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Sample records for additional regulatory factors

  1. Selection of color additives: a regulatory view.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Dureja, Harish; Madan, Anil K

    2012-01-01

    Color additives have a unique place in the categories of the excipients. However, most of the color additives are complex heterogeneous organic compounds. In pharmaceuticals, colors are used in various oral (solid, liquid) and topical dosage form. Different regulatory authorities have their own specific set of regulation for registration, approval, and control of color additives. However, at this time of globalization, selection of appropriate color is not an easy task when a company wants to sale its product in many countries. In this article, the authors have explored various important factors which should be considered in the selection of color additives.

  2. Sleep regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Porkka-Heiskanen, T

    2014-01-01

    The state of sleep consists of different phases that proceed in successive, tightly regulated order through the night forming a physiological program, which for each individual is different but stabile from one night to another. Failure to accomplish this program results in feeling of unrefreshing sleep and tiredness in the morning. The pro- gram core is constructed by genetic factors but regulated by circadian rhythm and duration and intensity of day time brain activity. Many environmental factors modulate sleep, including stress, health status and ingestion of vigilance-affecting nutrients or medicines (e.g. caffeine). Knowledge of the factors that regulate the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and factors that can affect this regulation forms the basis for diagnosis and treatment of the many common disorders of sleep.

  3. Additive Functions in Boolean Models of Gene Regulatory Network Modules

    PubMed Central

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H.; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in Boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a Boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred Boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  4. Additive functions in boolean models of gene regulatory network modules.

    PubMed

    Darabos, Christian; Di Cunto, Ferdinando; Tomassini, Marco; Moore, Jason H; Provero, Paolo; Giacobini, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Gene-on-gene regulations are key components of every living organism. Dynamical abstract models of genetic regulatory networks help explain the genome's evolvability and robustness. These properties can be attributed to the structural topology of the graph formed by genes, as vertices, and regulatory interactions, as edges. Moreover, the actual gene interaction of each gene is believed to play a key role in the stability of the structure. With advances in biology, some effort was deployed to develop update functions in boolean models that include recent knowledge. We combine real-life gene interaction networks with novel update functions in a boolean model. We use two sub-networks of biological organisms, the yeast cell-cycle and the mouse embryonic stem cell, as topological support for our system. On these structures, we substitute the original random update functions by a novel threshold-based dynamic function in which the promoting and repressing effect of each interaction is considered. We use a third real-life regulatory network, along with its inferred boolean update functions to validate the proposed update function. Results of this validation hint to increased biological plausibility of the threshold-based function. To investigate the dynamical behavior of this new model, we visualized the phase transition between order and chaos into the critical regime using Derrida plots. We complement the qualitative nature of Derrida plots with an alternative measure, the criticality distance, that also allows to discriminate between regimes in a quantitative way. Simulation on both real-life genetic regulatory networks show that there exists a set of parameters that allows the systems to operate in the critical region. This new model includes experimentally derived biological information and recent discoveries, which makes it potentially useful to guide experimental research. The update function confers additional realism to the model, while reducing the complexity

  5. Additional factors in chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Cullen, K J; Elder, J; Adams, A R; Stenhouse, N S

    1970-02-14

    A review of persons with chronic bronchitis and controls without bronchitis showed several irritants around the home that aggravated cough, such as house dust, flowers and grasses, smoke, strong fumes, hair spray, insecticide, and soap powders. Most subjects with bronchitis were affected by exposure to one or more of these irritants for at least once a day for three months of the year or more. Out of 163 subjects with chronic bronchitis only six non-smokers were free of factors associated with pulmonary irritation. This evidence from non-smokers not exposed to air pollution adds further strength to the hypothesis that daily phlegm is caused by persistent inhalation of irritants.

  6. Multiple functions of nucleosomes and regulatory factors in transcription.

    PubMed

    Workman, J L; Buchman, A R

    1993-03-01

    The in vivo packaging of DNA with histone proteins to form chromatin makes its transcription a difficult process. Biochemical and genetic studies are beginning to reveal mechanistic details of how transcriptional regulatory factors confront at least two hurdles created by nucleosomes, the primary structural unit of chromatin. Regulatory factors must gain access to their respective binding sites and activate the formation of transcription complexes at core promoter elements. Distinct regulatory factors may be specialized to perform these functions.

  7. Interferon regulatory factor 6 regulates keratinocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Leah C.; Naridze, Rachelle L.; DeMali, Kris A.; Lusche, Daniel F.; Kuhl, Spencer; Soll, David R.; Schutte, Brian C.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon regulatory factor 6 (Irf6) regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Irf6 regulates cellular migration and adhesion. Irf6-deficient embryos at 10.5 days post-conception failed to close their wound compared with wild-type embryos. In vitro, Irf6-deficient murine embryonic keratinocytes were delayed in closing a scratch wound. Live imaging of the scratch showed deficient directional migration and reduced speed in cells lacking Irf6. To understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions were investigated. We show that wild-type and Irf6-deficient keratinocytes adhere similarly to all matrices after 60 min. However, Irf6-deficient keratinocytes were consistently larger and more spread, a phenotype that persisted during the scratch-healing process. Interestingly, Irf6-deficient keratinocytes exhibited an increased network of stress fibers and active RhoA compared with that observed in wild-type keratinocytes. Blocking ROCK, a downstream effector of RhoA, rescued the delay in closing scratch wounds. The expression of Arhgap29, a Rho GTPase-activating protein, was reduced in Irf6-deficient keratinocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that Irf6 functions through the RhoA pathway to regulate cellular migration. PMID:24777480

  8. Search for regulatory factors of the pituitary-specific transcription factor PROP1 gene

    PubMed Central

    NISHIMURA, Naoto; UEHARU, Hiroki; NISHIHARA, Hiroto; SHIBUYA, Shiori; YOSHIDA, Saishu; HIGUCHI, Masashi; KANNO, Naoko; HORIGUCHI, Kotaro; KATO, Takako; KATO, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary-specific transcription factor PROP1, a factor important for pituitary organogenesis, appears on rat embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) in SOX2-expressing stem/progenitor cells and always coexists with SOX2 throughout life. PROP1-positive cells at one point occupy all cells in Rathke’s pouch, followed by a rapid decrease in their number. Their regulatory factors, except for RBP-J, have not yet been clarified. This study aimed to use the 3 kb upstream region and 1st intron of mouse prop1 to pinpoint a group of factors selected on the basis of expression in the early pituitary gland for expression of Prop1. Reporter assays for SOX2 and RBP-J showed that the stem/progenitor marker SOX2 has cell type-dependent inhibitory and activating functions through the proximal and distal upstream regions of Prop1, respectively, while RBP-J had small regulatory activity in some cell lines. Reporter assays for another 39 factors using the 3 kb upstream regions in CHO cells ultimately revealed that 8 factors, MSX2, PAX6, PIT1, PITX1, PITX2, RPF1, SOX8 and SOX11, but not RBP-J, regulate Prop1 expression. Furthermore, a synergy effect with SOX2 was observed for an additional 10 factors, FOXJ1, HES1, HEY1, HEY2, KLF6, MSX1, RUNX1, TEAD2, YBX2 and ZFP36Ll, which did not show substantial independent action. Thus, we demonstrated 19 candidates, including SOX2, to be regulatory factors of Prop1 expression. PMID:26640231

  9. Multilayered Control of Alternative Splicing Regulatory Networks by Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Han, Hong; Braunschweig, Ulrich; Gonatopoulos-Pournatzis, Thomas; Weatheritt, Robert J; Hirsch, Calley L; Ha, Kevin C H; Radovani, Ernest; Nabeel-Shah, Syed; Sterne-Weiler, Tim; Wang, Juli; O'Hanlon, Dave; Pan, Qun; Ray, Debashish; Zheng, Hong; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Datti, Alessandro; Magomedova, Lilia; Cummins, Carolyn L; Hughes, Timothy R; Greenblatt, Jack F; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Moffat, Jason; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2017-02-02

    Networks of coordinated alternative splicing (AS) events play critical roles in development and disease. However, a comprehensive knowledge of the factors that regulate these networks is lacking. We describe a high-throughput system for systematically linking trans-acting factors to endogenous RNA regulatory events. Using this system, we identify hundreds of factors associated with diverse regulatory layers that positively or negatively control AS events linked to cell fate. Remarkably, more than one-third of the regulators are transcription factors. Further analyses of the zinc finger protein Zfp871 and BTB/POZ domain transcription factor Nacc1, which regulate neural and stem cell AS programs, respectively, reveal roles in controlling the expression of specific splicing regulators. Surprisingly, these proteins also appear to regulate target AS programs via binding RNA. Our results thus uncover a large "missing cache" of splicing regulators among annotated transcription factors, some of which dually regulate AS through direct and indirect mechanisms.

  10. The regulatory compliance plan for the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Akgunduz, N.K.; Gimpel, R.F.; Finger, S.M.

    1993-01-27

    The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has initiated the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) Program to demonstrate and evaluate integrated treatment of the FEMP site`s Operable Unit 1 contaminated soils and sludges. The demonstration will require on-site operation of an integrated treatment system consisting of soil washing, water treatment by ion exchange, and vitrification of all contaminated solid wastes at a rate of 300 kg per day. Compliance with all relevant environmental regulations is a major priority of this program. Relevant regulatory requirements come under the jurisdiction of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). The plethora of potentially applicable regulations were reviewed and an efficient regulatory compliance strategy developed. This strategy was documented in the MAWS Regulatory Compliance Plan which was presented to the regulatory agencies as a reasonable working plan. The FEMP has found the development of a comprehensive, organized regulatory plan to be critical to the successful implementation of integrated demonstration projects such as the MAWS Program. This paper discusses the approaches used in the MAWS Regulatory Compliance Plan and highlights which could prove useful for others that want to approach the DOE and/or EPA with technology demonstrations.

  11. Regulatory Enhancer-Core-Promoter Communication via Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Zabidi, Muhammad A; Stark, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Gene expression is regulated by genomic enhancers that recruit transcription factors and cofactors to activate transcription from target core promoters. Over the past years, thousands of enhancers and core promoters in animal genomes have been annotated, and we have learned much about the domain structure in which regulatory genomes are organized in animals. Enhancer-core-promoter targeting occurs at several levels, including regulatory domains, DNA accessibility, and sequence-encoded core-promoter specificities that are likely mediated by different regulatory proteins. We review here current knowledge about enhancer-core-promoter targeting, regulatory communication between enhancers and core promoters, and the protein factors involved. We conclude with an outlook on open questions that we find particularly interesting and that will likely lead to additional insights in the upcoming years.

