic tracking methods

  10. Method for microbubble characterization using primary radiation force.

    PubMed

    Vos, Hendrik J; Guidi, Francesco; Boni, Enrico; Tortoli, Piero

    2007-07-01

    Medical ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have evolved from straight image enhancers to pathophysiological markers and drug delivery vehicles. However, the exact dynamic behavior of the encapsulated bubbles composing UCAs is still not entirely known. In this article, we propose to characterize full populations of UCAs, by looking at the translational effects of ultrasound radiation force on each bubble in a diluted population. The setup involves a sensitive, fully programmable transmitter/receiver and two unconventional, real-time display modes. Such display modes are used to measure the displacements produced by irradiation at frequencies in the range 2-8 MHz and pressures between 150 kPa and 1.5 MPa. The behavior of individual bubbles freely moving in a water tank is clearly observed, and it is shown that it depends on the bubble physical dimensions as well as on the viscoelastic properties of the encapsulation. A new method also is distilled that estimates the viscoelastic properties of bubble encapsulation by fitting the experimental bubble velocities to values simulated by a numerical model based on the modified Herring equation and the Bjerknes force. The fit results are a shear modulus of 18 MPa and a viscosity of 0.23 Pas for a thermoplastic PVC-AN shell. Phospholipid shell elasticity and friction parameter of the experimental contrast agent are estimated as 0.8 N/m and 1 10(-7) kg/s, respectively (shear modulus of 32 MPa and viscosity of 0.19 Pas, assuming 4-nm shell thickness).

  11. Regional and seasonal radiative forcing by perturbations to aerosol and ozone precursor emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellouin, Nicolas; Baker, Laura; Hodnebrog, Øivind; Olivié, Dirk; Cherian, Ribu; Macintosh, Claire; Samset, Bjørn; Esteve, Anna; Aamaas, Borgar; Quaas, Johannes; Myhre, Gunnar

    2016-11-01

    Predictions of temperature and precipitation responses to changes in the anthropogenic emissions of climate forcers require the quantification of the radiative forcing exerted by those changes. This task is particularly difficult for near-term climate forcers like aerosols, methane, and ozone precursors because their short atmospheric lifetimes cause regionally and temporally inhomogeneous radiative forcings. This study quantifies specific radiative forcing, defined as the radiative forcing per unit change in mass emitted, for eight near-term climate forcers as a function of their source regions and the season of emission by using dedicated simulations by four general circulation and chemistry-transport models. Although differences in the representation of atmospheric chemistry and radiative processes in different models impede the creation of a uniform dataset, four distinct findings can be highlighted. Firstly, specific radiative forcing for sulfur dioxide and organic carbon are stronger when aerosol-cloud interactions are taken into account. Secondly, there is a lack of agreement on the sign of the specific radiative forcing of volatile organic compound perturbations, suggesting they are better avoided in climate mitigation strategies. Thirdly, the strong seasonalities of the specific radiative forcing of most forcers allow strategies to minimise positive radiative forcing based on the timing of emissions. Finally, European and shipping emissions exert stronger aerosol specific radiative forcings compared to East Asia where the baseline is more polluted. This study can therefore form the basis for further refining climate mitigation options based on regional and seasonal controls on emissions. For example, reducing summertime emissions of black carbon and wintertime emissions of sulfur dioxide in the more polluted regions is a possible way to improve air quality without weakening the negative radiative forcing of aerosols.

  12. Direct weakening of tropical circulations from masked CO2 radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Merlis, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Climate models robustly simulate weakened mean circulations of the tropical atmosphere in direct response to increased carbon dioxide (CO2). The direct response to CO2, defined by the response to radiative forcing in the absence of changes in sea surface temperature, affects tropical precipitation and tropical cyclone genesis, and these changes have been tied to the weakening of the mean tropical circulation. The mechanism underlying this direct CO2-forced circulation change has not been elucidated. Here, I demonstrate that this circulation weakening results from spatial structure in CO2’s radiative forcing. In regions of ascending circulation, such as the intertropical convergence zone, the CO2 radiative forcing is reduced, or “masked,” by deep-convective clouds and high humidity; in subsiding regions, such as the subtropics, the CO2 radiative forcing is larger because the atmosphere is drier and deep-convective clouds are infrequent. The spatial structure of the radiative forcing reduces the need for the atmosphere to transport energy. This, in turn, weakens the mass overturning of the tropical circulation. The previously unidentified mechanism is demonstrated in a hierarchy of atmospheric general circulation model simulations with altered radiative transfer to suppress the cloud masking of the radiative forcing. The mechanism depends on the climatological distribution of clouds and humidity, rather than uncertain changes in these quantities. Masked radiative forcing thereby offers an explanation for the robustness of the direct circulation weakening under increased CO2. PMID:26460034

  13. Direct weakening of tropical circulations from masked CO2 radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Merlis, Timothy M

    2015-10-27

    Climate models robustly simulate weakened mean circulations of the tropical atmosphere in direct response to increased carbon dioxide (CO2). The direct response to CO2, defined by the response to radiative forcing in the absence of changes in sea surface temperature, affects tropical precipitation and tropical cyclone genesis, and these changes have been tied to the weakening of the mean tropical circulation. The mechanism underlying this direct CO2-forced circulation change has not been elucidated. Here, I demonstrate that this circulation weakening results from spatial structure in CO2's radiative forcing. In regions of ascending circulation, such as the intertropical convergence zone, the CO2 radiative forcing is reduced, or "masked," by deep-convective clouds and high humidity; in subsiding regions, such as the subtropics, the CO2 radiative forcing is larger because the atmosphere is drier and deep-convective clouds are infrequent. The spatial structure of the radiative forcing reduces the need for the atmosphere to transport energy. This, in turn, weakens the mass overturning of the tropical circulation. The previously unidentified mechanism is demonstrated in a hierarchy of atmospheric general circulation model simulations with altered radiative transfer to suppress the cloud masking of the radiative forcing. The mechanism depends on the climatological distribution of clouds and humidity, rather than uncertain changes in these quantities. Masked radiative forcing thereby offers an explanation for the robustness of the direct circulation weakening under increased CO2.

  14. Uncertainties in Carbon Dioxide Radiative Forcing in Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M.-H.; Potter, G. L.; Gates, W. L.; Taylor, K. E.; Barker, H. W.; Colman, R. A.; Fraser, J. R.; McAvaney, B. J.; Dazlich, D. A.; Randall, D. A.; DelGenio, A. D.; Lacis, A. A.; Esch, M.; Roeckner, E.; Galin, V.; Hack, J. J.; Kiehl, J. T.; Ingram, W. J.; LeTreut, H.

    1993-01-01

    Global warming, caused by an increase in the concentrations of greenhouse gases, is the direct result of greenhouse gas-induced radiative forcing. When a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide is considered, this forcing differed substantially among 15 atmospheric general circulation models. Although there are several potential causes, the largest contributor was the carbon dioxide radiation parameterizations of the models.

  15. Intertemporal cumulative radiative forcing effects of photovoltaic deployments.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Dwarakanath; Seager, Thomas P; Chester, Mikhail V; Fraser, Matthew P

    2014-09-02

    Current policies accelerating photovoltaics (PV) deployments are motivated by environmental goals, including reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by displacing electricity generated from fossil-fuels. Existing practice assesses environmental benefits on a net life-cycle basis, where displaced GHG emissions offset those generated during PV production. However, this approach does not consider that the environmental costs of GHG release during production are incurred early, while environmental benefits accrue later. Thus, where policy targets suggest meeting GHG reduction goals established by a certain date, rapid PV deployment may have counterintuitive, albeit temporary, undesired consequences. On a cumulative radiative forcing (CRF) basis, the environmental improvements attributable to PV might be realized much later than is currently understood, particularly when PV manufacturing utilizes GHG-intensive energy sources (e.g., coal), but deployment occurs in areas with less GHG-intensive electricity sources (e.g., hydroelectric). This paper details a dynamic CRF model to examine the intertemporal warming impacts of PV deployments in California and Wyoming. CRF payback times are longer than GHG payback times by 6-12 years in California and 6-11 years in Wyoming depending on the PV technology mix and deployment strategy. For the same PV capacity being deployed, early installations yield greater CRF benefits (calculated over 10 and 25 years) than installations occurring later in time. Further, CRF benefits are maximized when PV technologies with the lowest manufacturing GHG footprint (cadmium telluride) are deployed in locations with the most GHG-intensive grids (i.e., Wyoming).

  16. Relationship between acoustic power and acoustic radiation force on absorbing and reflecting targets for spherically focusing radiators.

    PubMed

    Gélat, Pierre; Shaw, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Total acoustic output power is an important parameter required by standards for most ultrasonic medical equipment including high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) systems. Radiation force balances are routinely used; however, radiation force is not strictly dependent on the ultrasound power but, rather, on the wave momentum resolved in one direction. Consequently, measurements based on radiation force become progressively less accurate as the ultrasound wave deviates further from a true plane wave. HIFU transducers can be very strongly focused with F-numbers less than one: under these conditions, the uncertainty associated with use of the radiation force method becomes very significant. International Standards IEC 61161 and IEC 62555 suggest plane-wave correction factors for unfocused transducers radiating onto an ideal absorbing target and focusing corrections for focused transducers radiating onto ideal absorbing targets and onto conical reflecting targets (IEC 61161). Previous models have relied on calculations based on the Rayleigh integral, which is not strictly correct for curved sources. In the work described here, an approach combining finite element methods with a discretization of the Helmholtz equation was developed, making it possible to model the boundary condition at the structure/fluid interface more correctly. This has been used to calculate the relationship between radiation force and total power for both absorbing and conical reflecting targets for transducers ranging from planar to an F-number of 0.5 (hemispherical) and to compare with the recommendations of IEC 61161 and IEC 62555.

  17. Radiative forcing impacts of boreal forest biofuels: a scenario study for Norway in light of albedo.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Strømman, Anders Hammer; Peters, Glen P

    2011-09-01

    Radiative forcing impacts due to increased harvesting of boreal forests for use as transportation biofuel in Norway are quantified using simple climate models together with life cycle emission data, MODIS surface albedo data, and a dynamic land use model tracking carbon flux and clear-cut area changes within productive forests over a 100-year management period. We approximate the magnitude of radiative forcing due to albedo changes and compare it to the forcing due to changes in the carbon cycle for purposes of attributing the net result, along with changes in fossil fuel emissions, to the combined anthropogenic land use plus transport fuel system. Depending on albedo uncertainty and uncertainty about the geographic distribution of future logging activity, we report a range of results, thus only general conclusions about the magnitude of the carbon offset potential due to changes in surface albedo can be drawn. Nevertheless, our results have important implications for how forests might be managed for mitigating climate change in light of this additional biophysical criterion, and in particular, on future biofuel policies throughout the region. Future research efforts should be directed at understanding the relationships between the physical properties of managed forests and albedo, and how albedo changes in time as a result of specific management interventions.

  18. Comparison of Two Methods for the Generation of Spatially Modulated Ultrasound Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Elegbe, Etana C.; Menon, Manoj G.; McAleavey, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially modulated ultrasound radiation force (SMURF) imaging is an elastographic technique that involves generating a radiation force beam with a lateral intensity variation of a defined spatial frequency. This results in a shear wave of known wavelength. By using the displacements induced by the shear wave and standard Doppler or speckle-tracking methods, the shear wave frequency, and thus material shear modulus, is estimated. In addition to generating a pushing beam pattern with a specified lateral intensity variation, it is generally desirable to induce larger displacements so that the displacement data signal-to-noise ratio is higher. We provide an analysis of two beam forming methods for generating SMURF in an elastic material: the focal Fraunhofer and intersecting plane wave methods. Both techniques generate beams with a defined spatial frequency. However, as a result of the trade-offs associated with each technique, the peak acoustic intensity outputs in the region of interest differs for the same combinations of parameters (e.g., the focal depth, the width of the area of interest, and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient). Assuming limited transducer drive voltage, we provide a decision plot to determine which of the two techniques yields the greater pushing force for a specific configuration. PMID:21768019

  19. On radiation forces acting on a transparent nanoparticle in the field of a focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Afanas'ev, A A; Rubinov, A N; Gaida, L S; Guzatov, D V; Svistun, A Ch

    2015-10-31

    Radiation forces acting on a transparent spherical nanoparticle in the field of a focused Gaussian laser beam are studied theoretically in the Rayleigh scattering regime. Expressions are derived for the scattering force and Cartesian components of the gradient force. The resultant force acting on a nanoparticle located in the centre of a laser beam is found. The parameters of the focused beam and optical properties of the nanoparticle for which the longitudinal component of the gradient force exceeds the scattering force are determined. Characteristics of the transverse gradient force are discussed. (nanophotonics)

  20. Aerosol types and radiative forcing estimates over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawar, Rohini L.; Lee, Woo-Seop; Rahul, P. R. C.

    2016-09-01

    Using the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite data sets along with the CSIRO-MK 3.6.0 model simulations, we analyzed the aerosol optical depth (AOD) variability during March-May (MAM), June-August (JJA) along with their annual mean variability over East Asia for the period 2006-2012. The CALIPSO measurements correlated well with the MODIS measurements and the CSIRO-MK 3.6.0 model simulations over the spatial distribution patterns of the aerosols, but CALIPSO underestimated the magnitudes of the AOD. Maximum smoke aerosol loading is observed to occur during JJA, as a result of wind transport from Southern China while dust loading dominated during MAM via the transport from desert region. The vertical distribution profiles revealed that there is uniform distribution of smoke aerosols during both MAM and JJA, only differing at the altitude at which they peak; while the dust aerosols during MAM showed a significant distribution from the surface to 10 km altitude and JJA was marked with lower dust loading at the same altitudes. Both dust and smoke aerosols warm the atmosphere in MAM but due to the absorbing nature of smoke aerosols, they cause considerable cooling at the surface which is double when compared to the dust aerosols. The top of the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) due to smoke and dust aerosols is positive in MAM which indicates warming over East Asia. During MAM a consistent declining trend of the surface ARF due to smoke aerosols persisted over the last three decades as conspicuously evidenced from model analysis; the decline is ∼10 W/m2 from 1980 to 2012.

  1. Estimation of Asian Dust Aerosol Effect on Cloud Radiation Forcing Using Fu-Liou Radiative Model and CERES Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Jing; Huang, Jianping; Fu, Qiang; Minnis, Patrick; Ge, Jinming; Bi, Jianrong

    2008-01-01

    The impact of Asian dust on cloud radiative forcing during 2003-2006 is studied by using the Earth's Radiant Energy Budget Scanner (CERES) data and the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model. Analysis of satellite data shows that the dust aerosol significantly reduced the cloud cooling effect at TOA. In dust contaminated cloudy regions, the 4-year mean values of the instantaneous shortwave, longwave and net cloud radiative forcing are -138.9, 69.1, and -69.7 Wm(sup -2), which are 57.0, 74.2, and 46.3%, respectively, of the corresponding values in more pristine cloudy regions. The satellite-retrieved cloud properties are significantly different in the dusty regions and can influence the radiative forcing indirectly. The contributions to the cloud radiation forcing by the dust direct, indirect and semi-direct effects are estimated using combined satellite observations and Fu-Liou model simulation. The 4-year mean value of combination of indirect and semi-direct shortwave radiative forcing (SWRF) is 82.2 Wm(sup -2), which is 78.4% of the total dust effect. The direct effect is only 22.7 Wm(sup -2), which is 21.6% of the total effect. Because both first and second indirect effects enhance cloud cooling, the aerosol-induced cloud warming is mainly the result of the semi-direct effect of dust.

  2. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chistopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna V.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  3. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning Using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna A.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  4. Finite-difference time-domain approach to acoustic radiation force problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Glauber T.

    2005-09-01

    Acoustic radiation force plays a major role in elastography methods such as vibro-acoustography, acoustic radiation force, shear wave elasticity, and supersonic shear wave imaging. The radiation force (dynamic or static) exerted on an object by an incident wave can be obtained by solving the acoustic scattering problem for the object. However, only in rather simple cases the scattering of waves can be described by exact analytical expressions. In this work, we developed an algorithm based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method to compute the radiation force exerted on arbitrary shaped objects. The algorithm simulates the wave propagation in a finite extended medium with an embedded object. The radiation force is obtained by numerically calculating a surface integral of the momentum flux, which depends on the incident and scattered fields. Absorbing boundary conditions are used to truncate the medium. We compute the radiation force exerted on a rigid and soft cylinder by a plane wave. Results are in agreement with the theoretical predictions. Discrepancies due to numerical dispersion in the algorithm are under investigation. The presented method might be used to calculate the radiation force on complex objects present in elastography techniques. [Work supported by FAPEAL/CNPq, Brazil.

  5. Evaluation of Radiative Kernels for Albedo Radiative Forcing Calculations Using CERES Satellite Observations: Applications for the LULCC Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, T. L.; Bright, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Modifications to the land surface that alter surface albedo consequently change the radiation balance of the planet, and therefore have the potential to modify climate. To quantify this "radiative forcing", researchers in the land use/ land cover change community must calculate the change in the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) shortwave radiative flux associated with measured or modeled changes in surface albedo. Conventional solutions to this problem include application of radiative transfer models that require detailed inputs of vertical profiles of cloud properties and atmospheric gas and particle concentrations. Performing these calculations can be logistically complex and computationally intensive. As biogeophysical effects of land use change are increasingly included into climate mitigation strategies, a need has arisen for efficient means of making these calculations. "Radiative kernels", which are essentially climatologies of the sensitivity of TOA fluxes to changes in surface albedo, as developed using offline calculations of the radiative transfer code inside a global climate model, have become popular options. However, satellite observations of TOA radiative fluxes may be applied with simple models to provide an attractive measurement-based alternative to radiative kernels. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments provide approximately 15 years (and growing) of remotely-sensed observations of TOA fluxes. Here we evaluate popular radiative kernels with CERES observations, and provide an empirical alternative for calculating TOA radiative forcing from surface albedo change using CERES data.

  6. Solar Radiation and Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Pacific Warm Pool Estimated Using TOGA COARE Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chou, Shu-Hsien; Zhao, Wenzhong

    1999-01-01

    The energy budget of the tropical western Pacific (TWP) is particularly important because this is one of the most energetic convection regions on the Earth. Nearly half of the solar radiation incident at the top of atmosphere is absorbed at the surface and only about 22% absorbed in the atmosphere. A large portion of the excess heat absorbed at the surface is transferred to the atmosphere through evaporation, which provides energy and water for convection and precipitation. The western equatorial Pacific is characterized by the highest sea surface temperature (SST) and heaviest rainfall in the world ocean. A small variation of SST associated with the eastward shift of the warm pool during El-Nino/Souther Oscillation changes the atmospheric circulation pattern and affects the global climate. In a study of the TWP surface heat and momentum fluxes during the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) Intensive observing period (IOP) from November 1992 to February have found that the solar radiation is the most important component of the surface energy budget, which undergoes significant temporal and spatial variation. The variations are influenced by the two 40-50 days Madden Julian Oscillations (MJOs) which propagated eastward from the Indian Ocean to the Central Pacific during the IOP. The TWP surface solar radiation during the COARE IOP was investigated by a number of studies. In addition, the effects of clouds on the solar heating of the atmosphere in the TWP was studied using energy budget analysis. In this study, we present some results of the TWP surface solar shortwave or SW radiation budget and the effect of clouds on the atmospheric solar heating using the surface radiation measurements and Japan's Geostationary Meteorological Satellite 4 radiance measurements during COARE IOP.

  7. Intercomparison of Models Representing Direct Shortwave Radiative Forcing by Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boucher, O.; Schwartz, S. E.; Ackerman, T. P.; Anderson, T. L.; Bergstrom, B.; Bonnel, B.; Dahlback, A.; Fouquart, Y.; Chylek, P.; Fu, Q.; Halthore, R. N.; Haywood, J. M.; Iversen, T.; Kato, S.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Knapp, K. R.; Lacis, A.; Laszlo, I.; Mishchenko, M. I.

    2000-01-01

    The importance of aerosols as agents of climate change has recently been highlighted. However, the magnitude of aerosol forcing by scattering of shortwave radiation (direct forcing) is still very uncertain even for the relatively well characterized sulfate aerosol. A potential source of uncertainty is in the model representation of aerosol optical properties and aerosol influences on radiative transfer in the atmosphere. Although radiative transfer methods and codes have been compared in the past, these comparisons have not focused on aerosol forcing (change in net radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere). Here we report results of a project involving 12 groups using 15 models to examine radiative forcing by sulfate aerosol for a wide range of values of particle radius, aerosol optical depth, surface albedo, and solar zenith angle. Among the models that were employed were high and low spectral resolution models incorporating a variety of radiative transfer approximations as well as a line-by-line model. The normalized forcings (forcing per sulfate column burden) obtained with the several radiative transfer models were examined, and the discrepancies were characterized. All models simulate forcings of comparable amplitude and exhibit a similar dependence on input parameters. As expected for a non-light-absorbing aerosol, forcings were negative (cooling influence) except at high surface albedo combined with small solar zenith angle. The relative standard deviation of the zenith-angle-averaged normalized broadband forcing for 15 models-was 8% for particle radius near the maximum in this forcing (approx. 0.2 microns) and at low surface albedo. Somewhat greater model-to-model discrepancies were exhibited at specific solar zenith angles. Still greater discrepancies were exhibited at small particle radii and much greater discrepancies were exhibited at high surface albedos, at which the forcing changes sign; in these situations, however, the normalized forcing is

  8. The Effect of Non-Lambertian Surface Reflectance on Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ricchiazzi, P.; O'Hirok, W.; Gautier, C.

    2005-03-18

    Surface reflectance is an important factor in determining the strength of aerosol radiative forcing. Previous studies of radiative forcing assumed that the reflected surface radiance is isotropic and does not depend on incident illumination angle. This Lambertian reflection model is not a very good descriptor of reflectance from real land and ocean surfaces. In this study we present computational results for the seasonal average of short and long wave aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface. The effect of the Lambertian assumption is found through comparison with calculations using a more detailed bi-direction reflectance distribution function (BRDF).

  9. Measuring the radiation force of megahertz ultrasound acting on a solid spherical scatterer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaeva, A. V.; Tsysar, S. A.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2016-01-01

    The paper considers the problem of precise measurement of the acoustic radiation force of an ultrasonic beam on targets in the form of solid spherical scatterers. Using known analytic relations, a numerical model is developed to perform calculations for different sizes of spherical scatterers and arbitrary frequencies of the incident acoustic wave. A novel method is proposed for measuring the radiation force, which is based on the principle of acoustic echolocation. The radiation force is measured experimentally in a wide range of incident wave intensities using two chosen methods differing in the way the location of the target is controlled.

  10. Role of additives in wood polymer composites. Relationship to analogous radiation grafting and curing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Loo-Teck; Garnett, John L.; Mohajerani, Shahroo

    1999-08-01

    Wood polymer composites (WPC) were prepared by impregnating an Australian softwood, Pinus radiata with methyl methacrylate which subsequently underwent in situ polymerisation utilising either γ radiation or the catalyst-accelerator method. Novel additives including thermal initiator, crosslinking agents, an inclusion compound and oxygen scavenger were incorporated to improve the polymer loading and properties of the resulting WPC. Polymer loadings of WPC obtained utilising the accelerator-catalyst method corresponded well with those obtained using γ radiation with 20 kGy radiation dose. The mechanistic significance of the current work in analogous radiation grafting and curing processes is discussed.

  11. Measurement and simulation of acoustic radiation force on a planar reflector.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z Y; Zhai, W; Yan, N; Wei, B

    2014-05-01

    The accurate calculation of the acoustic radiation force is important for ultrasonic application techniques. Usually, the acoustic radiation force can be divided into the near-field and the far-field force according to the ratio of the emitter-reflector distance to the wavelength. In this study, appropriate theories and methods are explored to simulate the far-field and the near-field acoustic radiation force exerted on a planar reflector. The comparison between simulation and experiment indicates that the far-field force is not sensitive to the boundary shape and size while the near-field force is highly sensitive to the boundary size. Only the acoustic model with the minimized boundary size could yield the near-field force consistent with the experiment. Further calculations reveal that the far-field force first increases and then decreases with the rise of the reflector radius, and that the near-field force fluctuates with the acoustic frequency, especially when the emitter-reflector distance is very small. The near-field repulsive force can be changed into the attractive force when the acoustic frequency is lowered.

  12. Radiation force on a spherical object in the field of a focused cylindrical transducer.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Apfel, R E

    1997-05-01

    An exact solution of the radiation force on a spherical object, when positioned on the acoustic axis of a cylindrical transducer, is provided. The solution is valid for any type of sphere of any size. The radiation force function allows the calibration of high-frequency focused ultrasound fields from radiation force measurements and expands the utility of the elastic sphere radiometer developed by Dunn et al. [Acustica 38, 58-61 (1977)]. Numeral results reveal an oscillatory behavior of the radiation force function for small spheres near the transducer surface and this behavior may present an opportunity for particle sorting based on the mechanical properties of the particle and other types of manipulation.

  13. Radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities in snow from MODIS surface reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Thomas H.; Bryant, Ann C.; Skiles, S. McKenzie

    2012-09-01

    The episodic deposition of dust and carbonaceous particles to snow decreases snow surface albedo and enhances absorption of solar radiation, leading to accelerated snowmelt, negative glacier mass balance, and the snow-albedo feedback. Until now, no remote sensing retrieval has captured the spatial and temporal variability of this forcing. Here we present the MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) model that retrieves surface radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities in snow cover from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data. Validation of MODDRFS with a 7-year record of in situ measurements indicates the radiative forcing retrieval has positive bias at lower values and slight negative bias above 200 W m-2, subject to mixed pixel uncertainties. With bias-correction, MODDRFS has a root mean squared error of 32 W m-2 and mean absolute error of 25 W m-2. We demonstrate MODDRFS in the Upper Colorado River Basin and Hindu Kush-Himalaya.

  14. Mathematical model of the solar radiation force and torques acting on the components of a spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgevic, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    General expressions for the solar radiation force and torques are derived in the vectorial form for any given reflecting surface, provided that the reflecting characteristics of the surface, as well as the value of the solar constant, are known. An appropriate choice of a spacecraft-fixed frame of reference leads to relatively simple expressions for the solar radiation forces and torques in terms of the functions of the sun-spacecraft-earth angle.

  15. Cytotoxic Effects of Temozolomide and Radiation are Additive- and Schedule-Dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, Anthony J.; Ruff, Elliot M.; Martindale, Christine; Lovegrove, Nadia; Short, Susan C.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Despite aggressive therapy comprising radical radiation and temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy, the prognosis for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains poor, particularly if tumors express O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT). The interactions between radiation and TMZ remain unclear and have important implications for scheduling and for developing strategies to improve outcomes. Methods and Materials: Factors determining the effects of combination therapy on clonogenic survival, cell-cycle checkpoint signaling and DNA repair were investigated in four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, U87-MG). Results: Combining TMZ and radiation yielded additive cytotoxicity, but only when TMZ was delivered 72 h before radiation. Radiosensitization was not observed. TMZ induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest at 48-72 h, coincident with phosphorylation of Chk1 and Chk2. Additive G2/M arrest and Chk1/Chk2 phosphorylation was only observed when TMZ preceded radiation by 72 h. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) inhibitor KU-55933 increased radiation sensitivity and delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks, but did not influence TMZ effects. The multiple kinase inhibitor caffeine enhanced the cytotoxicity of chemoradiation and exacerbated DNA damage. Conclusions: TMZ is not a radiosensitizing agent but yields additive cytotoxicity in combination with radiation. Our data indicate that TMZ treatment should commence at least 3 days before radiation to achieve maximum benefit. Activation of G2/M checkpoint signaling by TMZ and radiation has a cytoprotective effect that can be overcome by dual inhibition of ATM and ATR. More specific inhibition of checkpoint signaling will be required to increase treatment efficacy without exacerbating toxicity.

  16. The effects of cloud radiative forcing on an ocean-covered planet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Cumulus anvil clouds, whose importance has been emphasized by observationalists in recent years, exert a very powerful influence on deep tropical convection by tending to radiatively destabilize the troposphere. In addition, they radiatively warm the column in which they reside. Their strong influence on the simulated climate argues for a much more refined parameterization in the General Circulation Model (GCM). For Seaworld, the atmospheric cloud radiative forcing (ACRF) has a powerful influence on such basic climate parameters as the strength of the Hadley circulation, the existence of a single narrow InterTropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and the precipitable water content of the atmosphere. It seems likely, however, that in the real world the surface CRF feeds back negatively to suppress moist convection and the associated cloudiness, and so tends to counteract the effects of the ACRF. Many current climate models have fixed sea surface temperatures but variable land-surface temperatures. The tropical circulations of such models may experience a position feedback due to ACRF over the oceans, and a negative or weak feedback due to surface CRF over the land. The overall effects of the CRF on the climate system can only be firmly established through much further analysis, which can benefit greatly from the use of a coupled ocean-atmospheric model.

  17. Satellite Estimates of the Direct Radiative Forcing of Biomass Burning Aerosols Over South America and Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Wang, Min; Kliche, Donna V.; Berendes, Todd; Welch, Ronald M.; Yang, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic are important to the earth's radiative balance. Therefore it is important to provide adequate validation information on the spatial, temporal and radiative properties of aerosols. This will enable us to predict realistic global estimates of aerosol radiative effects more confidently. The current study utilizes 66 AVHRR LAC (Local Area Coverage) and coincident Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) images to characterize the fires, smoke and radiative forcings of biomass burning aerosols over four major ecosystems of South America.

  18. Experimental verification of theoretical equations for acoustic radiation force on compressible spherical particles in traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kennita A.; Vormohr, Hannah R.; Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache; Shields, C. Wyatt; López, Gabriel P.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustophoresis uses acoustic radiation force to remotely manipulate particles suspended in a host fluid for many scientific, technological, and medical applications, such as acoustic levitation, acoustic coagulation, contrast ultrasound imaging, ultrasound-assisted drug delivery, etc. To estimate the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, equations derived for an inviscid host fluid are commonly used. However, there are theoretical predictions that, in the case of a traveling wave, viscous effects can dramatically change the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces, which make the equations obtained for an inviscid host fluid invalid for proper estimation of acoustic radiation forces. To date, experimental verification of these predictions has not been published. Experimental measurements of viscous effects on acoustic radiation forces in a traveling wave were conducted using a confocal optical and acoustic system and values were compared with available theories. Our results show that, even in a low-viscosity fluid such as water, the magnitude of acoustic radiation forces is increased manyfold by viscous effects in comparison with what follows from the equations derived for an inviscid fluid.

  19. Radiative forcing perturbation due to observed increases in tropospheric ozone at Hohenpeissenberg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei-Chyung; Bojkov, Rumen D.; Zhuang, Yi-Cheng

    1994-01-01

    The effect on surface temperature due to changes in atmospheric O3 depends highly on the latitude where the change occurs. Previous sensitivity calculations indicate that ozone changes in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are more effective in causing surface temperature change (Wang et al., 1980). Long term ground-based observations show that tropospheric ozone, especially at the tropopause region, has been increasing at middle and high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NATO, 1988; Quadrennial Ozone Symposium, 1992). These increases will enhance the greenhouse effect and increase the radiative forcing to the troposphere-surface system, which is opposite to the negative radiative forcing calculated from the observed stratospheric ozone depletion recently reported in WMO (1992). We used more than two thousands regularly measured ozonesondes providing reliable vertical O3 distribution at Hohenpeissenberg (47N; 11E) for the 1967-1990 to study the instantaneous solar and longwave radiative forcing the two decades 1971-1990 and compare the forcing with those caused by increasing CO2, CH4, N2O, and CFCs. Calculations are also made to compare the O3 radiative forcing between stratospheric depletion and tropospheric increase. Results indicate that the O3 changes will induce a positive radiative forcing dominated by tropospheric O3 increase and the magnitude of the forcing is comparable to that due to CO2 increases during the two decades. The significant implications of the tropospheric O3 increase to the global climate are discussed.

  20. Matching of additive and polarizable force fields for multiscale condensed phase simulations

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher M.; Best, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Inclusion of electronic polarization effects is one of the key aspects in which the accuracy of current biomolecular force fields may be improved. The principal drawback of such approaches is the computational cost, which typically ranges from 3 – 10 times that of the equivalent additive model, and may be greater for more sophisticated treatments of polarization or other many-body effects. Here, we present a multiscale approach which may be used to enhance the sampling in simulations with polarizable models, by using the additive model as a tool to explore configuration space. We use a method based on information theory to determine the charges for an additive model that has optimal overlap with the polarizable one, and we demonstrate the feasibility of enhancing sampling via a hybrid replica exchange scheme for several model systems. An additional advantage is that, in the process, we obtain a systematic method for deriving charges for an additive model that will be the natural complement to its polarizable parent. The additive charges are found by an effective coarse-graining of the polarizable force field, rather than by ad hoc procedures. PMID:23997691

  1. Aerosol properties and radiative forcing for three air masses transported in Summer 2011 to Sopot, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozwadowska, Anna; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Makuch, P.; Markowicz, K. M.; Petelski, T.; Strzałkowska, A.; Zieliński, T.

    2013-05-01

    Properties of atmospheric aerosols and solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface were measured during Summer 2011 in Sopot, Poland. Three cloudless days, characterized by different directions of incoming air-flows, which are typical transport pathways to Sopot, were used to estimate a radiative forcing due to aerosols present in each air mass.

  2. Liver reserve function assessment by acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Lan; Liang, Li-Wei; Cao, Hui; Men, Qiong; Hou, Ke-Zhu; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Ya-E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the utility of liver reserve function by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging in patients with liver tumors. METHODS: Seventy-six patients with liver tumors were enrolled in this study. Serum biochemical indexes, such as aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum albumin (ALB), total bilirubin (T-Bil), and other indicators were observed. Liver stiffness (LS) was measured by ARFI imaging, measurements were repeated 10 times, and the average value of the results was taken as the final LS value. Indocyanine green (ICG) retention was performed, and ICG-K and ICG-R15 were recorded. Child-Pugh (CP) scores were carried out based on patient’s preoperative biochemical tests and physical condition. Correlations among CP scores, ICG-R15, ICG-K and LS values were observed and analyzed using either the Pearson correlation coefficient or the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare LS values of CP scores, and the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze liver reserve function assessment accuracy. RESULTS: LS in the ICG-R15 10%-20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.19 ± 0.27 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). LS in the ICG-R15 > 20% group was significantly higher than in the ICG-R15 < 10% group; and the difference was statistically significant (2.92 ± 0.29 vs 1.59 ± 0.32, P < 0.01). The LS value in patients with CP class A was lower than in patients with CP class B (1.57 ± 0.34 vs 1.86 ± 0.27, P < 0.05), while the LS value in patients with CP class B was lower than in patients with CP class C (1.86 ± 0.27 vs 2.47 ± 0.33, P < 0.01). LS was positively correlated with ICG-R15 (r = 0.617, P < 0.01) and CP score (r = 0.772, P < 0.01). Meanwhile, LS was negatively correlated with ICG-K (r = -0.673, P < 0.01). AST, ALT and T-Bil were positively correlated with LS, while ALB was negatively

  3. Non-Kyoto Radiative Forcing in Long-Run Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Steven K.; Richels, Richard G.; Smith, Steven J.; Riahi, Keywan; Stefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2014-04-27

    Climate policies designed to achieve climate change objectives must consider radiative forcing from the Kyoto greenhouse gas, as well as other forcing constituents, such as aerosols and tropospheric ozone. Net positive forcing leads to global average temperature increases. Modeling of non-Kyoto forcing is a relatively new component of climate management scenarios. Five of the nineteen models in the EMF-27 Study model both Kyoto and non-Kyoto forcing. This paper describes and assesses current non-Kyoto radiative forcing modeling within these integrated assessment models. The study finds negative forcing from aerosols masking significant positive forcing in reference non-climate policy projections. There are however large differences across models in projected non-Kyoto emissions and forcing, with differences stemming from differences in relationships between Kyoto and non-Kyoto emissions and fundamental differences in modeling structure and assumptions. Air pollution and non-Kyoto forcing decline in the climate policy scenarios. However, non-Kyoto forcing appears to be influencing mitigation results, including allowable carbon dioxide emissions, and further evaluation is merited. Overall, there is substantial uncertainty related to non-Kyoto forcing that must be considered.

  4. New Directions: Emerging Satellite Observations of Above-cloud Aerosols and Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Zhang, Zhibo

    2013-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar and passive sensors with multi-wavelength and polarization capabilities onboard the A-Train provide unprecedented opportunities of observing above-cloud aerosols and direct radiative forcing. Significant progress has been made in recent years in exploring these new aerosol remote sensing capabilities and generating unique datasets. The emerging observations will advance the understanding of aerosol climate forcing.

  5. Intercomparison of observed cloud radiative forcing: A zonal and global perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Song, B.J.; Robertson, F.R. )

    1993-06-01

    Despite the general agreement that clouds cool the earth-atmosphere, there are substantial differences in estimated magnitudes of the annual global mean of cloud radiative forcing. Recent estimates of globally averaged net cloud radiative forcing range from [minus]2 to [minus]27 W m[sup [minus]2]. The reasons for these differences have not been clarified in spite of the important role of clouds in maintaining global heat balance. Here, three estimation methods [Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), Regression I, and Regression II] are compared using the same data source and analysis period. Intercomparison has been done for the time period of February and March 1985 over which major satellite radiation budget and cloudiness datasets (ERBE radiation budget, Numbus-7, and ISCCP cloudiness) are contemporaneous. The global averages of five sets of net cloud radiative forcing by three independent methods agree to within 3.5 W m[sup [minus]2]; four of five cases agree to within 1 W m[sup [minus]2]. This suggests that differences in published global mean values of net cloud radiative forcing are mainly due to different data sources and analysis periods and a best estimated annual mean among all previous estimates appears to be the ERBE measurement, that is, [minus]17.3 Wm[sup [minus]2]. In contrast to the close agreement in the net cloud radiative forcing estimates, both longwave and shortwave cloud radiative forcing show more dependence on the chosen method and dataset. The bias of regression-retrieved values between Nimbus-7 and ISCCP cloud climatology is largely attributed to the difference in total cloudiness between two climatologies whereas the discrepancies between the ERBE and regression method appear to be, in part, due to the conceptually different definition of clear-sky flux. 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Eaton, Brian

    2012-10-01

    The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosol on solar and infrared radiation through droplet and crystal nucleation on aerosol, and semidirect effects through the influence of solar absorption on the distribution of clouds. A three-mode representation of the aerosol in version 5.1 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.1) yields global annual mean radiative forcing estimates for each of these forcing mechanisms that are within 0.1 W m–2 of estimates using a more complex seven-mode representation that distinguishes between fresh and aged black carbon and primary organic matter. Simulating fresh black carbon particles separately from internally mixed accumulation mode particles is found to be important only near fossil fuel sources. In addition to the usual large indirect effect on solar radiation, this study finds an unexpectedly large positive longwave indirect effect (because of enhanced cirrus produced by homogenous nucleation of ice crystals on anthropogenic sulfate), small shortwave and longwave semidirect effects, and a small direct effect (because of cancelation and interactions of direct effects of black carbon and sulfate). Differences between the threemode and seven-mode versions are significantly larger (up to 0.2 W m–2) when the hygroscopicity of primary organic matter is decreased from 0.1 to 0 and transfer of the primary carbonaceous aerosol to the accumulation mode in the seven-mode version requires more hygroscopic material coating the primary particles. Radiative forcing by cloudborne anthropogenic black carbon is only 20.07 W m–2.

