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Sample records for additional reactivity margin

  1. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  2. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidi none to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  3. The reactivation of the SW Iberian passive margin: a brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Joao; Rosas, Filipe; Terrinha, Pedro; Schellart, Wouter; Almeida, Pedro; Gutscher, Marc-André; Riel, Nicolas; Ribeiro, António

    2016-04-01

    On the morning of the 1st of November of 1755 a major earthquake struck offshore the Southwest Iberian margin. This was the strongest earthquake ever felt in Western Europe. The shake, fire and tsunami devastated Lisbon, was felt as far as Finland and had a profound impact on the thinkers of that time, in particular on the Enlightenment philosophers such as Voltaire, Rousseau and Kant. The Great Lisbon Earthquake is considered by many as the event that marks the birth of modern geosciences; and made of this region one of the most well studied areas in the world. After the 1755 earthquake, Kant and others authors wrote several treaties dealing with the causes and dynamics of earthquakes and tsunamis and were close to identify some key elements of what we now call plate tectonics. More than two hundred years later, in the year of 1969, the region was struck by another major earthquake. This was precisely during the period in which the theory of plate tectonics was being built. Geoscientists like Fukao (1973), Purdy (1975) and Mackenzie (1977) immediately focused their attention in the area. They suggested that these events were related with "transient" subduction of Africa below Iberia, along the East-West Azores-Gibraltar plate boundary. Several years later, Ribeiro (1989) suggested that instead of Africa being subducted below Iberia, it was the West Iberian passive margin that was being reactivated, a process that may, in time, lead to the formation of a new subduction zone. In the turning of the millennium, a subducting slab was imaged bellow the Gibraltar Straits, a remanent of the Western Mediterranean arc system that according to Gutscher et al. (2002) was related with ongoing subduction. Recently, it was proposed that a causal link between the Gibraltar subduction system and the reactivation of the SW Iberian margin might exist. In addition, the large-scale Africa-Eurasia convergence is inducing compressive stresses along the West Iberian margin. The margin

  4. Reactive Additives for Phenylethynyl-Containing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Rommel, Monica L.

    2005-01-01

    Phenylethynyl-containing reactive additive (PERA) compounds and mixtures have been found to be useful for improving the processability of oligomers, polymers, co-oligomers, and copolymers that contain phenylethynyl groups. The additives can be incorporated in different forms: A solution of an amide acid or an imide of a PERA can be added to a solution of phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer; or An imide powder of a PERA can be mixed with a dry powder of a phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer. The effect of a given PERA on the processability and other properties of the resin system depends on whether the PERA is used in the amide acid or an imide form. With proper formulation, the PERA reduces the melt viscosity of the resin and thereby reduces the processing pressures needed to form the adhesive bonds, consolidate filled or unfilled moldings, or fabricate fiber-reinforced composite laminates. During thermal cure, a PERA reacts with itself as well as with the phenylethynyl-containing host resin and thereby becomes chemically incorporated into the resin system. The effects of the PERA on mechanical properties, relative to those of the host resin, depend on the amount of PERA used. Typically, the incorporation of the PERA results in (1) increases in the glass-transition temperature (Tg), modulus of elasticity, and parameters that characterize behavior under compression, and (2) greater retention of the aforementioned mechanical properties at elevated temperatures without (3) significant reduction of toughness or damage tolerance. Of the formulations tested thus far, the ones found to yield the best overall results were those for which the host resin was the amide acid form of a phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) co-oligomer having a molecular weight of 5,000 g/mole [hence, designated PETI-5] and a PERA denoted as PERA-1. PETI-5 was made from 3,3',4'4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, 3

  5. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-08-02

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses.

  6. Assessment of Reactivity Margins and Loading Curves for PWR Burnup Credit Cask Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-12-17

    This report presents studies to assess reactivity margins and loading curves for pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety evaluations. The studies are based on a generic high-density 32-assembly cask and systematically vary individual calculational (depletion and criticality) assumptions to demonstrate the impact on the predicted effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, and burnup-credit loading curves. The purpose of this report is to provide a greater understanding of the importance of input parameter variations and quantify the impact of calculational assumptions on the outcome of a burnup-credit evaluation. This study should provide guidance to regulators and industry on the technical areas where improved information will most enhance the estimation of accurate subcritical margins. Based on these studies, areas where future work may provide the most benefit are identified. The report also includes an evaluation of the degree of burnup credit needed for high-density casks to transport the current spent nuclear fuel inventory. By comparing PWR discharge data to actinide-only based loading curves and determining the number of assemblies that meet the loading criteria, this evaluation finds that additional negative reactivity (through either increased credit for fuel burnup or cask design/utilization modifications) is necessary to accommodate the majority of current spent fuel assemblies in high-capacity casks. Assemblies that are not acceptable for loading in the prototypic high-capacity cask may be stored or transported by other means (e.g., lower capacity casks that utilize flux traps and/or increased fixed poison concentrations or high-capacity casks with design/utilization modifications).

  7. 78 FR 19413 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 246 and Reactive Blue 247...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... C.I. Reactive Blue 246. Studies included guinea pig maximization studies, in vivo ocular irritation... copolymerized color additives of C. I. Reactive Blue 247. Studies included guinea pig maximization studies,...

  8. Improved dental adhesive formulations based on reactive nanogel additives.

    PubMed

    Morães, R R; Garcia, J W; Wilson, N D; Lewis, S H; Barros, M D; Yang, B; Pfeifer, C S; Stansbury, J W

    2012-02-01

    Current challenges in adhesive dentistry include over-hydrophilic bonding formulations, which facilitate water percolation through the hybrid layer and result in unreliable bonded interfaces. This study introduces nanogel-modified adhesives as a way to control the material's hydrophobic character without changing the basic monomer formulation (keeping water-chasing capacity and operatory techniques unaltered). Nanogel additives of varied hydrophobicity were synthesized in solution, rendering 10- to 100-nm-sized particles. A model BisGMA/HEMA solvated adhesive was prepared (control), to which reactive nanogels were added. The increase in adhesive viscosity did not impair solvent removal by air-thinning. The degree of conversion in the adhesive was similar between control and nanogel-modified materials, while the bulk dry and, particularly, the wet mechanical properties were significantly improved through nanogel-based network reinforcement and reduced water solubility. As preliminary validation of this approach, short-term micro-tensile bond strengths to acid-etched and primed dentin were significantly enhanced by nanogel inclusion in the adhesive resins.

  9. Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of the Lung: Evolution from an Underlying Reactive Lymphoproliferative Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Jon Nicholas; Beatty, Colleen; Kinkade, Zoe; Bryan, Cara; Hogg, Jeffery Paul; Gibson, Laura F; Vos, Jeffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma (ENMZL) of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (MALT) is a problematic and sometimes controversial diagnosis. While commonly seen in the stomach in the setting of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection, other extranodal sites, such as the lung, may also present with disease. ENMZL is clinically and morphologically heterogeneous; however, regardless of presentation, the etiology lies in the accumulation of lymphoid tissue in non-traditional sites. This phenomenon is typically secondary to an underlying inflammatory stimulus such as chronic infection or autoimmune states. The current case report details the clinical history of a patient with Sjögren syndrome over a four year period who eventually developed ENMZL. The patient initially presented with an atypical, but polyclonal, lymphoproliferative process diagnosed as lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia. Over time, the patient showed evolution to a monoclonal process with associated radiologic progression of disease. This evolution manifested as a dense lymphoid infiltrate with prominent plasmacytic differentiation and the development of a lung mass radiologically. This case contributes to the growing body of knowledge that suggests ENMZL lies along a biological spectrum of lymphoproliferative disorders whereby a benign, reactive process may eventually undergo malignant transformation. This evolution likely represents the acquisition of genetic abnormalities that allow autonomous proliferation in the absence of the initial immune stimulus. In practice, determining when this event occurs and, thus, distinguishing between reactive and neoplastic disorders within this spectrum may be difficult as no single clinicopathologic feature may be present to establish the diagnosis. This case further illustrates the importance of correlating the clinical, radiologic and pathologic data to evaluate patients with atypical pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders and to allow the optimal management of

  10. 78 FR 42451 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 246 and Reactive Blue 247...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 Listing of Color Additives Exempt From... color additive regulations in Sec. Sec. 73.3100 and 73.3106 (21 CFR 73.3100 and 73.3106), respectively... Blue 246), as color additives in contact lenses. We also corrected the nomenclature for Reactive...

  11. Neogene and active shortening offshore the reactivated Levant margin in Lebanon: results of the SHALIMAR cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briais, A.; Singh, S. C.; Tapponnier, P.; Elias, A.; Sursock, A.; Jomaa, R.; Carton, H.; Daeron, M.; King, G.; Jacques, E.

    2004-12-01

    . The particularly large negative anomalies in the north likely reflect flexure of the lithosphere due to subduction under Cyprus and underthrusting beneath Lebanon. The SHALIMAR data suggest that local compression induced by the bend in the Dead Sea Transform reactivated faults of the Mesozoic Levant margin into lateral ramps and thrusts whose evolution may lead to subduction. It is possible that the shorter distance between the transform and margin in central Lebanon (35 km) than in Syria (65 km) is one measure of continental shortening. That the oceanic lithosphere is strong may explain why the Carmel and Roum faults did not extend into the Levant basin.

  12. The Dauki Fault in NE India: A crustal scale thrust-fold reactivating the continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, E. K.; Seeber, L.; Akhter, S. H.; Steckler, M. S.; Biswas, A.; Mukhopadhyay, B. P.

    2011-12-01

    New structural data along the central part of the Dauki topographic front supports the hypothesis that the Shillong Plateau is a highly asymmetric south-verging Quaternary anticline driven by a north-dipping blind thrust fault that projects into Bangladesh, south of the topographic front. This thrust-fold is tectonically more important than it appears from the relatively modest accumulated deformation, and may represent a reorganization of the eastern Himalayan front. The Dauki Fault is the most likely source of the 1897 Great Indian Earthquake and poses a hazard to densely populated areas on the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta region. The sharp linear topographic feature often mapped as the Dauki fault is instead a contact between competent Eocene limestone and much less competent younger clastic units. This contact may be depositional or locally a secondary back thrust. While the Sylhet basin has been rapidly subsiding in the Late Quaternary, the topographic front is marked by raised and eroded river fanglomerates, thus still on the hangingwall side of the fault. Samples from these raised terraces will be dated using optically stimulated luminescence. The exposed structural relief is primarily accounted for by folding, very broad at the culmination on the "plateau," but much sharper at the southern front. In the central and steepest Cherrapunji segment of the Dauki front, the fold is marked by the erosion resistant Cretaceous-Paleocene passive-margin sequence overlying the Sylhet Traps with evidence that the Cretaceous rifting was parallel to the Dauki front. The Dauki fault, therefore, could be a passive margin-related normal fault reactivated as a thrust. The part of the forelimb exposed in the ~20 km Cherrapunji segment exhibits two sharp kinks, suggesting blind imbricates above the main blind fault. The Shillong Plateau is characterized by a two-level drainage morphology. The well-preserved Precambrian surface and its Cretaceous cover along the southern edge of the

  13. Transcurrent reactivation of Australia's western passive margin: An example of intraplate deformation from the central Indo-Australian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengesh, J. V.; Whitney, B. B.

    2016-05-01

    Australia's northwestern passive margin intersects the eastern termination of the Java trench segment of the Sunda arc subduction zone and the western termination of Timor trough along the Banda arc tectonic collision zone. Differential relative motion between the Sunda arc subduction zone and the Banda arc collision zone has reactivated the former rifted margin of northwestern Australia evidenced by Pliocene to Quaternary age deformation along a 1400 km long offshore fault system. The fault system has higher rates of seismicity than the adjacent nonextended crustal terranes, has produced the largest historical earthquake in Australia (1941 ML 7.3 Meeberrie event), and is dominated by focal mechanism solutions consistent with dextral motion along northeast trending fault planes. The faults crosscut late Miocene unconformities that are eroded across middle Miocene inversion structures suggesting multiple phases of Neogene and younger fault reactivation. Onset of deformation is consistent with the timing of the collision of the Scott Plateau part of the passive continental margin with the former Banda trench between 3.0 Ma and present. The range of estimated maximum horizontal slip rates across the zone is ~1.4 to 2.6 mm yr-1, at the threshold of geodetically detectable motion, yet significant with respect to an intraplate tectonic setting. The folding and faulting along this part of the continental margin provides an example of intraplate deformation resulting from kinematic transitions along a distant plate boundary and demonstrates the presence of a youthful evolving intraplate fault system within the Indo-Australian plate.

  14. 78 FR 37962 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 246 and Reactive Blue 247...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 Listing of Color Additives Exempt From... rule that published in the Federal Register of April 1, 2013 (78 FR 19413), and that amended the color...-propenoic)ester (C.I. Reactive Blue 247) as color additives in contact lenses. DATES: Effective...

  15. 76 FR 59503 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 69; Confirmation of Effective...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 Listing of Color Additives Exempt From... May 4, 2011 (76 FR 25234). The final rule amended the color additive regulations to provide for the...-sulphonate (CAS Reg. No. 70209-99- 3), also known as Reactive Blue 69, as a color additive in contact...

  16. 76 FR 25234 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 69

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 Listing of Color Additives Exempt From... and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the color additive regulations to provide for the safe use... (CAS Reg. No. 70209-99-3), also known as Reactive Blue 69, as a color additive in contact lenses....

  17. Enhancing intermolecular benzoyl-transfer reactivity in crystals by growing a "reactive" metastable polymorph by using a chiral additive.

    PubMed

    Murali, Chebrolu; Shashidhar, Mysore S; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Bhadbhade, Mohan M

    2009-01-01

    Racemic 2,4-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoacetate, which normally crystallizes in a monoclinic form (form I, space group P2(1)/n) could be persuaded to crystallize out as a metastable polymorph (form II, space group C2/c) by using a small amount of either D- or L- 2,4-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoformate as an additive in the crystallization medium. The structurally similar enantiomeric additive was chosen by the scrutiny of previous experimental results on the crystallization of racemic 2,4-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoacetate. Form II crystals can be thermally transformed to form I crystals at about 145 degrees C. The relative organization of the molecules in these dimorphs vary slightly in terms of the helical assembly of molecules, that is, electrophile (El)...nucleophile (Nu) and C-H...pi interactions, but these minor variations have a profound effect on the facility and specificity of benzoyl-group-transfer reactivity in the two crystal forms. While form II crystals undergo a clean intermolecular benzoyl-group-transfer reaction, form I crystals are less reactive and undergo non-specific benzoyl-group transfer leading to a mixture of products. The role played by the additive in fine-tuning small changes that are required in the molecular packing opens up the possibility of creating new polymorphs that show varied physical and chemical properties. Crystals of D-2,6-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoformate (additive) did not show facile benzoyl-group-transfer reactivity (in contrast to the corresponding racemic compound) due to the lack of proper juxtaposition and assembly of molecules.

  18. Seismic reflection geometry of the Newark basin margin in Eastern Pennsylvania. Evidence for extensional reactivation of Paleozoic thrust faults

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, N.M.; Burton, W.C.; D'Angelo, R.M.; Costain, J.K.

    1986-07-01

    Low-angle 25/sup 0/ to 35/sup 0/ dips have been determined for the border fault of the Newark basin near Riegelsville, Pennsylvania, based on a VIBROSEIS profile and two continuously-cored drill holes across faults at the basin margin. A group of moderately strong planar reflections in a zone 0.5 km thick in gneiss and carbonate rocks of the footwall block coincide with the updip projection of imbricate fault slices and mylonites associated with the Musconetcong thrust system of Drake and others (1967). Contrasts in acoustic impedance among mylonitic dolostone and mylonitic gneiss and their protoliths, determined from measurements on core samples, are sufficiently large to account for reflections seen in the footwall block. Analysis of drill core and surface outcrops supports the conclusion that low-angle extensional faulting in the Early Mesozoic was localized by reactivation of Paleozoic imbricate thrust faults in the basement rocks. Extension in the NW-SE quadrant was approximately perpendicular to the strike of the ancient thrust faults in Eastern Pennsylvania and a passive origin of the Newark basin here is suggested. The data presented here represent some of the most explicit three-dimensional information obtained thus far, in the Eastern United States, in support of the concept of fault reactivation in controlling formation of Early Mesozoic extensional basins.

  19. Low-angle extensional faulting, reactivated mylonites, and seismic reflection geometry of the Newark basin margin in eastern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, N.M.; Burton, W.C.; D'Angelo, R.M.; Costain, J.K.

    1986-09-01

    Low-angle 25/sup 0/ to 35/sup 0/ dips have been determined for the border fault of the Newark basin near Riegelsville, Pennsylvania, on the basis of a Vibroseis profile and two continuously cored drill holes across faults at the basin margin. A group of moderately strong planar reflections in a zone 0.5 km thick in gneiss and carbonate rocks of the footwall block coincides with the updip projection of imbricate fault slices and mylonites associated with the Musconetcong thrust system of Drake et al. (1967). Contrasts in acoustic impedance among mylonitic dolostone and mylonitic gneiss and their protoliths, determined from measurements on samples from a third cored hole, are sufficiently large to account for reflections seen in the footwall block. Analysis of drill core and surface outcrops supports the conclusion that low-angle extensional faulting in the early Mesozoic was localized by reactivation of Paleozoic imbricate thrust faults in the basement rocks. Extension in the northwest-southeast quadrant was approximately perpendicular to the strike of the ancient thrust faults in eastern Pennsylvania. The data presented here are the most explicit three-dimensional information obtained thus far in the eastern US in support of the concept of fault reactivation in controlling formation of early Mesozoic extensional basins.

  20. Radiation-assisted PET recycling using glass fiber reinforcement and reactive additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, K.; Czvikovszky, T.; Abd-Elhamid, M.

    2004-02-01

    Post-consumer poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) material has been recycled in an upgrading procedure. Radiation treatment of modest dose (10 kGy) has been applied to activate a reactive additive (epoxy-acrylate, 2% to the PET) to bond together the matrix (recycled PET) and the reinforcement (chopped glass fiber, 10-20% to the PET). Tensile-, bending- and impact-resistance of the treated, recycled PET has been improved significantly. A new composite engineering material has been manufactured this way of reactive reinforcing recycling, surpassing the original, virgin PET especially in impact properties. The new thermoplastic is well suitable for injection molding of technical parts.

  1. Marginal regression approach for additive hazards models with clustered current status data.

    PubMed

    Su, Pei-Fang; Chi, Yunchan

    2014-01-15

    Current status data arise naturally from tumorigenicity experiments, epidemiology studies, biomedicine, econometrics and demographic and sociology studies. Moreover, clustered current status data may occur with animals from the same litter in tumorigenicity experiments or with subjects from the same family in epidemiology studies. Because the only information extracted from current status data is whether the survival times are before or after the monitoring or censoring times, the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator of survival function converges at a rate of n(1/3) to a complicated limiting distribution. Hence, semiparametric regression models such as the additive hazards model have been extended for independent current status data to derive the test statistics, whose distributions converge at a rate of n(1/2) , for testing the regression parameters. However, a straightforward application of these statistical methods to clustered current status data is not appropriate because intracluster correlation needs to be taken into account. Therefore, this paper proposes two estimating functions for estimating the parameters in the additive hazards model for clustered current status data. The comparative results from simulation studies are presented, and the application of the proposed estimating functions to one real data set is illustrated.

  2. Development of a Fragment-Based in Silico Profiler for Michael Addition Thiol Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ebbrell, David J; Madden, Judith C; Cronin, Mark T D; Schultz, Terry W; Enoch, Steven J

    2016-06-20

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) paradigm details the existing knowledge that links the initial interaction between a chemical and a biological system, termed the molecular initiating event (MIE), through a series of intermediate events, to an adverse effect. An important example of a well-defined MIE is the formation of a covalent bond between a biological nucleophile and an electrophilic compound. This particular MIE has been associated with various toxicological end points such as acute aquatic toxicity, skin sensitization, and respiratory sensitization. This study has investigated the calculated parameters that are required to predict the rate of chemical bond formation (reactivity) of a dataset of Michael acceptors. Reactivity of these compounds toward glutathione was predicted using a combination of a calculated activation energy value (Eact, calculated using density functional theory (DFT) calculation at the B3YLP/6-31G+(d) level of theory, and solvent-accessible surface area values (SAS) at the α carbon. To further develop the method, a fragment-based algorithm was developed enabling the reactivity to be predicted for Michael acceptors without the need to perform the time-consuming DFT calculations. Results showed the developed fragment method was successful in predicting the reactivity of the Michael acceptors excluding two sets of chemicals: volatile esters with an extended substituent at the β-carbon and chemicals containing a conjugated benzene ring as part of the polarizing group. Additionally the study also demonstrated the ease with which the approach can be extended to other chemical classes by the calculation of additional fragments and their associated Eact and SAS values. The resulting method is likely to be of use in regulatory toxicology tools where an understanding of covalent bond formation as a potential MIE is important within the AOP paradigm.

  3. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro.

  4. Vitrification of F006 plating waste sludge by Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP)

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.L.; Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.

    1994-06-01

    Solidification into glass of nickel-on-uranium plating wastewater treatment plant sludge (F006 Mixed Waste) has been demonstrated at the Savannah River She (SRS). Vitrification using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), greatly enhanced the solubility and retention of heavy metals In glass. The bench-scale tests using RASP achieved 76 wt% waste loading In both soda-lime-silica and borosilicate glasses. The RASP has been Independently verified by a commercial waste management company, and a contract awarded to vitrify the approximately 500,000 gallons of stored waste sludge. The waste volume reduction of 89% will greatly reduce the disposal costs, and delisting of the glass waste is anticipated. This will be the world`s first commercial-scale vitrification system used for environmental cleanup of Mixed Waste. Its stabilization and volume reduction abilities are expected to set standards for the future of the waste management Industry.

  5. The Effect of Manganese Additions on the Reactive Evaporation of Chromium in Ni-Cr Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Alman, David E.

    2004-10-20

    Chromium is used as an alloy addition in stainless steels and nickel-chromium alloys to form protective chromium oxide scales. Chromium oxide undergoes reactive evaporation in high temperature exposures in the presence of oxygen and/or water vapor. The deposition of gaseous chromium species onto solid oxide fuel cell electrodes can reduce the efficiency of the fuel cell. Manganese additions to the alloy can reduce the activity of chromium in the oxide, either from solid solution replacement of chromium with manganese (at low levels of manganese) or from the formation of manganese-chromium spinels (at high levels of manganese). This reduction in chromium activity leads to a predicted reduction in chromium evaporation by as much as a factor of 35 at 800 C and 55 at 700 C. The results of evaporation loss measurements on nickel-chromium-manganese alloys are compared with the predicted reduction. Quantifying the effects of manganese additions on chromium evaporation should aid alloy development of metallic interconnects and balance-of-plant alloys.

  6. Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP) for hazardous and mixed waste vitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-07-01

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for (1) nickel plating line (F006) sludges and (2) incinerator wastes. Vitrification of these wastes using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), has been determined to greatly enhance the dissolution and retention of hazardous, mixed, and heavy metal species in glass. RASP lowers melt temperatures (typically 1050-- 1150{degrees}C), thereby minimizing volatility concerns during vitrification. RASP maximizes waste loading (typically 50--75 wt% on a dry oxide basis) by taking advantage of the glass forming potential of the waste. RASP vitrification thereby minimizes waste disposal volume (typically 86--97 vol. %), and maximizes cost savings. Solidification of the F006 plating line sludges containing depleted uranium has been achieved in both soda-lime-silica (SLS) and borosilicate glasses at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 75 wt%. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and bottom kiln ash have been achieved in SLS glass at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 50% using RASP. These waste loadings correspond to volume reductions of 86 and 94 volume %, respectively, with large associated savings in storage costs.

  7. Impacts of powdered activated carbon addition on trihalomethane formation reactivity of dissolved organic matter in membrane bioreactor effluent.

    PubMed

    Ma, Defang; Gao, Yue; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics and trihalomethane (THM) formation reactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in effluents from two membrane bioreactors (MBRs) with and without powdered activated carbon (PAC) addition (referred to as PAC/MBR and MBR, respectively) were examined to investigate the effects of PAC addition on THM formation of MBR effluent during chlorination. PAC addition increased the specific UV absorbance. Hydrophobic DOM especially hydrophobic acids in PAC/MBR effluent (50%) were more than MBR effluent (42%). DOM with molecular weight <1 kDa constituted 12% of PAC/MBR effluent DOM, which was less than that of MBR effluent (16%). Data obtained from excitation and emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that PAC/MBR effluent DOM contained more simple aromatic protein, but had less fulvic acid-like and soluble microbial by-product-like. PAC addition reduced the formation of bromine-containing THMs during chlorination of effluents, but increased THM formation reactivity of effluent DOM.

  8. EVALUATION OF FGD DRY INJECTION SORBENTS AND ADDITIVES - VOLUME 1 - DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH REACTIVITY SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses recent work addressing lime enhancement by slurrying with siliceous materials and testing in a laboratory packed-bed reactor, as part of EPA's efforts to develop low cost, retrofit flue gas cleaning technology, including the development of highly reactive sor...

  9. Evaluating the combustion reactivity of drop tube furnace and thermogravimetric analysis coal chars with a selection of metal additives

    SciTech Connect

    Katherine Le Manquais; Colin E. Snape; Ian McRobbie; Jim Barker

    2011-03-17

    Opportunities exist for effective coal combustion additives that can reduce the carbon content of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) to below 6%, thereby making it saleable for filler/building material applications without the need for postcombustion treatment. However, with only limited combustion data currently available for the multitude of potential additives, catalytic performance under pulverized fuel (PF) boiler conditions has received relatively little attention. This paper therefore compares the reactivity of catalyzed bituminous coal chars from thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with those generated by devolatilization in a drop tube furnace (DTF). The principal aim was to explore the fundamental chemistry behind the chosen additives' relative reactivities. Accordingly, all eight of the investigated additives increased the TGA burnout rate of the TGA and DTF chars, with most of the catalysts demonstrating consistent reactivity levels across chars from both devolatilization methods. Copper(I) chloride, silver chloride, and copper nitrate were thus identified as the most successful additives tested, but it proved difficult to establish a definitive reactivity ranking. This was largely due to the use of physical mixtures for catalyst dispersion, the relatively narrow selection of additives examined, and the inherent variability of the DTF chars. Nevertheless, one crucial exception to normal additive behavior was discovered, with copper(I) chloride perceptibly deactivating during devolatilization in the DTF, even though it remained the most effective catalyst tested. As a prolonged burnout at over 1000{sup o}C was required to replicate this deactivation effect on the TGA, the phenomenon could not be detected by typical testing procedures. Subsequently, a comprehensive TGA study showed no obvious relationship between the catalyst-induced reductions in the reaction's apparent activation energy and the samples recorded burnout rates.

  10. Rifting and reactivation of a Cretaceous structural belt at the northern margin of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, Ugo; Pubellier, Manuel; Chan, Lung Sang; Sewell, Roderick J.

    2017-04-01

    The Tiu Tang Lung Fault, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region - China, is located on the northern stretched continental margin of the South China Sea. Along this fault, Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks of the Tai Mo Shan Formation are tectonically juxtaposed on Lower Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Pat Sin Leng Formation. Both extensional detachments and compressional features are observed and various genetic strain configurations are proposed for the Tiu Tang Lung Fault with implications for understanding the dynamics of the pre-South China Sea rifting during the Cretaceous. We have identified tilted bedding planes in the continental deposits of the Pat Sin Leng Formation which can be related to Early Cretaceous syn-extensional deposition. A mid-Cretaceous penetrative top-to-the-south to top-to-the-west shear fabric is also observed and serves as an indicator of the strain pattern. This deformation is expressed by cleavages, schistosity, S/C fabrics, kink-folds, phacoids and stretched pebbles at both a macroscopic and microscopic scale. Cleavages and bedding are generally sub-parallel to the local shear orientation. The whole sedimentary pile is crosscut by Cenozoic N70 and N150 normal faults. These constraints, together with previous fission track, seismic and structural data, allow us to reinterpret the kinematics of this domain during syn-orogenic to syn-extensional periods. The observed top-to-the-south thrusting event is coeval with NE-SW strike-slip sinistral fault movement. Subsequent N-S extension can be correlated with South China Sea rifting from Eocene to Oligocene. These observations reveal a polyphase history associated with continental margin inversion which witnessed localized extension on previous compressional structures.

  11. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  12. The addition of organic carbon and nitrate affects reactive transport of heavy metals in sandy aquifers.

    PubMed

    Satyawali, Yamini; Seuntjens, Piet; Van Roy, Sandra; Joris, Ingeborg; Vangeel, Silvia; Dejonghe, Winnie; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien

    2011-04-25

    Organic carbon introduction in the soil to initiate remedial measures, nitrate infiltration due to agricultural practices or sulphate intrusion owing to industrial usage can influence the redox conditions and pH, thus affecting the mobility of heavy metals in soil and groundwater. This study reports the fate of Zn and Cd in sandy aquifers under a variety of plausible in-situ redox conditions that were induced by introduction of carbon and various electron acceptors in column experiments. Up to 100% Zn and Cd removal (from the liquid phase) was observed in all the four columns, however the mechanisms were different. Metal removal in column K1 (containing sulphate), was attributed to biological sulphate reduction and subsequent metal precipitation (as sulphides). In the presence of both nitrate and sulphate (K2), the former dominated the process, precipitating the heavy metals as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In the presence of sulphate, nitrate and supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)) (K3), metal removal was also due to precipitation as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In abiotic column, K4, (with supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)), but no nitrate), cation exchange with soil led to metal removal. The results obtained were modeled using the reactive transport model PHREEQC-2 to elucidate governing processes and to evaluate scenarios of organic carbon, sulphate and nitrate inputs.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species as Additional Determinants for Cytotoxicity of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B

    PubMed Central

    Frädrich, Claudia; Beer, Lara-Antonia; Gerhard, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections can induce mild to severe diarrhoea and the often associated characteristic pseudomembranous colitis. Two protein toxins, the large glucosyltransferases TcdA and TcdB, are the main pathogenicity factors that can induce all clinical symptoms in animal models. The classical molecular mode of action of these homologous toxins is the inhibition of Rho GTPases by mono-glucosylation. Rho-inhibition leads to breakdown of the actin cytoskeleton, induces stress-activated and pro-inflammatory signaling and eventually results in apoptosis of the affected cells. An increasing number of reports, however, have documented further qualities of TcdA and TcdB, including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by target cells. This review summarizes observations dealing with the production of ROS induced by TcdA and TcdB, dissects pathways that contribute to this phenomenon and speculates about ROS in mediating pathogenesis. In conclusion, ROS have to be considered as a discrete, glucosyltransferase-independent quality of at least TcdB, triggered by different mechanisms. PMID:26797634

  14. Reactive nanophase oxide additions to melt-processed high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Goretta, K.C.; Brandel, B.P.; Lanagan, M.T.; Hu, J.; Miller, D.J.; Sengupta, S.; Parker, J.C.; Ali, M.N.; Chen, Nan

    1994-10-01

    Nanophase TiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders were synthesized by a vapor-phase process and mechanically mixed with stoichiometric YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} powders in 20 mole % concentrations. Pellets produced from powders with and without nanophase oxides were heated in air or O{sub 2} above the peritectic melt temperature and slow-cooled. At 4.2 K, the intragranular critical current density (J{sub c}) increased dramatically with the oxide additions. At 35--50 K, effects of the oxide additions were positive, but less pronounced. At 77 K, the additions decreased J{sub c}, probably because of inducing a depresion of the transition temperature.

  15. Reactivity of Dazomet, a Hydraulic Fracturing Additive: Hydrolysis and Interaction with Pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolazio, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Karamalidis, A.; Hakala, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Marcellus Shale is currently the largest shale gas formation in play across the world. The low-permeability formation requires hydraulic fracturing to be produced. In this process, millions of gallons of water are blended with chemical additives and pumped into each well to fracture the reservoir rock. Although additives account for less than 2% of the fracking fluid mixture, they amount to hundreds of tons per frack job. The environmental properties of some of these additives have been studied, but their behavior under downhole conditions is not widely reported in the peer-reviewed literature. These compounds and their reaction products may return to the surface as produced or waste water. In the event of a spill or release, this water has the potential to contaminate surface soil and water. Of these additives, biocides may present a formidable challenge to water quality. Biocides are toxic compounds (by design), typically added to the Marcellus Shale to control bacteria in the well. An assessment of the most frequently used biocides indicated a need to study the chemical dazomet under reservoir conditions. The Marcellus Shale contains significant deposits of pyrite. This is a ubiquitous mineral within black shales that is known to react with organic compounds in both oxic and anoxic settings. Thus, the objective of our study was to determine the effect of pyrite on the hydrolysis of dazomet. Liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QQQ) was used to calculate the loss rate of aqueous dazomet. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to identify the reaction products. Our experiments show that in water, dazomet rapidly hydrolyses in water to form organic and inorganic transformation products. This reaction rate was unaffected when performed under anoxic conditions. However, with pyrite we found an appreciable increase in the removal rate of dazomet. This was accompanied by a corresponding change in the distribution of observed

  16. Rifting and Post-Rift Reactivation of The Eastern Sardinian Margin (Western Tyrrhenian Back-Arc Basin) Evidenced by the Messinian Salinity Crisis Markers and Salt Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaullier, V.; Chanier, F.; Vendeville, B.; Lymer, G.; Lofi, J.; Sage, F.; Maillard, A.; Thinon, I.

    2014-12-01

    The Eastern Sardinian margin formed during the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea, a back-arc basin created by continental rifting and oceanic spreading related to the eastward migrating Apennine subduction system from middle Miocene to Pliocene times. We carried out the "METYSS" project aiming at better understanding the Miocene-Pliocene relationships between crustal tectonics and salt tectonics in this key-area, where rifting is pro parte coeval with the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.96-5.33 Ma) and Messinian salt décollement creates thin-skinned tectonics. Thereby, we use the MSC seismic markers and the deformation of viscous salt and its brittle overburden as proxies to better delineate the timing of rifting and post-rift reactivation, and especially to quantifying vertical and horizontal movements. Our mapping of the Messinian Erosion Surface and of Messinian Upper and Mobile Units shows that a rifted basin already existed by the Messinian times, revealing a major pre-MSC rifting episode across the entire domain. Because salt tectonics can create fan-shaped geometries in sediments, syn-rift deposits have to be carefully re-examined in order to decipher the effects of crustal tectonics (rifting) and salt tectonics. Our data surprisingly showed that there are no clues for Messinian syn-rift sediments along the East-Sardinia Basin and Cornaglia Terrace, hence no evidence for rifting after Late Tortonian times. Nevertheless, widespread deformation occurred during the Pliocene and is attributed to post-rift reactivation. Some Pliocene vertical movements have been evidenced by discovering localized gravity gliding of the salt and its Late Messinian (UU) and Early Pliocene overburden. To the South, crustal-scale southward tilting triggered along-strike gravity gliding of salt and cover recorded by upslope extension and downslope shortening. To the North, East of the Baronie Ridge, there was some post-salt crustal activity along a narrow N-S basement trough, bounded

  17. Is there role of additional chemotherapy after definitive local treatment for stage I/II marginal zone lymphoma?: Consortium for Improving Survival of Lymphoma (CISL) study.

    PubMed

    Koh, Myeong Seok; Kim, Won Seog; Kim, Seok Jin; Oh, Sung Yong; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Lee, Soon Il; Hong, Junshik; Song, Moo Kon; Shin, Ho-Jin; Kwon, Jung Hye; Kim, Hyo Jung; Do, Yong Rok; Suh, Cheolwon; Kim, Hyo Jin

    2015-10-01

    Even though local stage (Ann Arbor stage I/II) marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) is well controlled with local treatment-based therapy, no data exist on the role of additional chemotherapy after local treatment for stage I/II MZL. Patients with biopsy-confirmed Ann Arbor stage I/II MZL (n = 210) were included for analysis in this study. Of these, 180 patients (85.7 %) were stage I and 30 (14.3 %) were stage II. Most patients (n = 182, 86.7 %) were treated with a local modality including radiation therapy or surgery and 28 (13.3 %) received additional systemic chemotherapy after local treatment. The overall response rate was 98.3 % (95 % CI 96-100 %), with 187 complete responses and 20 partial responses. In the local treatment group, the mean progression-free survival (PFS) was 147.4 months (95 % CI 126.7-168.1 months) and the overall survival (OS) was 188.2 months (95 % CI 178.8-197.7 months). In the additional chemotherapy group, the mean PFS was 103.4 months (95 % CI 84.9-121.9 months) and the OS was 137.3 months (95 % CI 127.9-146.7 months). There was no difference between the two groups in OS (p = 0.836) and PFS (p = 0.695). Local stage MZL has a good clinical course and is well controlled with a local treatment modality without additional chemotherapy.

  18. Effect of Graphite Addition on Structure and Properties of Ti(CN) Coatings Deposited by Reactive Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Pengbo; He, Jining; Zhao, Hongjian; Ni, Zenglei; Ye, Fuxing

    2016-12-01

    Ti(CN) coatings with graphite addition ranging from 0 to 50 wt.% were prepared using reactive plasma spraying technology and their microstructure, mechanical, and tribological properties were investigated using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Vickers microhardness testing, and block-on-ring wear testing. The results showed that graphite addition resulted in crystallite size refinement and an increase in the amount of amorphous phase. The Ti(CN) coatings consisted of a mixture of Ti(CN), graphite, CN x , and amorphous phases. The hardness first increased then decreased as the graphite content was increased, with a maximum of 1450 HV0.2 for 30 wt.% graphite addition. The fracture toughness decreased from 4.38 MPa m1/2 to 2.76 MPa m1/2 with increasing graphite content. The friction coefficient decreased due to unreacted graphite embedded in the matrix. Also, the wear rate first decreased then increased, with a minimum value of 2.65 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1 for 30 wt.% graphite addition. The wear mechanisms of the Ti(CN) coatings included abrasive, adhesive, and oxidation wear.

  19. Versatile antifouling polyethersulfone filtration membranes modified via surface grafting of zwitterionic polymers from a reactive amphiphilic copolymer additive.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Pei-Bin; Sun, Jian; Liu, Cui-Jing; Yi, Zhuan; Zhu, Li-Ping; Xu, You-Yi

    2015-06-15

    Here we describe the development of versatile antifouling polyethersulfone (PES) filtration membranes modified via surface grafting of zwitterionic polymers from a reactive amphiphilic copolymer additive. Amphiphilic polyethersulfone-block-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PES-b-PHEMA) was beforehand designed and used as the blending additive of PES membranes prepared by phase inversion technique. The surface enriched PHEMA blocks on membrane surface acted as an anchor to immobilize the initiating site. Poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA) were subsequently grafted onto the PES blend membranes by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The analysis of surface chemistry confirmed the successful grafting of zwitterionic PSBMA brushes on PES membrane surface. The resulted PES-g-PSBMA membranes were capable of separating proteins from protein solution and oil from oil/water emulsion efficiently. Furthermore, the modified membranes showed high hydrophilicity and strongly antifouling properties due to the incorporation of well-defined PSBMA layer. In addition, the PES-g-PSBMA membranes exhibited excellent blood compatibility and durability during the washing process. The developed antifouling PES membranes are versatile and can find their applications in protein filtration, blood purification and oil/water separation, etc.

  20. TRPA1 activation leads to neurogenic vasodilatation: involvement of reactive oxygen nitrogen species in addition to CGRP and NO

    PubMed Central

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Kodji, Xenia; Abdul‐Kader, Nayaab; Heads, Richard; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Bevan, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Transient receptor potential ankyrin‐1 (TRPA1) activation is known to mediate neurogenic vasodilatation. We investigated the mechanisms involved in TRPA1‐mediated peripheral vasodilatation in vivo using the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde. Experimental Approach Changes in vascular ear blood flow were measured in anaesthetized mice using laser Doppler flowmetry. Key Results Topical application of cinnamaldehyde to the mouse ear caused a significant increase in blood flow in the skin of anaesthetized wild‐type (WT) mice but not in TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice. Cinnamaldehyde‐induced vasodilatation was inhibited by the pharmacological blockade of the potent microvascular vasodilator neuropeptide CGRP and neuronal NOS‐derived NO pathways. Cinnamaldehyde‐mediated vasodilatation was significantly reduced by treatment with reactive oxygen nitrogen species (RONS) scavenger such as catalase and the SOD mimetic TEMPOL, supporting a role of RONS in the downstream vasodilator TRPA1‐mediated response. Co‐treatment with a non‐selective NOS inhibitor L‐NAME and antioxidant apocynin further inhibited the TRPA1‐mediated vasodilatation. Cinnamaldehyde treatment induced the generation of peroxynitrite that was blocked by the peroxynitrite scavenger FeTPPS and shown to be dependent on TRPA1, as reflected by an increase in protein tyrosine nitration in the skin of WT, but not in TRPA1 KO mice. Conclusion and Implications This study provides in vivo evidence that TRPA1‐induced vasodilatation mediated by cinnamaldehyde requires neuronal NOS‐derived NO, in addition to the traditional neuropeptide component. A novel role of peroxynitrite is revealed, which is generated downstream of TRPA1 activation by cinnamaldehyde. This mechanistic pathway underlying TRPA1‐mediated vasodilatation may be important in understanding the role of TRPA1 in pathophysiological situations. PMID:27189253

  1. Covalent Modifiers: A Chemical Perspective on the Reactivity of α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyls with Thiols via Hetero-Michael Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Paul A; Widen, John C; Harki, Daniel A; Brummond, Kay M

    2017-02-09

    Although Michael acceptors display a potent and broad spectrum of bioactivity, they have largely been ignored in drug discovery because of their presumed indiscriminate reactivity. As such, a dearth of information exists relevant to the thiol reactivity of natural products and their analogues possessing this moiety. In the midst of recently approved acrylamide-containing drugs, it is clear that a good understanding of the hetero-Michael addition reaction and the relative reactivities of biological thiols with Michael acceptors under physiological conditions is needed for the design and use of these compounds as biological tools and potential therapeutics. This Perspective provides information that will contribute to this understanding, such as kinetics of thiol addition reactions, bioactivities, as well as steric and electronic factors that influence the electrophilicity and reversibility of Michael acceptors. This Perspective is focused on α,β-unsaturated carbonyls given their preponderance in bioactive natural products.

  2. Effect of minor reactive metal additions on fracture toughness of iron: 12-percent nickel alloy at-196 deg and 25 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.; Stephens, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The slow bend precracked Charpy fracture toughness and tensile behavior of arc-melted and hot-rolled Fe-12Ni alloys containing up to 4 atomic percent reactive metal additions were determined at -196 C and 25 C after water quenching from three annealing temperatures. The fracture toughness of Fe-12Ni at -196 C was improved by small amounts of Al, Ce, Hf, La, Nb, Ta, Ti, V, Y, and Zr, but not by Si. Cryogenic toughness was improved up to 7.5 times that of binary Fe-12Ni and varied with the reactive metal, its concentration, and the annealing temperature.

  3. In situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction of tobermorite formation in autoclaved aerated concrete: Influence of silica source reactivity and Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kunio; Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sato, Masugu

    2011-05-15

    The hydrothermal formation of tobermorite during the processing of autoclaved aerated concrete was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly developed autoclave cell and a photon-counting pixel array detector were used. To investigate the effects of the silica source, reactive quartz from chert and less-reactive quartz from quartz sand were used as starting materials. The effect of Al addition on tobermorite formation was also studied. In all cases, C-S-H, hydroxylellestadite and katoite were clearly observed as intermediates. Acceleration of tobermorite formation by Al addition was clearly observed. However, Al addition did not affect the dissolution rate of quartz. Two pathways, via C-S-H and katoite, were also observed in the Al-containing system. These results suggest that the structure of initially formed C-S-H is important for the subsequent tobermorite formation reactions.

  4. Sedimentary loading, lithospheric flexure and subduction initiation at passive margins

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.G. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Recent theoretical models have demonstrated the difficulty of subduction initiation at passive margins, whether subduction is assumed to initiate by overcoming the shear resistance on a thrust fault through the lithosphere or by failure of the entire lithosphere in bending due to sedimentary loading. A mechanism for subduction initiation at passive margins that overcomes these difficulties incorporates the increased subsidence of a marginal basin during decoupling of a previously locked margin. A passive margin may decouple by reactivation of rift-related faults in a local extensional or strike-slip setting. Flexure of marginal basins by sedimentary loading is modeled here by the bending of infinite and semi-infinite elastic plates under a triangular load. The geometry of a mature marginal basin fits the deflection produced by loading of an infinite plate in which the flexural rigidity of continental lithosphere is larger than that of oceanic lithosphere. Decoupling of such a locked passive margin by fault reactivation may cause the lithospheric bending behavior of the margin to change from that of an infinite plate to that of a semi-infinite plate, with a resultant increase in deflection of the marginal basin. The increase in deflection depends on the flexural rigidities of continental and oceanic lithosphere. For flexural rigidities of 10[sup 30]-10[sup 31] dyn-cm (elastic lithosphere thicknesses 24--51 km), the difference in deflections between infinite and semi-infinite plates is 15--17 km, so that decoupling sinks the top of the oceanic lithosphere to depths of ca 35 km. Additional sedimentation within the basin and phase changes within the oceanic crust may further increase this deflection. Subduction may initiate if the top of the oceanic lithosphere sinks to the base of the adjacent elastic lithosphere.

  5. Iberian Atlantic Margins Group investigates deep structure of ocean margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Iberian Atlantic Margins Group; Banda, Enric; Torne, Montserrat

    With recent seismic reflection data in hand, investigators for the Iberian Atlantic Margins project are preparing images of the deep continental and oceanic margins of Iberia. In 1993, the IAM group collected near vertical incidence seismic reflection data over a total distance of 3500 km along the North and Western Iberian Margins, Gorringe Bank Region and Gulf of Cadiz (Figure 1). When combined with data on the conjugate margin off Canada, details of the Iberian margin's deep structure should aid in distinguishing rift models and improve understanding of the processes governing the formation of margins.The North Iberian passive continental margin was formed during a Permian to Triassic phase of extension and matured during the early Cretaceous by rotation of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to Eurasia. From the late Cretaceous to the early Oligocene period, Iberia rotated in a counterclockwise direction around an axis located west of Lisbon. The plate boundary between Iberia and Eurasia, which lies along the Pyrenees, follows the north Spanish marginal trough, trends obliquely in the direction of the fossil Bay of Biscay triple junction, and continues along the Azores-Biscay Rise [Sibuet et al., 1994]. Following the NE-SW convergence of Iberia and Eurasia, the reactivation of the North Iberian continental margin resulted in the formation of a marginal trough and accretionary prism [Boillot et al., 1971].

  6. Marginal Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hecke, Martin

    2013-03-01

    All around us, things are falling apart. The foam on our cappuccinos appears solid, but gentle stirring irreversibly changes its shape. Skin, a biological fiber network, is firm when you pinch it, but soft under light touch. Sand mimics a solid when we walk on the beach but a liquid when we pour it out of our shoes. Crucially, a marginal point separates the rigid or jammed state from the mechanical vacuum (freely flowing) state - at their marginal points, soft materials are neither solid nor liquid. Here I will show how the marginal point gives birth to a third sector of soft matter physics: intrinsically nonlinear mechanics. I will illustrate this with shock waves in weakly compressed granular media, the nonlinear rheology of foams, and the nonlinear mechanics of weakly connected elastic networks.

  7. Study of Fluorine Addition Influence in the Dielectric Constant of Diamond-Like Carbon Thin Film Deposited by Reactive Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, S. C.; Mansano, R. D.

    The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films (a-C:H) or DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) films are well known for exhibiting high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant, high mechanical hardness, low friction coefficient, low superficial roughness and also for being inert. In this paper, we produced fluorinated DLC films (a-C:F), and studied the effect of adding CF4 on the above-mentioned properties of DLC films. These films were produced by a reactive RF magnetron sputtering system using a target of pure carbon in stable graphite allotrope. We performed measurements of electrical characteristic curves of capacitance as a function of applied tension (C-V) and current as a function of the applied tension (I-V). We showed the dielectric constant (k) and the resistivity (ρ) as functions of the CF4 concentration. On films with 65% CF4, we found that k = 2.7, and on films with 70% CF4, ρ = 12.3 × 1011 Ω cm. The value of the electrical breakdown field to films with 70% CF4 is 5.3 × 106 V/cm.

  8. Durability to oxygen reactive ion etching enhanced by addition of synthesized bis(trimethylsilyl)phenyl-containing (meth)acrylates in ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shunya; Sato, Hiroki; Tasaki, Yuhei; Watanuki, Kimihito; Nemoto, Nobukatsu; Nakagawa, Masaru

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the selection of bis(trimethylsilyl)phenyl-containing (meth)acrylates as additives to improve the durability to oxygen reactive ion etching (O2 RIE) of sub-50 nm imprint resist patterns suitable for bubble-defect-free UV nanoimprinting with a readily condensable gas. 2,5-Bis(2-acryloyloxyethoxy)-1,4-bis(trimethylsilyl)benzene, which has a diacrylate chemical structure similar to that of glycerol 1,3-diglycerolate diacrylate used as a base monomer, and 3-(2-methacryloyloxyethoxy)-1-(hydroxylethoxy)-2-propoxy-3,5-bis(trimethylsilyl)benzene, which has a hydroxy group similar to the base monomer, were synthesized taking into consideration the Ohnishi and ring parameters, and the oxidization of the trimethylsilyl moiety to inorganic species during O2 RIE. The addition of the latter liquid additive to the base monomer decreased etching rate owing to the good miscibility of the additive in the base monomer, while the addition of the former crystalline additive caused phase separation after UV nanoimprinting. The latter additive worked as a compatibilizer to the former additive, which is preferred for etching durability improvement. The coexistence of the additives enabled the fabrication of a 45 nm line-and-space resist pattern by UV nanoimprinting, and its residual layer could be removed by O2 RIE.

  9. Marginality principle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil is a fragile resource supplying many goods and services. Given the diversity of soil across the world and within a landscape, there are many different capacities among soils to provide the basic soil functions. Marginality of soils is a difficult process to define because the metrics to define ...

  10. Remote sulfonamido group enhances reactivity and selectivity for asymmetric Michael addition of nitroalkanes to α,β-unsaturated aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chao; Uang, Biing-Jiun

    2014-09-01

    The pyrrolidine-camphorsulfonamide-based catalyst 1 a catalyzes the enantioselective conjugate addition of nitroalkanes to α,β-unsaturated aldehydes in the presence of five equivalents of water in iPrOH to give the corresponding chiral Michael adducts in good yields and high enantioselectivities (up to 99% ee) with a catalyst loading as low as 1 mol%.

  11. Addition of quadricyclane to C[sub 60]: Easy access to fullerene derivatives bearing a reactive double bond in the side chain

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, M. ); Maggini, M.; Scorrano, G. ); Lucchini, V. )

    1993-07-02

    The reaction of C[sub 60] with quadricyclane gives a stable 6,6 adduct which has been spectroscopically characterized. The double bond of the [2.2.1]bicycloheptene moiety reacts readily with electrophiles (e.g., PhSCl). Soon after the isolation and characterization of fullerene C[sub 60], the electrophilic character of this carbon cluster was disclosed by both experimental and theoretical results. Additions of several electrophiles to C[sub 60] have also been reported, but the conditions necessary for these reactions to occur led often to inseparable mixtures of products of multiple addition. In order to allow a controlled addition of electrophiles and to enrich the chemistry of functionalization, C[sub 60] has to be structurally modified. Herein the authors report a simple cycloaddition approach to a stable and characterizable C[sub 60] derivative, in which the incorporated olefinic moiety shows high reactivity toward electrophiles. 3 figs.

  12. Activation of Marginally Reactive Boron Enolates by MeLi for the Formation of Enol Phosphates and Synthesis of the Δ(9)-THC Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Hiroki; Ikoma, Atsushi; Ogawa, Narihito; Kobayashi, Yuichi

    2015-09-18

    The addition of MeLi to boron enolates produced by the 1,4-addition of Ar2Cu(CN)Li2 to BF3·OEt2-activated enones was followed by the reaction with ClP(O)(OEt)2 to afford the corresponding enol phosphates in moderate to good yields. The scope of this method was examined with sterically hindered or electronically biased enones and/or reagents. This activation of boron enolates was successfully applied to the synthesis of the methyl ether of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol.

  13. Orientation-free and differentially pumped addition of a low-flux reactive gas beam to a surface analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harthcock, Colin; Jahanbekam, Abdolreza; Eskelsen, Jeremy R.; Lee, David Y.

    2016-11-01

    We describe an example of a piecewise gas chamber that can be customized to incorporate a low flux of gas-phase radicals with an existing surface analysis chamber for in situ and stepwise gas-surface interaction experiments without any constraint in orientation. The piecewise nature of this gas chamber provides complete angular freedom and easy alignment and does not require any modification of the existing surface analysis chamber. In addition, the entire gas-surface system is readily differentially pumped with the surface chamber kept under ultra-high-vacuum during the gas-surface measurements. This new design also allows not only straightforward reconstruction to accommodate the orientation of different surface chambers but also for the addition of other desired features, such as an additional pump to the current configuration. Stepwise interaction between atomic oxygen and a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surface was chosen to test the effectiveness of this design, and the site-dependent O-atom chemisorption and clustering on the graphite surface were resolved by a scanning tunneling microscope in the nm-scale. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to further confirm the identity of the chemisorbed species on the graphite surface as oxygen.

  14. Ivory Coast-Ghana margin: model of a transform margin

    SciTech Connect

    Mascle, J.; Blarez, E.

    1987-05-01

    The authors present a marine study of the eastern Ivory Coast-Ghana continental margins which they consider one of the most spectacular extinct transform margins. This margin has been created during Early-Lower Cretaceous time and has not been submitted to any major geodynamic reactivation since its fabric. Based on this example, they propose to consider during the evolution of the transform margin four main and successive stages. Shearing contact is first active between two probably thick continental crusts and then between progressively thinning continental crusts. This leads to the creation of specific geological structures such as pull-apart graben, elongated fault lineaments, major fault scarps, shear folds, and marginal ridges. After the final continental breakup, a hot center (the mid-oceanic ridge axis) is progressively drifting along the newly created margin. The contact between two lithospheres of different nature should necessarily induce, by thermal exchanges, vertical crustal readjustments. Finally, the transform margin remains directly adjacent to a hot but cooling oceanic lithosphere; its subsidence behavior should then progressively be comparable to the thermal subsidence of classic rifted margins.

  15. Addition of Si-H and B-H bonds and redox reactivity involving low-coordinate nitrido-vanadium complexes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rick; Tran, Ba L; Ghosh, Soumya; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Pink, Maren; Gao, Xinfeng; Carroll, Patrick J; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Mindiola, Daniel J

    2015-03-16

    In this study we enumerate the reactivity for two molecular vanadium nitrido complexes of [(nacnac)V≡N(X)] formulation [nacnac = (Ar)NC(Me)CHC(Me)(Ar)(-), Ar = 2,6-(CHMe2)2C6H3); X(-) = OAr (1) and N(4-Me-C6H4)2 (Ntolyl2) (2)]. Density functional theory calculations and reactivity studies indicate the nitride motif to have nucleophilic character, but where the nitrogen atom can serve as a conduit for electron transfer, thus allowing the reduction of the vanadium(V) metal ion with concurrent oxidation of the incoming substrate. Silane, H2SiPh2, readily converts the nitride ligand in 1 into a primary silyl-amide functionality with concomitant two-electron reduction at the vanadium center to form the complex [(nacnac)V{N(H)SiHPh2}(OAr)] (3). Likewise, addition of the B-H bond in pinacolborane to the nitride moiety in 2 results in formation of the boryl-amide complex [(nacnac)V{N(H)B(pinacol)}(Ntolyl2)] (4). In addition to spectroscopic data, complexes 3 and 4 were also elucidated structurally by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. One-electron reduction of 1 with 0.5% Na/Hg on a preparative scale allowed for the isolation and structural determination of an asymmetric bimolecular nitride radical anion complex having formula [Na]2[(nacnac)V(N)(OAr)]2 (5), in addition to room-temperature solution X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies.

  16. Comparison of reactivity of Pt(II) center in the mononuclear and binuclear organometallic diimineplatinum complexes toward oxidative addition of methyl iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    The reactivities of Pt(II) center in a series of organometallic mononuclear Pt(II), binuclear Pt(II) and binuclear mixed-valence Pt(II)-Pt(IV) complexes toward oxidative addition of MeI have been compared from a theoretical point of view. The nucleophilicity index and electron-donation power were calculated for each of these complexes. The energies of HOMO and dZ2 orbital were determined for these complexes. Very good correlations were found between logk2 (k2 is the experimentally determined second order rate constant for the oxidative addition of MeI on these complexes) and nucleophilicity index or electron-donation power for these complexes. The correlation between logk2 and the energy of HOMO or the energy of dZ2 orbital were also very good. The condensed-to-atom Fukui functions for electrophilic attack on these complexes showed that the Pt(II) center is the preferred site for the oxidative addition of MeI. All of these observations are in agreement with the proposed SN2 type mechanism in the oxidative addition of MeI on the Pt(II) center in these complexes.

  17. Electrophilic Addition to Alkenes: The Relation between Reactivity and Enthalpy of Hydrogenation: Regioselectivity is Determined by the Stability of the Two Conceivable Products.

    PubMed

    Schnatter, Wayne F K; Rogers, Donald W; Zavitsas, Andreas A

    2015-07-13

    Although electrophilic addition to alkenes has been well studied, some secrets still remain. Halogenations, hydrohalogenations, halohydrin formations, hydrations, epoxidations, other oxidations, carbene additions, and ozonolyses are investigated to elucidate the relation of alkene reactivities with their enthalpies of hydrogenation (ΔHhyd ). For addition of electrophiles to unconjugated hydrocarbon alkenes, ln(k) is a linear function of ΔHhyd , where k is the rate constant. Linear correlation coefficients are about 0.98 or greater. None of the many previously proposed correlations of ln(k) with the properties of alkenes or with linear free-energy relationships match the generality and accuracy of the simple linear relationship found herein. A notable exception is acid-catalyzed hydration in water or in solvents stabilizing relatively stable carbocation intermediates (e.g., tertiary, benzylic, or allylic). (13) C NMR chemical shifts of the two alkene carbons also predict regioselectivity. These effects have not been noted previously and are operative in general, including addition to heteroatom-substituted alkenes.