  12. Anti-Sigma Factors in E. coli: Common Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Sigma Factors Availability

    PubMed Central

    Treviño-Quintanilla, Luis Gerardo; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Martínez-Flores, Irma

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria, transcriptional regulation is a key step in cellular gene expression. All bacteria contain a core RNA polymerase that is catalytically competent but requires an additional σ factor for specific promoter recognition and correct transcriptional initiation. The RNAP core is not able to selectively bind to a given σ factor. In contrast, different σ factors have different affinities for the RNAP core. As a consequence, the concentration of alternate σ factors requires strict regulation in order to properly control the delicate interplay among them, which favors the competence for the RNAP core. This control is archived by different σ/anti-σ controlling mechanisms that shape complex regulatory networks and cascades, and enable the response to sudden environmental cues, whose global understanding is a current challenge for systems biology. Although there have been a number of excellent studies on each of these σ/anti-σ post-transcriptional regulatory systems, no comprehensive comparison of these mechanisms in a single model organism has been conducted. Here, we survey all these systems in E. coli dissecting and analyzing their inner workings and highlightin their differences. Then, following an integral approach, we identify their commonalities and outline some of the principles exploited by the cell to effectively and globally reprogram the transcriptional machinery. These principles provide guidelines for developing biological synthetic circuits enabling an efficient and robust response to sudden stimuli. PMID:24396271

  13. Anti-Sigma Factors in E. coli: Common Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Sigma Factors Availability.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Quintanilla, Luis Gerardo; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Martínez-Flores, Irma

    2013-09-01

    In bacteria, transcriptional regulation is a key step in cellular gene expression. All bacteria contain a core RNA polymerase that is catalytically competent but requires an additional σ factor for specific promoter recognition and correct transcriptional initiation. The RNAP core is not able to selectively bind to a given σ factor. In contrast, different σ factors have different affinities for the RNAP core. As a consequence, the concentration of alternate σ factors requires strict regulation in order to properly control the delicate interplay among them, which favors the competence for the RNAP core. This control is archived by different σ/anti-σ controlling mechanisms that shape complex regulatory networks and cascades, and enable the response to sudden environmental cues, whose global understanding is a current challenge for systems biology. Although there have been a number of excellent studies on each of these σ/anti-σ post-transcriptional regulatory systems, no comprehensive comparison of these mechanisms in a single model organism has been conducted. Here, we survey all these systems in E. coli dissecting and analyzing their inner workings and highlightin their differences. Then, following an integral approach, we identify their commonalities and outline some of the principles exploited by the cell to effectively and globally reprogram the transcriptional machinery. These principles provide guidelines for developing biological synthetic circuits enabling an efficient and robust response to sudden stimuli.

  14. Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 Promotes Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Duffau, Pierre; Menn-Josephy, Hanni; Cuda, Carla M.; Dominguez, Salina; Aprahamian, Tamar R.; Watkins, Amanda A.; Yasuda, Kei; Monach, Paul; Lafyatis, Robert; Rice, Lisa M.; Haines, G. Kenneth; Gravallese, Ellen M.; Baum, Rebecca; Richez, Christophe; Perlman, Harris; Bonegio, Ramon G.; Rifkin, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Polymorphisms in the transcription factor IRF5 are associated with an increased risk of developing RA. This study was done to determine the role of IRF5 in arthritis development. Methods K/BxN serum transfer arthritis was induced in mice deficient in IRF5, or lacking IRF5 only in myeloid cells, and arthritis severity was evaluated. K/BxN arthritis was also induced in mice deficient in TRIF, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4 and TLR7 to determine pathways through which IRF5 might promote arthritis. In-vitro studies were performed to determine the role of IRF5 in IL-1 receptor and TLR signaling. Results Arthritis severity was reduced in IRF5-deficient, TRIF-deficient, TLR3-deficient and TLR7-deficient mice. The expression of multiple genes regulating neutrophil recruitment or function and bioactive IL-1β formation was reduced in the joints during active arthritis in IRF5-deficient mice. In vitro studies showed that TLR7 and the TRIF-dependent TLR3 pathway induce pro-inflammatory cytokine production in disease relevant cell types in an IRF5-dependent manner. Conclusion IRF5 contributes to disease pathogenesis in inflammatory arthritis. This is likely due at least in part to the role of IRF5 in mediating pro-inflammatory cytokine production downstream of TLR7 and TLR3. As TLR7 and TLR3 are both RNA-sensing TLRs, this suggests that endogenous RNA ligands present in the inflamed joint promote arthritis development. These findings may be relevant to human RA as RNA capable of activating TLR7 and TLR3 is present in synovial fluid and TLR7 and TLR3 are upregulated in the joints of RA patients. PMID:26315890

  15. Regulatory coding of lymphoid lineage choice by hematopoietic transcription factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Luigi A.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2003-01-01

    During lymphopoiesis, precursor cells negotiate a complex regulatory space, defined by the levels of several competing and cross-regulating transcription factors, before arriving at stable states of commitment to the B-, T- and NK-specific developmental programs. Recent perturbation experiments provide evidence that this space has three major axes, corresponding to the PU.1 versus GATA-1 balance, the intensity of Notch signaling through the CSL pathway, and the ratio of E-box transcription factors to their Id protein antagonists.

  16. 14 CFR 1203.406 - Additional classification factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional classification factors. 1203.406... PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.406 Additional classification factors. In determining the appropriate classification category, the following additional factors should be considered:...

  17. Inferring transcription factor collaborations in gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Living cells are realized by complex gene expression programs that are moderated by regulatory proteins called transcription factors (TFs). The TFs control the differential expression of target genes in the context of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), either individually or in groups. Deciphering the mechanisms of how the TFs control the expression of target genes is a challenging task, especially when multiple TFs collaboratively participate in the transcriptional regulation. Results We model the underlying regulatory interactions in terms of the directions (activation or repression) and their logical roles (necessary and/or sufficient) with a modified association rule mining approach, called mTRIM. The experiment on Yeast discovered 670 regulatory interactions, in which multiple TFs express their functions on common target genes collaboratively. The evaluation on yeast genetic interactions, TF knockouts and a synthetic dataset shows that our algorithm is significantly better than the existing ones. Conclusions mTRIM is a novel method to infer TF collaborations in transcriptional regulation networks. mTRIM is available at http://www.msu.edu/~jinchen/mTRIM. PMID:24565025

  18. The effect of hyperammonemia on myostatin and myogenic regulatory factor gene expression in broiler embryos

    PubMed Central

    Stern, R.A.; Ashwell, C.M.; Dasarathy, S.; Mozdziak, P.E.

    2015-01-01

    Myogenesis is facilitated by four myogenic regulatory factors and is significantly inhibited by myostatin. The objective of the current study was to examine embryonic gene regulation of myostatin/myogenic regulatory factors, and subsequent manipulations of protein synthesis, in broiler embryos under induced hyperammonemia. Broiler eggs were injected with ammonium acetate solution four times over 48 hours beginning on either embryonic day (ED) 15 or 17. Serum ammonia concentration was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in ammonium acetate injected embryos for both ED17 and ED19 collected samples when compared to sham-injected controls. Expression of mRNA, extracted from pectoralis major of experimental and control embryos, was measured using real-time quantitative PCR for myostatin, myogenic regulatory factors myogenic factor 5, myogenic determination factor 1, myogenin, myogenic regulatory factor 4, and paired box 7. A significantly lower (P < 0.01) myostatin expression was accompanied by a higher serum ammonia concentration in both ED17 and ED19 collected samples. Myogenic factor 5 expression was higher (P < 0.05) in ED17 collected samples administered ammonium acetate. In both ED17 and ED19 collected samples, myogenic regulatory factor 4 was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in ammonium acetate injected embryos. No significant difference was seen in myogenic determination factor 1, myogenin, or paired box 7 expression between treatment groups for either age of sample collection. Additionally, there was no significant difference in BrdU staining of histological samples taken from treated and control embryos. Myostatin protein levels were evaluated by Western blot analysis, and also showed lower myostatin expression (P < 0.05). Overall, it appears possible to inhibit myostatin expression through hyperammonemia, which is expected to have a positive effect on embryonic myogenesis and postnatal muscle growth. PMID:25689990

  19. Putative Regulatory Factors Associated with Intramuscular Fat Content

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Aline S. M.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Koltes, James E.; Fritz-Waters, Eric R.; Lanna, Dante P. D.; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mourão, Gerson B.; Oliveira, Priscila S. N.; Reecy, James M.; Coutinho, Luiz L.

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content is related to insulin resistance, which is an important prediction factor for disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes in human. At the same time, it is an economically important trait, which influences the sensorial and nutritional value of meat. The deposition of IMF is influenced by many factors such as sex, age, nutrition, and genetics. In this study Nellore steers (Bos taurus indicus subspecies) were used to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in IMF content. This was accomplished by identifying differentially expressed genes (DEG), biological pathways and putative regulatory factors. Animals included in this study had extreme genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) for IMF. RNA-seq analysis, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and co-expression network methods, such as partial correlation coefficient with information theory (PCIT), regulatory impact factor (RIF) and phenotypic impact factor (PIF) were utilized to better understand intramuscular adipogenesis. A total of 16,101 genes were analyzed in both groups (high (H) and low (L) GEBV) and 77 DEG (FDR 10%) were identified between the two groups. Pathway Studio software identified 13 significantly over-represented pathways, functional classes and small molecule signaling pathways within the DEG list. PCIT analyses identified genes with a difference in the number of gene-gene correlations between H and L group and detected putative regulatory factors involved in IMF content. Candidate genes identified by PCIT include: ANKRD26, HOXC5 and PPAPDC2. RIF and PIF analyses identified several candidate genes: GLI2 and IGF2 (RIF1), MPC1 and UBL5 (RIF2) and a host of small RNAs, including miR-1281 (PIF). These findings contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie fat content and energy balance in muscle and provide important information for the production of healthier beef for human consumption. PMID:26042666

  20. Interferon regulatory factor 3 in adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ysebrant de Lendonck, Laure; Martinet, Valerie; Goriely, Stanislas

    2014-10-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 plays a key role in innate responses against viruses. Indeed, activation of this transcription factor triggers the expression of type I interferons and downstream interferon-stimulated genes in infected cells. Recent evidences indicate that this pathway also modulates adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the different mechanisms that are implicated in this process. We discuss the role of IRF3 within antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in the polarization of the cellular immune response and its implication in the pathogenesis of immune disorders.