  7. Reassessing properties and radiative forcing of contrail cirrus using a climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Lisa; Burkhardt, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Contrail cirrus is the largest known component contributing to the radiative forcing associated with aviation. Despite major advances simulating contrail cirrus, their microphysical and optical properties and the associated radiative forcing remain largely uncertain. We use a contrail cirrus parameterization in a global climate model which was extended to include a microphysical two-moment scheme. This allows a more realistic representation of microphysical processes, such as deposition and sedimentation, and therefore of the microphysical and optical properties of contrail cirrus. The simulated contrail microphysical and optical properties agree well with in situ and satellite observations. As compared to estimates using an older version of the contrail cirrus scheme, the optical depth of contrail cirrus is significantly higher, particularly in regions with high air traffic density, due to high ice crystal number concentrations on the main flight routes. Nevertheless, the estimated radiative forcing for the year 2002 supports our earlier results. The global radiative forcing of contrail cirrus for the year 2006 is estimated to be 56mW/m2. A large uncertainty of the radiative forcing estimate appears to be connected with the, on average, very small ice crystal radii simulated in the main air traffic areas, which make the application of a radiative transfer parameterization based on geometric optics questionable.

  8. Observation of Nonclassical Radiation Pressure Forces on a Mechanical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jeremy; Lecocq, Florent; Simmonds, Raymond; Aumentado, Jose; Teufel, John

    Squeezed states of light are known to be useful for enhancing mechanical displacement sensing since they can be tailored to reduce the ``photon counting noise'' that limits the measurement's noise floor. On the other hand, recent experiments in cavity optomechanics have reached measurement regimes where an interrogating light field exerts radiation pressure noise on a mechanical oscillator. One outstanding challenge has been to explore the intersection between such experiments. I will present data obtained using a superconducting cavity optomechanical system wherein a mechanical oscillator is driven by nonclassical radiation pressure imparted by squeezed microwave fields. JBC acknowledges the NRC for financial support.

  9. Satellite-derived aerosol radiative forcing from the 2004 British Columbia wildfires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, S.; Leighton, H.

    2008-01-01

    The British Columbia wildfires of 2004 was one of the largest wildfire events in the last ten years in Canada. Both the shortwave and longwave smoke aerosol radiative forcing at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) are investigated using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. Relationships between the radiative forcing fluxes (??F) and wildfire aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.55 ??m (??0.55) are deduced for both noontime instantaneous forcing and diurnally averaged forcing. The noontime averaged instantaneous shortwave and longwave smoke aerosol radiative forcing at the TOA are 45.8??27.5 W m-2 and -12.6??6.9 W m-2, respectively for a selected study area between 62??N and 68??N in latitude and 125??W and 145??W in longitude over three mainly clear-sky days (23-25 June). The derived diurnally averaged smoke aerosol shortwave radiative forcing is 19.9??12.1 W m-2 for a mean ??0.55 of 1.88??0.71 over the same time period. The derived ??F-?? relationship can be implemented in the radiation scheme used in regional climate models to assess the effect of wildfire aerosols.

  10. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G.; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction. PMID:25424490

  11. Analysis of radiation exposure, Task Force RAZOR. Exercise Desert Rock VI, Operation Teapot. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.; Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.

    1983-07-15

    The radiation dose to Task Force RAZOR personnel participating in Shot Apple II of Operation Teapot, Exercise Desert Rock VI, is reconstructed. Task force personnel were exposed to initial radiation while in their vehicles or in trenches at the time of Apple II detonation. They were also exposed to residual radiation during their subsequent manuever and during an inspection of the equipment display area. The calculated total gamma doses to fully-participating Task Force RAZOR personnel range from about 0.8 rem to 1.8 rem. The highest dose was received by personnel of the armored infantry platoon on right flank nearest ground zero. Internal radiation dose commitments to maximally exposed personnel inside vehicles are estimated to be about 0.4 rem to the thyroid, 0.003 rem to the whole body, and 0.002 rem to the bone.

  12. Radiative properties of ceramic metal-halide high intensity discharge lamps containing additives in argon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Yann; Teulet, Philippe; Zissis, Georges

    2016-07-01

    The lighting represents a consumption of about 19% of the world electricity production. We are thus searching new effective and environment-friendlier light sources. The ceramic metal-halide high intensity lamps (C-MHL) are one of the options for illuminating very high area. The new C-MHL lamps contain additives species that reduce mercury inside and lead to a richer spectrum in specific spectral intervals, a better colour temperature or colour rendering index. This work is particularly focused on the power radiated by these lamps, estimated using the net emission coefficient, and depending on several additives (calcium, sodium, tungsten, dysprosium, and thallium or strontium iodides). The results show the strong influence of the additives on the power radiated despite of their small quantity in the mixtures and the increase of visible radiation portion in presence of dysprosium.

  13. Global inspection of cloud feedbacks to radiative forcings from a satellite perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiacchio, Marc; Liepert, Beate; Wild, Martin

    2013-04-01

    The knowledge of the response of clouds to a warming or cooling of the climate still needs to be properly quantified and in particular the inter-relationship between top-of-atmosphere radiation and surface temperature with cloud properties should be more clearly defined. This relationship will be investigated globally in order to determine their spatial distribution. A detailed inspection of this distribution may help to determine a link between the radiative forcing and its effect on clouds either causing a shortwave cooling or longwave warming globally and within a particular region. Such an exercise could provide a measure for the cloud feedback, one of the largest sources of uncertainty in climate change research. In addition, monthly cloud properties from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) as well as shortwave and longwave top-of-the-atmosphere radiative fluxes from CERES (Cloud and Earth's Radiant Energy System) onboard Terra and Aqua will be used to investigate if there exists any links between these parameters. Time series of cloud properties will be constructed to visualize their variability over time to allow speculation for their change. Correlation of top-of-atmosphere longwave radiation and surface skin temperature with cloud properties from the AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) instrument onboard Aqua will be calculated to determine their relationship and how much of an influence these parameters may have on these cloud variables spatially and its role in cloud feedback. These results will be later compared to those from other related studies to provide a better understanding of how clouds respond to a change in the climate.

  14. Radiative flux and forcing parameterization error in aerosol-free clear skies

    SciTech Connect

    Pincus, Robert; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Baek, Sunghye; Brath, Manfred; Buehler, Stefan A.; Cady-Pereira, Karen E.; Cole, Jason N. S.; Dufresne, Jean -Louis; Kelley, Maxwell; Li, Jiangnan; Manners, James; Paynter, David J.; Roehrig, Romain; Sekiguchi, Miho; Schwarzkopf, Daniel M.

    2015-07-03

    This article reports on the accuracy in aerosol- and cloud-free conditions of the radiation parameterizations used in climate models. Accuracy is assessed relative to observationally validated reference models for fluxes under present-day conditions and forcing (flux changes) from quadrupled concentrations of carbon dioxide. Agreement among reference models is typically within 1 W/m2, while parameterized calculations are roughly half as accurate in the longwave and even less accurate, and more variable, in the shortwave. Absorption of shortwave radiation is underestimated by most parameterizations in the present day and has relatively large errors in forcing. Error in present-day conditions is essentially unrelated to error in forcing calculations. Recent revisions to parameterizations have reduced error in most cases. As a result, a dependence on atmospheric conditions, including integrated water vapor, means that global estimates of parameterization error relevant for the radiative forcing of climate change will require much more ambitious calculations.

  15. Active control of low-frequency sound radiation by cylindrical shell with piezoelectric stack force actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yin; Sun, Hongling; An, Fengyan; Li, Xiaodong

    2012-05-01

    A novel active control method of sound radiation from a cylindrical shell under axial excitations is proposed and theoretically analyzed. This control method is based on a pair of piezoelectric stack force actuators which are installed on the shell and parallel to the axial direction. The actuators are driven in phase and generate the same forces to control the vibration and the sound radiation of the cylindrical shell. The model considered is a fluid-loaded finite stiffened cylindrical shell with rigid end-caps and only low-frequency axial vibration modes are involved. Numerical simulations are performed to explore the required control forces and the optimal mounting positions of actuators under different cost functions. The results show that the proposed force actuators can reduce the radiated sound pressure of low-frequency axial modes in all directions.

  16. Infrared Aerosol Radiative Forcing at the Surface and the Top of the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2003-01-01

    We study the clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing at infrared wavelengths using data from the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) cruise of the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown. Limited number of data points is analyzed mostly from ship and collocated satellite values. An optical model is derived from chemical measurements, lidar profiles, and visible extinction measurements which is used to and estimate the infrared aerosol optical thickness and the single scattering albedo. The IR model results are compared to detailed Fourier Transform Interferometer based infrared aerosol forcing estimates, pyrgeometer based infrared downward fluxes, and against the direct solar forcing observations. This combined approach attests for the self-consistency of the optical model and allows to derive quantities such as the infrared forcing at the top of the atmosphere or the infrared optical thickness. The mean infrared aerosol optical thickness at 10 microns is 0.08 and the single scattering albedo is 0.55. The modeled infrared aerosol forcing reaches 10 W/sq m during the cruise, which is a significant contribution to the total direct aerosol forcing. The surface infrared aerosol radiative forcing is between 10 to 25% of the shortwave aerosol forcing. The infrared aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere can go up to 19% of the solar aerosol forcing. We show good agreement between satellite (CERES instrument) retrievals and model results at the top of the atmosphere. Over the Sea of Japan, the average infrared radiative forcing is 4.6 W/sq m in the window region at the surface and it is 1.5 W/sq m at top of the atmosphere. The top of the atmosphere IR forcing efficiency is a strong function of aerosol temperature while the surface IR forcing efficiency varies between 37 and 55 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit). and changes between 10 to 18 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit).

  17. Radiative forcing over the conterminous United States due to contemporary land cover land use albedo change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Christopher; Roy, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Recently available satellite land cover land use (LCLU) and albedo data are used to study the impact of LCLU change from 1973 to 2000 on surface albedo and radiative forcing for 36 ecoregions covering 43% of the conterminous United States (CONUS). Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow-free broadband albedo values are derived from Landsat LCLU classification maps located using a stratified random sampling methodology to estimate ecoregion estimates of LCLU induced albedo change and surface radiative forcing. The results illustrate that radiative forcing due to LCLU change may be disguised when spatially and temporally explicit data sets are not used. The radiative forcing due to contemporary LCLU albedo change varies geographically in sign and magnitude, with the most positive forcings (up to 0.284 Wm−2) due to conversion of agriculture to other LCLU types, and the most negative forcings (as low as −0.247 Wm−2) due to forest loss. For the 36 ecoregions considered a small net positive forcing (i.e., warming) of 0.012 Wm−2 is estimated.

  18. Sensitivity of scattering and absorbing aerosol direct radiative forcing to physical climate factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocko, Ilissa B.; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul; Ming, Yi; Horowitz, Larry W.

    2012-10-01

    The direct radiative forcing of the climate system includes effects due to scattering and absorbing aerosols. This study explores how important physical climate characteristics contribute to the magnitudes of the direct radiative forcings (DRF) from anthropogenic sulfate, black carbon, and organic carbon. For this purpose, we employ the GFDL CM2.1 global climate model, which has reasonable aerosol concentrations and reconstruction of twentieth-century climate change. Sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols constitute the most important anthropogenic aerosol perturbations to the climate system and provide striking contrasts between primarily scattering (sulfate and organic carbon) and primarily absorbing (black carbon) species. The quantitative roles of cloud coverage, surface albedo, and relative humidity in governing the sign and magnitude of all-sky top-of-atmosphere (TOA) forcings are examined. Clouds reduce the global mean sulfate TOA DRF by almost 50%, reduce the global mean organic carbon TOA DRF by more than 30%, and increase the global mean black carbon TOA DRF by almost 80%. Sulfate forcing is increased by over 50% as a result of hygroscopic growth, while high-albedo surfaces are found to have only a minor (less than 10%) impact on all global mean forcings. Although the radiative forcing magnitudes are subject to uncertainties in the state of mixing of the aerosol species, it is clear that fundamental physical climate characteristics play a large role in governing aerosol direct radiative forcing magnitudes.

  19. Influence of atmospheric relative humidity on ultraviolet flux and aerosol direct radiative forcing: Observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Dong; Chen, Ling; Chen, Huizhong; Luo, Xuyu; Deng, Tao

    2016-08-01

    The atmospheric aerosols can absorb moisture from the environment due to their hydrophilicity and thus affect atmospheric radiation fluxes. In this article, the ultraviolet radiation and relative humidity (RH) data from ground observations and a radiative transfer model were used to examine the influence of RH on ultraviolet radiation flux and aerosol direct radiative forcing under the clear-sky conditions. The results show that RH has a significant influence on ultraviolet radiation because of aerosol hygroscopicity. The relationship between attenuation rate and RH can be fitted logarithmically and all of the R2 of the 4 sets of samples are high, i.e. 0.87, 0.96, 0.9, and 0.9, respectively. When the RH is 60%, 70%, 80% and 90%, the mean aerosol direct radiative forcing in ultraviolet is -4.22W m-2, -4.5W m-2, -4.82W m-2 and -5.4W m-2, respectively. For the selected polluted air samples the growth factor for computing aerosol direct radiative forcing in the ultraviolet for the RH of 80% varies from 1.19 to 1.53, with an average of 1.31.

  20. The force-field derivation and application of explosive/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The inter-molecular force-field across RDX/(paraffin, fluoropolymer) interfaces are derived from first-principles calculated energies under the GGA+vdW functional. Based on the force-field, the polycrystal structures of mixture explosives are obtained, and a set of thermodynamic properties are calculated, including the elastic constants, thermal expansion coefficient, heat capacity, isothermal curve and the Hugoniot curve. The results are in good agreement with the available experiments, and provide a reasonable prediction about the properties of plastic bonded explosives. We find that the thermal expansion coefficient of a multi-component explosive is not only determined by the properties of the components, but is also affected by the thermal stress at the explosive/additive interfaces.

  1. Radiation processing of thermoplastic starch by blending aromatic additives: Effect of blend composition and radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandal, Dhriti; Mikus, Pierre-Yves; Dole, Patrice; Coqueret, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on poly α-1,4-glucose oligomers (maltodextrins) in the presence of water and of various aromatic additives, as model blends for gaining a better understanding at a molecular level the modifications occurring in amorphous starch-lignin blends submitted to ionizing irradiation for improving the properties of this type of bio-based thermoplastic material. A series of aromatic compounds, namely p-methoxy benzyl alcohol, benzene dimethanol, cinnamyl alcohol and some related carboxylic acids namely cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, was thus studied for assessing the ability of each additive to counteract chain scission of the polysaccharide and induce interchain covalent linkages. Gel formation in EB-irradiated blends comprising of maltodextrin was shown to be dependent on three main factors: the type of aromatic additive, presence of glycerol, and irradiation dose. The chain scission versus grafting phenomenon as a function of blend composition and dose were studied using Size Exclusion Chromatography by determining the changes in molecular weight distribution (MWD) from Refractive Index (RI) chromatograms and the presence of aromatic grafts onto the maltodextrin chains from UV chromatograms. The occurrence of crosslinking was quantified by gel fraction measurements allowing for ranking the cross-linking efficiency of the additives. When applying the method to destructurized starch blends, gel formation was also shown to be strongly affected by the moisture content of the sample submitted to irradiation. The results demonstrate the possibility to tune the reactivity of tailored blend for minimizing chain degradation and control the degree of cross-linking.

  2. Diagnosing Snow and Sea Ice Radiative Forcing in the Community Earth System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perket, J.; Flanner, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Earth's albedo is evolving from changes in seasonal snow and sea-ice. Albedo feedback in climate models has been evaluated previously using the radiative kernel technique, where top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes associated with albedo change are calculated "offline" using pre-defined atmospheric states. This approach facilitates model intercomparisons, but can lead to inaccuracies associated with inconsistent surface and cloud states. We have incorporated a new diagnostic feature in the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) that provides the instantaneous effect of land snow and sea ice on the TOA radiation budget at each time step. This diagnostic provides a precise measure of the radiative influence of model snow and sea ice, enables direct model comparison with observation-derived cryosphere radiative forcing (CrRF) estimates, and provides a means to evaluate the accuracy of the radiative kernel technique for diagnosing albedo feedback. Compared with observed northern hemisphere CrRF, we find that CESM produces a larger radiative effect for both land snow and sea ice. Preliminary analysis shows the snow radiative effect in the Northern Hemisphere to be higher in coupled ocean-land-atmosphere simulations compared to standalone land simulations forced with atmospheric reanalysis data. The same is true for ice when comparing the coupled system to offline ice simulations in the Southern Hemisphere. Differences are not as appreciable for sea ice in the North or snow in the South. Studies are planned to assess the accuracy of different radiative kernels, evaluate reasons for model-observation discrepancy in cryosphere radiative forcing, and quantify model changes in CrRF under different climate forcing scenarios.

  3. Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Weather Forecasts in the ECMWF Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, A.; Benedetti, A.; Rodwell, M. J.; Bechtold, P.; Remy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the energy balance of the Earth system via direct scattering and absorpiton of short-wave and long-wave radiation and indirect interaction with clouds. Diabatic heating or cooling by aerosols can also modify the vertical stability of the atmosphere and influence weather pattern with potential impact on the skill of global weather prediction models. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) provides operational daily analysis and forecast of aerosol optical depth (AOD) for five aerosol species using a prognostic model which is part of the Integrated Forecasting System of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF-IFS). The aerosol component was developed during the research project Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC). Aerosols can have a large impact on the weather forecasts in case of large aerosol concentrations as found during dust storms or strong pollution events. However, due to its computational burden, prognostic aerosols are not yet feasible in the ECMWF operational weather forecasts, and monthly-mean climatological fields are used instead. We revised the aerosol climatology used in the operational ECMWF IFS with one derived from the MACC reanalysis. We analyse the impact of changes in the aerosol radiative effect on the mean model climate and in medium-range weather forecasts, also in comparison with prognostic aerosol fields. The new climatology differs from the previous one by Tegen et al 1997, both in the spatial distribution of the total AOD and the optical properties of each aerosol species. The radiative impact of these changes affects the model mean bias at various spatial and temporal scales. On one hand we report small impacts on measures of large-scale forecast skill but on the other hand details of the regional distribution of aerosol concentration have a large local impact. This is the case for the northern Indian Ocean where the radiative impact of the mineral

  4. Classical tunneling as a consequence of radiation reaction forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denef, Frederik; Raeymaekers, Joris; Studer, Urban M.; Troost, Walter

    1997-09-01

    We show that the classical equation of motion of a radiating charged point particle (the Lorentz-Dirac equation) has ``tunneling'' solutions. For a given initial position and velocity we find that, contrary to common belief, several different physically acceptable solutions exist for a range of initial data. Both features are demonstrated for a rectangular barrier. To check that these phenomena are not dependent on the discontinuities of the potential, we also study in detail the solutions for a smoothened (single) potential step.

  5. The influence of an additional load on time and force changes in the ground reaction force during the countermovement vertical jump.

    PubMed

    Vaverka, Frantisek; Jakubsova, Zlatava; Jandacka, Daniel; Zahradnik, David; Farana, Roman; Uchytil, Jaroslav; Supej, Matej; Vodicar, Janez

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how an additional load influences the force-vs-time relationship of the countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ). The participants that took part in the experiment were 18 male university students who played sport recreationally, including regular games of volleyball. They were asked to perform a CMVJ without involving the arms under four conditions: without and with additional loads of 10%, 20%, and 30% of their body weight (BW). The vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRF) was measured by a force plate. The GRF was used to calculate the durations of the preparatory, braking, and acceleration phases, the total duration of the jump, force impulses during the braking and acceleration phases, average forces during the braking and acceleration phases, and the maximum force of impact at landing. Results were evaluated using repeated-measures ANOVA. Increasing the additional load prolonged both the braking and acceleration phases of the jump, with statistically significant changes in the duration of the acceleration phase found for an additional load of 20% BW. The magnitude of the force systematically and significantly increased with the additional load. The force impulse during the acceleration phase did not differ significantly between jumps performed with loads of 20% and 30% BW. The results suggest that the optimal additional load for developing explosive strength in vertical jumping ranges from 20% to 30% of BW, with this value varying between individual subjects.

  6. Role of radiatively forced temperature changes in enhanced semi-arid warming over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.; Huang, J.; Guo, R.; Lin, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    As the climate change occurred over East Asia since 1950s, intense interest and debate have arisen concerning the contribution of human activities to the warming observed in previous decades. In this study, we investigate surface temperature change using a recently developed methodology that can successfully identify and separate the dynamically induced temperature (DIT) and radiatively forced temperature (RFT) changes in raw surface air temperature (SAT) data. For regional averages, DIT and RFT make 43.7 and 56.3 % contributions to the SAT over East Asia, respectively. The DIT changes dominate the SAT decadal variability and are mainly determined by internal climate variability, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO). The radiatively forced SAT changes made major contribution to the global-scale warming trend and the regional-scale enhanced semi-arid warming (ESAW). Such enhanced warming is also found in radiatively forced daily maximum and minimum SAT. The long-term global-mean SAT warming trend is mainly related to radiative forcing produced by global well-mixed greenhouse gases. The regional anthropogenic radiative forcing, however, caused the enhanced warming in the semi-arid region, which may be closely associated with local human activities. Finally, the relationship between global warming hiatus and regional enhanced warming is discussed.

  7. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability.

    PubMed

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-05-24

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing.

  8. Modification of silicone sealant to improve gamma radiation resistance, by addition of protective agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pérez, Giovanni; Burillo, Guillermina

    2013-09-01

    Poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sealant (SS) was modified with the addition of different protective compounds to conserve its physical-chemical properties during gamma irradiation. 2-Vinyl naphthalene (2-VN), bisphenol-A (BPA) and poly (vinyl carbazole) (PVK) were used to evaluate radiation protection through the crosslinking effect of radiation. The samples were irradiated with doses from 100 kGy to 500 kGy at room temperature in air, with a 60Co gamma source, and the changes in molecular weight, thermal behavior, elastic properties and infrared spectra (FTIR-ATR) absorbance analysis were determined. The molecular weight of unmodified silicone sealant increases with the absorbed dose because of crosslinking as predominant effect. However, the crosslinking effect was inhibited with the addition of protective agent due to the aromatic compounds present. Modified silicone sealant films present better radiation resistance than unmodified system.

  9. Evaluation of additional lead shielding in protecting the physician from radiation during cardiac interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Chida, Koichi; Morishima, Yoshiaki; Katahira, Yoshiaki; Chiba, Hiroo; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2005-12-20

    Since cardiac interventional procedures deliver high doses of radiation to the physician, radiation protection for the physician in cardiac catheterization laboratories is very important. One of the most important means of protecting the physician from scatter radiation is to use additional lead shielding devices, such as tableside lead drapes and ceiling-mounted lead acrylic protection. During cardiac interventional procedures (cardiac IVR), however, it is not clear how much lead shielding reduces the physician dose. This study compared the physician dose [effective dose equivalent (EDE) and dose equivalent (DE)] with and without additional shielding during cardiac IVR. Fluoroscopy scatter radiation was measured using a human phantom, with an ionization chamber survey meter, with and without additional shielding. With the additional shielding, fluoroscopy scatter radiation measured with the human phantom was reduced by up to 98%, as compared with that without. The mean EDE (whole body, mean+/-SD) dose to the operator, determined using a Luxel badge, was 2.55+/-1.65 and 4.65+/-1.21 mSv/year with and without the additional shielding, respectively (p=0.086). Similarly, the mean DE (lens of the eye) to the operator was 15.0+/-9.3 and 25.73+/-5.28 mSv/year, respectively (p=0.092). In conclusion, although tableside drapes and lead acrylic shields suspended from the ceiling provided extra protection to the physician during cardiac IVR, the reduction in the estimated physician dose (EDE and DE) during cardiac catheterization with additional shielding was lower than we expected. Therefore, there is a need to develop more ergonomically useful protection devices for cardiac IVR.

  10. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  11. Radiation Pressure Force from Optical Cycling on a Polyatomic Molecule SrOH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Matsuda, Kyle; Sedlack, Alex; Hemmerling, Boerge; Doyle, John

    2016-05-01

    Polyatomic molecules hold promise for many applications in physics and chemistry due to their rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom. The starting point for our approach to the production of ultracold strontium monohydroxide (SrOH) is buffer-gas cooling followed by laser manipulation. Linear geometry, diagonal Franck-Condon factors, short radiative lifetimes and unresolved hyperfine splittings make SrOH a particularly attractive candidate for direct laser cooling. We report deflection of the SrOH beam through radiative force from optical cycling on the X~2Σ+ <-->Ã2Π1 / 2 transition. We observe × 12 fluorescence enhancement with closed spin-rotation splitting and demonstrate cycling between different vibrational levels with the Sr <--> O mode repumping laser. Observed deflection and detection signals correspond to the scattering of ~ 100 photons. Additional repumping laser for the bending mode would lead to scattering of ~ 1 , 000 photons allowing for transverse laser cooling of the SrOH beam. We will also describe our experimental efforts towards laser slowing and trapping of SrOH.

  12. Additional in-series compliance reduces muscle force summation and alters the time course of force relaxation during fixed-end contractions.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Dean L; Launikonis, Bradley S; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-11-15

    There are high mechanical demands placed on skeletal muscles in movements requiring rapid acceleration of the body or its limbs. Tendons are responsible for transmitting muscle forces, but, because of their elasticity, can manipulate the mechanics of the internal contractile apparatus. Shortening of the contractile apparatus against the stretch of tendon affects force generation according to known mechanical properties; however, the extent to which differences in tendon compliance alter force development in response to a burst of electrical impulses is unclear. To establish the influence of series compliance on force summation, we studied electrically evoked doublet contractions in the cane toad peroneus muscle in the presence and absence of a compliant artificial tendon. Additional series compliance reduced tetanic force by two-thirds, a finding predicted based on the force-length property of skeletal muscle. Doublet force and force-time integral expressed relative to the twitch were also reduced by additional series compliance. Active shortening over a larger range of the ascending limb of the force-length curve and at a higher velocity, leading to a progressive reduction in force-generating potential, could be responsible. Muscle-tendon interaction may also explain the accelerated time course of force relaxation in the presence of additional compliance. Our findings suggest that a compliant tendon limits force summation under constant-length conditions. However, high series compliance can be mechanically advantageous when a muscle-tendon unit is actively stretched, permitting muscle fibres to generate force almost isometrically, as shown during stretch-shorten cycles in locomotor activities. Restricting active shortening would likely favour rapid force development.

  13. Frequency locking in auditory hair cells: Distinguishing between additive and parametric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edri, Yuval; Bozovic, Dolores; Yochelis, Arik

    2016-10-01

    The auditory system displays remarkable sensitivity and frequency discrimination, attributes shown to rely on an amplification process that involves a mechanical as well as a biochemical response. Models that display proximity to an oscillatory onset (also known as Hopf bifurcation) exhibit a resonant response to distinct frequencies of incoming sound, and can explain many features of the amplification phenomenology. To understand the dynamics of this resonance, frequency locking is examined in a system near the Hopf bifurcation and subject to two types of driving forces: additive and parametric. Derivation of a universal amplitude equation that contains both forcing terms enables a study of their relative impact on the hair cell response. In the parametric case, although the resonant solutions are 1 : 1 frequency locked, they show the coexistence of solutions obeying a phase shift of π, a feature typical of the 2 : 1 resonance. Different characteristics are predicted for the transition from unlocked to locked solutions, leading to smooth or abrupt dynamics in response to different types of forcing. The theoretical framework provides a more realistic model of the auditory system, which incorporates a direct modulation of the internal control parameter by an applied drive. The results presented here can be generalized to many other media, including Faraday waves, chemical reactions, and elastically driven cardiomyocytes, which are known to exhibit resonant behavior.

  14. Aerosol radiative forcing efficiency in the UV-B region over central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palancar, Gustavo G.; Olcese, Luis E.; Lanzaco, Bethania L.; Achad, Mariana; López, María Laura; Toselli, Beatriz M.

    2016-07-01

    AEROSOL Robotic Network (AERONET), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and global UV-B (280-315 nm) irradiance measurements and calculations were combined to investigate the effects of aerosol loading on the ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B) reaching the surface under cloudless conditions in Córdoba, Argentina. The aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) and the aerosol forcing efficiency (ARFE) were calculated for an extended period of time (2000-2013) at a ground-based monitoring site affected by different types and loading of aerosols. The ARFE was evaluated by using the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 340 nm retrieved by AERONET at the Cordoba CETT site. The individual and combined effects of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the solar zenith angle (SZA) on the ARFE were also analyzed. In addition, and for comparison purposes, the MODIS AOD at 550 nm was used as input in a machine learning method to better characterize the aerosol load at 340 nm and evaluate the ARFE retrieved from AOD satellite measurements. The ARFE at the surface calculated using AOD data from AERONET ranged from (-0.11 ± 0.01) to (-1.76 ± 0.20) Wm-2 with an average of -0.61 Wm-2; however, when using AOD data from MODIS (TERRA/AQUA satellites), it ranged from (-0.22 ± 0.03) to (-0.65 ± 0.07) Wm-2 with an average value of -0.43 Wm-2. At the same SZA and SSA, the maximum difference between ground and satellite-based was 0.22 Wm-2.

  15. Forced motion and acoustic radiation of an elastic cylinder in axial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.; Miloh, T.

    2012-07-01

    We study the forced motion and far-field acoustic radiation of an elastic cylinder subject to uniform axial flow and actuated at its upstream end by small-amplitude periodic displacement and rotation. The linearized problem is analysed under subcritical conditions of low nondimensional stream-flow velocity, uforced motion at subcritical conditions is affected by the properties of the in vacuo system. A resonance is excited when the cylinder is actuated at one of its in vacuo eigenfrequencies, ωres, manifested by relatively large deflections. Fluid flow acts to regularize this behavior by transferring energy from the upstream driver to the fluid. The dynamical description is used as a source term in the formulation of the vibroacoustic problem. Assuming the cylinder is well-streamlined and neglecting the effect of vortex shedding, the far field sound is attributed directly to cylinder vibration. Acoustic radiation of a dipole type is found in the limit where the cylinder is acoustically compact. Following the dynamical description, it is shown that fluid flow reduces the sound level compared to that in the absence of mean flow, when actuation is applied close to ω=ωres. In addition, we demonstrate that far-field sound can be controlled by varying the actuation parameters. Analytical description of the dynamical and acoustic fields is obtained in the limit u≪1, and found in close agreement with the exact numerical solution up to u˜O(1). Discrepancies between the approximate and exact solutions are observed close to the resonance frequencies, and rationalized in terms of the strong fluid-structure coupling occurring when ω→ωres. At ω=ωres, a qualitative description of the effect of fluid stream flow on the system behavior is supplied.

  16. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging: Characterizing the mechanical properties of tissues using their transient response to localized force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Congdon, Amy N.; Frinkely, Kristin D.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2004-05-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging utilizes brief, high energy, focused acoustic pulses to generate radiation force in tissue, and conventional diagnostic ultrasound methods to detect the resulting tissue displacements in order to image the relative mechanical properties of tissue. The magnitude and spatial extent of the applied force is dependent upon the transmit beam parameters and the tissue attenuation. Forcing volumes are on the order of 5 mm3, pulse durations are less than 1 ms, and tissue displacements are typically several microns. Images of tissue displacement reflect local tissue stiffness, with softer tissues (e.g., fat) displacing farther than stiffer tissues (e.g., muscle). Parametric images of maximum displacement, time to peak displacement, and recovery time provide information about tissue material properties and structure. In both in vivo and ex vivo data, structures shown in matched B-mode images are in good agreement with those shown in ARFI images, with comparable resolution. Potential clinical applications under investigation include soft tissue lesion characterization, assessment of focal atherosclerosis, and imaging of thermal lesion formation during tissue ablation procedures. Results from ongoing studies will be presented. [Work supported by NIH Grant R01 EB002132-03, and the Whitaker Foundation. System support from Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc.

  17. Ozone precursors have regionally variable effect on radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-02-01

    When released near the surface, carbon monoxide, assorted nitrogen oxides (NOx ), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) contribute to the production of ozone, a key component of photochemical smog, which is known to have serious deleterious effects on human health. However, when ozone gets lifted into the troposphere, it is a greenhouse gas. That these ozone precursors have such a dual-pronged effect—affecting both human health and the global radiation budget—suggests that mitigating their emissions could be a potential method to both improve air quality and dampen the rate of anthropogenic climate change.

  18. Seasonal differences in aerosol abundance and radiative forcing in months of contrasting emissions and rainfall over northern South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadavarte, P.; Venkataraman, C.; Cherian, R.; Patil, N.; Madhavan, B. L.; Gupta, T.; Kulkarni, S.; Carmichael, G. R.; Adhikary, B.

    2016-01-01

    A modeling framework was used to examine gaps in understanding of seasonal and spatial heterogeneity in aerosol abundance and radiative forcing over northern South Asia, whose glimpses are revealed in observational studies. Regionally representative emissions were used in chemical transport model simulations at a spatial resolution of 60 × 60 km2, in April, July and September, chosen as months of contrasting emissions and rainfall. Modeled aerosol abundance in northern South Asia was predominantly found to be dust and carbonaceous in April, dust and sulfate in July and sulfate and carbonaceous in September. Anthropogenic aerosols arose from energy-use emissions (from industrial sources, residential biofuel cooking, brick kilns) in all months, additionally from field burning in April, and incursion from East Asia in September. In April, carbonaceous aerosols were abundant from open burning of agricultural fields even at high altitude locations (Godavari), and of forests in the eastern Gangetic Plain (Kolkata). Direct radiative forcing and heating rate, calculated from OPAC-SBDART, using modeled aerosol fields, and corrected by MODIS AOD observations, showed regionally uniform atmospheric forcing in April, compared to that in other months, influenced by both dust and black carbon abundance. A strong spatial heterogeneity of radiative forcing and heating rate was found, with factor of 2.5-3.5 lower atmospheric forcing over the Tibet plateau than that over the Ganga Plain and Northwest in July and September. However, even over the remote Tibet plateau, there was significant anthropogenic contribution to atmospheric forcing and heating rate (45% in Apr, 75% in Sep). Wind fields showed black carbon transport from south Asia in April and east Asia in September. Further evaluation of the transport of dust and anthropogenic emissions from various source regions and their deposition in the Himalaya and Tibet, is important in understanding regional air quality and climate

  19. Effects of ship wakes on ocean brightness and radiative forcing over ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatebe, C. K.; Wilcox, E.; Poudyal, R.; Wang, J.

    2011-09-01

    Changes in surface albedo represent one of the main forcing agents that can counteract, to some extent, the positive forcing from increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Here, we report on enhanced ocean reflectance from ship wakes over the Pacific Ocean near the California coast, where we determined, based on airborne radiation measurements that ship wakes can increase reflected sunlight by more than 100%. We assessed the importance of this increase to climate forcing, where we estimated the global radiative forcing of ship wakes to be -(0.14 ± 50%) mWm-2 assuming a global distribution of 32331 ships of size ≥100000 gross tonnage. The forcing is smaller than the forcing of aircraft contrails (-0.007 to +0.02 Wm-2), but considering that the global shipping fleet has rapidly grown in the last five decades and this trend is likely to continue because of the need of more inter-continental transportation as a result of economic globalization, we argue that the radiative forcing of wakes is expected to be increasingly important especially in harbors and coastal regions.

  20. Magnitude and pattern of Arctic warming governed by the seasonality of radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Bintanja, R; Krikken, F

    2016-12-02

    Observed and projected climate warming is strongest in the Arctic regions, peaking in autumn/winter. Attempts to explain this feature have focused primarily on identifying the associated climate feedbacks, particularly the ice-albedo and lapse-rate feedbacks. Here we use a state-of-the-art global climate model in idealized seasonal forcing simulations to show that Arctic warming (especially in winter) and sea ice decline are particularly sensitive to radiative forcing in spring, during which the energy is effectively 'absorbed' by the ocean (through sea ice melt and ocean warming, amplified by the ice-albedo feedback) and consequently released to the lower atmosphere in autumn and winter, mainly along the sea ice periphery. In contrast, winter radiative forcing causes a more uniform response centered over the Arctic Ocean. This finding suggests that intermodel differences in simulated Arctic (winter) warming can to a considerable degree be attributed to model uncertainties in Arctic radiative fluxes, which peak in summer.

  1. Acoustic radiation force on a double-layer microsphere by a Gaussian focused beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Rongrong; Cheng, Kaixuan; Liu, Jiehui; Mao, Yiwei; Gong, Xiufen; Liu, Xiaozhou

    2014-10-14

    A new model for calculating the radiation force on double-layer microsphere is proposed based on the ray acoustics approach. The axial acoustic radiation force resulting from a focused Gaussian beam incident on spherical shells immersed in water is examined theoretically in relation to its thickness and the contents of its double-layer. The attenuation both in the water and inside the sphere is considered in this method, which cannot be ignored while the high frequency ultrasonic is used. Results of numerical calculations are presented for fat and low density polyethylene materials, with the hollow region filled with animal oil, water, or air. These results show how the acoustic impedance and the sound velocity of both layers, together with the thickness of the shell, affect the acoustic radiation force.

  2. Ultrasonic actuation of biological tissues using dual acoustic radiation force for assessment of elastic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Yamaguchi, Jun; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    To assess mechanical properties of tissues, strain must be generated in an object. However, a single radiation force is not effective because it mainly generates translational motion when the object is much harder than the surrounding medium. In the present study, two cyclic radiation forces are simultaneously applied to a muscle phantom from two opposite horizontal directions so that the object is cyclically compressed in the horizontal direction. By the horizontal compression, the object is expanded vertically based on its incompressibility. The resultant vertical displacement is measured using another ultrasound pulse. The displacement of several micrometers in amplitude was measured by the ultrasonic phased-tracking method. Increase in thickness inside the object in the vertical direction was observed at the time of increasing acoustic radiation forces. Such changes in thickness corresponded to vertical expansion due to horizontal compression and show that the proposed method successfully generated strains inside the object.

  3. Atmospheric Teleconnection over Eurasia Induced by Aerosol Radiative Forcing During Boreal Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, K. M.; Chin, Mian; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, Greg K.