  18. Marginal Costs and Formula-Based Funding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Ellen

    Marginal cost is the cost of producing an additional unit. In higher education, one marginal cost would be cost of educating an additional student. Formula-based budget determination for public higher education is usually based on average cost per student. This study estimates marginal cost and compares it with average cost. There are several…

  19. Reactivation of the Archean-Proterozoic suture along the southern margin of Laurentia during the Mazatzal orogeny: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications of ca. 1.63 Ga granite in southeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Daniel S.; Barnes, Calvin G.; Premo, Wayne R.; Snoke, Arthur W.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of ca. 1.63 Ga monzogranite (the “white quartz monzonite”) in the southern Sierra Madre, southeastern Wyoming, is anomalous given its distance from the nearest documented plutons of similar age (central Colorado) and the nearest contemporaneous tectonic margin (New Mexico). It is located immediately south of the Cheyenne belt—a ca. 1.75 Ga Archean-Proterozoic tectonic suture. New geochronological, isotopic, and geochemical data suggest that emplacement of the white quartz monzonite occurred between ca. 1645 and 1628 Ma (main pulse ca. 1628 Ma) and that the white quartz monzonite originated primarily by partial melting of the Big Creek Gneiss, a modified arc complex. There is no evidence that mafic magmas were involved. Open folds of the ca. 1750 Ma regional foliation are cut by undeformed white quartz monzonite. On a regional scale, rocks intruded by the white quartz monzonite have experienced higher pressure and temperature conditions and are migmatitic as compared to the surrounding rocks, suggesting a genetic relationship between the white quartz monzonite and tectonic exhumation. We propose that regional shortening imbricated the Big Creek Gneiss, uplifting the now-exposed high-grade rocks of the Big Creek Gneiss (hanging wall of the thrust and wall rock to the white quartz monzonite) and burying correlative rocks, which partially melted to form the white quartz monzonite. This tectonism is attributed to the ca. 1.65 Ga Mazatzal orogeny, as foreland shortening spread progressively into the Yavapai Province. Mazatzal foreland effects have also been described in the Great Lakes region and have been inferred in the Black Hills of South Dakota. We suggest that the crustal-scale rheologic contrast across the Archean-Proterozoic suture, originally developed along the southern margin of Laurentia, and including the Cheyenne belt, facilitated widespread reactivation of that boundary during the Mazatzal orogeny. This finding emphasizes the degree to

  20. Addition of erythrocytes to in vitro culture medium attenuates the detrimental effects of reactive oxygen species on bovine preimplantation embryo development.

    PubMed

    Ideta, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Kanami; Aoyagi, Yoshito

    2012-01-01

    Erythrocytes were recently found to improve the early development of mice embryos by their antioxidant effect. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of erythrocytes on the in vitro development of bovine in vitro fertilized (IVF) embryos in medium supplemented with reactive oxygen species (ROS). IVF embryos were cultured in CR1aa medium supplemented with oxidizing agents, 0.5mmol/L hypoxanthine and 0.01U/mL xanthine oxidase (HX/XOD), in the presence and absence of erythrocytes (5×10(4) , 5×10(5) , 5×10(6) and 5×10(7) erythrocytes/mL). After 8 days, blastocysts were examined with a stereomicroscope. HX/XOD blocked development to the blastocyst stage (HX/XOD: 0%, control: 33%), but in the presence of both erythrocytes and HX/XOD, blastocyst development was restored to about one-third to two-thirds the normal rate (5×10(5) to 5×10(7) erythrocytes/mL: 12 to 23%). Furthermore, adding erythrocytes or erythrocyte hemolysate to medium without HX/XOD increased the blastocyst rate. These results suggest that the addition of erythrocytes can attenuate the detrimental effects of ROS on embryo development in bovine species as well as in mice.

  1. C-Reactive Protein in Stable Cystic Fibrosis: An Additional Indicator of Clinical Disease Activity and Risk of Future Pulmonary Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Matouk, Elias; Nguyen, Dao; Benedetti, Andrea; Bernier, Joanie; Gruber, James; Landry, Jennifer; Rousseau, Simon; Ahlgren, Heather G; Lands, Larry C; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Radzioch, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In stable adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, we assessed the role of baseline high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) on CF clinical variables and frequency of intravenous (IV) treated pulmonary exacerbations (PExs) 1-year post-baseline. Methods We recruited 51 clinically stable CF patients from our Adult CF Center. We incorporated collected parameters into Matouk CF clinical score and CF questionnaire-revised quality of life score (QOL). We used the clinical minus complications subscores as a clinical disease activity score (CDAS). We dichotomized our patients according to the cohort median baseline hs-CRP of 5.2 mg/L. Results Patients in the high hs-CRP group (≥ 5.2 mg/L) demonstrated worse CDAS (r=0.67, p=0.0001) and QOL scores (r=0.57, p=0.0017) at a given FEV1% predicted. In both hs-CRP groups, prior-year IV-treated PExs and baseline CDASs were significant predictors of future IV-treated PExs. Interestingly, the association between baseline CDAS and future PExs frequency was more robust in the high compared to the low hs-CRP group (r=−0.88, p<0.0001, r=−0.48, p=0.017, respectively) with a steeper regression slope (p=0.001). In addition, a significant interaction was demonstrated between elevated baseline hs-CRP levels and CDASs for the prediction of increased risk of future PExs (p=0.02). This interaction provided an additional indicator of clinical disease activity and added another dimension to the prior year PExs frequency phenotype to identify patients at increased risk for future PExs. Conclusion Stable CF patients with elevated baseline hs-CRP (≥ 5.2 mg/L) demonstrated worse clinical disease activity and QOL scores at a given level of disease severity (FEV1% predicted). Elevated baseline hs-CRP values combined with clinical disease activity scores are associated with increased risk for future IV-treated PExs even in those with mild clinical disease activity scores. PMID:28066689

  2. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  3. c-axis inclined ZnO films for shear-wave transducers deposited by reactive sputtering using an additional blind

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.; Schreiter, M.; Weber, J.; Gabl, R.; Pitzer, D.; Primig, R.; Wersing, W.; Assouar, M.B.; Elmazria, O.

    2006-03-15

    This article reports on the growth and characterization of polycrystalline ZnO films having c axis inclined up to 16 deg. with respect to the substrate normal. These films allow the excitation of shear and longitudinal waves with comparable electromechanical coupling constants and are of significant interest for thin film bulk acoustic resonators (FBARs). The films are deposited on silicon substrates covered by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} buffer layers under low pressure using a modified reactive dc-pulsed magnetron sputtering system. A blind has been positioned between target and substrate, allowing oblique particle incidence without tilting the wafer. The study of structural properties of the deposited ZnO films by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy has permitted to show the presence of the inclined structure. Electromechanical coupling constants K up to 13% have been extracted for shear-mode excitation using highly overmoded FBARs.

  4. Multicomponent reactions of phosphines, diynedioates, and aryl aldehydes generated furans appending reactive phosphorus ylides through cumulated trienoates as key intermediates: a phosphine α-addition-δ-evolvement of an anion pathway.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie-Cheng; Chuang, Shih-Ching

    2014-11-07

    Multicomponent reactions of phosphines, diynedioates, and aryl aldehydes have been demonstrated, providing trisubstituted furans appending reactive phosphorus ylides, through cumulated trienoates as key intermediates. The proposed trienoate intermediates, 1,5-dipolar species formed via nucleophilic α-attack of phosphines toward diynedioates (α-addition-δ-evolvement of an anion, abbreviated αAδE), undergo addition to aryl aldehydes followed by 5-endo-dig cyclization, proton transfer, and resonance to give trisubstituted furans. Furthermore, the phosphorus ylides are oxidized to α-keto ester furans and utilized as Wittig reagents.

  5. Marginal Costing Techniques for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Richard; Brinkman, Paul

    The techniques for calculating marginal costs in higher education are examined in detail. Marginal costs, as defined in economics, is the change in total cost associated with producing one additional unit of output. In higher education, the most frequently selected unit of output is a full-time-equivalent student or, alternatively, a student…

  6. Sulfonate activation of the electrophilic reactivity of chlorine and alkyl hypochlorides by the insertion of sulfur trioxide at the C1-C1 and O-C1 bonds. Addition of chlorine chloro- and ethoxysulfate to olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Zefirov, N.S.; Koz'min, A.S.; Sorokin, V.D.; Zhdankin, V.V.

    1986-10-10

    At low temperatures (-40 to -80/sup 0/C) sulfur trioxide enters the chlorine molecule (with the formation of chlorine chlorosulfate) and the ethyl hypochlorite molecule (giving chlorine ethoxysulfate). Both new compounds are highly reactive electrophilic chlorinating reagents and add to ethylene, activated alkenes (1-hexene and cyclohexene), and deactivated olefins (methyl methacrylate, tri- and tetrachloroethylene) in methylene chloride solution at low temperatures. The addition of chlorine chlorosulfate leads to the formation of ..beta..-chloroalkyl chlorosulfates with yields of 24-85%, and the addition of chlorine ethoxysulfate leads to ..beta..-chloroalkyl ethylsulfates with yields of 65-85%. The reactions with unsymmetrical olefins lead to mixtures of the regioisomers with a preference for the products from addition according to the Markovnikov rule; the addition to cyclohexene is trans-stereospecific. The investigated processes represent a new simple approach to the production of sulfate-activated chlorinating reagents and extend the possibilities for functional substitution of olefins.

  7. Effect of Ethyl Ester L-Lysine Triisocyanate addition to produce reactive PLA/PCL bio-polyester blends for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Visco, Annamaria; Nocita, Davide; Giamporcaro, Alberto; Ronca, Sara; Forte, Giuseppe; Pistone, Alessandro; Espro, Claudia

    2017-02-16

    We report in this paper the effects of Ethyl Ester L-Lysine Triisocyanate (LTI) on the physical-mechanical properties of Poly(lactide)/Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PLA/PCL) polyesters blends. The PLA/PCL ratios considered were 20/80, 50/50 and 80/20 (wt/wt %) and LTI was added in amounts of 0.0-0.5-1.0 phr. PLA and PCL reacted with LTI during processing in a Brabender twin screw internal mixer to produce block copolymers in-situ. The resulting blends have been characterized by torque measurements, uniaxial tensile tests, Differential Scanning Calorimeter, contact angle measurements with a Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) solution, ATR analysis and morphological SEM observations. Experimental results highlighted how LTI enhanced interaction and dispersion of the two components, resulting into a synergic effect in mechanical properties. Mechanical and physical properties can be tailored by changing the blend composition. The most noticeable trend was an increase in ductility of the mixed polymers. Besides, LTI decreased blend's wet ability in PBS and lowered the starting of crystalline phase formation for both polymers, confirming an interaction among them. These reactive blends could find use as biomedical materials, e.g. absorbable suture threads or scaffolds for cellular growth.

  8. [Marginalization and health. Introduction].

    PubMed

    Yunes, J

    1992-06-01

    The relationship between marginalization and health is clear. In Mexico, for example, life expectancy is 53 years for the poorest population sectors and 20 years more for the wealthiest. Infant mortality in poor Colombian families is twice that of wealthier families, and one-third of developing countries the rural population is only half as likely as the urban to have access to health services. Women in the Southern hemisphere are 12 times likelier than those in the Northern to die of maternal causes. The most important step in arriving at a solution to the inequity may be to analyze in depth the relationship between marginality and health. Marginality may be defined as the lack of participation of individuals or groups in certain key phases of societal life, such as production, consumption, or political decision making. Marginality came to be viewed as a social problem only with recognition of the rights of all individuals to participate in available social goods. Marginality is always relative, and marginal groups exist because central groups determine the criteria for inclusion in the marginal and central groups. Marginality thus always refers to a concrete society at a specific historical moment. Marginal groups may be of various types. At present, marginal groups include women, rural populations, people with AIDS or mental illness or certain other health conditions, refugees, ethnic or religious groups, homosexuals, and the poor, who are the largest group of marginal persons in the world. Even in developed countries, 100-200 million persons live below the poverty line. Latin America is struggling to emerge from its marginal status in the world. The economic crisis of the 1980s increased poverty in the region, and 40% are not considered impoverished. Latin America is a clear example of the relationship between marginality and health. Its epidemiologic profile is intimately related to nutrition, availability of potable water, housing, and environmental

  9. Direct Syn Addition of Two Silicon Atoms to a C≡C Triple Bond by Si-Si Bond Activation: Access to Reactive Disilylated Olefins.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maha; Gaumont, Annie-Claude; Durandetti, Muriel; Maddaluno, Jacques

    2017-02-20

    A catalytic intramolecular silapalladation of alkynes affords, in good yields and stereoselectively, syn-disilylated heterocycles of different chemical structure and size. When applied to silylethers, this reaction leads to vinylic silanols that undergo a rhodium-catalyzed addition to activated olefins, providing the oxa-Heck or oxa-Michael products, depending on the reaction conditions.

  10. Optimizing Surgical Margins in Breast Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Preya; Balci, Fatih Levent; Crowe, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Adequate surgical margins in breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer have traditionally been viewed as a predictor of local recurrence rates. There is still no consensus on what constitutes an adequate surgical margin, however it is clear that there is a trade-off between widely clear margins and acceptable cosmesis. Preoperative approaches to plan extent of resection with appropriate margins (in the setting of surgery first as well as after neoadjuvant chemotherapy,) include mammography, US, and MRI. Improvements have been made in preoperative lesion localization strategies for surgery, as well as intraoperative specimen assessment, in order to ensure complete removal of imaging findings and facilitate margin clearance. Intraoperative strategies to accurately assess tumor and cavity margins include cavity shave techniques, as well as novel technologies for margin probes. Ablative techniques, including radiofrequency ablation as well as intraoperative radiation, may be used to extend tumor-free margins without resecting additional tissue. Oncoplastic techniques allow for wider resections while maintaining cosmesis and have acceptable local recurrence rates, however often involve surgery on the contralateral breast. As systemic therapy for breast cancer continues to improve, it is unclear what the importance of surgical margins on local control rates will be in the future. PMID:23304479

  11. Frustrated Lewis Pair-Like Reactivity of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: 1,4-Addition Reactions and Polymerizations of Conjugated Polar Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfei; Yao, Yingming; Xu, Xin

    2017-01-26

    Three rare-earth aryloxide ion pairs {[L1REOAr](+) /[B(C6 F5 )4 ](-) ; L1=CH3 C(2,6-iPr2 C6 H3 N)CHC(CH3 )(NCH2 CH2 PPh2 ); RE=Sc, Y, Lu; Ar=2,6-tBu2 C6 H3 } were reported that feature rare-earth/phosphorus (RE/P) combinations exhibiting frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-like 1,4-addition reactions towards conjugated carbonyl substrates (e.g., enone, ynone, and acrylic substrates). Furthermore, these RE/P complexes were found to be effective catalysts for the polymerization of conjugated polar alkene monomers. Mechanistic studies revealed that the rare-earth metal-catalyzed polymerizations were initiated by new FLP-type 1,4-additions rather than traditional and ubiquitous covalent RE-E (E=H, C, N, etc.) bond insertion or single-electron transfer.

  12. Unprecedented chemical reactivity of a paramagnetic endohedral metallofullerene La@C(s)-C82 that leads hydrogen addition in the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Takano, Yuta; Slanina, Zdenek; Mateos, Jaime; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Kurihara, Hiroki; Uhlik, Filip; Herranz, María Ángeles; Martín, Nazario; Nagase, Shigeru; Akasaka, Takeshi

    2014-12-17

    Synthesizing unprecedented diamagnetic adducts of an endohedral metallofullerene was achieved by using 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of paramagnetic La@C(s)-C82 with a simultaneous hydrogen addition. The selective formation of two main products, La@C(s)-C82HCMe2NMeCHPh (2a and 2b), was first detected by HPLC analysis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. 2a and 2b-O, which was readily formed by the oxidation of 2b, were isolated by multistep HPLC separation and were fully characterized by spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D-NMR, UV-vis-NIR measurements and electrochemistry. The hydrogen atom was found to be connected to the fullerene cage directly in the case of 2a, and the redox behavior indicated that the C-H bond can still be readily oxidized. The reaction mechanism and the molecular structures of 2a and 2b were reasonably proposed by the interplay between experimental observations and DFT calculations. The feasible order of the reaction process would involve a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition followed by the hydrogen addition through a radical pathway. It is concluded that the characteristic electronic properties and molecular structure of La@C(s)-C82 resulted in a site-selective reaction, which afforded a unique chemical derivative of an endohedral metallofullerene in high yields. Derivative 2a constitutes the first endohedral metallofullerene where the direct linking of a hydrogen atom has been structurally proven.

  13. Increased pattern transfer fidelity ZEP 520A during reactive ion etching through chemical modifications by additional dosing of the electron beam resist.

    SciTech Connect

    Czaplewski, D. A.; Ocola, L. E.

    2011-03-01

    This article describes a postdevelopment, additional electron exposure to enhance the etch selectivity and improve pattern transfer fidelity of an electron beam resist, ZEP 520A, through chemical changes of the resist. After the critical features were patterned and developed, the resist was exposed at 5 kV accelerating voltage to a second dose of electrons ranging from 300 to 300,000 {micro}C/cm{sup 2}. The etch rate of the resist decreased by approximately 25% in a CHF{sub 3} and O{sub 2} plasma. More critically, the fidelity of the pattern transfer was improved. Infrared and Raman spectroscopies were used to characterize the resist before and after electron beam exposure for doses up to 3000 {micro}C/cm{sup 2}. The carbonyl bonding in the polymer showed significant changes after electron beam exposure that can be associated with improvement in the etch performance of this resist.

  14. Ocean margins workshop

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing the refocusing of its marine research program to emphasize the study of ocean margins and their role in modulating, controlling, and driving Global Change phenomena. This is a proposal to conduct a workshop that will establish priorities and an implementation plan for a new research initiative by the Department of Energy on the ocean margins. The workshop will be attended by about 70 scientists who specialize in ocean margin research. The workshop will be held in the Norfolk, Virginia area in late June 1990.

  15. Margin and sensitivity methods for security analysis of electric power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Scott L.

    Reliable operation of large scale electric power networks requires that system voltages and currents stay within design limits. Operation beyond those limits can lead to equipment failures and blackouts. Security margins measure the amount by which system loads or power transfers can change before a security violation, such as an overloaded transmission line, is encountered. This thesis shows how to efficiently compute security margins defined by limiting events and instabilities, and the sensitivity of those margins with respect to assumptions, system parameters, operating policy, and transactions. Security margins to voltage collapse blackouts, oscillatory instability, generator limits, voltage constraints and line overloads are considered. The usefulness of computing the sensitivities of these margins with respect to interarea transfers, loading parameters, generator dispatch, transmission line parameters, and VAR support is established for networks as large as 1500 buses. The sensitivity formulas presented apply to a range of power system models. Conventional sensitivity formulas such as line distribution factors, outage distribution factors, participation factors and penalty factors are shown to be special cases of the general sensitivity formulas derived in this thesis. The sensitivity formulas readily accommodate sparse matrix techniques. Margin sensitivity methods are shown to work effectively for avoiding voltage collapse blackouts caused by either saddle node bifurcation of equilibria or immediate instability due to generator reactive power limits. Extremely fast contingency analysis for voltage collapse can be implemented with margin sensitivity based rankings. Interarea transfer can be limited by voltage limits, line limits, or voltage stability. The sensitivity formulas presented in this thesis apply to security margins defined by any limit criteria. A method to compute transfer margins by directly locating intermediate events reduces the total number

  16. The Continental Margins Program in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cocker, M.D.; Shapiro, E.A.

    1999-01-01

    From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These addtional investigations are quite varied in scope, and many were made possible because of GIS expertise gained as a result of the Continental Margins Program. Future investigations will also reap the benefits of the Continental Margins Program.From 1984 to 1993, the Georgia Geologic Survey (GGS) participated in the Minerals Management Service-funded Continental Margins Program. Geological and geophysical data acquisition focused on offshore stratigraphic framework studies, phosphate-bearing Miocene-age strata, distribution of heavy minerals, near-surface alternative sources of groundwater, and development of a PC-based Coastal Geographic Information System (GIS). Seven GGS publications document results of those investigations. In addition to those publications, direct benefits of the GGS's participation include an impetus to the GGS's investigations of economic minerals on the Georgia coast, establishment of a GIS that includes computer hardware and software, and seeds for additional investigations through the information and training acquired as a result of the Continental Margins Program. These additional

  17. The Northwestern Atlantic Moroccan Margin From Deep Multichannel Seismic Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malod, J. A.; Réhault, J. P.; Sahabi, M.; Géli, L.; Matias, L.; Zitellini, N.; Sismar Group

    The NW Atlantic Moroccan margin, a conjugate of the Nova Scotia margin, is one of the oldest passive margins of the world. Continental break up occurred in the early Jurassic and the deep margin is characterized by a large salt basin. The SISMAR cruise (9 April to 4 May 2001) acquired 3667 km of 360 channel seismic reflection profiles. In addition, refraction data were recorded by means of 48 OBH/OBS deployments. Simultaneously, some of the marine profiles were extended onshore with 16 portable seismic land stations. WNW-ESE profiles 4 and 5 off El Jadida show a good section of the margin. The crustal thinning in this region is fairly abrupt. These profiles image the crust above a strong seismic reflector at about 12 s.twt., interpreted as the Moho. The crust exhibits several different characteristics from the continent towards the ocean.: - highly diffractive with a thickness larger than 25 km beneath the shelf. - stratified at a deep level and topped by few "tilted blocks" with a diffractive acoustic facies and for which 2 hypotheses are proposed: either continental crust tilted during the rifting or large landslides of crustal and sedimentary material slid down later. Liassic evapor- ites are present but seem less thick than to the south. - layered with seaward dipping reflectors: this type of crust correlates with the magnetic anomaly S1 and corresponds to the continent-ocean transition. - diffractive with an oceanic character. Oceanwards, the crust becomes more typically oceanic, but shows internal reflectors that may be re- lated to compressional reactivation during the Tertiary attested by large scale inverted basins. Our results allow us to discuss the nature and location of the continent-ocean transition at a regional scale and the rifting to spreading evolution of the very ma- ture continental margin off El Jadida. This provide us with some constraints for the initial reconstruction between Africa, North America and Iberia. Moreover, these re- sults help

  18. Thiol-copper(I) and disulfide-dicopper(I) complex O2-reactivity leading to sulfonate-copper(II) complex or the formation of a cross-linked thioether-phenol product with phenol addition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunho; Lee, Dong-Heon; Sarjeant, Amy A Narducci; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2007-11-01

    In order to better understand copper mediated oxidative chemistry via ligand-Cu(I)/O(2) reactivity employing S-donor ligands for copper, O(2)-reactivity studies of the copper(I) complexes (1 and 2, Chart 2) have been carried out with a tridentate N(2)S thiol ligand (1-(N-methyl-N-(2-(pyridin-2-yl)ethyl)amino)propane-2-thiol; L(SH)) or its oxidized disulfide form (L(SS)). Reactions of [L(SH)Cu(I)](+) (1) and [L(SS)(Cu(I))(2)(X)(2)](2+) (2) with O(2) give approximately 90% and approximately 70% yields of [L(SO3)Cu(II)(MeOH)(2)](+) (3), respectively, where L(SO3) is S-oxygenated sulfonate; 3 was characterized by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Mimicking TyrCys galactose oxidase cofactor biogenesis, a new C-S bond is formed (within new thioether moiety L(SPhOH)) from cuprous complex (both 1 and 2) dioxygen reactivity in the presence of 2,4-tBu(2)-phenolate. In addition, the disulfide ligand (L(SS)) reacts with 2equiv. cupric ion salts and the phenolate to efficiently give the cross-linked product L(SPhOH) in high yield (>90%) under anaerobic conditions. Separately, complex [L(SPhO)Cu(II)(ClO(4))] (4), possessing the cross-linked L(SPhOH), was characterized by ESI mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography.

  19. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T Ashton; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, J Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2011-02-15

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  20. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, Ashton T; Chin, Jason W; Anderson, Christopher J; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-21

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  1. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNAsyn-thetases, pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  2. Unnatural reactive amino acid genetic code additions

    SciTech Connect

    Deiters, Alexander; Cropp, T. Ashton; Chin, Jason W.; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2014-08-26

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  3. The geodynamics of the Levant margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Avraham, Z.

    2006-12-01

    The Levant continental margin, offshore Israel, Lebanon and Syria, is usually defined as a passive margin that was formed through rifting processes. During the formation two major continental fragments are assumed to separate from the northern edge of the Afro-Arabian plate to form the Levant basin: the Tauride and Eratosthenes blocks. Today an oceanic crust and, in places, a very thin continental crust are present between the Levant margin and Eratosthenes seamount. The margin can be divided into two distinct provinces that are separated by the Carmel Structure, which extends from seawards to the northwest across the continental shelf and slope. The preservation of segmentation, both in the shallow and in the deep structure, insinuates that the two segments were formed through different continental breakup processes, which continue to dictate the style of sediment accumulation. The nature and development of the continental margin offshore Israel were the subject of numerous studies, which suggest that the southern Levant segment (south of the Carmel Structure) was formed through continental rifting processes. In contrast, the northern segment, from the Carmel structure northwards and offshore southern Lebanon, was hardly studied before. Recent studies however indicate that the northern segment shows a strong similarity to classical transform margins in the world. In view of the new classification of the northern Levant margin a modified scenario is suggested for: (a) the initial stages in which the Levant margin was formed; and (b) the present day structural differences between the two segments of the margin. At present, the northern Levant continental margin is being reactivated by transpressional faulting of the marine continuation of the Carmel fault which bends northward at the base of the continental slope due to the rheological discontinuity in this region. This fault system coincides with the sharp continental-oceanic crustal transition, and acts as an

  4. Estimating the loading limit margin taking into account voltage collapse areas

    SciTech Connect

    Barquin, J.; Gomez, T.; Pagola, F.L.

    1995-11-01

    This paper addresses the computation of the margin to the maximum loading limit. In the maximum loading point the minimum singular value of the load flow jacobian matrix becomes zero. A new generalized singular value analysis is proposed to compute this critical singular value far away of the singular point. In addition, a second order approximation of the load flow equations is formulated and used to determine the margin to the loading limit in physical terms of MW and Mvar. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient. It is formulated so that it could consider different models for the power system components. It takes into account operating and equipment limits, such as the reactive power generator limits. The algorithm is tested in two systems: a 6-machines test system, which is a CIGRE benchmark for voltage instability studies, and the IEEE-118 buses system.

  5. Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... zone lymphomas are a group of indolent (slow-growing) NHL B-cell lymphomas, which account for approximately 12 percent of all B-cell lymphomas. The median age for diagnosis is 65 years old. There are three types of marginal zone lymphoma: ...

  6. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning.

  7. Predicting service life margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, G. F.

    1971-01-01

    Margins are developed for equipment susceptible to malfunction due to excessive time or operation cycles, and for identifying limited life equipment so monitoring and replacing is accomplished before hardware failure. Method applies to hardware where design service is established and where reasonable expected usage prediction is made.

  8. Maintaining plant safety margins

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.

  9. Risk Informed Margins Management as part of Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith

    2014-06-01

    The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about Light Water Reactor (LWR) design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as risk informed margins management (RIMM) strategies.

  10. Actively stressed marginal networks.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, M; Broedersz, C P; MacKintosh, F C

    2012-12-07

    We study the effects of motor-generated stresses in disordered three-dimensional fiber networks using a combination of a mean-field theory, scaling analysis, and a computational model. We find that motor activity controls the elasticity in an anomalous fashion close to the point of marginal stability by coupling to critical network fluctuations. We also show that motor stresses can stabilize initially floppy networks, extending the range of critical behavior to a broad regime of network connectivities below the marginal point. Away from this regime, or at high stress, motors give rise to a linear increase in stiffness with stress. Finally, we demonstrate that our results are captured by a simple, constitutive scaling relation highlighting the important role of nonaffine strain fluctuations as a susceptibility to motor stress.

  11. Reconstructing Rodinia by Fitting Neoproterozoic Continental Margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John H.

    2009-01-01

    extensional in origin, supports recognition of the Neoproterozoic fragmentation pattern of Rodinia and outlines the major continental masses that, prior to the breakup, formed the supercontinent. Using this pattern, Rodinia can be assembled by fitting the pieces together. Evidence for Neoproterozoic margins is fragmentary. The most apparent margins are marked by miogeoclinal deposits (passive-margin deposits). The margins can also be outlined by the distribution of continental-margin magmatic-arc rocks, by juvenile ocean-floor rocks, or by the presence of continent-ward extending aulacogens. Most of the continental margins described here are Neoproterozoic, and some had an older history suggesting that they were major, long-lived lithospheric flaws. In particular, the western margin of North America appears to have existed for at least 1,470 Ma and to have been reactivated many times in the Neoproterozoic and Phanerozoic. The inheritance of trends from the Mesoproterozoic by the Neoproterozoic is particularly evident along the eastern United States, where a similarity of Mesoproterozoic (Grenville) and Neoproterozoic trends, as well as Paleozoic or Mesozoic trends, is evident. The model of Rodinia presented here is based on both geologic and paleomagnetic information. Geologic evidence is based on the distribution and shape of Neoproterozoic continents and on assembling these continents so as to match the shape, history, and scale of adjoining margins. The proposed model places the Laurasian continents?Baltica, Greenland, and Laurentia?west of the South American continents (Amazonia, Rio de La Plata, and Sa? Francisco). This assembly is indicated by conjugate pairs of Grenville-age rocks on the east side of Laurentia and on the west side of South America. In the model, predominantly late Neoproterozoic magmatic-arc rocks follow the trend of the Grenville rocks. The boundary between South America and Africa is interpreted as the site of a Wilson cycle

  12. The Seismicity of Two Hyperextended Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Tim; Terje Osmundsen, Per

    2013-04-01

    , loads generated by escarpment erosion, offshore sedimentary deposition, and post-glacial rebound have been periodically superimposed throughout the Neogene. Their vertical stress patterns are mutually-reinforcing during deglaciation. However, compared to the post-glacial dome the pattern of maximum uplift/unloading generated by escarpment erosion will be longer, more linear, and located atop the emergent proximal margin. The pattern of offshore maximum deposition/loading will be similar. This may help explain the asymmetric expenditure of Fennoscandia's annual seismic energy budget. It may also help explain the obvious Conundrum: if stress generated by erosion and deposition is sufficiently great, fault reactivation and consequent seismicity can occur at any hyperextended passive margin sector regardless of its glacial history. Onshore Scandinavia, episodic footwall uplift and escarpment rejuvenation may have been driven by just such a mechanism throughout much of the later Cretaceous and Cenozoic. SE Brasil offers a glimpse of how Norway's hyperextended margin might manifest itself seismically in the absence of post-glacial rebound. Compilations suggest two seismic belts may exist. One, offshore, follows the thinned crust of the ultra-deep, hyperextended Campos and Santos basins. Onshore, earthquakes occur more commonly in the elevated highlands of the escarpments, and track especially the long, linear ranges such as the Serra de Mantiquiera and Serra do Espinhaço. Seismicity is more rare in the coastal lowlands, and largely absent in the Brasilian hinterland. Although never glaciated since the time of hyperextension and characterized by significantly fewer earthquakes in toto, SE Brasil's pattern of seismicity closely mimics Scandinavia. Commencing after perhaps just a few tens of millions of years of 'sag' basin infill, accommodation phase fault reactivation and footwall uplift at passive margins is the inexorable product of hyperextension. CITATIONS Redfield, T

  13. Marginality of Transfer Commuter Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kodama, Corinne Maekawa

    2002-01-01

    Examines marginality issues facing transfer commuter students attending a mid-Atlantic university and what student characteristics relate to their sense of marginality. Results showed that transfer students have few sources of on-campus support, which may lead to their feelings of marginality. Results were particularly true for woman and Asian…

  14. Amphetamine margin in sports

    SciTech Connect

    Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

    1981-10-01

    The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seem clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both humans and rats. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogs of such performances have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

  15. East Africa continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Bosellini, A.

    1986-01-01

    New well data from Somalia, together with the history of sea-floor spreading in the Indian Ocean derived from magnetic anomalies, show that the East African margins from latitude 15/sup 0/S into the Gulf of Aden comprise four distinct segments that formed successively by the southward drift of Madagascar from Somalia during the Middle to Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, by the northeastward drift of India along the Owen Transform during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene, and by the opening of the Gulf of Aden during the Neogene.

  16. Pellucid marginal corneal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Krachmer, J H

    1978-07-01

    Pellucid marginal degeneration of the cornea is a bilateral, clear, inferior, peripheral corneal-thinning disorder. Protrusion of the cornea occurs above a band of thinning, which is located 1 to 2 mm from the limbus and measures 1 to 2 mm in width. American ophthalmologists are generally not familiar with the condition because most of the literature concerning pellucid degeneration is European. Four cases are described. This condition is differentiated from other noninflammatory cornel-thinning disorders such as keratoconus, keratoglobus, keratotorus, and posterior keratoconus. It is also differentiated from peripheral corneal disorders associated with inflammation such as Terrien's peripheral corneal degeneration, Mooren's ulcers, and ulcers from connective tissue disease.

  17. New sensitive marginal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahf, L.

    1981-09-01

    A new type of a sensitive marginal oscillator has been developed for the determination of high magnetic inductions by means of nuclear magnetic resonance. Obtaining a high sensitivity with this measuring principle demands a soft behavior of the oscillator which is a particular feature of the circuit presented. It is shown that this behavior is due to the fact that a very weak positive feedback is established by the inner capacitances of the single field effect transistor used in the circuit. Optimal values for the operation parameters are calculated.

  18. Max-Margin-Based Discriminative Feature Learning.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Liu, Qingshan; Dong, Weishan; Wei, Fan; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Lin

    2016-12-01

    In this brief, we propose a new max-margin-based discriminative feature learning method. In particular, we aim at learning a low-dimensional feature representation, so as to maximize the global margin of the data and make the samples from the same class as close as possible. In order to enhance the robustness to noise, we leverage a regularization term to make the transformation matrix sparse in rows. In addition, we further learn and leverage the correlations among multiple categories for assisting in learning discriminative features. The experimental results demonstrate the power of the proposed method against the related state-of-the-art methods.

  19. Marginally compact hyperbranched polymer trees.

    PubMed

    Dolgushev, M; Wittmer, J P; Johner, A; Benzerara, O; Meyer, H; Baschnagel, J

    2017-03-29

    Assuming Gaussian chain statistics along the chain contour, we generate by means of a proper fractal generator hyperbranched polymer trees which are marginally compact. Static and dynamical properties, such as the radial intrachain pair density distribution ρpair(r) or the shear-stress relaxation modulus G(t), are investigated theoretically and by means of computer simulations. We emphasize that albeit the self-contact density diverges logarithmically with the total mass N, this effect becomes rapidly irrelevant with increasing spacer length S. In addition to this it is seen that the standard Rouse analysis must necessarily become inappropriate for compact objects for which the relaxation time τp of mode p must scale as τp ∼ (N/p)(5/3) rather than the usual square power law for linear chains.

  20. A comparison of marginal odds ratio estimators.

    PubMed

    Loux, Travis M; Drake, Christiana; Smith-Gagen, Julie

    2017-02-01

    Uses of the propensity score to obtain estimates of causal effect have been investigated thoroughly under assumptions of linearity and additivity of exposure effect. When the outcome variable is binary relationships such as collapsibility, valid for the linear model, do not always hold. This article examines uses of the propensity score when both exposure and outcome are binary variables and the parameter of interest is the marginal odds ratio. We review stratification and matching by the propensity score when calculating the Mantel-Haenszel estimator and show that it is consistent for neither the marginal nor conditional odds ratio. We also investigate a marginal odds ratio estimator based on doubly robust estimators and summarize its performance relative to other recently proposed estimators under various conditions, including low exposure prevalence and model misspecification. Finally, we apply all estimators to a case study estimating the effect of Medicare plan type on the quality of care received by African-American breast cancer patients.

  1. Dual-energy precursor and nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 activator treatment additively improve redox glutathione levels and neuron survival in aging and Alzheimer mouse neurons upstream of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debolina; LeVault, Kelsey R; Brewer, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether glutathione (GSH) loss or increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) are more important to neuron loss, aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we stressed or boosted GSH levels in neurons isolated from aging 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those from age-matched nontransgenic (non-Tg) neurons. Here, using titrating with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GCL), we observed that GSH depletion increased neuronal death of 3xTg-AD cultured neurons at increasing rates across the age span, whereas non-Tg neurons were resistant to GSH depletion until old age. Remarkably, the rate of neuron loss with ROS did not increase in old age and was the same for both genotypes, which indicates that cognitive deficits in the AD model were not caused by ROS. Therefore, we targeted for neuroprotection activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by 18 alpha glycyrrhetinic acid to stimulate GSH synthesis through GCL. This balanced stimulation of a number of redox enzymes restored the lower levels of Nrf2 and GCL seen in 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those of non-Tg neurons and promoted translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. By combining the Nrf2 activator together with the NADH precursor, nicotinamide, we increased neuron survival against amyloid beta stress in an additive manner. These stress tests and neuroprotective treatments suggest that the redox environment is more important for neuron survival than ROS. The dual neuroprotective treatment with nicotinamide and an Nrf2 inducer indicates that these age-related and AD-related changes are reversible.

  2. Becoming Marginalized in a Middle School Physical Education Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara Tyree; Goc-Karp, Grace

    This study examined the effects of social competence, group formation, and group behavior on the marginalization of students in a 7th-grade physical education setting. Marginalized students are defined as those in the class, but not "of" the class. In addition, factors such as individual and team activity and teacher expectations help to…

  3. Marginal Pricing and Student Investment in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelt, Steven W.; Stange, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of marginal price on students' educational investments using rich administrative data on students at Michigan public universities. Marginal price refers to the amount colleges charge for each additional credit taken in a semester. Institutions differ in how they price credits above the full-time minimum (of 12…

  4. Marginally Stable Nuclear Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Altamirano, D.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear X-ray bursts result from unstable nuclear burning of the material accreted on neutron stars in some low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). Theory predicts that close to the boundary of stability oscillatory burning can occur. This marginally stable regime has so far been identified in only a small number of sources. We present Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the bursting, high- inclination LMXB 4U 1323-619 that reveal for the first time in this source the signature of marginally stable burning. The source was observed during two successive RXTE orbits for approximately 5 ksec beginning at 10:14:01 UTC on March 28, 2011. Significant mHz quasi- periodic oscillations (QPO) at a frequency of 8.1 mHz are detected for approximately 1600 s from the beginning of the observation until the occurrence of a thermonuclear X-ray burst at 10:42:22 UTC. The mHz oscillations are not detected following the X-ray burst. The average fractional rms amplitude of the mHz QPOs is 6.4% (3 - 20 keV), and the amplitude increases to about 8% below 10 keV.This phenomenology is strikingly similar to that seen in the LMXB 4U 1636-53. Indeed, the frequency of the mHz QPOs in 4U 1323-619 prior to the X-ray burst is very similar to the transition frequency between mHz QPO and bursts found in 4U 1636-53 by Altamirano et al. (2008). These results strongly suggest that the observed QPOs in 4U 1323-619 are, like those in 4U 1636-53, due to marginally stable nuclear burning. We also explore the dependence of the energy spectrum on the oscillation phase, and we place the present observations within the context of the spectral evolution of the accretion-powered flux from the source.

  5. The synrift subsidence deficit at rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reston, T.

    2009-04-01

    Across rifted margins, the prerift continental crust thins from ~ 30 km, reaching zero at the continent-ocean transition (COT) beyond which either oceanic crust or unroofed mantle forms top basement. As a result of the crustal thinning, considerable subsidence is both expected and observed. However at several margins, subsidence appears to have occurred largely after rather than during rifting. Examples of such behaviour described in the literature include the West Iberia margin, the salt basins of the South Atlantic, and the Exmouth Plateau margin. This synrift subsidence deficit can be explained by crustal depth-dependent stretching, in which much of the crust is withdrawn after the end of rifting, but considerable problems arise with this model. They can however also be explained at magma-rich margins by thermal uplift during rifting, the addition of igneous intrusions to the lithosphere during rifting, and the partial depletion of the mantle. At magma-poor margins, mantle serpentinization has a similar effect, although as serpentinization can only occur once the entire curst has become brittle, this is likely to be important only at high degrees of stretching. An alternative explanation may be the influx of asthenosphere warmer than the relatively cool sublithospheric mantle observed beneath several continents and which is one explanation for the lack of melt at many rifted margins. These different models would thus imply some modification to the McKenzie model for lithospheric stretching, arising because of the geodynamic processes accompanying continental breakup. But it is also possible that synrift subsidence has been systematically underestimated if local water level was substantially below global sealevel. The presence of thick evaporites at many rifted margins indicates that this was true at the end of rifting. As rifting leading to continental breakup by definition occurs within a continent, it may be expected that the rift initially develops isolated

  6. Reactive sintering and reactive hot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. C.; German, R. M.

    1992-09-01

    NbAl3 has been synthesized from elemental powders by reactive sintering (RS) and reactive hot isostatic pressing (RHIP). Both processes involve a self-propagating exothermic reaction between the constituent powders to form an intermetallic compound. The RHIP approach uses simultaneous external pressurization to make a higher density product. This study focused on developing a method to use reactive synthesis to form high-density NbAl3 compacts. High RS and RHIP densities were possible with the appropriate raw materials and processing parameters. These include powder purity, particle sizes, degassing, heating rate, furnace temperature, and compaction pressures. Near full density was attained with RHIP, and up to 95 pct density was attained with RS.

  7. Subglacial hydrology and ice stream margin locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, Thibaut; Rice, James R.; Platt, John D.; Suckale, Jenny

    2015-07-01

    Fast-flowing ice streams in West Antarctica are separated from the nearly stagnant ice in the adjacent ridge by zones of highly localized deformation known as shear margins. It is presently uncertain what mechanisms control the location of shear margins and possibly allow them to migrate. In this paper we show how subglacial hydrological processes can select the shear margin location, leading to a smooth transition from a slipping to a locked bed at the base of an ice stream. Our study uses a two-dimensional thermomechanical model in a cross section perpendicular to the direction of flow. We confirm that the intense straining at the shear margins can generate large temperate regions within the deforming ice. Assuming that the melt generated in the temperate ice collects in a drainage channel at the base of the margin, we show that a channel locally decreases the pore pressure in the subglacial till. Therefore, the basal shear strength just outside the channel, assuming a Coulomb-plastic rheology, can be substantially higher than that inferred under the majority of the stream. Results show that the additional basal resistance produced by the channel lowers the stress concentrated on the locked portion of the bed. Matching the model to surface velocity data, we find that shear margins are stable when the slipping-to-locked bed transition occurs less than 500 m away from a channel operating at an effective pressure of 200 kPa and for a hydraulic transmissivity equivalent to a basal water film of order 0.2 mm thickness.

  8. Initiation of Extension in South China Continental Margin during the Active-Passive Margin Transition: Thermochronological and Kinematic Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, X.; Chan, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    The South China continental margin is characterized by a widespread magmatic belt, prominent NE-striking faults and numerous rifted basins filled by Cretaceous-Eocene sediments. The geology denotes a transition from active to passive margin, which led to rapid modifications of crustal stress configuration and reactivation of older faults in this area. Our zircon fission-track data in this region show two episodes of exhumation: The first episode, occurring during 170-120Ma, affected local parts of the Nanling Range. The second episode, a more regional exhumation event, occurred during 115-70Ma, including the Yunkai Terrane and the Nanling Range. Numerical geodynamic modeling was conducted to simulate the subduction between the paleo-Pacific plate and the South China Block. The modeling results could explain the fact that exhumation of the granite-dominant Nanling Range occurred earlier than that of the gneiss-dominant Yunkai Terrane. In addition to the difference in rock types, the heat from Jurassic-Early Cretaceous magmatism in Nanling may have softened the upper crust, causing the area to exhume more readily than Yunkai. Numerical modeling results also indicate that (1) high lithospheric geothermal gradient, high slab dip angle and low convergence velocity favor the reversal of crustal stress state from compression to extension in the upper continental plate; (2) late Mesozoic magmatism in South China was probably caused by a slab roll-back; and (3) crustal extension could have occurred prior to the cessation of plate subduction. The inversion of stress regime in the continental crust from compression to crustal extension imply that the Late Cretaceous-early Paleogene red-bed basins in South China could have formed during the late stage of the subduction, accounting for the occurrence of volcanic events in some sedimentary basins. We propose that the rifting started as early as Late Cretaceous, probably before the cessation of subduction process.

  9. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    SciTech Connect

    Kueck, John D; Kirby, Brendan J; Li, Fangxing; Tufon, Christopher; Isemonger, Alan

    2008-07-01

    system losses, increase circuit capacity, increase reliability, and improve efficiency. Reactive power is theoretically available from any inverter-based equipment such as photovoltaic (PV) systems, fuel cells, microturbines, and adjustable-speed drives. However, the installation is usually only economical if reactive power supply is considered during the design and construction phase. In this report, we find that if the inverters of PV systems or the generators of combined heat and power (CHP) systems were designed with capability to supply dynamic reactive power, they could do this quite economically. In fact, on an annualized basis, these inverters and generators may be able to supply dynamic reactive power for about $5 or $6 per kVAR. The savings from the local supply of dynamic reactive power would be in reduced losses, increased capacity, and decreased transmission congestion. The net savings are estimated to be about $7 per kVAR on an annualized basis for a hypothetical circuit. Thus the distribution company could economically purchase a dynamic reactive power service from customers for perhaps $6/kVAR. This practice would provide for better voltage regulation in the distribution system and would provide an alternate revenue source to help amortize the cost of PV and CHP installations. As distribution and transmission systems are operated under rising levels of stress, the value of local dynamic reactive supply is expected to grow. Also, large power inverters, in the range of 500 kW to 1 MW, are expected to decrease in cost as they become mass produced. This report provides one data point which shows that the local supply of dynamic reactive power is marginally profitable at present for a hypothetical circuit. We expect that the trends of growing power flow on the existing system and mass production of inverters for distributed energy devices will make the dynamic supply of reactive power from customers an integral component of economical and reliable system

  10. Thermophysical Reactivity Control of RBMK-1000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, Aleksander V.; Antonova, Aleksandra M.; Vinogradov, Maksim P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, viewed thermophysical characteristics of the moderator water graphite reactor RBMK. Indicated possibilities of controlling thermal state of graphite stack by regulation composition of the purge gas. Presents experimental results, but static thermal state characteristics of graphite moderator RBMK-1000. Developed a software code for integral characteristic engineering calculations, that determine value of margin reactivity reactor RBMK-1000, in the slow transients.

  11. Phase separation in NiCrN coatings induced by N2 addition in the gas phase: A way to generate magnetic thin films by reactive sputtering of a non-magnetic NiCr target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luciu, I.; Duday, D.; Choquet, P.; Perigo, E. A.; Michels, A.; Wirtz, T.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic coatings are used for a lot of applications from data storage in hard discs, spintronics and sensors. Meanwhile, magnetron sputtering is a process largely used in industry for the deposition of thin films. Unfortunately, deposition of magnetic coatings by magnetron sputtering is a difficult task due to the screening effect of the magnetic target lowering the magnetic field strength of the magnet positioned below the target, which is used to generate and trap ions in the vicinity of the target surface to be sputtered. In this work we present an efficient method to obtain soft magnetic thin films by reactive sputtering of a non-magnetic target. The aim is to recover the magnetic properties of Ni after dealloying of Ni and Cr due to the selective reactivity of Cr with the reactive nitrogen species generated during the deposition process. The effects of nitrogen content on the dealloying and DC magnetron sputtering (DCMS) deposition processes are studied here. The different chemical compositions, microstructures and magnetic properties of DCMS thin films obtained by sputtering in reactive gas mixtures with different ratios of Ar/N2 from a non-magnetic Ni-20Cr target have been determined. XPS data indicate that the increase of nitrogen content in the films has a strong influence on the NiCr phase decomposition into Ni and CrN, leading to ferromagnetic coatings due to the Ni phase. XRD results show that the obtained Ni-CrN films consist of a metallic fcc cubic Ni phase mixed with fcc cubic CrN. The lattice parameter decreases with the N2 content and reaches the theoretical value of the pure fcc-Ni, when Cr is mostly removed from the Ni-Cr phase. Dealloying of Cr from a Ni80-Cr20 solid solution is achieved in our experimental conditions and the deposition of Ni ferromagnetic coatings embedding CrN from a non-magnetic target is possible with reactive DC magnetron sputtering.

  12. Marginal longitudinal semiparametric regression via penalized splines

    PubMed Central

    Kadiri, M. Al; Carroll, R.J.; Wand, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the marginal longitudinal nonparametric regression problem and some of its semiparametric extensions. We point out that, while several elaborate proposals for efficient estimation have been proposed, a relative simple and straightforward one, based on penalized splines, has not. After describing our approach, we then explain how Gibbs sampling and the BUGS software can be used to achieve quick and effective implementation. Illustrations are provided for nonparametric regression and additive models. PMID:21037941

  13. Changes in ice-margin processes and sediment routing during ice-sheet advance across a marginal moraine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, P.G.; Jennings, C.E.; Waller, R.I.; Robinson, Z.P.

    2007-01-01

    Advance of part of the margin of the Greenland ice sheet across a proglacial moraine ridge between 1968 and 2002 caused progressive changes in moraine morphology, basal ice formation, debris release, ice-marginal sediment storage, and sediment transfer to the distal proglacial zone. When the ice margin is behind the moraine, most of the sediment released from the glacier is stored close to the ice margin. As the margin advances across the moraine the potential for ice-proximal sediment storage decreases and distal sediment flux is augmented by reactivation of moraine sediment. For six stages of advance associated with distinctive glacial and sedimentary processes we describe the ice margin, the debris-rich basal ice, debris release from the glacier, sediment routing into the proglacial zone, and geomorphic processes on the moraine. The overtopping of a moraine ridge is a significant glaciological, geomorphological and sedimentological threshold in glacier advance, likely to cause a distinctive pulse in distal sediment accumulation rates that should be taken into account when glacial sediments are interpreted to reconstruct glacier fluctuations. ?? 2007 Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography.

  14. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  15. [Health, marginality and regional development].

    PubMed

    Urbina-Fuentes, M; Narro-Robles, J; Wolpert-Barraza, E; Meljem-Moctezuma, J

    1996-01-01

    The paper discusses the close link between marginality, regional development and health. In order to do so, reference is made to some health indicators like nutrition, causes of death and health infrastructure within the low as well as the high marginality areas. The paper also presents the strategies that the Ministry of Health has established to assist the population living in the high marginality areas. It specifies the related activities that are being carried out through the national institutes of health and the sanitary regulation offices.

  16. Continental margin sedimentation: from sediment transport to sequence stratigraphy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P.M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Austin, James A.; Field, Michael E.; Kravitz, Joseph H.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Wiberg, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    This volume on continental margin sedimentation brings together an expert editorial and contributor team to create a state-of-the-art resource. Taking a global perspective, the book spans a range of timescales and content, ranging from how oceans transport particles, to how thick rock sequences are formed on continental margins. - Summarizes and integrates our understanding of sedimentary processes and strata associated with fluvial dispersal systems on continental shelves and slopes - Explores timescales ranging from particle transport at one extreme, to deep burial at the other - Insights are presented for margins in general, and with focus on a tectonically active margin (northern California) and a passive margin (New Jersey), enabling detailed examination of the intricate relationships between a wide suite of sedimentary processes and their preserved stratigraphy - Includes observational studies which document the processes and strata found on particular margins, in addition to numerical models and laboratory experimentation, which provide a quantitative basis for extrapolation in time and space of insights about continental-margin sedimentation - Provides a research resource for scientists studying modern and ancient margins, and an educational text for advanced students in sedimentology and stratigraphy

  17. Marginalized Discourses and Scientific Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Obed

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on the marginalized discourses that have arisen to oppose the racism, sexism, and classism espoused and advocated by mainstream science since its institutionalization up until the first half of the 20th century. Contains 39 references. (Author/PVD)

  18. Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2005-09-01

    The Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis (PDF 347 KB) identifies opportunities for developing advanced technologies and estimates both the necessary funding and the potential payoff. This analysis determines what portion of the energy bandwidth can be captured through the adoption of state-of-the-art technology and practices. R&D opportunities for addressing the remainder of the bandwidth are characterized and plotted on a marginal opportunity curve.

  19. Crustal thinning and tectonic geomorphology: redefining the passive margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, T.; Osmundsen, P. T.

    2012-04-01

    engendered by isostatically-induced flexure. Fault reactivation in the inner proximal margin may contribute to stabilize the location of the escarpment over time at sharply tapering margins. In this model the principal driver behind accomodation is the shifting of loads that commenced during the main phases of rifting and that has continued to present day.

  20. [Sinaloa: the geography of marginalization].

    PubMed

    Aguayo Hernandez, J R

    1993-01-01

    Sinaloa's State Population Program for 1993-98 contains the objective of promoting integration of demographic criteria into the planning process. The action program calls for establishing indicators of economic and social inequality so that conditions of poverty and margination can be identified. To further these goals, the State Population Council used data from the National Population Council project on regional inequality and municipal margination in Mexico to analyze margination at the state level. Nine indicators of educational status, housing conditions, spatial distribution, and income provide information that allows the definition of municipios and regions that should receive priority in economic and social development programs. The index of municipal margination (IMM) is a statistical summary of the nine indicators, which are based on information in the 1990 census. As of March 1990, 9.9% of Sinaloa's population over age 15 was illiterate and 37.4% had incomplete primary education. 91.0% had electricity, but 18.7% lacked indoor toilet facilities and 19.4% had no piped water. 23.7% of houses had dirt floors. 60% of households were crowded, defined as having more than two persons per bedroom. 43.5% of the state population lived in localities with fewer than 5000 inhabitants, where service delivery is difficult and costly. 55.6% of the economically active population was judged to earn less than the amount needed to satisfy essential needs. All except one municipio bordering the Pacific ocean had low or very low indicators of margination, while all those in the sierra had a medium or high degree of margination. Sinaloa's statewide IMM was eighteenth among Mexico's 32 federal entities, with Chiapas showing the highest degree of margination and the Federal District the lowest.

  1. Surgical margins in breast conservation.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Corrado; Rovera, Francesca; Corben, Adriana Dionigi; Fachinetti, Anna; De Berardinis, Valentina; Marchionini, Valentina; Rausei, Stefano; Boni, Luigi; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Dionigi, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common tumor affecting women worldwide. Breast-conserving therapy (BCT) followed by irradiation nowadays is the treatment of choice for early-stage disease; there is no difference in long-term survival between mastectomy and BCT combined with external radiotherapy. A positive margin is associated with increased risk of local recurrences after BCT for invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ. The exact definition of an adequate surgical margin after breast cancer resection has long been debated among physicians and represents an area of considerable variation in clinical practice. There is a lack of standardization in the pathology methods of margin evaluation, which yields little consensus regarding what constitutes an adequate negative margin. As a consequence, patient management varies widely based on the threshold that surgeons accept for adequate margins and the subsequent need for re-excision. We analyze and discuss recent literature about this topic both from the pathological and from the surgical point of view.

  2. Maximum margin Bayesian network classifiers.

    PubMed

    Pernkopf, Franz; Wohlmayr, Michael; Tschiatschek, Sebastian

    2012-03-01

    We present a maximum margin parameter learning algorithm for Bayesian network classifiers using a conjugate gradient (CG) method for optimization. In contrast to previous approaches, we maintain the normalization constraints on the parameters of the Bayesian network during optimization, i.e., the probabilistic interpretation of the model is not lost. This enables us to handle missing features in discriminatively optimized Bayesian networks. In experiments, we compare the classification performance of maximum margin parameter learning to conditional likelihood and maximum likelihood learning approaches. Discriminative parameter learning significantly outperforms generative maximum likelihood estimation for naive Bayes and tree augmented naive Bayes structures on all considered data sets. Furthermore, maximizing the margin dominates the conditional likelihood approach in terms of classification performance in most cases. We provide results for a recently proposed maximum margin optimization approach based on convex relaxation. While the classification results are highly similar, our CG-based optimization is computationally up to orders of magnitude faster. Margin-optimized Bayesian network classifiers achieve classification performance comparable to support vector machines (SVMs) using fewer parameters. Moreover, we show that unanticipated missing feature values during classification can be easily processed by discriminatively optimized Bayesian network classifiers, a case where discriminative classifiers usually require mechanisms to complete unknown feature values in the data first.

  3. The northern Egyptian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gad; Omar, Khaled; Farid, Walid

    2015-01-01

    Africa displays a variety of continental margin structures, tectonics and sedimentary records. The northern Egyptian continental margin represents the NE portion of the North African passive continental margin. Economically, this region is of great importance as a very rich and productive hydrocarbon zone in Egypt. Moreover, it is characterized by remarkable tectonic setting accompanied by active tectonic processes from the old Tethys to recent Mediterranean. In this article, seismicity of the northern Egyptian continental margin has been re-evaluated for more than 100-years and the source parameters of three recent earthquakes (October 2012, January 2013 and July 2013) have been estimated. Moment tensor inversions of 19th October 2012 and 17th January 2013 earthquakes reveal normal faulting mechanism with strike-slip component having seismic moment of 3.5E16 N m and 4.3E15 N m respectively. The operation of the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) since the end of 1997 has significantly enhanced the old picture of earthquake activity across northern Egyptian continental margin whereas; the record-ability (annual rate) has changed from 2-events/year to 54-event/year before and after ENSN respectively. The spatial distribution of earthquakes foci indicated that the activity tends to cluster at three zones: Mediterranean Ridge (MR), Nile Cone (NC) and Eratosthenes Seamount (ERS). However, two seismic gaps are reported along Levant Basin (LEV) and Herodotus Basin (HER).

  4. Atlantic marginal basins of Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, G.T.

    1988-02-01

    The over 10,000-km long Atlantic margin of Africa is divisible into thirty basins or segments of the margin that collectively contain over 18.6 x 10/sup 6/ km/sup 3/ of syn-breakup and post-breakup sediments. Twenty of these basins contain a sufficiently thick volume of sediments to be considered prospects. These basins lie, at least partially, within the 200 m isobath. The distribution of source rocks is broad enough to give potential to each of these basins. The sedimentation patterns, tectonics, and timing of events differ from basin to basin and are related directly to the margin's complex history. Two spreading modes exist: rift and transform. Rifting dates from Late Triassic-Early Jurassic in the northwest to Early Cretaceous south of the Niger Delta. A complex transform fault system separated these two margins. Deep-water communication between the two basins became established in the middle Cretaceous. This Mesozoic-Cenozoic cycle of rifting and seafloor spreading has segmented the margin and where observable, basins tend to be bounded by these segments.