  1. Regulatory role of the respiratory supercomplex factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rydström Lundin, Camilla; Ott, Martin; Ädelroth, Pia; Brzezinski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory supercomplex factors (Rcf) 1 and 2 mediate supramolecular interactions between mitochondrial complexes III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase; cyt. bc1) and IV (cytochrome c oxidase; CytcO). In addition, removal of these polypeptides results in decreased activity of CytcO, but not of cyt. bc1. In the present study, we have investigated the kinetics of ligand binding, the single-turnover reaction of CytcO with O2, and the linked cyt. bc1-CytcO quinol oxidation-oxygen-reduction activities in mitochondria in which Rcf1 or Rcf2 were removed genetically (strains rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ, respectively). The data show that in the rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ strains, in a significant fraction of the population, ligand binding occurs over a time scale that is ∼100-fold faster (τ ≅ 100 μs) than observed with the wild-type mitochondria (τ ≅ 10 ms), indicating structural changes. This effect is specific to removal of Rcf and not dissociation of the cyt. bc1–CytcO supercomplex. Furthermore, in the rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ strains, the single-turnover reaction of CytcO with O2 was incomplete. This observation indicates that the lower activity of CytcO is caused by a fraction of inactive CytcO rather than decreased CytcO activity of the entire population. Furthermore, the data suggest that the Rcf1 polypeptide mediates formation of an electron-transfer bridge from cyt. bc1 to CytcO via a tightly bound cyt. c. We discuss the significance of the proposed regulatory mechanism of Rcf1 and Rcf2 in the context of supramolecular interactions between cyt. bc1 and CytcO. PMID:27432958

  2. Regulatory factors governing adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Hong, HuiQi; Lin, Jaymie Siqi; Chen, Leilei

    2015-03-31

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing, the most prevalent mode of transcript modification in higher eukaryotes, is catalysed by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). A-to-I editing imposes an additional layer of gene regulation as it dictates various aspects of RNA metabolism, including RNA folding, processing, localization and degradation. Furthermore, editing events in exonic regions contribute to proteome diversity as translational machinery decodes inosine as guanosine. Although it has been demonstrated that dysregulated A-to-I editing contributes to various diseases, the precise regulatory mechanisms governing this critical cellular process have yet to be fully elucidated. However, integration of previous studies revealed that regulation of A-to-I editing is multifaceted, weaving an intricate network of auto- and transregulations, including the involvement of virus-originated factors like adenovirus-associated RNA. Taken together, it is apparent that tipping of any regulatory components will have profound effects on A-to-I editing, which in turn contributes to both normal and aberrant physiological conditions. A complete understanding of this intricate regulatory network may ultimately be translated into new therapeutic strategies against diseases driven by perturbed RNA editing events. Herein, we review the current state of knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms governing A-to-I editing and propose the role of other co-factors that may be involved in this complex regulatory process.

  3. Macrophage depletion impairs skeletal muscle regeneration: The roles of regulatory factors for muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Linlin; Zeng, Zhigang; Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie

    2017-03-01

    Though macrophages are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration, which is a complex process, the roles and mechanisms of the macrophages in the process of muscle regeneration are still not fully understood. The objective of this study is to explore the roles of macrophages and the mechanisms involved in the regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. One hundred and twelve C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into muscle contusion and macrophages depleted groups. Their gastrocnemius muscles were harvested at the time points of 12 h, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 d post-injury. The changes in skeletal muscle morphology were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stain. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The data showed that CL-liposomes treatment did affect the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MyoD, myogenin) after injury. In addition, CL-liposomes treatment decreased the expression of regulatory factors of muscle regeneration (HGF, uPA, COX-2, IGF-1, MGF, FGF6) and increased the expression of inflammatory cytokines (TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES) in the late stage of regeneration. Moreover, there were significant correlations between macrophages and some regulatory factors (such as HGF, uPA) for muscle regeneration. These results suggested that macrophages depletion impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and that the regulatory factors for muscle regeneration may play important roles in this process.

  4. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  5. Myogenic regulatory transcription factors regulate growth in rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tenente, Inês M; Hayes, Madeline N; Ignatius, Myron S; McCarthy, Karin; Yohe, Marielle; Sindiri, Sivasish; Gryder, Berkley; Oliveira, Mariana L; Ramakrishnan, Ashwin; Tang, Qin; Chen, Eleanor Y; Petur Nielsen, G; Khan, Javed; Langenau, David M

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric malignacy of muscle with myogenic regulatory transcription factors MYOD and MYF5 being expressed in this disease. Consensus in the field has been that expression of these factors likely reflects the target cell of transformation rather than being required for continued tumor growth. Here, we used a transgenic zebrafish model to show that Myf5 is sufficient to confer tumor-propagating potential to RMS cells and caused tumors to initiate earlier and have higher penetrance. Analysis of human RMS revealed that MYF5 and MYOD are mutually-exclusively expressed and each is required for sustained tumor growth. ChIP-seq and mechanistic studies in human RMS uncovered that MYF5 and MYOD bind common DNA regulatory elements to alter transcription of genes that regulate muscle development and cell cycle progression. Our data support unappreciated and dominant oncogenic roles for MYF5 and MYOD convergence on common transcriptional targets to regulate human RMS growth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19214.001 PMID:28080960

  6. Regulatory network reconstruction using an integral additive model with flexible kernel functions

    PubMed Central

    Novikov, Eugene; Barillot, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of regulatory networks is one of the most challenging tasks of systems biology. A limited amount of experimental data and little prior knowledge make the problem difficult to solve. Although models that are currently used for inferring regulatory networks are sometimes able to make useful predictions about the structures and mechanisms of molecular interactions, there is still a strong demand to develop increasingly universal and accurate approaches for network reconstruction. Results The additive regulation model is represented by a set of differential equations and is frequently used for network inference from time series data. Here we generalize this model by converting differential equations into integral equations with adjustable kernel functions. These kernel functions can be selected based on prior knowledge or defined through iterative improvement in data analysis. This makes the integral model very flexible and thus capable of covering a broad range of biological systems more adequately and specifically than previous models. Conclusion We reconstructed network structures from artificial and real experimental data using differential and integral inference models. The artificial data were simulated using mathematical models implemented in JDesigner. The real data were publicly available yeast cell cycle microarray time series. The integral model outperformed the differential one for all cases. In the integral model, we tested the zero-degree polynomial and single exponential kernels. Further improvements could be expected if the kernel were selected more specifically depending on the system. PMID:18218091

  7. Plants with genetically modified events combined by conventional breeding: an assessment of the need for additional regulatory data.

    PubMed

    Pilacinski, W; Crawford, A; Downey, R; Harvey, B; Huber, S; Hunst, P; Lahman, L K; MacIntosh, S; Pohl, M; Rickard, C; Tagliani, L; Weber, N

    2011-01-01

    Crop varieties with multiple GM events combined by conventional breeding have become important in global agriculture. The regulatory requirements in different countries for such products vary considerably, placing an additional burden on regulatory agencies in countries where the submission of additional data is required and delaying the introduction of innovative products to meet agricultural needs. The process of conventional plant breeding has predictably provided safe food and feed products both historically and in the modern era of plant breeding. Thus, previously approved GM events that have been combined by conventional plant breeding and contain GM traits that are not likely to interact in a manner affecting safety should be considered to be as safe as their conventional counterparts. Such combined GM event crop varieties should require little, if any, additional regulatory data to meet regulatory requirements.

  8. Clinical trials in "emerging markets": regulatory considerations and other factors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Romi; Wang, Ouhong

    2013-11-01

    Clinical studies are being placed in emerging markets as part of global drug development programs to access large pool of eligible patients and to benefit from a cost effective structure. However, over the last few years, the definition of "emerging markets" is being revisited, especially from a regulatory perspective. For purposes of this article, countries outside US, EU and the traditional "western countries" are discussed. Multiple factors are considered for placement of clinical studies such as adherence to Good Clinical Practice (GCP), medical infrastructure & standard of care, number of eligible patients, etc. This article also discusses other quantitative factors such as country's GDP, patent applications, healthcare expenditure, healthcare infrastructure, corruption, innovation, etc. These different factors and indexes are correlated to the number of clinical studies ongoing in the "emerging markets". R&D, healthcare expenditure, technology infrastructure, transparency, and level of innovation, show a significant correlation with the number of clinical trials being conducted in these countries. This is the first analysis of its kind to evaluate and correlate the various other factors to the number of clinical studies in a country.

  9. Reconstructing genome-wide regulatory network of E. coli using transcriptome data and predicted transcription factor activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks play essential roles in living organisms to control growth, keep internal metabolism running and respond to external environmental changes. Understanding the connections and the activity levels of regulators is important for the research of gene regulatory networks. While relevance score based algorithms that reconstruct gene regulatory networks from transcriptome data can infer genome-wide gene regulatory networks, they are unfortunately prone to false positive results. Transcription factor activities (TFAs) quantitatively reflect the ability of the transcription factor to regulate target genes. However, classic relevance score based gene regulatory network reconstruction algorithms use models do not include the TFA layer, thus missing a key regulatory element. Results This work integrates TFA prediction algorithms with relevance score based network reconstruction algorithms to reconstruct gene regulatory networks with improved accuracy over classic relevance score based algorithms. This method is called Gene expression and Transcription factor activity based Relevance Network (GTRNetwork). Different combinations of TFA prediction algorithms and relevance score functions have been applied to find the most efficient combination. When the integrated GTRNetwork method was applied to E. coli data, the reconstructed genome-wide gene regulatory network predicted 381 new regulatory links. This reconstructed gene regulatory network including the predicted new regulatory links show promising biological significances. Many of the new links are verified by known TF binding site information, and many other links can be verified from the literature and databases such as EcoCyc. The reconstructed gene regulatory network is applied to a recent transcriptome analysis of E. coli during isobutanol stress. In addition to the 16 significantly changed TFAs detected in the original paper, another 7 significantly changed TFAs have been detected by

  10. [Requirements for drug approval and additional benefits assessment: Regulatory aspects and experiences].

    PubMed

    Broich, K; Löbker, W; Schulte, A; Beinlich, P; Müller, T

    2016-04-01

    The early assessment of benefits of newly approved drugs with novel active substances or new applications, which came into force on 1 January 2011 still represents a challenge to all parties involved. This article highlights the definitions, regulatory requirements and interaction between drug marketing approval and early assessment of benefits in Germany. The constellation of an extensively harmonized European and even international drug authorization process with a predominantly national regulation of drug reimbursement situation inevitably causes friction, which could be markedly reduced through early joint advisory discussions during the planning phase for pivotal clinical trials. During the year 2015 the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) carried out 300 scientific advice procedures of which 34 were concerned with applications in the field of indications for the central nervous system (CNS). In comparison 98 advisory meetings were held by the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) of which the BfArM provided advice in 12 instances and in 2 cases on CNS indications. Study design, endpoints and appropriate comparative therapies are the key issues in exchanges and discussions between the BfArM, the G‑BA and applicants. Under these aspects the BfArM and G‑BA promote an early and consistent involvement in early advice procedures regarding the prerequisites for drug approval and assessment of additional benefits.