    2005-01-01

    The direct effects of aerosols on global and regional climate during boreal spring are investigated based on simulations using the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) finite-volume general circulation model (fvGCM) with Microphyics of clouds in Relaxed Arakawa Schubert Scheme (McRAS). The aerosol loading are prescribed from three-dimensional monthly distribution of tropospheric aerosols viz., sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, soil dust, and sea salt from output of the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The aerosol extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo, and asymmetric factor are computed as wavelength-dependent radiative forcing in the radiative transfer scheme of the fvGCM, and as a function of the aerosol loading and ambient relative humidity. We find that anomalous atmospheric heat sources induced by absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) excites a planetary scale teleconnection pattern in sea level pressure, temperature and geopotential height spanning North Africa through Eurasia to the North Pacific. Surface cooling due to direct effects of aerosols is found in the vicinity and downstream of the aerosol source regions, i.e., South Asia, East Asia, and northern and western Africa. Additionally, atmospheric heating is found in regions with large loading of dust (over Northern Africa, and Middle East), and black carbon (over South-East Asia). Paradoxically, the most pronounced feature in aerosol-induced surface temperature is an east-west dipole anomaly with strong cooling over the Caspian Sea, and warming over central and northeastern Asia, where aerosol concentration are low. Analyses of circulation anomalies show that the dipole anomaly is a part of an atmospheric teleconnection driven by atmospheric heating anomalies induced by absorbing aerosols in the source regions, but the influence was conveyed globally through barotropic energy dispersion and sustained by feedback processes

  4. Influences of relative humidity on aerosol optical properties and aerosol radiative forcing during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Jiyoung

    In situ measurements at Gosan, South Korea, and onboard C-130 aircraft during ACE-Asia were analyzed to investigate the influence of relative humidity (RH) on aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. The temporal variation of aerosol chemical composition at the Gosan super-site was highly dependent on the air mass transport pathways and source region. RH in the springtime over East Asia were distributed with very high spatial and temporal variation. The RH profile onboard C-130 aircraft measurements exhibits a mixed layer height of about 2 km. Aerosol scattering coefficient ( σsp) under ambient RH was greatly enhanced as compared with that at dry RH (RH<40%). From the aerosol optical and radiative transfer modeling studies, we found that the extinction and scattering coefficients are greatly enhanced with RH. Single scattering albedo with RH is also sensitively changed in the longer wavelength. Asymmetry parameter ( g) is gradually increased with RH although g decreases with wavelength at a given RH. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm and RH of 50% increased to factors 1.24, 1.51, 2.16, and 3.20 at different RH levels 70, 80, 90, and 95%, respectively. Diurnal-averaged aerosol radiative forcings for surface, TOA, and atmosphere were increased with RH because AOD was increased with RH due to hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles. This result implies that the hygroscopic growth due to water-soluble or hydrophilic particles in the lower troposphere may significantly modify the magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing both at the surface and TOA. However, the diurnal-averaged radiative forcing efficiencies at the surface, TOA, and atmosphere were decreased with increasing RH. The decrease of the forcing efficiency with RH results from the fact that increasing rate of aerosol optical depth with RH is greater than the increasing rate of aerosol radiative forcing with RH.

  5. A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical characteristics and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-02-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particle, changes the overall net aerosol radiative forcing from negative to positive. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Black carbon absorption is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings, but even more strongly by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative forcing when sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to climate benefits.

  6. Intercomparison of observed cloud radiative forcing - A zonal and global perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Robertson, Franklin R.

    1993-01-01

    Cloud radiative forcing determined by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scene identification method and two regression methods is compared using identical data sources and the same analysis periods. Results confirm that from the global perspective the increased reflection of SW radiation induced by clouds is greater than outgoing longwave energy trapped by clouds. The estimates of net effect obtained from the three methods are found to be in good agreement (within 3.5 W/sq m). It is concluded that differences in published global mean values of net cloud radiative forcing are mainly due to different data sources and analysis periods. The best estimated annual mean among all previous estimates is considered to be the ERBE measurement (-17.3 W/sq m).

  7. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived from Sea WiFS-Inferred Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties inferred from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) radiance measurements are used to compute the aerosol shortwave radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength of 865-nm is taken from the SeaWIFS archive. It is found that the nominal optical thickness over oceans ranges from 0.1 to 0.2. Using a maritime aerosol model and the radiances measured at the various SeaWiFS channels, the Angstrom exponent is determined to be 0.2174, the single-scattering albedo to be 0.995, and the asymmetry factor to be 0.786. The radiative transfer model has eight bands in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions and three bands in the near infrared. It includes the absorption due to aerosols, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and the scattering due to aerosols and gases (Rayleigh scattering). The radiative forcing is computed over global oceans for four months (January, April, July, and October, 1998) to represent four seasons. It is found that the aerosol radiative forcing is large and changes significantly with seasons near the continents with large-scale forest fires and desert dust. Averaged over oceans and the four months, the aerosol radiative forcing is approximately 7 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere. This large radiative forcing is expected to have a significant cooling effect on the Earth's climate as implied from simulations of a number of general circulation models.

  8. Acoustic radiation force due to arbitrary incident fields on spherical particles in soft tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Treweek, Benjamin C. Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2015-10-28

    Acoustic radiation force is of interest in a wide variety of biomedical applications ranging from tissue characterization (e.g. elastography) to tissue treatment (e.g. high intensity focused ultrasound, kidney stone fragment removal). As tissue mechanical properties are reliable indicators of tissue health, the former is the focus of the present contribution. This is accomplished through an investigation of the acoustic radiation force on a spherical scatterer embedded in tissue. Properties of both the scatterer and the surrounding tissue are important in determining the magnitude and the direction of the force. As these properties vary, the force computation shows changes in magnitude and direction, which may enable more accurate noninvasive determination of tissue properties.

  9. Experimental Demonstration of a Synthetic Lorentz Force by Using Radiation Pressure.

    PubMed

    Šantić, N; Dubček, T; Aumiler, D; Buljan, H; Ban, T

    2015-09-02

    Synthetic magnetism in cold atomic gases opened the doors to many exciting novel physical systems and phenomena. Ubiquitous are the methods used for the creation of synthetic magnetic fields. They include rapidly rotating Bose-Einstein condensates employing the analogy between the Coriolis and the Lorentz force, and laser-atom interactions employing the analogy between the Berry phase and the Aharonov-Bohm phase. Interestingly, radiation pressure - being one of the most common forces induced by light - has not yet been used for synthetic magnetism. We experimentally demonstrate a synthetic Lorentz force, based on the radiation pressure and the Doppler effect, by observing the centre-of-mass motion of a cold atomic cloud. The force is perpendicular to the velocity of the cold atomic cloud, and zero for the cloud at rest. Our novel concept is straightforward to implement in a large volume, for a broad range of velocities, and can be extended to different geometries.

  10. Acoustic radiation force due to arbitrary incident fields on spherical particles in soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treweek, Benjamin C.; Ilinskii, Yurii A.; Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic radiation force is of interest in a wide variety of biomedical applications ranging from tissue characterization (e.g. elastography) to tissue treatment (e.g. high intensity focused ultrasound, kidney stone fragment removal). As tissue mechanical properties are reliable indicators of tissue health, the former is the focus of the present contribution. This is accomplished through an investigation of the acoustic radiation force on a spherical scatterer embedded in tissue. Properties of both the scatterer and the surrounding tissue are important in determining the magnitude and the direction of the force. As these properties vary, the force computation shows changes in magnitude and direction, which may enable more accurate noninvasive determination of tissue properties.

  11. Experimental Demonstration of a Synthetic Lorentz Force by Using Radiation Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Šantić, N.; Dubček, T.; Aumiler, D.; Buljan, H.; Ban, T.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic magnetism in cold atomic gases opened the doors to many exciting novel physical systems and phenomena. Ubiquitous are the methods used for the creation of synthetic magnetic fields. They include rapidly rotating Bose-Einstein condensates employing the analogy between the Coriolis and the Lorentz force, and laser-atom interactions employing the analogy between the Berry phase and the Aharonov-Bohm phase. Interestingly, radiation pressure - being one of the most common forces induced by light - has not yet been used for synthetic magnetism. We experimentally demonstrate a synthetic Lorentz force, based on the radiation pressure and the Doppler effect, by observing the centre-of-mass motion of a cold atomic cloud. The force is perpendicular to the velocity of the cold atomic cloud, and zero for the cloud at rest. Our novel concept is straightforward to implement in a large volume, for a broad range of velocities, and can be extended to different geometries. PMID:26330327

  12. Observational determination of surface radiative forcing by CO2 from 2000 to 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, Daniel R.; Collins, William D.; Gero, P. Johnathan; Torn, Margaret S.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2015-02-25

    The climatic impact of CO2 and other greenhouse gases is usually quantified in terms of radiative forcing1, calculated as the difference between estimates of the Earth’s radiation field from pre-industrial and present-day concentrations of these gases. Radiative transfer models calculate that the increase in CO2 since 1750 corresponds to a global annual-mean radiative forcing at the tropopause of 1.82 ± 0.19 W m-2 (ref. 2). However, despite widespread scientific discussion and modelling of the climate impacts of well-mixed greenhouse gases, there is little direct observational evidence of the radiative impact of increasing atmospheric CO2. Here we present observationally based evidence of clear-sky CO2 surface radiative forcing that is directly attributable to the increase, between 2000 and 2010, of 22 parts per million atmospheric CO2. The time series of this forcing at the two locations—the Southern Great Plains and the North Slope of Alaska—are derived from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer spectra3 together with ancillary measurements and thoroughly corroborated radiative transfer calculations4. The time series both show statistically significant trends of 0.2 W m-2 per decade (with respective uncertainties of ±0.06 W m-2 per decade and ±0.07 W m-2 per decade) and have seasonal ranges of 0.1–0.2 W m-2. This is approximately ten per cent of the trend in downwelling longwave radiation5, 6, 7. These results confirm theoretical predictions of the atmospheric greenhouse effect due to anthropogenic emissions, and provide empirical evidence of how rising CO2 levels, mediated by temporal variations due to photosynthesis and respiration, are affecting the surface energy balance.

  13. Observational determination of surface radiative forcing by CO2 from 2000 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Feldman, D R; Collins, W D; Gero, P J; Torn, M S; Mlawer, E J; Shippert, T R

    2015-03-19

    The climatic impact of CO2 and other greenhouse gases is usually quantified in terms of radiative forcing, calculated as the difference between estimates of the Earth's radiation field from pre-industrial and present-day concentrations of these gases. Radiative transfer models calculate that the increase in CO2 since 1750 corresponds to a global annual-mean radiative forcing at the tropopause of 1.82 ± 0.19 W m(-2) (ref. 2). However, despite widespread scientific discussion and modelling of the climate impacts of well-mixed greenhouse gases, there is little direct observational evidence of the radiative impact of increasing atmospheric CO2. Here we present observationally based evidence of clear-sky CO2 surface radiative forcing that is directly attributable to the increase, between 2000 and 2010, of 22 parts per million atmospheric CO2. The time series of this forcing at the two locations-the Southern Great Plains and the North Slope of Alaska-are derived from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer spectra together with ancillary measurements and thoroughly corroborated radiative transfer calculations. The time series both show statistically significant trends of 0.2 W m(-2) per decade (with respective uncertainties of ±0.06 W m(-2) per decade and ±0.07 W m(-2) per decade) and have seasonal ranges of 0.1-0.2 W m(-2). This is approximately ten per cent of the trend in downwelling longwave radiation. These results confirm theoretical predictions of the atmospheric greenhouse effect due to anthropogenic emissions, and provide empirical evidence of how rising CO2 levels, mediated by temporal variations due to photosynthesis and respiration, are affecting the surface energy balance.

  14. Confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography using a ring ultrasonic transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Rui; Ma, Teng; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-03-24

    We designed and developed a confocal acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography system. A ring ultrasound transducer was used to achieve reflection mode excitation and generate an oscillating acoustic radiation force in order to generate displacements within the tissue, which were detected using the phase-resolved optical coherence elastography method. Both phantom and human tissue tests indicate that this system is able to sense the stiffness difference of samples and quantitatively map the elastic property of materials. Our confocal setup promises a great potential for point by point elastic imaging in vivo and differentiation of diseased tissues from normal tissue.

  15. Tunable optical lens array using viscoelastic material and acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Daisuke Kashihara, Yuta; Matsukawa, Mami; Hatanaka, Megumi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-10-28

    A movable optical lens array that uses acoustic radiation force was investigated. The lens array consists of a glass plate, two piezoelectric bimorph transducers, and a transparent viscoelastic gel film. A cylindrical lens array with a lens pitch of 4.6 mm was fabricated using the acoustic radiation force generated by the flexural vibration of the glass plate. The focal point and the positioning of the lenses can be changed using the input voltage and the driving phase difference between the two transducers, respectively.

  16. Acoustic power measurement of high intensity focused ultrasound in medicine based on radiation force.

    PubMed

    Shou, Wende; Huang, Xiaowei; Duan, Shimei; Xia, Rongmin; Shi, Zhonglong; Geng, Xiaoming; Li, Faqi

    2006-12-22

    How to measure the acoustic power of HIFU is one of the most important tasks in its medical application. In the paper a whole series of formula for calculating the radiation force related to the acoustic power radiated by a single element focusing transducer and by the focusing transducer array were given. Various system of radiation force balance (RFB) to measure the acoustic power of HIFU in medicine were designed and applied in China. In high power experiments, the dependence of radiation force acting the absorbing target on the target position at the beam axis of focusing transducer was fined. There is a peak value of "radiation force" acting the absorbing target in the focal region when the acoustic power through the focal plane exceeds some threshold. In order to avoid this big measurement error caused by the 'peak effect' in focal region, the distance between the absorbing target of RFB and the focusing transducer or transducer array was defined to be equal to or less than 0.7 times of the focal length in the National Standard of China for the measurements of acoustic power and field characteristics of HIFU. More than six different therapeutic equipments of HIFU have been examined by RFB for measuring the acoustic power since 1998. These results show that RFB with the absorbing target is valid in the acoustic power range up to 500W with good linearity for the drive voltage squared of focusing transducer or array. The uncertainty of measurement is within +/-15%.

  17. Consistent sets of atmospheric lifetimes and radiative forcings on climate for CFC replacements: HCFCs and HFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Vaishali; Jain, Atul K.; Patten, Kenneth O.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    2000-03-01

    Recognition of deleterious effects of chlorine and bromine on ozone and climate over the last several decades has resulted in international accords to halt the production of chlorine-containing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and bromine-containing halons. It is well recognized, however, that these chemicals have had important uses to society, particularly as refrigerants, as solvents, as plastic blowing agents, as fire retardants and as aerosol propellants. This has led to an extensive search for substitute chemicals with appropriate properties to be used in place of the CFCs and halons. The purpose of this study is to evaluate in a consistent manner the atmospheric lifetime and radiative forcing on climate for a number of replacement compounds. The unique aspect of this study is its attempt to resolve inconsistencies in previous evaluations of atmospheric lifetimes and radiative forcings for these compounds by adopting a uniform approach. Using the latest version of our two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model of the global atmosphere, we have determined the atmospheric lifetimes of 28 hydrohalocarbons (HCFCs and HFCs). Through the comparison of the model-calculated lifetimes with lifetimes derived using a simple scaling method, our study adds to earlier findings that consideration of stratospheric losses is important in determining the lifetimes of gases. Discrepancies were found in the reported lifetimes of several replacement compounds reported in the international assessment of stratospheric ozone published by the World Meteorological Organization [Granier et al., 1999] and have been resolved. We have also derived the adjusted and instantaneous radiative forcings for CFC-11 and 20 other halocarbons using our radiative transfer model. The sensitivity of radiative forcings to the vertical distribution of these gases is investigated in this study and is shown to be significant. The difference in the global radiative forcing arising from the assumption of a

  18. Sealing Force Increasing of ACM Gasket through Electron Beam Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, D. J.; Batalha, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Rubber is an engineering material largely used as sealing parts, in form of O-rings, solid gaskets and liquid gaskets, materials applied in liquid state with posterior vulcanization and sealing. Stress relaxation is a rubber characteristic which impacts negatively in such industrial applications (rings and solid gaskets). This work has the purpose to investigate the use of electron beam radiation (EB) as a technology able to decrease the stress relaxation in acrylic rubber (ACM), consequently increasing the sealing capability of this material. ACM samples were irradiated with dose of 100 kGy and 250 kGy, its behavior was comparatively investigated using, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments. The results obtained by DMA shown an increase of Tg and changes in dynamic mechanical behavior.

  19. Magnitude and pattern of Arctic warming governed by the seasonality of radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bintanja, Richard; Krikken, Folmer

    2015-04-01

    Observed and projected climate warming is strongest in the Arctic regions, and maximum in autumn/winter. Attempts to explain this feature have focused primarily on identifying the associated climate feedbacks, particularly the ice-albedo and lapse-rate feedbacks. However, the impact of seasonally varying climate forcing has not been identified and quantified. Here we use a state-of-the-art global climate model in idealized seasonal forcing simulations to show that Arctic warming is very sensitive to the season in which the radiative forcing occurs. More specifically, Arctic warming and sea ice decline (especially in winter) are particularly sensitive to forcing in spring, during which the energy is effectively 'absorbed' by the ocean (through sea ice melt and ocean warming, amplified by the ice-albedo feedback) and consequently released to the lower atmosphere in autumn and winter, mainly along the sea ice periphery. In contrast, wintertime radiative forcing yields a more evenly distributed winter warming, which, surprisingly, in certain regions is even smaller than that due to spring forcing. The dependence of the magnitude and pattern of Arctic warming on the seasonality of the climate forcing has important implications in terms of projected increases in anthropogenic forcing. For instance, shipping-induced emissions such as those of black carbon are projected to peak in the ice-free summer and will thereby exert a comparatively strong impact on Arctic warming.

  20. Quantitative assessment of radiation force effect at the dielectric air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Capeloto, Otávio Augusto; Zanuto, Vitor Santaella; Malacarne, Luis Carlos; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Lukasievicz, Gustavo Vinicius Bassi; Bialkowski, Stephen Edward; Astrath, Nelson Guilherme Castelli

    2016-01-01

    We induce nanometer-scale surface deformation by exploiting momentum conservation of the interaction between laser light and dielectric liquids. The effect of radiation force at the air-liquid interface is quantitatively assessed for fluids with different density, viscosity and surface tension. The imparted pressure on the liquids by continuous or pulsed laser light excitation is fully described by the Helmholtz electromagnetic force density. PMID:26856622

  1. Global Radiative Forcing of Coupled Tropospheric Ozone and Aerosols in a Unified General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liao, Hong; Seinfeld, John H.; Adams, Peter J.; Mickley, Loretta J.

    2008-01-01

    Global simulations of sea salt and mineral dust aerosols are integrated into a previously developed unified general circulation model (GCM), the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM II', that simulates coupled tropospheric ozone-NOx-hydrocarbon chemistry and sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, primary organic carbon, and secondary organic carbon aerosols. The fully coupled gas-aerosol unified GCM allows one to evaluate the extent to which global burdens, radiative forcing, and eventually climate feedbacks of ozone and aerosols are influenced by gas-aerosol chemical interactions. Estimated present-day global burdens of sea salt and mineral dust are 6.93 and 18.1 Tg with lifetimes of 0.4 and 3.9 days, respectively. The GCM is applied to estimate current top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface radiative forcing by tropospheric ozone and all natural and anthropogenic aerosol components. The global annual mean value of the radiative forcing by tropospheric ozone is estimated to be +0.53 W m(sup -2) at TOA and +0.07 W m(sup -2) at the Earth's surface. Global, annual average TOA and surface radiative forcing by all aerosols are estimated as -0.72 and -4.04 W m(sup -2), respectively. While the predicted highest aerosol cooling and heating at TOA are -10 and +12 W m(sup -2) respectively, surface forcing can reach values as high as -30 W m(sup -2), mainly caused by the absorption by black carbon, mineral dust, and OC. We also estimate the effects of chemistry-aerosol coupling on forcing estimates based on currently available understanding of heterogeneous reactions on aerosols. Through altering the burdens of sulfate, nitrate, and ozone, heterogeneous reactions are predicted to change the global mean TOA forcing of aerosols by 17% and influence global mean TOA forcing of tropospheric ozone by 15%.

  2. Aerosol Spectral Radiative Forcing Efficiency from Airborne Measurements During Multiple Field Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, S.; Leblanc, S. E.; Pilewskie, P.; Redemann, J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of shortwave spectral irradiance in conjunction with measurements of aerosol optical depth are used to determine the direct aerosol radiative forcing for various different regions and missions. To better compare cases with different air masses and solar geometry, we use the concept of top-of-layer and bottom-of-layer relative forcing efficiency. The aerosol layers were sampled from aircraft during several field campaigns, including the Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO, Mexico, 2006); the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS, Alaska and Alberta, 2008), Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex, California, 2010); and the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3, central US, 2012). We show that the spectral shape of the relative forcing efficiency is similar for these aerosol layers regardless of the aerosol type. The spectral relative forcing efficiency at any one wavelength for the majority of the cases is constrained within a span of 20% per unit of midvisible aerosol optical depth. Single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and surface albedo are secondary products for the various methods used to determine aerosol radiative forcing. Using these, we determine the diurnally averaged spectral and broadband top-of-atmosphere and surface radiative forcing efficiency for the various different aerosol types and surface conditions.

  3. Additive protective effects of the addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on excitability and force in isolated rat skeletal muscle depressed by elevated extracellular K+

    PubMed Central

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Overgaard, Kristian; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

    2007-01-01

    During strenuous exercise, extracellular K+ ([K+]o) is increased, which potentially can reduce muscle excitability and force production. In addition, exercise leads to accumulation of lactate and H+ and increased levels of circulating catecholamines. Individually, reduced pH and increased catecholamines have been shown to counteract the depressing effect of elevated K+. This study examines (i) whether the effects of addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on the excitability of isolated muscles are caused by separate mechanisms and are additive and (ii) whether the effect of adding lactic acid or increasing CO2 is related to a reduction of intra- or extracellular pH. Rat soleus muscles were incubated at a [K+]o of 15 mm, which reduced tetanic force by 85%. Subsequent addition of 20 mm lactic acid or 10−5m adrenaline led to a small recovery of force, but when added together induced an almost complete force recovery. Compound action potentials showed that the force recovery was associated with recovery of muscle excitability. The improved excitability after addition of adrenaline was associated with increased Na+–K+ pump activity resulting in hyperpolarization and an increase in the chemical Na+ gradient. In contrast, addition of lactic acid had no effect on the membrane potential or the Na+–K+ pump activity, but most likely increased excitability via a reduction in intracellular pH. It is concluded that the protective effects of acidosis and adrenaline on muscle excitability and force took place via different mechanisms and were additive. The results suggest that circulating catecholamines and development of acidosis during exercise may improve the tolerance of muscles to elevated [K+]o. PMID:17347268

  4. Additive protective effects of the addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on excitability and force in isolated rat skeletal muscle depressed by elevated extracellular K+.

    PubMed

    de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Overgaard, Kristian; Pedersen, Thomas Holm; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2007-06-01

    During strenuous exercise, extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)) is increased, which potentially can reduce muscle excitability and force production. In addition, exercise leads to accumulation of lactate and H(+) and increased levels of circulating catecholamines. Individually, reduced pH and increased catecholamines have been shown to counteract the depressing effect of elevated K(+). This study examines (i) whether the effects of addition of lactic acid and adrenaline on the excitability of isolated muscles are caused by separate mechanisms and are additive and (ii) whether the effect of adding lactic acid or increasing CO(2) is related to a reduction of intra- or extracellular pH. Rat soleus muscles were incubated at a [K(+)](o) of 15 mM, which reduced tetanic force by 85%. Subsequent addition of 20 mM lactic acid or 10(-5) M adrenaline led to a small recovery of force, but when added together induced an almost complete force recovery. Compound action potentials showed that the force recovery was associated with recovery of muscle excitability. The improved excitability after addition of adrenaline was associated with increased Na(+)-K(+) pump activity resulting in hyperpolarization and an increase in the chemical Na(+) gradient. In contrast, addition of lactic acid had no effect on the membrane potential or the Na(+)-K(+) pump activity, but most likely increased excitability via a reduction in intracellular pH. It is concluded that the protective effects of acidosis and adrenaline on muscle excitability and force took place via different mechanisms and were additive. The results suggest that circulating catecholamines and development of acidosis during exercise may improve the tolerance of muscles to elevated [K(+)](o).

  5. Simulation of uphill/downhill running on a level treadmill using additional horizontal force.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Philippe; Arnal, Pierrick J; Samozino, Pierre; Millet, Guillaume Y; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2014-07-18

    Tilting treadmills allow a convenient study of biomechanics during uphill/downhill running, but they are not commonly available and there is even fewer tilting force-measuring treadmill. The aim of the present study was to compare uphill/downhill running on a treadmill (inclination of ± 8%) with running on a level treadmill using additional backward or forward pulling forces to simulate the effect of gravity. This comparison specifically focused on the energy cost of running, stride frequency (SF), electromyographic activity (EMG), leg and foot angles at foot strike, and ground impact shock. The main results are that SF, impact shock, and leg and foot angle parameters determined were very similar and significantly correlated between the two methods, the intercept and slope of the linear regression not differing significantly from zero and unity, respectively. The correlation of oxygen uptake (V̇O2) data between both methods was not significant during uphill running (r=0.42; P>0.05). V̇O2 data were correlated during downhill running (r=0.74; P<0.01) but there was a significant difference between the methods (bias=-2.51 ± 1.94 ml min(-1) kg(-1)). Linear regressions for EMG of vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, soleus and tibialis anterior were not different from the identity line but the systematic bias was elevated for this parameter. In conclusion, this method seems appropriate for the study of SF, leg and foot angle, impact shock parameters but is less applicable for physiological variables (EMG and energy cost) during uphill/downhill running when using a tilting force-measuring treadmill is not possible.

  6. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  7. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-15

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO{sub 2} gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  8. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  9. Aerosol direct radiative forcing in desert and semi-desert regions of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jinyuan; Gong, Chongshui; Wang, Shigong; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-05-01

    The optical properties of dust aerosols were measured using narrow-band data from a portable sun photometer at four desert and semi-desert stations in northwestern China from 2004 to 2007. Ground-based and satellite observations indicated absorbing dust aerosol loading over the region surrounded by eight large-scale deserts. Radiation forcing was identified by using the Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) model. The ranges of annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angström exponents, and single-scattering albedo (SSA) were from 0.25 to 0.35, from - 0.73 to 1.18, and from 0.77 to 0.86, respectively. The ranges of annual mean aerosol direct radiative forcing values at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), mid-atmosphere, and on the surface were from 3.9 to 12.0, from 50.0 to 53.1, and from - 39.1 to - 48.1 W/m2, respectively. The aerosols' optical properties and radiative characteristics showed strong seasonal variations in both the desert and semi-desert regions. Strong winds and relatively low humidity will lead dust aerosols in the atmosphere to an increase, which played greatly affected these optical properties during spring and winter in northwestern China. Based on long-term observations and retrieved data, aerosol direct radiative forcing was confirmed to heat the atmosphere (50-53 W/m2) and cool the surface (- 39 to - 48 W/m2) above the analyzed desert. Radiative forcing in the atmosphere in spring and winter was 18 to 21 W/m2 higher than other two seasons. Based on the dust sources around the sites, the greater the AOD, the more negative the forcing. The annual averaged heating rates for aerosols close to the ground (1 km) were approximately 0.80-0.85 K/day.

  10. Hydrological and ecological implications of radiative forcing by dust in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T.; Bryant, A. C.; Deems, J. S.; Skiles, M.

    2012-12-01

    The runoff from the Colorado River supplies water to over 30 million people in seven US states and Mexico. Climate change projections suggest that this runoff will decrease in the next 50 years by 7-20% due to increases in evapotranspiration and decreases in the ratio of snowfall to rain. Such scenarios challenge the sustainability of the freshwater supply to the southwest US. Recent research however has shown that radiative forcing by dust in snow has been shortening snow cover duration by several weeks due to a 5-7-fold increase in dust loading relative to prior to the European-settlement of the western US in the mid-1800s. In the mountains of the Upper Colorado River, the absolute dust radiative forcing across the period ranges from 30 to 75 W m-2, in turn shortening snow cover duration by 21 to 51 days. Extended to the scale of the Upper Colorado River Basin, this impact has brought peak normalized runoff at Lee's Ferry, AZ (Lake Powell) more than three weeks earlier and reduced the total annual runoff by an average of ~5%. In this region, earlier snowmelt forced by dust radiative forcing impacts alpine vegetation by increasing synchronicity in phenology across the alpine landscape with increasingly earlier snowmelt. Whereas reduced dust load results in topographically-sensitive melt and loss of snow cover, the more spatially-uniform snowmelt from dust radiative forcing leads to synchronized growth and flowering across the landscape. Water managers in the Upper Colorado basin now seek detailed real-time knowledge of dust presence, radiative forcing, and its potential to accelerate snowmelt, as well as understanding its implications for water supply under current conditions and in a changed climate. Likewise, water stakeholder groups, water conservation districts, and state and federal agencies are discussing efforts to restabilize soil surfaces in the dust-emitting regions to mitigate impacts of dust on snowmelt and runoff. However, as these policy

  11. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events.

  12. Tropospheric Radiative Forcing from EL Chichon and MT. Pinatubo: Theory and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Ellsworth George

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of volcanic effects on global and regional climate variables has had a long history of speculation, correlative study, and proposed physical mechanisms. The potential for widespread surface cooling following the extensive spreading of long-lived stratospheric aerosols following major volcanic eruptions is based on the partial blocking of solar radiation incident at the top of the troposphere. Relatively simple physical mechanisms oppose this potential for cooling: dominant forward solar scattering and absorption of outgoing infrared radiation by the aerosols. More complex considerations are the spatial and temporal variations of the distributed aerosol and its optical and physical properties; potential for water/ice cloud modification by the volcanic particles; surface albedo, water vapor, and cloud feedbacks to a temperature change; the role of the oceans in a large-scale radiatively forced temperature variation; possible circulation modifications; and other forced and random variations in climate. In the current work, rigorous radiative transfer calculations relative to a subset of the above considerations are carried out and compared to observational data to examine deterministic volcanic effects on climate. Specifically, zonally resolved volcanic radiative forcing at the tropopause, and other levels, is computed from the best available information on the spatial and temporal distribution of volcanic aerosols from two recent eruptions, El Chichon (Mexico, 1982) and Mt. Pinatubo (Philippines, 1991). Accuracy of the radiative calculations is partially verified with surface- and satellite -based irradiance observations. Maximum global seasonal -mean radiative forcings of -4.5 and -2.2 W m^{-2} are calculated following the Mt. Pinatubo and El Chichon eruptions, respectively. Within hemisphere irradiance gradient anomalies of up to 16% at the tropopause are calculated for the second N. Hemisphere summer following the eruptions. The computed radiative

  13. Infrared Radiative Forcing and Atmospheric Lifetimes of Trace Species Based on Observations from UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minschwaner, K.; Carver, R. W.; Briegleb, B. P.

    1997-01-01

    Observations from instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) have been used to constrain calculations of infrared radiative forcing by CH4, CCl2F2 and N2O, and to determine lifetimes Of CCl2F2 and N2O- Radiative forcing is calculated as a change in net infrared flux at the tropopause that results from an increase in trace gas amount from pre-industrial (1750) to contemporary (1992) times. Latitudinal and seasonal variations are considered explicitly, using distributions of trace gases and temperature in the stratosphere from UARS measurements and seasonally averaged cloud statistics from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. Top-of-atmosphere fluxes calculated for the contemporary period are in good agreement with satellite measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Globally averaged values of the radiative forcing are 0.536, 0.125, and 0.108 W m-2 for CH4, CCl2F2, and N2O, respectively. The largest forcing occurs near subtropical latitudes during summer, predominantly as a result of the combination of cloud-free skies and a high, cold tropopause. Clouds are found to play a significant role in regulating infrared forcing, reducing the magnitude of the forcing by 30-40% compared to the case of clear skies. The vertical profile of CCl2F2 is important in determining its radiative forcing; use of a height-independent mixing ratio in the stratosphere leads to an over prediction of the forcing by 10%. The impact of stratospheric profiles on radiative forcing by CH4 and N2O is less than 2%. UARS-based distributions of CCl2F2 and N2O are used also to determine global destruction rates and instantaneous lifetimes of these gases. Rates of photolytic destruction in the stratosphere are calculated using solar ultraviolet irradiances measured on UARS and a line-by-line model of absorption in the oxygen Schumann-Runge bands. Lifetimes are 114 +/- 22 and 118 +/- 25 years for CCl2F2 and N2O, respectively.

  14. Dependence of the radiative forcing of the climate system on fossil fuel type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, L. I.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change mitigation strategies are greatly directed towards the reduction of CO2 emissions and other greenhouse gases from fossil fuel combustion to limit warming to 2º C in this century. For example, the Clean Power Plan aims to reduce CO2 emissions from the power sector by 32% of 2005 levels by 2030 by increasing power plant efficiency but also by switching from coal-fired power plants to natural gas-fired power plants. It is important to understand the impact of such fuel switching on climate change. While all fossil fuels emit CO2, they also emit other pollutants with varying effects on climate, health and agriculture. First, The emission of CO2 per joule of energy produced varies significantly between coal, oil and natural gas. Second, the complexity that the co-emitted pollutants add to the perturbations in the climate system necessitates the detangling of radiative forcing for each type of fossil fuel. The historical (1850-2011) net radiative forcing of climate as a function of fuel type (coal, oil, natural gas and biofuel) is reconstructed. The results reveal the significant dependence of the CO2 and the non-CO2 forcing on fuel type. The CO2 forcing per joule of energy is largest for coal. Radiative forcing from the co-emitted pollutants (black carbon, methane, nitrogen oxides, organic carbon, sulfate aerosols) changes the global mean CO2 forcing attributed to coal and oil significantly. For natural gas, the CO2-only radiative forcing from gas is increased by about 60% when the co-emitted pollutants are included.

  15. Thirty-Five Year Record of Shortwave TOA radiative cloud forcing from SBUV Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Herman, J. R.; Labow, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    A thirty-five year record (1980-2014) of Shortwave TOA radiative cloud forcing is derived from UV Lambertian-Equivalent (LER) reflectivity data constructed using measured upwelling radiances from Nimbus-7 SBUV and seven NOAA SBUV/2 polar orbiting instruments. The approach is to scale the dimensionless UV LER data to match the CERES Shortwave Cloud radiative forcing when they are concurrent (2000-2014). The derived scaling factors are then used to produces a CERES-proxy of SW cloud forcing back to 1980. The good agreement between trends and anomalies of the CERES-proxy and CERES Shortwave Cloud forcing records during the overlapping data period supports using this new data set for extended climate studies.During 1980-2000 period of globally warming surface temperatures, our record of shortwave cloud forcing shows a widespread global increase in forcing from reduced cloudiness. However, during the more recent pause in global warming 2000-2012, our record shows a reduction in SW cloud forcing from increased cloudiness.Historical CMIP5 AMIP simulations from eight models do not capture the 1980-2000 reduction in cloudiness. Twenty-year segments of future RCP45 long-term runs with comparable surface temperature warming to that observed from 1980-2000, also do not simulate our observed reduction in cloud amount. This suggests that the climate sensitivity in the tested CMIP5 models is too low.

  16. Radiative Forcing Due to Major Aerosol Emitting Sectors in China and India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streets, David G.; Shindell, Drew Todd; Lu, Zifeng; Faluvegi, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic aerosol sources is essential for making effective emission control decisions to mitigate climate change. We examined the net direct plus indirect radiative forcing caused by carbonaceous aerosol and sulfur emissions in key sectors of China and India using the GISS-E2 chemistry-climate model. Diesel trucks and buses (67 mW/ sq. m) and residential biofuel combustion (52 mW/ sq. m) in India have the largest global mean, annual average forcings due mainly to the direct and indirect effects of BC. Emissions from these two sectors in China have near-zero net global forcings. Coal-fired power plants in both countries exert a negative forcing of about -30 mW/ sq. m from production of sulfate. Aerosol forcings are largest locally, with direct forcings due to residential biofuel combustion of 580 mW/ sq. m over India and 416 mW/ sq. m over China, but they extend as far as North America, Europe, and the Arctic

  17. Active Path Selection of Fluid Microcapsules in Artificial Blood Vessel by Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Kohji; Muramatsu, Yusuke; Ueda, Sawami; Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakayashiki, Yusuke; Ishihara, Ken

    2009-07-01

    Micrometer-sized microcapsules collapse upon exposure to ultrasound. Use of this phenomenon for a drug delivery system (DDS), not only for local delivery of medication but also for gene therapy, should be possible. However, enhancing the efficiency of medication is limited because capsules in suspension diffuse in the human body after injection, since the motion of capsules in blood flow cannot be controlled. To control the behavior of microcapsules, acoustic radiation force was introduced. We detected local changes in microcapsule density by producing acoustic radiation force in an artificial blood vessel. Furthermore, we theoretically estimated the conditions required for active path selection of capsules at a bifurcation point in the artificial blood vessel. We observed the difference in capsule density at both in the bifurcation point and in alternative paths downstream of the bifurcation point for different acoustic radiation forces. Comparing the experimental results with those obtained theoretically, the conditions for active path selection were calculated from the acoustic radiation force and fluid resistance of the capsules. The possibility of controlling capsule flow towards a specific point in a blood vessel was demonstrated.

  18. Ultrasonic Measurement of Strain Distribution Inside Object Cyclically Compressed by Dual Acoustic Radiation Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagiri, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2008-05-01

    One possible way to evaluate acupuncture therapy quantitatively is to measure the change in the elastic property of muscle after application of the therapy. Many studies have been conducted to measure mechanical properties of tissues using ultrasound-induced acoustic radiation force. To assess mechanical properties, strain must be generated in an object. However, a single radiation force is not effective because it mainly generates translational motion when the object is much harder than the surrounding medium. In this study, two cyclic radiation forces are simultaneously applied to a muscle phantom from two opposite horizontal directions so that the object is cyclically compressed in the horizontal direction. By the horizontal compression, the object is expanded vertically based on its incompressibility. The resultant vertical displacement is measured using another ultrasound pulse. Two ultrasonic transducers for actuation were both driven by the sum of two continuous sinusoidal signals at two slightly different frequencies [1 MHz and (1 M + 5) Hz]. The displacement of several micrometers in amplitude, which fluctuated at 5 Hz, was measured by the ultrasonic phased tracking method. Increase in thickness inside the object was observed just when acoustic radiation forces increased. Such changes in thickness correspond to vertical expansion due to horizontal compression.