  5. The 'reactive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista Piccardo, Giovanni; Guarnieri, Luisa

    2010-05-01

    The Ligurian ophiolitic peridotites [South Lanzo, Erro-Tobbio, Internal Ligurides and Corsica] are characterized by the abundance of spinel(Sp) peridotites showing depleted compositions and ranging from Cpx-poor Sp lherzolites to Sp harzburgites. They were recognized in the last decades as refractory residua by MORB-forming partial melting of the asthenosphere, and were similar to abyssal peridotites. Recent structural and compositional studies promoted a better understanding of their structural and compositional features and their genetic processes. In the field these depleted peridotites replace with primary contacts pyroxenite-bearing fertile Sp lherzolites that have been recognized as sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Field relationships evidence that decametric-hectometric bodies of pristine pyroxenite-veined lithospheric Sp lherzolites are preserved as structural remnants within the km-scale masses of depleted peridotites. The depleted peridotites show coarse-grained recrystallized textures and reaction micro-structures indicating pyroxene dissolution and olivine precipitation that have been considered as records of melt/peridotite interaction during reactive diffuse porous flow of undersaturated melts. They show, moreover, contrasting bulk and mineral chemistries that cannot be produced by simple partial melting and melt extraction. In particular, their bulk compositions are depleted in SiO2 and enriched in FeO with respect to refractory residua after any kind of partial melting, as calculated by Niu (1997), indicating that they cannot be formed by simple partial melting and melt extraction processes. Moreover, TiO2 content in Sp is usually significantly higher (up to 0.8-1.0 wt%) than typical TiO2 contents of spinels (usually < 0.1-0.2 wt %) in fertile mantle peridotites and melting refractory residua, indicating that spinel attained element equilibration with a Ti-bearing basaltic melt. The depleted peridotites usually show strongly variable Cpx modal

  6. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  7. Resilience and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity under acute stress in young men.

    PubMed

    Mikolajczak, Moïra; Roy, Emmanuel; Luminet, Olivier; de Timary, Philippe

    2008-11-01

    The present study examined the relationship between resilience (measured using the Resilience Scale for Adults) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis reactivity. We examined the subjective and cortisol responses of 28 healthy young men to an acute stressor (public speech task). Eight saliva samples were collected in order to obtain the response curve (anticipation, reactivity, recuperation) for each subject. ANOVA indicated that highly resilient individuals tended to display less mood deterioration than less resilient individuals (marginal p(time x group interaction) = 0.075). They also revealed that the former tended to secrete less cortisol overall than the latter during the experiment (marginal p(main group effect) = 0.087) but this effect was not uniform across time (p(time x group interaction) = 0.029). Additional analyses performed to identify the source of this interaction revealed that resilience moderates cortisol secretion in anticipation of the stressor (i.e. highly resilient individuals secreted less cortisol than less resilient ones, p = 0.05) but that it is not conductive to lower HPA reactivity amidst stress (i.e. there was no difference between groups in the increase in cortisol secretion from baseline to peak). The recovery slopes were likewise not statistically different. The implications of these findings regarding health are discussed.

  8. Marginal Comment: Reservations about "Murder at the Margin."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimand, Mary Ann

    1991-01-01

    Reexamines the use of the novel, "Murder at the Margin," in college and high school economics instruction. Identifies errors in the book's application of economic principles. Explores the novel's approach to the "prisoner's dilemma" and the making of choices. Concludes that despite problems, the book remains valuable to…

  9. The multifaceted West Greenland passive margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Sonja; Damm, Volkmar; Block, Martin; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Heyde, Ingo; Nelson, Catherine; Kouwe, Wim

    2013-04-01

    The Baffin Bay located between Greenland and Canada, is the northward extension of the Labrador Sea. The Davis Strait High separates these two marine basins. The evolution of these basins is closely linked, and is as well affiliated to the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean. The opening history started in the Cretaceous with the formation of several terrestrial rift basins with a block-faulted, metamorphic Precambrian basement. The further opening of the Baffin Bay coincides with the volcanic activity (60.9-52.5 Ma) along the West Greenland margin (Storey et al., 1998). The subsequent seafloor spreading in the Baffin Bay is linked to the Labrador Sea by the Ungava Fault Zone (UFZ), which is the most prominent transform fault in this region. Two main problems are still unsolved: 1) There are clear indications for normal seafloor spreading in the Baffin Bay like the seaward dipping reflectors (SDRs) on the Canadian side (Skaarup et al., 2006) and on the Greenland side based on our data. On the other hand, associated magnetic spreading anomalies are not yet discovered in the Baffin Bay or are not formed. These findings may either point to slow or ultraslow spreading or underlying strongly extended continental crust and/or serpentinised mantle. 2) The Greenlandic margin is much wider than the Canadian. In addition, a breakup unconformity can only be traced on the Greenland side and is not reported for the Canadian side. Which process causes this asymmetric margin and differences in shelf width? Is it a result of asymmetric spreading or connected to volcanic activity during breakup processes? In summer 2008, a marine geoscientific expedition (MSM09/03) was conducted with the research vessel "Maria S. Merian" in the Davis Strait and southern Baffin Bay. Approximately 1800 km of multichannel reflection seismic data were acquired. To supplement the database, a subsequent marine geoscientific expedition ARK-XXV/3 with RV POLARSTERN in summer 2010 was conducted. In our

  10. Stochastic margin-based structure learning of Bayesian network classifiers.

    PubMed

    Pernkopf, Franz; Wohlmayr, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The margin criterion for parameter learning in graphical models gained significant impact over the last years. We use the maximum margin score for discriminatively optimizing the structure of Bayesian network classifiers. Furthermore, greedy hill-climbing and simulated annealing search heuristics are applied to determine the classifier structures. In the experiments, we demonstrate the advantages of maximum margin optimized Bayesian network structures in terms of classification performance compared to traditionally used discriminative structure learning methods. Stochastic simulated annealing requires less score evaluations than greedy heuristics. Additionally, we compare generative and discriminative parameter learning on both generatively and discriminatively structured Bayesian network classifiers. Margin-optimized Bayesian network classifiers achieve similar classification performance as support vector machines. Moreover, missing feature values during classification can be handled by discriminatively optimized Bayesian network classifiers, a case where purely discriminative classifiers usually require mechanisms to complete unknown feature values in the data first.

  11. Stochastic margin-based structure learning of Bayesian network classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Pernkopf, Franz; Wohlmayr, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The margin criterion for parameter learning in graphical models gained significant impact over the last years. We use the maximum margin score for discriminatively optimizing the structure of Bayesian network classifiers. Furthermore, greedy hill-climbing and simulated annealing search heuristics are applied to determine the classifier structures. In the experiments, we demonstrate the advantages of maximum margin optimized Bayesian network structures in terms of classification performance compared to traditionally used discriminative structure learning methods. Stochastic simulated annealing requires less score evaluations than greedy heuristics. Additionally, we compare generative and discriminative parameter learning on both generatively and discriminatively structured Bayesian network classifiers. Margin-optimized Bayesian network classifiers achieve similar classification performance as support vector machines. Moreover, missing feature values during classification can be handled by discriminatively optimized Bayesian network classifiers, a case where purely discriminative classifiers usually require mechanisms to complete unknown feature values in the data first. PMID:24511159

  12. Reactive oxygen species in iridium-based OER catalysts† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc01860b Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Verena; Wrabetz, Sabine; Massué, Cyriac; Velasco Vélez, Juan J.; Arrigo, Rosa; Scherzer, Michael; Piccinin, Simone; Hävecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Tremendous effort has been devoted towards elucidating the fundamental reasons for the higher activity of hydrated amorphous IrIII/IV oxyhydroxides (IrOx) in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in comparison with their crystalline counterpart, rutile-type IrO2, by focusing on the metal oxidation state. Here we demonstrate that, through an analogy to photosystem II, the nature of this reactive species is not solely a property of the metal but is intimately tied to the electronic structure of oxygen. We use a combination of synchrotron-based X-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopies, ab initio calculations, and microcalorimetry to show that holes in the O 2p states in amorphous IrOx give rise to a weakly bound oxygen that is extremely susceptible to nucleophilic attack, reacting stoichiometrically with CO already at room temperature. As such, we expect this species to play the critical role of the electrophilic oxygen involved in O–O bond formation in the electrocatalytic OER on IrOx. We propose that the dynamic nature of the Ir framework in amorphous IrOx imparts the flexibility in Ir oxidation state required for the formation of this active electrophilic oxygen. PMID:28042464

  13. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  14. Field grading in capacitor margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, T. E.; Sarjeant, W. J.; Nunnally, W. C.

    1981-06-01

    Some of the results of modeling electric fields in the margin of a bogey plastic film liquid impregnant capacitor are presented where effects of foil edge shape, different impregnants, and grading wires are examined. It is concluded that placement tolerance and connection problems make grading wires impractical and that folded foil edges are still the best solution to field grading.

  15. The effect of additives on the reactivity of palladium surfaces for the chemisorption and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide: A surface science and catalytic study. [LaMO/sub 3/(M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Rh)

    SciTech Connect

    Rucker, T.G.

    1987-06-01

    This research studied the role of surface additives on the catalytic activity and chemisorptive properties of Pd single crystals and foils. Effects of Na, K, Si, P, S, and Cl on the bonding of CO and H and on the cyclotrimerization of acetylene on the (111), (100) and (110) faces of Pd were investigated in addition to role of TiO/sub 2/ and SiO/sub 2/ overlayers deposited on Pd foils in the CO hydrogenation reaction. On Pd, only in the presence of oxide overlayers, are methane or methanol formed from CO and H/sub 2/. The maximum rate of methane formation is attained on Pd foil where 30% of the surface is covered with titania. Methanol formation can be achieved only if the TiO/sub x//Pd surface is pretreated in 50 psi of oxygen at 550/sup 0/C prior to the reaction. The additives (Na, K, Si, P, S, Cl) affect the bonding of CO and hydrogen and the cyclotrimerization of acetylene to benzene by structural and electronic interactions. In general, the electron donating additives increase the desorption temperature of CO and increase the rate of acetylene cyclotrimerization and the electron withdrawing additives decrease the desorption temperature of CO and decrease the rate of benzene formation from acetylene.

  16. Mesozoic and Cenozoic evolution of the SW Iberian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Adrià; Fernández, Oscar; Terrinha, Pedro; Muñoz, Josep Anton; Arnaiz, Álvaro

    2016-04-01

    The SW Iberian margin lies at the eastern termination of the Azores-Gibraltar Fracture Zone (AGFZ), the diffuse transform plate boundary between Africa and Iberia (Sartori et al., 1994). It comprises the Gulf of Cadiz and the Algarve Basin, which were developed under two main different regional stages of deformation. During the Mesozoic, the SW Iberian margin evolution since the Late Triassic was dominated by the Pangea break-up and the Central Atlantic opening up to Early Jurssic, followed by the westernmost Tethyan opening up to Mid/Late Jurassic, and the North Atlantic rifting from Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (e.g., Schettino and Turco, 2010). This phase of extension led to the formation of E-W to NE-SW trending, basement-involved extensional faults, the triggering of salt tectonics and the uplifting of basement highs (e.g., Guadalquivir Bank). This extensional phase was responsible not only for the sedimentary depocenter distribution, but also for the crustal configuration of this passive margin, extending from continental crust in the proximal part, to oceanic crust in the distal and deepest portion of the margin. Since the Late Cretaceous, the margin was inverted due to the N-S convergence between Africa and Iberia, being still undergoing collision given the dominance of reverse fault earthquake mechanisms (e.g., Zitellini et al., 2009). The shortening in the margin is mainly accommodated by the north-dipping foliation of the basin, expressed by south-directed blind thrusts affecting the present-day bathymetry, re-activating the basement highs and the salt tectonics, and controlling the Cenozoic depocenters. The emplacement of the Betics to the east led to the westward emplacement of the gravitational unit partially overlying the sedimentary basins, corresponding to the Allochthonous Unit of the Gulf of Cadiz (AUGC). Our observations of the margin configuration have been based on the interpretation of 2D and 3D seismic reflection surveys throughout the

  17. Tectonic evolution of Brazilian equatorial continental margin basins

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, R.P. )

    1993-02-01

    The structural style and stratigraphic relationships of sedimentary basins along the Brazilian Equatorial Atlantic Continental Margin were used to construct an empirical tectonic model for the development of ancient transform margins. The model is constrained by detailed structural and subsidence analyses of several basins along the margin. The structural framework of the basins was defined at shallow and deep levels by the integration of many geophysical and geological data sets. The Barreirinhas and Para-Maranhao Basins were divided in three tectonic domains: the Tutoia, Caete, and Tromai subbasins. The Caete area is characterized by northwest-southeast striking and northeast-dipping normal faults. A pure shear mechanism of basin formation is suggested for its development. The structure of the Tutoia and Tromai subbasins are more complex and indicative of a major strike-slip component with dextral sense of displacement, during early stages of basin evolution. These two later subbasins were developed on a lithosphere characterized by an abrupt transition (<50 km wide) from an unstretched continent to an oceanic lithosphere. The subsidence history of these basins do not comply with the classical models developed for passive margins or continental rifting. The thermo-mechanical model proposed for the Brazilian equatorial margin includes heterogeneous stretching combined with shearing at the plate margin. The tectonic history comprises: (1) Triassic-Jurassic limited extension associated with the Central Atlantic evolution; (2) Neocomian intraplate deformation consisting of strike-slip reactivation of preexisting shear zones; (3) Aptian-Cenomanian two-phase period of dextral shearing; and (4) Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic sea-floor spreading.

  18. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  19. Unravelling a Precambrian rift and passive margin sequence: pitfalls and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, M.; Leslie, A. G.

    2009-04-01

    The broad tectonic principle behind the formation of rift and passive margins basins is relatively simple. Nevertheless, the detailed sedimentology and architecture of rift/passive margin basins shows a huge diversity, caused by differences in - amongst several factors - amount and duration of extension, sediment supply from the hinterland, magmatic activity, and climate with its implications for carbonate production. Modern passive margin basins can be studied only by seismic methods and drilling, with clear limits on resolution. Ancient rift and especially passive margin basins can only be studied in outcrop after uplift following orogenesis, e.g. after closure of the ocean that created the passive margin in the first place. Such basins are thus deformed, metamorphosed and partially eroded, creating problems in restoration and interpretation. Therefore, to reach a complete understanding of rift / passive margin basins, the challenge is to compare two strands of evidence, each with its own limitations. Additional problems concern particular structures that can be formed either by sedimentary or by orogenic processes, or that can be reactivated during orogenesis. The Scottish sector of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian Laurentian margin, as exposed in the poly-deformed and medium-to-high grade metamorphosed Dalradian Supergroup, is a good example illustrating the challenges at hand. This sequence consists of a lowermost sand-dominated sequence (Grampian Group); succeeded by a varied, thin-bedded group of limestone, mudstone, sandstone and quartzite (Appin Group); to a varied group of quartzites and black shales, a first turbidite series and a basin-wide limestone (Argyll Group) and finally a second turbiditic sequence (Southern Highland Group). A particular problem of interpretation concerns ‘missing' Dalradian stratigraphy. In places, large sections of stratigraphy are absent, with high-level Argyll Group rocks juxtaposed against Grampian Group rocks. Traditionally

  20. Structural design/margin assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    Determining structural design inputs and the structural margins following design completion is one of the major activities in space exploration. The end result is a statement of these margins as stability, safety factors on ultimate and yield stresses, fracture limits (fracture control), fatigue lifetime, reuse criteria, operational criteria and procedures, stability factors, deflections, clearance, handling criteria, etc. The process is normally called a load cycle and is time consuming, very complex, and involves much more than structures. The key to successful structural design is the proper implementation of the process. It depends on many factors: leadership and management of the process, adequate analysis and testing tools, data basing, communications, people skills, and training. This process and the various factors involved are discussed.

  1. Mood Reactivity Rather than Cognitive Reactivity Is Predictive of Depressive Relapse: A Randomized Study with 5.5-Year Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rijsbergen, Gerard D.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Burger, Huibert; Spinhoven, Philip; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Hollon, Steven D.; Schene, Aart H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined whether cognitive reactivity, cognitive extremity reactivity, and mood reactivity following mood provocation predicted relapse in depression over 5.5 years. Additionally, this study was the 1st to examine whether changes in cognitive reactivity and mood reactivity following preventive cognitive therapy (PCT)…

  2. [Marginality, ethnic groups and health].

    PubMed

    Corretger, J M; Fortuny, C; Botet, F; Valls, O

    1992-06-01

    Main marginated ethnic groups in Span are to be found among gypsies and 3rd world immigrants. The first group include about 250,000 persons and the second group more tan half a million people. Their origins and their being past of the less fortunate social layers made them a group of health risk. Pediatric pathologies are those favored by socio-economic shortcomings as well as hygienic-sanitary deficiencies. Imported pediatric pathologies have a small incident.

  3. Passive margin formation, Timor Sea, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Hillis, R.R. )

    1990-06-01

    Recent ODP data show that sea-floor spreading began in the Argo Abyssal Plain in the earliest Cretaceous, and not the Callovian-Oxfordian as had previously been believed. These data are now consistent with the Callovian-Valanginian rifting observed on seismic records over the adjacent continental shelf (Vulcan subbasin, western Timor Sea). Tectonic subsidence plots have been constructed for well, extrapolated well, and significant off-well (seismically based) locations in the Vulcan subbasin and adjacent highs. The fully corrected plots show relatively little tectonic subsidence during the Callovian-Valanginian rift phase, even in the depocenter of the Swan Graben, where the Callovian-Valanginian interval reaches its maximum thickness. This is atypical for a passive margin basin. Assuming an extensional origin for the margin, the absence of tectonic subsidence is considered to indicate that continental rifting in the area was wet (accompanied by major volcanic activity). Recent studies have shown that extensive volcanism may occur where rift zones cut through regions of anomalously hot mantle (100-200{degree}C above normal). The addition to the crust of igneous material, the density of which has been modified by adiabatic decompression, inhibits syn-rift subsidence. A wet rifting model also has implications for the origin of the nearby marginal plateaux such as the Scott Plateau. Their relatively thick crust and lack of subsidence may be due to igneous underplating associated with wet rifting. As such the plateaux may be regarded as transitional between oceanic and continental crust. The post-Valanginian Cretaceous subsidence of the Vulcan subbasin and adjacent areas is consistent with typical post-rift thermal subsidence, the predicted exponentially decaying subsidence history for a wet rift being indistinguishable from that of a dry rift.

  4. Heavy mineral provinces of the Palos Verdes margin, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, F.L.

    2002-01-01

    Natural sources of sediment for the Palos Verdes margin, southern California, have been augmented by effluent discharged from Los Angeles County Sanitation District's sewage-treatment facility and by the reactivation of the Portuguese Bend landslide. Heavy minerals in very fine and fine sand (63-250 ??m) from beach and shelf sites off the Palos Verdes Peninsula distinguish effluent-affected sediment from unaffected deposits, and track the sediment contributed by the Portuguese Bend landslide. Heavy minerals also identify heterogeneous sediment sources for the nearshore zone and relate outer-shelf sediment to depositional cells north and south of the area.

  5. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  6. Optical assessment of tumor resection margins in the breast

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. Quincy; Bydlon, Torre M.; Richards, Lisa M.; Yu, Bing; Kennedy, Stephanie A.; Geradts, Joseph; Wilke, Lee G.; Junker, Marlee; Gallagher, Jennifer; Barry, William; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2011-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery, in which the breast tumor and surrounding normal tissue are removed, is the primary mode of treatment for invasive and in situ carcinomas of the breast, conditions that affect nearly 200,000 women annually. Of these nearly 200,000 patients who undergo this surgical procedure, between 20–70% of them may undergo additional surgeries to remove tumor that was left behind in the first surgery, due to the lack of intra-operative tools which can detect whether the boundaries of the excised specimens are free from residual cancer. Optical techniques have many attractive attributes which may make them useful tools for intra-operative assessment of breast tumor resection margins. In this manuscript, we discuss clinical design criteria for intra-operative breast tumor margin assessment, and review optical techniques appied to this problem. In addition, we report on the development and clinical testing of quantitative diffuse reflectance imaging (Q-DRI) as a potential solution to this clinical need. Q-DRI is a spectral imaging tool which has been applied to 56 resection margins in 48 patients at Duke University Medical Center. Clear sources of contrast between cancerous and cancer-free resection margins were identified with the device, and resulted in an overall accuracy of 75% in detecting positive margins. PMID:21544237

  7. Thermochronological evidence for polyphase post-rift reactivation in SE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogné, N.; Gallagher, K.; Cobbold, P. R.; Riccomini, C.

    2012-04-01

    The continental margin of SE Brazil shows good evidence for tectonic activity well after the break-up of Western Gondwana (see Cobbold et al., 2001 for a review). Additionally, SE Brazil ranks as an HEPM (high elevation passive margin), summits reaching 2800 m. To constrain the onshore evolution of the margin, especially during the Tertiary, we did a new thermochronological and structural study. After an initial regional study, during which we found additional evidence for a major phase of exhumation during the Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary (Cogné et al., 2011), we focussed on a region that was clearly subject to Tertiary tectonics. This region includes the Tertiary Taubaté basin and the adjacent Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira. We used two thermochronolgical methods on the same samples, apatite fission tracks (AFT) and U-Th/He on apatite (AHe). AFT ages range from 129.3±4.3 Ma to 60.7±1.9 Ma with mean track lengths (MTL) from 14.31±0.24 μm to 11.41±0.23 μm, whereas AHe ages range from 519.6±16.6 to 10.1±0.1 Ma. A subset of AHe ages, selected on the basis of data consistency and geological arguments, has a smaller range (122.4±2.5 to 45.1±1.5 Ma). We have combined inverse and forward modelling to assess the range of acceptable thermal histories. Results of inverse modelling confirm our earlier study by showing a Late Cretaceous phase of cooling. Around the onshore Taubaté Basin, for a limited number of samples, another period of cooling occurred during the Early Tertiary, around the time when the basin formed. The inferred thermal histories for most of the samples also imply a later reheating, followed by a Neogene cooling. According to forward modelling, the evidence for reheating seems to be robust around the margins of the Taubaté Basin, but elsewhere the data cannot really discriminate between this and a less complex thermal history. However forward modelling and geologically independent information support the conclusion that the whole

  8. Silenced, Silence, Silent: Motherhood in the Margins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Lorelei; Austin, Helena

    2007-01-01

    This project explores the experiences of women who mother children with ADHD. The authors use the metaphor of the text and the margin. The text is the "motherhood myth" that describes a particular sort of "good" mothering. The margin is the space beyond that text. This marginal space is inhabited by some or all of the mothers they spoke with, some…

  9. [Erosive marginal keratitis due to pilocarpine allergy].

    PubMed

    Radian, A B

    1999-01-01

    In 3 patients under local pilocarpine medication, corneal marginal infiltration and limbic ulcerations were noted that were typical for allergic marginal keratitis. A classical allergic conjunctivitis was present in every case. They healed after pilocarpine instillations were suspended and local corticosteroids together with oral antihistaminic drugs were applied. Marginal allergic erosions of the cornea is another form of secondary complication in patients using pilocarpine.

  10. 17 CFR 31.18 - Margin calls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Margin calls. 31.18 Section 31....18 Margin calls. (a) No leverage transaction merchant shall liquidate a leverage contract because of... after contact is effected in which to respond to a margin call. Twenty-four hours, excluding...

  11. Marginal Fit of CEREC Crowns at Different Finish Line Curvatures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    24 Figure 4: Master die abraded with Aluminium Oxide................................................. 24...measurement form the internal surface of the crown margin to the axial wall of the preparation is called the internal gap, and the same measurement at the...Fasbinder, 2010): the addition of a cylinder diamond, enabling the form -grinding of partial and full crowns (CEREC 2); the introduction of a two-bur

  12. Behavioral reactivity to emotion challenge is associated with cortisol reactivity and regulation at 7, 15, and 24 months of age.

    PubMed

    Ursache, Alexandra; Blair, Clancy; Granger, Douglas A; Stifter, Cynthia; Voegtline, Kristin

    2014-04-01

    Emotionally arousing stimuli have been largely unsuccessful in eliciting cortisol responses in young children. Whether or not emotion challenge will elicit a cortisol response, however, may in part be determined by the extent to which the tasks elicit behavioral reactivity and regulation. We examined relations of behavioral reactivity and regulation to emotional arousal in the context of fear and frustration to the cortisol response at 7, 15, and 24 months of age in a low income, rural population based sample of 1,292 families followed longitudinally from birth. At each age, children participated in fear and frustration inducing tasks, and cortisol samples were taken at three time points (before the tasks began, 20 min following peak emotional arousal or after the series of tasks ended, and 40 min after peak arousal or the tasks ended) in order to capture both increases (reactivity) and subsequent decreases (regulation) in the cortisol response. Using multilevel models, we predicted the cortisol response from measures of behavioral reactivity and regulation. At 7 months of age, cortisol reactivity and recovery were related to behavioral reactivity during a frustration-eliciting task and marginally related to behavioral reactivity during a fear-eliciting task. At 15 and 24 months of age, however, cortisol reactivity and recovery were related only to behavioral reactivity during a fear-eliciting task. Results indicate that while behavioral reactivity is predictive of whether or not infants and young children will exhibit a cortisol response to emotionally arousing tasks, behavioral and cortisol reactivity are not necessarily coupled.

  13. Continental margin tectonics - Forearc processes

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, N.; Reed, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of convergent plate margins and the structural development of forearc terranes are summarized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the geometry of accretionary prisms (Coulomb wedge taper and vertical motion in response to tectonic processes), offscraping vs underplating or subduction, the response to oblique convergence, fluids in forearc settings, the thermal framework and the effects of fluid advection, and serpentinite seamounts. Also included is a comprehensive bibliography for the period.

  14. Three-dimensional marginal separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1988-01-01

    The three dimensional marginal separation of a boundary layer along a line of symmetry is considered. The key equation governing the displacement function is derived, and found to be a nonlinear integral equation in two space variables. This is solved iteratively using a pseudo-spectral approach, based partly in double Fourier space, and partly in physical space. Qualitatively, the results are similar to previously reported two dimensional results (which are also computed to test the accuracy of the numerical scheme); however quantitatively the three dimensional results are much different.

  15. Phenylethynyl endcapping reagents and reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A phenylethynyl composition which can be used to endcap nucleophilic species is employed in the production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers exclusively. These phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers display unique thermal characteristics, as exemplified by the model compound, 4-phenoxy 4'-phenylethynylbenzophenone, which is relatively stable at 200 C, but reacts at 350 C. In addition, a reactive diluent was prepared which decreases the melt viscosity of the phenylethynyl terminated oligomers and subsequently reacts therewith to increase density of the resulting thermoset. The novelty of this invention resides in the phenylethynyl composition used to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent was also employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to increase the crosslink density of the resulting thermoset. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  16. Marginal Lands: Concept, Assessment and Management

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shujiang; Post, Wilfred M; West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Vara Prasad; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar; Wang, Dali; Nichols, Dr Jeff A

    2013-01-01

    Marginal lands have received wide attention for their potential to improve food security and support bioenergy production. However, environmental, ecosystem service, and sustainability concerns have been widely raised over the use of marginal land. Knowledge of the extent, location, and quality of marginal lands as well as their assessment and management are limited and diverse. This paper provides a review of the historical development of marginal concept, its application and assessment. Limitations and priority research needs of marginal land assessment and management were discussed.

  17. [The economic margins of activities of a bovine practitioner on dairy farms].

    PubMed

    van Genugten, A J M; van Haaften, J A; Hogeveen, H

    2011-11-01

    Because of lower margins and market liberalisation veterinarians and farmers are increasingly negotiating rates. Therefore, the margins of veterinarians are under pressure. In addition, the sales if drugs, performance of operations or giving of advice are more and more separated. These developments give veterinarians uncertainty about the profitability of their activities for dairy farmers. Not much is known about margins on veterinary activities on dairy farms. Moreover, it is interesting to see how much margins of the bovine practitioner differ between veterinary practises and dairy farms. In this study, invoices for bovine activities of 14 veterinary practises were combined with milk production registration data of the dairy farms of these practices. This way, the gross margin per bovine practitioner could be studied for the different veterinary practise. Moreover the relation between gross margin and specification of the veterinary practise could be studied. Finally, the gross margin per dairy farm and the factors that influenced this gross margin were studied. The most important result was the observation that the gross margin per bovine practitioner was dependent on the number of dairy farms per practitioner, the margin on drugs and the region of the veterinary practise. The size of the veterinary practise, the share of the dairy farming within the practise and the source of the gross margin (drugs, time or operations) did not influence the gross margin. Variables that explained the gross margin per dairy farm were, amongst others, the number of dairy cows, the milk production level of the farms and participation in PIR-DAP (a system to support the veterinarians herd health and management program). There is no relation of gross margin per dairy farm and the veterinary practise or region.

  18. Dynamics of the continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    On 18--20 June 1990, over 70 oceanographers conducting research in the ocean margins of North America attended a workshop in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The purpose of the workshop was to provide the Department of Energy with recommendations for future research on the exchange of energy-related materials between the coastal and interior ocean and the relationship between the ocean margins and global change. The workshop was designed to optimize the interaction of scientists from specific research disciplines (biology, chemistry, physics and geology) as they developed hypotheses, research questions and topics and implementation plans. The participants were given few restraints on the research they proposed other than realistic time and monetary limits. The interdisciplinary structure of the meeting promoted lively discussion and creative research plans. The meeting was divided into four working groups based on lateral, vertical, air/sea and sediment/water processes. Working papers were prepared and distributed before the meeting. During the meeting the groups revised the papers and added recommendations that appear in this report, which was reviewed by an Executive Committee.

  19. System for reactivating catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2010-03-02

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst is provided. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  20. Controllability Analysis for Operation Margin of Zone 3 Impedance Relay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenghu; Yorino, Naoto; Zoka, Yoshifumi

    Undesirable operation of zone 3 impedance relay (mho relays) is a possible factor for causing cascading failure as seen in several previous large scale blackouts, where power flow redistribution and power swing caused by outage or switching operations satisfy the condition for the relay operation. So far, the condition itself has not fully been investigated, and therefore, there has been little attempt to avoid the relay operation by means of direct power flow control. This paper analyzes the condition for zone 3 relay operation from the viewpoint of its sensitivity to power flow. An operating margin for security is defined for each relay to carry out effective monitoring. It is newly pointed out that undesirable operation can be effectively avoided by reactive power controls as well as real power controls. The method to compute the operation margin is also given through the analysis of the optimal Var location to control the operation margin. Effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated using the IEEE test systems.

  1. Marginal abatement cost curve for NOx incorporating controls, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel switching

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their resp...

  2. Marginal abatement cost curves for NOx that account for renewable electricity, energy efficiency, and fuel switching

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their resp...

  3. Chapter 34: Geology and petroleum potential of the rifted margins of the Canada Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houseknecht, D.W.; Bird, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Three sides of the Canada Basin are bordered by high-standing, conjugate rift shoulders of the Chukchi Borderland, Alaska and Canada. The Alaska and Canada margins are mantled with thick, growth-faulted sediment prisms, and the Chukchi Borderland contains only a thin veneer of sediment. The rift-margin strata of Alaska and Canada reflect the tectonics and sediment dispersal systems of adjacent continental regions whereas the Chukchi Borderland was tectonically isolated from these sediment dispersal systems. Along the eastern Alaska-southern Canada margin, termed herein the 'Canning-Mackenzie deformed margin', the rifted margin is deformed by ongoing Brooks Range tectonism. Additional contractional structures occur in a gravity fold belt that may be present along the entire Alaska and Canada margins of the Canada Basin. Source-rock data inboard of the rift shoulders and regional palaeogeographic reconstructions suggest three potential source-rock intervals: Lower Cretaceous (Hauterivian-Albian), Upper Cretaceous (mostly Turonian) and Lower Palaeogene. Burial history modelling indicates favourable timing for generation from all three intervals beneath the Alaska and Canada passive margins, and an active petroleum system has been documented in the Canning-Mackenzie deformed margin. Assessment of undiscovered petroleum resources indicates the greatest potential in the Canning-Mackenzie deformed margin and significant potential in the Canada and Alaska passive margins. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  4. Modes of Extension and Oceanization at Magma-Poor Margins: An Example from the Brazilian-African Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Gussinye, M.; Araujo, M. N.; Ros, E.; Andres-Martinez, M.; Morgan, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the amount of magmatism and occurrence of serpentinised mantle at rifted margins and oceanic ridges fundamentally depends on spreading rate and mantle potential temperature. Here we show that during continental extension the lower crustal strength exerts an additional fundamental control on the onset and amount of melting and serpentinisation and therefore the type of oceanization. Furthermore, using numerical modeling constrained by multi-channel seismic reflection and wide-angle data from the magma-poor margins of Brazil and Africa, we also show that it is possible to associate margin architectural styles to types of ocean-continent transitions. Observed margin architectural styles can be explained by a combination of extensional modes: core-complex, wide and narrow (Buck, 1991), with a fourth mode, sequential faulting, that accounts for conjugate margin asymmetry (Ranero & Perez-Gussinye, 2010, Brune et al., 2014). The prevalence of any of these modes during extension, which depends on lower crustal strength, controls mantle uplift velocity and hence the relative amounts and timing of melting and serpentinisation, and the character of the ocean-continent transition.

  5. Continental margin evolution of the northern Arabian platform in Syria

    SciTech Connect

    Best, J.A.; Barazangi, M. ); Al-Saad, D.; Sawaf, T.; Gebran, A. )

    1993-02-01

    Synthesis of available geological and geophysical data in the Syrian Arab Republic permits a descriptive account of the pre-Cenozoic geologic history of the northern Arabian platform. The northern Arabian platform appears to be a composite plate similar up to that interpreted in the rocks of the Arabian shield. The structural and stratigraphic relationships of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary sections in Syria record the transformation of an eastward-facing Gondwana passive margin in the early Paleozoic into a westward-facing Levantine margin in the Mesozoic, at which time the northern platform was closely associated with the creation of the eastern Mediterranean basin. Timing of the margin transformation is inferred from the orientation and thickness variations of Lower Triassic rocks, but the transformation may have initiated as early as the Permian. The diversity and timing of geological features in Syria suggest that the northern Arabian platform did not behave as a rigid plate throughout its geological history. The present-day Palmyride mountain belt, located within the northern Arabian platform in Syria and initiated in the early Mesozoic as a northeast-trending rift nearly perpendicular to the Levantine margin, subsequently was inverted in the Cenozoic by transpression. The location of the rift may be associated with the reactivation of a zone of crustal weakness, i.e., a Proterozoic suture zone previously proposed from modeling of Bouguer gravity data. Thus, the northern and southern parts of the Arabian platform are similar in their respective geologic histories during the Proterozoic and Paleozoic; however, the northern Arabian platform was greatly affected by Mesozoic rifting and the creation of the eastern Mediterranean basin during the Mesozoic. 13 figs.

  6. Tectonic structure and evolution of the Atlantic continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Klitgord, K.D.; Schouten, H.; Hutchinson, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Atlantic continental margin developed across the boundary between continental and oceanic crust as rifting and then sea-floor spreading broke apart and separated the North American and African plates, forming the Atlantic Ocean Basin. Continental rifting began in Late Triassic with reactivation of Paleozoic thrust faults as normal faults and with extension across a broad zone of subparallel rift basins. Extension became localized in Early to Middle Jurassic along the zone that now underlies the large marginal basins, and other rift zones, such as the Newark, Hartford, and Fundy basins, were abandoned. Rifting and crustal stretching between the two continents gave way to sea-floor spreading Middle Jurassic and the formation of oceanic crust. This tectonic evolution resulted in formation of distinctive structural features. The marginal basins are underlain by a thinner crust and contain a variety of fault-controlled structures, including half-grabens, seaward- and landward-tilted blocks, faults that die out within the crust, and faults that penetrate the entire crust. This variable structure probably resulted from the late Triassic-Early Jurassic pattern of normal, listric, and antithetic faults that evolved from the Paleozoic thrust fault geometry. The boundary between marginal basins and oceanic crust is marked approximately by the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly (ECMA). A major basement fault is located in the Baltimore Canyon trough at the landward edge of the ECMA and a zone of seaward dipping reflectors is found just seaward of the ECMA off Georges Bank. The fracture zone pattern in Mesozoic oceanic crust can be traced landward to the ECMA.

  7. Operating margin of Soviet RBMK-1000 nuclear power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.M.; Robinson, G.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Hochreiter, L.E. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports on a coupled thermal- hydraulic analysis that is performed for the Soviet-designed RBMK-1000 nuclear power reactor to assess the operating margin to critical heat flux (CHF); the Chernobyl-4 reactor serves as the principal model for this study. Calculations are performed using a simplified subchannel analysis. The overall analysis involves an iterative search to determine the individual subchannel flow rates, and a boiling transition analysis is performed to obtain a measure of the core operating margin. The operating margin is determined via two distinct methods. The first involves a calculation of the core critical power ratio (CPR) using an empirically derived correlation that the Soviets developed expressly for the RBMK-1000. Additionally, various subchannel CHF correlations typical of those used in the design of nuclear-powered reactors in the United States are also employed. When the Soviet critical power correlation is used, the calculations carried out for both normal operating and reference overpower conditions result in CPRs of 1.115 and 1.019, respectively. In most cases, the subchannel CHF correlations indicate that additional operating margin over that calculated by the Soviet critical power correlation exists for this design.

  8. Evaluating Marginal Policy Changes and the Average Effect of Treatment for Individuals at the Margin.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Pedro; Heckman, James J; Vytlacil, Edward

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops methods for evaluating marginal policy changes. We characterize how the effects of marginal policy changes depend on the direction of the policy change, and show that marginal policy effects are fundamentally easier to identify and to estimate than conventional treatment parameters. We develop the connection between marginal policy effects and the average effect of treatment for persons on the margin of indifference between participation in treatment and nonparticipation, and use this connection to analyze both parameters. We apply our analysis to estimate the effect of marginal changes in tuition on the return to going to college.

  9. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. On the Marginal Stability of Glassy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Le; Baity-Jesi, Marco; Müller, Markus; Wyart, Matthieu

    2015-03-01

    In various glassy systems that are out of equilibrium, like spin glasses and granular packings, the dynamics appears to be critical: avalanches involving almost the whole system could happen. A recent conceptual breakthrough argues that such glassy systems sample the ensemble of marginal stable states, which inevitably results into critical dynamics. However, it is unclear how the marginal stability is dynamically guaranteed. We investigate this marginal stability assumption by studying specifically the critical athermal dynamics of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model. We discuss how a pseudo-gap in the density distribution of local fields characterizing the marginal stability arises dynamically.

  11. Enhanced Oxidative Reactivity for Anthracite Coal via a Reactive Ball Milling Pretreatment Step

    SciTech Connect

    Angela D. Lueking; Apurba Sakti; Dania Alvarez-Fonseca; Nichole Wonderling

    2009-09-15

    Reactive ball milling in a cyclohexene solvent significantly increases the oxidative reactivity of an anthracite coal, due to the combined effects of particle size reduction, metal introduction, introduction of volatile matter, and changes in carbon structure. Metals introduced during milling can be easily removed via a subsequent demineralization process, and the increased reactivity is retained. Solvent addition alters the morphological changes that occur during pyrolysis and leads to a char with significantly increased reactivity. When the solvent is omitted, similar effects are seen for the milled product, but a significant fraction of the char is resistant to oxidation. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Geomorphology and Neogene tectonic evolution of the Palomares continental margin (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez de la Peña, Laura; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Muñoz, Araceli; Acosta, Juan; Gómez-Ballesteros, María; R. Ranero, César; Uchupi, Elazar

    2016-10-01

    The Palomares continental margin is located in the southeastern part of Spain. The margin main structure was formed during Miocene times, and it is currently part of the wide deformation zone characterizing the region between the Iberian and African plates, where no well-defined plate boundary occurs. The convergence between these two plates is here accommodated by several structures, including the left lateral strike-slip Palomares Fault. The region is characterized by sparse, low to moderate magnitude (Mw < 5.2) shallow instrumental earthquakes, although large historical events have also occurred. To understand the recent tectonic history of the margin we analyze new high-resolution multibeam bathymetry data and re-processed three multichannel seismic reflection profiles crossing the main structures. The analysis of seafloor morphology and associated subsurface structure provides new insights of the active tectonic features of the area. In contrast to other segments of the southeastern Iberian margin, the Palomares margin contains numerous large and comparatively closely spaced canyons with heads that reach near the coast. The margin relief is also characterized by the presence of three prominent igneous submarine ridges that include the Aguilas, Abubacer and Maimonides highs. Erosive processes evidenced by a number of scars, slope failures, gullies and canyon incisions shape the present-day relief of the Palomares margin. Seismic images reveal the deep structure distinguishing between Miocene structures related to the formation of the margin and currently active features, some of which may reactivate inherited structures. The structure of the margin started with an extensional phase accompanied by volcanic accretion during the Serravallian, followed by a compressional pulse that started during the Latemost Tortonian. Nowadays, tectonic activity offshore is subdued and limited to few, minor faults, in comparison with the activity recorded onshore. The deep Algero

  13. Asymmetry of Non-Volcanic Passive Margins Induced by the Proximity of a Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres-Martinez, M.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Morgan, J. P.; Araujo, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    rifting initiation to the craton influences the width of the margins. Additionally, we analyse viscosity, stress, strain and temperature fields given as an output from the models, in order to understand the feedbacks between the different processes that shape rifted margins in the presence of a craton.

  14. Storm tracks near marginal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambaum, Maarten; Novak, Lenka

    2015-04-01

    The variance of atmospheric storm tracks is characterised by intermittent bursts of activity interspersed with relatively quiescent periods. Most of the poleward heat transport by storm tracks is due to a limited number of strong heat flux events, which occur in a quasi-periodic fashion. This behaviour is in contradiction with the usual conceptual model of the storm tracks, which relies on high growth rate background flows which then spawn weather systems that grow in an exponential or non-normal fashion. Here we present a different conceptual model of the atmospheric storm tracks which is built on the observation that, when including diabatic and other dissipative effects, the storm track region is in fact most of the time marginally stable. The ensuing model is a nonlinear oscillator, very similar to Volterra-Lotka predator-prey models. We demonstrate the extensions of this model to a stochastically driven nonlinear oscillator. The model produces quasi-periodic behaviour dominated by intermittent heat flux events. Perhaps most surprisingly, we will show strong evidence from re-analysis data for our conceptual model: the re-analysis data produces a phase-space plot that is very similar indeed to the phase-space plot for our nonlinear oscillator model.

  15. A margin based approach to determining sample sizes via tolerance bounds.

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Justin T.; Freeland, Katherine Elizabeth

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a tolerance bound approach for determining sample sizes. With this new methodology we begin to think of sample size in the context of uncertainty exceeding margin. As the sample size decreases the uncertainty in the estimate of margin increases. This can be problematic when the margin is small and only a few units are available for testing. In this case there may be a true underlying positive margin to requirements but the uncertainty may be too large to conclude we have sufficient margin to those requirements with a high level of statistical confidence. Therefore, we provide a methodology for choosing a sample size large enough such that an estimated QMU uncertainty based on the tolerance bound approach will be smaller than the estimated margin (assuming there is positive margin). This ensures that the estimated tolerance bound will be within performance requirements and the tolerance ratio will be greater than one, supporting a conclusion that we have sufficient margin to the performance requirements. In addition, this paper explores the relationship between margin, uncertainty, and sample size and provides an approach and recommendations for quantifying risk when sample sizes are limited.

  16. Phenylethynyl reactive diluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having a specified general structure is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having a specified general structure is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react with to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  17. Marginal Basins of the Western Pacific: An Overview (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, S. D.

    2010-12-01

    Marginal ocean basins of the Western Pacific fall into several distinct categories based on their mechanisms of formation: 1) Back-arc basins that likely formed associated with island arc rifting and seafloor spreading, such as the Mariana Trough and the Shikoku-Parece Vela Basin. 2) Ocean basins that formed through processes related to continental rifting, such as the South China Sea and the Sea of Japan, and 3) marginal basins of ambiguous or uncertain origin such as the West Philippine Basin and the Celebes Sea, that may have originated by back-arc spreading, by entrapment of a fragment of an older ocean basin, or by rifting from the Southeast Asian continental margin. The origin of the largest of the western Pacific marginal basins, the West Philippine Basin, has been suggested to be either by back-arc rifting or through entrapment from a major ocean basin. Based on the geological/tectonic characteristics of ocean basin margins, the compositions and ages of oceanic basement, and the stratigraphic and paleomagnetic data from the marginal basins, only the Japan Sea, the South China Sea, the Andaman Sea, and perhaps the Celebes Sea are likely candidates for being formed in relation to the uplift off the Tibetan Plateau. While the age of formation of the West Philippine Basin (55-39 Ma) is roughly synchronous with Tibetan Plateau uplift, the lack of continental crustal blocks or continentally-derived sediment argues against an Asian continental margin origin for the West Philippine Basin. In addition, the evidence for active plate boundaries in the Philippines and along the western side of the West Philippine Basin at this time suggests that it was isolated from Asian deformation perhaps related to Tibetan Plateau uplift. The Celebes Sea is of similar age to the West Philippine Basin, and paleomagnetic data from basement rocks indicates that has moved less than 150 relative to Southeast Asia since it was formed. This evidence, coupled with N-MORB samples recovered

  18. Passive margins getting squeezed in the mantle convection vice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husson, Laurent; Yamato, Philippe; Becker, Thorsten; Pedoja, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    Quaternary coastal geomorphology reveals that passive margins underwent wholesale uplift at least during the glacial cycle. In addition, these not-so-passive margins often exhibit long term exhumation and tectonic inversion, which suggest that compression and tectonic shortening could be the mechanism that triggers their overall uplift. We speculate that the compression in the lithosphere gradually increased during the Cenozoic. The many mountain belts at active margins that accompany this event readily witness this increase. Less clear is how that compression increase affects passive margins. In order to address this issue, we design minimalist 2D viscous models to quantify the impact of plate collision on the stress regime. In these models, a sluggish plate is disposed on a less viscous mantle. It is driven by a "mantle conveyor belt" alternatively excited by lateral shear stresses that represent a downwelling on one side, an upwelling on the other side, or both simultaneously. The lateral edges of the plate are either free or fixed, respectively representing the cases of free convergence and collision. In practice, it dramatically changes the upper boundary condition for mantle circulation and subsequently, for the stress field. The flow pattern transiently evolves almost between two end-members, starting from a situation close to a Couette flow to a pattern that looks like a Poiseuille flow with an almost null velocity at the surface (though in the models, the horizontal velocity at the surface is not strictly null, as the lithosphere deforms). In the second case, the lithosphere is highly stressed horizontally and deforms. For an equivalent bulk driving force, compression increases drastically at passive margins if upwellings are active because they push plates towards the collision. Conversely, if only downwellings are activated, compression occurs on one half of the plate and extension on the other half, because only the downwelling is pulling the plate

  19. Tumor margin detection using optical biopsy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Li, Zhongwu; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Ke; Pu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhu, Ke; Li, Qingbo; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use the Resonance Raman (RR) and fluorescence spectroscopic technique for tumor margin detection with high accuracy based on native molecular fingerprints of breast and gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. This tumor margins detection method utilizes advantages of RR spectroscopic technique in situ and in real-time to diagnose tumor changes providing powerful tools for clinical guiding intraoperative margin assessments and postoperative treatments. The tumor margin detection procedures by RR spectroscopy were taken by scanning lesion from center or around tumor region in ex-vivo to find the changes in cancerous tissues with the rim of normal tissues using the native molecular fingerprints. The specimens used to analyze tumor margins include breast and GI carcinoma and normal tissues. The sharp margin of the tumor was found by the changes of RR spectral peaks within 2 mm distance. The result was verified using fluorescence spectra with 300 nm, 320 nm and 340 nm excitation, in a typical specimen of gastric cancerous tissue within a positive margin in comparison with normal gastric tissues. This study demonstrates the potential of RR and fluorescence spectroscopy as new approaches with labeling free to determine the intraoperative margin assessment.

  20. Marginalization in Random Nonlinear Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudeva Raju, Rajkumar; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Computations involved in tasks like causal reasoning in the brain require a type of probabilistic inference known as marginalization. Marginalization corresponds to averaging over irrelevant variables to obtain the probability of the variables of interest. This is a fundamental operation that arises whenever input stimuli depend on several variables, but only some are task-relevant. Animals often exhibit behavior consistent with marginalizing over some variables, but the neural substrate of this computation is unknown. It has been previously shown (Beck et al. 2011) that marginalization can be performed optimally by a deterministic nonlinear network that implements a quadratic interaction of neural activity with divisive normalization. We show that a simpler network can perform essentially the same computation. These Random Nonlinear Networks (RNN) are feedforward networks with one hidden layer, sigmoidal activation functions, and normally-distributed weights connecting the input and hidden layers. We train the output weights connecting the hidden units to an output population, such that the output model accurately represents a desired marginal probability distribution without significant information loss compared to optimal marginalization. Simulations for the case of linear coordinate transformations show that the RNN model has good marginalization performance, except for highly uncertain inputs that have low amplitude population responses. Behavioral experiments, based on these results, could then be used to identify if this model does indeed explain how the brain performs marginalization.

  1. 17 CFR 242.403 - Required margin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Required margin. 242.403 Section 242.403 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS M, SHO, ATS, AC, AND NMS AND CUSTOMER MARGIN REQUIREMENTS FOR SECURITY FUTURES Customer...

  2. 17 CFR 242.403 - Required margin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required margin. 242.403 Section 242.403 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS M, SHO, ATS, AC, AND NMS AND CUSTOMER MARGIN REQUIREMENTS FOR SECURITY FUTURES Customer...

  3. Dependency and Marginality in Kingston, Jamaica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Colin G.

    1983-01-01

    Kingston, capital of Jamaica, has been molded by three institutions: colonialism, the sugar plantation, and slavery. It has an enormous marginal population living in permanent poverty and not absorbable into the labor force. This marginality, fundamentally related to dependent capitalism, sustains itself by keeping wages low. (CS)

  4. Marginal Utility and Convex Indifference Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews discussion of the relationship between marginal utility and indifference curves which has been presented in recent issues of "Economics." Concludes that indifference analysis does not embody the assumptions of marginal utility theory and that there is no simple relationship between these concepts that does not entail unacceptable…

  5. Marginal Ice Zone: Biogeochemical Sampling with Gliders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Figure 3. Map of 2014 IBRV Araon Arctic cruise study area, indicating CTD, XCTD, sea- ice caps , and helicopter...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Marginal Ice Zone: Biogeochemical Sampling with Gliders...distribution of phytoplankton and particulate organic carbon in the Arctic under the ice and in the marginal ice zone, as well as to understand feedbacks

  6. Academic Prediction and the Marginal Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ludenia, Krista

    This study tried to determine whether (1) the ACT composite score, (2) high school percentile rank (HSPR), or (3) a combination of these were good predictors of academic success in college for the marginal student. The marginal student was defined as one not meeting standard admission requirements, but one whose ACT scores indicated some…

  7. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  8. Brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Castro, M B; Gracia-Sancho, J; Peralta, C

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that most organs for transplantation are currently procured from brain-dead donors; however, the presence of brain death is an important risk factor in liver transplantation. In addition, one of the mechanisms to avoid the shortage of liver grafts for transplant is the use of marginal livers, which may show higher risk of primary non-function or initial poor function. To our knowledge, very few reviews have focused in the field of liver transplantation using brain-dead donors; moreover, reviews that focused on both brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation, both being key risk factors in clinical practice, have not been published elsewhere. The present review aims to describe the recent findings and the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding the pathophysiological changes occurring during brain death, their effects on marginal liver grafts and summarize the more controversial topics of this pathology. We also review the therapeutic strategies designed to date to reduce the detrimental effects of brain death in both marginal and optimal livers, attempting to explain why such strategies have not solved the clinical problem of liver transplantation. PMID:26043077

  9. The Versatile Lid Crease Approach to Upper Eyelid Margin Rotation.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Antonio A V; Akaishi, Patricia M S; Al-Dufaileej, Mohammed; Galindo-Ferreiro, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Lid margin rotational procedures have been used to correct cicatricial trachomatous entropion since the 19(th) century. There are two basic types of surgeries used for lid margin rotation. The first type is based on through-and-through approach combining tarsotomy and the use of sutures on the anterior lamella. The second type of surgery was suggested by Trabut, who proposed a tarsal advancement by posterior approach. We demonstrate that using a lid crease incision combines the basic mechanisms of the anterior and posterior approaches and in addition, addresses a variety of lid problems commonly found in the aged population with cicatricial entropion. After tarsal plate exposure, a tarsotomy through conjunctiva is performed as described by Trabut. Then, instead of using external sutures secured by bolsters, internal absorbable sutures can be used to simultaneously advance the distal tarsal fragment and exert strong tension on the marginal orbicularis muscle. Sixty lids of 40 patients underwent surgery with a lid crease incision. The follow-up ranged from 1 to 12 months (mean 3.0 months ± 2.71). Forty percent of the patients (24 lids) had more than 3 months of follow-up. Adequate margin rotation was achieved in all lids but one that showed a medial eyelash touching the cornea.

  10. Brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Castro, M B; Gracia-Sancho, J; Peralta, C

    2015-06-04

    It is well known that most organs for transplantation are currently procured from brain-dead donors; however, the presence of brain death is an important risk factor in liver transplantation. In addition, one of the mechanisms to avoid the shortage of liver grafts for transplant is the use of marginal livers, which may show higher risk of primary non-function or initial poor function. To our knowledge, very few reviews have focused in the field of liver transplantation using brain-dead donors; moreover, reviews that focused on both brain death and marginal grafts in liver transplantation, both being key risk factors in clinical practice, have not been published elsewhere. The present review aims to describe the recent findings and the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding the pathophysiological changes occurring during brain death, their effects on marginal liver grafts and summarize the more controversial topics of this pathology. We also review the therapeutic strategies designed to date to reduce the detrimental effects of brain death in both marginal and optimal livers, attempting to explain why such strategies have not solved the clinical problem of liver transplantation.

  11. First OH reactivity measurements in Harvard Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdlinger-Blatt, I. S.; Martin, S. T.; Hansel, A.; McKinney, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The OH reactivity provides critical insight into the HOx budget under actual atmospheric conditions, and has implications for the production of ozone and the formation of secondary organic material. Previous studies have indicated that the OH reactivity measured at field sites often exceeds model estimations, but current experiments remain inconclusive about the origin of the discrepancy between the modeled and measured OH reactivity (Lou et al., 2010). As of now there are only a limited number of atmospheric studies of total OH reactivity available, so to improve understanding of the OH reactivity more studies are needed. The first OH reactivity measurements in the northeastern United States are being performed during the summer of 2013 at Harvard Forest. Harvard forest, is located about 100 km west of the Boston metropolitan area, is one of the most intensively studied forests in North America. The main biogenic VOC emitted from Harvard Forest is isoprene followed by monoterpenes and methanol. Sampling for the OH reactivity measurements will be conducted from a 30m tall meteorological tower at the Harvard Forest site. The air is drawn into a reaction cell where the OH reactivity is determined using the Comparative Reactivity Method (Sinha et al., 2008) employing a High-Sensitivity Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (Lindinger et al., 1998, Hansel et al., 1998). In addition to the OH reactivity measurements, the most abundant compounds present in the air sample will be quantified using PTR-MS. The quantification of these compounds is needed to compare the theoretical calculated OH reactivity with the measured OH reactivity data. The measurements will be used to evaluate our understanding of the OH budget at Harvard Forest. References: A. Hansel, A. Jordan, C. Warneke, R. Holzinger, and W. Lindinger.: Improved Detection Limit of the Proton-transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer: On-line Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds at Mixing Ratios of a Few PPTV

  12. Microsphere coated substrate containing reactive aldehyde groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Richard C. K. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A synthetic organic resin is coated with a continuous layer of contiguous, tangential, individual microspheres having a uniform diameter preferably between 100 Angstroms and 2000 Angstroms. The microspheres are an addition polymerized polymer of an unsaturated aldehyde containing 4 to 20 carbon atoms and are covalently bonded to the substrate by means of high energy radiation grafting. The microspheres contain reactive aldehyde groups and can form conjugates with proteins such as enzymes or other aldehyde reactive materials.

  13. Orogenic structural inheritance and rifted passive margin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Mora, Claudio A.; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Structural inheritance is related to mechanical weaknesses in the lithosphere due to previous tectonic events, e.g. rifting, subduction and collision. The North and South Atlantic rifted passive margins that formed during the breakup of Western Gondwana, are parallel to the older Caledonide and the Brasiliano-Pan-African orogenic belts. In the South Atlantic, 'old' mantle lithospheric fabric resulting from crystallographic preferred orientation of olivine is suggested to play a role during rifted margin formation (Tommasi and Vauchez, 2001). Magnetometric and gravimetric mapping of onshore structures in the Camamu and Almada basins suggest that extensional faults are controlled by two different directions of inherited older Brasiliano structures in the upper lithosphere (Ferreira et al., 2009). In the South Atlantic Campos Basin, 3D seismic data indicate that inherited basement structures provide a first order control on basin structure (Fetter, 2009). Here we investigate the role of structural inheritance on the formation of rifted passive margins with high-resolution 2D thermo-mechanical numerical experiments. The numerical domain is 1200 km long and 600 km deep and represents the lithosphere and the sublithospheric mantle. Model experiments were carried out by creating self-consistent orogenic inheritance where a first phase of orogen formation is followed by extension. We focus in particular on the role of varying amount of orogenic shortening, crustal rheology, contrasting styles of orogen formation on rifted margin style, and the time delay between orogeny and subsequent rifted passive formation. Model results are compared to contrasting structural styles of rifted passive margin formation as observed in the South Atlantic. Ferreira, T.S., Caixeta, J.M., Lima, F.D., 2009. Basement control in Camamu and Almada rift basins. Boletim de Geociências da Petrobrás 17, 69-88. Fetter, M., 2009. The role of basement tectonic reactivation on the structural evolution

  14. Selective Harvesting of Marginating-pulmonary Leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Shaashua, Lee; Sorski, Liat; Melamed, Rivka; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2016-03-11

    Marginating-pulmonary (MP) leukocytes are leukocytes that adhere to the inner endothelium of the lung capillaries. MP-leukocytes were shown to exhibit unique composition and characteristics compared to leukocytes of other immune compartments. Evidence suggests higher cytotoxicity of natural killer cells, and a distinct pro- and anti-inflammatory profile of the MP-leukocyte population compared to circulating or splenic immunocytes. The method presented herein enables selective harvesting of MP-leukocytes by forced perfusion of the lungs in either mice or rats. In contrast to other methods used to extract lung-leukocytes, such as tissue grinding and biological degradation, this method exclusively yields leukocytes from the lung capillaries, uncontaminated with parenchymal, interstitial, and broncho-alveolar cells. In addition, the perfusion technique better preserves the integrity and the physiological milieu of MP-leukocytes, without inducing physiological responses due to tissue processing. This unique MP leukocyte population is strategically located to identify and react towards abnormal circulating cells, as all circulating malignant cells and infected cells are detained while passing through the lung capillaries, physically interacting with endothelial cells and resident leukocytes,. Thus, selective harvesting of MP-leukocytes and their study under various conditions may advance our understanding of their biological and clinical significance, specifically with respect to controlling circulating aberrant cells and lung-related diseases.

  15. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Toivanen, P.; Toivanen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most important, HLA-B27 associated arthritis may occur identical to the Reiter's syndrome with accompanying uretheritis and/or conjunctivitis, whereas in the B27 non-associated form this has not been clearly described. Likewise, only the B27 associated form belongs to the group of spondyloarthropathies.