  11. Arabidopsis Ensemble Reverse-Engineered Gene Regulatory Network Discloses Interconnected Transcription Factors in Oxidative Stress[W

    PubMed Central

    Vermeirssen, Vanessa; De Clercq, Inge; Van Parys, Thomas; Van Breusegem, Frank; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The abiotic stress response in plants is complex and tightly controlled by gene regulation. We present an abiotic stress gene regulatory network of 200,014 interactions for 11,938 target genes by integrating four complementary reverse-engineering solutions through average rank aggregation on an Arabidopsis thaliana microarray expression compendium. This ensemble performed the most robustly in benchmarking and greatly expands upon the availability of interactions currently reported. Besides recovering 1182 known regulatory interactions, cis-regulatory motifs and coherent functionalities of target genes corresponded with the predicted transcription factors. We provide a valuable resource of 572 abiotic stress modules of coregulated genes with functional and regulatory information, from which we deduced functional relationships for 1966 uncharacterized genes and many regulators. Using gain- and loss-of-function mutants of seven transcription factors grown under control and salt stress conditions, we experimentally validated 141 out of 271 predictions (52% precision) for 102 selected genes and mapped 148 additional transcription factor-gene regulatory interactions (49% recall). We identified an intricate core oxidative stress regulatory network where NAC13, NAC053, ERF6, WRKY6, and NAC032 transcription factors interconnect and function in detoxification. Our work shows that ensemble reverse-engineering can generate robust biological hypotheses of gene regulation in a multicellular eukaryote that can be tested by medium-throughput experimental validation. PMID:25549671

  12. Inferring the role of transcription factors in regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Veber, Philippe; Guziolowski, Carito; Le Borgne, Michel; Radulescu, Ovidiu; Siegel, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background Expression profiles obtained from multiple perturbation experiments are increasingly used to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks, from well studied, simple organisms up to higher eukaryotes. Admittedly, a key ingredient in developing a reconstruction method is its ability to integrate heterogeneous sources of information, as well as to comply with practical observability issues: measurements can be scarce or noisy. In this work, we show how to combine a network of genetic regulations with a set of expression profiles, in order to infer the functional effect of the regulations, as inducer or repressor. Our approach is based on a consistency rule between a network and the signs of variation given by expression arrays. Results We evaluate our approach in several settings of increasing complexity. First, we generate artificial expression data on a transcriptional network of E. coli extracted from the literature (1529 nodes and 3802 edges), and we estimate that 30% of the regulations can be annotated with about 30 profiles. We additionally prove that at most 40.8% of the network can be inferred using our approach. Second, we use this network in order to validate the predictions obtained with a compendium of real expression profiles. We describe a filtering algorithm that generates particularly reliable predictions. Finally, we apply our inference approach to S. cerevisiae transcriptional network (2419 nodes and 4344 interactions), by combining ChIP-chip data and 15 expression profiles. We are able to detect and isolate inconsistencies between the expression profiles and a significant portion of the model (15% of all the interactions). In addition, we report predictions for 14.5% of all interactions. Conclusion Our approach does not require accurate expression levels nor times series. Nevertheless, we show on both data, real and artificial, that a relatively small number of perturbation experiments are enough to determine a significant portion of

  13. Altered oncomodules underlie chromatin regulatory factors driver mutations.

    PubMed

    Frigola, Joan; Iturbide, Ane; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Peiro, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel

    2016-05-24

    Chromatin regulatory factors (CRFs), are known to be involved in tumorigenesis in several cancer types. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms through which driver alterations of CRFs cause tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here, we developed a CRFs Oncomodules Discovery approach, which mines several sources of cancer genomics and perturbaomics data. The approach prioritizes sets of genes significantly miss-regulated in primary tumors (oncomodules) bearing mutations of driver CRFs. We applied the approach to eleven TCGA tumor cohorts and uncovered oncomodules potentially associated to mutations of five driver CRFs in three cancer types. Our results revealed, for example, the potential involvement of the mTOR pathway in the development of tumors with loss-of-function mutations of MLL2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The experimental validation that MLL2 loss-of-function increases the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to mTOR inhibition lends further support to the validity of our approach. The potential oncogenic modules detected by our approach may guide experiments proposing ways to indirectly target driver mutations of CRFs.

  14. Altered oncomodules underlie chromatin regulatory factors driver mutations

    PubMed Central

    Frigola, Joan; Iturbide, Ane; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Peiro, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin regulatory factors (CRFs), are known to be involved in tumorigenesis in several cancer types. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms through which driver alterations of CRFs cause tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here, we developed a CRFs Oncomodules Discovery approach, which mines several sources of cancer genomics and perturbaomics data. The approach prioritizes sets of genes significantly miss-regulated in primary tumors (oncomodules) bearing mutations of driver CRFs. We applied the approach to eleven TCGA tumor cohorts and uncovered oncomodules potentially associated to mutations of five driver CRFs in three cancer types. Our results revealed, for example, the potential involvement of the mTOR pathway in the development of tumors with loss-of-function mutations of MLL2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The experimental validation that MLL2 loss-of-function increases the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to mTOR inhibition lends further support to the validity of our approach. The potential oncogenic modules detected by our approach may guide experiments proposing ways to indirectly target driver mutations of CRFs. PMID:27095575

  15. 14 CFR § 1203.406 - Additional classification factors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Guides for Original Classification § 1203.406 Additional classification factors... Services will coordinate with the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) Committee and the National... information must be reasonably uniform within the Government. (b) Applicability of classification...

  16. Arenavirus nucleoprotein targets interferon regulatory factor-activating kinase IKKε.

    PubMed

    Pythoud, Christelle; Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Pasqual, Giulia; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kunz, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Arenaviruses perturb innate antiviral defense by blocking induction of type I interferon (IFN) production. Accordingly, the arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) was shown to block activation and nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in response to virus infection. Here, we sought to identify cellular factors involved in innate antiviral signaling targeted by arenavirus NP. Consistent with previous studies, infection with the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) prevented phosphorylation of IRF3 in response to infection with Sendai virus, a strong inducer of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)/mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway of innate antiviral signaling. Using a combination of coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, we found that LCMV NP associates with the IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase IKKε but that, rather unexpectedly, LCMV NP did not bind to the closely related TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1). The NP-IKKε interaction was highly conserved among arenaviruses from different clades. In LCMV-infected cells, IKKε colocalized with NP but not with MAVS located on the outer membrane of mitochondria. LCMV NP bound the kinase domain (KD) of IKKε (IKBKE) and blocked its autocatalytic activity and its ability to phosphorylate IRF3, without undergoing phosphorylation. Together, our data identify IKKε as a novel target of arenavirus NP. Engagement of NP seems to sequester IKKε in an inactive complex. Considering the important functions of IKKε in innate antiviral immunity and other cellular processes, the NP-IKKε interaction likely plays a crucial role in arenavirus-host interaction.

  17. Improvement of modal scaling factors using mass additive technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Allemang, Randall J.; Wei, Max L.; Brown, David L.

    1987-01-01

    A general investigation into the improvement of modal scaling factors of an experimental modal model using additive technique is discussed. Data base required by the proposed method consists of an experimental modal model (a set of complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors) of the original structure and a corresponding set of complex eigenvalues of the mass-added structure. Three analytical methods,i.e., first order and second order perturbation methods, and local eigenvalue modification technique, are proposed to predict the improved modal scaling factors. Difficulties encountered in scaling closely spaced modes are discussed. Methods to compute the necessary rotational modal vectors at the mass additive points are also proposed to increase the accuracy of the analytical prediction.

  18. [Factors associated with the addition of salt to prepared food].

    PubMed

    de Castro, Raquel da Silva Assunção; Giatti, Luana; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2014-05-01

    The scope of this research was to investigate the potential differences between men and women in the addition of salt to prepared food. The study included 47,557 individuals aged 18 to 64 participating in the Risk and Protection Factors for Chronic Disease Surveillance System by Telephone Interview carried out in 26 Brazilian state capitals and the Federal District in 2006. Differences between men and women were tested by the chi-square test and the association magnitudes between the dependent and independent variables were estimated by the Odds Ratio obtained by Multiple Logistic Regression analysis. The prevalence of the addition of salt to prepared food was 8.3%, being higher among men (9,8% vs 6,9%, p < 0.01). After adjustment, the addition of salt to prepared food was higher in individuals with self-rated fair to poor health, reporting cardiovascular disease and living in the North of Brazil. Hypertensive individuals reported addition of less salt to prepared food. Educational level was not associated with salt usage. Men add more salt than women. Public health policies aimed at reducing salt intake by the population should take into account the gender differences in salt intake and the factors that contribute to such differences.

  19. Increments and duplication events of enzymes and transcription factors influence metabolic and regulatory diversity in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected.

  20. Increments and Duplication Events of Enzymes and Transcription Factors Influence Metabolic and Regulatory Diversity in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected. PMID:23922780

  1. Interferon regulatory factors: at the crossroads of immunity, metabolism, and disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guang-Nian; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Li, Hongliang

    2015-02-01

    The interferon-regulatory factor (IRF) family comprises nine members in mammals. Although this transcription factor family was originally thought to function primarily in the immune system, contributing to both the innate immune response and the development of immune cells, recent advances have revealed that IRFs plays critical roles in other biological processes, such as metabolism. Accordingly, abnormalities in the expression and/or function of IRFs have increasingly been linked to disease. Herein, we provide an update on the recent progress regarding the regulation of immune responses and immune cell development associated with IRFs. Additionally, we discuss the relationships between IRFs and immunity, metabolism, and disease, with a particular focus on the role of IRFs as stress sensors. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control in cardiometabolic diseases.

  2. Chromatin Properties of Regulatory DNA Probed by Manipulation of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Nishiyama, Akira; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Transcription factors (TFs) bind to DNA and regulate the transcription of nearby genes. However, only a small fraction of TF binding sites have such regulatory effects. Here we search for the predictors of functional binding sites by carrying out a systematic computational screening of a variety of contextual factors (histone modifications, nuclear lamin-bindings, and cofactor bindings). We used regression analysis to test if contextual factors are associated with upregulation or downregulation of neighboring genes following the induction or knockdown of the 9 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Functional TF binding sites appeared to be either active (i.e., bound by P300, CHD7, mediator, cohesin, and SWI/SNF) or repressed (i.e., with H3K27me3 histone marks and bound by Polycomb factors). Active binding sites mediated the downregulation of nearby genes upon knocking down the activating TFs or inducing repressors. Repressed TF binding sites mediated the upregulation of nearby genes (e.g., poised developmental regulators) upon inducing TFs. In addition, repressed binding sites mediated repressive effects of TFs, identified by the downregulation of target genes after the induction of TFs or by the upregulation of target genes after the knockdown of TFs. The contextual factors associated with functions of DNA-bound TFs were used to improve the identification of candidate target genes regulated by TFs. PMID:24918633

  3. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  4. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C; Côté, Maxime C; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-14

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  5. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors. PMID:27739523

  6. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  7. Regulatory Network Structure as a Dominant Determinant of Transcription Factor Evolutionary Rate

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe-Huntington, Jasmin; Xia, Yu

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks has thus far mostly been studied at the level of cis-regulatory elements. To gain a complete understanding of regulatory network evolution we must also study the evolutionary role of trans-factors, such as transcription factors (TFs). Here, we systematically assess genomic and network-level determinants of TF evolutionary rate in yeast, and how they compare to those of generic proteins, while carefully controlling for differences of the TF protein set, such as expression level. We found significantly distinct trends relating TF evolutionary rate to mRNA expression level, codon adaptation index, the evolutionary rate of physical interaction partners, and, confirming previous reports, to protein-protein interaction degree and regulatory in-degree. We discovered that for TFs, the dominant determinants of evolutionary rate lie in the structure of the regulatory network, such as the median evolutionary rate of target genes and the fraction of species-specific target genes. Decomposing the regulatory network by edge sign, we found that this modular evolution of TFs and their targets is limited to activating regulatory relationships. We show that fast evolving TFs tend to regulate other TFs and niche-specific processes and that their targets show larger evolutionary expression changes than targets of other TFs. We also show that the positive trend relating TF regulatory in-degree and evolutionary rate is likely related to the species-specificity of the transcriptional regulation modules. Finally, we discuss likely causes for TFs' different evolutionary relationship to the physical interaction network, such as the prevalence of transient interactions in the TF subnetwork. This work suggests that positive and negative regulatory networks follow very different evolutionary rules, and that transcription factor evolution is best understood at a network- or systems-level. PMID:23093926

  8. Regulatory components of the alternative complement pathway in endothelial cell cytoplasm, factor H and factor I, are not packaged in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy A; Sartain, Sarah E; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF--but not factor H.