  19. Acoustic manipulation of oscillating spherical bodies: Emergence of axial negative acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, emergence of negative axial acoustic radiation force on a rigid oscillating spherical body is investigated for acoustic manipulation purposes. The problem of plane acoustic wave scattering from an oscillating spherical body submerged in an ideal acoustic fluid medium is solved. For the case of oscillating direction collinear with the wave propagation wave number vector (desired path), it has been shown that the acoustic radiation force, as a result of nonlinear acoustic wave interaction with bodies can be expressed as a linear function of incident wave field and the oscillation properties of the oscillator (i.e., amplitude and phase of oscillation). The negative (i.e., pulling effects) and positive (i.e., pushing effects) radiation force situations are divided in oscillation complex plane with a specific frequency-dependant straight line. This characteristic line defines the radiation force cancellation state. In order to investigate the stability of the mentioned manipulation strategy, the case of misaligned oscillation of sphere with the wave propagation direction is studied. The proposed methodology may suggest a novel concept of single-beam acoustic handling techniques based on smart carriers.

  20. Integration of acoustic radiation force and optical imaging for blood plasma clot stiffness measurement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Caroline W; Perez, Matthew J; Helmke, Brian P; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood's transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties.

  1. Intravascular Ultrasound Catheter to Enhance Microbubble-Based Drug Delivery via Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Joseph P.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Hossack, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that acoustic radiation force enhances intravascular microbubble adhesion to blood vessels in the presence of flow for molecular-targeted ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. A prototype acoustic radiation force intravascular ultrasound (ARFIVUS) catheter was designed and fabricated to displace a microbubble contrast agent in flow representative of conditions encountered in the human carotid artery. The prototype ARFIVUS transducer was designed to match the resonance frequency of 1.4- to 2.6-μm-diameter microbubbles modeled by an experimentally verified 1-D microbubble acoustic radiation force translation model. The transducer element was an elongated Navy Type I (hard) lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic designed to operate at 3 MHz. Fabricated devices operated with center frequencies of 3.3 and 3.6 MHz with −6-dB fractional bandwidths of 55% and 50%, respectively. Microbubble translation velocities as high as 0.86 m/s were measured using a high-speed streak camera when insonating with the ARFIVUS transducer. Finally, the prototype was used to displace microbubbles in a flow phantom while imaging with a commercial 45-MHz imaging IVUS transducer. A sustained increase of 31 dB in average video intensity was measured following insonation with the ARFIVUS, indicating microbubble accumulation resulting from the application of acoustic radiation force. PMID:23143566

  2. A Finite-Element Method Model of Soft Tissue Response to Impulsive Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Palmeri, Mark L.; Sharma, Amy C.; Bouchard, Richard R.; Nightingale, Roger W.; Nightingale, Kathryn R

    2010-01-01

    Several groups are studying acoustic radiation force and its ability to image the mechanical properties of tissue. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is one modality using standard diagnostic ultrasound scanners to generate localized, impulsive, acoustic radiation forces in tissue. The dynamic response of tissue is measured via conventional ultrasonic speckle-tracking methods and provides information about the mechanical properties of tissue. A finite-element method (FEM) model has been developed that simulates the dynamic response of tissues, with and without spherical inclusions, to an impulsive acoustic radiation force excitation from a linear array transducer. These FEM models were validated with calibrated phantoms. Shear wave speed, and therefore elasticity, dictates tissue relaxation following ARFI excitation, but Poisson’s ratio and density do not significantly alter tissue relaxation rates. Increased acoustic attenuation in tissue increases the relative amount of tissue displacement in the near field compared with the focal depth, but relaxation rates are not altered. Applications of this model include improving image quality, and distilling material and structural information from tissue’s dynamic response to ARFI excitation. Future work on these models includes incorporation of viscous material properties and modeling the ultrasonic tracking of displaced scatterers. PMID:16382621

  3. Integration of Acoustic Radiation Force and Optical Imaging for Blood Plasma Clot Stiffness Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline W.; Perez, Matthew J.; Helmke, Brian P.; Viola, Francesco; Lawrence, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the life-preserving function blood clotting serves in the body, inadequate or excessive blood clot stiffness has been associated with life-threatening diseases such as stroke, hemorrhage, and heart attack. The relationship between blood clot stiffness and vascular diseases underscores the importance of quantifying the magnitude and kinetics of blood’s transformation from a fluid to a viscoelastic solid. To measure blood plasma clot stiffness, we have developed a method that uses ultrasound acoustic radiation force (ARF) to induce micron-scaled displacements (1-500 μm) on microbeads suspended in blood plasma. The displacements were detected by optical microscopy and took place within a micro-liter sized clot region formed within a larger volume (2 mL sample) to minimize container surface effects. Modulation of the ultrasound generated acoustic radiation force allowed stiffness measurements to be made in blood plasma from before its gel point to the stage where it was a fully developed viscoelastic solid. A 0.5 wt % agarose hydrogel was 9.8-fold stiffer than the plasma (platelet-rich) clot at 1 h post-kaolin stimulus. The acoustic radiation force microbead method was sensitive to the presence of platelets and strength of coagulation stimulus. Platelet depletion reduced clot stiffness 6.9 fold relative to platelet rich plasma. The sensitivity of acoustic radiation force based stiffness assessment may allow for studying platelet regulation of both incipient and mature clot mechanical properties. PMID:26042775

  4. Impacts of Human Alteration of the Nitrogen Cycle in the U.S. on Radiative Forcing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen cycling processes affect radiative forcing directly through emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O) and indirectly because emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO x ) and ammonia (NH3) affect atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor (H2O), ozone (O...

  5. Evapo-transpiration, role of aerosol radiative forcing: a study over a dense canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanage, VInayak; Latha, R.; Murthy, B. S.

    2016-05-01

    Current study uses Satellite and Reanalysis data to quantify the effect of aerosol on ET at various space and time scales. All the data are obtained for the period June 2008 to May 2009 over Dibrugarh district, Assam, Indi a where NDVI has limited change of through the year. Monthly Evapo-Transpiration (ET, cumulative), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) are retrieved from satellite images of Terra-MODIS. The AOD data are evaluated against in-situ observations. Maximum values of AOD are observed in the pre-monsoon season while minimum AOD values are perceived in October and November. Aerosol Radiative Forcing (ARF) is calculated by using the MERRA data sets of `clean-clear radiation' and `clear-radiation' at surface over the study area. Maximum aerosol radiative forcing is observed during the pre-monsoon season; this is in tune with ground observations. Strong positive correlation (r=0.75) between ET and NDVI is observed and it is found that the dense vegetative surfaces exhibit higher rate of evapo-transpiration. A strong positive correlation (r= -0.85) between ARF at surface and AOD is observed with radiative forcing efficiency of 35 W/m2. A statistical regression equation of ET a s a function of NDVI and AOD i.e. ET = 0.25 + (-84.27) * AOD + (131.51) * NDVI, is obtained that shows a correlation of 0.824.

  6. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A. Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  7. A Comparison of Pre-monsoonal and Monsoonal Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols over South Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Cohen, J. B.; Wang, C.

    2012-12-01

    Radiative forcing by anthropogenic aerosols after monsoon onset is often considered unimportant compared to forcing during the pre-monsoonal period, due to precipitation scavenging. We tested this assumption for the South Asian monsoon using three model runs with forcing prescribed during the pre-monsoonal period (March-May), monsoon period (June-September) and both periods. The forcing represents the direct radiative effects of sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon. It was derived from a set of Kalman filter-optimised black carbon emissions from a modelling system based on the CAM3 GCM, a two-moment multi-scheme aerosol and radiation model, and a coupled urban scale processing package; we expect it to be reliable within its given error bounds. The monthly climatological forcing values were prescribed over South Asia every year for 100 years to CESM 1.0.4, a coupled atmosphere-ocean model. We shall compare the three resultant climatologies with climatologies from a no aerosol model and a full aerosol model.

  8. Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Hamish; Sengupta, Kamalika; Rap, Alexandru; Duplissy, Jonathan; Frege, Carla; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K.; Wagner, Robert; Dunne, Eimear M.; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill S.; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Fischer, Lukas; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Monks, Sarah A.; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E.; Seinfeld, John H.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Wagner, Andrea C.; Wagner, Paul E.; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-10-01

    The magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic emissions depends on the baseline state of the atmosphere under pristine preindustrial conditions. Measurements show that particle formation in atmospheric conditions can occur solely from biogenic vapors. Here, we evaluate the potential effect of this source of particles on preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing over the industrial period. Model simulations show that the pure biogenic particle formation mechanism has a much larger relative effect on CCN concentrations in the preindustrial atmosphere than in the present atmosphere because of the lower aerosol concentrations. Consequently, preindustrial cloud albedo is increased more than under present day conditions, and therefore the cooling forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is reduced. The mechanism increases CCN concentrations by 20-100% over a large fraction of the preindustrial lower atmosphere, and the magnitude of annual global mean radiative forcing caused by changes of cloud albedo since 1750 is reduced by 0.22 W m-2 (27%) to -0.60 W m-2. Model uncertainties, relatively slow formation rates, and limited available ambient measurements make it difficult to establish the significance of a mechanism that has its dominant effect under preindustrial conditions. Our simulations predict more particle formation in the Amazon than is observed. However, the first observation of pure organic nucleation has now been reported for the free troposphere. Given the potentially significant effect on anthropogenic forcing, effort should be made to better understand such naturally driven aerosol processes.

  9. Reduced anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing caused by biogenic new particle formation.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Hamish; Sengupta, Kamalika; Rap, Alexandru; Duplissy, Jonathan; Frege, Carla; Williamson, Christina; Heinritzi, Martin; Simon, Mario; Yan, Chao; Almeida, João; Tröstl, Jasmin; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ortega, Ismael K; Wagner, Robert; Dunne, Eimear M; Adamov, Alexey; Amorim, Antonio; Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Brilke, Sophia; Chen, Xuemeng; Craven, Jill S; Dias, Antonio; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Fischer, Lukas; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Fuchs, Claudia; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hoyle, Christopher R; Jokinen, Tuija; Junninen, Heikki; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Krapf, Manuel; Kürten, Andreas; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Molteni, Ugo; Monks, Sarah A; Onnela, Antti; Peräkylä, Otso; Piel, Felix; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Pringle, Kirsty J; Richards, Nigel A D; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Scott, Catherine E; Seinfeld, John H; Sharma, Sangeeta; Sipilä, Mikko; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Stratmann, Frank; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Vogel, Alexander Lucas; Wagner, Andrea C; Wagner, Paul E; Weingartner, Ernest; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Ye, Penglin; Zhang, Xuan; Hansel, Armin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Baltensperger, Urs; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim; Carslaw, Kenneth S

    2016-10-25

    The magnitude of aerosol radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic emissions depends on the baseline state of the atmosphere under pristine preindustrial conditions. Measurements show that particle formation in atmospheric conditions can occur solely from biogenic vapors. Here, we evaluate the potential effect of this source of particles on preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing over the industrial period. Model simulations show that the pure biogenic particle formation mechanism has a much larger relative effect on CCN concentrations in the preindustrial atmosphere than in the present atmosphere because of the lower aerosol concentrations. Consequently, preindustrial cloud albedo is increased more than under present day conditions, and therefore the cooling forcing of anthropogenic aerosols is reduced. The mechanism increases CCN concentrations by 20-100% over a large fraction of the preindustrial lower atmosphere, and the magnitude of annual global mean radiative forcing caused by changes of cloud albedo since 1750 is reduced by [Formula: see text] (27%) to [Formula: see text] Model uncertainties, relatively slow formation rates, and limited available ambient measurements make it difficult to establish the significance of a mechanism that has its dominant effect under preindustrial conditions. Our simulations predict more particle formation in the Amazon than is observed. However, the first observation of pure organic nucleation has now been reported for the free troposphere. Given the potentially significant effect on anthropogenic forcing, effort should be made to better understand such naturally driven aerosol processes.

  10. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings.

    PubMed

    Boos, William R; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-02-09

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a "tipping point." Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation's ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo.

  11. Radiative forcing by stratospheric aerosol in a CCM with interactive aerosol module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brühl, Christoph; Lelieveld, Jos; Tost, Holger; Steil, Benedikt; Höpfner, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Multiyear studies with the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC with the aerosol module GMXe demonstrate that stratospheric aerosol formation is controlled by COS oxidation and SO2 injected by low-latitude volcanic eruptions. The model consistently uses the same parameters in the troposphere and stratosphere for 7 aerosol modes applied. Calculated radiative heating by aerosol feeds back to stratospheric dynamics. Radiative forcing by stratospheric aerosol can be diagnosed separately. The simulations include the medium size tropical eruptions in 2003, 2005 and 2006 but also the major eruption of Pinatubo in 1991. We show that calculated radiative forcing by stratospheric aerosol agrees well with the corresponding satellite derived quantity and that the medium size tropical eruptions should not be neglected in climate simulations. Changes in temperature, dynamics and tracer transport due to interactive aerosol will be also presented. We show also that calculated aerosol and SO2 concentrations are consistent with the observations by SAGE and by MIPAS on ENVISAT.

  12. Radiative forcing and temperature response to changes in urban albedos and associated CO2 offsets

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-02-12

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and land surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe by 0.1. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the change in the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation and land surface temperature to a 0.1 increase in urban albedos for all global land areas. The global average increase in the total outgoing radiation was 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, and temperature decreased by {approx}0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in surface albedo. These averages represent all global land areas where data were available from the land surface model used and are for the boreal summer (June-July-August). For the continental U.S. the total outgoing radiation increased by 2.3 Wm{sup -2}, and land surface temperature decreased by {approx}0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in surface albedo. Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO{sub 2} offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be {approx} 57 Gt CO{sub 2}. A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on global climate and the expected CO{sub 2} offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  13. Acoustic backscattering and radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane progressive waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-03-01

    This work proposes a formal analytical theory using the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates, to calculate the acoustic backscattering form function as well as the radiation force-per-length on an infinitely long elliptical (non-circular) cylinder in plane progressive waves. The major (or minor) semi-axis of the ellipse coincides with the direction of the incident waves. The scattering coefficients for the rigid elliptical cylinder are determined by imposing the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface and solving a resulting system of linear equations by matrix inversion. The present method, which utilizes standard cylindrical (Bessel and Hankel) wave functions, presents an advantage over the solution for the scattering that is ordinarily expressed in a basis of elliptical Mathieu functions (which are generally non-orthogonal). Furthermore, an integral equation showing the direct connection of the radiation force function with the square of the scattering form function in the far-field from the scatterer (applicable for plane waves only), is noted and discussed. An important application of this integral equation is the adequate evaluation of the radiation force function from a bistatic measurement (i.e., in the polar plane) of the far-field scattering from any 2D object of arbitrary shape. Numerical predictions are evaluated for the acoustic backscattering form function and the radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density, and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb, without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation, acousto-fluidics and particle dynamics applications.

  14. Challenges in constraining anthropogenic aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing using present-day spatiotemporal variability

    PubMed Central

    Ghan, Steven; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Shipeng; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Gettelman, Andrew; Griesfeller, Jan; Kipling, Zak; Lohmann, Ulrike; Morrison, Hugh; Neubauer, David; Partridge, Daniel G.; Stier, Philip; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A large number of processes are involved in the chain from emissions of aerosol precursor gases and primary particles to impacts on cloud radiative forcing. Those processes are manifest in a number of relationships that can be expressed as factors dlnX/dlnY driving aerosol effects on cloud radiative forcing. These factors include the relationships between cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration and emissions, droplet number and CCN concentration, cloud fraction and droplet number, cloud optical depth and droplet number, and cloud radiative forcing and cloud optical depth. The relationship between cloud optical depth and droplet number can be further decomposed into the sum of two terms involving the relationship of droplet effective radius and cloud liquid water path with droplet number. These relationships can be constrained using observations of recent spatial and temporal variability of these quantities. However, we are most interested in the radiative forcing since the preindustrial era. Because few relevant measurements are available from that era, relationships from recent variability have been assumed to be applicable to the preindustrial to present-day change. Our analysis of Aerosol Comparisons between Observations and Models (AeroCom) model simulations suggests that estimates of relationships from recent variability are poor constraints on relationships from anthropogenic change for some terms, with even the sign of some relationships differing in many regions. Proxies connecting recent spatial/temporal variability to anthropogenic change, or sustained measurements in regions where emissions have changed, are needed to constrain estimates of anthropogenic aerosol impacts on cloud radiative forcing. PMID:26921324

  15. Simulation of aerosol direct radiative forcing with RAMS-CMAQ in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Han, X.; Liu, X.

    2011-12-01

    The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is developed to assess aerosol direct radiative forcing by linking simulated meteorological parameters and aerosol mass concentration with the aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module in this study. The module is capable of accounting for important factors that affect aerosol optical properties and radiative effect, such as incident wave length, aerosol size distribution, water uptake, and internal mixture. Subsequently, the modeling system is applied to simulate the temporal and spatial variations in mass burden, optical properties, and direct radiative forcing of diverse aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt over East Asia throughout 2005. Model performance is fully evaluated using various observational data, including satellite monitoring of MODIS and surface measurements of EANET (Acid Deposition Monitoring Network), AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), and CSHNET (Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network). The correlation coefficients of the comparisons of daily average mass concentrations of sulfate, PM2.5, and PM10 between simulations and EANET measurements are 0.70, 0.61, and 0.64, respectively. It is also determined that the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) is in congruence with the observed results from the AERONET, the CSHNET, and the MODIS. The model results suggest that the high AOD values ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 are mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin as well as over central and southeastern China, in East Asia. The aerosol direct radiative forcing patterns generally followed the AOD patterns. The strongest forcing effect ranging from -12 to -8 W/m2 was mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin and the eastern China's coastal regions in the all-sky case at TOA, and the forcing effect ranging from -8 to -4 W/m2 could be found over entire eastern China, Korea, Japan, East China Sea, and the sea areas of Japan.

  16. Simulation of aerosol direct radiative forcing with RAMS-CMAQ in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Han, Zhiwei; Xin, Jinyuan; Liu, Xiaohong

    2011-11-01

    The air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is developed to assess aerosol direct radiative forcing by linking simulated meteorological parameters and aerosol mass concentration with the aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module in this study. The module is capable of accounting for important factors that affect aerosol optical properties and radiative effect, such as incident wave length, aerosol size distribution, water uptake, and internal mixture. Subsequently, the modeling system is applied to simulate the temporal and spatial variations in mass burden, optical properties, and direct radiative forcing of diverse aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt over East Asia throughout 2005. Model performance is fully evaluated using various observational data, including satellite monitoring of MODIS and surface measurements of EANET (Acid Deposition Monitoring Network), AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network), and CSHNET (Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network). The correlation coefficients of the comparisons of daily average mass concentrations of sulfate, PM2.5, and PM10 between simulations and EANET measurements are 0.70, 0.61, and 0.64, respectively. It is also determined that the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) is in congruence with the observed results from the AERONET, the CSHNET, and the MODIS. The model results suggest that the high AOD values ranging from 0.8 to 1.2 are mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin as well as over central and southeastern China, in East Asia. The aerosol direct radiative forcing patterns generally followed the AOD patterns. The strongest forcing effect ranging from -12 to -8 W m -2 was mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin and the eastern China's coastal regions in the all-sky case at TOA, and the forcing effect ranging from -8 to -4 W m -2 could be found over entire eastern China, Korea, Japan, East China Sea, and the sea areas of Japan

  17. Acoustic radiation force on a rigid elliptical cylinder in plane (quasi)standing waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mitri, F. G.

    2015-12-07

    The acoustic radiation force on a 2D elliptical (non-circular) cylinder centered on the axis of wave propagation of plane quasi-standing and standing waves is derived, based on the partial-wave series expansion (PWSE) method in cylindrical coordinates. A non-dimensional acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit length, per characteristic energy density and per unit cross-sectional surface of the ellipse, is defined in terms of the scattering coefficients that are determined by applying the Neumann boundary condition for an immovable surface. A system of linear equations involving a single numerical integration procedure is solved by matrix inversion. Numerical simulations showing the transition from the quasi-standing to the (equi-amplitude) standing wave behaviour are performed with particular emphasis on the aspect ratio a/b, where a and b are the ellipse semi-axes, as well as the dimensionless size parameter kb (where k is the wavenumber), without the restriction to a particular range of frequencies. It is found that at high kb values > 1, the radiation force per length with broadside incidence is larger, whereas the opposite situation occurs in the long-wavelength limit (i.e., kb < 1). The results are particularly relevant in acoustic levitation of elliptical cylinders, the acoustic stabilization of liquid columns in a host medium, acousto-fluidics devices, and other particle dynamics applications to name a few. Moreover, the formalism presented here may be effectively applied to compute the acoustic radiation force on other 2D surfaces of arbitrary shape such as super-ellipses, Chebyshev cylindrical particles, or other non-circular geometries.

  18. Radiative Forcing and Temperature Response to Changes in Urban Albedos and Associated CO2 Offsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2009-01-01

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the response of the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation to urban albedo changes. Globally, the total outgoing radiation increased by 0.5 W/square m and temperature decreased by -0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in albedo. For the U.S. the total outgoing total radiation increased by 2.3 W/square meter, and temperature decreased by approximately 0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in albedo. These values are for the boreal summer (Tune-July-August). Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO2 offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be approximately 57 Gt CO2 . A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on climate and the expected CO2 offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  19. Aviation-induced radiative forcing and surface temperature change in dependency of the emission altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FröMming, C.; Ponater, M.; Dahlmann, K.; Grewe, V.; Lee, D. S.; Sausen, R.

    2012-10-01

    The present study provides a detailed assessment of the net impact of global flight altitude changes on radiative forcing and temperature response. Changes in contrail coverage, chemical perturbations (H2O, O3, CH4) and associated radiative forcings were determined from simulations with a quasi CTM. Future development of global mean radiative forcing and temperature response was calculated by means of a linear response model. The range of possible effects arising from various future scenarios is analyzed, and tradeoffs between partially counteracting short- and long term effects are studied. Present-day global mean radiative forcing of short-lived species and CH4 is reduced when flying lower, whereas that of CO2increases. The opposite effect is found for higher flight altitudes. For increasing and sustained emissions, the climate impact changes are dominated by the effect of short-lived species, yielding a reduction for lower flight altitudes and an increase for higher flight altitudes. For future scenarios involving a reduction or termination of emissions, radiative forcing of short-lived species decreases immediately, that of longer lived species decreases gradually, and respective temperature responses start to decay slowly. After disappearance of the shorter lived effects, only the counteracting CO2 effect remains, resulting in an increased climate effect for lower flight altitudes and a decrease for higher flight altitudes. Incorporating knowledge about the altitude sensitivity of aviation climate impact in the route planning process offers substantial mitigation potential. Scenarios and time horizons for the evaluation of future effects of mitigation instruments must be chosen carefully depending on the mitigation aim.

  20. Soot Superaggregates from Flaming Wildfires and Their Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmuller,Hans; China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires contribute significantly to global soot emissions, yet their aerosol formation mechanisms and resulting particle properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. The conventional view holds that soot is formed via the cluster-dilute aggregation mechanism in wildfires and emitted as aggregates with fractal dimension D(sub f) approximately equals 1.8 mobility diameter D(sub m) (is) less than or equal to 1 micron, and aerodynamic diameter D(sub a) (is) less than or equal to 300 nm. Here we report the ubiquitous presence of soot superaggregates (SAs) in the outflow from a major wildfire in India. SAs are porous, low-density aggregates of cluster-dilute aggregates with characteristic D(sub f) approximately equals 2.6,D(sub m) (is) greater than 1 micron, and D(sub a) is less than or equal to 300 nm that form via the cluster-dense aggregation mechanism.We present additional observations of soot SAs in wildfire smoke-laden air masses over Northern California, New Mexico, and Mexico City. We estimate that SAs contribute, per unit optical depth, up to 35% less atmospheric warming than freshly-emitted (D(sub f) approximately equals 1.8) aggregates, and approximately equals 90% more warming than the volume-equivalent spherical soot particles simulated in climate models.

  1. Soot superaggregates from flaming wildfires and their direct radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K; Beres, Nicholas D; Moosmüller, Hans; China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Dubey, Manvendra K; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I

    2014-07-01

    Wildfires contribute significantly to global soot emissions, yet their aerosol formation mechanisms and resulting particle properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. The conventional view holds that soot is formed via the cluster-dilute aggregation mechanism in wildfires and emitted as aggregates with fractal dimension Df ≈ 1.8 mobility diameter Dm ≤ 1 μm, and aerodynamic diameter Da ≤ 300 nm. Here we report the ubiquitous presence of soot superaggregates (SAs) in the outflow from a major wildfire in India. SAs are porous, low-density aggregates of cluster-dilute aggregates with characteristic Df ≈ 2.6, Dm > 1 μm, and Da ≤ 300 nm that form via the cluster-dense aggregation mechanism. We present additional observations of soot SAs in wildfire smoke-laden air masses over Northern California, New Mexico, and Mexico City. At 550 nm wavelength, [corrected] we estimate that SAs contribute, per unit optical depth, up to 35% less atmospheric warming than freshly-emitted (D(f) ≈ 1.8) [corrected] aggregates, and ≈90% more warming than the volume-equivalent spherical soot particles simulated in climate models.

  2. Soot superaggregates from flaming wildfires and their direct radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Beres, Nicholas D.; Moosmüller, Hans; China, Swarup; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires contribute significantly to global soot emissions, yet their aerosol formation mechanisms and resulting particle properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. The conventional view holds that soot is formed via the cluster-dilute aggregation mechanism in wildfires and emitted as aggregates with fractal dimension Df ≈ 1.8 mobility diameter Dm ≤ 1 μm, and aerodynamic diameter Da ≤ 300 nm. Here we report the ubiquitous presence of soot superaggregates (SAs) in the outflow from a major wildfire in India. SAs are porous, low-density aggregates of cluster-dilute aggregates with characteristic Df ≈ 2.6, Dm > 1 μm, and Da ≤ 300 nm that form via the cluster-dense aggregation mechanism. We present additional observations of soot SAs in wildfire smoke-laden air masses over Northern California, New Mexico, and Mexico City. We estimate that SAs contribute, per unit optical depth, up to 35% less atmospheric warming than freshly-emitted (Df ≈ 1.8) aggregates, and ≈90% more warming than the volume-equivalent spherical soot particles simulated in climate models. PMID:24981204

  3. Atmospheric Teleconnection over Eurasia Induced by Aerosol Radiative Forcing during Boreal Spring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Maeng-Ki; Lau, William K. M.; Chin, Mian; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Sud, Y. C.; Walker, Greg K.

    2006-01-01

    The direct effects of aerosols on global and regional climate during boreal spring are investigated based on numerical simulations with the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office finite-volume general circulation model (fvGCM) with Microphyics of Clouds with the Relaxed Arakawa Schubert Scheme (McRAS), using aerosol forcing functions derived from the Goddard Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). The authors find that anomalous atmospheric heat sources induced by absorbing aerosols (dust and black carbon) excite a planetary-scale teleconnection pattern in sea level pressure, temperature, and geopotential height spanning North Africa through Eurasia to the North Pacific. Surface cooling due to direct effects of aerosols is found in the vicinity and downstream of the aerosol source regions, that is, South Asia, East Asia, and northern and western Africa. Significant atmospheric heating is found in regions with large loading of dust (over northern Africa and the Middle East) and black carbon (over Southeast Asia). Paradoxically, the most pronounced feature in aerosol-induced surface temperature is an east west dipole anomaly with strong cooling over the Caspian Sea and warming over central and northeastern Asia, where aerosol concentrations are low. Analyses of circulation anomalies show that the dipole anomaly is a part of an atmospheric teleconnection pattern driven by atmospheric heating anomalies induced by absorbing aerosols in the source regions, but the influence was conveyed globally through barotropic energy dispersion and sustained by feedback processes associated with the regional circulations. The surface temperature signature associated with the aerosol-induced teleconnection bears striking resemblance to the spatial pattern of observed long-term trend in surface temperature over Eurasia. Additionally, the boreal spring wave train pattern is similar to that reported by Fukutomi et al. associated with the boreal summer

  4. An Energetic Perspective on Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Interactions with Atmospheric Wave Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinpour, F.; Wilcox, E. M.; Colarco, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols have the capability to alter regional-scale atmospheric circulations. A better understanding of the contribution of aerosols to multi-scale atmospheric phenomena and their transient changes is crucial for efforts to evaluate climate predictions using next generation climate models. In this study we address the following questions: (1) Is there a mechanistic relationship between variability of oceanic dust aerosol forcing and transient changes in the African easterly jet- African easterly wave (AEJ-AEW) system? (2) What are the long-term impacts of possible aerosol-wave interactions on climate dynamics of eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean and western African monsoon (WAM) region during boreal summer seasons? Our hypothesis is that aerosol radiative forcing may act as additional energy source to fuel the development of African easterly waves on the northern and southern sides of the AEJ. Evidence in support of this hypothesis is presented based on analysis of an ensemble of NASA satellite data sets, including aerosol optical thickness (AOT) observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) and the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS), as well as an atmospheric reanalysis from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and a simulation of global aerosol distributions made with the Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model with meteorology constrained by MERRA and an assimilation of MODIS AOT (MERRAero). We propose that the impacts of Saharan aerosols on the regional climate dynamics occur through contributions to the eddy energy of waves with 2—7-day and 7—11-day variability.

  5. Radiation of nitrogen molecules in a dielectric barrier discharge with small additives of chlorine and bromine

    SciTech Connect

    Avtaeva, S. V.; Avdeev, S. M.; Sosnin, E. A.

    2010-08-15

    Spectral and energy characteristics of nitrogen molecule radiation in dielectric barrier discharges in Ar-N{sub 2}, Ar-N{sub 2}-Cl{sub 2}, and Ar-N{sub 2}-Br{sub 2} mixtures were investigated experimentally. Small additives of molecular chlorine or bromine to an Ar-N{sub 2} mixture are found to increase the radiation intensity of the second positive system of nitrogen. The conditions at which the radiation spectrum predominantly consists of vibronic bands of this system are determined. Using a numerical model of plasmachemical processes, it is shown that, at electron temperatures typical of gas discharges (2-4 eV), a minor additive of molecular chlorine to an Ar-N{sub 2} mixture leads to an increase in the concentrations of electrons, positive ions, and metastable argon atoms. In turn, collisional energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to nitrogen molecules results in the excitation of the N{sub 2}(C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}) state.

  6. Dynamic simulation of viscoelastic soft tissue in acoustic radiation force creep imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Pelegri, Assimina A

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic radiation force (ARF) creep imaging applies step ARF excitation to induce creep displacement of soft tissue, and the corresponding time-dependent responses are used to estimate soft tissue viscoelasticity or its contrast. Single degree of freedom (SDF) and homogeneous analytical models have been used to characterize soft tissue viscoelasticity in ARF creep imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate the fundamental limitations of the commonly used SDF and homogeneous assumptions in ARF creep imaging. In this paper, finite element (FE) models are developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of viscoelastic soft tissue subjected to step ARF. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous models are studied with different soft tissue viscoelasticity and ARF configurations. The results indicate that the SDF model can provide good estimations for homogeneous soft tissue with high viscosity, but exhibits poor performance for low viscosity soft tissue. In addition, a smaller focal region of the ARF is desirable to reduce the estimation error with the SDF models. For heterogeneous media, the responses of the focal region are highly affected by the local heterogeneity, which results in deterioration of the effectiveness of the SDF and homogeneous simplifications.

  7. Re-Evaluation of Dust Radiative Forcing Using Remote Measurements of Dust Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Karnieli, Arnon; Remer, Lorraine A.

    1998-01-01

    Spectral remote observations of dust properties from space and from the ground creates a powerful tool for determination of dust absorption of solar radiation with an unprecedented accuracy. Absorption is a key component in understanding dust impact on climate. We use Landsat spaceborne measurements at 0.47 to 2.2 microns over Senegal with ground based sunphotometers to find that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is two to four times smaller than in models. Though dust absorbs in the blue, almost no absorption was found for wavelengths greater 0.6 microns. The new finding increases by 50% recent estimated solar radiative forcing by dust and decreases the estimated dust heating of the lower troposphere. Dust transported from Asia shows slightly higher absorption probably due to the presence of black carbon from populated regions. Large scale application of this method to satellite data from the Earth Observing System can reduce significantly the uncertainty in the dust radiative effects.

  8. Present and potential future contributions of sulfate, black and organic carbon aerosols from China to global air quality, premature mortality and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikawa, E.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.; Liu, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosols are harmful to human health and have both direct and indirect effects on climate. China is a major contributor to global emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a sulfate (SO42-) precursor, organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) aerosols. Although increasingly examined, the effect of present and potential future levels of these emissions on global premature mortality and climate change has not been well quantified. Through both direct and indirect effects, SO42- and OC exert negative radiative forcing (cooling) while BC exerts positive forcing (warming). We analyze the effect of China's emissions of SO2, SO42-, OC and BC in 2000 and for three emission scenarios in 2030 on global surface aerosol concentrations, premature mortality, and radiative forcing. Using global models of chemical transport (MOZART-2) and radiative transfer (GFDL RTM), and combining simulation results with gridded population data, mortality rates, and concentration-response relationships from the epidemiological literature, we estimate the contribution of Chinese aerosols to global annual premature mortality and to radiative forcing in 2000 and 2030. In 2000, we estimate these aerosols cause 385,320 premature deaths in China and an additional 18 240 globally. In 2030, aggressive emission controls lead to a reduction in premature deaths to 200,370 in China and 7,740 elsewhere, while under a high emissions scenario premature deaths would increase to 602,950 in China and to 29,750 elsewhere. Because the negative radiative forcing from SO42- and OC is larger than the positive forcing from BC, the Chinese aerosols lead to global net direct radiative forcing of -74 mW m-2 in 2000 and between -15 and -97 mW m-2 in 2030 based on the emissions scenario. Our analysis suggests that environmental policies that simultaneously improve public health and mitigate climate change would be highly beneficial (eg. reductions in BC emissions).

  9. Holocene carbon dynamics and radiative forcing of three different types of peatlands in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathijssen, Paul; Väliranta, Minna; Lohila, Annalea; Minkkinen, Kari; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Korrensalo, Aino

    2016-04-01

    total carbon budget of the peatlands throughout the Holocene. We combined the long-term effect of carbon accumulation and CH4 emission and modelled Holocene atmospheric radiative forcing. The radiative forcing models show that these peatlands had a warming effect on the atmosphere for the first 1 to 2 thousand years since peat accumulation started, after which they had an increasing cooling effect as a result of the long term effect of uptake and storage of CO2.

  10. Assessment of Clear Sky Radiative Forcing in the Caribbean Region Using an Aerosol Dispersion Model and Ground Radiometry During Puerto Rico Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, Santiago; Qi, Qiang; Westpthal, Douglas; Reid, Jeffery; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the surface and top of the atmosphere solar radiative forcing by long-range transport of Saharan dust. The calculations of radiative forcing are based on measurements collected in the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE) carried out during July, 2000. The purpose of the experiment was the characterization of the Saharan dust plume, which frequently reaches the Caribbean region during the summer. The experiment involved the use of three approaches to study the plume: space and ground based remote sensing, airborne and ground based in-situ measurements and aerosol dispersion modeling. The diversity of measuring platforms provides an excellent opportunity for determination of the direct effect of dust on the clear sky radiative forcing. Specifically, comparisons of heating rates, surface and TOA fluxes derived from the Navy global aerosol dispersion model NAAPS (NRL Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System) and actual measurements of fluxes from ground and space based platforms are shown. In addition, the direct effect of dust on the clear sky radiative forcing is modeled. The extent and time of evolution of the radiative properties of the plume are computed with the aerosol concentrations modeled by NAAPS. Standard aerosol parameterizations, as well as in-situ composition and size distributions measured during PRIDE, are utilized to compute the aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor. Radiative transfer computations are done with an in-house modified spectral radiative transfer code (Fu-Liou). The code includes gas absorption and cloud particles (ice and liquid phase) and it allows the input of meteorological data. The code was modified to include modules for the aerosols contribution to the calculated fluxes. This comparison study helps to narrow the current uncertainty in the dust direct radiative forcing, as recently reported in the 2001 IPCC assessment.

  11. Impact of Mixing State on Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Associated Climate Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramov, A.; Shin, H. J.; Wang, C.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols affect Earth's radiation balance directly by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and, indirectly, by changing the microphysical structure, lifetime and spatial extent of clouds. The aerosol mixing state to a large extent determines not only their optical properties (direct effect) but also their ability to serve as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei (indirect effect). Results from previous research have highlighted the importance of the aerosol mixing assumptions in radiative forcing estimates in model simulations. Here we take a step further to analyze the differences in associated climate responses, using a multimodal, size- and mixing-dependent aerosol model (MARC) incorporated within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The new model allows for a detailed representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions by including an improved treatment of aerosol mixing state and composition. First, we estimate and compare the magnitudes of direct and indirect forcing of anthropogenic aerosols under different mixing assumptions. We then carry out several century-long fully-coupled climate simulations designed to isolate the climate responses to direct and indirect forcings under the same aerosol mixing assumptions. In our analysis, we specifically focus on the following three climate response components: 1) cloud distribution and coverage; 2) precipitation amount and distribution; and 3) changes in circulation patterns.

  12. Radiation force of an arbitrary acoustic beam on an elastic sphere in a fluid

    PubMed Central

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical approach is developed to calculate the radiation force of an arbitrary acoustic beam on an elastic sphere in a liquid or gas medium. First, the incident beam is described as a sum of plane waves by employing conventional angular spectrum decomposition. Then, the classical solution for the scattering of a plane wave from an elastic sphere is applied for each plane-wave component of the incident field. The net scattered field is expressed as a superposition of the scattered fields from all angular spectrum components of the incident beam. With this formulation, the incident and scattered waves are superposed in the far field to derive expressions for components of the radiation stress tensor. These expressions are then integrated over a spherical surface to analytically describe the radiation force on an elastic sphere. Limiting cases for particular types of incident beams are presented and are shown to agree with known results. Finally, the analytical expressions are used to calculate radiation forces associated with two specific focusing transducers. PMID:23363086

  13. Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Regional Climate Impact over Middle East and North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangalth, H. K.; Stenchikov, G.; Zampieri, M.; Bantges, R.; Brindley, H.