 PMID:10577958

  16. Early Cenozoic tectonic quiescence at the southern Levant continental margin, eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattner, Uri; Segev, Amit; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    The geological record of the easternmost Mediterranean shows almost continuous tectonic activity across the Levant continental margin since its formation during the early Mesozoic until the Recent. The margin developed as part of the Gondwana super continent breakup. Since mid Cenozoic onwards Gondwana descendants, the African and Arabian plates, progressively collided with Eurasia. This collision along with the initiation activity of the Afar plume led to the Cenozoic reactivation of the Levant margin. We explore the geodynamic development of the Levant region between its formation and reactivation through one of the poorly understood time periods in its history. Geological evidence shows that tectonomagmatic processes associated with the formation of the Levant margin and later geodynamic events lasted until the Maastrichtian. During the following ~25 Myr exclusively, thick pelagic and deep sea sediments accumulated on the submerged northwestern Arabian plate. We interpret this early-to-middle Paleogene time window as a unique interval of tectonic and magmatic quiescence. During this mature post continental, breakup stage, thermal equilibrium and isostatic compensation were achieved. A three-dimensional layered lithosphere model was constructed to describe this Middle-Late Eocene geodynamic scene of the Levant area before its reactivation. Layers of the model include the Moho, top of the basement interfaces and the top Avedat Group (Upper Eocene) interfaces. The model was established after a 100 km horizontal restoration along the Dead Sea transform and vertical correction by isostatic compensation to achieve the paleo structure which prevailed in the study area at the end of the Eocene. The reconstructed elevation defines a ramp-shaped structure compatible with independent geological evidence. Results show that most parts of the central Levant margin were submerged ~200 m to ~1800 m, while the paleo bathymetric slopes ranged from ~2° (shelf) to ~6° (slope

  17. Marginal and happy? The need for uniqueness predicts the adjustment of marginal immigrants.

    PubMed

    Debrosse, Régine; de la Sablonnière, Roxane; Rossignac-Milon, Maya

    2015-12-01

    Marginalization is often presented as the strategy associated with the worst adjustment for immigrants. This study identifies a critical variable that buffers marginal immigrants from the negative effects of marginalization on adjustment: The need for uniqueness. In three studies, we surveyed immigrants recruited on university campuses (n = 119, n = 116) and in the field (n = 61). Among marginal immigrants, a higher need for uniqueness predicted higher self-esteem (Study 1), affect (Study 2), and life satisfaction (Study 3), and marginally higher happiness (Study 2) and self-esteem (Study 3). No relationship between the need for uniqueness and adjustment was found among non-marginal immigrants. The adaptive value of the need for uniqueness for marginal immigrants is discussed.

  18. Physiological and psychological stress reactivity in chronic tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, Kristin; Weise, Cornelia; Schwarz, Kristin; Rief, Winfried

    2008-06-01

    Several models of tinnitus maintenance emphasize the importance of cognitive, emotional and psychophysiological processes. These factors contribute to distress in patients with decompensated tinnitus symptoms. We investigated whether tinnitus patients show increased physiological levels of arousal, more intense stress reactivity patterns and exaggerated psychological strain compared to healthy controls. Seventy tinnitus patients and 55 healthy controls underwent various stress tests. Muscular reactivity and peripheral arousal as well as strain ratings were assessed. Tinnitus patients reported significantly more strain during stress tests compared to healthy controls. Few physiological reactivity patterns differed significantly between the two groups. The physiological data thus only partly supported a hyperreactivity hypothesis. Strain reports and physiological data were only marginally correlated. Tinnitus patients show maladaptive appraisal processes during stress exposure, yet physiological reactivity is only slightly affected. Treatment programs for patients with decompensated tinnitus symptoms should account for appraisal processes and coping mechanisms in stressful situations.

  19. Fluid flow paths and upper plate tectonics at erosional margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranero, C. R.; Weinrebe, W.; von Huene, R.; Huguen, C.; Sahling, H.; Bohrmann, G.

    2003-04-01

    An understanding of fluid flow regime and tectonics of convergent margins dominated by subduction erosion processes lags behind that for accretionary margins. Recent seafloor mapping and seismic images along Middle America and North Chile indicate that tectonic processes that pervasively fracture the upper plate across the entire continental slope create a complex hydrological system characterizing erosional margins. The most spectacular fracturing occurs where seamounts underthrust the margin locally uplifting and breaking the upper plate. Fractures concentrate at the summit of the uplift and leave a trail of mass wasting. At the summit, high backscatter energy is coincident with outcrops of authigenic carbonates. Away from the areas of seamount subduction, a pervasive extensional tectonic fabric develops due to collapse of the margin from basal erosion (upper plate material removal along the plate boundary). High resolution bathymetry displays arrays of margin semiparallel normal faults across the middle-upper slope. Associated with the faults groups of mud diapirs pierce through the slope sediment cover and crop out at the seafloor. Photographs and dredging indicate that the mounds are partially covered by chemoherm carbonates and locally chemosynthetic fauna were observed. Seismic data image some of the normal faults cutting from the seafloor to great depths into the upper plate, in some cases perhaps reaching the plate boundary. Thus, mud diapirs and faults might be tapping fluids from that depth. In addition to those areas of focussed fluids flow, positive temperature anomalies over large areas, deduced from depth to Bottom Simulating Reflectors, indicate a diffuse fluid flow. The lower slope is fronted by a small sediment prism (typically 5-15 km wide) constructed from debris wasted from the margin that increases pore pressure along the decollement and facilitates subduction of the incoming sediment. In some cases mass wasting may fill the trench with up to

  20. Smell differential reactivity, but not taste differential reactivity, is related to food neophobia in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Monnery-Patris, Sandrine; Wagner, Sandra; Rigal, Natalie; Schwartz, Camille; Chabanet, Claire; Issanchou, Sylvie; Nicklaus, Sophie

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has identified relationships between chemosensory reactivity and food neophobia in children. However, most studies have investigated this relationship using declarative data and without separately analysing smell and taste reactivity. Our first objective was to assess the relationships between smell and taste differential reactivity in toddlers (i.e. reactivity towards several stimuli), using experimental behavioural measurements. The second objective was to determine the relationships between smell (or taste) differential reactivity and food neophobia in toddlers, with the hypothesis that the more responsive a toddler was across food odours or tastes, the more neophobic s/he would be. An additional objective was to determine whether the potential relationships between smell (or taste) differential reactivity and food neophobia differ according to gender. One hundred and twenty-three toddlers aged from 20 to 22 months from the Opaline birth cohort (Observatory of Food Preferences in Infants and Children) were involved. A questionnaire was used to assess child's food neophobia. Toddlers' differential reactivity for smell (and for taste) was defined as the variability of behavioural responses over 8 odorants, and over the five basic tastes. Smell and taste differential reactivities were not correlated. Food neophobia scores were modestly but significantly positively correlated with smell differential reactivity but not with taste differential reactivity. When gender was considered, smell reactivity and neophobia were correlated only among boys. This indicates the need to study smell and taste reactivity separately to determine their associations with eating behaviours. This suggests that the rejection of novel foods in neophobic boys could be partly due to food odour. This finding is new and clearly requires further investigation.

  1. The Late Paleozoic Southern Margin of the Siberian paleocontinent: transformation from an active continental margin to intracontinental rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, A. M.; Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Sal'Nikova, E. B.

    2009-04-01

    The large volcanoplutonic belt was formed on the southern margin of Siberian paleocontinent in the Early Carboniferous-Early Permian. Now it's stretched through whole Mongolia and the adjacent region of China. In the belt structure there are defined the successive rock complexes: the older one represented by differentiated basalt-andesite-rhyodacite series and younger bimodal complex of basalt-comendite-trachyrhyolite composition. The granodiorite-plagiogranite and diorite-monzonite-granodiorite plutonic massifs are associated with the former, while peralkaline granite massifs are characteristic of the latter. Geochronological results and geological relations between rocks of the bimodal and differentiated complexes showed first that rocks of the differentiated complex originated 350 to 330 Ma ago at the initial stage of forming of the marginal continental belt, linked with development active continental margin. This is evident from geochronological dates obtained for the Adzh-Bogd and Edrengiyn-Nuruu massifs and for volcanic associations of the complex. The dates are consistent with paleontological data. The bimodal association was formed later, 320 to 290 Ma ago. The time span separating formation of two igneous complexes ranges from several to 20-30 m.y. in different areas of the marginal belt. The bimodal magmatism was interrelated with rifting responsible for development of the Gobi-Tien Shan rift zone in the belt axial part and the Main Mongolian lineament along the belt northern boundary. Loci of bimodal rift magmatism likely migrated with time: the respective magmatic activity first initiated on the west of the rift system and then advanced gradually eastward with development of rift structures. Normal granitoids untypical but occurring nevertheless among the products of rift magmatism in addition to peralkaline massifs are assumed to have been formed, when the basic magmatism associated with rifting stimulated crustal anatexis and generation of crustal

  2. Wholesale marginal prices in competitive generation markets

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Arriaga, I.J.; Meseguer, C.

    1997-05-01

    Wholesale marginal electricity prices are being used in several actual competitive generation markets worldwide, both to remunerate generators and to charge consumption. These prices must account not only for energy, but also for guarantee of supply in the long and the short term. This paper: (a) provides a sound conceptual and quantitative foundation for wholesale pricing based on generation services, where any existing restrictions in operation or planning in real power markets are accounted for, (b) clearly establishes the relationship between short term marginal costs, long term marginal costs and optimal wholesale electricity prices, and (c) identifies the reasons for mismatches in cost recovery with marginal generation prices. The theoretical results are verified with a detailed realistic power system model.

  3. Mental Depreciation and Marginal Decision Making

    PubMed

    Heath; Fennema

    1996-11-01

    We propose that individuals practice "mental depreciation," that is, they implicitly spread the fixed costs of their expenses over time or use. Two studies explore how people spread fixed costs on durable goods. A third study shows that depreciation can lead to two distinct errors in marginal decisions: First, people sometimes invest too much effort to get their money's worth from an expense (e.g., they may use a product a lot to spread the fixed expense across more uses). Second, people sometimes invest too little effort to get their money's worth: When people add a portion of the fixed cost to the current costs, their perceived marginal (i.e., incremental) costs exceed their true marginal costs. In response, they may stop investing because their perceived costs surpass the marginal benefits they are receiving. The latter effect is supported by two field studies that explore real board plan decisions by university students.

  4. On Efficient Large Margin Semisupervised Learning: Method and Theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhui; Shen, Xiaotong; Pan, Wei

    2009-03-01

    In classification, semisupervised learning usually involves a large amount of unlabeled data with only a small number of labeled data. This imposes a great challenge in that it is difficult to achieve good classification performance through labeled data alone. To leverage unlabeled data for enhancing classification, this article introduces a large margin semisupervised learning method within the framework of regularization, based on an efficient margin loss for unlabeled data, which seeks efficient extraction of the information from unlabeled data for estimating the Bayes decision boundary for classification. For implementation, an iterative scheme is derived through conditional expectations. Finally, theoretical and numerical analyses are conducted, in addition to an application to gene function prediction. They suggest that the proposed method enables to recover the performance of its supervised counterpart based on complete data in rates of convergence, when possible.

  5. On Efficient Large Margin Semisupervised Learning: Method and Theory

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhui; Shen, Xiaotong; Pan, Wei

    2012-01-01

    In classification, semisupervised learning usually involves a large amount of unlabeled data with only a small number of labeled data. This imposes a great challenge in that it is difficult to achieve good classification performance through labeled data alone. To leverage unlabeled data for enhancing classification, this article introduces a large margin semisupervised learning method within the framework of regularization, based on an efficient margin loss for unlabeled data, which seeks efficient extraction of the information from unlabeled data for estimating the Bayes decision boundary for classification. For implementation, an iterative scheme is derived through conditional expectations. Finally, theoretical and numerical analyses are conducted, in addition to an application to gene function prediction. They suggest that the proposed method enables to recover the performance of its supervised counterpart based on complete data in rates of convergence, when possible. PMID:24678270

  6. Energy margins in dynamic object manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tian; Sternad, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Many tasks require humans to manipulate dynamically complex objects and maintain appropriate safety margins, such as placing a cup of coffee on a coaster without spilling. This study examined how humans learn such safety margins and how they are shaped by task constraints and changing variability with improved skill. Eighteen subjects used a manipulandum to transport a shallow virtual cup containing a ball to a target without losing the ball. Half were to complete the cup transit in a comfortable target time of 2 s (a redundant task with infinitely many equivalent solutions), and the other half in minimum time (a nonredundant task with one explicit cost to optimize). The safety margin was defined as the ball energy relative to escape, i.e., as an energy margin. The first hypothesis, that subjects converge to a single strategy in the minimum-time task but choose different strategies in the less constrained target-time task, was not supported. Both groups developed individualized strategies with practice. The second hypothesis, that subjects decrease safety margins in the minimum-time task but increase them in the target-time task, was supported. The third hypothesis, that in both tasks subjects modulate energy margins according to their execution variability, was partially supported. In the target-time group, changes in energy margins correlated positively with changes in execution variability; in the minimum-time group, such a relation was observed only at the end of practice, not across practice. These results show that when learning a redundant object manipulation task, most subjects increase their safety margins and shape their movement strategies in accordance with their changing variability. PMID:22592302

  7. Geomorphology of the Iberian Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestro, Adolfo; López-Martínez, Jerónimo; Llave, Estefanía; Bohoyo, Fernando; Acosta, Juan; Hernández-Molina, F. Javier; Muñoz, Araceli; Jané, Gloria

    2013-08-01

    The submarine features and processes around the Iberian Peninsula are the result of a complex and diverse geological and oceanographical setting. This paper presents an overview of the seafloor geomorphology of the Iberian Continental Margin and the adjacent abyssal plains. The study covers an area of approximately 2.3 million km2, including a 50 to 400 km wide band adjacent to the coastline. The main morphological characteristics of the seafloor features on the Iberian continental shelf, continental slope, continental rise and the surrounding abyssal plains are described. Individual seafloor features existing on the Iberian Margin have been classified into three main groups according to their origin: tectonic and/or volcanic, depositional and erosional. Major depositional and erosional features around the Iberian Margin developed in late Pleistocene-Holocene times and have been controlled by tectonic movements and eustatic fluctuations. The distribution of the geomorphological features is discussed in relation to their genetic processes and the evolution of the margin. The prevalence of one or several specific processes in certain areas reflects the dominant morphotectonic and oceanographic controlling factors. Sedimentary processes and the resulting depositional products are dominant on the Valencia-Catalán Margin and in the northern part of the Balearic Promontory. Strong tectonic control is observed in the geomorphology of the Betic and the Gulf of Cádiz margins. The role of bottom currents is especially evident throughout the Iberian Margin. The Galicia, Portuguese and Cantabrian margins show a predominance of erosional features and tectonically-controlled linear features related to faults.

  8. Structural development of the western margins of the Sirte basin

    SciTech Connect

    Anketell, J.M.; Kumati, S.M.

    1988-08-01

    The Sirte basin, situated in north-central Libya, is a broad, northwest-trending embayment comprising a complex of small horsts and grabens. The basin was initiated in the early Cretaceous by collapse of the Tibisti-Sirte arch and underwent further faulting, notably in Late Cretaceous to early paleocene time and during the latter part of the Eocene. Throughout the greater part of the region, faults are obscured by Neogene cover; however, west of the Dahra-Hofra horst they are exposed. The last major phase of faulting in this region is late Lutetian to early Priabonian in age with minor reactivation during Oligocene and Miocene time. A phase of intra-Lutetian movement is also recognized. Following deposition of open marine limestones and chalks in the early Lutetian, the region was tilted toward the east-northeast with emergence and development of a complex system of east-flowing drainage channels which sculpted the emerging surface. The channels are wide but shallow, ranging up to 2 km wide and 10 m deep. This phase of movement and intraformational erosion was terminated by slow subsidence and/or transgression with development of restricted marine shales. The late Eocene faults which delineate the western margin of the Dahra horst throw down to the west and display a complex en echelon pattern. They are interpreted in terms of Riedel shear mechanics related to oblique-slip reactivation of basement shears. Counterclockwise orientation of the shears indicates they formed in response to sinistral slip.

  9. The basins on the Argentine continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Urien, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    After the stabilization of the central Gondwana Craton, orogenic belts were accreted, as a result of convergence events and an extensive passive margin developed in southwestern Gondwana. Thermal subsidence in Parana, Karoo-Ventania basins and the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic rifts, were modified by the Gondwana breakup and the South Atlantic opening. Early Paleozoic marine transgressions deposited the Table Mountain Group in Ventania. In southwestern Patagonia foreland clastics were deposited. Magmatic arcs and marine units indicate a tectonic trough was formed, alternating with continental sequences, over Late Paleozoic metamorphics and intrusives, resulting from plastered terrains along the Gondwana margin. In Patagonia, Permo-Carboniferous continental and glacio marine clastics infill the basins, while in Ventania, paralic sequences, grade from neritic to continental to the northeast, extending beneath the continental margin. The Triassic-Jurassic rift basins progressed onto regional widespread acid lavas and were infilled by lagoonal organic-rich sequences. Early drift phase built basins transverse to the margin, with fluvio-lacustrine sequences: Salado, Colorado, Valdes-Rawson, San Julian and North Malvinas intracratonic basins, which underwent transtensional faulting. Post-Oxfordian to Neocomian brackish sequences, onlapped the conjugate basins during the margin`s drift, with petroleum systems, as in Austral and Malvinas. In the Valanginian, basic extrusions commenced to form on the continental border, heralding the oceanic phase. Due to thermal subsidence, offlaping sediments prograded onto the remaining half-grabens. Several petroleum systems, proven and hypothetical, are identified in this region.

  10. Marginalizing Instrument Systematics in HST WFC3 Transit Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeford, H. R.; Sing, D.K.; Deming, D.; Mandell, A.

    2016-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) infrared observations at 1.1-1.7 microns probe primarily the H2O absorption band at 1.4 microns, and have provided low-resolution transmission spectra for a wide range of exoplanets. We present the application of marginalization based on Gibson to analyze exoplanet transit light curves obtained from HST WFC3 to better determine important transit parameters such as "ramp" probability (R (sub p)) divided by "ramp" total (R (sub asterisk)), which are important for accurate detections of H2O. We approximate the evidence, often referred to as the marginal likelihood, for a grid of systematic models using the Akaike Information Criterion. We then calculate the evidence-based weight assigned to each systematic model and use the information from all tested models to calculate the final marginalized transit parameters for both the band-integrated and spectroscopic light curves to construct the transmission spectrum. We find that a majority of the highest weight models contain a correction for a linear trend in time as well as corrections related to HST orbital phase. We additionally test the dependence on the shift in spectral wavelength position over the course of the observations and find that spectroscopic wavelength shifts delta (sub lambda) times lambda) best describe the associated systematic in the spectroscopic light curves for most targets while fast scan rate observations of bright targets require an additional level of processing to produce a robust transmission spectrum. The use of marginalization allows for transparent interpretation and understanding of the instrument and the impact of each systematic evaluated statistically for each data set, expanding the ability to make true and comprehensive comparisons between exoplanet atmospheres.

  11. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  12. Reactive modification of polyesters and their blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Chen

    2004-12-01

    As part of a broader research effort to investigate the chemical modification of polyesters by reactive processing a low molecular weight (MW) unsaturated polyester (UP) and a higher MW saturated polyester, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), alone or blended with polypropylene (PP) were melt processed in a batch mixer and continuous twin screw extruders. Modification was monitored by on-line rheology and the products were characterized primarily by off-line rheology, morphology and thermal analysis. Efforts were made to establish processing/property relationships and provide an insight of the accompanying structural changes. The overall response of the reactively modified systems was found to be strongly dependent on the component characteristics, blend composition, type and concentrations of reactive additives and processing conditions. The work concluded that UP can be effectively modified through reactive melt processing. Its melt viscosity and MW can be increased through chemical reactions between organic peroxides (POX) and chain unsaturation or between MgO and carboxyl/hydroxyl end groups. Reactive blending of PP/UP blends through peroxide modification gave finer and more uniform morphology than unreacted blends and at a given PP/UP weight ratio more thermoplastic elastomers-like rheological behavior. This is due to the continuously decreasing viscosity ratio of PP/UP towards unity by the competing reactions between POX and the blend components and formation of PP-UP copolymers which serve as in-situ compatibilizers to promote better interfacial adhesion. Kinetics of the competing reactions were analyzed through a developed model. In addition to POX concentration and mixing efficiency, rheology and morphology of UP/PP bends were significantly affected by the addition of inorganic and organic coagents. Addition of coagents such as a difunctional maleimide, MgO and/or an anhydride functionalized PP during reactive blending offers effective means for tailoring

  13. Offshore Benin, a classic passive margin

    SciTech Connect

    Mathalone, J.M.P. )

    1991-03-01

    Offshore Benin comprises a narrow east-west continental shelf, some 30 km wide. A sharp shelf break running parallel to the coast borders the shelf, whereupon water depths rapidly increase to over 7000 ft. The area lies within the Dahomey Embayment, one of a series of Cretaceous and younger basins lining the coast of Africa that owe their inception to the Late Mesozoic break-up of the Gondwanaland Continent. The basin extends some 100 km inland, but sedimentary section is thin onshore compared to a maximum of 20,000 ft of sediment offshore. Initial sedimentation in this basin was of Neocomian alluvial and lacustrine clastics. These were deposited in east-west-trending narrow half-grabens associated with the initial break up of the South American and African continents. They are covered unconformably by more extensive Albian and Cenomanian transgressive clastics and shallow marine Turonian sandstones which are the main reservoir at Seme, Benin's only oilfield. The Senonian section offshore comprises passive margin deep sea clastic sediments prograding southwards. Very large proximal deep sea channels up to 2500 ft thick are developed in this interval. These channels are associated with excellent petroleum source rocks, averaging 4-5% oil-prone organic carbon, and form the main exploration target in the area when configured in a trap morphology. Seismic data quality is excellent in the region allowing detailed examination of the relationships between the rifted section and later units. In addition, these data illustrate clearly both internal and external morphology of the Senonian proximal deep sea channels.

  14. Eastern Venezuela Basin's Post-Jurassic evolution as a passive transform margin basin

    SciTech Connect

    George, R.P. Jr. ); Sams, R.H. )

    1993-02-01

    Passive transform margins are segments of rifted continental margins bounded by transform faults that are active during rifting and that become inactive during drifting. Examples include the northern coast of Brazil and its matching margin along the Liberia-Nigeria coast. We propose that the northern margin of the Eastern Venezuela Basin was dominantly a passive transform margin during the Cretaceous and early Paleogene, rather than a purely passive margin. Published microplate reconstructions of the southern Caribbean show Jurassic separation of the Bahamas platform from northern South America along a northwest-trending transform fault postulated to lie just northeast of Trinidad and the Guianas. We conjecture that the [open quotes]Deflexion de Barcelona[close quotes] (a northwest-trending zone of strike slip faults along the southwestern edge of the Serrania del Interior) is controlled by a basement geofracture that is the onshore expression of Jurassic transform fault southwest of and subparallel to the southwestern Bahamas transform. Implications of this conjecture for the Eastern Venezuela Basin include: (1) absence of McKenzie-type regional crustal stretching, Mesozoic thermal anomaly, and Mesozoic thermal-tectonic subsidence; (2) abrupt rather than gradual seaward changes in crustal thickness; (3)abrupt lateral changes in thickness and facies of Mesozoic sediments, as in the Piaui-Ceara basins of northern Brazil; (4) tendency for structural styles developed during Neogene compression to include more strike-slip faults and en enchelon fold sets (because of reactivation of Mesozoic transforms) than would be expected by structural inversion of a purely passive margin.

  15. Meso-Cenozoic Source-to-Sink analysis of the African margin of the Equatorial Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardon, Dominique; Rouby, Delphine; Huyghe, Damien; Ye, Jing; Guillocheau, François; Robin, Cécile; Dall'Asta, Massimo; Brown, Roderick; Webster, David

    2015-04-01

    The Transform Source to Sink Project (TS2P) objective is to link the evolution of the offshore sedimentary basins of the African margin of the Equatorial Atlantic and their source areas on the West African Craton. The margin consists in alternating transform and oblique margin portions from Guinea, in the West, to Nigeria, in the East. Such a longitudinal structural variability is associated with variation in the margin width, continental geology and relief, drainage networks and subsidence/accumulation patterns that we analyzed using offshore seismic data and onshore geology and geomorphology. We compare syn- to post rift offshore geometry and long-term stratigraphic history of each of the margin segments. Transform faults appear to play a major role in shaping Early Cretaceous syn-rift basin architectures. Immediate post-rift Late Cretaceous sedimentary wedges record a transgression and are affected by the reactivation of some of transform faults. We produced A new type of inland paleogeographic maps for key periods since the end of the Triassic, allowing delineation of intracratonic basins having accumulated material issued from erosion of the marginal upwarps that have grown since break-up along the margin. We use offshore and onshore basin analysis to estimate sediment accumulation and integrate it in a source-to-sink analysis where Mesozoic onshore denudation will be estimated by low-temperature thermochronology. Cenozoic erosion and drainage history of the continental domain have been reconstructed from the spatial analysis of dated and regionally correlated geomorphic markers. The stationary drainage configuration of the onshore domain since 30 Ma offers the opportunity to correlate the detailed onshore morphoclimatic record based on the sequence of lateritic paleolandsurfaces to offshore stratigraphy, eustasy and global climatic proxies since the Oligocene. Within this framework, we simulate quantitative solute / solid erosional fluxes based on the

  16. Cenozoic uplift on the West Greenland margin: active sedimentary basins in quiet Archean terranes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jess, Scott; Stephenson, Randell; Brown, Roderick

    2016-04-01

    The North Atlantic is believed by some authors to have experienced tectonically induced uplift within the Cenozoic. Examination of evidence, onshore and offshore, has been interpreted to imply the presence of kilometre scale uplift across the margins of the Barents Sea, North Sea, Baffin Bay and Greenland Sea. Development of topography on the West Greenland margin (Baffin Bay), in particular, has been subject to much discussion and dispute. A series of low temperature thermochronological (AFT and AHe) studies onshore and interpretation of seismic architecture offshore have suggested uplift of the entire margin totalling ~3km. However, challenges to this work and recent analysis on the opposing margin (Baffin Island) have raised questions about the validity of this interpretation. The present work reviews and remodels the thermochronological data from onshore West Greenland with the aim of re-evaluating our understanding of the margin's history. New concepts within the discipline, such as effect of radiation damage on Helium diffusivity, contemporary modelling approaches and denudational mapping are all utilised to investigate alternative interpretations to this margins complex post rift evolution. In contrast to earlier studies our new approach indicates slow protracted cooling across much of the region; however, reworked sedimentary samples taken from the Cretaceous Nuussuaq Basin display periods of rapid reheating and cooling. These new models suggest the Nuussuaq Basin experienced a tectonically active Cenozoic, while the surrounding Archean basement remained quiet. Faults located within the basin appear to have been reactivated during the Palaeocene and Eocene, a period of well-documented inversion events throughout the North Atlantic, and may have resulted in subaerial kilometre scale uplift. This interpretation of the margin's evolution has wider implications for the treatment of low temperature thermochronological data and the geological history of the North

  17. Plume-lithosphere interactions near a passive continental margin: a thermo-mechanical modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Thomas; Cloetingh, Sierd; Burov, Evgueni; Matenco, Liviu

    2015-04-01

    Plume head-lithosphere (PLI) interactions have important consequences both for tectonic and mineralogical evolution of the lithosphere and are often considered to be an important factor of continental break-up. Nevertheless, the interaction between plume and post break-up tectonics (i.e. evolution of passive margins) remain unclear. The passive margins represent important geometrical, thermal and rheological barriers that interact with the plume head material during its emplacement below the lithosphere. For example on the Scandinavia's North Atlantic passive margin the large Cenozoic uplift comprised uplift of basin margins as well as accelerated subsidence of basin centres adjacent to the uplifted landmasses while the compressional reactivation coincides with the postulated Iceland-plume events associated with massive magma emplacement. The goal of this study is to understand the role of the Iceland plume in the Cenozoic evolution of the Scandinavia's North Atlantic passive margin. To investigate the interactions between the plume and passive margin we use fully coupled thermo-mechanical 2D numerical code (Flamar v12). The model area is 700 km deep and 1500 km wide comprising rheologically realistic lithosphere and the entire upper mantle Our models have free upper surface boundary, surface erosion, account for the rheological stratification (upper crust, lower crust, lithospheric mantle and asthenosphere), brittle-elastic-ductile rheology, metamorphic phase changes (density and physical properties) and for the specific crustal and thermal structure of the Scandinavia's North Atlantic passive margin. We have tested several parameters including the lateral position of the plume, the rate of extension and the thermo-rheological profile of the continental lithosphere.

  18. Reactive Power Compensator.

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  19. Reactive power compensator

    DOEpatents

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  20. Regional and sectoral marginal abatement cost curves for NOx incorporating controls, renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel switching

    EPA Science Inventory

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their resp...

  1. Crustal structure of the Nova Scotia margin and implications for the Moroccan margin conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Louden, K. E.; Jackson, R.; Dehler, S.; Funck, T.

    2003-04-01

    The Nova Scotia margin is located at a transition from volcanic margins in the south to non-volcanic margins in the north along the Eastern Atlantic continental margin system. South of the Nova Scotia margin, seaward dipping reflections (SDR) and a high-velocity lower crustal layer are observed across the ocean-continent transition (OCT), indicative of volcanic margins. North of the Nova Scotia margin, no SDR is observed and thin crust overlies serpentinized mantle across the OCT. Along the Nova Scotia margin, an SDR sequence is observed but only on the southern-most part neighboring Georges Bank. The East Coast Magnetic Anomaly, possibly related to an igneous wedge, extends further to the north but disappears south of the Scotian Basin. In order to understand the crustal structure of this transition from volcanic to non-volcanic margin, three wide-angle seismic reflection/refraction (WAR/R) profiles were acquired across the full width of the Nova Scotia margin in 2001, to delineate the crustal features from continental crust to oceanic crust. The northern profile (Line 1) crosses the Scotian Basin and coincides with existing multi-channel seismic reflection (MCS) profile 89-1; the middle profile (Line 2) crosses the Lahave Platform and coincides with MCS profiles 88-1 and 88-1a; and the southern profile (Line 3) crosses the southwestern part of the margin. Preliminary results for the middle WAR/R profile indicate that serpentinized mantle is observed below the OCT, possibly overlain by thin oceanic crust. Oceanic crust is about 6 km thick, 1-2 km thicker than that of the northern profile. This indicates increasing volcanism and magma generation from the northern to the southern parts of the margin. WAR/R profiles were collected across the conjugate NW-Moroccan margin in 2001, one of which is 60 km to the north of Line 1 in the plate reconstruction at the time of rifting. Similar amounts of crustal extension and widths of transitional crust are shown along these

  2. Marginal abatement cost curves for NOx that account for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) traces out the relationship between the quantity of pollution abated and the marginal cost of abating each additional unit. In the context of air quality management, MACCs typically are developed by sorting end-of-pipe controls by their respective cost effectiveness. Alternative measures, such as renewable electricity, energy efficiency, and fuel switching (RE/EE/FS), are not considered as it is difficult to quantify their abatement potential. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of an energy system model to develop a MACC for nitrogen oxides (NOx) that incorporates both end-of-pipe controls and these alternative measures. We decompose the MACC by sector, and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of RE/EE/FS relative to end-of-pipe controls. RE/EE/FS are shown to produce considerable emission reductions after end-of-pipe controls have been exhausted. Furthermore, some RE/EE/FS are shown to be cost-competitive with end-of-pipe controls. Demonstrate how the MARKAL energy system model can be used to evaluate the potential role of renewable electricity, energy efficiency and fuel switching (RE/EE/FS) in achieving NOx reductions. For this particular analysis, we show that RE/EE/FSs are able to increase the quantity of NOx reductions available for a particular marginal cost (ranging from $5k per ton to $40k per ton) by approximately 50%.

  3. Encoding of marginal utility across time in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Pine, Alex; Seymour, Ben; Roiser, Jonathan P; Bossaerts, Peter; Friston, Karl J.; Curran, H. Valerie; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Marginal utility theory prescribes the relationship between the objective property of the magnitude of rewards and their subjective value. Despite its pervasive influence, however, there is remarkably little direct empirical evidence for such a theory of value, let alone of its neurobiological basis. We show that human preferences in an inter-temporal choice task are best described by a model that integrates marginally diminishing utility with temporal discounting. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show that activity in the dorsal striatum encodes both the marginal utility of rewards, over and above that which can be described by their magnitude alone, and the discounting associated with increasing time. In addition, our data show that dorsal striatum may be involved in integrating subjective valuation systems inherent to time and magnitude, thereby providing an overall metric of value used to guide choice behaviour. Furthermore, during choice we show that anterior cingulate activity correlates with the degree of difficulty associated with dissonance between value and time. Our data support an integrative architecture for decision-making, revealing the neural representation of distinct subcomponents of value that may contribute to impulsivity and decisiveness. PMID:19641120

  4. Lithospheric growth at margins of cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.

    2002-09-01

    Deep seismic reflection profiles collected across Proterozoic-Archean margins are now sufficiently numerous to formulate a consistent hypothesis of how continental nuclei grow laterally to form cratonic shields. This picture is made possible both because the length of these regional profiles spans all the tectonic elements of an orogen on a particular cratonic margin and because of their great depth range. Key transects studied include the LITHOPROBE SNORCLE 1 transect and the BABEL survey, crossing the Slave and Baltic craton margins, respectively. In most cases, the older (Archean) block appears to form a wedge of uppermost mantle rock embedded into the more juvenile (Proterozoic) block by as much as 100-200 km at uppermost mantle depths and Archean lithosphere is therefore more laterally extensive at depth than at the surface. Particularly bright reflections along the Moho are cited as evidence of shear strain within a weak, low-viscosity lower crustal channel that lies along the irregular top of the indenting wedge. The bottom of the wedge is an underthrust/subduction zone, and associated late reversal in subduction polarity beneath the craton margin emerges as a common characteristic of these margins although related arc magmatism may be minor.

  5. Theory of margination in confined multicomponent suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriquez Rivera, Rafael; Sinha, Kushal; Graham, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In blood flow, leukocytes and platelets tend to segregate near the vessel walls; this is known as margination. Margination of leukocytes and platelets is important in physiological processes, medical diagnostics and drug delivery. A mechanistic theory is developed to describe flow-induced segregation in confined multicomponent suspensions of deformable particles such as blood. The theory captures the essential features of margination by describing it in terms of two key competing processes in these systems at low Reynolds number: wall-induced migration and hydrodynamic pair collisions. The theory also includes the effect of physical properties of the deformable particles and molecular diffusion. Several regimes of segregation are identified, depending on the value of a ``margination parameter'' M. Moreover, there is a critical value of M below which a sharp ``drainage transition'' occurs: one component is completely depleted from the bulk flow to the vicinity of the walls. Direct hydrodynamic simulations also display this transition in suspensions where the components differ in size or flexibility. The developed mechanistic theory leads to substantial insight into the origins of margination and will help in guiding development of new technologies involving multicomponent suspensions. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1436082.

  6. Passive margins: A model of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pichon, Xavier; Sibuet, Jean-Claude

    1981-05-01

    The stretching model of McKenzie is applied to the formation of passive continental margins, assuming local isostatic equilibrium. We present the quantitative implications of the model; we then discuss its fit to the IPOD data on the Armorican and Galicia continental margins of the northeast Atlantic. The amount of brittle stretching observed in the upper 8 km of the prestretched continental crust reaches a maximum value of about 3. This large amount of thinning is comparable to the thinning of the whole continental crust observed by seismic refraction measurements and required by the model for the whole lithosphere. This agreement suggests that the simple stretching model is a good first approximation to the actual physical process of formation of the margin. It is thus possible to compute simply the thermal evolution of the margin and to discuss its petrological consequences. It is also possible to obtain a quantitative reconstruction of the edge of the continent prior to breakup. Finally, the large slope of the base of the lithosphere during the formation of the margin results in a force similar but opposite to the `ridge-push' force acting on accreting plate boundaries.

  7. Abrupt plate accelerations shape rifted continental margins.

    PubMed

    Brune, Sascha; Williams, Simon E; Butterworth, Nathaniel P; Müller, R Dietmar

    2016-08-11

    Rifted margins are formed by persistent stretching of continental lithosphere until breakup is achieved. It is well known that strain-rate-dependent processes control rift evolution, yet quantified extension histories of Earth's major passive margins have become available only recently. Here we investigate rift kinematics globally by applying a new geotectonic analysis technique to revised global plate reconstructions. We find that rifted margins feature an initial, slow rift phase (less than ten millimetres per year, full rate) and that an abrupt increase of plate divergence introduces a fast rift phase. Plate acceleration takes place before continental rupture and considerable margin area is created during each phase. We reproduce the rapid transition from slow to fast extension using analytical and numerical modelling with constant force boundary conditions. The extension models suggest that the two-phase velocity behaviour is caused by a rift-intrinsic strength--velocity feedback, which can be robustly inferred for diverse lithosphere configurations and rheologies. Our results explain differences between proximal and distal margin areas and demonstrate that abrupt plate acceleration during continental rifting is controlled by the nonlinear decay of the resistive rift strength force. This mechanism provides an explanation for several previously unexplained rapid absolute plate motion changes, offering new insights into the balance of plate driving forces through time.

  8. Determination of all feasible robust PID controllers for open-loop unstable plus time delay processes with gain margin and phase margin specifications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Jay

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a novel alternative method to graphically compute all feasible gain and phase margin specifications-oriented robust PID controllers for open-loop unstable plus time delay (OLUPTD) processes. This method is applicable to general OLUPTD processes without constraint on system order. To retain robustness for OLUPTD processes subject to positive or negative gain variations, the downward gain margin (GM(down)), upward gain margin (GM(up)), and phase margin (PM) are considered. A virtual gain-phase margin tester compensator is incorporated to guarantee the concerned system satisfies certain robust safety margins. In addition, the stability equation method and the parameter plane method are exploited to portray the stability boundary and the constant gain margin (GM) boundary as well as the constant PM boundary. The overlapping region of these boundaries is graphically determined and denotes the GM and PM specifications-oriented region (GPMSOR). Alternatively, the GPMSOR characterizes all feasible robust PID controllers which achieve the pre-specified safety margins. In particular, to achieve optimal gain tuning, the controller gains are searched within the GPMSOR to minimize the integral of the absolute error (IAE) or the integral of the squared error (ISE) performance criterion. Thus, an optimal PID controller gain set is successfully found within the GPMSOR and guarantees the OLUPTD processes with a pre-specified GM and PM as well as a minimum IAE or ISE. Consequently, both robustness and performance can be simultaneously assured. Further, the design procedures are summarized as an algorithm to help rapidly locate the GPMSOR and search an optimal PID gain set. Finally, three highly cited examples are provided to illustrate the design process and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. Fluid and Solute Fluxes from the Deformation Front to the Upper Slope at the Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, R. D.; Solomon, E. A.; Johnson, H. P.; Culling, D. P.; Harris, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid expulsion from accretionary convergent margins may be an important factor in global geochemical cycling and biogeochemical processes. However, the rates and distribution of fluid flow at these margins are not well known. To better understand these processes at the Cascadia margin, we collected 35 short (<1m) sediment cores and 23 Mosquito fluid flow meter measurements along a transect from the deformation front to the upper slope offshore of the Washington coast as part of a coupled heat and fluid flow survey. We identified two active seep areas, one emergent at 1990 mbsl, and one long-lived at 1050 mbsl. At both sites we observed carbonate deposits several meters thick and hundreds of meters in horizontal dimension. Thermogenic hydrocarbons measured in pore waters at the long-lived seep site indicate deeply-sourced fluids originating at >80oC, likely migrating along faults. In addition, pore water solute profiles from the emergent seep site suggest active shallow circulation in the upper sediment column, with implications for the seep biological community and fluid budget of the margin. Pore fluid advection rates along the transect are used to characterize the geographic distribution and geologic controls on active fluid pathways. Pore water solute profiles from the sediment cores are integrated with the measured fluid advection rates to calculate solute fluxes out of the margin. Our transect of fluid flow and pore water chemistry measurements from the Cascadia margin will help to better understand fluid and geochemical cycling at accretionary convergent margins.

  10. Estimation of Model's Marginal likelihood Using Adaptive Sparse Grid Surrogates in Bayesian Model Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.

    2015-12-01

    A large number of model executions are required to obtain alternative conceptual models' predictions and their posterior probabilities in Bayesian model averaging (BMA). The posterior model probability is estimated through models' marginal likelihood and prior probability. The heavy computation burden hinders the implementation of BMA prediction, especially for the elaborated marginal likelihood estimator. For overcoming the computation burden of BMA, an adaptive sparse grid (SG) stochastic collocation method is used to build surrogates for alternative conceptual models through the numerical experiment of a synthetical groundwater model. BMA predictions depend on model posterior weights (or marginal likelihoods), and this study also evaluated four marginal likelihood estimators, including arithmetic mean estimator (AME), harmonic mean estimator (HME), stabilized harmonic mean estimator (SHME), and thermodynamic integration estimator (TIE). The results demonstrate that TIE is accurate in estimating conceptual models' marginal likelihoods. The BMA-TIE has better predictive performance than other BMA predictions. TIE has high stability for estimating conceptual model's marginal likelihood. The repeated estimated conceptual model's marginal likelihoods by TIE have significant less variability than that estimated by other estimators. In addition, the SG surrogates are efficient to facilitate BMA predictions, especially for BMA-TIE. The number of model executions needed for building surrogates is 4.13%, 6.89%, 3.44%, and 0.43% of the required model executions of BMA-AME, BMA-HME, BMA-SHME, and BMA-TIE, respectively.

  11. Phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A composition of matter having the general structure: ##STR1## (wherein X is F, Cl, or NO.sub.2, and Y is CO, SO.sub.2 or C(CF.sub.3).sub.2) is employed to terminate a nucleophilic reagent, resulting in the exclusive production of phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomers which display unique thermal characteristics. A reactive diluent having the general structure: ##STR2## (wherein R is any aliphatic or aromatic moiety) is employed to decrease the melt viscosity of a phenylethynyl terminated reactive oligomer and to subsequently react therewith to provide a thermosetting material of enhanced density. These materials have features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives.

  12. Interactive chemical reactivity exploration.

    PubMed

    Haag, Moritz P; Vaucher, Alain C; Bosson, Maël; Redon, Stéphane; Reiher, Markus

    2014-10-20

    Elucidating chemical reactivity in complex molecular assemblies of a few hundred atoms is, despite the remarkable progress in quantum chemistry, still a major challenge. Black-box search methods to find intermediates and transition-state structures might fail in such situations because of the high-dimensionality of the potential energy surface. Here, we propose the concept of interactive chemical reactivity exploration to effectively introduce the chemist's intuition into the search process. We employ a haptic pointer device with force feedback to allow the operator the direct manipulation of structures in three dimensions along with simultaneous perception of the quantum mechanical response upon structure modification as forces. We elaborate on the details of how such an interactive exploration should proceed and which technical difficulties need to be overcome. All reactivity-exploration concepts developed for this purpose have been implemented in the samson programming environment.

  13. Possible novel agents in marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Broccoli, Alessandro

    Efficacy, safety and mechanisms of action of novel agents in marginal zone lymphoma patients, both with a nodal and extranodal presentation, are reviewed. Data on lenalidomide, bortezomib and (90)yttrium-ibrutumomab tiuxetan are obtained from trials specifically designed for patients affected by marginal zone lymphoma and with various disease presentations. The role of targeted agents, such as obinutuzumab, ibrutinib and idelalisib, and of some very new drugs (venetoclax, copanlisib, ublituximab and TGR-1202) is also discussed, taking into account the most relevant experiences in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A glance to some possible drug combinations will also be provided, along with an update of the most relevant ongoing trials.

  14. Dehydroepiandrosterone Derivatives as Potent Antiandrogens with Marginal Agonist Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    DATES COVERED 01 July 2012 – 30 June 2013 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dehydroepiandrosterone Derivatives as Potent Antiandrogens with Marginal Agonist...Page Introduction…………………………………………………………….………..….. 1 Body………………………………………………………………………………….. 1- 4 Key Research...In addition, we previously found that androstenediol (Adiol), a physiological metabolite from dehydroepiandrosterone ( DHEA ) and a precursor of

  15. 17 CFR 242.405 - Withdrawal of margin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) REGULATIONS M, SHO, ATS, AC, AND NMS AND CUSTOMER MARGIN REQUIREMENTS FOR SECURITY FUTURES Customer Margin Requirements for Security Futures § 242.405 Withdrawal of margin. (a) By the customer. Except as otherwise... account after such withdrawal is sufficient to satisfy the required margin for the security futures...

  16. Improvement of the thermal margins in the Swedish Ringhals-3 PWR by introducing new fuel assemblies with thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, C. W.; Demaziere, C.; Nylen, H.; Sandberg, U.

    2012-07-01

    Thorium is a fertile material and most of the past research has focused on breeding thorium to fissile material. In this paper, the focus is on using thorium to improve the thermal margins by homogeneously distributing thorium in the fuel pellets. A proposed uranium-thorium-based fuel assembly is simulated for the Swedish Ringhals-3 PWR core in a realistic demonstration. All the key safety parameters, such as isothermal temperature coefficient of reactivity, Doppler temperature of reactivity, boron worth, shutdown margins and fraction of delayed neutrons are studied in this paper, and are within safety limits for the new core design using the uranium-thorium-based fuel assemblies. The calculations were performed by the two-dimensional transport code CASMO-4E and the two group steady-state three dimensional nodal code SIMULATE-3 from Studsvik Scandpower. The results showed that the uranium-thorium-based fuel assembly improves the thermal margins, both in the pin peak power and the local power (Fq). The improved thermal margins would allow more flexible core designs with less neutron leakage or could be used in power uprates to offer efficient safety margins. (authors)

  17. Hydrothermal Reactivity of Amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, K.; Shock, E.; Hartnett, H. E.; Williams, L. B.; Gould, I.

    2013-12-01

    The reactivity of aqueous amines depends on temperature, pH, and redox state [1], all of which are highly variable in hydrothermal systems. Temperature and pH affect the ratio of protonated to unprotonated amines (R-NH2 + H+ = R-NH3+), which act as nucleophiles and electrophiles, respectively. We hypothesize that this dual nature can explain the pH dependence of reaction rates, and predict that rates will approach a maximum at pH = pKa where the ratio of protonated and unprotonated amines approaches one and the two compounds are poised to react with one another. Higher temperatures in hydrothermal systems allow for more rapid reaction rates, readily reversible reactions, and unique carbon-nitrogen chemistry in which water acts as a reagent in addition to being the solvent. In this study, aqueous benzylamine was used as a model compound to explore the reaction mechanisms, kinetics, and equilibria of amines under hydrothermal conditions. Experiments were carried out in anoxic silica glass tubes at 250°C (Psat) using phosphate-buffered solutions to observe changes in reaction rates and product distributions as a function of pH. The rate of decomposition of benzylamine was much faster at pH 4 than at pH 9, consistent with the prediction that benzylamine acts as both nucleophile and an electrophile, and our estimate that the pKa of benzylamine is ~5 at 250°C and Psat. Accordingly, dibenzylamine is the primary product of the reaction of two benzylamine molecules, and this reaction is readily reversible under hydrothermal conditions. Extremely acidic or basic pH can be used to suppress dibenzylamine production, which also suppresses the formation of all other major products, including toluene, benzyl alcohol, dibenzylimine, and tribenzylamine. This suggests that dibenzylamine is the lone primary product that then itself reacts as a precursor to produce the above compounds. Analog experiments performed with ring-substituted benzylamine derivatives and chiral

  18. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  19. On the Evolution of Glaciated Continental Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverre Laberg, Jan; Rydningen, Tom Arne; Safronova, Polina A.; Forwick, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Glaciated continental margins, continental margins where a grounded ice sheet repeatedly has been at or near the shelf break, are found at both northern and southern high-latitudes. Their evolution are in several aspects different from their low-latitude counterparts where eustatic sea-level variations possess a fundamental control on their evolution and where fluvial systems provide the main sediment input. From studies of the Norwegian - Barents Sea - Svalbard and NE Greenland continental margins we propose the following factors as the main control on the evolution of glaciated continental margins: 1) Pre-glacial relief controlling the accommodation space, 2) Ice sheet glaciology including the location of fast-flowing ice streams where source area morphology exerts a fundamental control, 3) Composition of the glacigenic sediments where the clay content in previous studies have been found to be important, and 4) Sea-level controlled both by eustacy and isostacy. From three case studies, 1) the western Barents Sea, 2) part of the North Norwegian (Troms), and 3) the Mid-Norwegian margin, the influence on these factors for the sea-floor morphology, sedimentary processes of the continental slope - deep sea and continental margin architecture are discussed. The pre-glacial relief of the mid-Norwegian and Troms margins relates to the onset of rifting and plate break-up from the early Cenozoic while for the SW Barents Sea, plate shear was followed by rifting. A wide zone of extended continental crust occurs offshore mid-Norway while this zone is much narrower offshore Troms leading to a more pronounced pre-glacial relief. Regarding sediment delivery and ice sheet glaciology the western Barents Sea exemplifies very high sediment input corresponding to an estimated average erosion of the source area of ~0.4 mm/yr (SW Barents Sea), much of which is related to subglacial erosion of Mesozoic - Cenozoic sedimentary rocks from large paleo-ice streams. The mid-Norwegian margin

  20. Quaternary reactivation of a basement structure in the Barreirinhas Basin, Brazilian Equatorial Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida-Filho, Raimundo; Rossetti, Dilce F.; Miranda, Fernando P.; Ferreira, Francisco J.; Silva, Clauzionor; Beisl, Carlos

    2009-07-01

    The Pirapemas Lineament is a remarkable 200-km-long, NE-SW trending structure in the Barreirinhas Basin, one of the several Brazilian coastal basins. This lineament splits the study area in two sectors of distinctive morphology, drainage patterns, and sedimentary covers. Terrain northward of the lineament presents a smooth topography with sub-parallel to sub-dendritic drainage patterns, whereas a dissected plateau characterized by incised valleys and rectangular drainage pattern occurs southward, suggesting a structural control by joints and faults. Geological field data, crossed with thermal luminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, revealed that the surface southward of the lineament consists mostly of Miocene and late Pleistocene sedimentary deposits, represented by the Barreiras Formation and the Post-Barreiras sediments, respectively. In contrast, relatively younger sands mantle most of the northward terrain, as indicated by well-preserved paleodune deposits that grade into active aeolian dunes of the Lençóis Maranhenses National Park. Geomorphological and geological data analysis suggests that the northern sector is under the effect of subsidence, proving that the Pirapemas Lineament is an active agent modeling the landscape in the region. Geophysical data (gravity and seismic) confirm that such a structural feature is the surface expression of an active deep-seated basement fault.

  1. Test to Determine Margin-to-Failure for Hy-100 Steel with Undermatched Welds

    SciTech Connect

    K.R. Arpin; T.F. Trimble

    2003-04-01

    This test program was undertaken to determine the flaw tolerance and to quantify the strength margin-to-failure of high yield strength steel fillet welded specimens. The tests demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure for HY-100 specimens fabricated with matched welding systems. In the use of high yield (HY) steel materials in designs required to accommodate rapidly applied dynamic loads, the concern was raised where the possibility of decreased flaw tolerance and premature failure by unstable ductile tearing could limit their use. Tests were developed and conducted to demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure in HY-100 fillet and partial penetration welded structures. In addition, inelastic analytical predictions were performed to assess the accuracy of such predictive tools compared to actual test data. Results showed that adequate margin-to-failure exists when using matched welding systems.

  2. Isostatic and Dynamic Support of High Passive Margin Topography in Southern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, V. K.; Huismans, R. S.; Moucha, R.

    2015-12-01

    Substantial controversy surrounds the origin of high topography along passive continental margins. We focus on the well-documented elevated passive margin in southern Scandinavia, and quantify the relative contributions of crustal isostasy and dynamic topography in controlling topography. We find that most topography is compensated by the crustal structure, suggesting a topographic age related to ~400 Myr old orogenesis. In addition, we infer that dynamic uplift (~300 m) has rejuvenated existing topography within the last ~10 Myr. Such uplift can, combined with a general sea level fall, explain observations that have traditionally been interpreted in favor of a peneplain uplift model. We conclude that the high topography along the Scandinavian margin cannot represent remnants of a peneplain uplifted within the last ~20 Myr. Topography must have been high since ~400 Myr. Our results demonstrate that the enigmatic topography on passive margins cannot be attributed to a single causal mechanism.

  3. New Insights into Passive Margin Development from a Global Deep Seismic Reflection Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellingham, Paul; Pindell, James; Graham, Rod; Horn, Brian

    2014-05-01

    The kinematic and dynamic evolution of the world's passive margins is still poorly understood. Yet the need to replace reserves, a high oil price and advances in drilling technology have pushed the international oil and gas industry to explore in the deep and ultra-deep waters of the continental margins. To support this exploration and help understand these margins, ION-GXT has acquired, processed and interpreted BasinSPAN surveys across many of the world's passive margins. Observations from these data lead us to consider the modes of subsidence and uplift at both volcanic and non-volcanic margins. At non-volcanic margins, it appears that frequently much of the subsidence post-dates major rifting and is not thermal in origin. Rather the subsidence is associated with extensional displacement on a major fault or shear zone running at least as deep as the continental Moho. We believe that the subsidence is structural and is probably associated with the pinching out (boudinage) of the Lower Crust so that the Upper crust effectively collapses onto the mantle. Eventually this will lead to the exhumation of the sub-continental mantle at the sea bed. Volcanic margins present more complex challenges both in terms of imaging and interpretation. The addition of volcanic and plutonic material into the system and dynamic effects all impact subsidence and uplift. However, we will show some fundamental observations regarding the kinematic development of volcanic margins and especially SDRs which demonstate that the process of collapse and the development of shear zones within and below the crust are also in existence at this type of margin. A model is presented of 'magma welds' whereby packages of SDRs collapse onto an emerging sub-crustal shear zone and it is this collapse which creates the commonly observed SDR geometry. Examples will be shown from East India, Newfoundland, Brazil, Argentina and the Gulf of Mexico.

  4. SU-E-J-188: Theoretical Estimation of Margin Necessary for Markerless Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R; Block, A; Harkenrider, M; Roeske, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the margin necessary to adequately cover the target using markerless motion tracking (MMT) of lung lesions given the uncertainty in tracking and the size of the target. Methods: Simulations were developed in Matlab to determine the effect of tumor size and tracking uncertainty on the margin necessary to achieve adequate coverage of the target. For simplicity, the lung tumor was approximated by a circle on a 2D radiograph. The tumor was varied in size from a diameter of 0.1 − 30 mm in increments of 0.1 mm. From our previous studies using dual energy markerless motion tracking, we estimated tracking uncertainties in x and y to have a standard deviation of 2 mm. A Gaussian was used to simulate the deviation between the tracked location and true target location. For each size tumor, 100,000 deviations were randomly generated, the margin necessary to achieve at least 95% coverage 95% of the time was recorded. Additional simulations were run for varying uncertainties to demonstrate the effect of the tracking accuracy on the margin size. Results: The simulations showed an inverse relationship between tumor size and margin necessary to achieve 95% coverage 95% of the time using the MMT technique. The margin decreased exponentially with target size. An increase in tracking accuracy expectedly showed a decrease in margin size as well. Conclusion: In our clinic a 5 mm expansion of the internal target volume (ITV) is used to define the planning target volume (PTV). These simulations show that for tracking accuracies in x and y better than 2 mm, the margin required is less than 5 mm. This simple simulation can provide physicians with a guideline estimation for the margin necessary for use of MMT clinically based on the accuracy of their tracking and the size of the tumor.

  5. Chemical thermodynamics as a predictive tool in the reactive metal brazing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Lannutti, J.J.

    1995-06-01

    Thermodynamics have long been applied to the understanding of the reactive wetting phenomena in metal-ceramic joining. The authors postulate the existence of a ``solvent effect`` due to the interaction between the reactive element addition and the brazing alloy. This effect plays a significant role in reactive wetting. By taking this effect into account, more realistic reactivities of different reactive element additions into a given brazing base alloy are predicted. Irreversible thermodynamics are also used to characterize the driving forces for reactive metal-ceramic joining.

  6. The Rome trough and evolution of the Iapetean margin

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.; Hamilton-Smith, T.; Drahovzal, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Recent structural mapping of the Rome trough suggests a complex structure very different from the symmetrical and laterally continuous graben commonly depicted. Early and Middle Cambrian extension in the Rome trough of eastern Kentucky and adjacent areas resulted in a series of alternately facing half-grabens with variable displacement. These half-grabens are bounded by southwest-northeast-trending normal faults (e.g., Kentucky River and Warfield faults), which are laterally continuous only on the order to tens of kilometers. The Rome trough is laterally segmented by north-south-trending faults (e.g., Lexington fault) commonly expressed as flexures in younger rocks (e.g., Burning Springs anticline and Floyd County channel). Many of these north-south-trending faults have significant left-lateral displacement, and probably represent reactivated thrust faults of the Grenville tectonic front. The Rome trough and the associated Mississippi Valley, Rough Creek, and Birmingham fault systems were initiated during an Early Cambrian shift in sea-floor spreading from the Blue Ridge-Pine Mountain rift to the Ouachita rift along the Alabama-Oklahoma transform fault. These fault systems have been proposed as having originated from extensional stress propagated northward from the Ouachita rift across the transform fault. In the alternate model proposed here, faulting was brittle, extensional failure resulting form subsidence and flexure of the continental margin to the east. Following initiation of sea-floor spreading at the Blue Ridge-Pine Mountain rift in the latest Proterozoic, margin subsidence in the presence of the Alabama-Oklahoma transform boundary and the inherited Grenville tectonic front resulted in this interior cratonic fault system.

  7. Oxytocin administration attenuates stress reactivity in borderline personality disorder: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Simeon, D; Bartz, J; Hamilton, H; Crystal, S; Braun, A; Ketay, S; Hollander, E

    2011-10-01

    Oxytocin has known stress-reducing and attachment-enhancing effects. We thus hypothesized that oxytocin would attenuate emotional and hormonal responses to stress in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Fourteen BPD and 13 healthy control (HC) adults received 40 IU intranasal oxytocin or placebo in double-blind randomized order followed by the Trier Social Stress Test. Subjective dysphoria (Profile of Mood Changes) and plasma cortisol levels were measured. Childhood trauma history, attachment style, and self-esteem were also rated. A significant "Group × Drug × Time" interaction effect for dysphoria (p=.04) reflected a proportionately greater attenuation of stress-induced dysphoria in the BPD group after oxytocin administration. Additionally, a marginally significant "Group × Drug" interaction effect for cortisol (p=.10) reflected a tendency toward greater attenuation of the stress-induced cortisol surge in the BPD group after oxytocin administration. In the combined sample, the oxytocin-placebo difference in the emotional stress reactivity was significantly predicted by childhood trauma alone (p=.037) and combined with self-esteem (p=.030), whereas the oxytocin-placebo difference in cortisol stress reactivity was predicted only by insecure attachment (p=.013). Results suggest that oxytocin may have a beneficial impact on emotional regulation in BPD, which merits further investigation and could have important treatment implications.