  9. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture.

  10. Glatiramer acetate inhibits degradation of collagen II by suppressing the activity of interferon regulatory factor-1.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huading; Zeng, Chun; Zhao, Huiqing; Lian, Liyi; Dai, Yuhu

    2014-06-06

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) is considered to be the major one contributing to the process of development of osteoarthritis (OA).Interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) is an important transcriptional factor accounting for inflammation response induced by TNF-α. The physiological function of IRF-1 in OA is still unknown. In this study, we reported that the expression levels of IRF-1 in OA chondrocytes were significantly higher compared to those in normal chondrocytes, which was reversed by treatment with Glatiramer acetate (GA), a licensed clinical drug for treating patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS). We also found that GA is able to attenuate the upregulation of IRF-1 induced by TNF-α. Matrix metalloproteinase13 (MMP-13) is one of the downstream target genes of IRF-1, which can induce the degradation of collagen II. Importantly, our results indicated that GA suppressed the expression of MMP-13 as well as the degradation of collagen II. In addition, GA also suppressed TNF-α-induced production of NO and expression of iNOS. Finally, we found that the inhibition of STAT1 activation played a critical role in the inhibitory effects of GA on the induction of IRF-1 and MMP-13. These data suggest that GA might have a potential effect in therapeutic OA.

  11. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP-1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co-localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN-γ stimulation-induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  12. Reconstruction and topological characterization of the sigma factor regulatory network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Rinki; Ravi, Janani; Datta, Pratik; Chen, Tianlong; Schnappinger, Dirk; Bassler, Kevin E.; Balázsi, Gábor; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    Accessory sigma factors, which reprogram RNA polymerase to transcribe specific gene sets, activate bacterial adaptive responses to noxious environments. Here we reconstruct the complete sigma factor regulatory network of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis by an integrated approach. The approach combines identification of direct regulatory interactions between M. tuberculosis sigma factors in an E. coli model system, validation of selected links in M. tuberculosis, and extensive literature review. The resulting network comprises 41 direct interactions among all 13 sigma factors. Analysis of network topology reveals (i) a three-tiered hierarchy initiating at master regulators, (ii) high connectivity and (iii) distinct communities containing multiple sigma factors. These topological features are likely associated with multi-layer signal processing and specialized stress responses involving multiple sigma factors. Moreover, the identification of overrepresented network motifs, such as autoregulation and coregulation of sigma and anti-sigma factor pairs, provides structural information that is relevant for studies of network dynamics. PMID:27029515

  13. Reconstruction and topological characterization of the sigma factor regulatory network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Rinki; Ravi, Janani; Datta, Pratik; Chen, Tianlong; Schnappinger, Dirk; Bassler, Kevin E; Balázsi, Gábor; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2016-03-31

    Accessory sigma factors, which reprogram RNA polymerase to transcribe specific gene sets, activate bacterial adaptive responses to noxious environments. Here we reconstruct the complete sigma factor regulatory network of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis by an integrated approach. The approach combines identification of direct regulatory interactions between M. tuberculosis sigma factors in an E. coli model system, validation of selected links in M. tuberculosis, and extensive literature review. The resulting network comprises 41 direct interactions among all 13 sigma factors. Analysis of network topology reveals (i) a three-tiered hierarchy initiating at master regulators, (ii) high connectivity and (iii) distinct communities containing multiple sigma factors. These topological features are likely associated with multi-layer signal processing and specialized stress responses involving multiple sigma factors. Moreover, the identification of overrepresented network motifs, such as autoregulation and coregulation of sigma and anti-sigma factor pairs, provides structural information that is relevant for studies of network dynamics.

  14. Cell-type specific cis-regulatory networks: insights from Hox transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Polychronidou, Maria; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Hox proteins are a prominent class of transcription factors that specify cell and tissue identities in animal embryos. In sharp contrast to tissue-specifically expressed transcription factors, which coordinate regulatory pathways leading to the differentiation of a selected tissue, Hox proteins are active in many different cell types but are nonetheless able to differentially regulate gene expression in a context-dependent manner. This particular feature makes Hox proteins ideal candidates for elucidating the mechanisms employed by transcription factors to achieve tissue-specific functions in multi-cellular organisms. Here we discuss how the recent genome-wide identification and characterization of Hox cis-regulatory elements has provided insight concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying the high spatiotemporal specificity of Hox proteins. In particular, it was shown that Hox transcriptional outputs depend on the cell-type specific interplay of the different Hox proteins with co-regulatory factors as well as with epigenetic modifiers. Based on these observations it becomes clear that cell-type specific approaches are required for dissecting the tissue-specific Hox regulatory code. Identification and comparative analysis of Hox cis-regulatory elements driving target gene expression in different cell types in combination with analyses on how cofactors, epigenetic modifiers and protein-protein interactions mediate context-dependent Hox function will elucidate the mechanistic basis of tissue-specific gene regulation.

  15. A role for the transcription factor Helios in human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Goldberg, Monica V.; Harris, Timothy J.; Yen, Hung-Rong; Bruno, Tullia C.; Durham, Nicholas M.; Hipkiss, Edward L.; Pyle, Kristin J.; Wada, Satoshi; Pan, Fan; Pardoll, Drew M.; Drake, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    Relative up-regulation of the Ikaros family transcription factor Helios in natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been reported by several groups. However, a role for Helios in regulatory T cells has not yet been described. Here, we show that Helios is upregulated in CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments indicated that Helios binds to the FoxP3 promoter. These data were further corroborated by experiments showing that knocking-down Helios with siRNA oligonucleotides results in down-regulation of FoxP3. Functionally, we found that suppression of Helios message in CD4+CD25+ T cells significantly attenuates their suppressive function. Taken together, these data suggest that Helios may play an important role in regulatory T cell function and support the concept that Helios may be a novel target to manipulate Treg activity in a clinical setting. PMID:20226531

  16. Decreased Transcription Factor Binding Levels Nearby Primate Pseudogenes Suggest Regulatory Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Gavin M.; Wilson, Michael D.; Moses, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of pseudogene degeneration at the coding level are well-known, such as a shift toward neutral rates of nonsynonymous substitutions and gain of frameshift mutations. In contrast, degeneration of pseudogene transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here, we test two predictions of regulatory degeneration along a pseudogenized lineage: 1) Decreased transcription factor (TF) binding and 2) accelerated evolution in putative cis-regulatory regions. We find evidence for decreased TF binding levels nearby two primate pseudogenes compared with functional liver genes. However, the majority of TF-bound sequences nearby pseudogenes do not show evidence for lineage-specific accelerated rates of evolution. We conclude that decreases in TF binding level could be a marker for regulatory degeneration, while sequence degeneration in primate cis-regulatory modules may be obscured by background rates of TF binding site turnover. PMID:26882985

  17. Sparse Additive Ordinary Differential Equations for Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hulin; Lu, Tao; Xue, Hongqi; Liang, Hua

    2014-04-02

    The gene regulation network (GRN) is a high-dimensional complex system, which can be represented by various mathematical or statistical models. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) model is one of the popular dynamic GRN models. High-dimensional linear ODE models have been proposed to identify GRNs, but with a limitation of the linear regulation effect assumption. In this article, we propose a sparse additive ODE (SA-ODE) model, coupled with ODE estimation methods and adaptive group LASSO techniques, to model dynamic GRNs that could flexibly deal with nonlinear regulation effects. The asymptotic properties of the proposed method are established and simulation studies are performed to validate the proposed approach. An application example for identifying the nonlinear dynamic GRN of T-cell activation is used to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method.

  18. Sparse Additive Ordinary Differential Equations for Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hulin; Lu, Tao; Xue, Hongqi; Liang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Summary The gene regulation network (GRN) is a high-dimensional complex system, which can be represented by various mathematical or statistical models. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) model is one of the popular dynamic GRN models. High-dimensional linear ODE models have been proposed to identify GRNs, but with a limitation of the linear regulation effect assumption. In this article, we propose a sparse additive ODE (SA-ODE) model, coupled with ODE estimation methods and adaptive group LASSO techniques, to model dynamic GRNs that could flexibly deal with nonlinear regulation effects. The asymptotic properties of the proposed method are established and simulation studies are performed to validate the proposed approach. An application example for identifying the nonlinear dynamic GRN of T-cell activation is used to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method. PMID:25061254

  19. Pestivirus Npro Directly Interacts with Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Monomer and Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Holthauzen, Luis Marcelo F.; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is a transcription factor involved in the activation of type I alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) in response to viral infection. Upon viral infection, the IRF3 monomer is activated into a phosphorylated dimer, which induces the transcription of interferon genes in the nucleus. Viruses have evolved several ways to target IRF3 in order to subvert the innate immune response. Pestiviruses, such as classical swine fever virus (CSFV), target IRF3 for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. This is mediated by the viral protein Npro that interacts with IRF3, but the molecular details for this interaction are largely unknown. We used recombinant Npro and IRF3 proteins and show that Npro interacts with IRF3 directly without additional proteins and forms a soluble 1:1 complex. The full-length IRF3 but not merely either of the individual domains is required for this interaction. The interaction between Npro and IRF3 is not dependent on the activation state of IRF3, since Npro binds to a constitutively active form of IRF3 in the presence of its transcriptional coactivator, CREB-binding protein (CBP). The results indicate that the Npro-binding site on IRF3 encompasses a region that is unperturbed by the phosphorylation and subsequent activation of IRF3 and thus excludes the dimer interface and CBP-binding site. IMPORTANCE The pestivirus N-terminal protease, Npro, is essential for evading the host's immune system by facilitating the degradation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). However, the nature of the Npro interaction with IRF3, including the IRF3 species (inactive monomer versus activated dimer) that Npro targets for degradation, is largely unknown. We show that classical swine fever virus Npro and porcine IRF3 directly interact in solution and that full-length IRF3 is required for interaction with Npro. Additionally, Npro interacts with a constitutively active form of IRF3 bound to its transcriptional

  20. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M; Antony, Paul M; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; Del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels.