    2012-04-01

    Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is a unique region due in part to the abundance of atmospheric aerosols and their significant contribution to the energy balance of the region. Mineral dust plays a leading role in this process. In this study we evaluate the radiative forcing of dust aerosols in the MENA region and their impact on the regional circulation and temperature distribution using a global high-resolution atmospheric model HIRAM developed at the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. We found that dust aerosols reduce downward radiative fluxes at surface up to 30 W/m2 and warm by about this amount the lower five-km-deep atmospheric layer. To better quantify radiative impact of aerosols we have employed the available aerosol satellite observations that primarily provide column integral aerosol optical depth (AOD), as a measure of aerosol burden. Climatology of AOD from different satellites (MODIS, MISR, SEVIRI and CALIPSO) over MENA and their inter comparison is made to have a comprehension of the discrepancies and agreement between them. Though the observed AODs vary among the different instruments spatially and temporally, the difference falls within a factor of less than two. We implement these observed aerosols in HIRAM. The radiative forcing corresponding to the satellite aerosol observation and the sensitivity of regional climate to this forcing are analyzed. The analysis shows that the differential heating in the vertical and the corresponding response of the vertical temperature profile have a profound impact on the tropospheric dynamics and the structure of the boundary layer.

  14. Observations Determination of Surface Radiative Forcing by CO2 and CH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, William; Feldman, Daniel; Gero, Jonathan; Torn, Margaret; Mlawer, Eli; Shippert, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Earth's background atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations have been steadily rising due to anthropogenic emissions, and these increases since 1750 have implications for the radiative balance of the Earth's atmosphere. The physics governing how atmospheric CO2 and CH4, both well-mixed greenhouse gases (WMGHGs), influence atmospheric infrared energy balance, and thus climate, are well established, but the impact of recent atmospheric WMGHG trends on the surface energy balance has not been experimentally confirmed in the field. Using infrared WMGHG absorption bands and controlling for atmospheric temperature and water vapor, spectra from the DOE ARM Program's Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometers (AERI) yield the first direct observational evidence of the time-series of WMGHG surface radiative forcing directly attributable to recent increases in WMGHGs, in this case between 2000-2010. The time-series shows a secular trend of in the radiative forcing from both CO2 and CH4. This data record provides the first comprehensive observational evidence of surface radiative forcing by WMGHGs, confirming theoretical predictions of the atmospheric greenhouse effect. Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Department of Energy.

  15. Radiative flux and forcing parameterization error in aerosol-free clear skies

    DOE PAGES

    Pincus, Robert; Mlawer, Eli J.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; ...

    2015-07-03

    This article reports on the accuracy in aerosol- and cloud-free conditions of the radiation parameterizations used in climate models. Accuracy is assessed relative to observationally validated reference models for fluxes under present-day conditions and forcing (flux changes) from quadrupled concentrations of carbon dioxide. Agreement among reference models is typically within 1 W/m2, while parameterized calculations are roughly half as accurate in the longwave and even less accurate, and more variable, in the shortwave. Absorption of shortwave radiation is underestimated by most parameterizations in the present day and has relatively large errors in forcing. Error in present-day conditions is essentially unrelatedmore » to error in forcing calculations. Recent revisions to parameterizations have reduced error in most cases. As a result, a dependence on atmospheric conditions, including integrated water vapor, means that global estimates of parameterization error relevant for the radiative forcing of climate change will require much more ambitious calculations.« less

  16. Host Model Uncertainties in Aerosol Radiative Forcing Estimates: Results from the AeroCom Prescribed Intercomparison Study

    SciTech Connect

    Stier, Phillip; Schutgens, Nick A.; Bellouin, N.; Bian, Huisheng; Boucher, Olivier; Chin, Mian; Ghan, Steven J.; Huneeus, N.; Kinne, Stefan; Lin, G.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Myhre, G.; Penner, J. E.; Randles, Cynthia; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Takemura, T.; Yu, Fangqun; Yu, Hongbin; Zhou, Cheng

    2013-03-20

    Simulated multi-model "diversity" in aerosol direct radiative forcing estimates is often perceived as mea- sure of aerosol uncertainty. However, current models used for aerosol radiative forcing calculations vary considerably in model components relevant for forcing calculations and the associated "host-model uncertainties" are generally convoluted with the actual aerosol uncertainty. In this AeroCom Prescribed intercomparison study we systematically isolate and quantify host model uncertainties on aerosol forcing experiments through prescription of identical aerosol radiative properties in nine participating models. Even with prescribed aerosol radiative properties,simulated clear-sky and all-sky aerosol radiative forcings show significant diversity. For a purely scattering case with globally constant optical depth of 0.2, the global-mean all-sky top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing is -4.51 Wm-2 and the inter-model standard deviation is 0.70 Wm-2, corresponding to a relative standard deviation of 15%. For a case with partially absorbing aerosol with an aerosol optical depth of 0.2 and single scattering albedo of 0.8, the forcing changes to 1.26 Wm-2, and the standard deviation increases to 1.21 W-2, corresponding to a significant relative standard deviation of 96%. However, the top-of-atmosphere forcing variability owing to absorption is low, with relative standard deviations of 9% clear-sky and 12% all-sky. Scaling the forcing standard deviation for a purely scattering case to match the sulfate radiative in the AeroCom Direct Effect experiment, demonstrates that host model uncertain- ties could explain about half of the overall sulfate forcing diversity of 0.13 Wm-2 in the AeroCom Direct Radiative Effect experiment. Host model errors in aerosol radiative forcing are largest in regions of uncertain host model components, such as stratocumulus cloud decks or areas with poorly constrained.

  17. Aerosol radiative forcing during African desert dust events (2005-2010) over Southeastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, A.; Olmo, F. J.; Lyamani, H.; Antón, M.; Quirantes, A.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-11-01

    The daily (24 h) averages of the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) at the surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) were calculated during desert dust events over Granada (southeastern Spain) from 2005 to 2010. A radiative transfer model (SBDART) was utilized to simulate the solar irradiance values (0.31-2.8 μm) at the surface and TOA, using as input aerosol properties retrieved from CIMEL sun photometer measurements via an inversion methodology that uses the sky radiance measurements in principal plane configuration and a spheroid particle shape approximation. This inversion methodology was checked by means of simulated data from aerosol models, and the derived aerosol properties were satisfactorily compared against well-known AERONET products. Good agreement was found over a common spectral interval (0.2-4.0 μm) between the simulated SBDART global irradiances at surface and those provided by AERONET. In addition, simulated SBDART solar global irradiances at the surface have been successfully validated against CM-11 pyranometer measurements. The comparison indicates that the radiative transfer model slightly overestimates (mean bias of 3%) the experimental solar global irradiance. These results show that the aerosol optical properties used to estimate ARF represent appropriately the aerosol properties observed during desert dust outbreak over the study area. The ARF mean monthly values computed during desert dust events ranged from -13 ± 8 W m-2 to -34 ± 15 W m-2 at surface, from -4 ± 3 W m-2 to -13 ± 7 W m-2 at TOA and from +6 ± 4 to +21 ± 12 W m-2 in the atmosphere. We have checked if the differences found in aerosol optical properties among desert dust sectors translate to differences in ARF. The mean ARF at surface (TOA) were -20 ± 12 (-5 ± 5) W m-2, -21 ± 9 (-7 ± 5) W m-2 and -18 ± 9 (-6 ± 5) W m-2 for sector A (northern Morocco; northwestern Algeria), sector B (western Sahara, northwestern Mauritania and southwestern Algeria), and sector C

  18. Realistic Solar and Infra-Red Radiative Forcing within a Venus GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Richardson, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    Recent updates to the VenusFMS General Circulation Model have included a realistic Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) based upon on the Hadley Centre two-stream flux solver and constrained by a Discrete Ordinate model (Lee and Richardson, 2011). This RTM is capable of simulating the radiative fluxes in a Venus atmosphere modeled using 4 scattering cloud modes and 9 gases. In the current configuration the RTM is fast enough to compete with the Newtonian Relaxation approach used in earlier Venus GCMs (e.g. Lee et al. (2007), while providing much more accurate heating rates within the atmosphere and allowing interactive radiative forcing in the GCM. We show that the new RTM compares well with a DISORT/TWOSTR based solver using fewer spectral bands in the calculation (47 in the GCM versus 350 bands with DISORT/TWOSTR). We show that the RTM is capable of calculating solar and Infra-Red (IR) fluxes and therefore provides a consistent radiative heating for use in Venus GCMs. Previous heating parameterizations for Venus GCMs have used Newtonian Relaxation with prescribed heating rates or have calculated only some components of the radiative forcing, for example by calculating IR cooling rates and prescribing solar heating rates. The updated Venus GCM is then used to generate a super-rotating atmospheric circulation maintained by momentum transporting eddies. The underlying mechanism driving these eddies is described and the sensitivity of the circulation to the radiative forcing is discussed. Finally, we compare the atmospheric circulation and momentum transport to prior work conducted with this GCM using a simpler Newtonian Relaxation method (Lee and Richardson, 2010).

  19. Investigation of aerosol radiative forcing and atmosphere-ocean remote sensing in Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Chun; Hamre, Børge; Stamnes, Snorre; Frette, Øyvind; Stamnes, Kunt; Stamnes, Jakob J.

    2013-04-01

    We examine aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing at Andenes, Northern Norway (69N, 16E, 379 m altitude) during a two-year period (2008-2010) using AERONET data, radiative transfer modelling (C-DISORT), and Mie-scattering computations. We show that the mean value of the aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm derived from AERONET measurements is close to that obtained from Mie-scattering computations with input of aerosol size distribution and refractive index as derived from AERONET measurements. Also, different models for the ground reflectance used as input to the radiative transfer computations are shown to have little impact on the aerosol radiative forcing both at the top and bottom of the atmosphere. The coupled atmosphere-surface system accounted for by C-DISORT is suitable for radiative transfer calculations over open ocean and coastal water areas, and we discuss how it can be used to make simultaneous retrieval of aerosol and marine parameters from ocean colour data.

  20. Radiative-convective model with an explicit hydrologic cycle. 2: Sensitivity to large changes in solar forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renno, Nilton O.; Stone, Peter H.; Emanuel, Kerry A.

    1994-01-01

    The one-dimensional radiative-convective equilibrium model with an explicit hydrologic cycle introduced in part 1 is used to study the sensitivity of the model's atmosphere to large changes in the solar forcing, when various cumulus convection parameterizations are used. When the concentration of the absorbing as in the atmosphere is temperature dependent, equilibrium is impossible for values of the solar forcing larger than a critical value. This result is referred to as a runaway greenhouse. The cumulus convection parameterization schemes currently in use in global climate models (GCMs) employ different assumptions about moistening. This causes the critical solar forcing above which a runaway greenhouse occurs to be very sensitive to the cumulus convection scheme employed. Furthermore, we show that the sensitivity of the equilibrium temperature to changes in the solar forcing depends crucially on the microphysics of cumulus convection. For fixed cloud conditions, the critical forcing for a runaway greenhouse to occur is between approximately 1.22 and 1.49 times the global mean value for the Earth, and for clear sky conditions, it is a few percent lower. The runaway greenhouse in the experiments with the mass flux schemes generally occurs more rapidly than in the experiments with the adjustment schemes. In addition, the inability of the hard convective adjustment scheme to produce an efficient vertical transport of moisture, together with the saturation requirement for convection to occur, leads to the breakdown of the radiative-convective equilibria when other processes are not available to provide the necessary vertical transport of water vapor.

  1. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Allison; de Bever, Josh; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  2. A simulation technique for 3D MR-guided acoustic radiation force imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Allison; Bever, Josh de; Farrer, Alexis; Coats, Brittany; Parker, Dennis L.; Christensen, Douglas A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: In magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapies, the in situ characterization of the focal spot location and quality is critical. MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is a technique that measures the tissue displacement caused by the radiation force exerted by the ultrasound beam. This work presents a new technique to model the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model. Methods: When a steady-state point-source force acts internally in an infinite homogeneous medium, the displacement of the material in all directions is given by the Somigliana elastostatic tensor. The radiation force field, which is caused by absorption and reflection of the incident ultrasound intensity pattern, will be spatially distributed, and the tensor formulation takes the form of a convolution of a 3D Green’s function with the force field. The dynamic accumulation of MR phase during the ultrasound pulse can be theoretically accounted for through a time-of-arrival weighting of the Green’s function. This theoretical model was evaluated experimentally in gelatin phantoms of varied stiffness (125-, 175-, and 250-bloom). The acoustic and mechanical properties of the phantoms used as parameters of the model were measured using independent techniques. Displacements at focal depths of 30- and 45-mm in the phantoms were measured by a 3D spin echo MR-ARFI segmented-EPI sequence. Results: The simulated displacements agreed with the MR-ARFI measured displacements for all bloom values and focal depths with a normalized RMS difference of 0.055 (range 0.028–0.12). The displacement magnitude decreased and the displacement pattern broadened with increased bloom value for both focal depths, as predicted by the theory. Conclusions: A new technique that models the displacements caused by the radiation force of an ultrasound beam in a homogeneous tissue model theory has been rigorously validated through comparison

  3. E-Licensing of Radiation Applications (eLORA) in Armed Forces Hospitals: 'Nuts and Bolts'.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rohit; George, R A; Alam, Aftab; Soni, B K

    2017-01-01

    As per current statutory requirement, licence for operation of all medical radiation facilities (diagnostic radiology/radiotherapy/nuclear medicine) in India has to be obtained using the e-Licensing of Radiation Applications (acronym as 'eLORA') platform which is a web-based application on Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) website. This article is envisaged as a procedural guide for all medical administrators and radiologists in service institutions processing eLORA. Specific focus has been placed on practical methods to deal with inherent procedural hurdles unique to armed forces institutions, based on first-hand experience gained in successful eLORA processing at a tertiary care hospital.

  4. Radiation-assisted PET recycling using glass fiber reinforcement and reactive additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, K.; Czvikovszky, T.; Abd-Elhamid, M.

    2004-02-01

    Post-consumer poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) material has been recycled in an upgrading procedure. Radiation treatment of modest dose (10 kGy) has been applied to activate a reactive additive (epoxy-acrylate, 2% to the PET) to bond together the matrix (recycled PET) and the reinforcement (chopped glass fiber, 10-20% to the PET). Tensile-, bending- and impact-resistance of the treated, recycled PET has been improved significantly. A new composite engineering material has been manufactured this way of reactive reinforcing recycling, surpassing the original, virgin PET especially in impact properties. The new thermoplastic is well suitable for injection molding of technical parts.

  5. Tailored long range forces on polarizable particles by collective scattering of broadband radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzmann, D.; Ritsch, H.

    2016-10-01

    Collective coherent light scattering by polarizable particles creates surprisingly strong, long range inter-particle forces originating from interference of the light scattered by different particles. While for monochromatic laser beams this interaction decays with the inverse distance, we show here that in general the effective interaction range and geometry can be controlled by the illumination bandwidth and geometry. As generic example we study the modifications inter-particle forces within a 1D chain of atoms trapped in the field of a confined optical nanofiber mode. For two particles we find short range attraction as well as optical binding at multiple distances. The range of stable distances shrinks with increasing light bandwidth and for a very large bandwidth field as e.g. blackbody radiation. We find a strongly attractive potential up to a critical distance beyond which the force gets repulsive. Including multiple scattering can even lead to the appearance of a stable configuration at a large distance. Such broadband scattering forces should be observable contributions in ultra-cold atom interferometers or atomic clocks setups. They could be studied in detail in 1D geometries with ultra-cold atoms trapped along or within an optical nanofiber. Broadband radiation force interactions might also contribute in astrophysical scenarios as illuminated cold dust clouds.

  6. A kernel method for calculating effective radiative forcing in transient climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, E. J. L.; Portmann, R. W.

    2015-12-01

    Effective radiative forcing (ERF) is calculated as the flux change at the top of the atmosphere, after allowing fast adjustments, due to a forcing agent such as greenhouse gasses or volcanic events. Accurate estimates of the ERF are necessary in order to understand the drivers of climate change. ERF cannot be observed directly and is difficult to estimate from indirect observations due to the complexity of climate responses to individual forcing factors. We present a new method of calculating ERF using a kernel populated from a time series of a model variable (e.g. global mean surface temperature) in a CO2 step change experiment. The top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative imbalance has the best noise tolerance for retrieving the ERF of the model variables we tested. We compare the kernel method with the energy balance method for estimating ERF in the CMIP5 models. The energy balance method uses the regression between the TOA imbalance and temperature change in a CO2 step change experiment to estimate the climate feedback parameter. It then assumes the feedback parameter is constant to calculate the forcing time series. This method is sensitive to the number of years chosen for the regression and the nonlinearity in the regression leads to a bias. We quantify the sensitivities and biases of these methods and compare their estimates of forcing. The kernel method is more accurate for models in which a linear fit is a poor approximation for the relationship between temperature change and TOA imbalance.

  7. Renal acoustic radiation force impulse elastography in the evaluation of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Alan, Bircan; Göya, Cemil; Aktan, Adem; Alan, Sait

    2017-02-01

    Background Renal insufficiency may occur in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) is a method for quantifying tissue elasticity, which could be used as an additional diagnostic test for renal insufficiency and provide an additional contribution to the determination of CAD. Purpose To evaluate ARFI elastography with shear wave velocity (SWV) measurements in the diagnosis of mild-to-moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD) in CAD patients, and to analyze the relationship between the severity of CAD assessed by the Gensini scoring system and kidney stiffness. Material and Methods The study included 76 CAD patients and 79 healthy volunteers. SWV was measured for each kidney in the both groups. The CAD group was divided into two subgroups based on Gensini score: mild CAD and severe CAD. SWV values of the CAD patients were compared to those of the healthy volunteers; values of subgroups were also compared with each other. Results The patient group had significantly lower renal mean SWV values than those of the healthy group (1.87 ± 0.58 vs. 2.34 ± 0.38, P < 0.01). The SWV value decreased as the eGFR level decreased. Mean SWV values for kidneys of the patients with severe CAD were lower than those of the mild CAD patients (1.64 ± 0.39 vs. 2.42 ± 0.60, P < 0.01). Conclusion renal mean SWV values of CAD patients decreased in proportion to the reduction in eGFR, and the SWV values decreased as the severity of CAD increased. ARFI elastography is a novel technique for diagnosing CKD and defining illness severity in CAD patients.

  8. Minimum radiation force target size for power measurements in focused ultrasonic fields with circular symmetry.

    PubMed

    Beissner, K

    2010-12-01

    The time-averaged ultrasonic power emitted by medical ultrasonic equipment is mostly measured using a radiation force balance, and the question of the necessary target size is of practical importance. The question is answered here by calculations based on a Rayleigh integral algorithm for fields from circular, focusing transducers. This case occurs particularly in the field of high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound. The calculation yields the necessary size of an absorbing target so that the radiation force is 98% of that exerted on an absorber of infinite lateral size, and this as a function of the transducer-to-target distance, of the transducer radius in comparison with the wavelength and of the focus (half-)angle. Several distributions of the transducer vibration amplitude are considered. The Rayleigh integral strictly applies only to planar transducers, but among the amplitude distributions there is also one that allows the simulation of the spherically curved transducer type often found in practice.

  9. Acoustic manipulation of active spherical carriers: Generation of negative radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, Majid; Mojahed, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    This paper examines theoretically a novel mechanism of generating negative (pulling) radiation force for acoustic manipulation of spherical carriers equipped with piezoelectric actuators in its inner surface. In this mechanism, the spherical particle is handled by common plane progressive monochromatic acoustic waves instead of zero-/higher- order Bessel beams or standing waves field. The handling strategy is based on applying a spatially uniform harmonic electrical voltage at the piezoelectric actuator with the same frequency of handling acoustic waves, in order to change the radiation force effect from repulsive (away from source) to attractive (toward source). This study may be considered as a start point for development of contact-free precise handling and entrapment technology of active carriers which are essential in many engineering and medicine applications.

  10. High-speed focusing of a liquid microlens using acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Daisuke; Isago, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2011-05-01

    A compact, high-speed variable-focus liquid lens using acoustic radiation force is proposed. The lens consists of an annular piezoelectric ultrasound transducer and an aluminum cell (height: 3 mm; diameter: 6 mm) filled with degassed water and silicone oil. The profile of the oil-water interface can be rapidly varied by applying acoustic radiation force from the transducer, allowing the liquid lens to be operated as a variable-focus lens. A theoretical model based on a spring-mass-dashpot model is proposed for the vibration of the lens. The fastest response time of 6.7 ms was obtained with silicone oil with a kinematic viscosity of 100 cSt.

  11. Measurement of the acoustic radiation force on a sphere embedded in a soft solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidon, Pierre; Villa, Louis; Taberlet, Nicolas; Manneville, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force exerted on a small sphere located at the focus of an ultrasonic beam is measured in a soft gel. It is proved to evolve quadratically with the local amplitude of the acoustic field. Strong oscillations of the local pressure are observed and attributed to an acoustic Fabry-Pérot effect between the ultrasonic emitter and the sphere. Taking this effect into account with a simple model, a quantitative link between the radiation force and the acoustic pressure is proposed and compared to theoretical predictions in the absence of dissipation. The discrepancy between experiment and theory suggests that dissipative effects should be taken into account for fully modeling the observations.

  12. Influence of radiation reaction force on ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration.

    PubMed

    Capdessus, R; McKenna, P

    2015-05-01

    The role of the radiation reaction force in ultraintense laser-driven ion acceleration is investigated. For laser intensities ∼10(23)W/cm(2), the action of this force on electrons is demonstrated in relativistic particle-in-cell simulations to significantly enhance the energy transfer to ions in relativistically transparent targets, but strongly reduce the ion energy in dense plasma targets. An expression is derived for the revised piston velocity, and hence ion energy, taking account of energy loses to synchrotron radiation generated by electrons accelerated in the laser field. Ion mass is demonstrated to be important by comparing results obtained with proton and deuteron plasma. The results can be verified in experiments with cryogenic hydrogen and deuterium targets.

  13. Amphibian Nitrate Stress as an Additional Terrestrial Threat from Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian C.; Honeyman, Michelle D.

    2008-08-01

    Various astrophysical events have been suggested as sources of ionizing radiation that, by way of destruction of the ozone layer and the subsequent increase in UVB and deposition of nitrate, could pose a threat to life on Earth. We have investigated whether the nitrate deposition that follows an ionizing event is sufficient to cause an additional stress beyond that of the heightened UVB previously considered. Our results show that, subsequent to the most intense ionization event likely to have occurred in the last billion years, the increase in nitrate concentration in bodies of water would not be sufficient to cause serious additional stress on amphibian populations and may actually provide some benefit by acting as fertilizer.

  14. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for evaluation of renal parenchyma elasticity in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Goya, Cemil; Kilinc, Faruk; Hamidi, Cihad; Yavuz, Alpaslan; Yildirim, Yasar; Cetincakmak, Mehmet Guli; Hattapoglu, Salih

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE. The goal of this study is to evaluate the changes in the elasticity of the renal parenchyma in diabetic nephropathy using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. The study included 281 healthy volunteers and 114 patients with diabetic nephropathy. In healthy volunteers, the kidney elasticity was assessed quantitatively by measuring the shear-wave velocity using acoustic radiation force impulse imaging based on age, body mass index, and sex. The changes in the renal elasticity were compared between the different stages of diabetic nephropathy and the healthy control group. RESULTS. In healthy volunteers, there was a statistically significant correlation between the shear-wave velocity values and age and sex. The shear-wave velocity values for the kidneys were 2.87, 3.14, 2.95, 2.68, and 2.55 m/s in patients with stage 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 diabetic nephropathy, respectively, compared with 2.35 m/s for healthy control subjects. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging was able to distinguish between the different diabetic nephropathy stages (except for stage 5) in the kidneys. The threshold value for predicting diabetic nephropathy was 2.43 m/s (sensitivity, 84.1%; specificity, 67.3%; positive predictive value, 93.1%; negative predictive value 50.8%; accuracy, 72.1%; positive likelihood ratio, 2.5; and negative likelihood ratio, 0.23). CONCLUSION. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging could be used for the evaluation of the renal elasticity changes that are due to secondary structural and functional changes in diabetic nephropathy.

  15. Experience with the application of radiation protection standards: A driving force

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, J.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Vallario, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    This paper identifies the driving forces for the development of new standards within the radiation protection areas, characterizes the process of developing such guidance, discusses problems with the application of guidance and discusses experience in applying recommendations and standards. Efforts to improve performance in health physics measurements will also be described including methods to determine the feasibility and applicability of standards. 15 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Recommendations for diagnosing effective radiative forcing from climate models for CMIP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Piers M.; Richardson, Thomas; Maycock, Amanda C.; Smith, Christopher J.; Samset, Bjorn H.; Myhre, Gunnar; Andrews, Timothy; Pincus, Robert; Schulz, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The usefulness of previous Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) exercises has been hampered by a lack of radiative forcing information. This has made it difficult to understand reasons for differences between model responses. Effective radiative forcing (ERF) is easier to diagnose than traditional radiative forcing in global climate models (GCMs) and is more representative of the eventual temperature response. Here we examine the different methods of computing ERF in two GCMs. We find that ERF computed from a fixed sea surface temperature (SST) method (ERF_fSST) has much more certainty than regression based methods. Thirty year integrations are sufficient to reduce the 5-95% confidence interval in global ERF_fSST to 0.1 W m-2. For 2xCO2 ERF, 30 year integrations are needed to ensure that the signal is larger than the local confidence interval over more than 90% of the globe. Within the ERF_fSST method there are various options for prescribing SSTs and sea ice. We explore these and find that ERF is only weakly dependent on the methodological choices. Prescribing the monthly averaged seasonally varying model's preindustrial climatology is recommended for its smaller random error and easier implementation. As part of CMIP6, the Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project (RFMIP) asks models to conduct 30 year ERF_fSST experiments using the model's own preindustrial climatology of SST and sea ice. The Aerosol and Chemistry Model Intercomparison Project (AerChemMIP) will also mainly use this approach. We propose this as a standard method for diagnosing ERF and recommend that it be used across the climate modeling community to aid future comparisons.

  17. Plasma acceleration and cooling by strong laser field due to the action of radiation reaction force.

    PubMed

    Berezhiani, V I; Mahajan, S M; Yoshida, Z

    2008-12-01

    It is shown that for super intense laser pulses propagating in a hot plasma, the action of the radiation reaction force (appropriately incorporated into the equations of motion) causes strong bulk plasma motion with the kinetic energy raised even to relativistic values; the increase in bulk energy is accompanied by a corresponding cooling (intense cooling) of the plasma. The effects are demonstrated through explicit analytical calculations.

  18. A new model for biological effects of radiation and the driven force of molecular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Takahiro; Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Hiroo; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Bando, Masako

    We proposed a new mathematical model to estimate biological effects of radiation, which we call Whack-A-Mole (WAM) model. A special feature of WAM model is that it involves the dose rate of radiation as a key ingredient. We succeeded to reproduce the experimental data of various species concerning the radiation induced mutation frequencies. From the analysis of the mega-mouse experiments, we obtained the mutation rate per base-pair per year for mice which is consistent with the so-called molecular clock in evolution genetics, 10-9 mutation/base-pair/year. Another important quantity is the equivalent dose rate for the whole spontaneous mutation, deff. The value of deff for mice is 1.1*10-3 Gy/hour which is much larger than the dose rate of natural radiation (10- (6 - 7) Gy/hour) by several orders of magnitude. We also analyzed Drosophila data and obtained essentially the same numbers. This clearly indicates that the natural radiation is not the dominant driving force of the molecular evolution, but we should look for other factors, such as miscopy of DNA in duplication process. We believe this is the first quantitative proof of the small contribution of the natural radiation in the molecular evolution.

  19. The Impact of Desert Dust Aerosol Radiative Forcing on Global and West African Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, A.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Dezfuli, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Desert dust aerosols exert a radiative forcing on the atmosphere, influencing atmospheric temperature structure and modifying radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and surface. As dust aerosols perturb radiative fluxes, the atmosphere responds by altering both energy and moisture dynamics, with potentially significant impacts on regional and global precipitation. Global Climate Model (GCM) experiments designed to characterize these processes have yielded a wide range of results, owing to both the complex nature of the system and diverse differences across models. Most model results show a general decrease in global precipitation, but regional results vary. Here, we compare simulations from GFDL's CM2Mc GCM with multiple other model experiments from the literature in order to investigate mechanisms of radiative impact and reasons for GCM differences on a global and regional scale. We focus on West Africa, a region of high interannual rainfall variability that is a source of dust and that neighbors major Sahara Desert dust sources. As such, changes in West African climate due to radiative forcing of desert dust aerosol have serious implications for desertification feedbacks. Our CM2Mc results show net cooling of the planet at TOA and surface, net warming of the atmosphere, and significant increases in precipitation over West Africa during the summer rainy season. These results differ from some previous GCM studies, prompting comparative analysis of desert dust parameters across models. This presentation will offer quantitative analysis of differences in dust aerosol parameters, aerosol optical properties, and overall particle burden across GCMs, and will characterize the contribution of model differences to the uncertainty of forcing and climate response affecting West Africa.

  20. Variability of aerosol optical depth and aerosol radiative forcing over Northwest Himalayan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheb, Shaik Darga; Kant, Yogesh; Mitra, D.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the aerosol loading in India is increasing that has significant impact on the weather/climatic conditions. The present study discusses the analysis of temporal (monthly and seasonal) variation of aerosol optical depth(AOD) by the ground based observations from sun photometer and estimate the aerosol radiative forcing and heating rate over selected station Dehradun in North western Himalayas, India during 2015. The in-situ measurements data illustrate that the maximum seasonal average AOD observed during summer season AOD at 500nm ≍ 0.59+/-0.27 with an average angstrom exponent, α ≍0.86 while minimum during winter season AOD at 500nm ≍ 0.33+/-0.10 with angstrom exponent, α ≍1.18. The MODIS and MISR derived AOD was also compared with the ground measured values and are good to be in good agreement. Analysis of air mass back trajectories using HYSPLIT model reveal that the transportation of desert dust during summer months. The Optical Properties of Aerosols and clouds (OPAC) model was used to compute the aerosol optical properties like single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom coefficient (α) and Asymmetry(g) parameter for each day of measurement and they are incorporated in a Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model, i.e Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART) to estimate the direct short-wave (0.25 to 4 μm) Aerosol Radiative forcing at the Surface (SUR), the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and Atmosphere (ATM). The maximum Aerosol Radiative Forcing (ARF) was observed during summer months at SUR ≍ -56.42 w/m2, at TOA ≍-21.62 w/m2 whereas in ATM ≍+34.79 w/m2 with corresponding to heating rate 1.24°C/day with in lower atmosphere.

  1. Seasonal variation of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing over the globe derived from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Shashi K.; Staylor, W. Frank; Darnell, Wayne L.; Wilber, Anne C.; Ritchey, Nancy A.

    1993-01-01

    Global distributions of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing parameters have been derived using parameterized radiation models with satellite meteorological data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, and directly measured top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Specifically, shortwave, longwave, and total cloud forcing at the surface, and column-averaged values of longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere were derived for the midseasonal months of April, July, and October 1985 and January 1986, covering a complete annual cycle. Seasonal variability is illustrated by comparing the results for July 1985 and January 1986, which represent the seasonal extremes. Surface shortwave cloud forcing is always negative, representing a cooling of the surface, with strongest cooling (-120 to -180 W/sq m) occurring over midlatitude storm tracks of the summer hemisphere. Surface longwave cloud forcing is always positive, representing a warming of the surface, with strongest warming (60 to 75 W/sq m) occurring over storm tracks of the winter hemisphere. Zonal averages show the entire summer hemisphere dominated by shortwave cooling, the middle and high latitudes of the winter hemisphere dominated by longwave warming, and a broad zone of transition in between. The globally averaged total cloud forcing amounts to a cooling throughout the year, ranging from a low of about -12 W/sq m for July 1985 to a high of about -25 W/sq m for January 1986. The longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere shows a strong warming over deep convective regions in the tropics and a moderate cooling outside the tropics, amounting to a weak cooling (-2 to -5 W/sq m) in the global average. Comparisons of the results with general circulation model simulations show broad qualitative agreement regarding the locations of prominent warming and cooling regions. Quantitative comparisons, on the other hand, show significant differences between the

  2. Comparison of radiative forcing impacts of the use of wood, peat, and fossil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Savolainen, I.; Hillebrand, K.; Nousiainen, I.; Sinisalo, J.

    1994-06-01

    The present study investigates the greenhouse impacts and the relevant time factors of the use of peat and wood for energy production and compares them with those of fossil fuels. Emissions and sinks of the whole energy production chain and subsequent use of the wood or peat production site are taken into account. The radiative forcing caused by energy production is used as a measure for the greenhouse impact. Economical considerations are not included. Radiative forcing is calculated for carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]), methane (CH[sub 4]) and nitrous oxide (N[sub 2]O) emissions. The real emissions of energy production are calculated by subtracting the emissions of non-use from the emissions of energy production. All the emissions are given as a function of time, i.e. their evolution over time is taken into account. At this point the estimates for some emission developments are quite crude and should be considered exemplary. The studied energy production chains can be divided roughly into three groups, if the greenhouse impact caused by continuous energy production of hundred years is considered. In this case forest residues, planted stands and unused merchantable wood cause the least radiative forcing per unit of primary energy generated. Natural gas and peat from cultivated peatland form the middle group. According to the calculations coal and conventional peat cause the greatest greenhouse impact.

  3. Optical Quantification of Harmonic Acoustic Radiation Force Excitation in a Tissue-Mimicking Phantom.

    PubMed

    Suomi, Visa; Edwards, David; Cleveland, Robin

    2015-12-01

    Optical tracking was used to characterize acoustic radiation force-induced displacements in a tissue-mimicking phantom. Amplitude-modulated 3.3-MHz ultrasound was used to induce acoustic radiation force in the phantom, which was embedded with 10-μm microspheres that were tracked using a microscope objective and high-speed camera. For sine and square amplitude modulation, the harmonic components of the fundamental and second and third harmonic frequencies were measured. The displacement amplitudes were found to increase linearly with acoustic radiation force up to 10 μm, with sine modulation having 19.5% lower peak-to-peak amplitude values than square modulation. Square modulation produced almost no second harmonic, but energy was present in the third harmonic. For the sine modulation, energy was present in the second harmonic and low energy in the third harmonic. A finite-element model was used to simulate the deformation and was both qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with the measurements.

  4. Stratospheric sulfur and its implications for radiative forcing simulated by the chemistry climate model EMAC

    PubMed Central

    Brühl, C; Lelieveld, J; Tost, H; Höpfner, M; Glatthor, N

    2015-01-01

    Multiyear simulations with the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC with a microphysical modal aerosol module at high vertical resolution demonstrate that the sulfur gases COS and SO2, the latter from low-latitude and midlatitude volcanic eruptions, predominantly control the formation of stratospheric aerosol. Marine dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and other SO2 sources, including strong anthropogenic emissions in China, are found to play a minor role except in the lowermost stratosphere. Estimates of volcanic SO2 emissions are based on satellite observations using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument for total injected mass and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on Envisat or Stratospheric Aerosol and Gases Experiment for the spatial distribution. The 10 year SO2 and COS data set of MIPAS is also used for model evaluation. The calculated radiative forcing of stratospheric background aerosol including sulfate from COS and small contributions by DMS oxidation, and organic aerosol from biomass burning, is about 0.07W/m2. For stratospheric sulfate aerosol from medium and small volcanic eruptions between 2005 and 2011 a global radiative forcing up to 0.2W/m2 is calculated, moderating climate warming, while for the major Pinatubo eruption the simulated forcing reaches 5W/m2, leading to temporary climate cooling. The Pinatubo simulation demonstrates the importance of radiative feedback on dynamics, e.g., enhanced tropical upwelling, for large volcanic eruptions. PMID:25932352

  5. Stratospheric sulfur and its implications for radiative forcing simulated by the chemistry climate model EMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brühl, C.; Lelieveld, J.; Tost, H.; Höpfner, M.; Glatthor, N.

    2015-03-01

    Multiyear simulations with the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC with a microphysical modal aerosol module at high vertical resolution demonstrate that the sulfur gases COS and SO2, the latter from low-latitude and midlatitude volcanic eruptions, predominantly control the formation of stratospheric aerosol. Marine dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and other SO2 sources, including strong anthropogenic emissions in China, are found to play a minor role except in the lowermost stratosphere. Estimates of volcanic SO2 emissions are based on satellite observations using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer and Ozone Monitoring Instrument for total injected mass and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on Envisat or Stratospheric Aerosol and Gases Experiment for the spatial distribution. The 10 year SO2 and COS data set of MIPAS is also used for model evaluation. The calculated radiative forcing of stratospheric background aerosol including sulfate from COS and small contributions by DMS oxidation, and organic aerosol from biomass burning, is about 0.07W/m2. For stratospheric sulfate aerosol from medium and small volcanic eruptions between 2005 and 2011 a global radiative forcing up to 0.2W/m2 is calculated, moderating climate warming, while for the major Pinatubo eruption the simulated forcing reaches 5W/m2, leading to temporary climate cooling. The Pinatubo simulation demonstrates the importance of radiative feedback on dynamics, e.g., enhanced tropical upwelling, for large volcanic eruptions.

  6. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  7. Magnitude and pattern of Arctic warming governed by the seasonality of radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bintanja, R.; Krikken, F.

    2016-12-01

    Observed and projected climate warming is strongest in the Arctic regions, peaking in autumn/winter. Attempts to explain this feature have focused primarily on identifying the associated climate feedbacks, particularly the ice-albedo and lapse-rate feedbacks. Here we use a state-of-the-art global climate model in idealized seasonal forcing simulations to show that Arctic warming (especially in winter) and sea ice decline are particularly sensitive to radiative forcing in spring, during which the energy is effectively ‘absorbed’ by the ocean (through sea ice melt and ocean warming, amplified by the ice-albedo feedback) and consequently released to the lower atmosphere in autumn and winter, mainly along the sea ice periphery. In contrast, winter radiative forcing causes a more uniform response centered over the Arctic Ocean. This finding suggests that intermodel differences in simulated Arctic (winter) warming can to a considerable degree be attributed to model uncertainties in Arctic radiative fluxes, which peak in summer.

  8. Magnitude and pattern of Arctic warming governed by the seasonality of radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Bintanja, R.; Krikken, F.