  8. Basement Tectonics 8: Characterization and comparison of ancient and mesozoic continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M.J. . Inst. of Earth Sciences and Resources); Hyndman, D.W. . Dept. of Geology); Mogk, D.W. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Mason, R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1988-01-01

    The International Conference on Basement Tectonics was held in Butte, Montana, August 8--12,1988. Historically, basement tectonics conferences have focused on such topics as reactivation of faults, the influence of basement faults on metallogeny and hydrocarbon accumulation, and the use of geophysical and remote sensing techniques to interpret subsurface and surface geology. The 8th Conference diverged from past conferences in that a unifying theme was selected. Because ancient major terrane or cratonic boundaries are often postulated to be fault zones which are subsequently reactivated, the conference was organized to examine all aspects of ancient continental margins and terrane boundaries and to compare younger (Mesozoic) ones, about which more is known, with older (Paleozoic and Precambrian) ones. Moreover, because the 8th Conference was held in the northwestern United States, a greater emphasis was placed on the Mesozoic margin of western North America and the North American shield. The seven oral sessions and four poster sessions all dealt with aspects of the conference theme: characterization and comparison of ancient continental margins. The papers will be indexed individually.

  9. Basement Tectonics 8: Characterization and comparison of ancient and mesozoic continental margins. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, M.J.; Hyndman, D.W.; Mogk, D.W.; Mason, R.

    1988-12-31

    The International Conference on Basement Tectonics was held in Butte, Montana, August 8--12,1988. Historically, basement tectonics conferences have focused on such topics as reactivation of faults, the influence of basement faults on metallogeny and hydrocarbon accumulation, and the use of geophysical and remote sensing techniques to interpret subsurface and surface geology. The 8th Conference diverged from past conferences in that a unifying theme was selected. Because ancient major terrane or cratonic boundaries are often postulated to be fault zones which are subsequently reactivated, the conference was organized to examine all aspects of ancient continental margins and terrane boundaries and to compare younger (Mesozoic) ones, about which more is known, with older (Paleozoic and Precambrian) ones. Moreover, because the 8th Conference was held in the northwestern United States, a greater emphasis was placed on the Mesozoic margin of western North America and the North American shield. The seven oral sessions and four poster sessions all dealt with aspects of the conference theme: characterization and comparison of ancient continental margins. The papers will be indexed individually.

  10. Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaka, F.

    2016-12-13

    The Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT) is used to determine the thermal stability of High Explosives (HEs) and chemical compatibility between (HEs) and alien materials. The CRT is one of the small-scale safety tests performed on HE at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF).

  11. Reactive power compensating system

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  12. Reactive Sensor Networks (RSN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    Networks,” Distributed Autonomous Robotic Systems DARS 2000, pp. 471-472, Springer Verlag, Tokyo. R. R. Brooks. “Stigmergy an intelligence metric...Paper, March 2003. • R. Brooks, et al. “Reactive Sensor Networks: Mobile Code Support for Autonomous Sensor Networks,” Distributed Autonomous Robotic Systems DARS

  13. Reactive transport modeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This special section in the Vadose Zone Journal focusing on reactive transport modeling was developed from a special symposium jointly sponsored by the Soil Physics and Soil Chemistry Divisions of the Soil Science Society of America at the 2010 annual meetings held in Long Beach, CA. It contains eig...

  14. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  15. Modeling Atmospheric Reactive Nitrogen

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life. Reactive nitrogen, which is naturally produced via enzymatic reactions, forest fires and lightning, is continually recycled and cascades through air, water, and soil media. Human ...

  16. Study and modification of the reactivity of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, P. L., Jr.; Ismail, I. M.; Mahajan, O. P.; Eapen, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The reactivity to air of polyactylonitrile-based carbon fiber cloth was enhanced by the addition of metals to the cloth. The cloth was oxidized in 54 wt% nitric acid in order to increase the surface area of the cloth and to add carbonyl groups to the surface. Metal addition was then achieved by soaking the cloth in metal acetate solution to effect exchange between the metal carbon and hydrogen on the carbonyl groups. The addition of potassium, sodium, calcium and barium enhanced fiber cloth reactivity to air at 573 K. Extended studies using potassium addition showed that success in enhancing fiber cloth reactivity to air depends on: extent of cloth oxidation in nitric acid, time of exchange in potassium acetate solution and the thoroughness of removing metal acetate from the fiber pore structure following exchange. Cloth reactivity increases essentially linearly with increase in potassium addition via exchange.

  17. Thinking on the Margin: A Classroom Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangs, Joann

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important concepts being taught in principles classes is the idea of "thinking on the margin." It can also be one of the most difficult to get across. One of the most telling examples, according to this author, comes in trying to get students to learn the profit maximizing condition for perfectly competitive firms. She…

  18. 12 CFR 349.9 - Margin requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... depository institution engaging, or offering to engage, in retail forex transactions must collect from each retail forex customer an amount of margin not less than: (1) Two percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for major currency pairs and 5 percent of the notional value of the retail...

  19. 12 CFR 48.9 - Margin requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., in retail forex transactions must collect from each retail forex customer an amount of margin not less than: (1) Two percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for major currency pairs and 5 percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for all other currency...

  20. 12 CFR 48.9 - Margin requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., in retail forex transactions must collect from each retail forex customer an amount of margin not less than: (1) Two percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for major currency pairs and 5 percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for all other currency...

  1. 12 CFR 48.9 - Margin requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., in retail forex transactions must collect from each retail forex customer an amount of margin not less than: (1) Two percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for major currency pairs and 5 percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for all other currency...

  2. 12 CFR 349.9 - Margin requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... depository institution engaging, or offering to engage, in retail forex transactions must collect from each retail forex customer an amount of margin not less than: (1) Two percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for major currency pairs and 5 percent of the notional value of the retail...

  3. 12 CFR 240.9 - Margin requirements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... required. A banking institution engaging, or offering to engage, in retail forex transactions must collect from each retail forex customer an amount of margin not less than: (1) Two percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for major currency pairs and 5 percent of the notional value...

  4. 12 CFR 349.9 - Margin requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... depository institution engaging, or offering to engage, in retail forex transactions must collect from each retail forex customer an amount of margin not less than: (1) Two percent of the notional value of the retail forex transaction for major currency pairs and 5 percent of the notional value of the retail...

  5. Keeping Academically Marginal Youth in School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpert, Geoffrey; Dunham, Roger

    1986-01-01

    From among factors theoretically considered relevant to preventing school dropouts, empirical procedures identified five variables that predicted most of the variance among marginal youth: (1) extent of misbehavior in school; (2) belief in school's relevance to employment; (3) feelings of success in school; (4) parental monitoring of behavior; (5)…

  6. Young People Speaking Back from the Margins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smyth, John

    2010-01-01

    The diminished educational opportunities and subsequent life chances of many marginalized young people have been dramatic, even to the point of being catastrophic. But they are not hapless victims, nor are they passive recipients of deficit categories like "at riskness", placed upon them by the media, politicians, agencies, and some…

  7. Negative Stress Margins - Are They Real?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Lee, Darlene S.; Mohaghegh, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Advances in modeling and simulation, new finite element software, modeling engines and powerful computers are providing opportunities to interrogate designs in a very different manner and in a more detailed approach than ever before. Margins of safety are also often evaluated using local stresses for various design concepts and design parameters quickly once analysis models are defined and developed. This paper suggests that not all the negative margins of safety evaluated are real. The structural areas where negative margins are frequently encountered are often near stress concentrations, point loads and load discontinuities, near locations of stress singularities, in areas having large gradients but with insufficient mesh density, in areas with modeling issues and modeling errors, and in areas with connections and interfaces, in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) transitions, bolts and bolt modeling, and boundary conditions. Now, more than ever, structural analysts need to examine and interrogate their analysis results and perform basic sanity checks to determine if these negative margins are real.

  8. RISK-INFORMED SAFETY MARGIN CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Nam Dinh; Ronaldo Szilard

    2009-07-01

    The concept of safety margins has served as a fundamental principle in the design and operation of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). Defined as the minimum distance between a system’s “loading” and its “capacity”, plant design and operation is predicated on ensuring an adequate safety margin for safety-significant parameters (e.g., fuel cladding temperature, containment pressure, etc.) is provided over the spectrum of anticipated plant operating, transient and accident conditions. To meet the anticipated challenges associated with extending the operational lifetimes of the current fleet of operating NPPs, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have developed a collaboration to conduct coordinated research to identify and address the technological challenges and opportunities that likely would affect the safe and economic operation of the existing NPP fleet over the postulated long-term time horizons. In this paper we describe a framework for developing and implementing a Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) approach to evaluate and manage changes in plant safety margins over long time horizons.

  9. 5TH BIOTECHNOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OCEAN MARGINS PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    DR. ARTURO MASSOL, PROGRAM CHAIR; DR. ROSA BUXEDA, PROGRAM CO-CHAIR

    2004-01-08

    BI-OMP supports DOE's mission in Climate Change Research. The program provides the fundamental understanding of the linkages between carbon and nitrogen cycles in ocean margins. Researchers are providing a mechanistic understanding of these cycles, using the tools of modern molecular biology. The models that will allow policy makers to determine safe levels of greenhouse gases for the Earth System.

  10. Second Language Learners' Use of Marginal Glosses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of marginal reading glosses by 18 second language (L2) learners is examined through a quantitative and qualitative analysis of audiotaped think-aloud protocols. How these readers interact with the glosses is identified and divided into five categories or gloss interactions. Examples from each are presented. The primary research question…

  11. Structural Marginality and the Urban Social Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapferer, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    This article argues for a redefinition of "Marginality" in terms of the principles that influence the developing order of the urban formation as a whole. The emerging social order and the political participation of residents of two shanty areas in Kabwe, Zambia are traced over a period of 40 years. (Author/EB)

  12. Marginalization in neural circuits with divisive normalization

    PubMed Central

    Beck, J.M.; Latham, P.E.; Pouget, A.

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of computations performed by the nervous system involves a type of probabilistic inference known as marginalization. This computation comes up in seemingly unrelated tasks, including causal reasoning, odor recognition, motor control, visual tracking, coordinate transformations, visual search, decision making, and object recognition, to name just a few. The question we address here is: how could neural circuits implement such marginalizations? We show that when spike trains exhibit a particular type of statistics – associated with constant Fano factors and gain-invariant tuning curves, as is often reported in vivo – some of the more common marginalizations can be achieved with networks that implement a quadratic nonlinearity and divisive normalization, the latter being a type of nonlinear lateral inhibition that has been widely reported in neural circuits. Previous studies have implicated divisive normalization in contrast gain control and attentional modulation. Our results raise the possibility that it is involved in yet another, highly critical, computation: near optimal marginalization in a remarkably wide range of tasks. PMID:22031877

  13. Leukocyte Margination in a Model Microvessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan

    2006-11-01

    In the inflammation response, multi-body interactions of blood cells in the microcirculation bring leukocytes (white blood cells) to the vessel walls. We investigated the fluid mechanics of this using numerical simulations of 29 red blood cells and one leukocyte flowing in a two-dimensional microvessel. The cells are modeled as linearly elastic shell membranes. Though obviously simplified, this model reproduced the increasingly blunted velocity profiles and increased leukocyte margination observed at lower shear rates. To study its effect, we varied the relative stiffness of the red cells by over a factor of ten, but the margination was found to be much less correlated with this than to the bluntness of the mean velocity profile. The detailed velocity field around near-wall leukocyte was sensitive to the red cell stiffness, but it changed little for strongly versus weakly marginating cases. In the more strongly marginating cases, however, a red cell is typically leaning on the upstream side of the leukocyte and appears to stabilize it. A well-known feature of the microcirculation is a near-wall cell-free layer. We observed that the leukocyte's most probable position was at the edge of this layer, whose thickness increased following a lubrication scaling. The leukocyte's near-wall position is observed to be less stable with increasing mean stand-off distance, but this distance would have potentially greater effect on adhesion since the range of the molecular binding is so short.

  14. Confronting the Marginalization of Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleeter, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    Globally, over the last two decades, attention to culturally responsive, multicultural approaches to teaching have largely been supplanted by standardized curricula and pedagogy that derive from neoliberal business models of school reform. In this essay, I discuss three factors that contribute to the marginalization of culturally responsive…

  15. Japan's Winning Margins. Management, Training, and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorriman, John; Kenjo, Takashi

    This book explains the fundamental reasons for Japan's astonishing commercial success in relation to its Western competitors. Chapter 1 is an introduction. Chapter 2 discusses implications of Japanese history for education, training, and management. Chapter 3 looks at the first winning margin--education. It covers the following: Japan's long…

  16. Miocene shale tectonics in the Moroccan margin (Alboran Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Couto, D.; El Abbassi, M.; Ammar, A.; Gorini, C.; Estrada, F.; Letouzey, J.; Smit, J.; Jolivet, L.; Jabour, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Betic (Southern Spain) and Rif (Morocco) mountains form an arcuate belt that represents the westernmost termination of the peri-mediterranean Alpine mountain chain. The Miocene Alboran Basin and its subbasins is located in the hinterland of the Betic-Rif belt. It is considered to be a back-arc basin that developed during the coeval westward motion of the Alboran domain and the extensional collapse of previously thickened crust of the Betic-Rif belt. The Western Alboran Basin (WAB) is the major sedimentary depocenter with a sediment thickness in excess of 10 km, it is bordered by the Gibraltar arc, the volcanic Djibouti mounts and the Alboran ridge. Part of the WAB is affected by shale tectonics and associated mud volcanism. High-quality 2D seismic profiles acquired on the Moroccan margin of the Alboran Basin during the last decade reveal the multiple history of the basin. This study deals with the analysis of a number of these seismic profiles that are located along and orthogonal to the Moroccan margin. Seismic stratigraphy is calibrated from industrial wells. We focus on the interactions between the gravity-driven tectonic processes and the sedimentation in the basin. Our seismic interpretation confirms that the formation of the WAB began in the Early Miocene (Aquitanian - Burdigalian). The fast subsidence of the basin floor coeval to massive sedimentation induced the undercompaction of early miocene shales during their deposition. Downslope migration of these fine-grained sediments initiated during the deposition of the Langhian siliciclastics. This gravity-driven system was accompanied by continuous basement subsidence and induced disharmonic deformation in Mid Miocene units (i.e. not related to basement deformation). The development of shale-cored anticlines and thrusts in the deep basin is the result of compressive deformation at the front of the gravity-driven system and lasted for ca. 15 Ma. The compressive front has been re-activated by strong

  17. Heat shock and herpes virus: enhanced reactivation without untargeted mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lytle, C.D.; Carney, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    Enhanced reactivation of Ultraviolet-irradiated virus has been reported to occur in heat-shocked host cells. Since enhanced virus reactivation is often accompanied by untargeted mutagenesis, we investigated whether such mutagenesis would occur for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in CV-1 monkey kidney cells subjected to heat shock. In addition to expressing enhanced reactivation, the treated cells were transiently more susceptible to infection by unirradiated HSV. No mutagenesis of unirradiated HSV was found whether infection occurred at the time of increased susceptibility to infection or during expression of enhanced viral reactivation.

  18. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  19. Leukocyte margination in a model microvessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan B.

    2007-02-01

    The physiological inflammation response depends upon the multibody interactions of blood cells in the microcirculation that bring leukocytes (white blood cells) to the vessel walls. We investigate the fluid mechanics of this using numerical simulations of 29 red blood cells and one leukocyte flowing in a two-dimensional microvessel, with the cells modeled as linearly elastic shell membranes. Despite its obvious simplifications, this model successfully reproduces the increasingly blunted velocity profiles and increased leukocyte margination observed at lower shear rates in actual microvessels. Red cell aggregation is shown to be unnecessary for margination. The relative stiffness of the red cells in our simulations is varied by over a factor of 10, but the margination is found to be much less correlated with this than it is to changes associated with the blunting of the mean velocity profile at lower shear rates. While velocity around the leukocyte when it is near the wall depends upon the red cell properties, it changes little for strongly versus weakly marginating cases. In the more strongly marginating cases, however, a red cell is frequently observed to be leaning on the upstream side of the leukocyte and appears to stabilize it, preventing other red cells from coming between it and the wall. A well-known feature of the microcirculation is a near-wall cell-free layer. In our simulations, it is observed that the leukocyte's most probable position is at the edge of this layer. This wall stand-off distance increases with velocity following a scaling that would be expected for a lubrication mechanism, assuming that there were a nearly constant force pushing the cells toward the wall. The leukocyte's near-wall position is observed to be less stable with increasing mean stand-off distance, but this distance would have potentially greater effect on adhesion since the range of the molecular binding is so short.

  20. Reactivity Network: Secondary Sources for Inorganic Reactivity Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, E. K.

    1989-01-01

    Provides an eclectic annotated bibliography of secondary sources for inorganic reactivity information of interest to reactivity network review authors and to anyone seeking information about simple inorganic reactions in order to develop experiments and demonstrations. Gives 119 sources. (MVL)

  1. Effect of two prophylaxis methods on marginal gap of Cl Vresin-modified glass-ionomer restorations

    PubMed Central

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Daneshpooy, Mehdi; Abed Kahnamoii, Mehdi; Davoodi, Farnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the effect of two prophylaxis techniques on the marginal gap of CI V resin-modified glass-ionomer restorations. Methods. Standard Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 48 sound bovine mandibular incisors in this in vitro study. After restoration of the cavities with GC Fuji II LC resin-modified glass-ionomer, the samples were randomly assigned to 3 groups of 16. In group 1, the prophylactic procedures were carried out with rubber cup and pumice powder and in group 2 with air-powder polishing device (APD). In group 3 (control), the samples did not undergo any prophylactic procedures. Then the marginal gaps were measured. Two-way ANOVA was used to compare marginal gaps at the occlusal and gingival margins between the groups. Post hoc Tukey test was used for two-by-two comparisons. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the means of marginal gaps in terms of prophylactic techniques (P < 0.001), with significantly larger marginal gaps in the APD group compared to the pumice and rubber cup group, which in turn exhibited significantly larger marginal gaps compared to the control group (P < 0.0005). In addition, the means of marginal gaps were significant in terms of the margin type (P < 0.001), with significantly larger gaps at gingival margins compared to the occlusal margins (P < 0.0005). Conclusion. The prophylactic techniques used in this study had a negative effect on the marginal gaps of Cl V resin-modified glass-ionomer restorations. PMID:27092211

  2. Measurement of VOC reactivities using a photochemical flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Japar, S.M.; Wallington, T.J.

    1998-07-01

    A commercial ambient air monitoring instrument, the Airtrak 2000, has been modified for use as a photochemical flow reactor and used to measure the absolute and incremental reactivity of 18 single test VOCs and the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent VOC mixtures. A flow technique is a useful supplement to traditional static chamber experiments. The static chamber technique involves periodic sampling of an irradiated mixture in a photochemical chamber. Under these conditions, the irradiated mixture is always in transition. Using a flow system, a steady-state condition is established within the flow reactor that is representative, in this case, of the early stages of the smog forming process in the atmosphere. The measurement technique also allows changes in the background chamber reactivity to be monitored and taken into account. The incremental reactivity of 13 of the 18 test compounds measured is compared with previously reported results from a static chamber experiment, and the two data sets are generally in good agreement. The additivity of reactivity was tested by measuring the incremental reactivity of six multicomponent mixtures, the components being compounds measured individually in this study. The measured reactivity of a mixture was compared to that calculated from the sum of the measured reactivity of the mixture`s individual components. The results show that reactivity is additive for the concentration range studied.

  3. Metallacyclopentadienes: synthesis, structure and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wangyang; Yu, Chao; Chen, Tianyang; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Wen-Xiong; Xi, Zhenfeng

    2017-02-20

    Metallacyclopentadienes, which possess two M-C(sp(2)) bonds and feature the structure of M(C[upper bond 1 start]R(1)[double bond, length as m-dash]CR(2)-CR(3)[double bond, length as m-dash]C[upper bond 1 end]R(4)), are an important class of five-membered metallacycles. They are considered as both reactive intermediates in the stoichiometric and catalytic transformations of organic molecules and useful precursors to main group element compounds, and have received considerable attention in organometallic chemistry, coordination chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry over the past six decades because of their unique metallacyclic structure. This review comprehensively presents the synthesis, structure and reactivity of the s-, p-, d- and f-block metallacyclopentadienes distributed in the whole periodic table. In addition, their application in synthetic organic chemistry and polymer chemistry is summarized. This review aims to be beneficial for the design and synthesis of novel metallacyclopentadienes, and for promoting the rapid development of metallacyclic chemistry.

  4. Reliability and reactivity of three new functional assessment measures.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Leonard N; Rogers, Lisa C; Kaskutas, Victoria; Dakos, Mark

    2002-01-01

    This study of the reliability of three new tests of work performance considered the effect of test reactivity on measured performance. The tests are components of an employment screening battery designed for placement of applicants in automotive assembly jobs. Statistical measures of reliability were compared with a simple measure of test reactivity in a sample of 51 healthy adults. The effect of test reactivity on employment selection decisions using various cut scores was studied. Test reactivity is found to be a significant threat to reliability that must be considered when skill-based performance tests are used on a serial basis. When intended for use on a serial basis, such tests should be studied for both reliability and reactivity. In addition to reporting traditional statistical indices of reliability, an index of the reactivity should be reported.

  5. JAEA Studies on High Burnup Fuel Behaviors during Reactivity-Initiated Accident and Loss-of-Coolant Accident

    SciTech Connect

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Nagase, Fumihisa; Suzuki, Motoe

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of fuel safety research program at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) are; to evaluate adequacy of present safety criteria and safety margins; to provide a database for future regulation on higher burnup UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels, new cladding and pellets; and to provide reasonably mechanistic computer codes for regulatory application. The JAEA program is comprised of reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) studies including pulse-irradiation experiments in the NSRR and cladding mechanical tests, loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) tests including integral thermal shock test and oxidation rate measurement, development and verification of computer codes FEMAXI-6 and RANNS, and so on. In addition to an overview of the fuel safety research at JAEA, most recent progresses in the RIA and LOCA tests programs and the codes development are described and discussed in the paper. (authors)

  6. Large-scale pattern of mantle evolution through rifting in hyper-extended margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picazo, Suzanne; Müntener, Othmar; Manatschal, Gianreto; Bauville, Arthur

    2016-04-01

    New ideas and concepts have been developed to understand and be able to give a simplified large-scale view of the evolution of the mantle lithosphere in hyper-extended magma-poor rifted margins based on the ancient Alpine Tethys rifted margin. In contrast to the classical assumption assuming a simple, isotropic mantle lithosphere, these new models integrate observations from exposed and drilled mantle rocks and propose that the mantle lithosphere evolved and was modified during an extensional cycle from post-orogenic collapse through several periods of rifting to embryonic oceanic (ultra-) slow seafloor spreading. But it is, at present, unclear how far these ideas can be generalized at Atlantic type rifted margins. In our presentation, we review the available mantle data from dredged samples in the North Atlantic and from ophiolite massifs and xenoliths in preserved and reactivated passive margins i.e. the Alpine Tethys, the Pyrenean domain, and the Dinarides and Hellenides. We revisit the available terminology concerning mantle massifs and xenoliths and compile the available data to identify different mantle domains. We define chemical and petrological characteristics of mantle domains based on clinopyroxene and spinel compositions and compile them on present-day and paleo-geographic maps of Western Europe. Finally we link the observed distribution of mantle domains to the post-Variscan extensional cycle and link domains to processes related to the late post-Variscan extension, the rift evolution and refertilization associated to hyper-extension and the development of embryonic oceanic domains.

  7. Thermal control of ice-stream margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, Charles F.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal balance at the base of an ice sheet near an ice-stream margin was investigated theoretically. Specifically, conditions such that the base of the ice sheet would be frozen in the absence of heat generated by the ice motion were investigated. The base of the ice stream is maintained at melting as a result of high dissipation of heat at the base associated with its fast motion over the bed. Heat dissipation in the inter-ice-stream ridge ice is presumed to be too small to maintain melting conditions on the bed there. Two opposing effects can be identified near the shear margin separating the fast and slow motions. Because the velocity of an ice stream falls off toward its margin, there is a near margin heat deficit zone where the heat generated at the bed is not, by itself, sufficient to maintain melting conditions. Without some counteracting process, the base could freeze inward toward the ice stream and cause it to narrow. The marginal shearing generates heat within the ice above the bed. This heat produces a thermal shielding effect that tends to warm the bed on both sides of the boundary between the fast and slow motion. This shielding effect, if strong enough, could produce a thawed zone beyond the fast/slow boundary. If melting at the bed by itself allows fast motion, then the ice stream would be free to widen. A coupled mass and heat flow model is being developed to examine these competing processes. Preliminary calculations using available information for boundary conditions appropriate for Ice Stream B predict that the shielding effect is most important. This tentative result suggests that thermal conditions are such that the ice stream could widen unstably. Other constraints would be required to stabilize the width. Possible factors could be bed morphology beneath ridges that does not allow fast motion even in thawed conditions, or inward advection of cold ice from the ridges across the margin and into the ice stream, which suppresses the

  8. An Evaluation of the Marginal Sharpness of the Porcelain Labial Margin Metal Ceramic Restoration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    permanent molar in each case and constructed 12 crowns, one each for 12 patients, which they checked annually for three years. The gingival index of...the gingival attachment complex. He observed that frequently a healthy sulcus will probe less than one millimeter. In such cases , a restoration should...in many cases the cement film thickness at the defective margin was greater than 200 micrometers. This degree of marginal opening provided an ideal

  9. Reactive Air Aluminization

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  10. Nonquaternary Cholinesterase Reactivators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-30

    Methylphosphonyl-AChE by la, lb, 2, and 3 . .............................................. 83 Chapter III 1 Lineweaver - Burke Plot for Compound 3a...Not determined. I11 ................ ."--..-. . . .S . -. -.. .i.,...,. _. o, . ’._ -. .-. . , , I I 1 .. .! 8.08.O 1I i i 7.0 LINEWEAVER - BURKE ...10 15 20 25 30 35 40 [AcSCh] - 1 , M -1 x 10 -4 JA-1 043-23 FIGURE 1 LINEWEAVER - BURKE PLOT FOR COMPOUND 3a 112 nonquaternary reactivators with ethyl

  11. Skylab reactivation mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    On July 11, 1979, Skylab impacted the Earth's surface. The debris dispersion area stretched from the South Eastern Indian Ocean across a sparsely populated section of Western Australia. The events leading to the reentry of Skylab are discussed and a final assessment of the Skylab debris impact footprint is presented. Also included are detailed evaluations of the various Skylab systems that were reactivated when control of Skylab was regained in mid-1978 after having been powered down since February 4, 1974.

  12. Future coral reef habitat marginality: Temporal and spatial effects of climate change in the Pacific basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guinotte, J.M.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Kleypas, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Marginal reef habitats are regarded as regions where coral reefs and coral communities reflect the effects of steady-state or long-term average environmental limitations. We used classifications based on this concept with predicted time-variant conditions of future climate to develop a scenario for the evolution of future marginality. Model results based on a conservative scenario of atmospheric CO2 increase were used to examine changes in sea surface temperature and aragonite saturation state over the Pacific Ocean basin until 2069. Results of the projections indicated that essentially all reef locations are likely to become marginal with respect to aragonite saturation state. Significant areas, including some with the highest biodiversity, are expected to experience high-temperature regimes that may be marginal, and additional areas will enter the borderline high temperature range that have experienced significant ENSO-related bleaching in the recent past. The positive effects of warming in areas that are presently marginal in terms of low temperature were limited. Conditions of the late 21st century do not lie outside the ranges in which present-day marginal reef systems occur. Adaptive and acclimative capabilities of organisms and communities will be critical in determining the future of coral reef ecosystems.

  13. Numerical simulation of platelet margination in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The adhesion of platelets to vascular walls is the first step in clotting. This process critically depends on the preferential concentration of platelets near walls. The presence of red blood cells, which are the predominant blood constituents, is known to affect the steady state platelet concentration and the dynamic platelet margination, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood to-day. We use a direct numerical simulation to study the platelet margination process, with particular emphasis on the Stokesian hydrodynamic interactions among red cells, platelets, and vessel walls. Well-known mechanical models are used for the shearing and bending stiffness of red cell membranes, and the stiffer platelets are modeled as rigid discoids. A boundary integral formulation is used to solve the flow field, where the numerical solution procedure is accelerated by a parallel O(N N) smooth particle-mesh Ewald method. The effects of red cell hematocrit and deformability will be discussed.

  14. Stepwise Signal Extraction via Marginal Likelihood

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chao; Kao, Chu-Lan Michael

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the estimation of stepwise signal. To determine the number and locations of change-points of the stepwise signal, we formulate a maximum marginal likelihood estimator, which can be computed with a quadratic cost using dynamic programming. We carry out extensive investigation on the choice of the prior distribution and study the asymptotic properties of the maximum marginal likelihood estimator. We propose to treat each possible set of change-points equally and adopt an empirical Bayes approach to specify the prior distribution of segment parameters. Detailed simulation study is performed to compare the effectiveness of this method with other existing methods. We demonstrate our method on single-molecule enzyme reaction data and on DNA array CGH data. Our study shows that this method is applicable to a wide range of models and offers appealing results in practice. PMID:27212739

  15. Marginal Loss Calculations for the DCOPF

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, Brent; O'Neill, Richard P.; Castillo, Andrea R.

    2016-12-05

    The purpose of this paper is to explain some aspects of including a marginal line loss approximation in the DCOPF. The DCOPF optimizes electric generator dispatch using simplified power flow physics. Since the standard assumptions in the DCOPF include a lossless network, a number of modifications have to be added to the model. Calculating marginal losses allows the DCOPF to optimize the location of power generation, so that generators that are closer to demand centers are relatively cheaper than remote generation. The problem formulations discussed in this paper will simplify many aspects of practical electric dispatch implementations in use today, but will include sufficient detail to demonstrate a few points with regard to the handling of losses.

  16. Adaptive marginal median filter for colour images.

    PubMed

    Morillas, Samuel; Gregori, Valentín; Sapena, Almanzor

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new filter for impulse noise reduction in colour images which is aimed at improving the noise reduction capability of the classical vector median filter. The filter is inspired by the application of a vector marginal median filtering process over a selected group of pixels in each filtering window. This selection, which is based on the vector median, along with the application of the marginal median operation constitutes an adaptive process that leads to a more robust filter design. Also, the proposed method is able to process colour images without introducing colour artifacts. Experimental results show that the images filtered with the proposed method contain less noisy pixels than those obtained through the vector median filter.

  17. Time-Domain Stability Margin Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The baseline stability margins for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle were generated via the classical approach of linearizing the system equations of motion and determining the gain and phase margins from the resulting frequency domain model. To improve the fidelity of the classical methods, the linear frequency domain approach can be extended by replacing static, memoryless nonlinearities with describing functions. This technique, however, does not address the time varying nature of the dynamics of a launch vehicle in flight. An alternative technique for the evaluation of the stability of the nonlinear launch vehicle dynamics along its trajectory is to incrementally adjust the gain and/or time delay in the time domain simulation until the system exhibits unstable behavior. This technique has the added benefit of providing a direct comparison between the time domain and frequency domain tools in support of simulation validation.

  18. Time Domain Stability Margin Assessment Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Keith

    2017-01-01

    The baseline stability margins for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle were generated via the classical approach of linearizing the system equations of motion and determining the gain and phase margins from the resulting frequency domain model. To improve the fidelity of the classical methods, the linear frequency domain approach can be extended by replacing static, memoryless nonlinearities with describing functions. This technique, however, does not address the time varying nature of the dynamics of a launch vehicle in flight. An alternative technique for the evaluation of the stability of the nonlinear launch vehicle dynamics along its trajectory is to incrementally adjust the gain and/or time delay in the time domain simulation until the system exhibits unstable behavior. This technique has the added benefit of providing a direct comparison between the time domain and frequency domain tools in support of simulation validation.

  19. Focused fluid flow in passive continental margins.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Christian

    2005-12-15

    Passive continental margins such as the Atlantic seaboard of Europe are important for society as they contain large energy resources, and they sustain ecosystems that are the basis for the commercial fish stock. The margin sediments are very dynamic environments. Fluids are expelled from compacting sediments, bottom water temperature changes cause gas hydrate systems to change their locations and occasionally large magmatic intrusions boil the pore water within the sedimentary basins, which is then expelled to the surface. The fluids that seep through the seabed at the tops of focused fluid flow systems have a crucial role for seabed ecology, and study of such fluid flow systems can also help in predicting the distribution of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and deciphering the climate record. Therefore, the study of focused fluid flow will become one of the most important fields in marine geology in the future.

  20. Earthquakes at North Atlantic passive margins

    SciTech Connect

    Gregersen, S. ); Basham, P.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The main focus of this volume is the earthquakes that occur at and near the continental margins on both sides of the North Atlantic. The book, which contains the proceedings of the NATO workshop on Causes and Effects of Earthquakes at Passive Margins and in Areas of Postglacial Rebound on Both Sides of the North Atlantic, draws together the fields of geophysics, geology and geodesy to address the stress and strain in the Earth's crust. The resulting earthquakes produced on ancient geological fault zones and the associated seismic hazards these pose to man are also addressed. Postglacial rebound in North America and Fennoscandia is a minor source of earthquakes today, during the interglacial period, but evidence is presented to suggest that the ice sheets suppressed earthquake strain while they were in place, and released this strain as a pulse of significant earthquakes after the ice melted about 9000 years ago.

  1. Geomorphologic Structures on the South Cretan Margin, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Lykousis, Vasilis; Alexandri, Matina; Rousakis, Grigoris; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Lampridou, Danai; Alves, Tiago; Ballas, Dionysios

    2015-04-01

    Geomorphologic Structures on the South Cretan Margin, Greece Nomikou P.1, Lykousis V.2, Alexandri M.2, Rousakis G.2, Sakellariou D.2, Lampridou D.1 , Alves T.3, Ballas D.2 1University of Athens, Department of Geology and Geoenvironment, Panepistimioupoli Zografou, 15784 Athens, Greece. 2Inst. of Oceanography, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Anavyssos, Greece. 33D Seismic Laboratory, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Cardiff University, Main Building-Park Place, CF10 3AT Cardiff, UK. The swath bathymetric survey of the South Cretan Margin has been conducted during the HERMES-1 (May-June 2005) and HERMES-2 (September-October 2005) cruises onboard R/V "AEGAEO" using the 20 kHz, SEABEAM 2120 system. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry outlines in unprecedented detail the shape and the morphological features of the region. One of the most dominant geomorphological structures of the southwest Cretan slope is the submarine Samaria Canyon (Western Cretan Trough) which is characterized by high relief steep walls and V-shaped cross sections. Despite the fact that the trough trends predominantly northeastward, with a central axis oriented from east to west, the head displays a north-trending hook termination on the continental shelf. The minimum depth of its axis is 1400 m and the thalweg ranges from 1500 to 3500m. In addition, abrupt alternation in the axial trend of the canyon is observed, accompanied by sharp changes in axial gradient and in the geometry of the canyon profile ending in a flat area of 3600 m depth. From Paleochora up to Sindonia, numerous small canyons trending N-S crosscut the steep Cretan southern margin, that reaches the 2000 m isobath. These are transversal to the main direction E-W of the slope. Furthermore, the detailed bathymetric map reveals the morphology of several troughs bounded by steep flanks. Their flat bottom may reach up to 3000m water depth. The most characteristic one, Ptolemy trough (eastern South Cretan Trough), is located in

  2. Sequence stratigraphy and continental margin development of the northwestern shelf of the South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.P.H. ); Zhi Yuong Chen; Qi Min Zhang )

    1993-05-01

    Based on the sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Tertiary in the northwestern continental margin of the South China Sea, this paper summarizes the regional tectonics and their influences on the basin developments and discusses the systems tract distributions through the continental margin growth. The study area is underlain by two Tertiary basins separated by a major basin boundary fault across which two distinctly different basin structural styles developed. The Qiongdongnan basin shows characteristic rift structures and is closely related to the opening of the South China Sea. The Yinggehai basin is filled with thick Neogene monoclines overlying basement without apparent rift structures. The Yinggehai's genesis has been linked to the tectonism along the Red River suture zone. The margin development is characterized by depositional environments of sediment influx constantly exceeding accommodation space. Under these environments, the highstand deltas frequently developed near shelf edges, where vertically stacked shallow water sands of both highstand deltas and lowstand wedges/deltas could produce favorable exploration targets. High rates of sedimentation in the study area allow the identification of fourth-order cyclicity in the Quaternary. Regional sequence stratigraphic correlations suggest that many sequence boundaries appear to be synchronous, but not all boundaries exist in all basins along the eastern and southern continental margins of mainland China. The margin evolved through the repeated development of lowstand fans, lowstand wedges, transgressive systems tracts, and highstand deltas. Prior to the Pliocene, the shelf was sourced both from Vietnam and Hainan Island and, as a result, two shelf margins developed. The southwestern margin stopped growing in the late Miocene, and the northern margin continued to prograde with possible additional sediment inputs through the Red River system in the Quaternary. 29 refs., 22 figs.

  3. Accuracy of Various MRI Sequences in Determining the Tumour Margin in Musculoskeletal Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Putta, Tharani; Gibikote, Sridhar; Madhuri, Vrisha; Walter, Noel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background It is imperative that bone tumour margin and extent of tumour involvement are accurately assessed pre-operatively in order for the surgeon to attain a safe surgical margin. In this study, we comprehensively assessed each of the findings that influence surgical planning, on various MRI sequences and compared them with the gold standard – pathology. Material/Methods In this prospective study including 21 patients with extremity bone tumours, margins as seen on various MRI sequences (T1, T2, STIR, DWI, post-gadolinium T1 FS) were measured and biopsies were obtained from each of these sites during the surgical resection. The resected tumour specimen and individual biopsy samples were studied to assess the true tumour margin. Margins on each of the MRI sequences were then compared with the gold standard – pathology. In addition to the intramedullary tumour margin, we also assessed the extent of soft tissue component, neurovascular bundle involvement, epiphyseal and joint involvement, and the presence or absence of skip lesions. Results T1-weighted imaging was the best sequence to measure tumour margin without resulting in clinically significant underestimation or overestimation of the tumour extent (mean difference of 0.8 mm; 95% confidence interval between −0.9 mm to 2.5 mm; inter-class correlation coefficient of 0.998). STIR and T1 FS post-gadolinium imaging grossly overestimated tumour extent by an average of 16.7 mm and 16.8 mm, respectively (P values <0.05). Post-gadolinium imaging was better to assess joint involvement while T1 and STIR were the best to assess epiphyseal involvement. Conclusions T1-weighted imaging was the best sequence to assess longitudinal intramedullary tumour extent. We suggest that osteotomy plane 1.5 cm beyond the T1 tumour margin is safe and also limits unwarranted surgical bone loss. However, this needs to be prospectively proven with a larger sample size. PMID:28058070

  4. Subglacial hydrology as a control on ice stream shear margin locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, Thibaut; Rice, James R.; Platt, John D.; Suckale, Jenny

    2015-11-01

    Ice streams are fast-flowing bands of ice separated from the nearly stagnant ice in the adjacent ridge by zones of highly localized deformation known as shear margins. However, it is presently unclear what mechanisms can control the location of shear margins. Within the shear margin, the transition from a slipping bed beneath the ice stream to a locked bed beneath the ridge concentrates stresses. We show that subglacial hydrology can select the shear margin location by strengthening the till within the margin. Our study uses a two-dimensional thermo-mechanical model in a cross-section perpendicular to the direction of flow. We show that the intense straining at the shear margins can generate large temperate regions within the deforming ice. Assuming that the melt generated in the temperate ice collects in a drainage channel at the base, we show that the channel locally decreases the pore pressure in the till. For a Coulomb-plastic rheology, this depressed pore pressure leads to a basal strength substantially higher than that inferred under the majority of the stream. Our results show that the additional basal resistance produced by the channel can reduce the stresses concentrated on the locked bed. Matching the model to surface velocity data at Whillans ice stream margin, we show that a stable shear margin occurs when the slipping-to-locked bed transition is less than 500 m away from a channel operating at an effective pressure of 200 kPa if the basal hydraulic transmissivity is equivalent to that of a water-film 0.2 mm thick.

  5. Marginal selenium status in northern Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Jeffrey M; Ball, Madeleine J

    2011-09-01

    Se plays many important roles in humans. Marginal Se status has been associated with adverse health effects including an increased risk of chronic disease such as cancer. There are few Australian data, but the population of Tasmania, Australia, is potentially at risk of marginal Se status. A cross-sectional study of 498 men and women aged 25-84 years was undertaken to assess the Se status of the northern Tasmanian population. Se status was assessed using dietary estimates and measures of serum Se and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Mean Se intakes were 77·4 (sd 31·3) and 65·1 (sd 23·7) μg/d for men and women, respectively; 27 % of the subjects consumed less than the Australian/New Zealand estimated average requirement. Mean serum Se concentration was 89·1 (sd 15·1) μg/l; 83 % of the study subjects had serum Se concentrations below 100 μg/l and 60 % had serum Se concentration below 90 μg/l, suggesting that Se status in many subjects was inadequate for maximal GPx activity. This was supported by the positive association between serum Se and serum GPx (P < 0·001), indicating that enzyme activity was limited by Se concentrations. The lowest mean serum Se concentrations were observed in the oldest age ranges; however, the prevalence of marginal Se status was similar across age ranges and did not appear to be influenced by sex or socio-economic status. The prevalence of marginal Se status was high in all sex and age subgroups, suggesting that the northern Tasmanian population could benefit from increasing Se intakes.

  6. Modeling Sedimentary Deposits on the Continental Margin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    sedimentation processes. P. 151-164, in Numerical Experiments in Stratigraphy : Recent Advances in stratigraphic and sedimentologic Computer Simulations. Soc...Niedoroda, A.W., 1996, Modeling the sedimentology and stratigraphy of continental margins, Oceanography, v. 9, p183-188 Swift, D. J. P. B. S. Parsons...hypothesis that on muddy shelves such as the northern California shelf, Holocene event stratigraphy consists of the deposits of high-concentration

  7. Testing for conditional multiple marginal independence.

    PubMed

    Bilder, Christopher R; Loughin, Thomas M

    2002-03-01

    Survey respondents are often prompted to pick any number of responses from a set of possible responses. Categorical variables that summarize this kind of data are called pick any/c variables. Counts from surveys that contain a pick any/c variable along with a group variable (r levels) and stratification variable (q levels) can be marginally summarized into an r x c x q contingency table. A question that may naturally arise from this setup is to determine if the group and pick any/c variable are marginally independent given the stratification variable. A test for conditional multiple marginal independence (CMMI) can be used to answer this question. Since subjects may pick any number out of c possible responses, the Cochran (1954, Biometrics 10, 417-451) and Mantel and Haenszel (1959, Journal of the National Cancer Institute 22, 719-748) tests cannot be used directly because they assume that units in the contingency table are independent of each other. Therefore, new testing methods are developed. Cochran's test statistic is extended to r x 2 x q tables, and a modified version of this statistic is proposed to test CMMI. Its sampling distribution can be approximated through bootstrapping. Other CMMI testing methods discussed are bootstrap p-value combination methods and Bonferroni adjustments. Simulation findings suggest that the proposed bootstrap procedures and the Bonferroni adjustments consistently hold the correct size and provide power against various alternatives.

  8. Maximum Margin Clustering of Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazmardi, S.; Safari, A.; Homayouni, S.

    2013-09-01

    In recent decades, large margin methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are supposed to be the state-of-the-art of supervised learning methods for classification of hyperspectral data. However, the results of these algorithms mainly depend on the quality and quantity of available training data. To tackle down the problems associated with the training data, the researcher put effort into extending the capability of large margin algorithms for unsupervised learning. One of the recent proposed algorithms is Maximum Margin Clustering (MMC). The MMC is an unsupervised SVMs algorithm that simultaneously estimates both the labels and the hyperplane parameters. Nevertheless, the optimization of the MMC algorithm is a non-convex problem. Most of the existing MMC methods rely on the reformulating and the relaxing of the non-convex optimization problem as semi-definite programs (SDP), which are computationally very expensive and only can handle small data sets. Moreover, most of these algorithms are two-class classification, which cannot be used for classification of remotely sensed data. In this paper, a new MMC algorithm is used that solve the original non-convex problem using Alternative Optimization method. This algorithm is also extended for multi-class classification and its performance is evaluated. The results of the proposed algorithm show that the algorithm has acceptable results for hyperspectral data clustering.

  9. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli A.; Kluesner, Jared W.

    2016-06-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a "depositionary forearc," a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  10. Ocean Margins Programs, Phase I research summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, P.

    1994-08-01

    During FY 1992, the DOE restructured its regional coastal-ocean programs into a new Ocean Margins Program (OMP), to: Quantify the ecological and biogeochemical processes and mechanisms that affect the cycling, flux, and storage of carbon and other biogenic elements at the land/ocean interface; Define ocean-margin sources and sinks in global biogeochemical cycles, and; Determine whether continental shelves are quantitatively significant in removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and isolating it via burial in sediments or export to the interior ocean. Currently, the DOE Ocean Margins Program supports more than 70 principal and co-principal investigators, spanning more than 30 academic institutions. Research funded by the OMP amounted to about $6.9M in FY 1994. This document is a collection of abstracts summarizing the component projects of Phase I of the OMP. This phase included both research and technology development, and comprised projects of both two and three years duration. The attached abstracts describe the goals, methods, measurement scales, strengths and limitations, and status of each project, and level of support. Keywords are provided to index the various projects. The names, addresses, affiliations, and major areas of expertise of the investigators are provided in appendices.

  11. Origin and dynamics of depositionary subduction margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vannucchi, Paola; Morgan, Jason P.; Silver, Eli; Kluesner, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Here we propose a new framework for forearc evolution that focuses on the potential feedbacks between subduction tectonics, sedimentation, and geomorphology that take place during an extreme event of subduction erosion. These feedbacks can lead to the creation of a “depositionary forearc,” a forearc structure that extends the traditional division of forearcs into accretionary or erosive subduction margins by demonstrating a mode of rapid basin accretion during an erosive event at a subduction margin. A depositionary mode of forearc evolution occurs when terrigenous sediments are deposited directly on the forearc while it is being removed from below by subduction erosion. In the most extreme case, an entire forearc can be removed by a single subduction erosion event followed by depositionary replacement without involving transfer of sediments from the incoming plate. We need to further recognize that subduction forearcs are often shaped by interactions between slow, long-term processes, and sudden extreme events reflecting the sudden influences of large-scale morphological variations in the incoming plate. Both types of processes contribute to the large-scale architecture of the forearc, with extreme events associated with a replacive depositionary mode that rapidly creates sections of a typical forearc margin. The persistent upward diversion of the megathrust is likely to affect its geometry, frictional nature, and hydrogeology. Therefore, the stresses along the fault and individual earthquake rupture characteristics are also expected to be more variable in these erosive systems than in systems with long-lived megathrust surfaces.

  12. Terrane amalgamation in the Philippine Sea margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Robert; Nichols, Gary J.

    1990-09-01

    The Philippine Sea plate includes plateaus of thickened crust interpreted as imbricated ophiolite and arc-related terranes of late Mesozoic-early Tertiary age separated by thinner oceanic crust. The arrival of plateaus at the subducting southwest margin of the Philippine Sea plate has caused the Philippine Trench to propagate southward in increments and caused transfer of terranes to the Philippine margin. New data from the Halmahera region indicate that the position, nature and evolution of plate boundaries have been strongly influenced by the heterogeneous character of the Philippine Sea plate. At present the Philippine Trench terminates at an oceanic plateau which is structurally continuous with an old forearc and ophiolite terrane on Halmahera. The position of this terrane has caused Philippine Sea plate-Eurasia convergence to be transferred from subduction at the Philippine Trench to the Molucca Sea Collision Zone through a broad NE-SW dextral transpressional zone across Halmahera. This plate boundary configuration is unstable and requires the future development of a new subduction zone to the east of Halmahera which will result in amalgamation of the Halmahera ophiolite terrane to the Philippine margin. In the Halmahera region amalgamation of terranes to the evolving Philippine microcontinent is currently in process.

  13. Defining the distal margin of rectal cancer for surgical planning

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Takashi; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is essential in selecting the appropriate surgical procedure. However, there is no standard measurement method. The National Cancer Institute consensus group recommends use of the anal verge (AV) as a landmark, and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology recommends use of the anorectal ring (ARR). In addition, whether measurements should be made on double contrast barium enema (BE) radiographs or magnetic resonance (MR) images remains controversial. We measured the distal tumor margin on both BE and MR images obtained preoperatively from 52 patients who underwent sphincter-saving resection for rectal cancer. The distances from the distal end of the tumor to the AV and the ARR were measured on both types of images, and the variability was investigated by Bland-Altman analysis. The mean distance from the tumor to the AV was 8.9 cm on the BE radiographs and 7.7 cm on the MR images (P=0.013). The mean distances to the ARR were 6.8 and 5.6 cm, respectively (P=0.070). Significant proportional bias was shown as the measured distances increased, the difference between the BE- and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measurements increased. Use of one or the other landmark did not affect selection of the appropriate surgical procedure. We conclude that an approximate 1-cm underestimation should be taken into account when MRI-based measurement of the distal rectal tumor margin is used to choose between sphincter-saving resection and abdominoperineal resection. PMID:28280625

  14. Subglacial hydrology as a control on ice stream shear margin locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perol, T.; Rice, J. R.; Platt, J. D.; Suckale, J.

    2015-12-01

    Ice streams are fast-flowing bands of ice separated from the nearly stagnant ice in the adjacent ridge by zones of highly localized deformation known as shear margins. However, it is presently unclear what mechanisms can control the location of shear margins, and possibly allow them to migrate. Within the shear margin, the transition from a freely slipping bed beneath the ice stream to a locked bed beneath the ridge concentrates stresses on the locked bed. We show that subglacial hydrological processes can select the shear margin location by strengthening the subglacial till within the margin, reducing the stress concentration associated with the transition from a slipping to a locked bed. Our study uses a two-dimensional thermo-mechanical model in a cross-section perpendicular to the direction of flow. We show that the intense straining at the shear margins can generate large temperate regions within the deforming ice. Assuming that the melt generated in the temperate ice collects in a drainage channel at the base of the margin, we show that the channel locally decreases the pore pressure in the subglacial till. For a Coulomb-plastic rheology, this depressed pore pressure leads to a basal shear strength substantially higher than that inferred under the majority of the stream. Our results show that the additional basal resistance produced by the channel can offset the large stresses concentrated on the locked bed, allowing the drainage channel to select the margin location. Matching the model to surface velocity data near Dragon Margin within Whillans ice stream B2, we show that a stable shear margin occurs when the slipping-to-locked bed transition is less than 500 m away from a channel operating at an effective pressure of 200 kPa if the basal hydraulic transmissivity is equivalent to that of a water-film ~0.2 mm thick. Extending these results we explore how the shear margin location varies with the effective pressure of the channel and hydraulic properties of

  15. The Eastern Sardinian Margin (Tyrrhenian Sea, Western Mediterranean) : a key area to study the rifting and post-breakup evolution of a back-arc passive continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaullier, Virginie; Chanier, Frank; Vendeville, Bruno; Maillard, Agnès; Thinon, Isabelle; Graveleau, Fabien; Lofi, Johanna; Sage, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    The Eastern Sardinian passive continental margin formed during the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea, which is a back-arc basin created by continental rifting and oceanic spreading related to the eastward migrating Apennine subduction system (middle Miocene to Pliocene). Up to now, rifting in this key area was considered to be pro parte coeval with the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC, 5.96-5.32 Ma). We use the MSC seismic markers and the deformation of viscous salt and its brittle overburden as proxies to better delineate the timing of rifting and post-rift reactivation, and especially to quantify vertical and horizontal movements. On this young, highly-segmented margin, the Messinian Erosion Surface and the Upper and Mobile Units are systematically associated, respectively, to basement highs and deeper basins, showing that a rifted deep-sea domain already existed by Messinian times, therefore a major pre-MSC rifting episode occurred across the entire domain. Data show that there are no signs of Messinian syn-rift sediments, hence no evidence for rifting after Late Tortonian times. Moreover, because salt tectonics creates fan-shaped geometries in sediments, syn-rift deposits have to be carefully re-examined to distinguish the effects of crustal tectonics (rifting) and salt tectonics. We also precise that rifting is clearly diachronous from the upper margin (East-Sardinia Basin) to the lower margin (Cornaglia Terrace) with two unconformities, attributed respectively to the necking and to the lithospheric breakup unconformities. The onshore part of the upper margin has been recently investigated in order to characterize the large crustal faults affecting the Mesozoic series (geometry, kinematics and chronology) and to decipher the role of the structural inheritance and of the early rifting. Seaward, we also try to constrain the architecture and timing of the continent-ocean transition, between the hyper-extended continental crust and the first oceanic crust. Widespread

  16. Postrift history of the eastern central Atlantic passive margin: Insights from the Saharan region of South Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leprêtre, Rémi; Missenard, Yves; Barbarand, Jocelyn; Gautheron, Cécile; Saddiqi, Omar; Pinna-Jamme, Rosella

    2015-06-01

    The passive margin of South Morocco is a low-elevated passive margin. It constitutes one of the oldest margins of the Atlantic Ocean, with an Early Jurassic breakup, and little geological data are available concerning its postrift reactivation so far. We investigated the postrift thermal history of the onshore part of the margin with low-temperature thermochronology on apatite crystals. Fission track and (U-Th-Sm)/He ages we obtained are significantly younger than the breakup (~190 Ma). Fission track ages range from 107 ± 8 to 175 ± 16 Ma, with mean track lengths from 10.7 ± 0.3 to 12.5 ± 0.2 µm. (U-Th-Sm)/He ages range from 14 ± 1 to 185 ± 15 Ma. Using inverse modeling of low-temperature thermochronological data, we demonstrate that the South Moroccan continental margin underwent a complex postrift history with at least two burial and exhumation phases. The first exhumation event occurred during Late Jurassic/Early Cretaceous, and we attribute this to mantle dynamics rather than to intrinsic rifting-related processes such as flexural rebound. The second event, from Late Cretaceous to early Paleogene, might record the onset of Africa/Europe convergence. We show a remarkably common behavior of the whole Moroccan passive margin during its early postrift evolution. The present-day differences result from a segmentation of the margin domains due to the Africa/Europe convergence. Finally we propose that varying retained strengths during rifting and also the specific crustal/lithospheric geometry of stretching explain the difference between the topographical expressions on the continental African margin compared to its American counterpart.

  17. Lead mobilization during tectonic reactivation of the western Baltic Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Romer, R.L. Luleaa Univ. ); Wright, J.E. )

    1993-06-01

    Lead isotope data from sulfide deposits of the western part of the Baltic Shield define mixing lines in the [sup 206]Pb/[sup 204]Pb-[sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb diagram. Lead from two types of sulfide deposits have been investigated: (1) Exhalative and volcanogenic deposits that are syngenetic with their host rocks; and (2) vein deposits. The syngenetic deposits locally show a very wide range of lead isotopic compositions that reflect a variable addition of highly radiogenic lead, while the vein deposits, although they have radiogenic lead isotopic compositions, exhibit only limited isotopic variations. In different provinces of the shield, both types of deposits fall on the same lead mixing array. The slope of the lead mixing lines varies as a function of the age of basement rocks and the age of the tectonic event which produced the lead mobilization and therefore relates the source rock age with the age of lead mobilization. Calculated mixing ages fall into several short time periods that correspond either to orogenic events or to major phases of continental rifting. The orogenic events are the ca 360--430 Ma Caledonian, ca 900--1100 Ma Sveconorwegian, and the ca 1800--1900 Ma Svecofennian orogenic cycles. The rifting events correspond to the formation of the ca 280 Ma Oslo rift and the Ordovician (ca 450 Ma) graben system in the area of the present Gulf of Bothnia. Each mixing age indicates that lead was mobilized, probably as a consequence of mild thermal disturbances, and that the crust was permeable to lead migration. The data show that the geographic distribution of sulfide deposits with highly radiogenic lead isotopic compositions coincides with old graben systems, orogenic belts, and orogenic forelands on the Baltic Shield. The ages of vein deposits and their geographic distribution demonstrate multiple tectonic reactivation of the interior of the Baltic Shield in response to orogenic events at its margin. 68 refs., 6 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Robust Flutter Margin Analysis that Incorporates Flight Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, Rick; Brenner, Martin J.

    1998-01-01

    An approach for computing worst-case flutter margins has been formulated in a robust stability framework. Uncertainty operators are included with a linear model to describe modeling errors and flight variations. The structured singular value, mu, computes a stability margin that directly accounts for these uncertainties. This approach introduces a new method of computing flutter margins and an associated new parameter for describing these margins. The mu margins are robust margins that indicate worst-case stability estimates with respect to the defined uncertainty. Worst-case flutter margins are computed for the F/A-18 Systems Research Aircraft using uncertainty sets generated by flight data analysis. The robust margins demonstrate flight conditions for flutter may lie closer to the flight envelope than previously estimated by p-k analysis.

  19. Distinguishing Terrestrial Organic Carbon in Marginal Sediments of East China Sea and Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, Selvaraj; Lin, Baozhi; Wang, Huawei; Liu, Qianqian; Liu, Zhifei; Lou, Jiann-Yuh; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Mayer, Lawrence M.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge about the sources, transport pathways and behavior of terrestrial organic carbon in continental margins adjoining to large rivers has improved in recent decades, but uncertainties and complications still exist with human-influenced coastal regions in densely populated wet tropics and subtropics. In these regions, the monsoon and other episodic weather events exert strong climatic control on mineral and particulate organic matter delivery to the marginal seas. Here we investigate elemental (TOC, TN and bromine-Br) and stable carbon isotopic (δ13C) compositions of organic matter (OM) in surface sediments and short cores collected from active (SW Taiwan) and passive margin (East China Sea) settings to understand the sources of OM that buried in these settings. We used sedimentary bromine to total organic carbon (Br/TOC) ratios to apportion terrigenous from marine organic matter, and find that Br/TOC may serve as an additional, reliable proxy for sedimentary provenance in both settings. Variations in Br/TOC are consistent with other provenance indicators in responding to short-lived terrigenous inputs. Because diagenetic alteration of Br is insignificant on shorter time scales, applying Br/TOC ratios as a proxy to identify organic matter source along with carbon isotope mixing models may provide additional constraints on the quantity and transformation of terrigenous organics in continental margins. We apply this combination of approaches to land-derived organic matter in different depositional environments of East Asian marginal seas.