  1. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M.; Antony, Paul M.; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels

  2. The transcription factor regulatory factor X1 increases the expression of neuronal glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kaiwen; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-07-28

    Glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAAT) play an important role in maintaining extracellular glutamate homeostasis and regulating glutamate neurotransmission. However, very few studies have investigated the regulation of EAAT expression. A binding sequence for the regulatory factor X1 (RFX1) exists in the promoter region of the gene encoding for EAAT3, a neuronal EAAT, but not in the promoter regions of the genes encoding for EAAT1 and EAAT2, two glial EAATs. RFX proteins are transcription factors binding to X-boxes of DNA sequences. Although RFX proteins are necessary for the normal function of sensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, their roles in the mammalian brain are not known. We showed that RFX1 increased EAAT3 expression and activity in C6 glioma cells. RFX1 binding complexes were found in the nuclear extracts of C6 cells. The activity of EAAT3 promoter as measured by luciferase reporter activity was increased by RFX1 in C6 cells and the neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells. However, RFX1 did not change the expression of EAAT2 proteins in the NRK52E cells. RFX1 proteins were expressed in the neurons of rat brain. A high expression level of RFX1 proteins was found in the neurons of cerebral cortex and Purkinje cells. Knockdown of the RFX1 expression by RFX1 antisense oligonucleotides decreased EAAT3 expression in rat cortical neurons in culture. These results suggest that RFX1 enhances the activity of EAAT3 promoter to increase the expression of EAAT3 proteins. This study provides initial evidence for the regulation of gene expression in the nervous cells by RFX1.

  3. Priming of human monocytes for enhanced lipopolysaccharide responses: expression of alpha interferon, interferon regulatory factors, and tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, M P; Zoon, K C

    1993-01-01

    Culture of human monocytes with either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) results in a primed state, during which these cells express heightened responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The production of IFN-alpha in response to LPS by human monocytes has an absolute requirement for priming. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) expression is also greatly enhanced in primed monocytes after LPS stimulation, but unlike IFN-alpha, TNF is readily expressed in unprimed monocytes as well. In an effort to determine the molecular events associated with IFN-alpha induction in this system, freshly isolated human monocytes were primed by culture with either IFN-gamma or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with LPS; expression of IFN-alpha subtype 2 (IFN-alpha 2), IFN regulatory factors (IRFs), and TNF was assessed by Northern (RNA blot) analysis. IRF-1 mRNA is expressed at high levels in monocytes and is regulated by both LPS and priming cytokines, but its expression alone does not correlate with the induction of IFN-alpha 2 expression. IRF-2 mRNA is expressed in a more gradual manner following LPS stimulation, implying a possible feedback mechanism for inhibiting IFN-alpha expression. However, nuclear run-on analysis indicates that IFN-alpha 2 is not transcriptionally modulated in this system, in striking contrast to TNF, which is clearly regulated at the transcriptional level. In addition, IFN-alpha 2 mRNA accumulation is superinduced when primed monocytes are treated with LPS plus cycloheximide, while TNF mRNA is relatively unaffected. The results demonstrate that priming can affect subsequent LPS-induced gene expression at different levels in human monocytes. Images PMID:8335353

  4. A regulatory cascade of three transcription factors in a single specific neuron, DVC, in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Feng, Huiyun; Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M; Hope, Ian A

    2012-02-15

    Homeobox proteins are critical regulators of developmental gene transcription and cell specification. Many insights into transcriptional regulation have been gained from studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We investigated the expression and regulation of the C. elegans homeobox gene ceh-63, which encodes a single-homeodomain transcription factor of 152 amino acids. ceh-63 is expressed in the interneuron DVC in both sexes, from late embryogenesis through adulthood, and two pairs of uterine cells in reproductive hermaphrodites only. A reporter gene fusion, encoding GFP fused to the full-length CEH-63, also drove weak inconsistent expression in additional unidentified cells in the head and tail. A potential ceh-63 null mutant had no obvious abnormalities, except for a possible increase in subtle defects of the DVC axon projection. No behavioural responses were observed upon either laser ablation of DVC or activation of DVC through light stimulation of channelrhodopsin-2 specifically expressed in this neuron. The function of DVC therefore remains enigmatic. A transcriptional regulatory cascade operating in DVC was defined from the LIM-homeodomain protein CEH-14 through CEH-63 to the helix-turn-helix transcription factor MBR-1. Both CEH-14 and CEH-63 individually bound the mbr-1 promoter in a yeast one-hybrid assay. A model is proposed suggesting that CEH-14 activates ceh-63 and then along with CEH-63 co-ordinately activates mbr-1.

  5. Specific detection of interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5): A case of antibody inequality

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; De, Saurav; Li, Dan; Song, Su; Matta, Bharati; Barnes, Betsy J.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is a member of the IRF family of transcription factors. IRF5 was first identified and characterized as a transcriptional regulator of type I interferon expression after virus infection. In addition to its critical role(s) in the regulation and development of host immunity, subsequent studies revealed important roles for IRF5 in autoimmunity, cancer, obesity, pain, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism. Based on these important disease-related findings, a large number of commercial antibodies have become available to study the expression and function of IRF5. Here we validate a number of these antibodies for the detection of IRF5 by immunoblot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry using well-established positive and negative controls. Somewhat surprising, the majority of commercial antibodies tested were unable to specifically recognize human or mouse IRF5. We present data on antibodies that do specifically recognize human or mouse IRF5 in a particular application. These findings reiterate the importance of proper controls and molecular weight standards for the analysis of protein expression. Given that dysregulated IRF5 expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including autoimmune and cancer, results indicate that caution should be used in the evaluation and interpretation of IRF5 expression analysis. PMID:27481535

  6. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Results Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. Conclusions In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs. PMID:22672438

  7. Identification and validation of regulatory SNPs that modulate transcription factor chromatin binding and gene expression in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Jung, Segun; DebRoy, Auditi R.; Davuluri, Ramana V.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common solid tumor for cancer related deaths in American men. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the increased risk of PCa. Because most of the susceptibility SNPs are located in noncoding regions, little is known about their functional mechanisms. We hypothesize that functional SNPs reside in cell type-specific regulatory elements that mediate the binding of critical transcription factors (TFs), which in turn result in changes in target gene expression. Using PCa-specific functional genomics data, here we identify 38 regulatory candidate SNPs and their target genes in PCa. Through risk analysis by incorporating gene expression and clinical data, we identify 6 target genes (ZG16B, ANKRD5, RERE, FAM96B, NAALADL2 and GTPBP10) as significant predictors of PCa biochemical recurrence. In addition, 5 SNPs (rs2659051, rs10936845, rs9925556, rs6057110 and rs2742624) are selected for experimental validation using Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), dual-luciferase reporter assay in LNCaP cells, showing allele-specific enhancer activity. Furthermore, we delete the rs2742624-containing region using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing and observe the drastic downregulation of its target gene UPK3A. Taken together, our results illustrate that this new methodology can be applied to identify regulatory SNPs and their target genes that likely impact PCa risk. We suggest that similar studies can be performed to characterize regulatory variants in other diseases. PMID:27409348

  8. PlantTFDB 4.0: toward a central hub for transcription factors and regulatory interactions in plants

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jinpu; Tian, Feng; Yang, De-Chang; Meng, Yu-Qi; Kong, Lei; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2017-01-01

    With the goal of providing a comprehensive, high-quality resource for both plant transcription factors (TFs) and their regulatory interactions with target genes, we upgraded plant TF database PlantTFDB to version 4.0 (http://planttfdb.cbi.pku.edu.cn/). In the new version, we identified 320 370 TFs from 165 species, presenting a more comprehensive genomic TF repertoires of green plants. Besides updating the pre-existing abundant functional and evolutionary annotation for identified TFs, we generated three new types of annotation which provide more directly clues to investigate functional mechanisms underlying: (i) a set of high-quality, non-redundant TF binding motifs derived from experiments; (ii) multiple types of regulatory elements identified from high-throughput sequencing data; (iii) regulatory interactions curated from literature and inferred by combining TF binding motifs and regulatory elements. In addition, we upgraded previous TF prediction server, and set up four novel tools for regulation prediction and functional enrichment analyses. Finally, we set up a novel companion portal PlantRegMap (http://plantregmap.cbi.pku.edu.cn) for users to access the regulation resource and analysis tools conveniently. PMID:27924042

  9. MicroRNA and Transcription Factor Gene Regulatory Network Analysis Reveals Key Regulatory Elements Associated with Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Ranjbar, Bijan; Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; M. Khan, Faiz; Schmitz, Ulf; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Gupta, Shailendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances in multi-omics data generation and integration approaches help elucidate genetic features of complex biological traits and diseases such as prostate cancer. Due to its heterogeneity, the identification of key functional components involved in the regulation and progression of prostate cancer is a methodological challenge. In this study, we identified key regulatory interactions responsible for primary to metastasis transitions in prostate cancer using network inference approaches by integrating patient derived transcriptomic and miRomics data into gene/miRNA/transcription factor regulatory networks. One such network was derived for each of the clinical states of prostate cancer based on differentially expressed and significantly correlated gene, miRNA and TF pairs from the patient data. We identified key elements of each network using a network analysis approach and validated our results using patient survival analysis. We observed that HOXD10, BCL2 and PGR are the most important factors affected in primary prostate samples, whereas, in the metastatic state, STAT3, JUN and JUNB are playing a central role. Benefiting integrative networks our analysis suggests that some of these molecules were targeted by several overexpressed miRNAs which may have a major effect on the dysregulation of these molecules. For example, in the metastatic tumors five miRNAs (miR-671-5p, miR-665, miR-663, miR-512-3p and miR-371-5p) are mainly responsible for the dysregulation of STAT3 and hence can provide an opportunity for early detection of metastasis and development of alternative therapeutic approaches. Our findings deliver new details on key functional components in prostate cancer progression and provide opportunities for the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. PMID:28005952

  10. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  11. Dynamic Evolution of Immune System Regulators: The History of the Interferon Regulatory Factor Family

    PubMed Central

    Nehyba, Jiří; Hrdličková, Radmila

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript presents the first extensive phylogenetics analysis of a key family of immune regulators, the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family. The IRF family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress responses, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Several times during their evolution, the IRF genes have undergone expansion and diversification. These genes were also completely lost on two separate occasions in large groups of metazoans. The origin of the IRF family coincides with the appearance of multicellularity in animals. IRF genes are present in all principal metazoan groups, including sea sponges, placozoans, comb jellies, cnidarians, and bilaterians. Although the number of IRF family members does not exceed two in sponges and placozoans, this number reached five in cnidarians. At least four additional independent expansions lead up to 11 members in different groups of bilaterians. In contrast, the IRF genes either disappeared or mutated beyond recognition in roundworms and insects, the two groups that include most of the metazoan species. The IRF family separated very early into two branches ultimately leading to vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 supergroups (SGs). Genes encoding the IRF-SGs are present in all bilaterians and cnidarians. The evolution of vertebrate IRF family members further proceeded with at least two additional steps. First, close to the appearance of the first vertebrate, the IRF family probably expanded to four family members, predecessors of the four vertebrate IRF groups (IRF1, 3, 4, 5 groups). In the second step, 10 vertebrate family members evolved from these four genes, likely as a result of the 2-fold duplication of the entire genome. Interestingly, the IRF family coevolved with the Rel/NF-κB family with which it shares some important evolutionary characteristics, including roles in defense responses, metazoan specificity, extensive diversification in vertebrates, and elimination

  12. Boolean Modelling Reveals New Regulatory Connections between Transcription Factors Orchestrating the Development of the Ventral Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Lovrics, Anna; Gao, Yu; Juhász, Bianka; Bock, István; Byrne, Helen M.; Dinnyés, András; Kovács, Krisztián A.