    2016-01-01

    Observed and projected climate warming is strongest in the Arctic regions, peaking in autumn/winter. Attempts to explain this feature have focused primarily on identifying the associated climate feedbacks, particularly the ice-albedo and lapse-rate feedbacks. Here we use a state-of-the-art global climate model in idealized seasonal forcing simulations to show that Arctic warming (especially in winter) and sea ice decline are particularly sensitive to radiative forcing in spring, during which the energy is effectively ‘absorbed’ by the ocean (through sea ice melt and ocean warming, amplified by the ice-albedo feedback) and consequently released to the lower atmosphere in autumn and winter, mainly along the sea ice periphery. In contrast, winter radiative forcing causes a more uniform response centered over the Arctic Ocean. This finding suggests that intermodel differences in simulated Arctic (winter) warming can to a considerable degree be attributed to model uncertainties in Arctic radiative fluxes, which peak in summer. PMID:27910905

  9. Binding Dynamics of Targeted Microbubbles in Response to Modulated Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiying; Hossack, John A; Klibanov, Alexander L; Mauldin, F William

    2014-01-01

    Detection of molecular targeted microbubbles plays a foundational role in ultrasound-based molecular imaging and targeted gene or drug delivery. In this paper, an empirical model describing the binding dynamics of targeted microbubbles in response to modulated acoustic radiation forces in large vessels is presented and experimentally verified using tissue-mimicking flow phantoms. Higher flow velocity and microbubble concentration led to faster detaching rates for specifically bound microbubbles (p < 0.001). Higher time-averaged acoustic radiation force intensity led to faster attaching rates and a higher saturation level of specifically bound microbubbles (p < 0.05). The level of residual microbubble signal in targeted experiments after cessation of radiation forces was the only response parameter that was reliably different between targeted and control experiments (p < 0.05). A related parameter, the ratio of residual-to-saturated microbubble signal (Rresid), is proposed as a measurement that is independent of absolute acoustic signal magnitude and therefore able to reliably detect targeted adhesion independently of control measurements (p < 0.01). These findings suggest the possibility of enhanced detection of specifically bound microbubbles in real-time, using relatively short imaging protocols (approximately 3 min), without waiting for free microbubble clearance. PMID:24374866

  10. Scenarios of Future Socio-Economics, Energy, Land Use, and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Jiyong; Moss, Richard H.; Edmonds, James A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Patel, Pralit L.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2013-04-13

    This chapter explores uncertainty in future scenarios of energy, land use, emissions and radiative forcing that span the range in the literature for radiative forcing, but also consider uncertainty in two other dimensions, challenges to mitigation and challenges to adaptation. We develop a set of six scenarios that we explore in detail including the underlying the context in which they are set, assumptions that drive the scenarios, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), used to produce quantified implications for those assumptions, and results for the global energy and land-use systems as well as emissions, concentrations and radiative forcing. We also describe the history of scenario development and the present state of development of this branch of climate change research. We discuss the implications of alternative social, economic, demographic, and technology development possibilities, as well as potential stabilization regimes for the supply of and demand for energy, the choice of energy technologies, and prices of energy and agricultural commodities. Land use and land cover will also be discussed with the emphasis on the interaction between the demand for bioenergy and crops, crop yields, crop prices, and policy settings to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

  11. Near-linear response of mean monsoon strength to a broad range of radiative forcings

    PubMed Central

    Boos, William R.; Storelvmo, Trude

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models have been used to argue that seasonal mean monsoons will shift abruptly and discontinuously from wet to dry stable states as their radiative forcings pass a critical threshold, sometimes referred to as a “tipping point.” Further support for a strongly nonlinear response of monsoons to radiative forcings is found in the seasonal onset of the South Asian summer monsoon, which is abrupt compared with the annual cycle of insolation. Here it is shown that the seasonal mean strength of monsoons instead exhibits a nearly linear dependence on a wide range of radiative forcings. First, a previous theory that predicted a discontinuous, threshold response is shown to omit a dominant stabilizing term in the equations of motion; a corrected theory predicts a continuous and nearly linear response of seasonal mean monsoon strength to forcings. A comprehensive global climate model is then used to show that the seasonal mean South Asian monsoon exhibits a near-linear dependence on a wide range of isolated greenhouse gas, aerosol, and surface albedo forcings. This model reproduces the observed abrupt seasonal onset of the South Asian monsoon but produces a near-linear response of the mean monsoon by changing the duration of the summer circulation and the latitude of that circulation’s ascent branch. Thus, neither a physically correct theoretical model nor a comprehensive climate model support the idea that seasonal mean monsoons will undergo abrupt, nonlinear shifts in response to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations, aerosol emissions, or land surface albedo. PMID:26811462

  12. Global mountain snow and ice loss driven by dust and black carbon radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Changes in mountain snow and glaciers have been our strongest indicators of the effects of changing climate. Earlier melt of snow and losses of glacier mass have perturbed regional water cycling, regional climate, and ecosystem dynamics, and contributed strongly to sea level rise. Recent studies however have revealed that in some regions, the reduction of albedo by light absorbing impurities in snow and ice such as dust and black carbon can be distinctly more powerful than regional warming at melting snow and ice. In the Rocky Mountains, dust deposition has increased 5 to 7 fold in the last 150 years, leading to ~3 weeks earlier loss of snow cover from forced melt. In absolute terms, in some years dust radiative forcing there can shorten snow cover duration by nearly two months. Remote sensing retrievals are beginning to reveal powerful dust and black carbon radiative forcing in the Hindu Kush through Himalaya. In light of recent ice cores that show pronounced increases in loading of dust and BC during the Anthropocene, these forcings may have contributed far more to glacier retreat than previously thought. For example, we have shown that the paradoxical end of the Little Ice Age in the European Alps beginning around 1850 (when glaciers began to retreat but temperatures continued to decline and precipitation was unchanged) very likely was driven by the massive increases in deposition to snow and ice of black carbon from industrialization in surrounding nations. A more robust understanding of changes in mountain snow and ice during the Anthropocene requires that we move past simplistic treatments (e.g. temperature-index modeling) to energy balance approaches that assess changes in the individual forcings such as the most powerful component for melt - net solar radiation. Remote sensing retrievals from imaging spectrometers and multispectral sensors are giving us more powerful insights into the time-space variation of snow and ice albedo.

  13. Solar Spectral Radiative Forcing Due to Dust Aerosol During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Bergstrom, R.; Rabbette, M.; Livingston, J.; Russell, P.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE) upwelling and downwelling solar spectral irradiance was measured on board the SPAWAR Navajo and downwelling solar spectral flux was measured at a surface site using the NASA Ames Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer. These data will be used to determine the net solar radiative forcing of dust aerosol and to quantify the solar spectral radiative energy budget in the presence of elevated aerosol loading. We will assess the variability in spectral irradiance using formal principal component analysis procedures and relate the radiative variability to aerosol microphysical properties. Finally, we will characterize the sea surface reflectance to improve aerosol optical depth retrievals from the AVHRR satellite and to validate SeaWiFS ocean color products.

  14. Is functional hypertrophy and specific force coupled with the addition of myonuclei at the single muscle fiber level?

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Rizwan; Renaud, Guillaume; Morine, Kevin; Barton, Elisabeth R; Sweeney, H Lee; Larsson, Lars

    2012-03-01

    Muscle force is typically proportional to muscle size, resulting in constant force normalized to muscle fiber cross-sectional area (specific force). Mice overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) exhibit a proportional gain in muscle force and size, but not the myostatin-deficient mice. In an attempt to explore the role of the cytoplasmic volume supported by individual myonuclei [myonuclear domain (MND) size] on functional capacity of skeletal muscle, we have investigated specific force in relation to MND and the content of the molecular motor protein, myosin, at the single muscle fiber level from myostatin-knockout (Mstn(-/-)) and IGF-1-overexpressing (mIgf1(+/+)) mice. We hypothesize that the addition of extra myonuclei is a prerequisite for maintenance of specific force during muscle hypertrophy. A novel algorithm was used to measure individual MNDs in 3 dimensions along the length of single muscle fibers from the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus and the slow-twitch soleus muscle. A significant effect of the size of individual MNDs in hypertrophic muscle fibers on both specific force and myosin content was observed. This effect was muscle cell type specific and suggested there is a critical volume individual myonuclei can support efficiently. The large MNDs found in fast muscles of Mstn(-/-) mice were correlated with the decrement in specific force and myosin content in Mstn(-/-) muscles. Thus, myostatin inhibition may not be able to maintain the appropriate MND for optimal function.

  15. A Study of Direct and Cloud-Mediated Radiative Forcing of Climate Due to Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Shao-Cai

    1999-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has reported that in the southeastern US and eastern China, the general greenhouse warming due to anthropogenic gaseous emissions is dominated by the cooling effect of anthropogenic aerosols. To verify this model prediction in eastern China and southeastern US, we analyzed regional patterns of climate changes at 72 stations in eastern China during 1951- 94 (44 years), and at 52 stations in the southeastern US during 1949-94 (46 years) to detect the fingerprint of aerosol radiative forcing. It was found that the mean rates of change of annual mean daily, maximum, minimum temperatures and diurnal temperature range (DTR) in eastern China were 0.8, -0.2, 1.8, and -2.0 C/100 years respectively, while the mean rates of change of annual mean daily, maximum, minimum temperatures and DTR in the southeastern US were -0.2, -0.6, 0.2, and -0.8 C/100 years, respectively. This indicates that the high rate of increase in annual mean minimum temperature in eastern China results in a slightly warming trend of daily temperature, while the high rate of decrease in annual mean maximum temperature and low rate of increase in annual mean minimum temperature lead to the cooling trend of daily temperature in the southeastern US. We found that the warming from the longwave forcing due to both greenhouse gases and aerosols was completely counteracted by the shortwave aerosol forcing in the southeastern US in the past 46 years. A slightly overall warming trend in eastern China is evident; winters have become milder. This finding is explained by hypothesizing that increasing energy usage during the past 44 years has resulted in more coal and biomass burning, thus increasing the emission of absorbing soot and organic aerosols in eastern China. Such emissions, in addition to well-known Asia dust and greenhouse gases, may be responsible for the winter warming trend in eastern China that we have reported here. The sensitivity of aerosol

  16. Radiation-Reaction Force on a Small Charged Body to Second Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxon, Jordan; Flanagan, Eanna

    2015-04-01

    In classical electrodynamics, an accelerating charge emits radiation and experiences a corresponding radiation reaction force, or self force. We extend to greater precision (higher order in perturbation theory) a previous rigorous derivation of the electromagnetic self force in flat spacetime by Gralla, Harte, and Wald. The method introduced by Gralla, Harte, and Wald computes the self-force from the Maxwell field equations and conservation of stress-energy, and does not require regularization of a singular point charge, as has been necessary in prior computations. For our higher order compuation, it becomes necessary to adopt an adjusted definition of the mass of the body to avoid including self-energy from the electromagnetic field sourced during the history of the body. We derive the evolution equations for the mass, spin, and center of mass position of an extended body through second order using our adjusted formalism. The final equations give an acceleration dependent evolution of the spin (self-torque), as well as a mixing between the extended body effects and the acceleration dependent effects on the overall body motion.

  17. Acoustic radiation force on a heated sphere including effects of heat transfer and acoustic streaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chun P.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1988-01-01

    A previous theoretical result on the subject of the acoustic radiation force on a heated sphere (Lee and Wang, 1984) is reexamined. For a more complete understanding, effects of heat transfer and acoustic streaming are taken into consideration. Essentially, it was found that, at high sound-pressure levels in a steady situation, the force is not affected significantly by the temperature profile, consistent with the result of an experimental work (Leung and Wang, 1985). This resolves the earlier apparent contradiction between the theory and the experiment. If excessive hot air is accumulated around the sphere, which can happen in transient situations, the force can be weakened or reversed in sign. A heat transfer model due to acoustic streaming was also found.

  18. Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-07-25

    A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

  19. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging (ARFI) on an IVUS Circular Array

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vivek; Dahl, Jeremy; Bradway, David; Doherty, Joshua; Lee, Seung Yun; Smith, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Our long-term goal is the detection and characterization of vulnerable plaque in the coronary arteries of the heart using IVUS catheters. Vulnerable plaque, characterized by a thin fibrous cap and a soft, lipid-rich, necrotic core is a pre-cursor to heart attack and stroke. Early detection of such plaques may potentially alter the course of treatment of the patient in order to prevent ischemic events. We have previously described the characterization of carotid plaques using external linear arrays operating at 9 MHz. In addition, we previously modified circular array IVUS catheters by short-circuiting several neighboring elements to produce fixed beam-widths for intra-vascular hyperthermia applications. In this paper we modified Volcano Visions 8.2 French, 9 MHz catheters and Volcano Platinum 3.5 French, 20 MHz catheters by short circuiting portions of the array for ARFI applications. The catheters had an effective transmit aperture size of 2 mm and 1.5 mm respectively. The catheters were connected to a Verasonics scanner and driven with pushing pulses of 180 V p-p to acquire ARFI data from a soft gel phantom with a Young’s modulus of 2.9 kPa. The dynamic response of the tissue-mimicking material demonstrates a typical ARFI motion of 1–2 microns as the gel phantom displaces away and recovers back to its normal position. The hardware modifications applied to our IVUS catheters mimic potential beamforming modifications that could be implemented on IVUS scanners. Our results demonstrate that the generation of radiation force from IVUS catheters and the development of intra-vascular ARFI may be feasible. PMID:24554291

  20. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Measurement in Renal Transplantation: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study With Protocol Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhan; Oh, Young Taik; Joo, Dong Jin; Ma, Bo Gyoung; Lee, A-lan; Lee, Jae Geun; Song, Seung Hwan; Kim, Seung Up; Jung, Dae Chul; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Yu Seun

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) is a common cause of kidney allograft loss. Several noninvasive techniques developed to assess tissue fibrosis are widely used to examine the liver. However, relatively few studies have investigated the use of elastographic methods to assess transplanted kidneys. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical implications of the acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) technique in renal transplant patients. A total of 91 patients who underwent living donor renal transplantation between September 2010 and January 2013 were included in this prospective study. Shear wave velocity (SWV) was measured by ARFI at baseline and predetermined time points (1 week and 6 and 12 months after transplantation). Protocol biopsies were performed at 12 months. Instead of reflecting IF/TA, SWVs were found to be related to time elapsed after transplantation. Mean SWV increased continuously during the first postoperative year (P < 0.001). In addition, mixed model analysis showed no correlation existed between SWV and serum creatinine (r = -0.2426, P = 0.0771). There was also no evidence of a relationship between IF/TA and serum creatinine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, P = 0.7648). Furthermore, SWV temporal patterns were dependent on the kidney weight to body weight ratio (KW/BW). In patients with a KW/BW < 3.5 g/kg, mean SWV continuously increased for 12 months, whereas it decreased after 6 months in those with a KW/BW ≥ 3.5 g/kg.No significant correlation was observed between SWV and IF/TA or renal dysfunction. However, SWV was found to be related to the time after transplantation. Renal hemodynamics influenced by KW/BW might impact SWV values.

  1. Variation of radiative forcings and global warming potentials from regional aviation NOx emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, Agnieszka; Lee, David S.; De León, Ruben R.

    2015-03-01

    The response to hemispherical and regional aircraft NOx emissions is explored by using two climate metrics: radiative forcing (RF) and Global Warming Potential (GWP). The global chemistry transport model, MOZART-3 CTM, is applied in this study for a series of incremental aircraft NOx emission integrations to different regions. It was found that the sensitivity of chemical responses per unit emission rate from regional aircraft NOx emissions varies with size of aircraft NOx emission rate and that climate metric values decrease with increasing aircraft NOx emission rates, except for Southeast Asia. Previous work has recognized that aircraft NOx GWPs may vary regionally. However, the way in which these regional GWPs are calculated are critical. Previous studies have added a fixed amount of NOx to different regions. This approach can heavily bias the results of a regional GWP because of the well-established sensitivity of O3 production to background NOx whereby the Ozone Production Efficiency (OPE) is greater at small background NOx. Thus, even a small addition of NOx in a clean-air area can produce a large O3 response. Using this 'fixed addition' method of 0.035 Tg(N) yr-1, results in the greatest effect observed for North Atlantic and Brazil, ∼10.0 mW m-2/Tg(N) yr-1. An alternative 'proportional approach' is also taken that preserves the subtle balance of local NOx-O3-CH4 systems with the existing emission patterns of aircraft and background NOx, whereby a proportional amount of aircraft NOx, 5% (N) yr-1, is added to each region in order to determine the response. This results in the greatest effect observed for North Pacific that with its net NOx RF of 23.7 mW m-2/Tg(N) yr-1 is in contrast with the 'fixed addition' method. For determining regional NOx GWPs, it is argued that the 'proportional' approach gives more representative results. However, a constraint of both approaches is that the regional GWP determined is dependent on the relative global emission pattern

  2. Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Pekour, Mikhail; Barnard, James

    2012-10-01

    The majority of previous studies dealing with effect of coarse mode aerosols (supermicron) on the radiation budget have focused primarily on regions where total aerosol loadings are substantial. We reexamine this effect for a relatively clean area using a unique 1-month dataset collected during the recent Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES, June 2010) in the central California region near Sacramento. Here we define “clean” as aerosol optical depths less than 0.1 at 0.5 μm. We demonstrate that coarse mode particles contributed substantially (more than 50%) and frequently (up to 85% of time) to the total aerosol volume during this study. In contrast to conventional expectations that the radiative impact of coarse mode aerosols should be small for clean regions, we find that neglecting large particles may lead to significant overestimation, up to 45%, of direct aerosol radiative forcing despite very small aerosol optical depths. Our findings highlight the potential for substantial impacts of coarse mode aerosols on radiative properties over clean areas and the need for more explicit inclusion of coarse mode aerosols in climate-related observational studies.

  3. Determination of Radiative Forcing of Saharan Dust using Combined TOMS and ERBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, N. Christina; Herman, Jay R.; Weaver, Clark

    1999-01-01

    The direct radiative forcing of Saharan dust aerosols has been determined by combining aerosol information derived from Nimbus-7 TOMS with radiation measurements observed at the top of atmosphere (TOA) by NOAA-9 ERBE made during February-July 1985. Cloud parameters and precipitable water derived from the NOAA-9 HIRS2 instrument were used to aid in screening for clouds and water vapor in the analyses. Our results indicate that under "cloud-free" and "dry" conditions there is a good correlation between the ERBE TOA outgoing longwave fluxes and the TOMS aerosol index measurements over both land and ocean in areas under the influence of airborne Saharan dust. The ERBE TOA outgoing shortwave fluxes were also found to correlate well with the dust loading derived from TOMS over ocean. However, the calculated shortwave forcing of Saharan dust aerosols is very weak and noisy over land for the range of solar zenith angle viewed by the NOAA-9 ERBE in 1985. Sensitivity factors of the TOA outgoing fluxes to changes in aerosol index were estimated using a linear regression fit to the ERBE and TOMS measurements. The ratio of the shortwave-to-longwave response to changes in dust loading over the ocean is found to be roughly 2 to 3, but opposite in sign. The monthly averaged "clear-sky" TOA direct forcing of airborne Saharan dust was also calculated by multiplying these sensitivity factors by the TOMS monthly averaged "clear-sky" aerosol index. Both the observational and theoretical analyses indicate that the dust layer height, ambient moisture content as well as the presence of cloud all play an important role in determining the TOA direct radiative forcing due to mineral aerosols.

  4. On the relationship between aerosol model uncertainty and radiative forcing uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Reddington, Carly L.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in the historical radiative forcing of climate is caused by the interaction of aerosols with clouds. Historical forcing is not a directly measurable quantity, so reliable assessments depend on the development of global models of aerosols and clouds that are well constrained by observations. However, there has been no systematic assessment of how reduction in the uncertainty of global aerosol models will feed through to the uncertainty in the predicted forcing. We use a global model perturbed parameter ensemble to show that tight observational constraint of aerosol concentrations in the model has a relatively small effect on the aerosol-related uncertainty in the calculated forcing between preindustrial and present-day periods. One factor is the low sensitivity of present-day aerosol to natural emissions that determine the preindustrial aerosol state. However, the major cause of the weak constraint is that the full uncertainty space of the model generates a large number of model variants that are equally acceptable compared to present-day aerosol observations. The narrow range of aerosol concentrations in the observationally constrained model gives the impression of low aerosol model uncertainty. However, these multiple “equifinal” models predict a wide range of forcings. To make progress, we need to develop a much deeper understanding of model uncertainty and ways to use observations to constrain it. Equifinality in the aerosol model means that tuning of a small number of model processes to achieve model−observation agreement could give a misleading impression of model robustness. PMID:26848136

  5. Acoustic radiation force on a sphere in a progressive and standing zero-order quasi-Bessel-Gauss beam.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Liu, Xiaozhou; Liu, Jiehui; Mao, Yiwei; Marston, Philip L

    2017-04-01

    By means of series expansion theory, the incident quasi-Bessel-Gauss beam is expanded using spherical harmonic functions, and the beam coefficients of the quasi-Bessel-Gauss beam are calculated. According to the theory, the acoustic radiation force function, which is the radiation force per unit energy on a unit cross-sectional surface on a sphere made of diverse materials and immersed in an ideal fluid along the propagation axis of zero-order quasi-Bessel-Gauss progressive and standing beams, is investigated. The acoustic radiation force function is calculated as a function of the spherical radius parameter ka and the half-cone angle β with different beam widths in a progressive and standing zero-order Bessel-Gauss beam. Simulation results indicate that the acoustic radiation forces with different waist radii demonstrate remarkably different features from those found in previous studies. The results are expected to be useful in potential applications such as acoustic tweezers.

  6. Radiative forcing and climate response to projected 21st century aerosol decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.; Golaz, J.-C.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    It is widely expected that global emissions of atmospheric aerosols and their precursors will decrease strongly throughout the remainder of the 21st century, due to emission reduction policies enacted to protect human health. For instance, global emissions of aerosols and their precursors are projected to decrease by as much as 80 % by the year 2100, according to the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. The removal of aerosols will cause unintended climate consequences, including an unmasking of global warming from long-lived greenhouse gases. We use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Coupled Climate Model version 3 (GFDL CM3) to simulate future climate over the 21st century with and without the aerosol emission changes projected by each of the RCPs in order to isolate the radiative forcing and climate response resulting from the aerosol reductions. We find that the projected global radiative forcing and climate response due to aerosol decreases do not vary significantly across the four RCPs by 2100, although there is some mid-century variation, especially in cloud droplet effective radius, that closely follows the RCP emissions and energy consumption projections. Up to 1 W m-2 of radiative forcing may be unmasked globally from 2005 to 2100 due to reductions in aerosol and precursor emissions, leading to average global temperature increases up to 1 K and global precipitation rate increases up to 0.09 mm day-1. However, when using a version of CM3 with reduced present-day aerosol radiative forcing (-1.0 W m-2), the global temperature increase for RCP8.5 is about 0.5 K, with similar magnitude decreases in other climate response parameters as well. Regionally and locally, climate impacts can be much larger than the global mean, with a 2.1 K warming projected over China, Japan, and Korea due to the reduced aerosol emissions in RCP8.5, as well as nearly a 0.2 mm day-1 precipitation increase, a 7 g m-2 LWP decrease, and a 2 μm increase in

  7. The vertical distribution of ozone instantaneous radiative forcing from satellite and chemistry climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghedo, A. M.; Bowman, K. W.; Worden, H. M.; Kulawik, S. S.; Shindell, D. T.; Lamarque, J. F.; Faluvegi, G.; Parrington, M.; Jones, D. B. A.; Rast, S.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate the instantaneous radiative forcing (IRF) of tropospheric ozone predicted by four state-of-the-art global chemistry climate models (AM2-Chem, CAM-Chem, ECHAM5-MOZ, and GISS-PUCCINI) against ozone distribution observed from the NASA Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) during August 2006. The IRF is computed through the application of an observationally constrained instantaneous radiative forcing kernels (IRFK) to the difference between TES and model-predicted ozone. The IRFK represent the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation to the vertical and spatial distribution of ozone under all-sky condition. Through this technique, we find total tropospheric IRF biases from -0.4 to + 0.7 W/m2 over large regions within the tropics and midlatitudes, due to ozone differences over the region in the lower and middle troposphere, enhanced by persistent bias in the upper troposphere-lower stratospheric region. The zonal mean biases also range from -30 to +50 mW/m2 for the models. However, the ensemble mean total tropospheric IRF bias is less than 0.2 W/m2 within the entire troposphere.

  8. The significance of cloud-radiative forcing to the general circulation on climate time scales - A satellite interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Smith, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of cloud- and surface-atmosphere forcing on the net radiation balance and their potential impact on the general circulation at climate time scales. The globally averaged cloud-forcing estimates and cloud sensitivity values taken from various recent studies are summarized. It is shown that the net radiative heating over the tropics is principally due to high clouds, while the net cooling in mid- and high latitudes is dominated by low and middle clouds.

  9. The Effect of Asian Dust Aerosols on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing from MODIS and CERES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Lin, Bing; Wang, Tianhe; Yi, Yuhong; Hu, Yongxiang; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Ayers, Kirk

    2005-01-01

    The effects of dust storms on cloud properties and radiative forcing are analyzed over northwestern China from April 2001 to June 2004 using data collected by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments on the Aqua and Terra satellites. On average, ice cloud effective particle diameter, optical depth and ice water path of the cirrus clouds under dust polluted conditions are 11%, 32.8%, and 42% less, respectively, than those derived from ice clouds in dust-free atmospheric environments. The humidity differences are larger in the dusty region than in the dust-free region, and may be caused by removal of moisture by wet dust precipitation. Due to changes in cloud microphysics, the instantaneous net radiative forcing is reduced from -71.2 W/m2 for dust contaminated clouds to -182.7 W/m2 for dust-free clouds. The reduced cooling effects of dusts may lead to a net warming of 1 W/m2, which, if confirmed, would be the strongest aerosol forcing during later winter and early spring dust storm seasons over the studied region.

  10. Radiative forcing associated with particulate carbon emissions resulting from the use of mercury control technology.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guangxing; Penner, Joyce E; Clack, Herek L

    2014-09-02

    Injection of powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbents into the flue gas of coal fired power plants with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is the most mature technology to control mercury emissions for coal combustion. However, the PAC itself can penetrate ESPs to emit into the atmosphere. These emitted PACs have similar size and optical properties to submicron black carbon (BC) and thus could increase BC radiative forcing unintentionally. The present paper estimates, for the first time, the potential emission of PAC together with their climate forcing. The global average maximum potential emissions of PAC is 98.4 Gg/yr for the year 2030, arising from the assumed adoption of the maximum potential PAC injection technology, the minimum collection efficiency, and the maximum PAC injection rate. These emissions cause a global warming of 2.10 mW m(-2) at the top of atmosphere and a cooling of -2.96 mW m(-2) at the surface. This warming represents about 2% of the warming that is caused by BC from direct fossil fuel burning and 0.86% of the warming associated with CO2 emissions from coal burning in power plants. Its warming is 8 times more efficient than the emitted CO2 as measured by the 20-year-integrated radiative forcing per unit of carbon input (the 20-year Global Warming Potential).

  11. Temperature rise, sea level rise and increased radiative forcing - an application of cointegration methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmith, Torben; Thejll, Peter; Johansen, Søren

    2016-04-01

    We analyse the statistical relationship between changes in global temperature, global steric sea level and radiative forcing in order to reveal causal relationships. There are in this, however, potential pitfalls due to the trending nature of the time series. We therefore apply a statistical method called cointegration analysis, originating from the field of econometrics, which is able to correctly handle the analysis of series with trends and other long-range dependencies. Further, we find a relationship between steric sea level and temperature and find that temperature causally depends on the steric sea level, which can be understood as a consequence of the large heat capacity of the ocean. This result is obtained both when analyzing observed data and data from a CMIP5 historical model run. Finally, we find that in the data from the historical run, the steric sea level, in turn, is driven by the external forcing. Finally, we demonstrate that combining these two results can lead to a novel estimate of radiative forcing back in time based on observations.

  12. Sensitivity of precipitation extremes to radiative forcing of greenhouse gases and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lei; Wang, Zhili; Xu, Yangyang; Fu, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    Greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols are the two most important anthropogenic forcing agents in the 21st century. The expected declines of anthropogenic aerosols in the 21st century from present-day levels would cause an additional warming of the Earth's climate system, which would aggravate the climate extremes caused by GHG warming. We examine the increased rate of precipitation extremes with global mean surface warming in the 21st century caused by anthropogenic GHGs and aerosols, using an Earth system model ensemble simulation. Similar to mean precipitation, the increased rate of precipitation extremes caused by aerosol forcing is significantly larger than that caused by GHG forcing. The aerosol forcing in the coming decades can play a critical role in inducing change in precipitation extremes if a lower GHG emission pathway is adopted. Our results have implications for policy-making on climate adaptation to extreme precipitation events.

  13. Variable ultrasound trigger delay for improved magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Waspe, Adam; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) allows the quantification of microscopic displacements induced by ultrasound pulses, which are proportional to the local acoustic intensity. This study describes a new method to acquire MR-ARFI maps, which reduces the measurement noise in the quantification of displacement as well as improving its robustness in the presence of motion. Two MR-ARFI sequences were compared in this study. The first sequence ‘variable MSG’ involves switching the polarity of the motion sensitive gradient (MSG) between odd and even image frames. The second sequence named ‘static MSG’ involves a variable ultrasound trigger delay to sonicate during the first or second MSG for odd and even image frames, respectively. As previously published, the data acquired with a variable MSG required the use of reference data acquired prior to any sonication to process displacement maps. In contrary, data acquired with a static MSG were converted to displacement maps without using reference data acquired prior to the sonication. Displacement maps acquired with both sequences were compared by performing sonications for three different conditions: in a polyacrylamide phantom, in the leg muscle of a freely breathing pig and in the leg muscle of pig under apnea. The comparison of images acquired at even image frames and odd image frames indicates that the sequence with a static MSG provides a significantly better steady state (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) than the images acquired with a variable MSG. In addition no reference data prior to sonication were required to process displacement maps for data acquired with a static MSG. The absence of reference data prior to sonication provided a 41% reduction of the spatial distribution of noise (p  <  0.001 based on a Student’s t-test) and reduced the sensitivity to motion for displacements acquired with a static MSG. No significant differences were expected and

  14. Addition of Electrostatic Forces to EDEM with Applications to Triboelectrically Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos; Curry, David

    2008-01-01

    Tribocharging of particles is common in many processes including fine powder handling and mixing, printer toner transport and dust extraction. In a lunar environment with its high vacuum and lack of water, electrostatic forces are an important factor to consider when designing and operating equipment. Dust mitigation and management is critical to safe and predictable performance of people and equipment. The extreme nature of lunar conditions makes it difficult and costly to carryout experiments on earth which are necessary to better understand how particles gather and transfer charge between each other and with equipment surfaces. DEM (Discrete Element Modeling) provides an excellent virtual laboratory for studying tribocharging of particles as well as for design of devices for dust mitigation and for other purposes related to handling and processing of lunar regolith. Theoretical and experimental work has been performed pursuant to incorporating screened Coulombic electrostatic forces into EDEM Tm, a commercial DEM software package. The DEM software is used to model the trajectories of large numbers of particles for industrial particulate handling and processing applications and can be coupled with other solvers and numerical models to calculate particle interaction with surrounding media and force fields. In this paper we will present overview of the theoretical calculations and experimental data and their comparison to the results of the DEM simulations. We will also discuss current plans to revise the DEM software with advanced electrodynamic and mechanical algorithms.

  15. [CALCULATION OF RADIATION LOADS ON THE ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOM ONBOARD THE SPACE STATION IN THE CASE OF ADDITIONAL SHIELDING].

    PubMed

    Kartashov, D A; Shurshakov, V A

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the results of calculating doses from space ionizing radiation for a modeled orbital station cabin outfitted with an additional shield aimed to reduce radiation loads on cosmonaut. The shield is a layer with the mass thickness of -6 g/cm2 (mean density = 0.62 g/cm3) that covers the outer cabin wall and consists of wet tissues and towels used by cosmonauts for hygienic purposes. A tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom imitates human body. Doses were calculated for the standard orbit of the International space station (ISS) with consideration of the longitudinal and transverse phantom orientation relative to the wall with or without the additional shield. Calculation of dose distribution in the human body improves prediction of radiation loads. The additional shield reduces radiation exposure of human critical organs by -20% depending on their depth and body spatial orientation in the ISS compartment.

  16. Cumulative Radiative Forcing Implications of Deployment Strategies for Carbon Capture and Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathre, R. C.; Masanet, E.

    2011-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is increasingly discussed as a potential means of mitigating the climate disruption associated with fossil fuel use. Some technologies for capturing, transporting, and sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) are already mature, while others technologies under development may lead to more cost- and energy-efficient CCS systems. Various elements of CCS systems are currently in operation at relatively small scale, but will need to be scaled up very substantially in order to make a significant contribution to climate change mitigation. Because the rate of fossil fuel CO2 emission is continuing to increase and the emitted CO2 will remain in the atmosphere for long time periods, the speed at which CCS is deployed will strongly affect the cumulative CO2 emission and the climate impacts. To better understand these issues, in this analysis we integrate scenario forecasting of energy supply systems, life cycle emission modeling, and time-dependent calculations of cumulative radiative forcing. We develop a series of CCS deployment scenarios that describe plausible future trajectories for CCS implementation in the US electric power plant fleet. The scenarios incorporate dimensions such as speed of deployment build-out, year of initiating deployment, efficiency of capture technology, and installation in new power plants vs. retrofitting existing plants. We conduct life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions analyses of each scenario to estimate annual emission profiles of CO2, CH4, and N2O over a 90-year time horizon, from 2010 to 2100. We then model the atmospheric dynamics of the emitted GHGs including atmospheric decay and instantaneous radiative forcing patterns over time. Finally, we determine the cumulative radiative forcing of each scenario, which we use as a proxy for surface temperature change and resulting disruption to physical, ecological and social systems. The results show strong climate mitigation benefits of early, aggressive

  17. Building an open-source simulation platform of acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound-based elastography including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, point shear wave elastography and supersonic shear imaging (SSI) have been used to differentiate breast tumors among other clinical applications. The objective of this study is to extend a previously published virtual simulation platform built for ultrasound quasi-static breast elastography toward acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography. Consequently, the extended virtual breast elastography simulation platform can be used to validate image pixels with known underlying soft tissue properties (i.e. ‘ground truth’) in complex, heterogeneous media, enhancing confidence in elastographic image interpretations. The proposed virtual breast elastography system inherited four key components from the previously published virtual simulation platform: an ultrasound simulator (Field II), a mesh generator (Tetgen), a finite element solver (FEBio) and a visualization and data processing package (VTK). Using a simple message passing mechanism, functionalities have now been extended to acoustic radiation force-based elastography simulations. Examples involving three different numerical breast models with increasing complexity—one uniform model, one simple inclusion model and one virtual complex breast model derived from magnetic resonance imaging data, were used to demonstrate capabilities of this extended virtual platform. Overall, simulation results were compared with the published results. In the uniform model, the estimated shear wave speed (SWS) values were within 4% compared to the predetermined SWS values. In the simple inclusion and the complex breast models, SWS values of all hard inclusions in soft backgrounds were slightly underestimated, similar to what has been reported. The elastic contrast values and visual observation show that ARFI images have higher spatial resolution, while SSI images can provide higher inclusion-to-background contrast

  18. Source attribution of black carbon and its direct radiative forcing in China

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Hailong; Smith, Steven J.; ...

    2017-03-30

    The source attributions for mass concentration, haze formation, transport and direct radiative forcing of black carbon (BC) in various regions of China are quantified in this study using the Community Earth System Model (CESM) with a source-tagging technique. Anthropogenic emissions are from the Community Emissions Data System that is newly developed for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 6 (CMIP6). Over north China where the air quality is often poor, about 90 % of near-surface BC concentration is contributed by local emissions. Overall, 35 % of BC concentration over south China in winter can be attributed to emissions from north China, andmore » 19 % comes from sources outside China in spring. For other regions in China, BC is largely contributed from nonlocal sources. We further investigated potential factors that contribute to the poor air quality in China. During polluted days, a net inflow of BC transported from nonlocal source regions associated with anomalous winds plays an important role in increasing local BC concentrations. BC-containing particles emitted from East Asia can also be transported across the Pacific. Our model results show that emissions from inside and outside China are equally important for the BC outflow from East Asia, while emissions from China account for 8 % of BC concentration and 29 % in column burden in the western United States in spring. Radiative forcing estimates show that 65 % of the annual mean BC direct radiative forcing (2.2 W m−2) in China results from local emissions, and the remaining 35 % is contributed by emissions outside of China. Efficiency analysis shows that a reduction in BC emissions over eastern China could have a greater benefit for the regional air quality in China, especially in the winter haze season.« less

  19. The impacts of land use, radiative forcing, and biological changes on regional climate in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairaku, K.; Pielke, R. A., Sr.

    2013-12-01

    Because regional responses of surface hydrological and biogeochemical changes are particularly complex, it is necessary to develop assessment tools for regional scale adaptation to climate. We developed a dynamical downscaling method using the regional climate model (NIED-RAMS) over Japan. The NIED-RAMS model includes a plant model that considers biological processes, the General Energy and Mass Transfer Model (GEMTM) which adds spatial resolution to accurately assess critical interactions within the regional climate system for vulnerability assessments to climate change. We digitalized a potential vegetation map that formerly existed only on paper into Geographic Information System data. It quantified information on the reduction of green spaces and the expansion of urban and agricultural areas in Japan. We conducted regional climate sensitivity experiments of land use and land cover (LULC) change, radiative forcing, and biological effects by using the NIED-RAMS with horizontal grid spacing of 20 km. We investigated regional climate responses in Japan for three experimental scenarios: 1. land use and land cover is changed from current to potential vegetation; 2. radiative forcing is changed from 1 x CO2 to 2 x CO2; and 3. biological CO2 partial pressures in plants are doubled. The experiments show good accuracy in reproducing the surface air temperature and precipitation. The experiments indicate the distinct change of hydrological cycles in various aspects due to anthropogenic LULC change, radiative forcing, and biological effects. The relative impacts of those changes are discussed and compared. Acknowledgments This study was conducted as part of the research subject "Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate Change in Water Hazard Assessed Using Regional Climate Scenarios in the Tokyo Region' (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention; PI: Koji Dairaku) of Research Program on Climate Change Adaptation (RECCA), and was supported by the

  20. Building an open-source simulation platform of acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Peng, Bo; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-03-07

    Ultrasound-based elastography including strain elastography, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, point shear wave elastography and supersonic shear imaging (SSI) have been used to differentiate breast tumors among other clinical applications. The objective of this study is to extend a previously published virtual simulation platform built for ultrasound quasi-static breast elastography toward acoustic radiation force-based breast elastography. Consequently, the extended virtual breast elastography simulation platform can be used to validate image pixels with known underlying soft tissue properties (i.e. 'ground truth') in complex, heterogeneous media, enhancing confidence in elastographic image interpretations. The proposed virtual breast elastography system inherited four key components from the previously published virtual simulation platform: an ultrasound simulator (Field II), a mesh generator (Tetgen), a finite element solver (FEBio) and a visualization and data processing package (VTK). Using a simple message passing mechanism, functionalities have now been extended to acoustic radiation force-based elastography simulations. Examples involving three different numerical breast models with increasing complexity-one uniform model, one simple inclusion model and one virtual complex breast model derived from magnetic resonance imaging data, were used to demonstrate capabilities of this extended virtual platform. Overall, simulation results were compared with the published results. In the uniform model, the estimated shear wave speed (SWS) values were within 4% compared to the predetermined SWS values. In the simple inclusion and the complex breast models, SWS values of all hard inclusions in soft backgrounds were slightly underestimated, similar to what has been reported. The elastic contrast values and visual observation show that ARFI images have higher spatial resolution, while SSI images can provide higher inclusion-to-background contrast. In

  1. Vascular Endoluminal Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Andrew; Wang, Jianjun; Chen, Xucai; Grata, Michelle; Leeman, Jonathan; Winston, Brion; Kaya, Mehmet; Fu, Huili; Lavery, Linda; Fischer, David; Wagner, William R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of functional endothelium is a requirement for preventing late stent thrombosis. We propose a novel method for targeted delivery of stem cells to a site of arterial injury using ultrasound-generated acoustic radiation force. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were surface-coated electrostatically with cationic gas-filled lipid microbubbles (mb-MSC). mb-MSC was characterized microscopically and by flow cytometry. The effect of ultrasound (5 MHz) on directing mb-MSC movement toward the vessel wall under physiologic flow conditions was tested in vitro in a vessel phantom. In vivo testing of acoustic radiation force-mediated delivery of mb-MSCs to balloon-injured aorta was performed in rabbits using intravascular ultrasound (1.7 MHz) during intra-aortic infusion of mb-MSCs. Application of ultrasound led to marginalization and adhesion of mb-MSCs to the vessel phantom wall, whereas no effect was observed on mb-MSCs in the absence of ultrasound. The effect was maximal when there were 7±1 microbubbles/cell (n=6). In rabbits (n=6), adherent MSCs were observed in the ultrasound-treated aortic segment 20 min after the injection (334±137 MSCs/cm2), whereas minimal adhesion was observed in control segments not exposed to ultrasound (2±1 MSCs/cm2, p<0.05). At 24 h after mb-MSC injection and ultrasound treatment, the engrafted MSCs persisted and spread out on the luminal surface of the artery. The data demonstrate proof of principle that acoustic radiation force can target delivery of therapeutic cells to a specific endovascular treatment site. This approach may be used for endoluminal cellular paving and could provide a powerful tool for cell-based re-endothelialization of injured arterial segments. PMID:21247343

  2. Radiative Forcing of the Pinatubo Aerosol as a Function of Latitude and Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Kinne, S.; Russell, P. B.; Bauman, J. J.; Minnis, P.