  20. Quantifying the margin sharpness of lesions on radiological images for content-based image retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiajing; Napel, Sandy; Greenspan, Hayit; Beaulieu, Christopher F.; Agrawal, Neeraj; Rubin, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to quantify the margin sharpness of lesions on CT and to evaluate it in simulations and CT scans of liver and lung lesions. Methods: The authors computed two attributes of margin sharpness: the intensity difference between a lesion and its surroundings, and the sharpness of the intensity transition across the lesion boundary. These two attributes were extracted from sigmoid curves fitted along lines automatically drawn orthogonal to the lesion margin. The authors then represented the margin characteristics for each lesion by a feature vector containing histograms of these parameters. The authors created 100 simulated CT scans of lesions over a range of intensity difference and margin sharpness, and used the concordance correlation between the known parameter and the corresponding computed feature as a measure of performance. The authors also evaluated their method in 79 liver lesions (44 patients: 23 M, 21 F, mean age 61) and 58 lung nodules (57 patients: 24 M, 33 F, mean age 66). The methodology presented takes into consideration the boundary of the liver and lung during feature extraction in clinical images to ensure that the margin feature do not get contaminated by anatomy other than the normal organ surrounding the lesions. For evaluation in these clinical images, the authors created subjective independent reference standards for pairwise margin sharpness similarity in the liver and lung cohorts, and compared rank orderings of similarity used using our sharpness feature to that expected from the reference standards using mean normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) over all query images. In addition, the authors compared their proposed feature with two existing techniques for lesion margin characterization using the simulated and clinical datasets. The authors also evaluated the robustness of their features against variations in delineation of the lesion margin by simulating five types of deformations of the lesion margin

  1. Particulate Organic Carbon Burial in Ocean Margin Sediments in the Oregon Upwelling Margin: Terrestrial vs. Marine Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, R. H.; Goni, M. A.; Wheatcroft, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Eastern boundary currents are often sites of intense primary production fueled by coastal upwelling. Along these same margins there are often numerous small, mountainous rivers that have high sediment (and POC) yields. In some cases, for example the California Current system, there is a seasonal offset between these two sources of POC, whereby marine POC is delivered to the seabed during spring/summer, and terrestrial POC is delivered during fall/winter. Processes that determine the dispersal, transformation and ultimate burial of this material differ substantially between seasons, therefore the fate of POC on the shelf is complex and uncertain. To investigate these issues we have initiated a study of the Umpqua River dispersal system on the central Oregon margin, a region that is well known for its upwelling-fueled primary production. Elemental, stable isotopic and biomarker analyses were done on surface sediments from ~65 short cores collected on the shelf and upper slope adjacent to the Umpqua River. Multiple tracers of terrestrial organic matter indicate a well-resolved depocenter centered approximately 8 km north of the river mouth at 80-90 m water depth. The terrestrial organic matter depocenter stretches along-margin for ~40 km, is 6-8 km wide and covers an area of approximately 200 square km. Sediment accumulation rates within the depocenter (based on Pb-210 geochronology) are 3-5 times ambient shelf sediments. In addition, measurements of river suspended sediment indicate that much the organic matter carried by the Umpqua River is modern in age (i.e., is not petrogenic). Collectively, these data indicate that both modern terrestrial organic matter as well as marine organic matter are being actively buried on the Umpqua shelf.

  2. Marginally hydrophobic transmembrane α-helices shaping membrane protein folding

    PubMed Central

    De Marothy, Minttu T; Elofsson, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cells have developed an incredible machinery to facilitate the insertion of membrane proteins into the membrane. While we have a fairly good understanding of the mechanism and determinants of membrane integration, more data is needed to understand the insertion of membrane proteins with more complex insertion and folding pathways. This review will focus on marginally hydrophobic transmembrane helices and their influence on membrane protein folding. These weakly hydrophobic transmembrane segments are by themselves not recognized by the translocon and therefore rely on local sequence context for membrane integration. How can such segments reside within the membrane? We will discuss this in the light of features found in the protein itself as well as the environment it resides in. Several characteristics in proteins have been described to influence the insertion of marginally hydrophobic helices. Additionally, the influence of biological membranes is significant. To begin with, the actual cost for having polar groups within the membrane may not be as high as expected; the presence of proteins in the membrane as well as characteristics of some amino acids may enable a transmembrane helix to harbor a charged residue. The lipid environment has also been shown to directly influence the topology as well as membrane boundaries of transmembrane helices—implying a dynamic relationship between membrane proteins and their environment. PMID:25970811

  3. Marginal Zone Lymphoma Complicated by Protein Losing Enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Stanek, Nadine; Bauerfeind, Peter; Herzog, Guido; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Lenggenhager, Daniela; Reiner, Cäcilia; Manz, Markus G.; Goede, Jeroen S.

    2016-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) refers to excessive intestinal protein loss, resulting in hypoalbuminemia. Underlying pathologies include conditions leading to either reduced intestinal barrier or lymphatic congestion. We describe the case of a patient with long-lasting diffuse abdominal problems and PLE. Repetitive endoscopies were normal with only minimal lymphangiectasia in biopsies. Further evaluations revealed an indolent marginal zone lymphoma with minor bone marrow infiltration. Monotherapy with rituximab decreased bone marrow infiltration of the lymphoma but did not relieve PLE. Additional treatments with steroids, octreotide, a diet devoid of long-chain fatty-acids, and parenteral nutrition did not prevent further clinical deterioration with marked weight loss (23 kg), further reduction in albumin concentrations (nadir 8 g/L), and a pronounced drop in performance status. Finally, immunochemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustine resulted in hematological remission and remarkable clinical improvement. 18 months after therapy the patient remains free of gastrointestinal complaints and has regained his body weight with normal albumin levels. We demonstrate a case of PLE secondary to indolent marginal zone lymphoma. No intestinal pathologies were detected, contrasting a severe and almost lethal clinical course. Immunochemotherapy relieved lymphoma and PLE, suggesting that a high suspicion of lymphoma is warranted in otherwise unexplained cases of PLE. PMID:27891267

  4. Marginal Zone Lymphoma Complicated by Protein Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Stanek, Nadine; Bauerfeind, Peter; Herzog, Guido; Heinrich, Henriette; Sauter, Matthias; Lenggenhager, Daniela; Reiner, Cäcilia; Manz, Markus G; Goede, Jeroen S; Misselwitz, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Protein losing enteropathy (PLE) refers to excessive intestinal protein loss, resulting in hypoalbuminemia. Underlying pathologies include conditions leading to either reduced intestinal barrier or lymphatic congestion. We describe the case of a patient with long-lasting diffuse abdominal problems and PLE. Repetitive endoscopies were normal with only minimal lymphangiectasia in biopsies. Further evaluations revealed an indolent marginal zone lymphoma with minor bone marrow infiltration. Monotherapy with rituximab decreased bone marrow infiltration of the lymphoma but did not relieve PLE. Additional treatments with steroids, octreotide, a diet devoid of long-chain fatty-acids, and parenteral nutrition did not prevent further clinical deterioration with marked weight loss (23 kg), further reduction in albumin concentrations (nadir 8 g/L), and a pronounced drop in performance status. Finally, immunochemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustine resulted in hematological remission and remarkable clinical improvement. 18 months after therapy the patient remains free of gastrointestinal complaints and has regained his body weight with normal albumin levels. We demonstrate a case of PLE secondary to indolent marginal zone lymphoma. No intestinal pathologies were detected, contrasting a severe and almost lethal clinical course. Immunochemotherapy relieved lymphoma and PLE, suggesting that a high suspicion of lymphoma is warranted in otherwise unexplained cases of PLE.

  5. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    SciTech Connect

    Foad, Basma; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO{sub 2} and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  6. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of reactivities for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foad, Basma; Takeda, Toshikazu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply our improved method for calculating sensitivities and uncertainties of reactivity responses for UO2 and MOX fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The improved method has been used to calculate sensitivity coefficients relative to infinite dilution cross-sections, where the self-shielding effect is taken into account. Two types of reactivities are considered: Doppler reactivity and coolant void reactivity, for each type of reactivity, the sensitivities are calculated for small and large perturbations. The results have demonstrated that the reactivity responses have larger relative uncertainty than eigenvalue responses. In addition, the uncertainty of coolant void reactivity is much greater than Doppler reactivity especially for large perturbations. The sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of both reactivities were verified by comparing with SCALE code results using ENDF/B-VII library and good agreements have been found.

  7. Post-breakup topographic rejuvenation of passive margins is directly related to the architecture of hyperextension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Tim; Terje Osmundsen, Per

    2014-05-01

    Post-breakup topographic rejuvenation of individual escarpment sectors atop passive continental margins has been documented for decades. In two recent publications we have identified and quantified a scaling relationship that links the width of a proximal margin sector to the absolute elevation of its seaward-facing escarpment. The scaling relationship appears to be valid, globally, on margin sectors where hyperextended crustal architecture is present offshore (see Osmundsen & Redfield, 2011). In a detailed test we have also documented clear correlations between the geomorphic characteristics of the Scandinavian hinterland backslope, its point of flexure against the Archean craton, today's seismicity, and the now-offshore Taper Break, or the point of deformation coupling/decoupling that was active during high-beta thinning (see Redfield & Osmundsen, 2013). In one particularly fine example the More og Trondelag Fault Complex is shown to have reactivated in accordance with a normal displacement gradient that in turn obeys a simple distance relationship with the Taper Break. These results demonstrate that the topographic fate of a passive margin is determined by the end of the rift phase, and is directly related to the pattern of large-magnitude extensional faults that created the crustal taper and decided the location of the Taper Break. Post-breakup and/or 'accommodation-phase' uplift at passive margins is the inexorable and penultimate phase of hyperextension and is independent of external factors such as mantle convection, lithoshpheric composition/delamination, glacial history, magmatic style, or far field stresses such as those postulated from 'ridge push' or changes in plate motion. Osmundsen & Redfield, 2011, Terra Nova, 23, 349-361. Redfield & Osmundsen, 2013, GSA Bulletin, 125, 184-200.

  8. Carbonate comparison of west Florida continental margin with margins of eastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    Temperate carbonate margins may have as many similarities to clastic margins as to other carbonate systems. An example is the west Florida continental margin north of Florida Bay, a vast area of more than 150,000 km/sup 2/. The facies of this area differ from those of other Holocene carbonates, such as the Bahama Banks, the Great Barrier Reef, and the Caribbean and Pacific bioherms. The west Florida margin is analogous to the predominantly clastic southeastern US in both physiology and sedimentary processes. The shelf facies is a veneer of carbonate sand, primarily molluscan shell fragments, with low sedimentation rates. It is similar to the southeastern US sand veneer with the clastic component removed. Like the US system, the west Florida shelf has a ridge and swale topography replete with sedimentary structures, such as sand waves, with a series of drainage systems incised into its surface at lower stands of sea level. On the outer edge, it is commonly bounded by outcrops with considerable positive relief. The upper slope of the west Florida margin is a calcilutite, a Holocene chalk deposit accumulating at rates of tens of centimeters/1000 years, comparable to the clastic lutite depositional rates of the eastern US continental slope, and two orders of magnitude higher than deep-sea oozes of similar composition. These relatively high rates are probably caused by fines pumped from and across the coarser shelf-sand sheets in both systems.

  9. Reading Repression: Textualizing the Linguistic Marginalization of Nonnative English-Speaking Teachers in Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Avram; Johnson, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    This discussion draws attention to the discriminatory efforts of policymakers in Arizona to professionally marginalize public school teachers deemed to have an accent. In addition to debunking the linguistic and pedagogic validity of this policy, we emphasize the role of the media in the (re)construction and justification of language ideologies…

  10. Basin inversion by distributed deformation: the southern margin of the Bristol Channel Basin, England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, R. A.; Hancock, P. L.; Whittaker, A.

    Several models of basin inversion described in the literature are tested in a study of Triassic and Early Jurassic strata exposed along the southern margin of the Bristol Channel Basin in Somerset, England that has been exhumed by <3 km. Two key features of the superbly exposed normal faults are that they formed at several times during basin evolution—not during Triassic to Early Jurassic growth, but during Late Jurassic rifting, and during and after inversion; and that >95% of them are still in net extension, despite widespread kinematic evidence for reverse reactivation. When coupled with the general absence of thin-skinned thrusts and the widespread occurrence of regional contractional folds, it appears that none of three main inversion models—the fault-reactivation model, the thin-skinned model and the buttress model—are by themselves applicable. We erect a new model of basin inversion, the distributed deformation model, which consists of three stages of basin inversion. Stage one involved early partial reactivation of large-displacement steep normal faults. Stage two was dominated by folding, wherein fault blocks underwent oblique (non-coaxial) shortening by map scale folding, accompanied by formation of outer arc normal faults, minor cleavage and neoformed thrusts. Stage three involved reverse reactivation of outer arc normal faults and activation of oblique and strike-slip faults that partitioned deformation into compartments.

  11. Marginal integrity of turkom-cera compared to other all-ceramic materials: effect of finish line.

    PubMed

    Al-Makramani, Bandar M A; Razak, Abdul A A; Abu-Hassan, Mohamed I; Sulaiman, Eshamsul; Loon, Lui Joo; Yahya, Noor Azlin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic crowns compared to In-Ceram and Procera AllCeram systems. The influence of finish line design (chamfer or shoulder) on the marginal adaptation of Turkom-Cera all-ceramic crowns was also investigated. Thirty human premolars were prepared with chamfer margins and assigned to either the Turkom-Cera, In-Ceram, or Procera system group. In addition, 10 premolars were prepared with rounded shoulder finish lines and assigned to an additional Turkom-Cera group. Ceramic copings (0.6-mm thick) were fabricated for each group following the manufacturers' instructions. The copings were seated on abutments using a special holding device that facilitated uniform loading, and marginal adaptation was assessed using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance, the Tukey HSD post hoc test, and an independent samples t test. There was a statistically significant difference regarding marginal adaptation among the three all-ceramic systems (P < .05). There were no significant differences in the mean marginal discrepancies of Turkom-Cera crowns among chamfer and shoulder finish line groups (P > .05). Within the limitations of this study, the marginal discrepancies were all within the clinically acceptable standard. Int J Prosthodont 2011;24:379-381.

  12. Unitary-process discrimination with error margin

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, T.; Hayashi, A.; Horibe, M.; Hayashi, M.

    2010-06-15

    We investigate a discrimination scheme between unitary processes. By introducing a margin for the probability of an erroneous guess, this scheme interpolates the two standard discrimination schemes: minimum-error and unambiguous discrimination. We present solutions for two cases. One is the case of two unitary processes with general prior probabilities. The other is the case with a group symmetry: The processes comprise a projective representation of a finite group. In the latter case, we found that unambiguous discrimination is a kind of 'all or nothing': The maximum success probability is either 0 or 1. We also thoroughly analyze how entanglement with an auxiliary system improves discrimination performance.

  13. New Outer Bounds on the Marginal Polytope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-06

    not find any violated inequalities) Cycle inequalities. The marginal polytope can be defined by the intersection of a large number of linear...possibly zero) number of cut edges. Suppose we start at node i, where xi = 0. As we traverse the cycle, the assignment changes each time we cross a cut edge...Since we must return to xi = 0, the assignment can only change an even number of times. For a cycleC and any F ⊆ C such that |F | is odd, this

  14. Reversible Oxidative Addition at Carbon.

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, Antonius F; Fuchs, Sonja; Flock, Marco; Marder, Todd B; Radius, Udo

    2017-04-07

    The reactivity of N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) and cyclic alkyl amino carbenes (cAACs) with arylboronate esters is reported. The reaction with NHCs leads to the reversible formation of thermally stable Lewis acid/base adducts Ar-B(OR)2 ⋅NHC (Add1-Add6). Addition of cAAC(Me) to the catecholboronate esters 4-R-C6 H4 -Bcat (R=Me, OMe) also afforded the adducts 4-R-C6 H4 Bcat⋅cAAC(Me) (Add7, R=Me and Add8, R=OMe), which react further at room temperature to give the cAAC(Me) ring-expanded products RER1 and RER2. The boronate esters Ar-B(OR)2 of pinacol, neopentylglycol, and ethyleneglycol react with cAAC at RT via reversible B-C oxidative addition to the carbene carbon atom to afford cAAC(Me) (B{OR}2 )(Ar) (BCA1-BCA6). NMR studies of cAAC(Me) (Bneop)(4-Me-C6 H4 ) (BCA4) demonstrate the reversible nature of this oxidative addition process.

  15. Feedback-reactivity time-dependencies for a negative reactivity insertion in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-01-01

    Knowledge of time-dependencies (and magnitudes) of feedback components is necessary for interpretation and understanding of transient behaviors. Described herein is one analysis of negative insertion (approx. 36 cents) of a control rod from full power during Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) run 93a. The time-dependencies of the component feedbacks have been analyzed using 24 channels in the EROS computer code. Seventy distinct temperature coefficients of reactivity were used in conjunction with this 24-channel EBR-II model. These temperature coefficients of reactivity were obtained using an addition (TEMCO) to the EBRPOCO code.

  16. Deep crustal structure and continent-ocean boundary along the Galicia continental margin (NW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druet, María; Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Carbó, Andrés; Acosta, Juan; Granja Bruña, José Luis; Llanes, Pilar; Vázquez, Juan-Tomás; Ercilla, Gemma

    2016-04-01

    The Galicia continental margin is a magma-poor rifted margin with an extremely complex structure. Its formation involves several rifting episodes during the Mesozoic in the vicinity of a ridge triple junction, which produces a change in the orientation of the main structures. In addition, there is an overimposed Cenozoic partial tectonic inversion along its northern border. Although this continental margin has been widely studied since the 70's, most studies have focused on its western part in the transition to the Iberia Abyssal Plain, and there is a significant lack of information on the north and northwestern flanks of this margin. This fact, along with its great structural complexity, has resulted in the absence of a previous comprehensive regional geodynamic model integrating all the processes observed. In the present study we integrate a large volume of new geophysical data (gravity, swath bathymetry and 2D multichannel reflection seismic). Data come from the systematic mapping of the Spanish EEZ project which provides a dense grid of gravity data and full seafloor coverage with swath bathymetry, and from the ERGAP project which provides serially-arranged 2D seismic reflection profiles across the NW Iberia margin. The combined interpretation and modelling of this new information has arisen significant constraints on the origin, the deep crustal structure and the physiographic complexity of the margin, as well as on the characterization of the along- and across-strike variation of the ocean-continent transition along NW Iberia margin. The analysis of this information leads us to propose a conceptual model for the initiation of the tectonic inversion of a magma-poor rifted margin. Finally, a framework for the geodynamic evolution of the Galicia margin has been constructed, involving three main stages: A) an early stage from the end of rifting and oceanic drift in the Bay of Biscay (Santonian); B) an intermediate stage with the beginning of tectonic inversion in

  17. Characterizing entanglement with global and marginal entropic measures

    SciTech Connect

    Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio; De Siena, Silvio

    2003-12-01

    We qualify the entanglement of arbitrary mixed states of bipartite quantum systems by comparing global and marginal mixednesses quantified by different entropic measures. For systems of two qubits we discriminate the class of maximally entangled states with fixed marginal mixednesses, and determine an analytical upper bound relating the entanglement of formation to the marginal linear entropies. This result partially generalizes to mixed states the quantification of entanglement with marginal mixednesses holding for pure states. We identify a class of entangled states that, for fixed marginals, are globally more mixed than product states when measured by the linear entropy. Such states cannot be discriminated by the majorization criterion.

  18. Pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity in DNA and RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Marc M.

    2016-11-01

    Nucleobase radicals are major products of the reactions between nucleic acids and hydroxyl radical, which is produced via the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. The nucleobase radicals also result from hydration of cation radicals that are produced via the direct effect of ionizing radiation. The role that nucleobase radicals play in strand scission has been investigated indirectly using ionizing radiation to generate them. More recently, the reactivity of nucleobase radicals resulting from formal hydrogen atom or hydroxyl radical addition to pyrimidines has been studied by independently generating the reactive intermediates via UV-photolysis of synthetic precursors. This approach has provided control over where the reactive intermediates are produced within biopolymers and facilitated studying their reactivity. The contributions to our understanding of pyrimidine nucleobase radical reactivity by this approach are summarized.

  19. Variational reactivity estimates: new analyses and new results

    SciTech Connect

    Favorite, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    A modified form of the variational estimate of the reactivity worth ofa perturbation was previously developed to extend the range of applicability of variational perturbation theory for perturbations leading to negative reactivity worths. Recent numerical results challenged the assumptions behind the modified form. In this paper, more results are obtained, leading to the conclusion that sometimes the modified form extends the range ofapplicability of variational perturbation theory for positive reactivity worths as well, and sometimes the standard variational form is more accurate for negative-reactivity perturbations. In addition, this paper proves that using the exact generalized adjoint function would lead to an inaccurate variational reactivity estimate when the error in the first-order estimate is large; the standard generalized adjoint function, an approximation to the exact one, leads to Lore accurate results. This conclusion is also demonstrated numerically. Transport calculations use the PARTISN multi group discrete ordinates code

  20. Sensitivity-based reactive power control for voltage profile improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Exposito, A.G.; Ramos, J.L.M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Macias, J.L.R. ); Salinas, Y.C.

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents a procedure for dispatching reactive power when voltage deviations are not acceptable. The proposed method, intended for real-time use, determines which control variables are actually effective for solving voltage violations. Efficiency is measured according to sensitivities, current voltage profile and reserve margin of control variables. The selected control variables are rescheduled in proportion to their efficiency coefficients. State-of-the-art sparsity techniques are used to speed-up computation of sensitivities. An example is included to show effectiveness of the method.

  1. Tectonic isolation of the Levant basin offshore Galilee-Lebanon effects of the Dead Sea fault plate boundary on the Levant continental margin, eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schattner, U.; Ben-Avraham, Z.; Lazar, M.; Hüebscher, C.

    2006-11-01

    The continental margin of the central Levant, offshore northern Israel and southern Lebanon is characterized by a sharp continental-oceanic crustal transition, exhibited on the bathymetry as a steep continental slope. At the base of the slope a narrow zone of faulting deforms the upper Messinian-recent sedimentary sequence. Further into the basin no major deformations are observed. However, onland a restraining bend along the Dead Sea fault plate boundary results in the formation of the Lebanon and anti-Lebanon mountain ranges, which exhibit a large positive isostatic anomaly not compensated at depth. All these geologic features follow a NNE-SSW trend. A dense network of multi-channel and single-channel seismic profiles, covering 5000 km of ship-track offshore northern Israel and southern Lebanon, was analyzed for the purpose of characterizing the continental margin. Additional seismic surveys covering the area between the Levant margin and the Cyprean arc were examined. Data were then incorporated with magnetic, gravity and earthquake measurements to reveal the deep crustal structure of the area and integrated with bathymetry data to describe the behavior of the young sedimentary basin fill. Results indicate that the Levant basin, offshore northern Israel and southern Lebanon (up to Beirut) is more-or-less unaffected by the intense tectonic deformation occurring onland. The transition between the deformed area onland and the undeformed Levant basin occurs along the base of the continental slope. Along the base, the upper Messinian-recent sedimentary sequence is cut by two sets of faults: shallow growth faults resulting from salt tectonics and high angle faults, marking the surface expression of a deeper crustal discontinuity - the marine extension of the Carmel fault zone. The central Levant continental margin is being reactivated by transpressional faulting of the marine continuation of the Carmel fault, at the base of the continental slope. This fault system

  2. Semisupervised kernel marginal Fisher analysis for face recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziqiang; Sun, Xia; Sun, Lijun; Huang, Yuchun

    2013-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction is a key problem in face recognition due to the high-dimensionality of face image. To effectively cope with this problem, a novel dimensionality reduction algorithm called semisupervised kernel marginal Fisher analysis (SKMFA) for face recognition is proposed in this paper. SKMFA can make use of both labelled and unlabeled samples to learn the projection matrix for nonlinear dimensionality reduction. Meanwhile, it can successfully avoid the singularity problem by not calculating the matrix inverse. In addition, in order to make the nonlinear structure captured by the data-dependent kernel consistent with the intrinsic manifold structure, a manifold adaptive nonparameter kernel is incorporated into the learning process of SKMFA. Experimental results on three face image databases demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm.

  3. Semisupervised Kernel Marginal Fisher Analysis for Face Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziqiang; Sun, Xia; Sun, Lijun; Huang, Yuchun

    2013-01-01

    Dimensionality reduction is a key problem in face recognition due to the high-dimensionality of face image. To effectively cope with this problem, a novel dimensionality reduction algorithm called semisupervised kernel marginal Fisher analysis (SKMFA) for face recognition is proposed in this paper. SKMFA can make use of both labelled and unlabeled samples to learn the projection matrix for nonlinear dimensionality reduction. Meanwhile, it can successfully avoid the singularity problem by not calculating the matrix inverse. In addition, in order to make the nonlinear structure captured by the data-dependent kernel consistent with the intrinsic manifold structure, a manifold adaptive nonparameter kernel is incorporated into the learning process of SKMFA. Experimental results on three face image databases demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. PMID:24163638

  4. Resection margins in carcinoma of the head of the pancreas. Implications for radiation therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Willett, C G; Lewandrowski, K; Warshaw, A L; Efird, J; Compton, C C

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective review of the pathology and clinical course of 72 patients undergoing resection of carcinoma of the head of the pancreas was undertaken to identify the frequency of tumor involvement at standard surgical transection margins (stomach, duodenum, pancreas, and bile duct) as well as the peripancreatic soft tissue margin and the potential clinical significance of these findings. Of 72 patients undergoing resection, 37 patients (51%) were found to have tumor extension to the surgical margins. The most commonly involved margin was peripancreatic soft tissue (27 patients) followed by pancreatic transection line (14 patients) and bile duct transection line (4 patients). For 37 patients with tumor present at a resection margin, there were no survivors beyond 41 months. No difference in survival or local control was seen between 14 patients receiving postoperative radiation therapy and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) compared with 23 patients not receiving additional treatment. In contrast, the 5-year actuarial survival and local control of 35 patients undergoing resection without tumor invasion to a resection margin was 22% and 43%, respectively. The 5-year survival and local control of 16 patients receiving adjuvant radiation therapy and 5-FU was 29% and 42%, respectively, whereas these figures were 18% and 31% for 19 patients not receiving adjuvant therapy (p > 0.10). Because residual local tumor after resection is common, preoperative radiation therapy may be beneficial in this disease. It should minimize the risk of dissemination during operative manipulation and facilitate a curative resection by promoting tumor regression. Because local failure rates approach 60% after resection and adjuvant therapy even in cases having clear resection margins, intraoperative radiation therapy to the tumor bed at the time of resection also might be considered. Protocols evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of preoperative radiation therapy and resection with intraoperative

  5. Spectrally Encoded Confocal Microscopy (SECM) for Diagnosing of Breast Cancer in Excision and Margin Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Brachtel, Elena F.; Johnson, Nicole B.; Huck, Amelia E.; Rice-Stitt, Travis L.; Vangel, Mark G.; Smith, Barbara L.; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Kang, Dongkyun

    2016-01-01

    A large percentage of breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving surgery need to undergo multiple surgeries due to positive margins found during post-operative margin assessment. Carcinomas could be removed completely during the initial surgery and additional surgery avoided if positive margins can be determined intra-operatively. Spectrally-encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology that has a potential to rapidly image the entire surgical margin at sub-cellular resolution and accurately determine margin status intra-operatively. In this paper, in order to test feasibility of using SECM for intra-operative margin assessment, we have evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of SECM for detecting various types of breast cancers. Forty-six surgically-removed breast specimens were imaged with a SECM system. Side-by-side comparison between SECM and histologic images showed that SECM images can visualize key histomorphologic patterns of normal/benign and malignant breast tissues. Small (500 µm × 500 µm) spatially-registered SECM and histologic images (n=124 for each) were diagnosed independently by three pathologists with expertise in breast pathology. Diagnostic accuracy of SECM for determining malignant tissues was high, average sensitivity of 0.91, specificity of 0.93, positive predictive value of 0.95, and negative predictive value of 0.87. Intra-observer agreement and inter-observer agreement for SECM were also high, 0.87 and 0.84, respectively. Results from this study suggest that SECM may be developed into an intra-operative margin assessment tool for guiding breast cancer excisions. PMID:26779830

  6. Substrate dependence of graphene reactivity towards hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.; Holroyd, C.; Clough, J.; Horn, A.; Koehler, S. P. K.; Casiraghi, C.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to functionalize graphene with several methods, such as radical reactions, cyclo-additions, hydrogenation, and oxidations, allows this material to be used in a large range of applications. In this framework, it is essential to be able to control the efficiency and stability of the functionalization process—this requires understanding how the graphene reactivity is affected by the environment, including the substrate. In this work we provide an insight on the substrate dependence of graphene reactivity towards hydrogenation by comparing three different substrates: silicon, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2). Although MoS2 and h-BN have flatter surfaces than silicon, we found that the H coverage of graphene on h-BN is about half of the H coverage on graphene on both silicon and MoS2. Therefore, graphene shows strongly reduced reactivity towards hydrogenation when placed on h-BN. The difference in hydrogenation reactivity between h-BN and MoS2 may indicate a stronger van der Waals force between graphene and h-BN, compared to MoS2, or may be related to the chemical properties of MoS2, which is a well-known catalyst for hydrogen evolution reactions.

  7. Reactive Nitrogen Intermediates in Giant Cell Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Astrid; Younge, Brian R.; Szweda, Luke; Mock, Bettina; Björnsson, Johannes; Moeller, Kerstin; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2002-01-01

    Arterial wall damage in giant cell arteritis (GCA) is mediated by several different macrophage effector functions, including the production of metalloproteinases and lipid peroxidation. Tissue-invading macrophages also express nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-2, but it is not known whether nitric oxide-related mechanisms contribute to the disease process. Nitric oxide can form nitrating agents, including peroxynitrite, a nitric oxide congener formed in the presence of reactive oxygen intermediates. Protein nitration selectively targets tyrosine residues and can result in a gain, as well as a loss, of protein function. Nitrated tyrosine residues in GCA arteries were detected almost exclusively on endothelial cells of newly formed microcapillaries in the media, whereas microvessels in the adventitia and the intima were spared. Nitration correlated with endothelial NOS-3 expression and not with NOS-2-producing macrophages, which preferentially homed to the hyperplastic intima. The restriction of nitration to the media coincided with the production of reactive oxygen intermediates as demonstrated by the presence of the toxic aldehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal. Depletion of tissue-infiltrating macrophages in human temporal artery-SCID mouse chimeras disrupted nitrotyrosine generation, demonstrating a critical role of macrophages in the nitration process that targeted medial microvessels. Thus, protein nitration in GCA is highly compartmentalized, reflecting the production of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen intermediates in the inflamed arterial wall. Heterogeneity of microvessels in NOS-3 regulation may be an additional determinant contributing to this compartmentalization and could explain the preferential targeting of newly generated capillary beds. PMID:12107096

  8. Transform continental margins - Part 2: A worldwide review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier de Lépinay, Marion; Loncke, Lies; Basile, Christophe; Roest, Walter R.; Patriat, Martin; Maillard, Agnès; De Clarens, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We present a global inventory of transform continental margins, based on both a worldwide comparison of continent-ocean boundary identifications with oceanic fracture zones traces, and a compilation of published regional studies. This inventory increases the number of identified transform margins from 29 to 78. These margins represent 16% of continental margins in cumulative length and 31% of non-convergent margins. We include morphological data, published upper crustal sections, continent to ocean transition locations and published Moho shape data in the new database. This review confirms that continent to ocean transitions are sharper at transform margins than at divergent margins. It also emphasizes the structural diversity of transform margins. Associated with one third of transform margins, we define marginal plateaus as a new type of relief that corresponds to a flat but deep surface inside the continental slope, and that may be inherited from crustal thinning prior to transform faulting. Transform margin initiation appears to be favoured along propagating oceans and within cold and thick lithospheres.

  9. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shujiang; Post, Wilfred M; Wang, Dali; Nichols, Dr Jeff A; Bandaru, Vara Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  10. Large margin classifier-based ensemble tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuru; Liu, Qiaoyuan; Yin, Minghao; Wang, ShengSheng

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, many studies consider visual tracking as a two-class classification problem. The key problem is to construct a classifier with sufficient accuracy in distinguishing the target from its background and sufficient generalize ability in handling new frames. However, the variable tracking conditions challenges the existing methods. The difficulty mainly comes from the confused boundary between the foreground and background. This paper handles this difficulty by generalizing the classifier's learning step. By introducing the distribution data of samples, the classifier learns more essential characteristics in discriminating the two classes. Specifically, the samples are represented in a multiscale visual model. For features with different scales, several large margin distribution machine (LDMs) with adaptive kernels are combined in a Baysian way as a strong classifier. Where, in order to improve the accuracy and generalization ability, not only the margin distance but also the sample distribution is optimized in the learning step. Comprehensive experiments are performed on several challenging video sequences, through parameter analysis and field comparison, the proposed LDM combined ensemble tracker is demonstrated to perform with sufficient accuracy and generalize ability in handling various typical tracking difficulties.

  11. Instability and Tsunamigenic Potential at Convergent Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Huene, R.; Ranero, C. R.; Watts, P.

    2001-12-01

    Along many convergent margins multibeam echosounding navigated with GPS has revealed large slope failures that were probably tsunamigenic. Bathymetric data combined with seismic reflection imaging indicate multiple causes. The 55-km wide Nicoya Slump resulted from the steepening slope above an underthrusting seamount on the subducting oceanic plate. This slump may have generated a 27-m high wave. Several 5-7 km wide mid-slope slides off central Nicaragua probably resulted from steepening of the continental slope by tectonic erosion. They may have generated waves 6-7 m high. A 30 km wide mid-slope slump off northern Peru may have generated a 5 m high wave. Its cause will not be understood without better seismic reflection imaging but considerable fluid venting was observed across its headwall. In the Gulf of Alaska a large slide appears to have resulted from rapid sedimentation. Tsunamigenic slope failure along convergent margins is only beginning to be resolved and the causes vary. Subducted ocean floor relief, tectonically steepened slopes, and sites of rapid sedimentation can help target potential failure and possible future tsunami hazards.

  12. Research priorities for zoonoses and marginalized infections.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a review and analysis of the research landscape for zoonoses and marginalized infections which affect poor populations, and a list of research priorities to support disease control. The work is the output of the Disease Reference Group on Zoonoses and Marginalized Infectious Diseases of Poverty (DRG6), which is part of an independent think tank of international experts, established and funded by the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR), to identify key research priorities through review of research evidence and input from stakeholder consultations. The report covers a diverse range of diseases, including zoonotic helminth, protozoan, viral and bacterial infections considered to be neglected and associated with poverty. Disease-specific research issues are elaborated under individual disease sections and many common priorities are identified among the diseases such as the need for new and/or improved drugs and regimens, diagnostics and, where appropriate, vaccines. The disease-specific priorities are described as micro priorities compared with the macro level priorities which will drive policy-making for: improved surveillance; interaction between the health, livestock, agriculture, natural resources and wildlife sectors in tackling zoonotic diseases; and true assessment of the burden of zoonoses. This is one often disease and thematic reference group reports that have come out of the TDR Think Tank, all of which have contributed to the development of the Global Report search on Infectious Diseases of Poverty, available at: w.who.int/tdr/stewardship/global_report/en/index.html.

  13. Review and Assessment of JPL's Thermal Margins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebes, G.; Kingery, C.; Farguson, C.; White, M.; Blakely, M.; Nunes, J.; Avila, A.; Man, K.; Hoffman, A.; Forgrave, J.

    2012-01-01

    JPL has captured its experience from over four decades of robotic space exploration into a set of design rules. These rules have gradually changed into explicit requirements and are now formally implemented and verified. Over an extended period of time, the initial understanding of intent and rationale for these rules has faded and rules are now frequently applied without further consideration. In the meantime, mission classes and their associated risk postures have evolved, coupled with resource constraints and growing design diversity, bringing into question the current "one size fits all" thermal margin approach. This paper offers a systematic review of the heat flow path from an electronic junction to the eventual heat rejection to space. This includes the identification of different regimes along this path and the associated requirements. The work resulted in a renewed understanding of the intent behind JPL requirements for hot thermal margins and a framework for relevant considerations, which in turn enables better decision making when a deviation to these requirements is considered.

  14. Hydrocarbon source potential in Brazilian margin basins

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, M.R.; Estrella, G.D.O.; Gaglianone, P.C.

    1984-04-01

    Twenty thousand samples from the Brazilian continental shelf basins were analyzed to characterize and evaluate the hydrocarbon source potential of the areas. The geochemical evaluation of the rock and oil samples was performed by organic carbon determinations, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, vitrinite reflectance, thermal alteration index, liquid and gas chromatographies, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and carbon isotope analyses. Three source rock systems have been identified: lower Neocomian shales deposited in a continental environment, upper Neocomian shales grading from continental to lagoonal environment, and Aptian shales related to evaporitic and lacustrine sequences. Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary open marine slope sediments are not considered as source rocks. Locally, these sediments present high organic carbon content but show an extremely poor hydrocarbon yield. Anoxic depositional conditions, nevertheless, can be traced locally along some levels of the Santonian to Cenomanian shales and marls. These sediments are generally immature in the Brazilian margin basins and no oil was generated from this section. Three oil families were distinguished through oil-to-oil and oil-to-source rock correlations: the lower Neocomian continental type, the upper Neocomian continental to lagoonal type, and the Aptian evaporitic to lacustrine related sequences. The geochemical studies, together with geologic and geophysical data, provided the basis to display some models for the migration pathways and habitat of oils in the Brazilian margin basins.

  15. On recent developments in marginal separation theory

    PubMed Central

    Braun, S.; Scheichl, S.

    2014-01-01

    Thin aerofoils are prone to localized flow separation at their leading edge if subjected to moderate angles of attack α. Although ‘laminar separation bubbles’ at first do not significantly alter the aerofoil performance, they tend to ‘burst’ if α is increased further or if perturbations acting upon the flow reach a certain intensity. This then either leads to global flow separation (stall) or triggers the laminar–turbulent transition process within the boundary layer flow. This paper addresses the asymptotic analysis of the early stages of the latter phenomenon in the limit as the characteristic Reynolds number , commonly referred to as marginal separation theory. A new approach based on the adjoint operator method is presented that enables the fundamental similarity laws of marginal separation theory to be derived and the analysis to be extended to higher order. Special emphasis is placed on the breakdown of the flow description, i.e. the formation of finite-time singularities (a manifestation of the bursting process), and on its resolution being based on asymptotic arguments. The passage to the subsequent triple-deck stage is described in detail, which is a prerequisite for carrying out a future numerical treatment of this stage in a proper way. Moreover, a composite asymptotic model is developed in order for the inherent ill-posedness of the Cauchy problems associated with the current flow description to be resolved. PMID:24936013

  16. The genetics of nodal marginal zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Valeria; Khiabanian, Hossein; Messina, Monica; Monti, Sara; Cascione, Luciano; Bruscaggin, Alessio; Spaccarotella, Elisa; Holmes, Antony B.; Arcaini, Luca; Lucioni, Marco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Zairis, Sakellarios; Diop, Fary; Cerri, Michaela; Chiaretti, Sabina; Marasca, Roberto; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Deaglio, Silvia; Ramponi, Antonio; Tiacci, Enrico; Pasqualucci, Laura; Paulli, Marco; Falini, Brunangelo; Inghirami, Giorgio; Bertoni, Francesco; Foà, Robin; Rabadan, Raul; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Nodal marginal zone lymphoma (NMZL) is a rare, indolent B-cell tumor that is distinguished from splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) by the different pattern of dissemination. NMZL still lacks distinct markers and remains orphan of specific cancer gene lesions. By combining whole-exome sequencing, targeted sequencing of tumor-related genes, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, we aimed at disclosing the pathways that are molecularly deregulated in NMZL and we compare the molecular profile of NMZL with that of SMZL. These analyses identified a distinctive pattern of nonsilent somatic lesions in NMZL. In 35 NMZL patients, 41 genes were found recurrently affected in ≥3 (9%) cases, including highly prevalent molecular lesions of MLL2 (also known as KMT2D; 34%), PTPRD (20%), NOTCH2 (20%), and KLF2 (17%). Mutations of PTPRD, a receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase regulating cell growth, were enriched in NMZL across mature B-cell tumors, functionally caused the loss of the phosphatase activity of PTPRD, and were associated with cell-cycle transcriptional program deregulation and increased proliferation index in NMZL. Although NMZL shared with SMZL a common mutation profile, NMZL harbored PTPRD lesions that were otherwise absent in SMZL. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the genetics of NMZL, identify PTPRD lesions as a novel marker for this lymphoma across mature B-cell tumors, and support the distinction of NMZL as an independent clinicopathologic entity within the current lymphoma classification. PMID:27335277

  17. Introducing new reactivity descriptors: "Bond reactivity indices." Comparison of the new definitions and atomic reactivity indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Márquez, Jesús

    2016-11-01

    A new methodology to obtain reactivity indices has been defined. This is based on reactivity functions such as the Fukui function or the dual descriptor and makes it possible to project the information of reactivity functions over molecular orbitals instead of the atoms of the molecule (atomic reactivity indices). The methodology focuses on the molecule's natural bond orbitals (bond reactivity indices) because these orbitals (with physical meaning) have the advantage of being very localized, allowing the reaction site of an electrophile or nucleophile to be determined within a very precise molecular region. This methodology gives a reactivity index for every Natural Bond Orbital (NBO), and we have verified that they have equivalent information to the reactivity functions. A representative set of molecules has been used to test the new definitions. Also, the bond reactivity index has been related with the atomic reactivity one, and complementary information has been obtained from the comparison. Finally, a new atomic reactivity index has been defined and compared with previous definitions.

  18. Is earthquake activity along the French Atlantic margin favoured by local rheological contrasts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazabraud, Yves; Béthoux, Nicole; Delouis, Bertrand

    2013-09-01

    The seismological study of recent seismic crises near Oleron Island confirms the coexistence of an extensional deformation and a transtensive regime in the Atlantic margin of France, which is different from the general western European stress field corresponding to a strike-slip regime. We argue that the switch of the principal stress axes σ1/σ2 in a NW-SE vertical plane is linked with the existence of crustal heterogeneities. Events of magnitude larger than 5 sometimes occur along the Atlantic margin of France, such as the 7 September 1972 (ML = 5.2) earthquake near Oleron island and the 30 September 2002 (ML = 5.7) Hennebont event in Brittany. To test the mechanism of local strain localization, we model the deformation of the hypocentral area of the Hennebont earthquake using a 3D thermo-mechanical finite element code. We conclude that the occurrence of moderate earthquakes located in limited parts of the Hercynian shear zones (as the often reactivated swarms near Oleron) could be due to local reactivation of pre-existing faults. These sporadic seismic ruptures are favoured by stress concentration due to rheological heterogeneities.

  19. Isostatic and dynamic support of high topography on a North Atlantic passive margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Vivi K.; Huismans, Ritske S.; Moucha, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Substantial controversy surrounds the origin of high topography along passive continental margins. Here we focus on the well-documented elevated passive margin in southwestern Scandinavia, and quantify the relative contributions of crustal isostasy and dynamic topography in controlling the present topography. We find that majority of the topography is compensated by the crustal structure, suggesting a topographic age that is in accord with the 400 Myr old Caledonian orogenesis. In addition, we propose that dynamic uplift of ∼300 m has rejuvenated existing topography locally in the coastal region over the last 10 Myr. Such uplift, combined with a general sea level fall, can help explain a variety of observations that have traditionally been interpreted in favor of a peneplain uplift model. We conclude that high topography along the Scandinavian margin cannot represent remnants of a peneplain uplifted within the last 20 Myr. The topography must have been high since the Caledonian orogeny.

  20. Seismic evidence for widespread serpentinized forearc upper mantle along the Cascadia margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Parsons, T.; Trehu, A.M.; Snelson, C.M.; Fisher, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Petrologic models suggest that dehydration and metamorphism of subducting slabs release water that serpentinizes the overlying forearc mantle. To test these models, we use the results of controlled-source seismic surveys and earthquake tomography to map the upper mantle along the Cascadia margin forearc. We find anomalously low upper-mantle velocities and/or weak wide-angle reflections from the top of the upper mantle in a narrow region along the margin, compatible with recent teleseismic studies and indicative of a serpentinized upper mantle. The existence of a hydrated forearc upper-mantle wedge in Cascadia has important geological and geophysical implications. For example, shearing within the upper mantle, inferred from seismic reflectivity and consistent with its serpentinite rheology, may occur during aseismic slow slip events on the megathrust. In addition, progressive dehydration of the hydrated mantle wedge south of the Mendocino triple junction may enhance the effects of a slap gap during the evolution of the California margin.

  1. Horizontal compressive stress regime on the northern Cascadia margin inferred from borehole breakouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M.; Malinverno, A.; Wang, K.; Goldberg, D.; Guerin, G.

    2016-09-01

    During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311 five boreholes were drilled across the accretionary prism of the northern Cascadia subduction zone. Logging-while-drilling borehole images are utilized to determine breakout orientations to define maximum horizontal compressive stress orientations. Additionally, wireline logging data at two of these sites and from Site 889 of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 146 are used to define breakouts from differences in the aperture of caliper arms. At most sites, the maximum horizontal compressive stress SHmax is margin-normal, consistent with plate convergence. Deviations from this trend reflect local structural perturbations. Our results do not constrain stress magnitudes. If the margin-normal compressional stress is greater than the vertical stress, the margin-normal SHmax direction we observe may reflect current locking of a velocity-weakening shallow megathrust and thus potential for trench-breaching, tsunamigenic rupture in a future megathrust earthquake.

  2. Reconstructing conjugate margins of the Canada-Amerasian basin: New tectonic constraints from deep seismic data and gravity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helwig, J.; Ady, B.; Kumar, N.; Granath, J. W.; Dinkelman, M. G.; Bird, D. E.; Emmet, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past 5 years, decreasing sea ice and increasing scientific and economic interest in the Arctic have prompted new geological and geophysical studies that advance knowledge of the northern continental margins of North America. We report here on ArcticSPAN™ 40-km deep, PSDM (Pre-Stack Depth Migrated) marine seismic reflection profiles and gravity data from the Beaufort Sea of Canada and the US Chukchi Sea that constrain the position of the continent-ocean boundary and the relict spreading center of the Canada Basin, displaying significant variations in the orientation, geometry and deep crustal structure of the passive margin facing the Arctic Ocean. In the Canadian Beaufort Sea three distinct segments of the margin correspond to contrasts of pre-rift foundations: 1. the rifted, rotated Arctic Alaska Terrane west of the Mackenzie Delta (Beaufort segment); 2. the transform-faulted Laurentian crust of the Tuktoyaktuk margin (Tuk segment); and, 3. the rifted Laurentian crust of the Banks Island segment. The thick late Mesozoic-Cenozoic clastic prism of the continental margin was centered in the Mackenzie delta area by Mesozoic rifting of the Canada Basin. The northerly Paleocene-Miocene sweep of Cordilleran deformation modified the passive margin, overprinting the offshore Mackenzie Delta. The interpreted tectonic architecture of the three segments of the Beaufort passive margin demonstrates their distinct roles in opening of the Canada Basin. Two conjugate rifted margin segments (Beaufort and Banks Island) and a linking transform fault margin (Tuk) formed during the separation of the Arctic Alaska Terrane from northwestern Laurentia, in accord with a Jurassic-Aptian rotational model of Canada Basin opening. But the orientation of the Tuk transform segment indicates that a single pole of rotation cannot describe the opening of the basin. Additional seismic profiles from investigations of the Chukchi Sea margin display passive margin structures and rift to pre

  3. Reactive attachment disorder.

    PubMed

    Hornor, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect affects the lives of many American children and can result in physical injury and disability as well as psychological trauma. Reactive attachment disorder (RAD) is one possible psychological consequence of child abuse and neglect for very young children, younger than 5 years of age. RAD is described as markedly disturbed and developmentally inappropriate social relatedness usually beginning before age 5 years. These behavioral manifestations are the direct result of and come after pathogenic care. To better understand RAD, it is first necessary to understand attachment; therefore, attachment theory is examined. Risk factors for the development of RAD are presented. Implications for pediatric nurse practitioner practice are explored. The pediatric nurse practitioner can play a vital role in recognizing RAD and ensuring that children with this disorder receive prompt mental health assessment and therapy.

  4. Reactive flow in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassart, Laurence; Suo, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    When guest atoms diffuse into a host solid and react, the host may flow inelastically. Often a reaction can stimulate flow in a host too brittle to flow under a mechanical load alone. We formulate a theory of reactive flow in solids by regarding both flow and reaction as nonequilibrium processes, and placing the driving forces for flow and reaction on equal footing. We construct chemomechanical rate-dependent kinetic models without yield strength. In a host under constant stress and chemical potential, flow will persist indefinitely, but reaction will arrest. We also construct chemomechanical yield surface and flow rule by extending the von Mises theory of plasticity. We show that the host under a constant deviatoric stress will flow gradually in response to ramp chemical potential, and will ratchet in response to cyclic chemical potential.

  5. Transform continental margins - part 1: Concepts and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews the geodynamic concepts and models related to transform continental margins, and their implications on the structure of these margins. Simple kinematic models of transform faulting associated with continental rifting and oceanic accretion allow to define three successive stages of evolution, including intra-continental transform faulting, active transform margin, and passive transform margin. Each part of the transform margin experiences these three stages, but the evolution is diachronous along the margin. Both the duration of each stage and the cumulated strike-slip deformation increase from one extremity of the margin (inner corner) to the other (outer corner). Initiation of transform faulting is related to the obliquity between the trend of the lithospheric deformed zone and the relative displacement of the lithospheric plates involved in divergence. In this oblique setting, alternating transform and divergent plate boundaries correspond to spatial partitioning of the deformation. Both obliquity and the timing of partitioning influence the shape of transform margins. Oblique margin can be defined when oblique rifting is followed by oblique oceanic accretion. In this case, no transform margin should exist in the prolongation of the oceanic fracture zones. Vertical displacements along transform margins were mainly studied to explain the formation of marginal ridges. Numerous models were proposed, one of the most used is being based on thermal exchanges between the oceanic and the continental lithospheres across the transform fault. But this model is compatible neither with numerical computation including flexural behavior of the lithosphere nor with timing of vertical displacements and the lack of heating related to the passing of the oceanic accretion axis as recorded by the Côte d'Ivoire-Ghana marginal ridge. Enhanced models are still needed. They should better take into account the erosion on the continental slope, and the level of coupling

  6. Envisioning and advancing marginalized men's health disparities scholarship: the marginality-cultural competence integrative framework (M-CCIF).

    PubMed

    Willis, Danny G; Porche, Demetrius J

    2006-05-01

    Given the current focus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on eliminating health disparities among minority populations, a substantive body of culturally competent scholarship about marginalized men's health disparities is needed to add knowledge about the complex features, processes, and relationships underlying health disparities, marginality, men's health, interventions, and clinical outcomes. Marginalized men in the United States suffer disproportionately from mental and chronic health problems. Historically disadvantaged, their voices have not been privileged in health care and clinical discourses. Utilizing the concepts of marginalization and culturally competent scholarship, an integrative framework has been created to facilitate clinicians and scholars in envisioning and advancing critical scholarship related to marginalized men's health disparities.

  7. Multiplicative update rules for concurrent nonnegative matrix factorization and maximum margin classification.

    PubMed

    Zoidi, Olga; Tefas, Anastasios; Pitas, Ioannis

    2013-03-01

    The state-of-the-art classification methods which employ nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) employ two consecutive independent steps. The first one performs data transformation (dimensionality reduction) and the second one classifies the transformed data using classification methods, such as nearest neighbor/centroid or support vector machines (SVMs). In the following, we focus on using NMF factorization followed by SVM classification. Typically, the parameters of these two steps, e.g., the NMF bases/coefficients and the support vectors, are optimized independently, thus leading to suboptimal classification performance. In this paper, we merge these two steps into one by incorporating maximum margin classification constraints into the standard NMF optimization. The notion behind the proposed framework is to perform NMF, while ensuring that the margin between the projected data of the two classes is maximal. The concurrent NMF factorization and support vector optimization are performed through a set of multiplicative update rules. In the same context, the maximum margin classification constraints are imposed on the NMF problem with additional discriminant constraints and respective multiplicative update rules are extracted. The impact of the maximum margin classification constraints on the NMF factorization problem is addressed in Section VI. Experimental results in several databases indicate that the incorporation of the maximum margin classification constraints into the NMF and discriminant NMF objective functions improves the accuracy of the classification.

  8. Surgical margins in breast-conserving therapy: current trends and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, Alessandro; Lucchini, Roberta; Santoprete, Stefano; Bistoni, Giovanni; Avenia, Stefano; Triola, Roberto; Avenia, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate surgical margins represent a high risk for adverse clinical outcome in breast-conserving therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer. The majority of studies report positive resection margins in 20% to 40% of the patients who underwent BCT. This may result in an increased local recurrence (LR) rate or additional surgery and, consequently, adverse effects on cosmesis, psychological distress, and health costs. In the literature, various risk factors are reported to be associated with positive margin status after lumpectomy, which may allow the surgeon to distinguish those patients with a higher “a priori” risk for re-excision. However, most risk factors are related to tumor biology and patient characteristics, which cannot be modified as such. Therefore, efforts to reduce the number of positive margins should focus on optimizing the surgical procedure itself, because the surgeon lacks real time intraoperative information on the presence of positive resection margins during breast-conserving surgery. This review presents the status of pre- and intraoperative modalities currently used in BCT. Furthermore, innovative intraoperative approaches, such as positron emission tomography, radio-guided occult lesion localization, and near-infrared fluorescence optical imaging, are addressed, which have to prove their potential value in improving surgical outcome and reducing the need for re-excision in BCT.

  9. Fate of marginal neuroblasts in the vomeronasal epithelium of adult mice.

    PubMed

    De La Rosa-Prieto, C; Saiz-Sanchez, D; Ubeda-Bañon, I; Argandoña-Palacios, L; Garcia-Muñozguren, S; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2009-12-10

    Chemical stimuli are sensed through the olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia, and the sensory cells of both systems undergo neuronal turnover during adulthood. In the vomeronasal epithelium, stem cells adjacent to the basal lamina divide and migrate to replace two classes of sensory neurons: apical neurons that express G(i2alpha)-linked V1R vomeronasal receptors and project to the anterior accessory olfactory bulb, and basal neurons that express G(oalpha)-linked V2R receptors and project to the posterior accessory olfactory bulb. Most of the dividing cells are present in the margins of the epithelium and only migrate locally. Previous studies have suggested that these marginal cells may participate in growth, sensory cell replacement or become apoptotic before maturation; however, the exact fate of these cells have remained unclear. In this work we investigated the fate of these marginal cells by analyzing markers of neurogenesis (bromodeoxyuridine incorporation), apoptosis (caspase-3), and neuronal maturation (olfactory marker protein and Neurotrace Nissl stain). Our data reveal a pool of dividing cells in the epithelial margins that predominantly give rise to mature neurons and only rarely undergo apoptosis. Newly generated cells are several times more numerous than apoptotic cells. These marginal neuroblasts could therefore constitute a net neural addition zone during adulthood.

  10. Investigating Continental Margins: An Activity to Help Students Better Understand the Continental Margins of North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poli, Maria-Serena; Capodivacca, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Continental margins are an important part of the ocean floor. They separate the land above sea level from the deep ocean basins below and occupy about 11% of Earth's surface. They are also economically important, as they harbor both mineral resources and some of the most valuable fisheries in the world. In this article students investigate North…

  11. Talking (and Not Talking) about Race, Social Class and Dis/Ability: Working Margin to Margin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferri, Beth A.; Connor, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine some of the omnipresent yet unacknowledged discourses of social and economic disadvantage and dis/ability within schools in the US. First, we document ways that social class, race, and dis/ability function within schools to further disadvantage and exclude already marginalized students. Next, we show how particular ways…

  12. Marginalized, Not Marginal: Adult Education's Unique Contribution to the Fight against HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, John P.

    2005-01-01

    As the North American HIV/AIDS epidemic enters its third decade, marginalized communities remain disproportionately vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. What contributions has adult education made so far--and how might it play an increased role in the future?

  13. Neotectonic evolution of the Brazilian northeastern continental margin based on sedimentary facies and ichnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandini, Rosana; Rossetti, Dilce de Fátima; Netto, Renata Guimarães; Bezerra, Francisco Hilário Rego; Góes, Ana Maria

    2014-09-01

    Quaternary post-Barreiras sediments are widespread along Brazil's passive margin. These deposits are well exposed in the onshore Paraíba Basin, which is one of the rift basins formed during the Pangean continental breakup. In this area, the post-Barreiras sediments consist of sandstones with abundant soft-sediment deformation structures related to seismicity contemporaneous with deposition. The trace fossils Thalassinoides and Psilonichnus are found up to 38 m above modern sea level in sandstones dated between 60.0 (± 1.4) and 15.1 (± 1.8) ka. The integration of ichnological and sedimentary facies suggests nearshore paleoenvironments. Such deposits could not be related to eustatic sea-level rise, as this time coincides with the last glaciation. Hence, an uplift of 0.63 mm/yr, or 1.97 mm/yr if sea level was 80 m lower in the last glaciation, would have been required to ascend the post-Barreiras sediments several meters above the present-day sea level during the last 60 ka. This would suggest that the post-rift stage of the South American eastern passive margin may have experienced tectonic reactivation more intense than generally recognized. Although more complete data are still needed, the information presented herein may play an important role in studies aiming to decipher the Quaternary evolution of this passive margin.

  14. Multifunctional fuel additives and compositions thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a liquid fuel composition. It comprises a major proportion of liquid fuel and a minor proportion of an additive product of reaction made by reacting under esterification conditions comonomers of a diaminodiol or combination of diaminodiols, and a reactive acid and/or anhydride derived from the reaction of pyromellitic dianhydride or its acid equivalent with an aminoalcohol, the product of a secondary amine and an epoxide.

  15. Transition from magma dominant to magma poor rifting along the Nova Scotia Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, K. H.; Louden, K. E.; Nedimović, M. R.; Whitehead, M.; Farkas, A.; Watremez, L.; Dehler, S. A.

    2011-12-01

    OCTOPUS survey, wide-angle seismic data along a 240-km-long margin parallel profile extending from the central to the northern margin segments along an existing industry MCS profile (Ion/GX Technology NovaSPAN 5100). Twenty OBSs at 10-km spacing were analysed. A preliminary p-wave velocity model along the profile indicates that the cross-strike structures are continuous within the OCT. However, a substantial anisotropy in velocity (~8% lower parallel to the margin) is observed within the OCT. This result is consistent with an interpretation of partially serpentinized mantle that flowed perpendicular to the margin during its extension. In addition, along strike variations are also observed along the profile, which suggest a higher degree of volcanism and a thinner layer of serpentinized mantle to the southwest. These results provide a framework for future studies to the southwest to further investigate the transition to a magma-dominant regime towards the US East Coast.