    2014-01-01

    We have assembled a network of cell-fate determining transcription factors that play a key role in the specification of the ventral neuronal subtypes of the spinal cord on the basis of published transcriptional interactions. Asynchronous Boolean modelling of the network was used to compare simulation results with reported experimental observations. Such comparison highlighted the need to include additional regulatory connections in order to obtain the fixed point attractors of the model associated with the five known progenitor cell types located in the ventral spinal cord. The revised gene regulatory network reproduced previously observed cell state switches between progenitor cells observed in knock-out animal models or in experiments where the transcription factors were overexpressed. Furthermore the network predicted the inhibition of Irx3 by Nkx2.2 and this prediction was tested experimentally. Our results provide evidence for the existence of an as yet undescribed inhibitory connection which could potentially have significance beyond the ventral spinal cord. The work presented in this paper demonstrates the strength of Boolean modelling for identifying gene regulatory networks. PMID:25398016

  13. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element’s Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a “gradient effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a “threshold effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor. PMID:27538250

  14. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element's Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns.

    PubMed

    Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Lamaze, Fabien C; Deschênes, Astrid; Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Belleau, Pascal; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a "gradient effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a "threshold effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor.

  15. Does the Transcription Factor NemR Use a Regulatory Sulfenamide Bond to Sense Bleach?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Michael Jeffrey; Li, Yan; Leichert, Lars Ingo-Ole

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reactive chlorine species (RCS), such as hypochlorous acid (i.e., bleach), are antimicrobial oxidants produced by the innate immune system. Like many redox-regulated transcription factors, the Escherichia coli repressor NemR responds to RCS by using the reversible oxidation of highly conserved cysteines to alter its DNA-binding affinity. However, earlier work showed that RCS response in NemR does not depend on any commonly known oxidative cysteine modifications. We have now determined the crystal structure of NemR, showing that the regulatory cysteine, Cys106, is in close proximity to a highly conserved lysine (Lys175). We used crystallographic, biochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses to analyze the role of this lysine residue in RCS sensing. Based on our results, we hypothesize that RCS treatment of NemR results in the formation of a reversible Cys106-Lys175 sulfenamide bond. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of a protein whose function is regulated by a cysteine–lysine sulfenamide thiol switch, constituting a novel addition to the biological repertoire of functional redox switches. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 747–754. PMID:25867078

  16. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 Has a Protective Role in the Host Response to Endotoxic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Paige; Moreland, Jessica G.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF) 6, a member of the IRF family, is essential for epidermal and orofacial embryonic development. Irf6 is strongly expressed in keratinocytes, in which it regulates epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and migration. A recent role for Irf6 in Toll-like receptor 2-dependent chemokine gene expression was also reported in an epithelial cell line. However, a function for Irf6 in innate immune cells was not previously reported. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of Irf6 in bone marrow-derived neutrophils and macrophages. We show here, using a conditional knockout of Irf6 in lysosymeM expressing cells, that Irf6 is required for resistance to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. In addition, Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived neutrophils exhibited increased chemotactic index and velocity compared with wild-type cells in vitro. TLR4-specific KC and IL6 secretions were upregulated in Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These cells also exhibited an increased level of phosphorylated IkBa. Collectively, our findings suggest a role for Irf6 in the resistance to endotoxic shock due to NFk-B-mediated alteration of cytokine production. PMID:27035130

  17. Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengtao; Lee, Heuiran; Guo, Jie; Neipel, Frank; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Ozato, Keiko; Jung, Jae U.

    1998-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are a family of multifunctional cytokines with antiviral activities. The K9 open reading frame of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) exhibits significant homology with cellular IFN regulatory factors (IRFs). We have investigated the functional consequence of K9 expression in IFN-mediated signal transduction. Expression of K9 dramatically repressed transcriptional activation induced by IFN-α, -β, and -γ. Further, it induced transformation of NIH 3T3 cells, resulting in morphologic changes, focus formation, and growth in reduced-serum conditions. The expression of antisense K9 in KSHV-infected BCBL-1 cells consistently increased IFN-mediated transcriptional activation but drastically decreased the expression of certain KSHV genes. Thus, the K9 gene of KSHV encodes the first virus-encoded IRF (v-IRF) which functions as a repressor for cellular IFN-mediated signal transduction. In addition, v-IRF likely plays an important role in regulating KSHV gene expression. These results suggest that KSHV employs an unique mechanism to antagonize IFN-mediated antiviral activity by harboring a functional v-IRF. PMID:9620998

  18. Does the Transcription Factor NemR Use a Regulatory Sulfenamide Bond to Sense Bleach?

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael Jeffrey; Li, Yan; Leichert, Lars Ingo-Ole; Xu, Zhaohui; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-09-20

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS), such as hypochlorous acid (i.e., bleach), are antimicrobial oxidants produced by the innate immune system. Like many redox-regulated transcription factors, the Escherichia coli repressor NemR responds to RCS by using the reversible oxidation of highly conserved cysteines to alter its DNA-binding affinity. However, earlier work showed that RCS response in NemR does not depend on any commonly known oxidative cysteine modifications. We have now determined the crystal structure of NemR, showing that the regulatory cysteine, Cys106, is in close proximity to a highly conserved lysine (Lys175). We used crystallographic, biochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses to analyze the role of this lysine residue in RCS sensing. Based on our results, we hypothesize that RCS treatment of NemR results in the formation of a reversible Cys106-Lys175 sulfenamide bond. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of a protein whose function is regulated by a cysteine-lysine sulfenamide thiol switch, constituting a novel addition to the biological repertoire of functional redox switches.

  19. Coupling of tandem Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor (Smurf) WW domains modulates target specificity.

    PubMed

    Chong, P Andrew; Lin, Hong; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2010-10-26

    Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in degradation of TGF-β receptors and other targets. Smurf2 WW domains recognize PPXY (PY) motifs on ubiquitin ligase target proteins or on adapters, such as Smad7, that bind to E3 target proteins. We previously demonstrated that the isolated WW3 domain of Smurf2, but not the WW2 domain, can directly bind to a Smad7 PY motif. We show here that the WW2 augments this interaction by binding to the WW3 and making auxiliary contacts with the PY motif and a novel E/D-S/T-P motif, which is N-terminal to all Smad PY motifs. The WW2 likely enhances the selectivity of Smurf2 for the Smad proteins. NMR titrations confirm that Smad1 and Smad2 are bound by Smurf2 with the same coupled WW domain arrangement used to bind Smad7. The analogous WW domains in the short isoform of Smurf1 recognize the Smad7 PY peptide using the same coupled mechanism. However, a longer Smurf1 isoform, which has an additional 26 residues in the inter-WW domain linker, is only partially able to use the coupled WW domain binding mechanism. The longer linker results in a decrease in affinity for the Smad7 peptide. Interdomain coupling of WW domains enhances selectivity and enables the tuning of interactions by isoform switching.

  20. Modulation of neoplastic gene regulatory pathways by the RNA-binding factor AUF1

    PubMed Central

    Zucconi, Beth E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    The mRNA-binding protein AUF1 regulates the expression of many key players in cancer including proto-oncogenes, regulators of apoptosis and the cell cycle, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, principally by directing the decay kinetics of their encoded mRNAs. Most studies support an mRNA-destabilizing role for AUF1, although other findings suggest additional functions for this factor. In this review, we explore how changes in AUF1 isoform distribution, subcellular localization, and post-translational protein modifications can influence the metabolism of targeted mRNAs. However, several lines of evidence also support a role for AUF1 in the initiation and/or development of cancer. Many AUF1-targeted transcripts encode products that control pro- and anti-oncogenic processes. Also, overexpression of AUF1 enhances tumorigenesis in murine models, and AUF1 levels are enhanced in some tumors. Finally, signaling cascades that modulate AUF1 function are deregulated in some cancerous tissues. Together, these features suggest that AUF1 may play a prominent role in regulating the expression of many genes that can contribute to tumorigenic phenotypes, and that this post-transcriptional regulatory control point may be subverted by diverse mechanisms in neoplasia. PMID:21622178

  1. Fruit flies with additional expression of the elongation factor EF-1 alpha live longer.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, J C; Walldorf, U; Hug, P; Gehring, W J

    1989-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the decrease in protein synthesis that accompanies aging is preceded by a decrease in elongation factor EF-1 alpha protein and mRNA. Here we show that Drosophila transformed with a P-element vector containing an EF-1 alpha gene under control of hsp70 regulatory sequences have a longer life-span than control flies. Images PMID:2508089

  2. The regulatory network of B-cell differentiation: a focused view of early B-cell factor 1 function

    PubMed Central

    Boller, Sören; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, many studies have investigated the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of lineage decision in the hematopoietic system. These efforts led to a model in which extrinsic signals and intrinsic cues establish a permissive chromatin context upon which a regulatory network of transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers act to guide the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. These networks include lineage-specific factors that further modify the epigenetic landscape and promote the generation of specific cell types. The process of B lymphopoiesis requires a set of transcription factors, including Ikaros, PU.1, E2A, and FoxO1 to ‘prime’ cis-regulatory regions for subsequent activation by the B-lineage-specific transcription factors EBF1 and Pax-5. The expression of EBF1 is initiated by the combined action of E2A and FoxO1, and it is further enhanced and maintained by several positive feedback loops that include Pax-5 and IL-7 signaling. EBF1 acts in concert with Ikaros, PU.1, Runx1, E2A, FoxO1, and Pax-5 to establish the B cell-specific transcription profile. EBF1 and Pax-5 also collaborate to repress alternative cell fates and lock cells into the B-lineage fate. In addition to the functions of EBF1 in establishing and maintaining B-cell identity, EBF1 is required to coordinate differentiation with cell proliferation and survival. PMID:25123279

  3. Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Qiu; Nagarajan, Harish; Embree, Mallory; Shieu, Wendy; Abate, Elisa; Juarez, Katy; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Elkins, James G; Nevin, Kelly P.; Barrett, Christian; Lovley, Derek; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zengler, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  4. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses.