    1996-01-01

    We present calculations of the radiative forcing of the Mt. Pinatubo aerosols as a function of latitude and time after the eruption and compare the results with GOES satellite data. The results from the model indicate that the net effect of the aerosol was to cool the earth-atmosphere system with the most significant radiative effect in the tropics (corresponding to the location of the tropical stratospheric reservoir) and at latitudes greater than 60 deg. The high-latitude maximum is a combined effect of the high-latitude peak in optical depth (Trepte et al 1994) and the large solar zenith angles. The comparison of the predicted and measured net flux shows relatively good agreement, with the model consistently under predicting the cooling effect of the aerosol.

  3. Observation of strong radiation pressure forces from squeezed light on a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Jeremy B.; Lecocq, Florent; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Aumentado, José; Teufel, John D.

    2016-07-01

    In quantum-enhanced sensing, non-classical states are used to improve the sensitivity of a measurement. Squeezed light, in particular, has proved a useful resource in enhanced mechanical displacement sensing, although the fundamental limit to this enhancement due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle has not been encountered experimentally. Here we use a microwave cavity optomechanical system to observe the squeezing-dependent radiation pressure noise that necessarily accompanies any quantum enhancement of the measurement precision and ultimately limits the measurement noise performance. By increasing the measurement strength so that radiation pressure forces dominate the thermal motion of the mechanical oscillator, we exploit the optomechanical interaction to implement an efficient quantum nondemolition measurement of the squeezed light. Thus, our results show how the mechanical oscillator improves the measurement of non-classical light, just as non-classical light enhances the measurement of the motion.

  4. The Action of Pressure-Radiation Forces on Pulsating Vapor Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hao, Y.; Oguz, N.; Prosperetti, A.

    2001-01-01

    The action of pressure-radiation (or Bjerknes) forces on gas bubbles is well understood. This paper studies the analogous phenomenon for vapor bubbles, about which much less is known. A possible practical application is the removal of boiling bubbles from the neighborhood of a heated surface in the case of a downward facing surface or in the absence of gravity. For this reason, the case of a bubble near a plane rigid surface is considered in detail. It is shown that, when the acoustic wave fronts are parallel to the surface, the bubble remains trapped due to secondary Bjerknes force caused by an "image bubble." When the wave fronts are perpendicular to the surface, on the other hand, the bubble can be made to slide laterally.

  5. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  6. Shortwave radiative forcing and efficiency of key aerosol types using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O. E.; Díaz, J. P.; Expósito, F. J.; Díaz, A. M.; Dubovik, O.; Derimian, Y.; Dubuisson, P.; Roger, J.-C.

    2011-12-01

    The shortwave radiative forcing (ΔF) and the radiative forcing efficiency (ΔFeff) of natural and anthropogenic aerosols have been analyzed using estimates of radiation both at the top (TOA) and at the bottom of atmosphere (BOA) modeled based on AERONET aerosol retrievals. In this study we have considered six main types of atmospheric aerosols: desert mineral dust, biomass burning, urban-industrial, continental background, oceanic and free troposphere. The ΔF averages obtained vary from -148 ± 44 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 0.55 μm, 0.85 ± 0.45) at the BOA for the mixture of desert mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols in Central Africa and -42 ± 22 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.86 ± 0.51) at the TOA for the pure mineral dust also in this region up to -6 ± 3 Wm-2 and -4 ± 2 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.03 ± 0.02) at the BOA and the TOA, respectively, for free troposphere conditions. This last result may be taken as reference on a global scale. Furthermore, we observe that the more absorbing aerosols are overall more efficient at the BOA in contrast to at the TOA, where they backscatter less solar energy into the space. The analysis of the radiative balance at the TOA shows that, together with the amount of aerosols and their absorptive capacity, it is essential to consider the surface albedo of the region on which they are. Thus, we document that in regions with high surface reflectivity (deserts and snow conditions) atmospheric aerosols lead to a warming of the Earth-atmosphere system, contributing to the greenhouse gas effect.

  7. Shortwave radiative forcing and efficiency of key aerosol types using AERONET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, O. E.; Díaz, J. P.; Expósito, F. J.; Díaz, A. M.; Dubovik, O.; Derimian, Y.; Dubuisson, P.; Roger, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The shortwave radiative forcing (ΔF) and the radiative forcing efficiency (ΔFeff) of natural and anthropogenic aerosols have been analyzed using estimates of radiation both at the Top (TOA) and at the Bottom Of Atmosphere (BOA) modeled based on AERONET aerosol retrievals. Six main types of atmospheric aerosols have been compared (desert mineral dust, biomass burning, urban-industrial, continental background, oceanic and free troposphere) in similar observational conditions (i.e., for solar zenith angles between 55° and 65°) in order to compare the nearly same solar geometry. The instantaneous ΔF averages obtained vary from -122 ± 37 Wm-2 (aerosol optical depth, AOD, at 0.55 μm, 0.85 ± 0.45) at the BOA for the mixture of desert mineral dust and biomass burning aerosols in West Africa and -42 ± 22 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.9 ± 0.5) at the TOA for the pure mineral dust also in this region up to -6 ± 3 Wm-2 and -4 ± 2 Wm-2 (AOD = 0.03 ± 0.02) at the BOA and the TOA, respectively, for free troposphere conditions. This last result may be taken as reference on a global scale. Furthermore, we observe that the more absorbing aerosols are overall more efficient at the BOA in contrast to at the TOA, where they backscatter less solar energy into the space. The analysis of the radiative balance at the TOA shows that, together with the amount of aerosols and their absorptive capacity, it is essential to consider the surface albedo of the region on which they are. Thus, we document that in regions with high surface reflectivity (deserts and snow conditions) atmospheric aerosols lead to a warming of the Earth-atmosphere system.

  8. Cloud radiative forcing induced by layered clouds and associated impact on the atmospheric heating rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Qiaoyi; Li, Jiming; Wang, Tianhe; Huang, Jianping

    2015-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of cloud fraction, cloud radiative forcing, and cloud radiative heating rate (CRH) of the single-layered cloud (SLC) and the multi-layered cloud (MLC), and their differences is presented, based on the 2B-CLDCLASS-LIDAR and 2B-FLXHR-LIDAR products on the global scale. The CRH at a given atmospheric level is defined as the cloudy minus clear-sky radiative heating rate. The statistical results show that the globally averaged cloud fraction of the MLC (24.9%), which is primarily prevalent in equatorial regions, is smaller than that of the SLC (46.6%). The globally averaged net radiative forcings (NET CRFs) induced by the SLC (MLC) at the top and bottom of the atmosphere (TOA and BOA) and in the atmosphere (ATM) are-60.8 (-40.9),-67.5 (-49.6), and 6.6 (8.7) W m-2, respectively, where the MLC contributes approximately 40.2%, 42.4%, and 57% to the NET CRF at the TOA, BOA, and in the ATM, respectively. The MLC exhibits distinct differences to the SLC in terms of CRH. The shortwave CRH of the SLC (MLC) reaches a heating peak at 9.75 (7.5) km, with a value of 0.35 (0.60) K day-1, and the differences between SLC and MLC transform from positive to negative with increasing altitude. However, the longwave CRH of the SLC (MLC) reaches a cooling peak at 2 (8) km, with a value of-0.45 (-0.42) K day-1, and the differences transform from negative to positive with increasing altitude. In general, the NET CRH differences between SLC and MLC are negative below 7.5 km. These results provide an observational basis for the assessment and improvement of the cloud parameterization schemes in global models.

  9. Modeling radiation forces acting on TOPEX/Poseidon for precision orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. Andrew; Luthcke, Scott B.

    1994-01-01

    Geodetic satellites, such as GEOSAT, SPOT, ERS-1, and TOPEX/Poseidon require accurate orbital computations to support the scientific data they collect. The TOPEX/Poseidon mission requirements dictate that the mismodeling of the nonconservative forces of solar radiation, Earth albedo and infrared reradiation, and spacecraft thermal imbalances produce in combination more than a 6-cm radial rms orbit error over a 10-day period. Therefore, a box-wing satellite form was investigated to model the satellite as the combination of flat plates arranged in the shape of a box and a connected solar array.

  10. Environmental Assessment: Construct a CDC Main Entry Addition at Grand Forks Air Force Base

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    North Dakota. Purpose and Need: The purpose of the proposed action is to construct an addition to the northeast end of the Child Development Center...families. There is a companion proposal to repair the administrative support area in the northeast end of the Child Development Center (CDC), Bldg...action is to construct an addition to the northeast end of the Child Development Center (CDC), Building 168 at 1683 J St. The addition will provide

  11. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Dalakishvili, G. T.; Rogava, A. D.; Berezhiani, V. I.

    2007-08-15

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common 'bead-on-the-wire' approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their 'falling' on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed.

  12. Acoustic radiation force in tissue-like solids due to modulated sound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontsov, Egor V.; Guzina, Bojan B.

    2012-10-01

    The focus of this study is the sustained body force (the so-called acoustic radiation force) in homogeneous tissue-like solids generated by an elevated-intensity, focused ultrasound field (Mach number=O(10-3)) in situations when the latter is modulated by a low-frequency signal. This intermediate-asymptotics problem, which bears relevance to a number of emerging biomedical applications, is characterized by a number of small (but non-vanishing) parameters including the Mach number, the ratio between the modulation and ultrasound frequency, the ratio of the shear to bulk modulus, and the dimensionless attenuation coefficient. On approximating the response of soft tissues as that of a nonlinear viscoelastic solid with heat conduction, the featured second-order problem is tackled via a scaling paradigm wherein the transverse coordinates are scaled by the width of the focal region, while the axial and temporal coordinate are each split into a "fast" and "slow" component with the twin aim of: (i) canceling the linear terms from the field equations governing the propagation of elevated-intensity ultrasound, and (ii) accounting for the effect of ultrasound modulation. In the context of the focused ultrasound analyses, the key feature of the proposed study revolves around the dual-time-scale treatment of the temporal variable, which allows one to parse out the contribution of ultrasound and its modulation in the nonlinear solution. In this way the acoustic radiation force (ARF), giving rise to the mean tissue motion, is exacted by computing the "fast" time average of the germane field equations. A comparison with the existing theory reveals a number of key features that are brought to light by the new formulation, including the contributions to the ARF of ultrasound modulation and thermal expansion, as well as the precise role of constitutive nonlinearities in generating the sustained body force in tissue-like solids by a focused ultrasound beam.

  13. Seasonal and Elevational Variations of Black Carbon and Dust in Snow and Ice in the Solu-Khumbu, Nepal and Estimated Radiative Forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspari, S.; Painter, T. H.; Gysel, M.; Skiles, M.; Schwikowski, M.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) and dust deposited on snow and glacier surfaces can reduce the surface albedo, accelerate melt, and trigger albedo feedback. Assessing BC and dust concentrations in snow and ice in the Himalaya is of interest because this region borders large BC and dust sources, and seasonal snow and glacier ice in this region are an important source of water resources. Snow and ice samples were collected from crevasse profiles and snowpits at elevations between 5400 and 6400 m asl from Mera glacier located in the Solu-Khumbu region of Nepal. The samples were measured for Fe concentrations (used as a dust proxy) via ICP-MS, total impurity content gravimetrically, and BC concentrations using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). BC and Fe concentrations are substantially higher at elevations < 6000 m due to post-depositional processes including melt and sublimation and greater loading in the lower troposphere. Because the largest areal extent of snow and ice resides at elevations < 6000 m, the higher BC and dust concentrations at these elevations can reduce the snow and glacier albedo over large areas, accelerating melt, affecting glacier mass-balance and water resources, and contributing to a positive climate forcing. Radiative transfer modeling constrained by measurements at 5400 m at Mera La indicates that BC concentrations in the winter-spring snow/ice horizons are sufficient to reduce albedo by 6-10% relative to clean snow, corresponding to localized instantaneous radiative forcings of 75-120 W m-2. The other bulk impurity concentrations, when treated separately as dust, reduce albedo by 40-42% relative to clean snow and give localized instantaneous radiative forcings of 488 to 525 W m-2. Adding the BC absorption to the other impurities results in additional radiative forcings of 3 W m-2. While these results suggest that the snow albedo and radiative forcing effect of dust is considerably greater than BC, there are several sources of uncertainty.

  14. A rapid magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging sequence for ultrasonic refocusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Engler, Steven; Waspe, Adam; Constanciel Colas, Elodie; Drake, James M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance guided acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) is being used to correct for aberrations induced by tissue heterogeneities when using high intensity focusing ultrasound (HIFU). A compromise between published MR-ARFI adaptive solutions is proposed to achieve efficient refocusing of the ultrasound beam in under 10 min. In addition, an ARFI sequence based on an EPI gradient echo sequence was used to simultaneously monitor displacement and temperature with a large SNR and low distortion. This study was conducted inside an Achieva 3T clinical MRI using a Philips Sonalleve MR-HIFU system to emit a 1 ms pulsed sonication with duty cycle of 2.3% at 300 Wac inside a polymer phantom. Virtual elements defined by a Hadamard array with sonication patterns composed of 6 phase steps were used to characterize 64 groups of 4 elements to find the optimal phase of the 256 elements of the transducer. The 384 sonication patterns were acquired in 580 s to identify the set of phases that maximize the displacement at the focal point. Three aberrators (neonatal skull, 8 year old skull and a checkered pattern) were added to each sonication pattern to evaluate the performance of this refocusing algorithm (n  =  4). These aberrators reduced the relative intensities to 95.3%, 69.6% and 25.5% for the neonatal skull, 8 year old skull, and checkered pattern virtual aberrators respectively. Using a 10 min refocusing algorithm, relative intensities of 101.6%, 91.3% and 93.3% were obtained. Better relative intensities of 103.9%, 94.3% and 101% were achieved using a 25 min refocusing algorithm. An average temperature increase of 4.2 °C per refocusing test was induced for the 10 min refocusing algorithm, resulting in a negligible thermal dose of 2 EM. A rapid refocusing of the beam can be achieved while keeping thermal effects to a minimum.

  15. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J.-H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  16. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J.-H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2012-08-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 15 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 15 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 W m-2, with a mean of -0.30 W m-2 for the 15 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.39 W m-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  17. Radiative Forcing of the Direct Aerosol Effect from AeroCom Phase II Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevag, A.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; vanNoije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, O.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 W m(sup-2), with a mean of -0.27 W m(sup-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 W m(sup-2). Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study.We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results

  18. Radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect from AeroCom Phase II simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Myhre, G.; Samset, B. H.; Schulz, M.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S.; Berntsen, T. K.; Bian, H.; Bellouin, N.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T.; Easter, R. C.; Feichter, J.; Ghan, S. J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Iversen, T.; Kinne, S.; Kirkevåg, A.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Lund, M. T.; Luo, G.; Ma, X.; van Noije, T.; Penner, J. E.; Rasch, P. J.; Ruiz, A.; Seland, Ø.; Skeie, R. B.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Tsigaridis, K.; Wang, P.; Wang, Z.; Xu, L.; Yu, H.; Yu, F.; Yoon, J. -H.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, H.; Zhou, C.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the AeroCom Phase II direct aerosol effect (DAE) experiment where 16 detailed global aerosol models have been used to simulate the changes in the aerosol distribution over the industrial era. All 16 models have estimated the radiative forcing (RF) of the anthropogenic DAE, and have taken into account anthropogenic sulphate, black carbon (BC) and organic aerosols (OA) from fossil fuel, biofuel, and biomass burning emissions. In addition several models have simulated the DAE of anthropogenic nitrate and anthropogenic influenced secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The model simulated all-sky RF of the DAE from total anthropogenic aerosols has a range from -0.58 to -0.02 Wm-2, with a mean of -0.27 Wm-2 for the 16 models. Several models did not include nitrate or SOA and modifying the estimate by accounting for this with information from the other AeroCom models reduces the range and slightly strengthens the mean. Modifying the model estimates for missing aerosol components and for the time period 1750 to 2010 results in a mean RF for the DAE of -0.35 Wm-2. Compared to AeroCom Phase I (Schulz et al., 2006) we find very similar spreads in both total DAE and aerosol component RF. However, the RF of the total DAE is stronger negative and RF from BC from fossil fuel and biofuel emissions are stronger positive in the present study than in the previous AeroCom study. We find a tendency for models having a strong (positive) BC RF to also have strong (negative) sulphate or OA RF. This relationship leads to smaller uncertainty in the total RF of the DAE compared to the RF of the sum of the individual aerosol components. The spread in results for the individual aerosol components is substantial, and can be divided into diversities in burden, mass extinction coefficient (MEC), and normalized RF with respect to AOD. We find that these three factors give similar contributions to the spread in results.

  19. Acoustic radiation force expansions in terms of partial wave phase shifts for scattering: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Philip L.; Zhang, Likun

    2016-11-01

    When evaluating radiation forces on spheres in soundfields (with or without orbital-angular momentum) the interpretation of analytical results is greatly simplified by retaining the use of s-function notation for partial-wave coefficients imported into acoustics from quantum scattering theory in the 1970s. This facilitates easy interpretation of various efficiency factors. For situations in which dissipation is negligible, each partial-wave s-function becomes characterized by a single parameter: a phase shift allowing for all possible situations. These phase shifts are associated with scattering by plane traveling waves and the incident wavefield of interest is separately parameterized. (When considering outcomes, the method of fabricating symmetric objects having a desirable set of phase shifts becomes a separate issue.) The existence of negative radiation force "islands" for beams reported in 2006 by Marston is manifested. This approach and consideration of conservation theorems illustrate the unphysical nature of various claims made by other researchers. This approach is also directly relevant to objects in standing waves. Supported by ONR.

  20. Propagation of shear waves generated by a modulated finite amplitude radiation force in a viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Giannoula, Alexia; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2009-03-01

    An effective way to generate localized narrowband low-frequency shear waves within tissue noninvasively, is by the modulated radiation force, resulting from the interference of two confocal quasi-CW ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies. By using approximate viscoelastic Green's functions, investigations of the properties of the propagated shear-field component at the fundamental modulation frequency were previously reported by our group. However, high-amplitude source excitations may be needed to increase the signal-to-noise-ratio for shear-wave detection in tissue. This paper reports a study of the generation and propagation of dynamic radiation force components at harmonics of the modulation frequency for conditions that generally correspond to diagnostic safety standards. We describe the propagation characteristics of the resulting harmonic shear waves and discuss how they depend on the parameters of nonlinearity, focusing gain, and absorption. For conditions of high viscosity (believed to be characteristic of soft tissue) and higher modulation frequencies, the approximate shear wave Green's function is inappropriate. A more exact viscoelastic Green's function is derived in k-space, and using this, it is shown that the lowpass and dispersive effects, associated with a Voigt model of tissue, are more accurately represented. Finally, it is shown how the viscoelastic properties of the propagating medium can be estimated, based on several spectral components of the shearwave spectrum.

  1. Markedly enhanced absorption and direct radiative forcing of black carbon under polluted urban environments

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Levy Zamora, Misti; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Glen, Crystal R.; Collins, Donald R.; Molina, Mario J.; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) exerts profound impacts on air quality and climate because of its high absorption cross-section over a broad range of electromagnetic spectra, but the current results on absorption enhancement of BC particles during atmospheric aging remain conflicting. Here, we quantified the aging and variation in the optical properties of BC particles under ambient conditions in Beijing, China, and Houston, United States, using a novel environmental chamber approach. BC aging exhibits two distinct stages, i.e., initial transformation from a fractal to spherical morphology with little absorption variation and subsequent growth of fully compact particles with a large absorption enhancement. The timescales to achieve complete morphology modification and an absorption amplification factor of 2.4 for BC particles are estimated to be 2.3 h and 4.6 h, respectively, in Beijing, compared with 9 h and 18 h, respectively, in Houston. Our findings indicate that BC under polluted urban environments could play an essential role in pollution development and contribute importantly to large positive radiative forcing. The variation in direct radiative forcing is dependent on the rate and timescale of BC aging, with a clear distinction between urban cities in developed and developing countries, i.e., a higher climatic impact in more polluted environments. We suggest that mediation in BC emissions achieves a cobenefit in simultaneously controlling air pollution and protecting climate, especially for developing countries. PMID:27035993

  2. Shipwreck rates reveal Caribbean tropical cyclone response to past radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Trouet, Valerie; Harley, Grant L.; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Assessing the impact of future climate change on North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity is of crucial societal importance, but the limited quantity and quality of observational records interferes with the skill of future TC projections. In particular, North Atlantic TC response to radiative forcing is poorly understood and creates the dominant source of uncertainty for twenty-first-century projections. Here, we study TC variability in the Caribbean during the Maunder Minimum (MM; 1645–1715 CE), a period defined by the most severe reduction in solar irradiance in documented history (1610–present). For this purpose, we combine a documentary time series of Spanish shipwrecks in the Caribbean (1495–1825 CE) with a tree-growth suppression chronology from the Florida Keys (1707–2009 CE). We find a 75% reduction in decadal-scale Caribbean TC activity during the MM, which suggests modulation of the influence of reduced solar irradiance by the cumulative effect of cool North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, El Niño–like conditions, and a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Our results emphasize the need to enhance our understanding of the response of these oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns to radiative forcing and climate change to improve the skill of future TC projections. PMID:26951648

  3. Markedly enhanced absorption and direct radiative forcing of black carbon under polluted urban environments.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Levy Zamora, Misti; Zeng, Limin; Shao, Min; Wu, Yu-Sheng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Glen, Crystal R; Collins, Donald R; Molina, Mario J; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-19

    Black carbon (BC) exerts profound impacts on air quality and climate because of its high absorption cross-section over a broad range of electromagnetic spectra, but the current results on absorption enhancement of BC particles during atmospheric aging remain conflicting. Here, we quantified the aging and variation in the optical properties of BC particles under ambient conditions in Beijing, China, and Houston, United States, using a novel environmental chamber approach. BC aging exhibits two distinct stages, i.e., initial transformation from a fractal to spherical morphology with little absorption variation and subsequent growth of fully compact particles with a large absorption enhancement. The timescales to achieve complete morphology modification and an absorption amplification factor of 2.4 for BC particles are estimated to be 2.3 h and 4.6 h, respectively, in Beijing, compared with 9 h and 18 h, respectively, in Houston. Our findings indicate that BC under polluted urban environments could play an essential role in pollution development and contribute importantly to large positive radiative forcing. The variation in direct radiative forcing is dependent on the rate and timescale of BC aging, with a clear distinction between urban cities in developed and developing countries, i.e., a higher climatic impact in more polluted environments. We suggest that mediation in BC emissions achieves a cobenefit in simultaneously controlling air pollution and protecting climate, especially for developing countries.

  4. Shipwreck rates reveal Caribbean tropical cyclone response to past radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Trouet, Valerie; Harley, Grant L; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta

    2016-03-22

    Assessing the impact of future climate change on North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity is of crucial societal importance, but the limited quantity and quality of observational records interferes with the skill of future TC projections. In particular, North Atlantic TC response to radiative forcing is poorly understood and creates the dominant source of uncertainty for twenty-first-century projections. Here, we study TC variability in the Caribbean during the Maunder Minimum (MM; 1645-1715 CE), a period defined by the most severe reduction in solar irradiance in documented history (1610-present). For this purpose, we combine a documentary time series of Spanish shipwrecks in the Caribbean (1495-1825 CE) with a tree-growth suppression chronology from the Florida Keys (1707-2009 CE). We find a 75% reduction in decadal-scale Caribbean TC activity during the MM, which suggests modulation of the influence of reduced solar irradiance by the cumulative effect of cool North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, El Niño-like conditions, and a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Our results emphasize the need to enhance our understanding of the response of these oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns to radiative forcing and climate change to improve the skill of future TC projections.

  5. Shipwreck rates reveal Caribbean tropical cyclone response to past radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouet, Valerie; Harley, Grant L.; Domínguez-Delmás, Marta

    2016-03-01

    Assessing the impact of future climate change on North Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC) activity is of crucial societal importance, but the limited quantity and quality of observational records interferes with the skill of future TC projections. In particular, North Atlantic TC response to radiative forcing is poorly understood and creates the dominant source of uncertainty for twenty-first-century projections. Here, we study TC variability in the Caribbean during the Maunder Minimum (MM; 1645-1715 CE), a period defined by the most severe reduction in solar irradiance in documented history (1610-present). For this purpose, we combine a documentary time series of Spanish shipwrecks in the Caribbean (1495-1825 CE) with a tree-growth suppression chronology from the Florida Keys (1707-2009 CE). We find a 75% reduction in decadal-scale Caribbean TC activity during the MM, which suggests modulation of the influence of reduced solar irradiance by the cumulative effect of cool North Atlantic sea surface temperatures, El Niño-like conditions, and a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation. Our results emphasize the need to enhance our understanding of the response of these oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns to radiative forcing and climate change to improve the skill of future TC projections.

  6. Regional Climate Response to Volcanic Radiative Forcing in Middle East and North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenchikov, G.; Dogar, M.

    2012-04-01

    We have tested the regional climate sensitivity in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to radiation perturbations caused by the large explosive equatorial volcanic eruptions of the second part of 20th century, El Chichon and Pinatubo occurred, respectively, in 1982 and 1991. The observations and reanalysis data show that the surface volcanic cooling in the MENA region is two-three times larger than the global mean response to volcanic forcing. The Red Sea surface temperature appears to be also very sensitive to the external radiative impact. E.g., the sea surface cooling, associated with the 1991 Pinatubo eruption, caused deep water mixing and coral bleaching for a few years. To better quantify these effects we use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory global High Resolution Atmospheric Model (HIRAM) to conduct simulations of both the El Chichon and Pinatubo impacts with the effectively 25-km grid spacing. We find that the circulation changes associated with the positive phase of the arctic oscillation amplified the winter temperature anomalies in 1982-1984 and 1991-1993. The dynamic response to volcanic cooling also is characterized by the southward shift of the inter-tropical convergence zone in summer and associated impact on the precipitation patterns. Thus, these results suggest that the climate regime in the MENA region is highly sensitive to external forcing. This is important for better understanding of the climate variability and change in this region.

  7. Post-fire influences of snag attrition on albedo and radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Halloran, T. L.; Acker, S. A.; Joerger, V.; Kertis, J.; Law, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    We examine albedo perturbation and associated radiative forcing after a high-severity fire in a mature forest in the Oregon Cascade Range. Correlations between post-fire albedo and seedling, sapling, and standing dead tree (snag) density were investigated across fire severity classes and seasons for years 4-15 after fire. Albedo perturbation was 14 times larger in winter compared to summer and increased with fire severity class for the first several years after fire. Summer and winter albedo perturbation increased approximately linearly over the study period. Albedo correlations were strongest with snags, and significant in all fire classes in both summer and winter. The resulting annual radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere decreased (became more negative) linearly for the first 15 years after fire. These results suggest that snags, more than recovering vegetation, can control the shortwave energy balance of the burned land surface. As such, the dynamics of snag attrition may need to be included in coupled land-atmosphere models to properly represent the climate impacts of wildfire.

  8. Microphysical and compositional influences on shortwave radiative forcing of climate by sulfate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S F; Wagener, Richard; Nemesure, S

    1995-01-01

    Anthropogenic sulfate aerosols scatter shortwave (solar) radiation incident upon the atmosphere, thereby exerting a cooling influence on climate relative to pre-industrial times. Previous estimates of this forcing place its global and annual average value at about -1 W m{sup -2}, uncertain to a factor of somewhat more than 2, comparable in magnitude to greenhouse gas forcing over the same period but opposite in sign and much more uncertain. Key sources of uncertainty are atmospheric chemistry factors (yield, residence time), and microphysical factors (scattering efficiency, upscatter fraction, and the dependence of these quantities on particle size and relative humidity, RH). This paper examines these microphysical influences to identify properties required to obtain more a accurate description of this forcing. The mass scattering efficiency exhibits a maximum at a particle diameter ({approximately}0.5 M) roughly equal to the wavelength of maximum power in the solar spectrum and roughly equal to diameter typical of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. Particle size, and hence mass scattering efficiency, increase with increasing on RH because of accretion of water by deliquescent salt aerosols. For example the scattering efficiency of aqueous (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} (dry radius 0.2 {mu}m) increases from 8 to 80 m{sup 2}/g (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) as RH increases from 39 to 97%. The sensitivity of forcing to particle dry mass and relative humidity suggest the need to explicitly represent these properties if the sulfate aerosol forcing is to be accurately described in climate models.

  9. Dust and Black Carbon Radiative Forcing Controls on Snowmelt in the Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, Sara McKenzie

    Light absorbing impurities (LAIs), like dust and black carbon (BC), initiate powerful albedo feedbacks when deposited on snow cover, yet due to a scarcity of observations radiative forcing by LAIs is often neglected, or poorly constrained, in climate and hydrological models. This has important consequences for regions like the Colorado River Basin, where dust deposition to mountain snow cover frequently occurs in the upper basin in the springtime, a relatively new phenomenon since western expansion of the US. Previous work showed that dust on snow (DOS) enhances snowmelt by 3-7 weeks, shifts timing and intensity of runoff, and reduces total water yield. Here, advanced methods are presented to measure, model, and monitor DOS in the hydrologically sensitive Colorado River Basin. A multi-year multi-site spatial variability analysis indicates the heaviest dust loading comes from point sources in the southern Colorado Plateau, but also shows that lower levels of dust loading from diffuse sources still advances melt by 3-4 weeks. A high-resolution snow property dataset, including vertically resolved measurements of snow optical grain size and dust/BC concentrations, confirms that impurity layers remain in the layer in which they are deposited and converge at the surface as snow melts: influencing snow properties, rapidly reducing snow albedo, and increasing snowmelt rates. The optical properties of deposited impurities, which are mainly dust, are determined using an inversion technique from measurements of hemispherical reflectance and particle size distributions. Using updated optical properties in the snow+aerosols radiative transfer model SNICAR improves snow albedo modeling over a more general dust characterization, reducing errors by 50% across the full range of snow reflectance. Radiative forcing by LAIs in the CRB, estimated directly from measurements and updated optical properties, is most strongly controlled by dust concentrations in the uppermost surface layer

  10. Coefficients of an analytical aerosol forcing equation determined with a Monte-Carlo radiation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Taufiq; Moosmüller, H.; Chung, Chul E.

    2015-10-01

    Simple analytical equations for global-average direct aerosol radiative forcing are useful to quickly estimate aerosol forcing changes as function of key atmosphere, surface and aerosol parameters. The surface and atmosphere parameters in these analytical equations are the globally uniform atmospheric transmittance and surface albedo, and have so far been estimated from simplified observations under untested assumptions. In the present study, we take the state-of-the-art analytical equation and write the aerosol forcing as a linear function of the single scattering albedo (SSA) and replace the average upscatter fraction with the asymmetry parameter (ASY). Then we determine the surface and atmosphere parameter values of this equation using the output from the global MACR (Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation) model, as well as testing the validity of the equation. The MACR model incorporated spatio-temporally varying observations for surface albedo, cloud optical depth, water vapor, stratosphere column ozone, etc., instead of assuming as in the analytical equation that the atmosphere and surface parameters are globally uniform, and should thus be viewed as providing realistic radiation simulations. The modified analytical equation needs globally uniform aerosol parameters that consist of AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth), SSA, and ASY. The MACR model is run here with the same globally uniform aerosol parameters. The MACR model is also run without cloud to test the cloud effect. In both cloudy and cloud-free runs, the equation fits in the model output well whether SSA or ASY varies. This means the equation is an excellent approximation for the atmospheric radiation. On the other hand, the determined parameter values are somewhat realistic for the cloud-free runs but unrealistic for the cloudy runs. The global atmospheric transmittance, one of the determined parameters, is found to be around 0.74 in case of the cloud-free conditions and around 1.03 with cloud. The surface

  11. Direct radiative forcing properties of atmospheric aerosols over semi-arid region, Anantapur in India.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, Raja Obul Reddy; Gugamsetty, Balakrishnaiah; Kotalo, Rama Gopal; Nagireddy, Siva Kumar Reddy; Tandule, Chakradhar Rao; Thotli, Lokeswara Reddy; Rajuru Ramakrishna, Reddy; Surendranair, Suresh Babu

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the aerosols optical, physical characteristics and the aerosol radiative forcing pertaining to semi-arid region, Anantapur for the period January 2013-December 2014. Collocated measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Black Carbon mass concentration (BC) are carried out by using MICROTOPS II and Aethalometer and estimated the aerosol radiative forcing over this location. The mean values of AOD at 500nm are found to be 0.47±0.09, 0.34±0.08, 0.29±0.06 and 0.30±0.07 during summer, winter, monsoon and post-monsoon respectively. The Angstrom exponent (α380-1020) value is observed maximum in March (1.25±0.19) and which indicates the predominance of fine - mode aerosols and lowest in the month of July (0.33±0.14) and may be due to the dominance of coarse-mode aerosols. The diurnal variation of BC is exhibited two height peaks during morning 07:00-08:00 (IST) and evening 19:00-21:00 (IST) hours and one minima noticed during afternoon (13:00-16:00). The highest monthly mean BC concentration is observed in the month of January (3.4±1.2μgm(-3)) and the lowest in July (1.1±0.2μgm(-3)). The estimated Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing (ADRF) in the atmosphere is found to be +36.8±1.7Wm(-2), +26.9±0.2Wm(-2), +18.0±0.6Wm(-2) and +18.5±3.1Wm(-2) during summer, winter, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. Large difference between TOA and BOA forcing is observed during summer which indicate the large absorption of radiant energy (36.80Wm(-2)) which contributes more increase in atmospheric heating by ~1K/day. The BC contribution on an average is found to be 64% and is responsible for aerosol atmospheric heating.

  12. Aerosol distributions and radiative forcing over the Asian Pacific region simulated by Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Toshihiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Higurashi, Akiko; Ohta, Sachio; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2003-12-01

    A three-dimensional aerosol transport-radiation model coupled with a general circulation model, Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS), simulates atmospheric aerosol distributions and optical properties. The simulated results are compared with aerosol sampling and optical observations from ground, aircraft, and satellite acquired by intensive observation campaigns over east Asia in spring 2001. Temporal variations of the aerosol concentrations, optical thickness, and Ångström exponent are in good agreement between the simulation and observations. The midrange values of the Ångström exponent, even at the Asian dust storm events over the outflow regions, suggest that the contribution of the anthropogenic aerosol, such as carbonaceous and sulfate, to the total optical thickness is of an order comparable to that of the Asian dust. The radiative forcing by the aerosol direct and indirect effects is also calculated. The negative direct radiative forcing is simulated to be over -10 W m-2 at the tropopause in the air mass during the large-scale dust storm, to which both anthropogenic aerosols and Asian dust contribute almost equivalently. The direct radiative forcing, however, largely depends on the cloud water content and the vertical profiles of aerosol and cloud. The simulation shows that not only sulfate and sea salt aerosols but also black carbon and soil dust aerosols, which absorb solar and thermal radiation, make strong negative radiative forcing by the direct effect at the surface, which may exceed the positive forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases over the east Asian region.

  13. Effect of Spectrally Varying Albedo of Vegetation Surfaces on Shortwave Radiation Fluxes and Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, L.; Martins, J. V.; Yu, H.

    2012-01-01

    This study develops an algorithm for representing detailed spectral features of vegetation albedo based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) observations at 7 discrete channels, referred to as the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Albedo (MEVA) algorithm. The MEVA algorithm empirically fills spectral gaps around the vegetation red edge near 0.7 micrometers and vegetation water absorption features at 1.48 and 1.92 micrometers which cannot be adequately captured by the MODIS 7 channels. We then assess the effects of applying MEVA in comparison to four other traditional approaches to calculate solar fluxes and aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) based on the MODIS discrete reflectance bands. By comparing the DRF results obtained through the MEVA method with the results obtained through the other four traditional approaches, we show that filling the spectral gap of the MODIS measurements around 0.7 micrometers based on the general spectral behavior of healthy green vegetation leads to significant improvement in the instantaneous aerosol DRF at TOA (up to 3.02Wm(exp -2) difference or 48% fraction of the aerosol DRF, .6.28Wm(exp -2), calculated for high spectral resolution surface reflectance from 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers for deciduous vegetation surface). The corrections of the spectral gaps in the vegetation spectrum in the near infrared, again missed by the MODIS reflectances, also contributes to improving TOA DRF calculations but to a much lower extent (less than 0.27Wm(exp -2), or about 4% of the instantaneous DRF). Compared to traditional approaches, MEVA also improves the accuracy of the outgoing solar flux between 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at TOA by over 60Wm(exp -2) (for aspen 3 surface) and aerosol DRF by over 10Wm(exp -2) (for dry grass). Specifically, for Amazon vegetation types, MEVA can improve the accuracy of daily averaged aerosol radiative forcing in the spectral range of 0.3 to 2.5 micrometers at equator at the

  14. Radiative Forcing associated with Particulate Carbon Emissions resulting from the Use of Mercury Control Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clack, H.; Penner, J. E.; Lin, G.