  16. Engine Development Design Margins Briefing Charts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentz, Chuck

    2006-01-01

    New engines experience durability problems after entering service. The most prevalent and costly is the hot section, particularly the high-pressure turbine. The origin of durability problems can be traced back to: 1) the basic aero-mechanical design systems, assumptions, and design margins used by the engine designers, 2) the available materials systems, and 3) to a large extent, aggressive marketing in a highly competitive environment that pushes engine components beyond the demonstrated capability of the basic technology available for the hardware designs. Unfortunately the user must operate the engine in the service environment in order to learn the actual thrust loading and the time at max effort take-off conditions used in service are needed to determine the hot section life. Several hundred thousand hours of operational service will be required before the demonstrated reliability of a fleet of engines or the design deficiencies of the engine hot section parts can be determined. Also, it may take three to four engine shop visits for heavy maintenance on the gas path hardware to establish cost effective build standards. Spare parts drive the oerator's engine maintenance costs but spare parts also makes lots of money for the engine manufacturer during the service life of an engine. Unless competition prevails for follow-on engine buys, there is really no motivation for an OEM to spend internal money to improve parts durability and reduce earnings derived from a lucrative spare parts business. If the hot section life is below design goals or promised values, the OEM migh argue that the engine is being operated beyond its basic design intent. On the other hand, the airframer and the operator will continue to remind the OEM that his engine was selected based on a lot of promises to deliver spec thrust with little impact on engine service life if higher thrust is used intermittently. In the end, a standoff prevails and nothing gets fixed. This briefing will propose

  17. Adaptive limit margin detection and limit avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavrucuk, Ilkay

    This thesis concerns the development of methods, algorithms, and control laws for the development of an adaptive flight envelope protection system to be used for both manned and unmanned aircraft. The proposed method lifts the requirement for detailed a priori information of aircraft dynamics by enabling adaptation to system uncertainty. The system can be used for limits that can be either measured or related to selected measurable quantities. Specifically, an adaptive technique for predicting limit margins and calculating the corresponding allowable control or controller command margins of an aircraft is described in an effort to enable true carefree maneuvering. This new approach utilizes adaptive neural network based loops for the approximation of required aircraft dynamics. For limits that reach their maximum value in steady state, a constructed estimator model is used to predict the maneuvering quasi-steady response behavior---the so called dynamic trim---of the limit parameters and the corresponding control or command margins. Linearly Parameterized Neural Networks as well as Single Hidden Layer Neural Networks are used for on-line adaptation. The approach does not require any off-line training of the neural networks, instead all learning is achieved during flight. Lyapunov based weight update laws are derived. The method is extended for multi-channelled control limiting for aircraft subject to multiple limits, and for automatic control and command limiting for UAV's. Simulation evaluations of the method using a linear helicopter model and a nonlinear Generalized Tiltrotor Simulation (GTRSIM) model are presented. Limit avoidance methods are integrated and tested through the implementation of an artificial pilot model and an active-stick controller model for tactile cueing in the tiltrotor simulation, GTRSIM. Load factor, angle-of-attack, and torque limits are considered as examples. Similarly, the method is applied to the Georgia Tech's Yamaha R-Max (GTMax

  18. Subduction Variability Along the Active Chilean Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, C. J.; Barckhausen, U.; Bartsch, H.; Block, M.; Boennemann, C.; Diaz-Naveas, J. L.; Flueh, E. R.; Delisle, G.; Gaedicke, C.; Kopp, H.; Krawczyk, C. M.; Kus, J.; Ladage, S.; Ranero, C.; Schreckenberger, B.; Stoll, J. B.; Urbina, O.; Wiedicke-Hombach, M.

    2002-12-01

    The presence of different subduction modes in the convergence process between the Nazca and South-American plates along the Chilean margin is known from previous investigations. In order to study this variability in detail a comprehensive combined off- and onshore geo-scientific survey (SPOC) was recently conducted between Coquimbo and Valdivia in collaboration between a number of German and Chilean institutions. Major focus was also put on the structure of the sedimentary forearc basins and the distribution of gas hydrates along the slope. SPOC is the successor project to a similar experiment named CINCA that was earlier performed in the far north of Chile between Arica and Taltal. The SPOC results clearly show a change in subduction mode at about 33 deg S where the Juan Fernandez Ridge presently strikes the margin. North of that latitude, structural features such as extensional fracturing of the continental slope, very little or almost no sedimentary trench fill, intensive block faulting of the oceanic crust, a missing accretionary wedge, a very narrow shelf and other facts provide evidence for subduction erosion in that region. South of 33 deg S, we observed significantly steeper frontal slope angles and much less inclination of the oceanic crust toward the trench. In general, the topography of the oceanic crust is relatively smooth with the exception of several seamounts and fracture zones. Moreover, the width of the trench and of the shelf significantly widens toward the south, and pronounced forearc basins developed. Compared to the thick sedimentary trench fill of up to 2 km a very narrow accretionary wedge was encountered. Preliminary mass balancing combined with the assumption that the high present convergence rate occurred also in the past suggests that the bulk of the trench sediments is removed by subduction. Thus, accretionary processes can play only a subordinate or intermittent role. Geological seafloor samples support the assumption that small- to

  19. Additive Similarity Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  20. In silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Tim; Lewis, Richard; Luker, Tim; Bonnert, Roger; Bernstein, Michael A.; Birkinshaw, Timothy N.; Thom, Stephen; Wenlock, Mark; Paine, Stuart

    2011-11-01

    Drugs and drug candidates containing a carboxylic acid moiety, including many widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often metabolized to form acyl glucuronides (AGs). NSAIDs such as Ibuprofen are amongst the most widely used drugs on the market, whereas similar carboxylic acid drugs such as Suprofen have been withdrawn due to adverse events. Although the link between these AG metabolites and toxicity is not proven, there is circumstantial literature evidence to suggest that more reactive acyl glucuronides may, in some cases, present a greater risk of exhibiting toxic effects. We wished therefore to rank the reactivity of potential new carboxylate-containing drug candidates, and performed kinetic studies on synthetic acyl glucuronides to benchmark our key compounds. Driven by the desire to quickly rank the reactivity of compounds without the need for lengthy synthesis of the acyl glucuronide, a correlation was established between the degradation half-life of the acyl glucuronide and the half life for the hydrolysis of the more readily available methyl ester derivative. This finding enabled a considerable broadening of chemical property space to be investigated. The need for kinetic measurements was subsequently eliminated altogether by correlating the methyl ester hydrolysis half-life with the predicted 13C NMR chemical shift of the carbonyl carbon together with readily available steric descriptors in a PLS model. This completely in silico prediction of acyl glucuronide reactivity is applicable within the earliest stages of drug design with low cost and acceptable accuracy to guide intelligent molecular design. This reactivity data will be useful alongside the more complex additional pharmacokinetic exposure and distribution data that is generated later in the drug discovery process for assessing the overall toxicological risk of acidic drugs.

  1. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  2. On safety margin for drug interchangeability.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiayin; Chow, Shein-Chung; Song, Fuyu

    2016-12-02

    As more and more generic (or biosimilar) drug products become available in the market place, it is a concern whether the approved generic (or biosimilar) drug products are safe and efficacious and hence can be used interchangeably. According to current regulation, most regulatory agencies such as the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) indicate an approved generic (or biosimilar) drug product can serve as a substitute for the innovative drug product. Bioequivalence (biosimilarity) assessment for regulatory approval among generic copies (or biosimilars) of the innovative drug product are not required. In practice, approved generic (or biosimilar) drugs are commonly used interchangeably without any mechanism of safety monitoring. In this article, current bioequivalence (or biosimilarity) limit is adjusted according to the observed geometric mean ratio and corresponding variability for development of safety margins for monitoring of drug interchangeability by minimizing the relative change in response with and without the switching.

  3. Northeast Atlantic Igneous Province volcanic margin development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mjelde, R.; Breivik, A. J.; Faleide, J. I.

    2009-04-01

    Early Eocene continental breakup in the NE Atlantic Volcanic Province (NAIP) was associated with voluminous extrusive and intrusive magmatism, and initial seafloor spreading produced anomalously thick oceanic crust. Recent publications based on crustal-scale wide-angle seismic data show that there is a positive correlation between igneous crustal thickness (H) and average P-wave velocity (Vp) on all investigated margins in the NAIP. Vp can be used as a proxy for crustal composition, which can be related to the mode of mantle melting. A positive H-Vp correlation indicates that excessive mantle melting the first few million years after breakup was driven by an initial increased temperature that cools off as seafloor spreading develops, consistent with a mantle plume model. Variations in mantle composition can explain excess magmatism, but will generate a negative H-Vp correlation. Active mantle convection may increase the flux of mantle rocks through the melting zone above the rate of passive corner flow, which can also produce excessive magmatism. This would produce little H-Vp correlation, and place the curve lower than the passive flow melting curve in the diagram. We have compiled earlier published results with our own analyses of published and unpublished data from different groups to look for systematic variations in the mantle melting mode along the NAIP margins. Earlier studies (Holbrook et al., 2002, White et al, 2008) on the southeast Greenland conjugate system, indicate that the thick igneous crust of the southern NAIP (SE Greenland ? Hatton Bank) was dominated by increased mantle temperature only, while magmatism closer to the southern side of and including the Greenland-Iceland-Færøy Ridge (GIFR) was created by combined temperature increase and active mantle convection. Recent publications (Breivik et al., 2008, White et al, 2008) north of the GIFR for the Norway Basin segment, indicate temperature dominated magmatism between the Jan Mayen Fracture

  4. Understanding Continental Margin Biodiversity: A New Imperative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Sibuet, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the deep continental margins (200-4,000 m) were perceived as monotonous mud slopes of limited ecological or environmental concern. Progress in seafloor mapping and direct observation now reveals unexpected heterogeneity, with a mosaic of habitats and ecosystems linked to geomorphological, geochemical, and hydrographic features that influence biotic diversity. Interactions among water masses, terrestrial inputs, sediment diagenesis, and tectonic activity create a multitude of ecological settings supporting distinct communities that populate canyons and seamounts, high-stress oxygen minimum zones, and methane seeps, as well as vast reefs of cold corals and sponges. This high regional biodiversity is fundamental to the production of valuable fisheries, energy, and mineral resources, and performs critical ecological services (nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, nursery and habitat support). It is under significant threat from climate change and human resource extraction activities. Serious actions are required to preserve the functions and services provided by the deep-sea settings we are just now getting to know.

  5. Understanding continental margin biodiversity: a new imperative.

    PubMed

    Levin, Lisa A; Sibuet, Myriam

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the deep continental margins (200-4,000 m) were perceived as monotonous mud slopes of limited ecological or environmental concern. Progress in seafloor mapping and direct observation now reveals unexpected heterogeneity, with a mosaic of habitats and ecosystems linked to geomorphological, geochemical, and hydrographic features that influence biotic diversity. Interactions among water masses, terrestrial inputs, sediment diagenesis, and tectonic activity create a multitude of ecological settings supporting distinct communities that populate canyons and seamounts, high-stress oxygen minimum zones, and methane seeps, as well as vast reefs of cold corals and sponges. This high regional biodiversity is fundamental to the production of valuable fisheries, energy, and mineral resources, and performs critical ecological services (nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, nursery and habitat support). It is under significant threat from climate change and human resource extraction activities. Serious actions are required to preserve the functions and services provided by the deep-sea settings we are just now getting to know.

  6. Structure and rheology of the lithosphere below southeastern margin of India and Sri Lanka, and its conjugate segment of the east Antarctica: Implications on early breakup history and margin formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao Gangumalla, Srinivasa; Radhakrishna, Munukutla

    2014-05-01

    The eastern continental margin of India has evolved as a consequence of rifting and breakup between India and east Antarctica during the early Cretaceous. Plate reconstruction models for the breakup of eastern Gondwanaland by many earlier workers have unambiguously placed the southeast margin of Sri Lanka and India together as a conjugate segment with the east Antarctica margin that extends from Gunnerus Ridge in the west to western Enderby basin in the east. In this study, we present results of integrated analysis of gravity, geoid, magnetic and seismic data from these two conjugate portions in order to examine the lithosphere structure and early seafloor spreading, style of breakup, continent-ocean boundary (COB) and rheological characteristics at these margins. The interpreted COB lies at a distance of 55-140 km on the side of southeast margin of Sri Lanka and India, whereas, it lies at a distance of 190-550 km on the side of east Antarctica margin. The seismic profiles and the constrained potential field models across these two segments do not show the existence of seaward dipping reflector sequences or magmatic underplating suggesting that these segments have not encountered major magmatic activity. While, significant crustal thinning/stretching is observed at the east Antarctic margin, the Cauvery offshore had experienced limited stretching with faulted Moho interface. Further, the conspicuous residual geoid low in the Cauvery offshore basin is inferred to be due to a continental crustal block. The modelled Lithosphere-Astenosphere Boundary (LAB) in these two margins is located around 110-120 km depth with slightly thicker lithosphere at the east Antarctica margin. In addition, the interpretation of magnetic anomalies provided structure of the oceanic crust generated through seafloor spreading processes with age and magnetization data constrained from the identified magnetic anomalies in the respective margins. Using the Bouguer coherence method, we computed

  7. Reactivity of San Andres dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.S. )

    1991-05-01

    The San Andres formation is routinely stimulated with acid. Although numerous acidizing simulators are available to aid in treatment optimization, existing reactivity data were generated with quarried rock rather than formation samples. This paper presents reactivity data for five San Andres dolomite samples. These data can be used in most fracture-acidizing-design simulators to allow more accurate simulation of the acidizing process.

  8. Localized Deformation along an Inverted Rifted Margin: Example of the Northern Ligurian Margin, Western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SAGE, F.; Beslier, M.; Mercier De Lepinay, B. F.; Béthoux, N.; Gaullier, V.; Larroque, C.; Corradi, N.; Schenini, L.; Dessa, J.; Bigot, A.; Migeon, S.; Ruiz-Constán, A.

    2013-12-01

    Along rifted margins, continental edges are heterogeneous systems that juxtapose lithospheres with different nature, mechanical behavior and structural inheritance. In this study, we focus on the northern Ligurian margin to examine how such complex systems might deform when they are submitted to a compressive stress field. The northern Ligurian margin, of Oligo-Miocene age, has been undergoing contraction over at least the past ~ 6 Ma. Active thrust faults and folds responsible for the regional uplift of the continental edge have previously been identified below the margin. Although seismicity extends as far as the axis of the basin, no recent or active crustal compressional structure has been identified so far in the oceanic domain. We used new 12-channel high-resolution seismic data (FABLES cruise, 2012) and other seismic reflexion lines from the last decades to image the sedimentary cover in the Ligurian oceanic basin, down to the bottom of the Messinian salt layer ~ 3 km below the seafloor. Because the Messinian event is well dated over the Mediterranean (5.96-5.32 Ma) and well identified in the seismic data, it forms a clear marker characterizing the recent deformation related to both salt and crustal tectonics. Noticeable deformation within the oceanic domain is restricted to large, SW-NE elongated salt walls located 10 to 40 km from the margin toe, over a 70-km length. The salt walls have a specific structure and arrangement that cannot result from salt tectonics only. We thus interpret them as resulting from combined deep-seated crustal and thin-skinned deformations. However, although the salt walls are well expressed in the seafloor morphology, their seismic images do not reveal any significant vertical throw across their trace, and they gradually disappear toward the SW. We thus interpret the salt walls as strike-slip structures with possibly very moderate compression. Overall, the post-Messinian deformation taken along these features is likely moderate

  9. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  10. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  11. Numerical experiments on the influence of melt and serpentinization on passive margin structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, Joya; Buiter, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Passive margins are often classified as magma-rich or magma-poor, with distinctly different crustal architectures. For example, end-member magma-rich margins have thick sequences of seaward-dipping reflectors, short necking zones, and thick oceanic crusts, whereas many magma-poor margins have wide necking zones, hyper-extended crust, and exhumed serpentinized mantle. Melt and magmatic processes can strongly affect the mantle and crust during various stages of extension. At late stages of extension, serpentinization of upper mantle rocks will also affect crustal strength. We aim to study the influence of melt and serpentinization on structures developed during passive margin formation. Melt and serpentinization are two processes that can alter crust and mantle rheologic properties during different stages of extension. Introducing melt into a rift system will alter the thermal field, rheology, and density of crust and lithosphere. The presence of large amounts of melt (7-8%) in upper mantle rocks will significantly lower the viscosity. In addition, depleted mantle rocks can have significant loss of water that would result in raising the viscosity by about a factor of 100. Intrusion and underplating of magma to the lower crust can cause metamorphism and thus density and rheological changes of the surrounding crust. Furthermore, analogue experiments have shown that magmatic underplating will induce strain localization in the crust during extension. In regions such as the magma-poor margins of the North Atlantic, the serpentinization of mantle peridotites after sufficient thinning of continental crust can lead to strain localization that will subsequently affect the margin architecture. Upper mantle rocks become serpentinized at temperatures lower than 400 degrees when seawater infiltrates. The lower frictional properties that serpentinized peridotites have at these temperatures work to localize strain and allow detachment faults to form. We use 2D numerical experiments

  12. Do Medicare Advantage Plans Select Enrollees in Higher Margin Clinical Categories?

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P.; McWilliams, J. Michael; Price, Mary; Huang, Jie; Fireman, Bruce; Hsu, John

    2013-01-01

    of high margin HCC’s in Medicare more generally. These results do not permit a conclusion on overall social efficiency, but we note that selection according to margin could be socially efficient. In addition, our findings suggest there are omitted interaction terms in the risk adjustment model that Medicare currently uses. PMID:24308879

  13. Reactivity monitoring. Final report, Task 2

    SciTech Connect

    Reier, M.; Ching, J.

    1980-05-05

    A study has been made of a pulsed neutron technique which can be used to estimate the reactivity worth of spent fuel assemblies prior to storage. Nuclear design has been performed of a subcritical facility which can accommodate a test assembly of fresh fuel as well as one with a high degree of burnup. Calculations include the k/sub eff/ of the system and the gamma shielding required to protect personnel and instrumentation from fission product radiation. In addition, the technique and relevant equations to analyze the data are discussed. The calculations indicate that the technique can provide a rough differentiation between assemblies based on reactivity. However, practical problems involving the shield and neutron source impose severe limitations on the use of this method.

  14. Identification and Optimization of Short Helical Peptides with Novel Reactive Functionality as Catalysts for Acyl Transfer by Reactive Tagging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-21

    spectrograms, reactive tag synthesis and their physical data, library hits mass-spectrograms, CD spectra, NOE spectra, cartoon representations of peptide...with reactive tag RT2 to look for hits that additionally have competitive deacylation properties . In this mode, the tagging time was extended so that...In prin- ciple, beads displaying a fast k1 (acylation) and a competent deacylation (k3) should have good catalytic properties . This two step treatment

  15. Formation and evolution of magma-poor margins, an example of the West Iberia margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Andres-Martinez, Miguel; Morgan, Jason P.; Ranero, Cesar R.; Reston, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The West Iberia-Newfoundland (WIM-NF) conjugate margins have been geophysically and geologically surveyed for the last 30 years and have arguably become a paradigm for magma-poor extensional margins. Here we present a coherent picture of the WIM-NF rift to drift evolution that emerges from these observations and numerical modeling, and point out important differences that may exist with other magma-poor margins world-wide. The WIM-NF is characterized by a continental crust that thins asymmetrically and a wide and symmetric continent-ocean transition (COT) interpreted to consist of exhumed and serpentinised mantle with magmatic products increasing oceanward. The architectural evolution of these margins is mainly dominated by cooling under very slow extension velocities (<~6 mm/yr half-rate) and a lower crust that most probably was not extremely weak at the start of rifting. These conditions lead to a system where initially deformation is distributed over a broad area and the upper, lower crust and lithosphere are decoupled. As extension progresses upper, lower, crust and mantle become tightly coupled and deformation localizes due to strengthening and cooling during rifting. Coupling leads to asymmetric asthenospheric uplift and weakening of the hanginwall of the active fault, where a new fault forms. This continued process leads to the formation of an array of sequential faults that dip and become younger oceanward. Here we show that these processes acting in concert: 1) reproduce the margin asymmetry observed at the WIM-NF, 2) explain the fault geometry evolution from planar, to listric to detachment like by having one common Andersonian framework, 3) lead to the symmetric exhumation of mantle with little magmatism, and 4) explain the younging of the syn-rift towards the basin centre and imply that unconformities separating syn- and post-rift may be diachronous and younger towards the ocean. Finally, we show that different lower crustal rheologies lead to different

  16. Hydrothermal reactivity of saponite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1983-01-01

    The nature and extent of the reactions of synthetic Fe-free saponite have been investigated under experimental hydrothermal conditions as a first step towards understanding saponite reactivity under relatively simple conditions. Saponite crystallizes from amorphous gel of ideal saponite composition within 7 days at 300o-550oC under P = 1 kbar. Reactions subsequent to this initial crystallization depend on reaction T and interlayer cations. Saponite is found to react hydrothermally, over a period of 200 days, at T down to 400oC, at least 150oC lower than previously reported, but showed no signs of reaction below 400oC. At 450oC, a mixture of talc/saponite and saponite/phlogopite clays forms from K-saponite via intracrystalline layer transformations, while above 450oC the initial K-saponite dissolves, with talc and phlogopite forming as discrete phases. After 200 days reactions at 400-450oC were not complete, so that given sufficient time to reach equilibrium, a lower hydrothermal stability limit for saponite is possible. Further study of the Fe-bearing saponite system will be required before experimental results can be applied to natural systems.-D.F.B.

  17. A marginal benefit approach for vaccinating influenza “superspreaders”

    PubMed Central

    Skene, Katherine J.; Paltiel, A. David; Shim, Eunha; Galvani, Alison P.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is widespread recognition that interventions targeting “superspreaders” are more effective at containing epidemics than strategies aimed at the broader population. However, little attention has been devoted to determining optimal levels of coverage for targeted vaccination strategies, given the nonlinear relationship between program scale and the costs and benefits of identifying and successfully administering vaccination to potential superspreaders. Methods We developed a framework for such an assessment derived from a transmission model of seasonal influenza parameterized to emulate typical seasonal influenza epidemics in the US. We used this framework to estimate how the marginal benefit of expanded targeted vaccination changes with the proportion of the target population already vaccinated. Results The benefit of targeting additional superspreaders varies considerably as a function of both the baseline vaccination coverage and proximity to the herd immunity threshold. The general form of the marginal benefit function starts low, particularly for severe epidemics, increases monotonically until its peak at the point of herd immunity, and then plummets rapidly. Limitations We present a simplified transmission model, primarily designed to convey qualitative insight rather than quantitative precision. With appropriate contact data, future work could address more complex population structures, such as age structure and assortative mixing patterns. Our illustrative example highlights the general economic and epidemiological findings of our method, but does not contrive to address intervention design, policy, and resource allocation issues related to practical implementation of this particular scenario. Conclusions Our approach offers a means of estimating willingness to pay for search costs associated with targeted vaccination of superspreaders, which can inform policies regarding whether a targeted intervention should be implemented and, if so

  18. Suitability of marginal biomass-derived biochars for soil amendment.

    PubMed

    Buss, Wolfram; Graham, Margaret C; Shepherd, Jessica G; Mašek, Ondřej

    2016-03-15

    The term "marginal biomass" is used here to describe materials of little or no economic value, e.g. plants grown on contaminated land, food waste or demolition wood. In this study 10 marginal biomass-derived feedstocks were converted into 19 biochars at different highest treatment temperatures (HTT) using a continuous screw-pyrolysis unit. The aim was to investigate suitability of the resulting biochars for land application, judged on the basis of potentially toxic element (PTE) concentration, nutrient content and basic biochar properties (pH, EC, ash, fixed carbon). It was shown that under typical biochar production conditions the percentage content of several PTEs (As, Al, Zn) and nutrients (Ca, Mg) were reduced to some extent, but also that biochar can be contaminated by Cr and Ni during the pyrolysis process due to erosion of stainless steel reactor parts (average+82.8% Cr, +226.0% Ni). This can occur to such an extent that the resulting biochar is rendered unsuitable for soil application (maximum addition +22.5 mg Cr kg(-1) biochar and +44.4 mg Ni kg(-1) biochar). Biomass grown on land heavily contaminated with PTEs yielded biochars with PTE concentrations above recommended threshold values for soil amendments. Cd and Zn were of particular concern, exceeding the lowest threshold values by 31-fold and 7-fold respectively, despite some losses into the gas phase. However, thermal conversion of plants from less severely contaminated soils, demolition wood and food waste anaerobic digestate (AD) into biochar proved to be promising for land application. In particular, food waste AD biochar contained very high nutrient concentrations, making it interesting for use as fertiliser.

  19. Neoichnology at lake margins: Implications for paleo-lake systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, Jessica M. M.; Sheldon, Nathan D.

    2010-07-01

    Neoichnological studies provide significant information that can aid in the interpretation of ancient ichnological assemblages. Here we examine, for the first time, the pattern in both vertebrate and invertebrate trace distribution and abundance that can be seen in two geographically separate, but broadly analogous, contemporary semi-arid climate lake margin settings in an effort to describe taphonomic processes relevant to paleo-lake systems. Lake margin to supralittoral zone transects were made at Ruby Reservoir, Montana (USA) and La Sotonera, Spain and vegetation cover, trace cover %, trace diversity, and substrate characteristics were recorded. Similar patterns in trace distribution were seen through the eulittoral to supralittoral zones, with the majority of traces identified within a single transect present at both sites. However, a few traces attributed to larger organisms were found to be unique to each and in some instances, could to be assigned to a specific trace maker. The eulittoral zone was considered to have characteristics attributable to the Scoyenia ichnofacies, however, analysis of the supralittoral zone shows some characteristics of both the Coprinisphaera and the Mermia ichnofacies. In addition, a transitional zone between a Scoyenia-like ichnofacies and a fully terrestrial assemblage was found, which may enable continental ichnofacies to be further refined for application to paleo-lake systems. Study of the distribution of traces with distance along the transects also suggests taphonomic biases against the preservation of certain types of traces (e.g., avian) due to seasonal fluctuations of the lake level and the subsequent reduced preservation potential for lake-proximal traces.

  20. Analysis of System Margins on Missions Utilizing Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, David Y.; Landau, Damon; Randolph, Thomas; Timmerman, Paul; Chase, James; Sims, Jon; Kowalkowski, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has conducted a study focused on the analysis of appropriate margins for deep space missions using solar electric propulsion (SEP). The purpose of this study is to understand the links between disparate system margins (power, mass, thermal, etc.) and their impact on overall mission performance and robustness. It is determined that the various sources of uncertainty and risk associated with electric propulsion mission design can be summarized into three relatively independent parameters 1) EP Power Margin, 2) Propellant Margin and 3) Duty Cycle Margin. The overall relationship between these parameters and other major sources of uncertainty is presented. A detailed trajectory analysis is conducted to examine the impact that various assumptions related to power, duty cycle, destination, and thruster performance including missed thrust periods have on overall performance. Recommendations are presented for system margins for deep space missions utilizing solar electric propulsion.

  1. Evaluation of margin angles of collarless metal ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Dalvit, Deborah L; Parker, M Harry; Cameron, Stephen M; Hawkins, M Chad; Agar, John R; Brousseau, J Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the porcelain margin angles of completed collarless metal ceramic restorations and determine if these angles correspond to the most frequently recommended porcelain margin angle of 90 degrees. A sample of 99 metal ceramic restorations with porcelain labial margins were evaluated. A 1.0 mm slice taken from the midfacial impression of each restoration was evaluated by tooth location with a stereomaster microscope and the angle of the labial porcelain margin was calculated. The comparison of margin angles by tooth location showed no statistical difference between the groups. Comparison of the average margin angle with the most suggested 90-degree angle was analyzed with a One-Sample t-test and found to be statistically significant (p = 0.000). Although the majority of dental schools teach the shoulder preparation for collarless metal ceramic restorations, only 43% of the restorations measured fell within 10 degrees of this standard.

  2. [Clinical to planning target volume margins in prostate cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, F; Duvergé, L; Castelli, J; Nguyen, T D; Servagi-Vernat, S; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge of inter- and intrafraction motion and deformations of the intrapelvic target volumes (prostate, seminal vesicles, prostatectomy bed and lymph nodes) as well as the main organs at risk (bladder and rectum) allow to define rational clinical to planning target volume margins, depending on the different radiotherapy techniques and their uncertainties. In case of image-guided radiotherapy, prostate margins and seminal vesicles margins can be between 5 and 10mm. The margins around the prostatectomy bed vary from 10 to 15mm and those around the lymph node clinical target volume between 7 and 10mm. Stereotactic body radiotherapy allows lower margins, which are 3 to 5mm around the prostate. Image-guided and stereotactic body radiotherapy with adequate margins allow finally moderate or extreme hypofractionation.

  3. Upper mantle viscosity and dynamic subsidence of curved continental margins.

    PubMed

    Sacek, Victor; Ussami, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    Continental rifting does not always follow a straight line. Nevertheless, little attention has been given to the influence of rifting curvature in the evolution of extended margins. Here, using a three-dimensional model to simulate mantle dynamics, we demonstrate that the curvature of rifting along a margin also controls post-rift basin subsidence. Our results indicate that a concave-oceanward margin subsides faster than a convex margin does during the post-rift phase. This dynamic subsidence of curved margins is a result of lateral thermal conduction and mantle convection. Furthermore, the differential subsidence is strongly dependent on the viscosity structure. As a natural example, we analyse the post-rift stratigraphic evolution of the Santos Basin, southeastern Brazil. The differential dynamic subsidence of this margin is only possible if the viscosity of the upper mantle is >2-3 × 10(19) Pa s.

  4. Emerging role of infectious etiologies in the pathogenesis of marginal zone B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Emanuele; Bertoni, Francesco; Vannata, Barbara; Cavalli, Franco

    2014-10-15

    Extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphomas of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) arise from lymphoid populations that are induced by chronic inflammation in extranodal sites. The most frequently affected organ is the stomach, where MALT lymphoma is incontrovertibly associated with a chronic gastritis induced by a microbial pathogen, Helicobacter pylori. Gastric MALT lymphoma therefore represents a paradigm for evaluating inflammation-associated lymphomagenesis, which may lead to a deeper understanding of a possible etiologic association between other microorganisms and nongastric marginal zone lymphomas. Besides infectious etiology, chronic inflammation caused by autoimmune diseases, such as Sjögren syndrome or Hashimoto thyroiditis, can also carry a significant risk factor for the development of marginal zone lymphoma. In addition to the continuous antigenic drive, additional oncogenic events play a relevant role in lymphoma growth and progression to the point at which the lymphoproliferative process may eventually become independent of antigenic stimulation. Recent studies on MALT lymphomas have in fact demonstrated genetic alterations affecting the NF-κB) pathway, a major signaling pathway involved in many cancers. This review aims to present marginal zone lymphoma as an example of the close pathogenetic link between chronic inflammation and tumor development, with particular attention to the role of infectious agents and the integration of these observations into everyday clinical practice. See all articles in this CCR Focus section, "Paradigm Shifts in Lymphoma."

  5. Probabilistic margin evaluation on accidental transients for the ASTRID reactor project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquès, Michel

    2014-06-01

    ASTRID is a technological demonstrator of Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) under development. The conceptual design studies are being conducted in accordance with the Generation IV reactor objectives, particularly in terms of improving safety. For the hypothetical events, belonging to the accidental category "severe accident prevention situations" having a very low frequency of occurrence, the safety demonstration is no more based on a deterministic demonstration with conservative assumptions on models and parameters but on a "Best-Estimate Plus Uncertainty" (BEPU) approach. This BEPU approach ispresented in this paper for an Unprotected Loss-of-Flow (ULOF) event. The Best-Estimate (BE) analysis of this ULOFt ransient is performed with the CATHARE2 code, which is the French reference system code for SFR applications. The objective of the BEPU analysis is twofold: first evaluate the safety margin to sodium boiling in taking into account the uncertainties on the input parameters of the CATHARE2 code (twenty-two uncertain input parameters have been identified, which can be classified into five groups: reactor power, accident management, pumps characteristics, reactivity coefficients, thermal parameters and head losses); secondly quantify the contribution of each input uncertainty to the overall uncertainty of the safety margins, in order to refocusing R&D efforts on the most influential factors. This paper focuses on the methodological aspects of the evaluation of the safety margin. At least for the preliminary phase of the project (conceptual design), a probabilistic criterion has been fixed in the context of this BEPU analysis; this criterion is the value of the margin to sodium boiling, which has a probability 95% to be exceeded, obtained with a confidence level of 95% (i.e. the M5,95percentile of the margin distribution). This paper presents two methods used to assess this percentile: the Wilks method and the Bootstrap method ; the effectiveness of the two methods

  6. Fractal geometry of some Martian lava flow margins: Alba Patera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauhanen, K.

    1993-01-01

    Fractal dimension for a few lava flow margins on the gently sloping flanks of Alba Patera were measured using the structured walk method. Fractal behavior was observed at scales ranging from 20 to 100 pixels. The upper limit of the linear part of log(margin length) vs. log(scale) profile correlated well to the margin length. The lower limit depended on resolution and flow properties.

  7. Wheeling rates based on marginal-cost theory

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, H.M.; Erickson, B.W. )

    1989-11-01

    Knowledge of what rates for wheeling electric power would be, if based on marginal costs, is vital in the debate on how wheeling should be priced. This paper presents the first extensive computations of marginal costs of wheeling, and of rates based on these marginal costs. Sensitivities to losses, constraints, load levels, amount of power wheeled, revenue reconciliation, etc., are examined in the context of two case studies.

  8. Bounded Linear Stability Margin Analysis of Nonlinear Hybrid Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Boskovic, Jovan D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a bounded linear stability analysis for a hybrid adaptive control that blends both direct and indirect adaptive control. Stability and convergence of nonlinear adaptive control are analyzed using an approximate linear equivalent system. A stability margin analysis shows that a large adaptive gain can lead to a reduced phase margin. This method can enable metrics-driven adaptive control whereby the adaptive gain is adjusted to meet stability margin requirements.

  9. The Reactivity of Germanium Phosphanides with Chalcogens.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lisa M; Tam, Eric C Y; Cummins, Struan J W; Coles, Martyn P; Fulton, J Robin

    2017-03-06

    The reactivity of germanium phosphanido complexes with elemental chalcogens is reported. Addition of sulfur to [(BDI)GePCy2] (BDI = CH{(CH3)CN-2,6-iPr2C6H3}2) results in oxidation at germanium to form germanium(IV) sulfide [(BDI)Ge(S)PCy2] and oxidation at both germanium and phosphorus to form germanium(IV) sulfide dicylohexylphosphinodithioate complex [(BDI)Ge(S)SP(S)Cy2], whereas addition of tellurium to [(BDI)GePCy2] only gives the chalcogen inserted product, [(BDI)GeTePCy2]. This reactivity is different from that observed between [(BDI)GePCy2] and selenium. Addition of selenium to the diphenylphosphanido germanium complex, [(BDI)GePPh2], results in insertion of selenium into the Ge-P bond to form [(BDI)GeSePCy2] as well as the oxidation at phosphorus to give [(BDI)GeSeP(Se)Ph2]. In contrast, addition of selenium to the bis(trimethylsilyl)phosphanido germanium complex, [(BDI)GeP(SiMe3)2], yields the germanium(IV) selenide [(BDI)Ge(Se)P(SiMe3)2].

  10. Relational victimization and proactive versus reactive relational aggression: The moderating effects of respiratory sinus arrhythmia and skin conductance.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Caitlin R; Abaied, Jamie L

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the moderating effect of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) on the associations between relational victimization and reactive and proactive relational aggression. Both branches of the ANS, the parasympathetic nervous system (indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity; RSA-Reactivity) and the sympathetic nervous system (indexed by skin conductance level reactivity; SCL-Reactivity), were examined. Emerging adults (N = 168) self-reported on relational victimization and proactive and reactive relational aggression; RSA-Reactivity and SCL-Reactivity were assessed in response to a laboratory stressor. Relational victimization predicted heightened reactive relational aggression given RSA augmentation/high SCL-Reactivity (i.e., coactivation) and RSA withdrawal/low SCL-Reactivity (i.e., coinhibition). In addition, relational victimization predicted heightened reactive relational aggression given RSA augmentation/low SCL-Reactivity (i.e., reciprocal parasympathetic activation). This study extends previous research on relational victimization and provides novel evidence that (a) exposure to relational victimization is associated with reactive relational aggression, but not proactive relational aggression, and (b) parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system reactivity jointly moderate the link between relational victimization and reactive relational aggression.

  11. A corrected formulation for marginal inference derived from two-part mixed models for longitudinal semi-continuous data

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li; Farewell, Vernon T

    2013-01-01

    For semi-continuous data which are a mixture of true zeros and continuously distributed positive values, the use of two-part mixed models provides a convenient modelling framework. However, deriving population-averaged (marginal) effects from such models is not always straightforward. Su et al. presented a model that provided convenient estimation of marginal effects for the logistic component of the two-part model but the specification of marginal effects for the continuous part of the model presented in that paper was based on an incorrect formulation. We present a corrected formulation and additionally explore the use of the two-part model for inferences on the overall marginal mean, which may be of more practical relevance in our application and more generally. PMID:24201470

  12. Better numerical model for shape-dependent dose margin correction using model-based mask data preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yasuki; Kubota, Takao; Kouno, Kenji; Hagiwara, Kazuyuki; Matsushita, Shohei; Hara, Daisuke

    2013-06-01

    For the mask making community, maintaining acceptable dose margin has been recognized as a critical factor in the mask-making process. This is expected to be more critical for 20nm logic node masks and beyond. To deal with this issue, model-based mask data preparation (MB-MDP) had been presented as a useful method to obtain sufficient dose margin for these complex masks, in addition to reducing shot count. When the MB-MDP approach is applied in the actual mask production, the prediction of the dose margin and the CD in the finished mask is essential. This paper describes an improved model of mask process which predicts dose margin and CD in finished masks better compared with the single Gaussian model presented in previous work. The better predictions of this simple numerical model are confirmed with simulation by D2S and actual mask written by HOYA using JEOL JBX-3200MV.

  13. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2015-01-01

    The oceans' continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins, (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services. These include primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  14. The many ways to be marginal in a group.

    PubMed

    Ellemers, Naomi; Jetten, Jolanda

    2013-02-01

    Previous theory and research primarily address marginal group members on the path to achieve core membership status. The authors argue that these only represent one form of marginality and that there are many other ways to be marginal within the group. The authors develop a dynamic model in which marginality is conceptualized as resulting from group and individual negotiation about inclusion (the Marginality as Resulting From Group and Individual Negotiation About Inclusion [MARGINI] model), and where individual and group inclusion goals can converge (resulting in relatively stable forms of marginality) or diverge (resulting in less stable forms of marginality). When the marginal position is unstable, individuals can either be motivated to move toward or move further away from the group, and such changing inclusion goals are associated with different emotions and behaviors. The authors argue that one needs to understand the interplay between individual and group inclusion goals to predict and explain the full complexity and diversity of the behavior of marginal group members.

  15. Plate tectonic evolution of circum-Antarctic passive margins

    SciTech Connect

    Scotese, C.R.; Lawver, L.A.; Sclater, J.G.; Mayes, C.L.; Norton, I.; Royer, J.

    1987-05-01

    Passive margins that formed during the Late Jurassic and Cretaceous account for approximately 80% of the 15,000-km circumference of Antarctica. There are no passive margins younger than Late Cretaceous. Approximately 28% of these margins are Late Jurassic in age, 24% are Early Cretaceous in age, and the remaining 48% formed during the Late Cretaceous. The tectonic style of the rifting events that formed these margins varies considerably along the perimeter of Antarctica. In several areas the initiation of sea-floor spreading was preceded by a long period of extension and predrift stretching (Wilkes Land). Along other portions of the margin, rifting proceeded rapidly with little evidence for a lengthy phase of pre-drift extension (Queen Maud Land). Though extension is the dominant tectonic style, there is evidence for large-scale strike-slip movement associated with the early phases of continental breakup along the coasts of Crown Princess Martha Land and Victoria Land. Except for a short segment of the margin between the West Antarctic peninsula and Marie Byrdland, the Antarctic passive margins have not been affected by subsequent subduction-related compressive deformation. This presentation will review the plate tectonic evolution of the Circum-Antarctic passive margins during five time intervals: Early Jurassic, Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, mid-Cretaceous, and latest Cretaceous. A map illustrating the relative amounts of extension along the margin of Antarctica will be presented, and a computer animation illustrating the breakup of Gondwana from an Antarctic perspective will be shown.

  16. Comparative biogeochemistry-ecosystem-human interactions on dynamic continental margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levin, Lisa A.; Liu, Kon-Kee; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Breitburg, Denise L.; Cloern, James; Deutsch, Curtis; Giani, Michele; Goffart, Anne; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Lachkar, Zouhair; Limburg, Karin; Liu, Su-Mei; Montes, Enrique; Naqvi, Wajih; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rabouille, Christophe; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Swaney, Dennis P.; Wassman, Paul; Wishner, Karen F.

    2014-01-01

    The ocean’s continental margins face strong and rapid change, forced by a combination of direct human activity, anthropogenic CO2-induced climate change, and natural variability. Stimulated by discussions in Goa, India at the IMBER IMBIZO III, we (1) provide an overview of the drivers of biogeochemical variation and change on margins, (2) compare temporal trends in hydrographic and biogeochemical data across different margins (3) review ecosystem responses to these changes, (4) highlight the importance of margin time series for detecting and attributing change and (5) examine societal responses to changing margin biogeochemistry and ecosystems. We synthesize information over a wide range of margin settings in order to identify the commonalities and distinctions among continental margin ecosystems. Key drivers of biogeochemical variation include long-term climate cycles, CO2-induced warming, acidification, and deoxygenation, as well as sea level rise, eutrophication, hydrologic and water cycle alteration, changing land use, fishing, and species invasion. Ecosystem responses are complex and impact major margin services including primary production, fisheries production, nutrient cycling, shoreline protection, chemical buffering, and biodiversity. Despite regional differences, the societal consequences of these changes are unarguably large and mandate coherent actions to reduce, mitigate and adapt to multiple stressors on continental margins.

  17. Rifting and volcanism: Examples from volcanic rifted and magma-poor margins based on multichannel seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, D.

    2012-04-01

    Great efforts in the research of passive rifted margins in the last decades highlighted also that lots of open questions remain. A considerable controversy exists about the role of the mantle during rifting and the subsequent formation of oceanic crust and about the interaction of mantle and surface processes, i.e. the precise nature of volcanism in the rifting process. There are two end-member extremes of passive rifted margins. Volcanic rifted margins evolve by a combination of extension, and extensive extrusive flood volcanism over short time periods during breakup, manifested in reflection seismic data as seaward dipping reflectors. These margins are commonly related to mantle plumes; however, in the past years this has been questioned. Magma-poor rifted margins in contrast show wide extensional features as rotated faults blocks and detachment surfaces near the base of the continental crust, but limited magmatism that in addition seems to be delayed to post-breakup. In this presentation examples from three locations that are less frequently cited in the discussion about (either magma-poor or volcanic) rifted margins will be shown: The Laptev Sea margin in the Arctic Ocean, where the active Arctic mid-oceanic ridge meets continental lithosphere at a high angle, the southernmost South Atlantic with well expressed conjugate volcanic rifted margins in a comparably "simple" configuration, potentially influenced by a mantle plume, the Tristan hot spot, and the South China Sea that may represent an intermediary form of continental extension between the end member extremes. The role of (hot-spot related) volcanism during break-up will be discussed for the three example margins that evolved in the Early Cretaceous, the Paleocene and the Oligocene, respectively.

  18. A study of the mutational landscape of pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric nodal marginal zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Michael G; Bhaduri, Aparna; Chisholm, Karen M; Baker, Steven A; Ma, Lisa; Zehnder, James L; Luna-Fineman, Sandra; Link, Michael P; Merker, Jason D; Arber, Daniel A; Ohgami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric marginal zone lymphoma are two of the rarest B-cell lymphomas. These lymphomas occur predominantly in the pediatric population and show features distinct from their more common counterparts in adults: adult-type follicular lymphoma and adult-type nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Here we report a detailed whole-exome deep sequencing analysis of a cohort of pediatric-type follicular lymphomas and pediatric marginal zone lymphomas. This analysis revealed a recurrent somatic variant encoding p.Lys66Arg in the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) in 3 of 6 cases (50%) of pediatric-type follicular lymphoma. This specific point mutation was not detected in pediatric marginal zone lymphoma or in adult-type follicular lymphoma. Additional somatic point mutations in pediatric-type follicular lymphoma were observed in genes involved in transcription, intracellular signaling, and cell proliferation. In pediatric marginal zone lymphoma, no recurrent mutation was identified; however, somatic point mutations were observed in genes involved in cellular adhesion, cytokine regulatory elements, and cellular proliferation. A somatic variant in AMOTL1, a recurrently mutated gene in splenic marginal zone lymphoma, was also identified in a case of pediatric marginal zone lymphoma. The overall non-synonymous mutational burden was low in both pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric marginal zone lymphoma (4.6 mutations per exome). Altogether, these findings support a distinctive genetic basis for pediatric-type follicular lymphoma and pediatric marginal zone lymphoma when compared with adult subtypes and to one another. Moreover, identification of a recurrent point mutation in IRF8 provides insight into a potential driver mutation in the pathogenesis of pediatric-type follicular lymphoma with implications for novel diagnostic or therapeutic strategies. PMID:27338637

  19. Analysis of Bubble Plume Distributions to Evaluate Methane Hydrate Decomposition on the Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, U. K.; Johnson, H. P.; Salmi, M.; Solomon, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane gas is formed within the sediments of accretionary prisms by the biological and thermal degradation of organic matter. Some of this methane is trapped as solid-phase methane hydrate, the stability of which is temperature and pressure-dependent. Past fluctuations in global temperatures have resulted in the decomposition of continental margin gas hydrate reservoirs and subsequent emissions of methane, creating a positive feedback to global warming with additional impacts on the marine environment. Temperature data collected over the past four decades show that bottom water on the upper slope of the Washington State continental margin has undergone systematic warming. Thermal models of this heat propagation into the sediments indicate a 40 meter deepening of the methane hydrate stability depth (MHDS) that if correct, would suggest a preferential release of methane into the water column from these depths on the Cascadia margin. Location data for over 100 active methane seeps on the Cascadia margin were compiled from a variety of sources including research cruises, published literature, and local fishermen. Emission site locations show anomalous plume densities at depths associated with the MHDS, which lies at approximately 500 meters water depth in the NE Pacific. This supports the hypothesis that warming of seawater at intermediate depths due to contemporary climate change has begun to destabilize the Cascadia margin gas hydrate reservoir. While relatively small sample size and incomplete coverage due to the ad-hoc nature of data acquisition limit confidence in any conclusions drawn from this dataset, this study provides a framework for future analysis of methane plume distributions and supports the need for a comprehensive and systematic geophysical and geochemical examination of the Cascadia margin.

  20. Cenozoic magmatism in the northern continental margin of the South China Sea: evidence from seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiao; Wu, Shiguo; Dong, Dongdong

    2016-06-01

    Igneous rocks in the northern margin of the South China Sea (SCS) have been identified via high resolution multi-channel seismic data in addition to other geophysical and drilling well data. This study identified intrusive and extrusive structures including seamounts and buried volcanoes, and their seismic characteristics. Intrusive features consist of piercement and implicit-piercement type structures, indicating different energy input associated with diapir formation. Extrusive structures are divided into flat-topped and conical-topped seamounts. Three main criteria (the overlying strata, the contact relationship and sills) were used to distinguish between intrusive rocks and buried volcanos. Three criteria are also used to estimate the timing of igneous rock formation: the contact relationship, the overlying sedimentary thickness and seismic reflection characteristics. These criteria are applied to recognize and distinguish between three periods of Cenozoic magmatism in the northern margin of the SCS: before seafloor spreading (Paleocene and Eocene), during seafloor spreading (Early Oligocene-Mid Miocene) and after cessation of seafloor spreading (Mid Miocene-Recent). Among them, greater attention is given to the extensive magmatism since 5.5 Ma, which is present throughout nearly all of the study area, making it a significant event in the SCS. Almost all of the Cenozoic igneous rocks were located below the 1500 m bathymetric contour. In contrast with the wide distribution of igneous rocks in the volcanic rifted margin, igneous rocks in the syn-rift stage of the northern margin of the SCS are extremely sporadic, and they could only be found in the southern Pearl River Mouth basin and NW sub-sea basin. The ocean-continent transition of the northern SCS exhibits high-angle listric faults, concentrated on the seaward side of the magmatic zone, and a sharply decreased crust, with little influence from a mantle plume. These observations provide further evidence to

  1. Acquired reactive perforating collagenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Chengwen; Wang, Yao; Gong, Yu; Xu, Hui; Yu, Qian; Shi, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Reactive perforating collagenosis (RPC) is a rare form of transepithelial elimination, in which altered collagen is extruded through the epidermis. There are 2 types of RPC, acquired RPC (ARPC) and inherited RPC, while the latter is extremely rare. Here we report on 1 case of ARPC. Methods: A 73-year-old female was presented with strongly itchy papules over her back and lower limbs for 3 months. She denied the history of oozing or vesiculation. A cutaneous examination showed diffusely distributed multiple well-defined keratotic papules, 4 to 10 mm in diameter, on the bilateral lower limbs and back as well as a few papules on her chest and forearm. Scratching scars were over the resolved lesions while Koebner phenomenon was negative. The patient had a history of type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Laboratory examinations showed elevated blood glucose level. Skin lesion biopsy showed a well-circumscribed area of necrosis filled with a keratotic plug. Parakeratotic cells and lymphocytic infiltration could be seen in the necrosed area. In dermis, sparse fiber bundles were seen perforating the epidermis. These degenerated fiber bundles were notarized as collagen fiber by elastic fiber stain, suggesting a diagnosis of RPC. Results: Then a diagnosis of ARPC was made according to the onset age and the history of diabetes mellitus. She was treated with topical application of corticosteroids twice a day and oral antihistamine once a day along with compound glycyrrhizin tablets 3 times a day. And the blood glucose was controlled in a satisfying range. Two months later, a significant improvement was seen in this patient. Conclusion: Since there is no efficient therapy to RPC, moreover, ARPC is considered to be associated with some systemic diseases, the management of the coexisting disease is quite crucial. The patient in this case received a substantial improvement due to the control of blood glucose and application of compound glycyrrhizin tablets. PMID

  2. Differential expression of antimicrobial peptides in margins of chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Dressel, Stefanie; Harder, Jürgen; Cordes, Jesko; Wittersheim, Maike; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Sunderkötter, Cord; Gläser, Regine

    2010-07-01

    Skin wounds usually heal without major infections, although the loss of the mechanical epithelial barrier exposes the tissue to various bacteria. One reason may be the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMP) of which some [human beta-defensins (hBD) and LL-37] were recently shown to support additionally certain steps of wound healing. There are no studies which have compared expression patterns of different classes of AMP in chronic wounds. The aim of our study was therefore to analyse the expression profile of hBD-2, hBD-3, LL-37, psoriasin and RNase 7 by immunohistochemistry from defined wound margins of chronic venous ulcers. We detected a strong induction of psoriasin and hBD-2 in chronic wounds in comparison with healthy skin. Except for stratum corneum, no expression of RNase 7 and LL-37 was detected in the epidermis while expression of hBD-3 was heterogeneous. Bacterial swabs identified Staphylococcus aureus and additional bacterial populations, but no association between colonization and AMP expression was found. The differential expression of AMP is noteworthy considering the high bacterial load of chronic ulcers. Clinically, supplementation of AMP with the capability to enhance wound healing besides restricting bacterial overgrowth could present a physiological support for treatment of disturbed wound healing.

  3. Polylactides in additive biomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Poh, Patrina S P; Chhaya, Mohit P; Wunner, Felix M; De-Juan-Pardo, Elena M; Schilling, Arndt F; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; van Griensven, Martijn; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2016-12-15

    New advanced manufacturing technologies under the alias of additive biomanufacturing allow the design and fabrication of a range of products from pre-operative models, cutting guides and medical devices to scaffolds. The process of printing in 3 dimensions of cells, extracellular matrix (ECM) and biomaterials (bioinks, powders, etc.) to generate in vitro and/or in vivo tissue analogue structures has been termed bioprinting. To further advance in additive biomanufacturing, there are many aspects that we can learn from the wider additive manufacturing (AM) industry, which have progressed tremendously since its introduction into the manufacturing sector. First, this review gives an overview of additive manufacturing and both industry and academia efforts in addressing specific challenges in the AM technologies to drive toward AM-enabled industrial revolution. After which, considerations of poly(lactides) as a biomaterial in additive biomanufacturing are discussed. Challenges in wider additive biomanufacturing field are discussed in terms of (a) biomaterials; (b) computer-aided design, engineering and manufacturing; (c) AM and additive biomanufacturing printers hardware; and (d) system integration. Finally, the outlook for additive biomanufacturing was discussed.

  4. Additive Manufactured Product Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Wells, Doug; James, Steve; Nichols, Charles

    2017-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  5. Geodynamic models of convergent margin tectonics: transition from rifted margin to overthrust belt and consequences for foreland-basin development

    SciTech Connect

    Stockmal, G.S.; Beaumont, C.; Boutilier, R.

    1986-02-01

    A quantitative geodynamic model for overthrusting of a passive continental margin during attempted continental subduction demonstrates the mechanical and thermal coupling between overthrust loads, the lithosphere, and the associated foreland basin. The model treated the lithosphere as a two-dimensional nonuniform elastic plate whose strength is controlled thermally. The thermal and flexural evolution of a margin is followed from initial rifting and passive-margin development, through overthrusting and foreland-basin deposition, to postdeformational erosion.

  6. Mean-reversion in income over feed cost margins: evidence and implications for managing margin risk by US dairy producers.

    PubMed

    Bozic, M; Newton, J; Thraen, C S; Gould, B W

    2012-12-01

    With the increased volatility of feed prices, dairy farm managers are no longer concerned with managing only milk price volatility, but are considering the adoption of risk management programs that address income over feed cost (IOFC) margin risk. Successful margin risk management should be founded on an understanding of the behavior of IOFC margins. To that end, we have constructed forward IOFC margins using Class III milk, corn, and soybean meal futures prices. We focus on the characteristics of the term structure of forward IOFC margins, that is, the sequence of forward margins for consecutive calendar months, all observed on the same trading day. What is apparent from the shapes of these term structures is that both in times when margins were exceptionally high and in times when they were disastrously low, market participants expected that a reversal back to average margin levels would not come quickly, but rather would take up to 9 mo. Slopes of the forward margin term structure before and after most of the major swings in IOFC indicate these shocks were mostly unanticipated, whereas the time needed for recovery to normal margin levels was successfully predicted. This suggests that IOFC margins may exhibit slow mean-reverting, rather than predictable cyclical behavior, as is often suggested in the popular press. This finding can be exploited to design a successful catastrophic risk management program by initiating protection at 9 to 12 mo before futures contract maturity. As a case study, we analyzed risk management strategies for managing IOFC margins that used Livestock Gross Margin for Dairy Cattle insurance contracts and created 2 farm profiles. The first one represents dairy farms that grow most of their feed, whereas the second profile is designed to capture the risk exposure of dairy farms that purchase all their dairy herd, dry cow, and heifer feed. Our case study of this program encompasses the 2009 period, which was characterized by exceptionally

  7. Impact of Particle Aggregation on Nanoparticle Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, David

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of nanoparticles in the environment is expected to grow in the coming years due to their increasing pervasiveness in consumer and industrial applications. Once released into the environment, nanoparticles encounter conditions of pH, salinity, UV light, and other solution conditions that may alter their surface characteristics and lead to aggregation. The unique properties that make nanoparticles desirable are a direct consequence of their size and increased surface area. Therefore, it is critical to recognize how aggregation alters the reactive properties of nanomaterials, if we wish to understand how these properties are going to behave once released into the environment. The size and structure of nanoparticle aggregates depend on surrounding conditions, including hydrodynamic ones. Depending on these conditions, aggregates can be large or small, tightly packed or loosely bound. Characterizing and measuring these changes to aggregate morphology is important to understanding the impact of aggregation on nanoparticle reactive properties. Examples of decreased reactivity due to aggregation include the case where tightly packed aggregates have fewer available surface sites compared to loosely packed ones; also, photocatalytic particles embedded in the center of large aggregates will experience less light when compared to particles embedded in small aggregates. However, aggregation also results in an increase in solid-solid interfaces between nanoparticles. This can result in increased energy transfer between neighboring particles, surface passivation, and altered surface tension. These phenomena can lead to an increase in reactivity. The goal of this thesis is to examine the impacts of aggregation on the reactivity of a select group of nanomaterials. Additionally, we examined how aggregation impacts the removal efficiency of fullerene nanoparticles using membrane filtration. The materials we selected to study include ZnS---a metal chalcogenide

  8. Reactivities of Quinone Methides versus o-Quinones in Catecholamine Metabolism and Eumelanin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sugumaran, Manickam

    2016-01-01

    Melanin is an important biopolymeric pigment produced in a vast majority of organisms. Tyrosine and its hydroxylated product, dopa, form the starting material for melanin biosynthesis. Earlier studies by Raper and Mason resulted in the identification of dopachrome and dihydroxyindoles as important intermediates and paved way for the establishment of well-known Raper–Mason pathway for the biogenesis of brown to black eumelanins. Tyrosinase catalyzes the oxidation of tyrosine as well as dopa to dopaquinone. Dopaquinone thus formed, undergoes intramolecular cyclization to form leucochrome, which is further oxidized to dopachrome. Dopachrome is either converted into 5,6-dihydroxyindole by decarboxylative aromatization or isomerized into 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid. Oxidative polymerization of these two dihydroxyindoles eventually produces eumelanin pigments via melanochrome. While the role of quinones in the biosynthetic pathway is very well acknowledged, that of isomeric quinone methides, however, remained marginalized. This review article summarizes the key role of quinone methides during the oxidative transformation of a vast array of catecholamine derivatives and brings out the importance of these transient reactive species during the melanogenic process. In addition, possible reactions of quinone methides at various stages of melanogenesis are discussed. PMID:27657049

  9. Adjoint operator approach in marginal separation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Stefan; Scheichl, Stefan; Kluwick, Alfred

    2013-10-01

    Thin airfoils are prone to localized flow separation at their leading edge if subjected to moderate angles of attack α. Although 'laminar separation bubbles' at first do not significantly alter the airfoil performance, they tend to 'burst' if a is increased further or perturbations acting upon the flow reach a certain intensity. This then leads either to global flow separation (stall) or triggers the laminar-turbulent transition process within the boundary layer flow. The present paper addresses the asymptotic analysis of the early stages of the latter phenomenon in the limit as the characteristic Reynolds number Re → ∞, commonly referred to as marginal separation theory (MST). A new approach based on the adjoint operator method is presented to derive the fundamental similarity laws of MST and to extend the analysis to higher order. Special emphasis is placed on the breakdown of the flow description, i.e. the formation of finite time singularities (a manifestation of the bursting process), and its resolution based on asymptotic reasoning. The computation of the spatio-temporal evolution of the flow in the subsequent triple deck stage is performed by means of a Chebyshev spectral method. The associated numerical treatment of fractional integrals characteristic of MST is based on barycentric Lagrange interpolation, which is described in detail.