    2013-12-01

    Mercury is a persistent, toxic metal that bio-accumulates within the food web and causes neurological damage and fetal defects in humans. The U.S. was the first country to regulate the leading anthropogenic source of mercury into the atmosphere: coal combustion for electric power generation. The U.S. EPA's 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) was replaced and further tightened in 2012 by the Mercury and Air Toxics Standard (MATS), which required existing coal-fired utilities to reduce their mercury emissions by approximately 90% by 2015. Outside the U.S., the Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has passed the legally binding Minamata global mercury treaty that compels its signatory countries to prevent and reduce the emission and release of mercury. The most mature technology for controlling mercury emissions from coal combustion is the injection into the flue gas of powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbents having chemically treated surfaces designed to rapidly oxidize and adsorb mercury. However, such PAC is known to have electrical properties that make it difficult to remove from flue gas via electrostatic precipitation, by far the most common particulate control technology used in countries such as the U.S., India, and China which rely heavily on coal for power generation. As a result, PAC used to control mercury emissions can be emitted into the atmosphere, the sub-micron fraction of which may result in unintended radiative forcing similar to black carbon (BC). Here, we estimate the potential increases in secondary BC emissions, those not produced from combustion but arising instead from the use of injected PAC for mercury emission reduction. We also calculate the radiative forcing associated with these secondary BC emissions by using a global atmospheric chemical transport model coupled with a radiative transfer model.

  15. Markedly enhanced direct radiative forcing of black carbon particles under polluted urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jianfei; Hu, Min; Guo, Song; Du, Zhuofei; Zheng, Jing; Shang, Dongjie; Zamora, Misti; Zeng, Liming; Shao, Min; Wu, Yusheng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Yuan; Collins, Don; Zhang, Renyi

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles, produced from incomplete fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and have profound impacts on air quality, human health, weather, and climate. For example, in areas identified as aerosol hotspots, which include many urban centers and megacities worldwide, solar heating by BC particles has been shown to be comparable to warming due to the greenhouse gases2. Although BC represents a key short-lived climate forcer, its direct radiative forcing remains highly uncertain. In particular, the available results of absorption enhancement of BC particles during atmospheric aging are conflicting from the previous studies, leading to a large uncertainty in global radiative transfer calculation. Here, we quantified the aging and variation in the optical properties of BC particles under ambient conditions in Beijing, China and Houston, US, using a novel chamber approach. BC aging exhibits two distinct stages - initial transformation from a fractal to spherical morphology with little absorption variation and the subsequent growth of fully compact particles with a maximum absorption enhancement factor of 2.4. The variation in BC direct radiative forcing is highly dependent of the rate and timescale of aging, with an estimated increase of 0.45 (0.21 - 0.80) W m-2 from fresh to fully aged particles. Our results reveal a high climatic impact in polluted environments due to rapid aging and a clear distinction between urban cities in developed and developing countries for BC particles, highlighting a larger than recognized co-benefit in air quality improvement and climate protection by BC mediation.

  16. Aerosol radiative forcing controls: Results from an Indian table-top mining region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha, R.; Murthy, B. S.; Kumar, Manoj; Lipi, K.; Jyotsna, S.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) over intense mining area in Indian monsoon trough region, computed based on the aerosol optical properties obtained through Prede (POM-1L) sky radiometer and radiative transfer model, are analysed for the year 2011 based on 21 clear sky days spread through seasons. Due to active mining and varied minerals ARF is expected to be significantly modulated by single scattering albedo (SSA). Our studies show that radiative forcing normalized by aerosol optical depth (AOD) is highly correlated with SSA (0.96) while ARF at the surface with AOD by 0.92. Our results indicate that for a given AOD, limits or range of ARF are determined by SSA, hence endorses the need to obtain SSA accurately, preferably derived through observations concurrent with AOD. Noticeably, ARF at the top-of the atmosphere is well connected to SSA (r = 0.77) than AOD (r = 0.6). Relation between observed black carbon and SSA are investigated. A possible over estimation of SSA by the inversion algorithm, SKYRAD.pack 4.2, used in the current study is also discussed. Choice of atmospheric profiles deviating from tropical to mid altitude summer or winter does not appear to be sensitive in ARF calculation by SBDART. Based on the 21 clear sky days, a multiple linear regression equation is obtained for ARFbot as a function of AOD and SSA with a bias of ±2.7 Wm-2. This equation is verified with an independent data set of seasonal mean AOD and SSA to calculate seasonal ARF that compares well with the modeled ARF within ±4 Wm-2.

  17. Strategy to use the Terra Aerosol Information to Derive the Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing of Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Terra will derive the aerosol optical thickness and properties. The aerosol properties can be used to distinguish between natural and human-made aerosol. In the polar orbit Terra will measure aerosol only once a day, around 10:30 am. How will we use this information to study the global radiative impacts of aerosol on climate? We shall present a strategy to address this problem. It includes the following steps: - From the Terra aerosol optical thickness and size distribution model we derive the effect of aerosol on reflection of solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. In a sensitivity study we show that the effect of aerosol on solar fluxes can be derived 10 times more accurately from the MODIS data than derivation of the optical thickness itself. Applications to data over several regions will be given. - Using 1/2 million AERONET global data of aerosol spectral optical thickness we show that the aerosol optical thickness and properties during the Terra 10:30 pass are equivalent to the daily average. Due to the aerosol lifetime of several days measurements at this time of the day are enough to assess the daily impact of aerosol on radiation. - Aerosol impact on the top of the atmosphere is only part of the climate question. The INDOEX experiment showed that addressing the impact of aerosol on climate, requires also measurements of the aerosol forcing at the surface. This can be done by a combination of measurements of MODIS and AERONET data.

  18. New Satellite Measurements of Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing from MODIS, MISR, and POLDER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y.

    2000-01-01

    New set of satellites, MODIS and MISR launched on EOS-Terra and POLDER launched on ADEOS-1, and scheduled for ADEOS-II and PARASOL in orbit with EOS-AQUA, open exciting opportunities to measure aerosol and their radiative forcing of climate. Each of these instruments has a different approach to invert remote sensing data to derive the aerosol properties. MODIS is using wide spectral range 0.47-2.1 micron. MISR is using narrower spectral range (0.44 to 0.87 micron) but observing the same spot from 9 different angles along the satellite track. POLDER using similar wavelengths, uses two dimensional view with a wide angle optics and adds polarization to the inversion process. Among these instruments, we expect to measure the global distribution of aerosol, to distinguish small pollution particles from large particles from deserts and ocean spray. We shall try to measure the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, and their refractive index that indicates the effect of liquid water on the aerosol size and interaction with sunlight. The radiation field measured by these instruments in variety of wavelengths and angles, is also used to derive the effect of the aerosol on reflection of sunlight spectral fluxes to space. When combined with flux measurements at the ground, it gives a complete characterization of the effect of aerosol on solar illumination, heating in the atmosphere and reflection to space.

  19. Numerical analysis of a deep drawing process with additional force transmission for an extension of the process limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, B.-A.; Bonk, C.; Grbic, N.; Vucetic, M.

    2017-02-01

    By sheet metal forming processes the forming limits and part characteristics are defined through the process specific loads. In deep drawing processes the maximum deep draw ratios as well as the springback behaviour of the metal parts are depending on the stress distribution in the part material during the forming process. While exceeding the load limits, a failure in the material occurs, which can be avoided by additional force transmission activated in the deep drawing process before the forming limit of material is achieved. This contribution deals with numerical investigation of process effect caused by additional force transmission regarding the extension of the process limits. Here, the steel material HCT 600X+Z (1.0941) in thickness s 0 = 1.0 mm is analyzed numerically using the anisotropic model Hill48. This model is validated by the means of cup test by Swift. Both, the FEA of conventional and forming process with additional force transmission are carried out. The numerical results are compared with reference geometry of rectangle cup.

  20. Microphysical and compositional influences on shortwave radiative forcing of climate by sulfate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.; Wagener, R.; Nemesure, S.

    1995-02-01

    Anthropogenic sulfate aerosols scatter shortwave (solar) radiation iincident upon the atmosphere, thereby exerting a cooling influence on climate relative to pre-industrial times. Previous estimates of this forcing place its global and annual average value at about {minus}1 W M{sup {minus}2}, uncertain to a factor of somewhat more than 2, comparable in magnitude to greenhouse gas forcing over the same period but opposite in sign and much more uncertain. Key sources of uncertainty are atmospheric chemistry factors (yield, residence time), and microphysical factors (scattering efficiency, upscatter fraction, and the dependence of these quantities on particle size and relative humidity, RH). This paper examines these microphysical influences to indentify properties required to obtain more a accurate description of this forcing. The mass scattering efficiency exhibits a maximum at a particle diameter ({approximately}0.5 {mu}m) roughly equal to the wavelength of maximum power in the solar spectrum and roughly equal to diameter typical of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. Particle size, and hence mass scattering efficiency, increase with increasing on RH because of accretion of water by deliquescent salt aerosols.

  1. Experimental Demonstration of Synthetic Lorentz Force on Cold Atoms by Using Radiation Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Ticijana; Santic, Neven; Dubcek, Tena; Aumiler, Damir; Buljan, Hrvoje

    2015-05-01

    The quest for synthetic magnetism in quantum degenerate atomic gases is motivated by producing controllable quantum emulators, which could mimic complex quantum systems such as interacting electrons in magnetic fields. Experiments on synthetic magnetic fields for neutral atoms have enabled realization of the Hall effect, Harper and Haldane Hamiltonians, and other intriguing topological effects. Here we present the first demonstration of a synthetic Lorentz force, based on the radiation pressure and the Doppler effect, in cold atomic gases captured in a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). Synthetic Lorentz force on cold atomic cloud is measured by recording the cloud trajectory. The observed force is perpendicular to the cloud velocity, and it is zero for the atomic cloud at rest. The proposed concept is straightforward to implement in a large volume and different geometries, it is applicable for a broad range of velocities, and it can be realized for different atomic species. The experiment is based on the theoretical proposal introduced in. This work was supported by the UKF Grant No. 5/13 and Croatian MZOS.

  2. Role of radiatively forced temperature changes in enhanced semi-arid warming in the cold season over east Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.; Huang, J.; Guo, R.; Yu, H.; Lin, P.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    As climate change has occurred over east Asia since the 1950s, intense interest and debate have arisen concerning the contribution of human activities to the observed warming in past decades. In this study, we investigate regional surface temperature change during the boreal cold season using a recently developed methodology that can successfully identify and separate the dynamically induced temperature (DIT) and radiatively forced temperature (RFT) changes in raw surface air temperature (SAT) data. For regional averages, DIT and RFT contribute 44 and 56 % to the SAT over east Asia, respectively. The DIT changes dominate the SAT decadal variability and are mainly determined by internal climate variability, represented by the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO). Radiatively forced SAT changes have made a major contribution to the global-scale warming trend and the regional-scale enhanced semi-arid warming (ESAW). Such enhanced warming is also found in radiatively forced daily maximum and minimum SAT. The long-term global-mean SAT warming trend is mainly related to radiative forcing produced by global well-mixed greenhouse gases. The regional anthropogenic radiative forcing, however, caused the enhanced warming in the semi-arid region, which may be closely associated with local human activities. Finally, the relationship between the so-called "global warming hiatus" and regional enhanced warming is discussed.

  3. Polymeric Materials With Additives for Durability and Radiation Shielding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric materials are attractive for use in space structures because of their light weight and high strength In addition, polymers are made of elements with low atomic numbers (Z), primarily carbon (C), hydrogen (H), oxygen (0), and nitrogen (N) which provide the best shielding from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) (ref. 1). Galactic cosmic rays are composed primarily of nuclei (i.e., fully ionized atoms) plus a contribution of about 2% from electrons and positrons. There is a small but significant component of GCR particles with high charge (Z > 10) and high energy (E >100 GeV) (ref. 2). These so-called HZE particles comprise only 1 to 2% of the cosmic ray fluence but they interact with very high specific ionization and contribute 50% of the long- term dose to humans. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is not feasible. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Moreover, neutrons are formed in the interactions of GCR particles with materials. Neutrons can only lose energy by collisions or reactions with a nucleus since they are uncharged. This is a process that is much less probable than the Coulombic interactions of charged particles. Thus, neutrons migrate far from the site of the reaction in which they were formed. This increases the probability of neutrons reaching humans or electronic equipment. Fast neutrons (> 1 MeV) can interact with silicon chips in electronic equipment resulting in the production of recoil ions which can cause single event upsets (SEU) in sensitive components (ref. 3). Neutrons lose energy most effectively by elastic collisions with light atoms, particularly hydrogen atoms. Therefore, hydrogen-containing polymers are not only effective in interacting with GCR particles; they are also effective in reducing the energy of the neutrons formed in the interactions.

  4. Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

    2011-07-21

    This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

  5. A Delphi Study of Additive Manufacturing Applicability for United States Air Force Civil Engineer Contingency Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    This simple process is the basis for most consumer-grade desktop AM machines, commonly known as 3D printers (Pham & Gault, 1998:1270). Material...as a single purchase to decrease initial capital costs. Once the 3D printers are purchased and delivered, the selected bases can begin training...for several Questions if you would liKe to explain or elaborate on your answers. Additional information •out 3D printers and UTCs is provided as an

  6. A Comparative Kirkwood-Buff Study of Aqueous Methanol Solutions Modeled by the CHARMM Additive and Drude Polarizable Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; He, Xibing; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study on aqueous methanol solutions modeled by the CHARMM additive and Drude polarizable force fields was carried out by employing Kirkwood-Buff analysis. It was shown that both models reproduced the experimental Kirkwood-Buff integrals and excess coordination numbers adequately well over the entire concentration range. The Drude model showed significant improvement over the additive model in solution densities, partial molar volumes, excess molar volumes, concentration-dependent diffusion constants, and dielectric constants. However, the additive model performed somewhat better than the Drude model in reproducing the activity derivative, excess molar Gibbs energy and excess molar enthalpy of mixing. This is due to the additive achieving a better balance among solute-solute, solute-solvent, and solvent-solvent interactions, indicating the potential for improvements in the Drude polarizable alcohol model. PMID:23947568

  7. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; ...

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. he effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. he coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x≤1.5). he maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5 MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2 MGOe forx=1.5. he smallest domain size with a relatively short magnetic correlation length of 128 nm and largest root-mean-square phase shiftΦrmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. he optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  8. Radiative Forcing Due to Enhancements in Tropospheric Ozone and Carbonaceous Aerosols Caused by Asian Fires During Spring 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natarajan, Murali; Pierce, R. Bradley; Lenzen, Allen J.; Al-Saadi, Jassim A.; Soja, Amber J.; Charlock, Thomas P.; Rose, Fred G.; Winker, David M.; Worden, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Simulations of tropospheric ozone and carbonaceous aerosol distributions, conducted with the Real-time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS), are used to study the effects of major outbreaks of fires that occurred in three regions of Asia, namely Thailand, Kazakhstan, and Siberia, during spring 2008. RAQMS is a global scale meteorological and chemical modeling system. Results from these simulations, averaged over April 2008, indicate that tropospheric ozone column increases by more than 10 Dobson units (DU) near the Thailand region, and by lesser amounts in the other regions due to the fires. Widespread increases in the optical depths of organic and black carbon aerosols are also noted. We have used an off-line radiative transfer model to evaluate the direct radiative forcing due to the fire-induced changes in atmospheric composition. For clear sky, the monthly averaged radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is mostly negative with peak values less than -12 W/sq m occurring near the fire regions. The negative forcing represents the increased outgoing shortwave radiation caused by scattering due to carbonaceous aerosols. At high latitudes, the radiative forcing is positive due to the presence of absorbing aerosols over regions of high surface albedo. Regions of positive forcing at TOA are more pronounced under total sky conditions. The monthly averaged radiative forcing at the surface is mostly negative, and peak values of less than -30 W/sq m occur near the fire regions. Persistently large negative forcing at the surface could alter the surface energy budget and potentially weaken the hydrological cycle.

  9. Radiative forcing of climate in the western Antarctic Peninsula: Effects of cloud, surface, and aerosol properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payton, Allison Mccomiskey

    2003-12-01

    Polar regions are expected to show early and extreme responses to a rise in average global temperatures. The region west of the Antarctic Peninsula has shown a significant rise in temperature of the past half century while temperatures over the rest of the continent are decreasing. Approximately half of the warming over the western Antarctic Peninsula has been explained by changes in atmospheric circulation. This research has examined local climate feedback processes involving aerosols, clouds, and surface properties relative to sea ice cover, to explain the remainder of the warming, and addresses the most appropriate approach in examining local radiative processes. Two data sets are used: a highly resolved ground-based data set from the spring and summer season of 1999 2000 at Palmer Station, Antarctica and a 14 year satellite-derived data set. A three- dimensional radiative transfer model is shown to perform better than the plane-parallel models traditionally used for this application. Aerosol concentrations are low, as expected, and have a typical optical depth of 0.05 which has little effect on surface radiation budgets and climate feedback processes. An absorption process is found on three clear-sky days that accounts for 5 20 W·m-2 of energy absorbed by the atmosphere. The absorption process is of unknown origin. Cloud properties over the short- and long-term were found to be invariant with time and changes in temperature except in the summer season. Cloud radiative forcing was negative throughout the 14 year time period, but the majority of this effect was attributed to changes in surface properties (decreasing reflectance) rather than increasing cloud amount or thickness. The trend in cloud cover over the long-term and the effect of clouds on climate appears to be different in the region of the western Antarctic Peninsula than in the Arctic.

  10. Temporal Variability of Aerosol Properties during TCAP: Impact on Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-11-01

    Ground-based remote sensing and in situ observations of aerosol microphysical and optical properties have been collected during summertime (June-August, 2012) as part of the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP; http://campaign.arm.gov/tcap/), which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (http://www.arm.gov/). The overall goal of the TCAP field campaign is to study the evolution of optical and microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosol transported from North America to the Atlantic and their impact on the radiation energy budget. During TCAP, the ground-based ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed on Cape Cod, an arm-shaped peninsula situated on the easternmost portion of Massachusetts (along the east coast of the United States) and that is generally downwind of large metropolitan areas. The AMF site was equipped with numerous instruments for sampling aerosol, cloud and radiative properties, including a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS), and a three-wavelength nephelometer. In this study we present an analysis of diurnal and day-to-day variability of the column and near-surface aerosol properties obtained from remote sensing (MFRSR data) and ground-based in situ measurements (SMPS, APS, and nephelometer data). In particular, we show that the observed diurnal variability of the MFRSR aerosol optical depth is strong and comparable with that obtained previously from the AERONET climatology in Mexico City, which has a larger aerosol loading. Moreover, we illustrate how the variability of aerosol properties impacts the direct aerosol radiative forcing at different time scales.

  11. Dust, Elemental Carbon and Other Impurities on Central Asian Glaciers: Origin and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmale, J.; Flanner, M.; Kang, S.; Sprenger, M.; Zhang, Q.; Li, Y.; Guo, J.; Schwikowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    In Central Asia, more than 60 % of the population depends on water stored in glaciers and mountain snow. While temperature, precipitation and dynamic processes are key drivers of glacial change, deposition of light absorbing impurities such as mineral dust and black carbon can lead to accelerated melting through surface albedo reduction. Here, we discuss the origin of deposited mineral dust and black carbon and their impacts on albedo change and radiative forcing (RF). 218 snow samples were taken from 13 snow pits on 4 glaciers, Abramov (Pamir), Suek, Glacier No. 354 and Golubin (Tien Shan), representing deposition between summer 2012 and 2014. They were analyzed for elemental and organic carbon by a thermo-optical method, mineral dust by gravimetry, and iron by ICP-MS. Back trajectory ensembles were released every 6 hours with the Lagranto model for the covered period at all sites. Boundary layer "footprints" were calculated to estimate general source regions and combined with MODIS fire counts for potential fire contributions. Albedo reduction due to black carbon and mineral dust was calculated with the Snow-Ice-Aerosol-Radiative model (SNICAR), and surface spectral irradiances were derived from atmospheric radiative transfer calculations to determine the RF under clear-sky and all sky conditions using local radiation measurements. Dust contributions came from Central Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, the Sahara and partly the Taklimakan. Fire contributions were higher in 2014 and generally came from the West and North. We find that EC exerts roughly 3 times more RF than mineral dust in fresh and relatively fresh snow (~5 W/m2) and up to 6 times more in snow that experienced melting (> 10 W/m2) even though EC concentrations (average per snow pit from 90 to 700 ng/g) were up to two orders of magnitude lower than mineral dust (10 to 140 μg/g).

  12. Quantifying the climatological cloud-free direct radiative forcing of aerosol over the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindley, Helen; Osipov, Serega; Bantges, Richard; Smirnov, Alexander; Banks, Jamie; Levy, Robert; Prakash, P.-Jish; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2015-04-01

    A combination of ground-based and satellite observations are used, in conjunction with column radiative transfer modelling, to assess the climatological aerosol loading and quantify its corresponding cloud-free direct radiative forcing (DRF) over the Red Sea. While there have been campaigns designed to probe aerosol-climate interactions over much of the world, relatively little attention has been paid to this region. Because of the remoteness of the area, satellite retrievals provide a crucial tool for assessing aerosol loading over the Sea. However, agreement between aerosol properties inferred from measurements from different instruments, and even in some cases from the same measurements using different retrieval algorithms can be poor, particularly in the case of mineral dust. Ground based measurements which can be used to evaluate retrievals are thus highly desirable. Here we take advantage of ship-based sun-photometer micro-tops observations gathered from a series of cruises which took place across the Red Sea during 2011 and 2013. To our knowledge these data represent the first set of detailed aerosol measurements from the Sea. They thus provide a unique opportunity to assess the performance of satellite retrieval algorithms in this region. Initially two aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms developed for the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) instruments are evaluated via comparison with the co-located cruise observations. These show excellent agreement, with correlations typically better than 0.9 and very small root-mean-square and bias differences. Calculations of radiative fluxes and DRF along one of the cruises using the observed aerosol and meteorological conditions also show good agreement with co-located estimates from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument if the aerosol asymmetry parameter is adjusted to account for the presence of large

  13. Spatial variations in immediate greenhouse gases and aerosol emissions and resulting radiative forcing from wildfires in interior Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shengli; Liu, Heping; Dahal, Devendra; Jin, Suming; Li, Shuang; Liu, Shuguang

    2016-02-01

    Boreal fires can cool the climate; however, this conclusion came from individual fires and may not represent the whole story. We hypothesize that the climatic impact of boreal fires depends on local landscape heterogeneity such as burn severity, prefire vegetation type, and soil properties. To test this hypothesis, spatially explicit emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosols and their resulting radiative forcing are required as an important and necessary component towards a full assessment. In this study, we integrated remote sensing (Landsat and MODIS) and models (carbon consumption model, emission factors model, and radiative forcing model) to calculate the carbon consumption, GHGs and aerosol emissions, and their radiative forcing of 2001-2010 fires at 30 m resolution in the Yukon River Basin of Alaska. Total carbon consumption showed significant spatial variation, with a mean of 2,615 g C m-2 and a standard deviation of 2,589 g C m-2. The carbon consumption led to different amounts of GHGs and aerosol emissions, ranging from 593.26 Tg (CO2) to 0.16 Tg (N2O). When converted to equivalent CO2 based on global warming potential metric, the maximum 20 years equivalent CO2 was black carbon (713.77 Tg), and the lowest 20 years equivalent CO2 was organic carbon (-583.13 Tg). The resulting radiative forcing also showed significant spatial variation: CO2, CH4, and N2O can cause a 20-year mean radiative forcing of 7.41 W m-2 with a standard deviation of 2.87 W m-2. This emission forcing heterogeneity indicates that different boreal fires have different climatic impacts. When considering the spatial variation of other forcings, such as surface shortwave forcing, we may conclude that some boreal fires, especially boreal deciduous fires, can warm the climate.

  14. How Well Will MODIS Measure Top of Atmosphere Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Levin, Zev; Ghan, Stephen; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The new generation of satellite sensors such as the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) will be able to detect and characterize global aerosols with an unprecedented accuracy. The question remains whether this accuracy will be sufficient to narrow the uncertainties in our estimates of aerosol radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere. Satellite remote sensing detects aerosol optical thickness with the least amount of relative error when aerosol loading is high. Satellites are less effective when aerosol loading is low. We use the monthly mean results of two global aerosol transport models to simulate the spatial distribution of smoke aerosol in the Southern Hemisphere during the tropical biomass burning season. This spatial distribution allows us to determine that 87-94% of the smoke aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere occurs in grid squares with sufficient signal to noise ratio to be detectable from space. The uncertainty of quantifying the smoke aerosol forcing in the Southern Hemisphere depends on the uncertainty introduced by errors in estimating the background aerosol, errors resulting from uncertainties in surface properties and errors resulting from uncertainties in assumptions of aerosol properties. These three errors combine to give overall uncertainties of 1.5 to 2.2 Wm-2 (21-56%) in determining the Southern Hemisphere smoke aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere. The range of values depend on which estimate of MODIS retrieval uncertainty is used, either the theoretical calculation (upper bound) or the empirical estimate (lower bound). Strategies that use the satellite data to derive flux directly or use the data in conjunction with ground-based remote sensing and aerosol transport models can reduce these uncertainties.

  15. Radiative forcing and climate response to projected 21st century aerosol decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westervelt, D. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Naik, V.; Mauzerall, D. L.

    2015-03-01

    It is widely expected that global emissions of atmospheric aerosols and their precursors will decrease strongly throughout the remainder of the 21st century, due to emission reduction policies enacted to protect human health. For instance, global emissions of aerosols and their precursors are projected to decrease by as much as 80% by the year 2100, according to the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. The removal of aerosols will cause unintended climate consequences, including an unmasking of global warming from long-lived greenhouse gases. We use the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 3 (GFDL CM3) to simulate future climate over the 21st century with and without the aerosol emission changes projected by each of the RCPs in order to isolate the radiative forcing and climate response resulting from the aerosol reductions. We find that the projected global radiative forcing and climate response due to aerosol decreases do not vary significantly across the four RCPs by 2100, although there is some mid-century variation, especially in cloud droplet effective radius, that closely follows the RCP emissions and energy consumption projections. Up to 1 W m-2 of radiative forcing may be unmasked globally from 2005 to 2100 due to reductions in aerosol and precursor emissions, leading to average global temperature increases up to 1 K and global precipitation rate increases up to 0.09 mm d-1. Regionally and locally, climate impacts can be much larger, with a 2.1 K warming projected over China, Japan, and Korea due to the reduced aerosol emissions in RCP8.5, as well as nearly a 0.2 mm d-1 precipitation increase, a 7 g m-2 LWP decrease, and a 2 μm increase in cloud droplet effective radius. Future aerosol decreases could be responsible for 30-40% of total climate warming by 2100 in East Asia, even under the high greenhouse gas emissions scenario (RCP8.5). The expected unmasking of global warming caused by aerosol reductions will

  16. Further Evidence that Radiation Forces Affect the Frequencies Of the Kilohertz QPOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenfei; Lamb, F. K.

    2006-09-01

    In the sonic-point and spin-resonance beat-frequency (SPSRBF) model of the kHz QPOs, the frequency of the upper kHz QPO is close to the azimuthal frequency of the innermost nearly circular streamline (INCS). The INCS is created by the combined effects of the radiation and magnetic forces acting on the gas in the disk and the general relativistic 'pit' in the effective gravitational potential near the star. Variations in the luminosity of the star can be produced by variations in the accretion rate through the inner disk or other mechanisms, such as variations in the nuclear burning rate. In the SPSRBF model, the time-varying radiation force caused by any luminosity variations that are independent of the accretion rate through the inner disk causes variations in the frequency of the upper kHz QPO that are out of phase with those luminosity variations. Such variations have been seen in Sco X-1 and 4U 1608-52 at the frequencies of the 6 Hz normal branch oscillation and mHz QPOs. The highest frequency of the upper kHz QPO observed at a given X-ray flux (or count rate) of 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1636-53 is anti-correlated with the flux (or count rate). If we suppose that the highest frequency kHz QPOs reflect the azimuthal frequency of the gas very close to the general relativistic innermost stable circular orbit, so that the radius of the gas is very nearly constant, then the observed anti-correlation of the maximum frequency of the upper kHz QPO and the X-ray flux is consistent with the idea that the gas circulating there is partially supported by the radial component of the radiation force. This research was supported in part by NASA grants NAG 5-12030 and NNG05GL60G, NSF grant AST 0098399, and funds of the Fortner Endowed Chair at the University of Illinois.

  17. Lense-Thirring Effect Measurement from LAGEOS Node: Limitation from Radiation Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slabinski, Victor J.

    2015-05-01

    The Lense-Thirring (L-T) effect from General Relativity predicts a small secular increase to the node right ascension for close Earth satellites. For the LAGEOS 1 satellite, the predicted node increase is 31 mas/y. There is a current effort to observationally evaluate L-T to 1 percent accuracy through an orbit analysis of the laser-ranged LAGEOS 1, LAGEOS 2, and LARES satellites. Uncertainty in the computed gravitational perturbations to the satellite nodes, due to parameter uncertainties, is largely eliminated by taking a linear combination of the node positions which eliminates the uncertainty due to the major terms. One then looks for the L-T effect on this composite node.But there remains uncertainty in the computed perturbations due to two radiation (non-gravitational) forces: the solar radiation (SR) force and thermal thrust (Yarkovsky effects). This paper treats LAGEOS 1 perturbations. For simplicity in discussion, we treat perturbations to its node rather than perturbations to the composite node.Uncertainty in the perturbation rates arises from ignorance of parameter values for the LAGEOS 1 exterior aluminum surface, specifically, the solar absorbtance and thermal emittance. The LAGEOS 1 Phase B design study proposed three different sets of aluminum surface parameters without recommending a particular set. The LAGEOS 1 as-built surface parameters were not measured prior to spacecraft launch.The possible spread in LAGEOS 1 solar absorbtance values gives a spread of ±0.42 mas/y in the SR force contribution to its node rate. This results in a ±1.3 percent uncertainty to the L-T determination. But because of its long-period perturbation to the eccentricity vector, evaluating the SR force parameter as a solved-for parameter in the orbit analysis should significantly reduce the uncertainty in the corresponding node motion.The possible spread in LAGEOS 1 surface values gives a spread of ±0.16 mas/y in the thermal thrust contribution to its node rate. This

  18. Decadal Changes in Arctic Radiative Forcing from Aerosols and Tropospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breider, T. J.; Mickley, L. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Payer Sulprizio, M.; Croft, B.; Ridley, D. A.; Ge, C.; Yang, Q.; Bitz, C. M.; McConnell, J.; Sharma, S.; Skov, H.; Eleftheriadis, K.

    2014-12-01

    Annual average Arctic sea ice coverage has declined by 3.6% per decade since the 1980s, but factors driving this trend are uncertain. Long-term surface observations and ice core records suggest recent, large declines in the Arctic atmospheric burden of sulfate aerosol, which may account in part for the warming trend. The decline in black carbon (BC) aerosol in the Arctic during the same period may partly offset the warming due to decreases in sulfate. Here we use the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model together with a detailed inventory of historical anthropogenic trace gas and primary aerosol emissions to quantify changes in Arctic radiative forcing from tropospheric ozone and aerosol between 1980 and 2010. Previous studies have reported an increasing trend in observed ozone at 500 hPa over Canada, but our simulation shows no significant trend. Over Europe, good agreement is found with observed long-term trends in sulfate in surface air (observed = -0.14±0.02 μg m-3 yr-1, model = -0.13±0.01 μg m-3 yr-1), while the observed trend in sulfate in precipitation (-0.20±0.03 μg m-3 yr-1) is underestimated by 40%. At Alert, the timing of the observed decline in sulfate after 1991 is well captured in the simulation, but the observed trend between 1991 and 2001 (-36.3±4.1 ng m-3 yr-1) is underestimated by 26%. BC observations at remote Arctic surface stations are biased low throughout 1980-2010 by a factor of 2. At Greenland ice cores, observed 1980-2010 trends in sulfate deposition are underestimated by 35%. The smaller model bias in observed sulfate and BC deposition at ice cores in southern Greenland (5% and 65%) compared to northern Greenland (56% and 90%) indicates greater uncertainty in pollution emissions from Eurasian sources. We estimate a surface radiative forcing from atmospheric aerosols in the Arctic during 2008 of -0.51 W m-2. The forcing is largest in spring (-1.36 W m-2) and dominated by sulfate aerosol (87%). We will quantify the contributions to the

  19. Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Radiation Therapy and Daily Temozolomide Is Associated With Minimal Toxicity in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Vredenburgh, James J.; Desjardins, Annick; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Reardon, David A.; Peters, Katherine B.; Herndon, James E.; Marcello, Jennifer; Bailey, Leighann; Threatt, Stevie; Sampson, John; Friedman, Allan; Friedman, Henry S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled in the study, and received standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide. All patients underwent a craniotomy and were at least 2 weeks postoperative. Radiation therapy was administered in 1.8-Gy fractions, with the clinical target volume for the primary course treated to a dose of 45 to 50.4 Gy, followed by a boost of 9 to 14.4 Gy, to a total dose of 59.4 Gy. Patients received temozolomide at 75 mg/m{sup 2} daily throughout the course of radiation therapy. Bevacizumab was given at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 14 days, beginning a minimum of 4 weeks postoperatively. Results: Of the 125 patients, 120 (96%) completed the protocol-specified radiation therapy. Five patients had to stop the protocol therapy, 2 patients with pulmonary emboli, and 1 patient each with a Grade 2 central nervous system hemorrhage, Grade 4 pancytopenia, and wound dehiscence requiring surgical intervention. All 5 patients ultimately finished the radiation therapy. After radiation therapy, 3 patients had progressive disease, 2 had severe fatigue and decreased performance status, 1 patient had a colonic perforation, and 1 had a rectal fissure; these 7 patients therefore did not proceed with the protocol-specified adjuvant temozolomide, bevacizumab, and irinotecan. However, 113 patients (90%) were able to continue on study. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide was found to be associated with minimal toxicity in patients newly diagnosed with GBM.

  20. The Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneity of Precipitation and Aerosol-Cloud Radiative Forcing Uncertainty in Climatically Important Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regayre, L.; Pringle, K.; Lee, L.; Booth, B.; Browse, J.; Mann, G.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Reddington, C.; Carslaw, K. S.; Rap, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud radiative forcing and precipitation sensitivities are quantified within climatically important regions, where surface temperatures and moisture availability are thought to influence large-scale climatic effects. The sensitivity of precipitation and the balance of incoming and outgoing radiation to uncertain historical aerosol emission fluxes and aerosol-cloud parametrisations are quantified and their climatic importance considered. The predictability of monsoon onset and intensity, position of the inter-tropical convergence zone, tropical storm frequency and intensity, heat transport to the Arctic and changes in the mode of the El Niño Southern Oscillation are all limited by the parametric uncertainties examined here. Precipitation and aerosol-cloud radiative forcing sensitivities are found to be both spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Statistical analysis highlights aspects of aerosol-climate research and model development that should be prioritised in order to reduce the impact of uncertainty in regional precipitation and aerosol-cloud forcing on near-term climate projections.

  1. Mechanism of Radiative Forcing of Greenhouse Gas and its Implication to the Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shia, R.

    2010-12-01

    A thorough understanding of how the greenhouse gas (GHG) perturbs climate in the first place would help to fight the global warming. It is generally acknowledged that the warming is due to the absorption by the GHG of the infrared radiation emitted from the surface (IPCC AR4, 2007). However, the molecules of GHG not only absorb the infrared radiation they also reemit it to the space. This presentation demonstrates that it is the moving up of the emission level, which generates the climate effects when the concentration of GHG increases. The Instantaneous Radiative Forcing (IRF) of Greenhouse Gas is defined as the reduction of outgoing infrared radiation flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) when the concentration of greenhouse gas increases. It is the primary parameter for measuring the climate effects of greenhouse gas (IPCC AR4, 2007). IRF includes both the reduction of direct emission from the surface and the change of the reemission from the atmosphere. The direct IRF is always positive (warming). The reemission IRF has two origins, more emitters and higher emission level, which is located around the optical depth equal to 1 from TOA. Using the radiative transfer equation it is proved that after the cancellation of the direct IRF and the first part of the reemission IRF the total IRF is determined only by the moving up of the emission level. Therefore, IRF can be positive or negative depending on the temperature gradients of the atmosphere. For an atmosphere with a monotonically increasing (decreasing) temperature profile the IRA is negative (positive) because the reemission is from the region with higher (lower) temperature and the reemitted outgoing infrared radiation flux is larger (smaller) when GHG increases. This is an extension of a well-known fact that the IRF is zero in an isothermal atmosphere. The GHG warms the Earth because over most part of the Earth there is a large troposphere, where the temperature gradient in negative. IRF should be negative

  2. Mechanobiological Modulation of Cytoskeleton and Calcium Influx in Osteoblastic Cells by Short-Term Focused Acoustic Radiation Force

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu; Cheng, Jiqi; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2012-01-01

    Mechanotransduction has demonstrated potential for regulating tissue adaptation in vivo and cellular activities in vitro. It is well documented that ultrasound can produce a wide variety of biological effects in biological systems. For example, pulsed ultrasound can be used to noninvasively accelerate the rate of bone fracture healing. Although a wide range of studies has been performed, mechanism for this therapeutic effect on bone healing is currently unknown. To elucidate the mechanism of cellular response to mechanical stimuli induced by pulsed ultrasound radiation, we developed a method to apply focused acoustic radiation force (ARF) (duration, one minute) on osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and observed cellular responses to ARF using a spinning disk confocal microscope. This study demonstrates that the focused ARF induced F-actin cytoskeletal rearrangement in MC3T3-E1 cells. In addition, these cells showed an increase in intracellular calcium concentration following the application of focused ARF. Furthermore, passive bending movement was noted in primary cilium that were treated with focused ARF. Cell viability was not affected. Application of pulsed ultrasound radiation generated only a minimal temperature rise of 0.1°C, and induced a streaming resulting fluid shear stress of 0.186 dyne/cm2, suggesting that hyperthermia and acoustic streaming might not be the main causes of the observed cell responses. In conclusion, these data provide more insight in the interactions between acoustic mechanical stress and osteoblastic cells. This experimental system could serve as basis for further exploration of the mechanosensing mechanism of osteoblasts triggered by ultrasound. PMID:22701628

  3. Optical properties and radiative forcing of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash layer observed over Lille, France, in 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derimian, Y.; Dubovik, O.; Tanre, D.; Goloub, P.; Lapyonok, T.; Mortier, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this work we characterize optical properties and asses