  10. Vertical tectonics at an active continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlié, N.; Stern, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    Direct observations of vertical movements of the earth's surface are now possible with space-based GPS networks, and have applications to resources, hazards and tectonics. Here we present data on vertical movements of the Earth's surface in New Zealand, computed from the processing of GPS data collected between 2000 and 2015 by 189 permanent GPS stations. We map the geographical variation in vertical rates and show how these variations are explicable within a tectonic framework of subduction, volcanic activity and slow slip earthquakes. Subsidence of >3 mm/yr is observed along southeastern North Island and is interpreted to be due to the locked segment of the Hikurangi subduction zone. Uplift of 1-3 mm/yr further north along the margin of the eastern North Island is interpreted as being due to the plate interface being unlocked and underplating of sediment on the subduction thrust. The Volcanic Plateau of the central North Island is being uplifted at about 1 mm/yr, which can be explained by basaltic melts being injected in the active mantle-wedge at a rate of ∼6 mm/yr. Within the Central Volcanic Region there is a 250 km2 area that subsided between 2005 and 2012 at a rate of up to 14 mm/yr. Time series from the stations located within and near the zone of subsidence show a strong link between subsidence, adjacent uplift and local earthquake swarms.

  11. Evidence for Marginal Stability in Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie; Jorjadze, Ivane; Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Wyart, Matthieu; Brujic, Jasna

    2016-11-01

    We report the first measurements of the effect of pressure on vibrational modes in emulsions, which serve as a model for soft frictionless spheres at zero temperature. As a function of the applied pressure, we find that the density of states D (ω ) exhibits a low-frequency cutoff ω*, which scales linearly with the number of extra contacts per particle δ z . Moreover, for ω <ω*, our results are consistent with D (ω )˜ω2/ω*2, a quadratic behavior whose prefactor is larger than what is expected from Debye theory. This surprising result agrees with recent theoretical findings [E. DeGiuli, A. Laversanne-Finot, G. A. Düring, E. Lerner, and M. Wyart, Soft Matter 10, 5628 (2014); S. Franz, G. Parisi, P. Urbani, and F. Zamponi, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 112, 14539 (2015)]. Finally, the degree of localization of the softest low frequency modes increases with compression, as shown by the participation ratio as well as their spatial configurations. Overall, our observations show that emulsions are marginally stable and display non-plane-wave modes up to vanishing frequencies.

  12. Granular flow in the marginal ice zone.

    PubMed

    Feltham, Daniel L

    2005-07-15

    The region of sea ice near the edge of the sea ice pack is known as the marginal ice zone (MIZ), and its dynamics are complicated by ocean wave interaction with the ice cover, strong gradients in the atmosphere and ocean and variations in sea ice rheology. This paper focuses on the role of sea ice rheology in determining the dynamics of the MIZ. Here, sea ice is treated as a granular material with a composite rheology describing collisional ice floe interaction and plastic interaction. The collisional component of sea ice rheology depends upon the granular temperature, a measure of the kinetic energy of flow fluctuations. A simplified model of the MIZ is introduced consisting of the along and across momentum balance of the sea ice and the balance equation of fluctuation kinetic energy. The steady solution of these equations is found to leading order using elementary methods. This reveals a concentrated region of rapid ice flow parallel to the ice edge, which is in accordance with field observations, and previously called the ice jet. Previous explanations of the ice jet relied upon the existence of ocean currents beneath the ice cover. We show that an ice jet results as a natural consequence of the granular nature of sea ice.

  13. Geology of New England passive margin

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, J.A. Jr.; Uchupi, E.; Shaughnessy, D.R. III; Ballard, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The New England continental margin began to develop in the Middle Triassic, when rifting of Precambrian/Paleozoic terrane produced a complex arrangement of horsts and grabens. During the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic, these grabens were filled with terrigenous clastics, volcanics, and evaporites. When plate separation took place and seafloor spreading began approximately 195 to 190 m.y.B.P., the newly formed continental edge was uplifted and eroded, truncating preexisting rift structures. As North America began to drift away from Africa, subsidence occurred along a series of normal faults now beneath the outer continental shelf. This hinge zone may represent the boundary between continental crust and a transitional zone of continental and oceanic crustal fragments. Atop the faulted and subsiding crustal platform, thick sediments were deposited. The lower part of the drift sequence is an evaporite-carbonate unit of Early-Middle Jurassic age, and the upper part is a clastic wedge of Middle Jurassic to Cenozoic age. More than 80% of these sediments are Jurassic. Their total thickness may be as much as 13 km beneath the southeastern part of Georges Bank.

  14. Signal transmissibility in marginal granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinson, Matthew B.; Witten, Thomas A.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the ‘transmissibility’ of a simulated two-dimensional pack of frictionless disks formed by confining dilute disks in a shrinking, periodic box to the point of mechanical stability. Two opposite boundaries are then removed, thus allowing a set of free motions. Small free displacements on one boundary then induce proportional displacements on the opposite boundary. Transmissibility is the ability to distinguish different perturbations by their distant responses. We assess transmissibility by successively identifying free orthonormal modes of motion that have the smallest distant responses. The last modes to be identified in this ‘pessimistic’ basis are the most transmissive. The transmitted amplitudes of these most transmissive modes fall off exponentially with mode number. Similar exponential falloff is seen in a simple elastic medium, though the responsible modes differ greatly in structure in the two systems. Thus the marginal pack’s transmissibility is qualitatively similar to that of a simple elastic medium. We compare our results with recent findings based on the projection of the space of free motion onto interior sites.

  15. Geometry of the neoproterozoic and paleozoic rift margin of western Laurentia: Implications for mineral deposit settings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lund, K.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. and Canadian Cordilleran miogeocline evolved during several phases of Cryogenian-Devonian intracontinental rifting that formed the western mangin of Laurentia. Recent field and dating studies across central Idaho and northern Nevada result in identification of two segments of the rift margin. Resulting interpretations of rift geometry in the northern U.S. Cordillera are compatible with interpretations of northwest- striking asymmetric extensional segments subdivided by northeast-striking transform and transfer segments. The new interpretation permits integration of miogeoclinal segments along the length of the western North American Cordillera. For the U.S. Cordillera, miogeoclinal segments include the St. Mary-Moyie transform, eastern Washington- eastern Idaho upper-plate margin, Snake River transfer, Nevada-Utah lower-plate margin, and Mina transfer. The rift is orthogonal to most older basement domains, but the location of the transform-transfer zones suggests control of them by basement domain boundaries. The zigzag geometry of reentrants and promontories along the rift is paralleled by salients and recesses in younger thrust belts and by segmentation of younger extensional domains. Likewise, transform transfer zones localized subsequent transcurrent structures and igneous activity. Sediment-hosted mineral deposits trace the same zigzag geometry along the margin. Sedimentary exhalative (sedex) Zn-Pb-Ag ??Au and barite mineral deposits formed in continental-slope rocks during the Late Devonian-Mississippian and to a lesser degree, during the Cambrian-Early Ordovician. Such deposits formed during episodes of renewed extension along miogeoclinal segments. Carbonate-hosted Mississippi Valley- type (MVT) Zn-Pb deposits formed in structurally reactivated continental shelf rocks during the Late Devonian-Mississippian and Mesozoic due to reactivation of preexisting structures. The distribution and abundance of sedex and MVT deposits are controlled by the

  16. Monitoring reactive microencapsulation dynamics using microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Polenz, Ingmar; Brosseau, Quentin; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-21

    We use microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices to measure the kinetics of reactive encapsulations occurring at the interface of emulsion droplets. The formation of the polymeric shell is inferred from the droplet deformability measured in a series of expansion-constriction chambers along the microfluidic chip. With this tool we quantify the kinetic processes governing the encapsulation at the very early stage of shell formation with a time resolution of the order of the millisecond for overall reactions occurring in less than 0.5 s. We perform a comparison of monomer reactivities used for the encapsulation. We study the formation of polyurea microcapsules (PUMCs); the shell formation proceeds at the water-oil interface by an immediate reaction of amines dissolved in the aqueous phase and isocyanates dissolved in the oil phase. We observe that both monomers contribute differently to the encapsulation kinetics. The kinetics of the shell formation process at the oil-in-water (O/W) experiments significantly differs from the water-in-oil (W/O) systems; the component dissolved in the continuous phase has the largest impact on the kinetics. In addition, we quantified the retarding effect on the encapsulation kinetics by the interface stabilizing agent (surfactant). Our approach is valuable for quantifying in situ reactive encapsulation processes and provides guidelines to generate microcapsules with soft interfaces of tailored and controllable interfacial properties.

  17. Monitoring reactive microencapsulation dynamics using microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Brosseau, Quentin; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We use microfluidic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) devices to measure the kinetics of reactive encapsulations occurring at the interface of emulsion droplets. The formation of the polymeric shell is inferred from the droplet deformability measured in a series of expansion–constriction chambers along the microfluidic chip. With this tool we quantify the kinetic processes governing the encapsulation at the very early stage of shell formation with a time resolution of the order of the millisecond for overall reactions occurring in less than 0.5 s. We perform a comparison of monomer reactivities used for the encapsulation. We study the formation of polyurea microcapsules (PUMCs); the shell formation proceeds at the water–oil interface by an immediate reaction of amines dissolved in the aqueous phase and isocyanates dissolved in the oil phase. We observe that both monomers contribute differently to the encapsulation kinetics. The kinetics of the shell formation process at the oil-in-water (O/W) experiments significantly differs from the water-in-oil (W/O) systems; the component dissolved in the continuous phase has the largest impact on the kinetics. In addition, we quantified the retarding effect on the encapsulation kinetics by the interface stabilizing agent (surfactant). Our approach is valuable for quantifying in situ reactive encapsulation processes and provides guidelines to generate microcapsules with soft interfaces of tailored and controllable interfacial properties. PMID:25705975

  18. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  19. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  20. Grinding methods to enhance the reactivity of olivine

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Cathy A.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, Gilbert E.; O'Connor, William K.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2005-08-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) conducted studies of mechanical activation by conventional and ultrafine grinding techniques to enhance olivine reactivity in mineral carbonation reactions. Activated olivine is one of several solid feed materials used at ARC in reactions with carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. This paper compares grinding techniques via energy demand data and product characteristics, including particle size distributions, surface areas, full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) XRD analyses, and particle morphology by SEM analyses. Reactivity was calculated by percent conversion to carbonate in subsequent carbonation tests. Particle size reduction has the greatest impact on reactivity, and wet grinding is more energy efficient than dry grinding. Large additional inputs of energy to increase surface area or reduce crystallinity do not result in proportional improvements in reactivity.

  1. Integrating Safety Assessment Methods using the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; Diego Mandelli

    2013-03-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of nuclear power plants (NPPs). As the current light water reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of systems, structures, and components (SSC) degradations or failures that initiate safety significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated primarily based on engineering judgment backed by a set of conservative engineering calculations. The ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin is important to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margin management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. In addition, as research and development (R&D) in the LWR Sustainability (LWRS) Program and other collaborative efforts yield new data, sensors, and improved scientific understanding of physical processes that govern the aging and degradation of plant SSCs needs and opportunities to better optimize plant safety and performance will become known. To support decision making related to economics, readability, and safety, the RISMC Pathway provides methods and tools that enable mitigation options known as margins management strategies. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk

  2. Effect of relative humidity and additives on the reaction of sulfur dioxide with calcium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Alsop, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of process variables and additives on the reaction rate of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ with SO/sub 2/ at conditions similar to these encountered in the bag filters used to collect solids following flue gas desulfurization by spray drying. The effect of Ca(OH)/sub 2/ loading, temperature, relative humidity, and inlet SO/sub 2/ concentration were investigated. Of these variables, relative humidity showed the greatest impact on the reaction rate. The effect of small amounts of additives were also investigated. Of the additives tried (buffer acids, organic deliquescents, and inorganic deliquescents) deliquescent salts were the only additives that improved reactivity. A shrinking core model with zero order kinetics in SO/sub 2/ was used to model experimental data. An empirical correlation was included in the model to account for shape and surface roughness of the Ca(OH)/sub 2/ particles. The diffusion coefficient of the SO/sub 2/ through the product layer was found to increase linearly with relative humidity, and the kinetic rate constant increases exponentially with relative humidity. With a few exceptions the model was able to predict the experimental data within the margin of experimental error (+/- 10%). At high relative humidity and/or high SO/sub 2/ concentration, reaction kinetics control the overall reaction rate, while at low relative humidity and/or low SO/sub 2/ concentration, SO/sub 2/ diffusion through the product layer controls the rate. The reaction solids were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, Coulter counter size distribution BET (N/sub 2/) surface area, energy dispersive spectrometry, and differential scanning calorimetry.

  3. Safety margins in the implementation of planetary quarantine requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schalkowsky, S.; Jacoby, I.

    1972-01-01

    The formulation of planetary quarantine requirements, and their implementation as determined by a risk allocation model, is discussed. The model defines control safety margins with particular emphasis on utility in achieving the desired minimization of excessive margins, and their effect on implementation procedures.

  4. Coping with Marginalized Students Inclusion in EL Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petkovska, Viktorija

    2015-01-01

    Marginalized groups present part of our reality which we would prefer to forget about. Yet, the humankind remains (un)aware of the simple fact that there is merely a very tiny red line between the central and marginalized parts: any of us can at one point in life simply, unwillingly and abruptly wake up on the other side of this line!!!…

  5. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  6. Structure of the North American Atlantic Continental Margin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitgord, K. K.; Schlee, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Offers explanations on the origin of the North American Atlantic continental margin. Provides an analysis and illustrations of structural and strategraphic elements of cross sections of the Atlantic continental margin. Also explains the operations and applications of seismic-relection profiles in studying ocean areas. (ML)

  7. 12 CFR 220.12 - Supplement: margin requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Supplement: margin requirements. 220.12 Section 220.12 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.12 Supplement: margin requirements....

  8. 12 CFR 220.12 - Supplement: margin requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Supplement: margin requirements. 220.12 Section 220.12 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) CREDIT BY BROKERS AND DEALERS (REGULATION T) § 220.12 Supplement: margin...

  9. Perceived Marginalization and the Prediction of Romantic Relationship Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehmiller, Justin J.; Agnew, Christopher R.

    2007-01-01

    The present research examined how perceived marginalization of one's romantic relationship is associated with level of future commitment to and stability of that involvement. Results from a 7-month longitudinal study of romantically involved individuals (N = 215) revealed that perceived social network marginalization at Time 1 predicted breakup…

  10. A Study of Haskell Students: Academic Performance and Cultural Marginality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Richard E.

    1978-01-01

    In 1975, behavior of Haskell Indian Junior College freshmen as a whole fit a pattern of cultural marginality, with traditional students exhibiting more pronounced marginal behavior than nontraditional students, reflecting the Haskell social environment. Students' ACT and GPA scores appeared meaningless, supporting the idea of an educational…

  11. 17 CFR 242.405 - Withdrawal of margin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Withdrawal of margin. 242.405 Section 242.405 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS M, SHO, ATS, AC, AND NMS AND CUSTOMER MARGIN REQUIREMENTS FOR SECURITY FUTURES Customer...

  12. Managing Marginal School Employees: Applying Standards-Based Performance Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Lynette; Reck, Brianne; Egley, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This book contains a collection of case studies that provide a variety of situations in managing or working with marginal employees in a school system. Managing Marginal School Employees will serve as a primary or companion text for administrator candidates or current administrators that include dilemmas for the student to think about, discuss,…

  13. Living on the Margin: Disabled Iranians in Belgian Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Gary L.; Devlieger, Patrick J.; Van Hove, Geert

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the antecedents, experiences and consequences of marginalization as reported and dealt with by disabled Iranian immigrants in Belgium. This work extends the work of Gallie and colleagues and Siegrist demonstrating that the forces of marginalization applicable to all immigrants are particularly pertinent to disabled immigrants.…

  14. Lorna Dee Cervantes: A Writer in the Margins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Colette

    Chicana literary authors are sometimes thought to occupy the edges of two "texts," their own culture and the Anglo-American hegemony, where they are oppressed and marginalized by sexism and racism. In these margins, however, Chicana authors can dismantle stereotypes and construct new and empowering images of self. As an example of this…

  15. The Role of Intragroup Marginalization in Latino College Student Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Linda G.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine how intragroup marginalization has a potential impact on Latino college students' psychological adjustment. The concept of intragroup marginalization in this context relates to the perceived rejection of students by persons of their heritage culture group in response to the students' acculturation efforts…

  16. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  17. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  18. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Chen, James M.; Yang, Ralph T.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850.degree.-1000.degree. C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  19. Reactive Orthotropic Lattice Diffuser for Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An orthotropic lattice structure interconnects porous surfaces of the flap with internal lattice-structured perforations to equalize the steady pressure field on the flap surfaces adjacent to the end and to reduce the amplitude of the fluctuations in the flow field near the flap end. The global communication that exists within all of the perforations provides the mechanism to lessen the pressure gradients experienced by the end portion of the flap. In addition to having diffusive effects (diffusing the incoming flow), the three-dimensional orthogonal lattice structure is also reactive (acoustic wave phase distortion) due to the interconnection of the perforations.

  20. Preparation of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate

    DOEpatents

    Shen, M.S.; Chen, J.M.; Yang, R.T.

    1980-02-28

    This invention relates to the preparation of fine particles of reactive beta-dicalcium silicate by means of a solid state process which comprises firing a mixture of calcium sulfate, silica, and a reducing additive selected from the group consisting of calcium sulfide, carbon, carbon monoxide, methane, and hydrogen, at a temperature of about 850 to 1000/sup 0/C. A carrier gas such as nitrogen or carbon dioxide may also be added, if desired. A high concentration of sulfur dioxide is a by-product of this process.

  1. Secure provision of reactive power ancillary services in competitive electricity markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Samahy, Ismael

    The research work presented in this thesis discusses various complex issues associated with reactive power management and pricing in the context of new operating paradigms in deregulated power systems, proposing appropriate policy solutions. An integrated two-level framework for reactive power management is set forth, which is both suitable for a competitive market and ensures a secure and reliable operation of the associated power system. The framework is generic in nature and can be adopted for any electricity market structure. The proposed hierarchical reactive power market structure comprises two stages: procurement of reactive power resources on a seasonal basis, and real-time reactive power dispatch. The main objective of the proposed framework is to provide appropriate reactive power support from service providers at least cost, while ensuring a secure operation of the power system. The proposed procurement procedure is based on a two-step optimization model. First, the marginal benefits of reactive power supply from each provider, with respect to system security, are obtained by solving a loadability-maximization problem subject to transmission security constraints imposed by voltage and thermal limits. Second, the selected set of generators is determined by solving an optimal power flow (OPF)-based auction. This auction maximizes a societal advantage function comprising generators' offers and their corresponding marginal benefits with respect to system security, and considering all transmission system constraints. The proposed procedure yields the selected set of generators and zonal price components, which would form the basis for seasonal contracts between the system operator and the selected reactive power service providers. The main objective of the proposed reactive power dispatch model is to minimize the total payment burden on the Independent System Operator (ISO), which is associated with reactive power dispatch. The real power generation is

  2. Synchronous reactive programming in Ptolemy

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, F.; Vidal-Naquet, G.

    1996-12-31

    Synchronous reactive languages allow a high level deterministic description of reactive systems such as control-command systems. Their well defined mathematical semantics makes it possible to check formal properties on the control of a system. In previous work, we developed an object-oriented execution model for synchronous reactive modules. This model is implemented as a set of tools and a C++ class library, and allows us to use object-oriented methodologies and tools for the design of complex applications with both transformational and reactive parts. Among these design tools, the Ptolemy system stands as an object-oriented framework that supports various execution models, or {open_quotes}domains{close_quotes}. We are currently working on a translator from the output format of the Lustre and Esterel compilers to the Ptolemy language. Since no existing domain matches the reactive synchronous execution model, we also plan to develop a SEC (Synchronous Execution and Communication) domain. Such a domain will provide support for the execution of synchronous modules in Ptolemy. One of the most interesting features of Ptolemy is the communication between domains. Therefore we discuss the interface of the SEC domain to other domains to determine the meaning of communications between them. The main goal is to allow the use of synchronous reactive modules for the control of the behavior of data-flow or discrete event processes.

  3. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Leigh; Quirk, Sarah; Smith, Wendy L.

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Respiratory margins for partial breast irradiation (PBI) have been largely based on geometric observations, which may overestimate the margin required for dosimetric coverage. In this study, dosimetric population-based respiratory margins and margin formulas for external beam partial breast irradiation are determined. Methods: Volunteer respiratory data and anterior–posterior (AP) dose profiles from clinical treatment plans of 28 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) PBI patient plans were used to determine population-based respiratory margins. The peak-to-peak amplitudes (A) of realistic respiratory motion data from healthy volunteers were scaled from A = 1 to 10 mm to create respiratory motion probability density functions. Dose profiles were convolved with the respiratory probability density functions to produce blurred dose profiles accounting for respiratory motion. The required margins were found by measuring the distance between the simulated treatment and original dose profiles at the 95% isodose level. Results: The symmetric dosimetric respiratory margins to cover 90%, 95%, and 100% of the simulated treatment population were 1.5, 2, and 4 mm, respectively. With patient set up at end exhale, the required margins were larger in the anterior direction than the posterior. For respiratory amplitudes less than 5 mm, the population-based margins can be expressed as a fraction of the extent of respiratory motion. The derived formulas in the anterior/posterior directions for 90%, 95%, and 100% simulated population coverage were 0.45A/0.25A, 0.50A/0.30A, and 0.70A/0.40A. The differences in formulas for different population coverage criteria demonstrate that respiratory trace shape and baseline drift characteristics affect individual respiratory margins even for the same average peak-to-peak amplitude. Conclusions: A methodology for determining population-based respiratory margins using real respiratory motion patterns and dose profiles in the AP direction was

  4. African humid periods triggered the reactivation of a large river system in Western Sahara

    PubMed Central

    Skonieczny, C.; Paillou, P.; Bory, A.; Bayon, G.; Biscara, L.; Crosta, X.; Eynaud, F.; Malaizé, B.; Revel, M.; Aleman, N.; Barusseau, J. -P.; Vernet, R.; Lopez, S.; Grousset, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Sahara experienced several humid episodes during the late Quaternary, associated with the development of vast fluvial networks and enhanced freshwater delivery to the surrounding ocean margins. In particular, marine sediment records off Western Sahara indicate deposition of river-borne material at those times, implying sustained fluvial discharges along the West African margin. Today, however, no major river exists in this area; therefore, the origin of these sediments remains unclear. Here, using orbital radar satellite imagery, we present geomorphological data that reveal the existence of a large buried paleodrainage network on the Mauritanian coast. On the basis of evidence from the literature, we propose that reactivation of this major paleoriver during past humid periods contributed to the delivery of sediments to the Tropical Atlantic margin. This finding provides new insights for the interpretation of terrigenous sediment records off Western Africa, with important implications for our understanding of the paleohydrological history of the Sahara. PMID:26556052

  5. Margination of White Blood Cells in Microcapillary Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Fornleitner, Julia; Gompper, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Margination of white blood cells (WBCs) towards vessel walls is an essential precondition for their efficient adhesion to the vascular endothelium. We perform numerical simulations with a two-dimensional blood flow model to investigate the dependence of WBC margination on hydrodynamic interactions of blood cells with the vessel walls, as well as on their collective behavior and deformability. We find WBC margination to be optimal in intermediate ranges of red blood cell (RBC) volume fractions and flow rates, while, beyond these ranges, it is substantially attenuated. RBC aggregation enhances WBC margination, while WBC deformability reduces it. These results are combined in state diagrams, which identify WBC margination for a wide range of flow and cell suspension conditions.

  6. Rat cardiovascular telemetry: Marginal distribution applied to positive control drugs.

    PubMed

    Accardi, M V; Troncy, E; Abtout, S; Ascah, A; Maghezzi, S; Authier, S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects are considered frequent during drug safety testing. This investigation aimed to characterize the pharmacological response of the conscious telemetered rat in vivo model to known cardiovascular active agents. These effects were analyzed using statistical analysis and cloud representation with marginal distribution curves for the contractility index and heart rate as to assess the effect relationship between cardiac variables. Arterial blood pressure, left ventricular pressure, electrocardiogram and body temperature were monitored. The application of data cloud with marginal distribution curves to heart rate and contractility index provided an interesting tactic during the interpretation of drug-induced changes particularly during selective time resolution (i.e. marginal distribution curves restricted to Tmax). Taken together, the present data suggests that marginal distribution curves can be a valuable interpretation strategy when using the rat cardiovascular telemetry model to detect drug-induced cardiovascular effects. Marginal distribution curves could also be considered during the interpretation of other inter-dependent parameters in safety pharmacology studies.

  7. Case-based reactive navigation: a method for on-line selection and adaptation of reactive robotic control parameters.

    PubMed

    Ram, A; Arkin, R C; Moorman, K; Clark, R J

    1997-01-01

    We present a new line of research investigating on-line adaptive reactive control mechanisms for autonomous intelligent agents. We discuss a case-based method for dynamic selection and modification of behavior assemblages for a navigational system. The case-based reasoning module is designed as an addition to a traditional reactive control system, and provides more flexible performance in novel environments without extensive high level reasoning that would otherwise slow the system down. The method is implemented in the ACBARR (case-based reactive robotic) system and evaluated through empirical simulation of the system on several different environments, including "box canyon" environments known to be problematic for reactive control systems in general.

  8. The Formation, Alteration and Preservation of Flood Deposits on the Pacific Northwest Continental Margin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-30

    rivers . APPROACH Box cores are the primary sampling device used in this research. Cores are taken in two different modes: (1) replicate time-series...sampling of four stations along the 70-m isobath, and (2) broad, large- scale coverage of the Eel and other river -system margins. Subsequent sources of...composition, abundance and biomass. In addition, box cores were collected offshore of several other major rivers in the Pacific Northwest (e.g

  9. Time Series Models with a Specified Symmetric Non-Normal Marginal Distribution.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    processes with a specified non-Normal - marginal distribution, Gastwirth and Wolff [Ref.13] had derived a solution to the linear additive first-order...of Lewis, Orav and Uribe [Ref. 15]. The least squares estimation theory is derived around the concept of a linearized residual. Asymptotic properties...linear process of Gastwirth and Wolff [Ref. 13], called the LAR(1) process. The LDAR(1) model produces an {X I sequence using then first-order

  10. Bivariate Frequency Analysis with Nonstationary Gumbel/GEV Marginal Distributions for Rainfall Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Kyungwon; Kim, Sunghun; Kim, Hanbeen; Ahn, Hyunjun; Heo, Jun-Haeng

    2016-04-01

    Multivariate frequency analysis has been developing for hydrological data recently. Particularly, the copula model has been used as an effective method which has no limitation on deciding marginal distributions. The time-series rainfall data can be characterized to rainfall event by inter-event time definition and each rainfall event has rainfall depth and duration. In addition, changes in rainfall depth have been studied recently due to climate change. The nonstationary (time-varying) Gumbel and Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) have been developed and their performances have been investigated from many studies. In the current study, bivariate frequency analysis has performed for rainfall depth and duration using Archimedean copula on stationary and nonstationary hourly rainfall data to consider the effect of climate change. The parameter of copula model is estimated by inference function for margin (IFM) method and stationary/nonstationary Gumbel and GEV distributions are used for marginal distributions. As a result, level curve of copula model is obtained and goodness-of-fit test is performed to choose appropriate marginal distribution among the applied stationary and nonstationary Gumbel and GEV distributions.

  11. Deep-sea environment and biodiversity of the West African Equatorial margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibuet, Myriam; Vangriesheim, Annick

    2009-12-01

    The long-term BIOZAIRE multidisciplinary deep-sea environmental program on the West Equatorial African margin organized in partnership between Ifremer and TOTAL aimed at characterizing the benthic community structure in relation with physical and chemical processes in a region of oil and gas interest. The morphology of the deep Congo submarine channel and the sedimentological structures of the deep-sea fan were established during the geological ZAIANGO project and helped to select study sites ranging from 350 to 4800 m water depth inside or near the channel and away from its influence. Ifremer conducted eight deep-sea cruises on board research vessels between 2000 and 2005. Standardized methods of sampling together with new technologies such as the ROV Victor 6000 and its associated instrumentation were used to investigate this poorly known continental margin. In addition to the study of sedimentary environments more or less influenced by turbidity events, the discovery of one of the largest cold seeps near the Congo channel and deep coral reefs extends our knowledge of the different habitats of this margin. This paper presents the background, objectives and major results of the BIOZAIRE Program. It highlights the work achieved in the 16 papers in this special issue. This synthesis paper describes the knowledge acquired at a regional and local scale of the Equatorial East Atlantic margin, and tackles new interdisciplinary questions to be answered in the various domains of physics, chemistry, taxonomy and ecology to better understand the deep-sea environment in the Gulf of Guinea.

  12. Variability of subseafloor viral abundance at the geographically and geologically distinct continental margins.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Morono, Yuki; Yoshida-Takashima, Yukari; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Sunamura, Michinari; Inagaki, Fumio; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Takai, Ken; Nunoura, Takuro

    2014-04-01

    We studied the relationship between viral particle and microbial cell abundances in marine subsurface sediments from three geographically distinct locations in the continental margins (offshore of the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan, the Cascadia Margin off Oregon, and the Gulf of Mexico) and found depth variations in viral abundances among these sites. Viruses in sediments obtained offshore of the Shimokita and in the Cascadia Margin generally decreased with increasing depth, whereas those in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were relatively constant throughout the investigated depths. In addition, the abundance ratios of viruses to microbial cells notably varied among the sites, ranging between 10(-3) and 10(1) . The subseafloor viral abundance offshore of the Shimokita showed a positive relationship with the microbial cell abundance and the sediment porosity. In contrast, no statistically significant relationship was observed in the Cascadia Margin and the Gulf of Mexico sites, presumably due to the long-term preservation of viruses from enzymatic degradation within the low-porosity sediments. Our observations indicate that viral abundance in the marine subsurface sedimentary environment is regulated not only by in situ production but also by the balance of preservation and decay, which is associated with the regional sedimentation processes in the geological settings.

  13. Margins of oral leukoplakia: autofluorescence and histopathology.

    PubMed

    Elvers, D; Braunschweig, T; Hilgers, R-D; Ghassemi, A; Möhlhenrich, S C; Hölzle, F; Gerressen, M; Modabber, A

    2015-02-01

    Autofluorescence devices are widely used to examine oral lesions. The aim of this study was to see whether there were any signs of dysplasia, parakeratosis, or mucosal inflammation in the borders of homogeneous oral leukoplakia using autofluorescence, and we also compared clinically visible extensions with those detected by autofluorescence. Twenty patients with 26 homogeneous areas of oral leukoplakia were included in the study. After the clinically visible extensions of the lesion had been marked, we took a photograph through the autofluorescence device, which showed both borders in one picture. We then used photo-editing software to measure the size of the area of leukoplakia together with the area with loss of autofluorescence. We took 3 punch biopsy specimens: one from the leukoplakia, one 2.5mm from its marked borders, and one from healthy mucosa. Seventy-eight biopsy specimens were examined by an experienced pathologist, and 95% CI calculated to assess the amount of parakeratosis. Spearman's rank correlation was used to assess the association with mucosal inflammation. Ten areas of leukoplakia were surrounded by normal green autofluorescence, and 16 were consistent with loss of autofluorescence with a mean size of 66%, which exceeded the clinically visible size of the area of leukoplakia. We calculated that there was a strong association between these entities and their surrounding areas, with loss of autofluorescence for parakeratosis. Some leukoplakias showed clinically invisible extensions during histopathological examination and autofluorescence. The technique described enables clinicians to measure the extent of these lesions beyond their visible margins. We found no dysplasia, which emphasises that autofluorescence detects non-dysplastic lesions caused by mucosal inflammation and parakeratosis.

  14. Coral reef evolution on rapidly subsiding margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, J.M.; Braga, J.C.; Clague, D.A.; Gallup, C.; Hein, J.R.; Potts, D.C.; Renema, W.; Riding, R.; Riker-Coleman, K.; Silver, E.; Wallace, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A series of well-developed submerged coral reefs are preserved in the Huon Gulf (Papua New Guinea) and around Hawaii. Despite different tectonics settings, both regions have experienced rapid subsidence (2-6??m/ka) over the last 500??ka. Rapid subsidence, combined with eustatic sea-level changes, is responsible for repeated drowning and backstepping of coral reefs over this period. Because we can place quantitative constraints on these systems (i.e., reef drowning age, eustatic sea-level changes, subsidence rates, accretion rates, basement substrates, and paleobathymetry), these areas represent unique natural laboratories for exploring the roles of tectonics, reef accretion, and eustatic sea-level changes in controlling the evolution of individual reefs, as well as backstepping of the entire system. A review of new and existing bathymetric, radiometric, sedimentary facies and numerical modeling data indicate that these reefs have had long, complex growth histories and that they are highly sensitive, recording drowning not only during major deglaciations, but also during high-frequency, small-amplitude interstadial and deglacial meltwater pulse events. Analysis of five generalized sedimentary facies shows that reef drowning is characterized by a distinct biological and sedimentary sequence. Observational and numerical modeling data indicate that on precessional (20??ka) and sub-orbital timescales, the rate and amplitude of eustatic sea-level changes are critical in controlling initiation, growth, drowning or sub-aerial exposure, subsequent re-initiation, and final drowning. However, over longer timescales (> 100-500??ka) continued tectonic subsidence and basement substrate morphology influence broad scale reef morphology and backstepping geometries. Drilling of these reefs will yield greatly expanded stratigraphic sections compared with similar reefs on slowly subsiding, stable and uplifting margins, and thus they represent a unique archive of sea-level and climate

  15. Reactivity measurement in estimation of benzoquinone and benzoquinone derivatives’ allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Mbiya, Wilbes; Chipinda, Itai; Simoyi, Reuben H.; Siegel, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Benzoquinone (BQ) and benzoquinone derivatives (BQD) are used in the production of dyes and cosmetics. While BQ, an extreme skin sensitizer, is an electrophile known to covalently modify proteins via Michael Addition (MA) reaction whilst halogen substituted BQD undergo nucleophilic vinylic substitution (SNV) mechanism onto amine and thiol moieties on proteins, the allergenic effects of adding substituents on BQ have not been reported. The effects of inserting substituents on the BQ ring has not been studied in animal assays. However, mandated reduction/elimination of animals used in cosmetics testing in Europe has led to an increased need for alternatives for the prediction of skin sensitization potential. Electron withdrawing and electron donating substituents on BQ were assessed for effects on BQ reactivity toward nitrobenzene thiol (NBT). The NBT binding studies demonstrated that addition of EWG to BQ as exemplified by the chlorine substituted BQDs increased reactivity while addition of EDG as in the methyl substituted BQDs reduced reactivity. BQ and BQD skin allerginicity was evaluated in the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). BQD with electron withdrawing groups had the highest chemical potency followed by unsubstituted BQ and the least potent were the BQD with electron donating groups. The BQD results demonstrate the impact of inductive effects on both BQ reactivity and allergenicity, and suggest the potential utility of chemical reactivity data for electrophilic allergen identification and potency ranking. PMID:26612505

  16. Understanding the Reactivity of Lunar Dust for Future Lunar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William; Taylor, L. A.; Jeevarajan, Antony

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, dust was found to cause numerous problems for various instruments and systems. Additionally, the dust may have caused momentary health issues for some of the astronauts. Therefore, the plan to resume robotic and manned missions to the Moon in the next decade has led to a renewed interest in the properties of lunar dust, ranging from geological to chemical to toxicological. An important property to understand is the reactivity of the dust particles. Due to the lack of an atmosphere on the Moon, there is nothing to protect the lunar soil from ultraviolet radiation, solar wind, and meteorite impacts. These processes could all serve to activate the soil, or produce reactive surface species. On the Moon, these species can be maintained for millennia without oxygen or water vapor present to satisfy the broken bonds. Unfortunately, the Apollo dust samples that were returned to Earth were inadvertently exposed to the atmosphere, causing them to lose their reactive characteristics. In order to aid in the preparation of mitigation techniques prior to returning to the Moon, we measured the ability of lunar dust, lunar dust simulant, and quartz samples to produce hydroxyl radicals in solution[1]. As a first approximation of meteorite impacts on the lunar surface, we ground samples using a mortar and pestle. Our initial studies showed that all three test materials (lunar dust (62241), lunar dust simulant (JSC-1Avf), and quartz) produced hydroxyl radicals after grinding and mixing with water. However, the radical production of the ground lunar dust was approximately 10-fold and 3-fold greater than quartz and JSC-1 Avf, respectively. These reactivity differences between the different samples did not correlate with differences in specific surface area. The increased reactivity produced for the quartz by grinding was attributed to the presence of silicon- or oxygen-based radicals on the surface, as had been seen previously[2]. These radicals may also

  17. Group Sparse Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Junming; Chen, Xi; Xing, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of sparse variable selection in nonparametric additive models, with the prior knowledge of the structure among the covariates to encourage those variables within a group to be selected jointly. Previous works either study the group sparsity in the parametric setting (e.g., group lasso), or address the problem in the nonparametric setting without exploiting the structural information (e.g., sparse additive models). In this paper, we present a new method, called group sparse additive models (GroupSpAM), which can handle group sparsity in additive models. We generalize the ℓ1/ℓ2 norm to Hilbert spaces as the sparsity-inducing penalty in GroupSpAM. Moreover, we derive a novel thresholding condition for identifying the functional sparsity at the group level, and propose an efficient block coordinate descent algorithm for constructing the estimate. We demonstrate by simulation that GroupSpAM substantially outperforms the competing methods in terms of support recovery and prediction accuracy in additive models, and also conduct a comparative experiment on a real breast cancer dataset.

  18. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  19. "We Call Ourselves Marginalized": Young People's Environmental Learning and Navigations of Marginalization in a Kenyan Pastoralist Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordt Jørgensen, Nanna

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, indigenous knowledge has been added to the environmental education agenda in an attempt to address the marginalization of non-western perspectives. While these efforts are necessary, the debate is often framed in terms of a discourse of victimization that overlooks the agency of the people we refer to as marginalized. In this…

  20. Agrochemicals in field margins--assessing the impacts of herbicides, insecticides, and fertilizer on the common buttercup (Ranunculus acris).

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Juliane; Schäfer, Karoline; Brühl, Carsten A

    2013-04-01

    The effects of herbicide, insecticide, and fertilizer inputs on the common buttercup Ranunculus acris in field margins were studied in an experimental field study. The test design allowed us to investigate the single and combined effects of repeated herbicide, insecticide, and fertilizer applications in successive growing seasons. To assess the effects of the agrochemical applications on R. acris, plant community assessments were carried out and a photodocumentation of the flowering intensity was performed over two years. In addition, the authors conducted a monitoring survey of R. acris in field margins in the proximity of the study site. In the field experiment, R. acris plant density decreased significantly with treatments including fertilizer. The herbicide caused a sublethal effect by reducing flower intensity by 85%. In the long run, both effects will result in a decline of R. acris and lead to shifts in plant communities in field margins. This was confirmed by the monitoring survey, where R. acris could hardly be observed in field margins directly adjacent to cereal fields, whereas in margins next to meadows the species was recorded frequently. Besides the implications for the plants, the sublethal effects may also affect many flower-visiting insects. The results indicate that the current risk assessment for nontarget plants is insufficiently protective for wild plant species in field margins and that consideration of sublethal effects is crucial to preserve biodiversity in agricultural landscapes.

  1. Gigapixel surface imaging of radical prostatectomy specimens for comprehensive detection of cancer-positive surgical margins using structured illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei; Tulman, David B.; Sholl, Andrew B.; Kimbrell, Hillary Z.; Mandava, Sree H.; Elfer, Katherine N.; Luethy, Samuel; Maddox, Michael M.; Lai, Weil; Lee, Benjamin R.; Brown, J. Quincy

    2016-01-01

    Achieving cancer-free surgical margins in oncologic surgery is critical to reduce the need for additional adjuvant treatments and minimize tumor recurrence; however, there is a delicate balance between completeness of tumor removal and preservation of adjacent tissues critical for normal post-operative function. We sought to establish the feasibility of video-rate structured illumination microscopy (VR-SIM) of the intact removed tumor surface as a practical and non-destructive alternative to intra-operative frozen section pathology, using prostate cancer as an initial target. We present the first images of the intact human prostate surface obtained with pathologically-relevant contrast and subcellular detail, obtained in 24 radical prostatectomy specimens immediately after excision. We demonstrate that it is feasible to routinely image the full prostate circumference, generating gigapixel panorama images of the surface that are readily interpreted by pathologists. VR-SIM confirmed detection of positive surgical margins in 3 out of 4 prostates with pathology-confirmed adenocarcinoma at the circumferential surgical margin, and furthermore detected extensive residual cancer at the circumferential margin in a case post-operatively classified by histopathology as having negative surgical margins. Our results suggest that the increased surface coverage of VR-SIM could also provide added value for detection and characterization of positive surgical margins over traditional histopathology. PMID:27257084

  2. Gigapixel surface imaging of radical prostatectomy specimens for comprehensive detection of cancer-positive surgical margins using structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei; Tulman, David B.; Sholl, Andrew B.; Kimbrell, Hillary Z.; Mandava, Sree H.; Elfer, Katherine N.; Luethy, Samuel; Maddox, Michael M.; Lai, Weil; Lee, Benjamin R.; Brown, J. Quincy

    2016-06-01

    Achieving cancer-free surgical margins in oncologic surgery is critical to reduce the need for additional adjuvant treatments and minimize tumor recurrence; however, there is a delicate balance between completeness of tumor removal and preservation of adjacent tissues critical for normal post-operative function. We sought to establish the feasibility of video-rate structured illumination microscopy (VR-SIM) of the intact removed tumor surface as a practical and non-destructive alternative to intra-operative frozen section pathology, using prostate cancer as an initial target. We present the first images of the intact human prostate surface obtained with pathologically-relevant contrast and subcellular detail, obtained in 24 radical prostatectomy specimens immediately after excision. We demonstrate that it is feasible to routinely image the full prostate circumference, generating gigapixel panorama images of the surface that are readily interpreted by pathologists. VR-SIM confirmed detection of positive surgical margins in 3 out of 4 prostates with pathology-confirmed adenocarcinoma at the circumferential surgical margin, and furthermore detected extensive residual cancer at the circumferential margin in a case post-operatively classified by histopathology as having negative surgical margins. Our results suggest that the increased surface coverage of VR-SIM could also provide added value for detection and characterization of positive surgical margins over traditional histopathology.

  3. Response of the Rhône deltaic margin to loading and subsidence during the last climatic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouet, Gwenael; Hutton, Eric W. H.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Berné, Serge

    2008-10-01

    Passive continental margin subsidence is initiated by the synrift mechanical stretching of the lithospheric upper brittle layer and continues during the postrift phase; the thermal cooling and contraction of the upwelled asthenosphere forces the margin to subside in addition to the overloads from sea water and sediments. Therefore, the total subsidence in stretched basins includes fault-controlled initial sinking, thermal subsidence and flexural isostatic compensations. Decoupling and estimating the different components of this subsidence from stratigraphic analysis and restricted geophysical and sedimentological databases remains problematic. In particular, backstripping the sediment layers requires a well-constrained geological framework. A method is proposed here to investigate the subsidence history of a margin based on forward stratigraphic modelling. Using the Sedflux model, several experiments are done using generally agreed upon assumptions on the parameters describing lithospheric rheology and isostatic behaviour of a margin. The stratigraphic modelling of the Rhône deltaic margin during the last climatic cycle (125 kyr) provides an assessment of these parameter estimates and their influence on geohistory (tectonic/thermal subsidence and sediment loading). The model results confirm the important impact of water loading on vertical deflection along the platform between glacial low sea-level and interglacial high sea-level. Based on Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean) observations, a conceptual method that uses the stratigraphic simulations is produced in order to evaluate the different components of the total subsidence of a margin, and, in particular, the relative impact of tectonic subsidence and sediment load.

  4. The importance of familia for Latina/o college students: examining the role of familial support in intragroup marginalization.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Jasmín D; Morgan Consoli, Melissa

    2012-10-01

    Intragroup marginalization refers to the perceived interpersonal distancing by members of the heritage culture when an individual exhibits cultural characteristics of the dominant group. This study expands understanding of the college experience of Latina/o students by examining relationships between intragroup marginalization, college adjustment, resilience, and thriving in a sample of 181 Latina/o college students, ranging from freshman to graduate students. In addition, the role of familial social support is explored to determine any possible mediating effects on the relationship between intragroup marginalization, college adjustment, resilience, and thriving. Findings revealed that intragroup marginalization predicted college adjustment, resilience, and thriving. Familial social support was found to mediate the relationship between intragroup marginalization and thriving. This research highlights the negative impact of intragroup marginalization for Latina/o students, as well as the role of familial support in thriving. The results also shed light on the Latina/o college experience as a means to improving Latina/o students' college outcomes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Melanoma in Situ Treated with Topical Imiquimod for Management of Persistently Positive Margins: A Review of Treatment Methods

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qing; Cohen, Stephanie; John, Becky; Riker, Adam I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Imiquimod is a topical cream approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, and genital-perianal warts. Its successful use in patients with persistently positive margins of melanoma in situ (MIS) after surgical excision has been previously reported. Case Report A 75-year-old female presented with a primary melanoma that was removed through an elliptical excision with 1 cm margins. Pathology revealed 3 involved margins with residual MIS without an invasive component. After a second operation removed an additional 1 cm margin, pathology revealed 2 positive margins with residual MIS. Rather than undergoing a third excision, the patient decided to pursue a nonsurgical approach with topical imiquimod, and at the 4-month follow-up examination, the incision was completely healed with no clinical evidence of tumor recurrence. Conclusion A nonsurgical approach with 5% topical imiquimod cream applied along the incision was utilized. In specific patient populations, the use of imiquimod is a reasonable alternative approach for the management of persistently positive MIS margins. Long-term follow-up is necessary to assess for evidence of recurrence and the ultimate success of this nonsurgical approach. PMID:26730231

  6. Fused Lasso Additive Model

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Ashley; Witten, Daniela; Simon, Noah

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of predicting an outcome variable using p covariates that are measured on n independent observations, in a setting in which additive, flexible, and interpretable fits are desired. We propose the fused lasso additive model (FLAM), in which each additive function is estimated to be piecewise constant with a small number of adaptively-chosen knots. FLAM is the solution to a convex optimization problem, for which a simple algorithm with guaranteed convergence to a global optimum is provided. FLAM is shown to be consistent in high dimensions, and an unbiased estimator of its degrees of freedom is proposed. We evaluate the performance of FLAM in a simulation study and on two data sets. Supplemental materials are available online, and the R package flam is available on CRAN. PMID:28239246

  7. Euphorbia Kansui Reactivates Latent HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Daniele C.; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV infected individuals, these treatments are unable to eradicate the virus. Current approaches to reactivate the virus have been limited by toxicity, lack of an orally available therapy, and limited responses in primary CD4+ T cells and in clinical trials. The PKC agonist ingenol, purified from Euphorbia plants, is a potent T cell activator and reactivates latent HIV. Euphorbia kansui itself has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat ascites, fluid retention, and cancer. We demonstrate that an extract of this plant, Euphorbia kansui, is capable of recapitulating T cell activation induced by the purified ingenol. Indeed, Euphorbia kansui induced expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69 and P-TEFb in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, Euphorbia kansui reactivated latent HIV in a CD4+ T cell model of latency and in HIV+ HAART suppressed PBMC. When combined with the other latency reversing agents, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui required to reactive HIV was reduced 10-fold and resulted in synergistic reactivation of latent HIV. We conclude that Euphorbia Euphorbia kansui reactivates latent HIV and activates CD4+ T cells. When used in combination with a latency reversing agent, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui is reduced; which suggests its application as a combination strategy to reactivate latent HIV while limiting the toxicity due to global T cell activation. As a natural product, which has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, Euphorbia kansui is attractive as a potential treatment strategy, particularly in resource poor countries with limited treatment options. Further clinical testing will be required to determine its safety with current anti-retroviral therapies. PMID:27977742

  8. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  9. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  10. Reactivity to nicotine cues over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

    PubMed

    LaRowe, Steven D; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J; Upadhyaya, Himanshu P

    2007-12-01

    The present study investigated whether reactivity to nicotine-related cues would attenuate across four experimental sessions held 1 week apart. Participants were nineteen non-treatment seeking, nicotine-dependent males. Cue reactivity sessions were performed in an outpatient research center using in vivo cues consisting of standardized smoking-related paraphernalia (e.g., cigarettes) and neutral comparison paraphernalia (e.g., pencils). Craving ratings were collected before and after both cue presentations while physiological measures (heart rate, skin conductance) were collected before and during the cue presentations. Although craving levels decreased across sessions, smoking-related cues consistently evoked significantly greater increases in craving relative to neutral cues over all four experimental sessions. Skin conductance was higher in response to smoking cues, though this effect was not as robust as that observed for craving. Results suggest that, under the described experimental parameters, craving can be reliably elicited over repeated cue reactivity sessions.

  11. Erosion and tectonics at the margins of continental plateaus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.; Isacks, Bryan L.; Gubbels, Timothy L.; Fielding, Eric J.

    1994-01-01

    We hypothesize that the steep frontal slope and high peaks of the Beni region and Himalayan front largely reflect the high orographic precipitation and high erosion rates occurring in these regions and that the more gentle topography of the semiarid Pilcomayo region reflects a tectonic landform only slightly modified by erosion. We propose that orographic precipitation impinging on a plateau margin will generally tend to drop moisture low on the slope, eroding back the plateau while enhancing or maintaining the steep long-wavelength slope. A numerical model coupling orographic precipitation, erosion, and tectonic uplift demonstrates the plausibility of this hypothesis. The erosional efflux in both the Beni and Nepal Himalaya have been considerable, and simple mass balance calculations for the Himalaya suggest that during the Neogene, the erosional mass efflux has generally outpaced the tectonic mass influx. This contrasts with the apparent prior domination of tectonic influx and may reflect a decrease in the rate of tectonic addition during the same period, and/or increased late Cenozoic erosion rates.

  12. Antarctic glacial history from numerical models and continental margin sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, P.F.; Barrett, P.J.; Cooper, A. K.; Huybrechts, P.

    1999-01-01

    The climate record of glacially transported sediments in prograded wedges around the Antarctic outer continental shelf, and their derivatives in continental rise drifts, may be combined to produce an Antarctic ice sheet history, using numerical models of ice sheet response to temperature and sea-level change. Examination of published models suggests several preliminary conclusions about ice sheet history. The ice sheet's present high sensitivity to sea-level change at short (orbital) periods was developed gradually as its size increased, replacing a declining sensitivity to temperature. Models suggest that the ice sheet grew abruptly to 40% (or possibly more) of its present size at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary, mainly as a result of its own temperature sensitivity. A large but more gradual middle Miocene change was externally driven, probably by development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and Polar Front, provided that a few million years' delay can be explained. The Oligocene ice sheet varied considerably in size and areal extent, but the late Miocene ice sheet was more stable, though significantly warmer than today's. This difference probably relates to the confining effect of the Antarctic continental margin. Present-day numerical models of ice sheet development are sufficient to guide current sampling plans, but sea-ice formation, polar wander, basal topography and ice streaming can be identified as factors meriting additional modelling effort in the future.

  13. BSR occurrence along the Sunda margin: evidence from seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Heidrun

    2002-04-01

    The occurrence of bottom simulating reflections (BSRs) along the Sunda margin off Indonesia is investigated for the first time using seismic reflection data from three surveys conducted across the subduction zone and the forearc domain off southern Sumatra to central Java. BSRs commonly concur with the base of the thermodynamically stable hydrate zone and are thus an important indicator for gas hydrates. Along the Sunda Arc, BSR occurrence is restricted to the forearc domain in regions likely to represent a focussing of fluid flow, such as the forearc basin slopes or anticline structures. Dissociation of gas hydrates due to uplift along anticline structures may be an important secondary cause of BSR formation. The absence of BSRs in the forearc basin center despite continuous sedimentation to ensure carbon supply may be related to the very high sedimentation rate (>0.4 km/Ma) which causes unused carbon to pass through the stability zone even for a high rate constant of methanogenesis. In addition, the interbedding of low- and high-permeability layers renders fluid flow across layering ineffective. No BSR phases could be detected along the accretionary prism or the outer high, although the P- T regime would allow a potential BSR to lie within the accretionary sedimentary column.

  14. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  15. More Than Additional Space...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A much needed addition to the Jamestown Elementary School turned out to be more than an expansion of walls for more space. A new educational program, a limited budget, and a short time line were tackled on a team approach basis and were successfully resolved. (Author)

  16. Marginal erg facies: A trial approach toward a descriptive classification

    SciTech Connect

    Caputo, M.V. ); Langford, R.P. )

    1991-03-01

    During the late 1970s and early 1980s, sedimentologists began recognizing the margins of eolian sand seas as separate, components which differed from interior sand seas in geometry, extent, and facies. Stratigraphers have now observed these differences in eolian rocks. Erg margins may be grouped in five ways: (1) by associations with extradunal environments-coastal plain, lacustrine, periglacial, marine (tidal flat, coastal sabkha, beach, and lagoon), and arid alluvial (alluvial fan, fluvial, playa, inland sabkha); (2) by allocyclic controls-eustasy, plate tectonism, and climate; (3) by autocyclic controls-local tectonism, topography, vegetation, hydrology, structure, sediment source and supply, and wind regime; (4) by geographic position-upwind, downwind, and along-wind margins; and (5) by sedimentary facies-texture and architecture. In contrast with erg interiors, erg margins are characterized by smaller, less complex dune-forms related to thinner sand accumulation; elementary dune architecture; more vegetation and bioturbation; high occurrence of sand sheet, zibar, and serir facies; expansive, low-relief interdunes with widely distributed dunes; and a greater proportion of interbedded extradunal deposits. Some of the published studies on ancient eolian systems have identified erg margin facies that have been influences by marine and arid alluvial processes. Few reports have described lacustrine-eolian and periglacial-eolian interactions. This study is an attempt to organize known features of modern and ancient erg margins into a scheme based on erg margin controls.

  17. Wave speed structure of the eastern North American margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B.; Covellone, B. M.; Shen, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The eastern North American margin (ENAM) is the result of nearly a billion years of continental collision and rifting. To the west of this margin lies thick continental lithosphere of the North American craton, and to the east is oceanic lithosphere in the Atlantic. The substantial changes in lithosphere thickness at this boundary are thought to drive asthenosphere upwelling along the edge of the continent. Through iterative, full-waveform, ambient noise tomography, we observe a heterogeneous low wave speed margin along the continent in the upper mantle. Multiple low wave speed features imaged within the margin are consistent with asthenospeheric upwelling due to edge-driven convection. Also within the margin are high wave speed anomalies that maybe the remnants of eclogitic delamination of the Appalachian crustal root, which contribute to convection at the margin. Edge driven, small-scale convection keeps the margin weak and thus controls the large scale plate tectonic patterns and the crustal deformation. The imaged mantle wave speed anomalies, interpreted as edge-driven convection, correlate with and may increase the likelihood of damaging earthquakes in the eastern portion of North America.

  18. Stroke: a Hidden Danger of Margin Trading in Stock Markets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Hui; Wang, Chien-Ho; Liu, Tsai-Ching; Chen, Chin-Shyan

    2015-10-01

    Using 10-year population data from 2000 through 2009 in Taiwan, this is the first paper to analyze the relationship between margin trading in stock markets and stroke hospitalizations. The results show that 3 and 6 days after an increase of margin trading in the Taiwan stock markets are associated with greater stoke hospitalizations. In general, a 1 % increase in total margin trading positions is associated with an increment of 2.5 in the total number of stroke hospitalizations, where the mean number of hospital admissions is 233 cases a day. We further examine the effects of margin trading by gender and age groups and find that the effects of margin trading are significant for males and those who are 45-74 years old only. In summary, buying stocks with money you do not have is quite risky, especially if the prices of those stocks fall past a certain level or if there is a sudden and severe drop in the stock market. There is also a hidden danger to one's health from margin trading. A person should be cautious before conducting margin trading, because while it can be quite profitable, danger always lurks just around the corner.

  19. Sequence stratigraphy on an early Cretaceous passive margin, Exmouth Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R.; Gorur, N.; Ito, M.; O'Brien, D.; Wilkens, R.; Tang, C.

    1989-03-01

    Permian-Jurassic rifting of northwestern Australia resulted in the development of a passive continental margin flanking the northeastern Indian Ocean. On this margin the relatively thin synrift to postrift sedimentary sequence of southern Exmouth Plateau was drilled during ODP Leg 122. A sequence-stratigraphy analysis of the complete Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary succession at Sites 762 and 763 was derived from a synthesis of seismic stratigraphy, wireline logs, lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, and magnetostratigraphy. Results indicate that during breakup, the southern Exmouth Plateau was a transform margin with an extensional component. Between the Tithonian and Valanginian, a thick clastic wedge prograded from the transform margin south of Site 763 northwestward toward Site 762 and onto subsiding continental crust. Southern clastic supply decreased into the Aptian-Cenomanian, and cyclic deposition of deep-water mudstones continued during subsidence of the earlier shelf margin wedge. Between the Albian and Cenomanian, deposition gradually became dominated by pelagic carbonates. Two regional unconformities mark the Cenomanian/Turonian and Cretaceous/Tertiary boundaries. Each was an erosional event, succeeded by renewed pelagic carbonate deposition that began in the distal northern basin and onlapped progressively toward the topographic high, which persisted into the Tertiary along the southern margin. The entire Jurassic to Holocene record at the southern Exmouth Plateau ODP sites is less than 1500 m thick and represents a classic rift to mature ocean passive-margin succession.

  20. Neurobehavioral foundation of environmental reactivity.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah R; Depue, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Sensitivity to environmental context has been of interest for many years, but the nature of individual differences in environmental sensitivity has become of particular focus over the past 2 decades. What is particularly uncertain are the neural variables and processes that mediate the effects of environment on developmental outcomes. Accordingly, we provide a neurobehavioral foundation of reactivity to the environment in several steps. First, the different patterns of environmental sensitivity are defined to identify the significant factors involved in the manifestation of these patterns. Second, we focus on neurobiological reactivity as the construct underlying variation in sensitivity to the environment by (a) providing an organizing threshold model of elicitation of neurobiology by environmental context; and (b) integrating the literature on 2 sets of neuromodulators in terms of each modulator's (a) contribution to neural and behavioral reactivity to stimulation, and (b) relation to emotional-motivational systems (dopamine, opiates and oxytocin, corticotropin-releasing hormone) or the general modulation of those systems (serotonin, norepinephrine, and GABA). Discussion concludes with (a) a comprehensive neurobehavioral framework of environmental reactivity based on a combinatorial model of a supertrait, (b) methodological implications of the model, and (c) a developmental perspective on environmental reactivity.