  5. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses. PMID:26103991

  6. Assessment of diurnal systemic dose of agrochemicals in regulatory toxicity testing--an integrated approach without additional animal use.

    PubMed

    Saghir, Shakil A; Bartels, Michael J; Rick, David L; McCoy, Alene T; Rasoulpour, Reza J; Ellis-Hutchings, Robert G; Sue Marty, M; Terry, Claire; Bailey, Jason P; Billington, Richard; Bus, James S

    2012-07-01

    Integrated toxicokinetics (TK) data provide information on the rate, extent and duration of systemic exposure across doses, species, strains, gender, and life stages within a toxicology program. While routine for pharmaceuticals, TK assessments of non-pharmaceuticals are still relatively rare, and have never before been included in a full range of guideline studies for a new agrochemical. In order to better understand the relationship between diurnal systemic dose (AUC(24h)) and toxicity of agrochemicals, TK analyses in the study animals is now included in all short- (excluding acute), medium- and long-term guideline mammalian toxicity studies including reproduction/developmental tests. This paper describes a detailed procedure for the implementation of TK in short-, medium- and long-term regulatory toxicity studies, without the use of satellite animals, conducted on three agrochemicals (X11422208, 2,4-D and X574175). In these studies, kinetically-derived maximum doses (KMD) from short-term studies instead of, or along with, maximum tolerated doses (MTD) were used for the selection of the high dose in subsequent longer-term studies. In addition to leveraging TK data to guide dose level selection, the integrated program was also used to select the most appropriate method of oral administration (i.e., gavage versus dietary) of test materials for rat and rabbit developmental toxicity studies. The integrated TK data obtained across toxicity studies (without the use of additional/satellite animals) provided data critical to understanding differences in response across doses, species, strains, sexes, and life stages. Such data should also be useful in mode of action studies and to improve human risk assessments.

  7. Mining 3D genome structure populations identifies major factors governing the stability of regulatory communities

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Li, Wenyuan; Tjong, Harianto; Hao, Shengli; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Qingjiao; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Bing; Alber, Frank; Jasmine Zhou, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) genome structures vary from cell to cell even in an isogenic sample. Unlike protein structures, genome structures are highly plastic, posing a significant challenge for structure-function mapping. Here we report an approach to comprehensively identify 3D chromatin clusters that each occurs frequently across a population of genome structures, either deconvoluted from ensemble-averaged Hi-C data or from a collection of single-cell Hi-C data. Applying our method to a population of genome structures (at the macrodomain resolution) of lymphoblastoid cells, we identify an atlas of stable inter-chromosomal chromatin clusters. A large number of these clusters are enriched in binding of specific regulatory factors and are therefore defined as ‘Regulatory Communities.' We reveal two major factors, centromere clustering and transcription factor binding, which significantly stabilize such communities. Finally, we show that the regulatory communities differ substantially from cell to cell, indicating that expression variability could be impacted by genome structures. PMID:27240697

  8. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures. PMID:25425016

  9. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, Ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-11-26

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures.

  10. Assessing efficacy and therapeutic claims in emerging indications for recombinant factor VIIa: regulatory perspectives.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Albert

    2006-01-01

    When compared with the evidence-based, cost-effectiveness criteria underpinning most government reimbursement schemes in the social market economies, the three regulatory hurdles of safety, quality and efficacy are probably of modest impact in influencing increased usage of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa; NovoSeven, Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark). Nevertheless, efficacy claims must be supported if regulatory approval is to be granted for the wider range of indications that have been proposed for rFVIIa. With the refinement of clinical trial designs over the past 40 years, the randomized controlled trial (RCT) has assumed the role of gold standard, providing the highest level of evidence for therapeutic efficacy. However, it is incorrect to assume that regulatory authorities give sole credence to RCTs in assessing claims. It is noteworthy that the indications already accepted for rFVIIa by international regulatory authorities--including the treatment of inhibitors to factor VIII and factor IX, substitution for FVII deficiency, and treatment of Glanzmann's thrombasthenia--were supported not by RCTs but by studies conventionally considered to provide modest evidence levels. Therefore, the use of studies other than RCTs for the more recently proposed indications for rFVIIa in a range of conditions requiring hemostatic correction is perfectly feasible. What regulators expect are well-conducted and well-described studies adhering to principles of good clinical practice, which can be scrutinized for evidence of clinical efficacy and which are based on the initially proven principle for the drug. This paper discusses the regulatory history of rFVIIa in the major regulatory authorities and assesses the route needed to support claims being made in the mainstream literature. Recent episodes where post-market events have forced regulators to be more than usually cautious will be used as examples to suggest possible pitfalls to the extension of approved claims for

  11. Comparative analysis of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Vargas, Lev; Santillán, Moisés

    2008-01-01

    Background The regulatory interactions between transcription factors (TF) and regulated genes (RG) in a species genome can be lumped together in a single directed graph. The TF's and RG's conform the nodes of this graph, while links are drawn whenever a transcription factor regulates a gene's expression. Projections onto TF nodes can be constructed by linking every two nodes regulating a common gene. Similarly, projections onto RG nodes can be made by linking every two regulated genes sharing at least one common regulator. Recent studies of the connectivity pattern in the transcription-factor regulatory network of many organisms have revealed some interesting properties. However, the differences between TF and RG nodes have not been widely explored. Results After analysing the RG and TF projections of the transcription-factor gene regulatory networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found several common characteristic as well as some noticeable differences. To better understand these differences, we compared the properties of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae RG- and TF-projected networks with those of the corresponding projections built from randomized versions of the original bipartite networks. These last results indicate that the observed differences are mostly due to the very different ratios of TF to RG counts of the E. coli and S. cerevisiae bipartite networks, rather than to their having different connectivity patterns. Conclusion Since E. coli is a prokaryotic organism while S. cerevisiae is eukaryotic, there are important differences between them concerning processing of mRNA before translation, DNA packing, amount of junk DNA, and gene regulation. From the results in this paper we conclude that the most important effect such differences have had on the development of the corresponding transcription-factor gene regulatory networks is their very different ratios of TF to RG numbers. This ratio is more than three times larger in S

  12. Regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor-α genetic variations

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YANGZHOU; HAN, NING; LI, QINCHUAN; LI, ZENGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genetic variations. The GSE5760 expression profile data, which was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, contained 30 wild-type (WT) and 28 mutation (MUT) samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two types of samples were identified using the Student's t-test, and the corresponding microRNAs (miRNAs) were screened using WebGestalt software. An integrated miRNA-DEG network was constructed using the Cytoscape software, based on the interactions between the DEGs, as identified using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, and the correlation between miRNAs and their target genes. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and the KEGG Orthology Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 390 DEGS between the WT and MUT samples, along with 11 -associated miRNAs, were identified. The integrated miRNA-DEG network consisted of 38 DEGs and 11 miRNAs. Within this network, COPS2 was found to be associated with transcriptional functions, while FUS was found to be involved in mRNA metabolic processes. Other DEGs, including FBXW7 and CUL3, were enriched in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway. In addition, miR-15 was predicted to target COPS2 and CUL3. The results of the present study suggested that COPS2, FUS, FBXW7 and CUL3 may be associated with sepsis in patients with TNF-α genetic variations. In the progression of sepsis, FBXW7 and CUL3 may participate in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway, whereas COPS2 may regulate the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of the FUS protein. Furthermore, COPS2 and CUL3 may be novel targets of miR-15. PMID:27347057

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  14. Evolution of DNA-Binding Sites of a Floral Master Regulatory Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Muiño, Jose M.; de Bruijn, Suzanne; Pajoro, Alice; Geuten, Koen; Vingron, Martin; Angenent, Gerco C.; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Flower development is controlled by the action of key regulatory transcription factors of the MADS-domain family. The function of these factors appears to be highly conserved among species based on mutant phenotypes. However, the conservation of their downstream processes is much less well understood, mostly because the evolutionary turnover and variation of their DNA-binding sites (BSs) among plant species have not yet been experimentally determined. Here, we performed comparative ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-seq experiments of the MADS-domain transcription factor SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) in two closely related Arabidopsis species: Arabidopsis thaliana and A. lyrata which have very similar floral organ morphology. We found that BS conservation is associated with DNA sequence conservation, the presence of the CArG-box BS motif and on the relative position of the BS to its potential target gene. Differences in genome size and structure can explain that SEP3 BSs in A. lyrata can be located more distantly to their potential target genes than their counterparts in A. thaliana. In A. lyrata, we identified transposition as a mechanism to generate novel SEP3 binding locations in the genome. Comparative gene expression analysis shows that the loss/gain of BSs is associated with a change in gene expression. In summary, this study investigates the evolutionary dynamics of DNA BSs of a floral key-regulatory transcription factor and explores factors affecting this phenomenon. PMID:26429922

  15. CisMapper: predicting regulatory interactions from transcription factor ChIP-seq data.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Timothy; Bodén, Mikael; Bailey, Timothy L

    2016-10-24

    Identifying the genomic regions and regulatory factors that control the transcription of genes is an important, unsolved problem. The current method of choice predicts transcription factor (TF) binding sites using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq), and then links the binding sites to putative target genes solely on the basis of the genomic distance between them. Evidence from chromatin conformation capture experiments shows that this approach is inadequate due to long-distance regulation via chromatin looping. We present CisMapper, which predicts the regulatory targets of a TF using the correlation between a histone mark at the TF's bound sites and the expression of each gene across a panel of tissues. Using both chromatin conformation capture and differential expression data, we show that CisMapper is more accurate at predicting the target genes of a TF than the distance-based approaches currently used, and is particularly advantageous for predicting the long-range regulatory interactions typical of tissue-specific gene expression. CisMapper also predicts which TF binding sites regulate a given gene more accurately than using genomic distance. Unlike distance-based methods, CisMapper can predict which transcription start site of a gene is regulated by a particular binding site of the TF.

  16. PcFKH1, a novel regulatory factor from the forkhead family, controls the biosynthesis of penicillin in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Santos, Rebeca; García-Estrada, Carlos; Kosalková, Katarina; Prieto, Carlos; Santamarta, Irene; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum (re-identified as Penicillium rubens) is a good example of a biological process subjected to complex global regulatory networks and serves as a model to study fungal secondary metabolism. The winged-helix family of transcription factors recently described, which includes the forkhead type of proteins, is a key type of regulatory proteins involved in this process. In yeasts and humans, forkhead transcription factors are involved in different processes (cell cycle regulation, cell death control, pre-mRNA processing and morphogenesis); one member of this family of proteins has been identified in the P. chrysogenum genome (Pc18g00430). In this work, we have characterized this novel transcription factor (named PcFKH1) by generating knock-down mutants and overexpression strains. Results clearly indicate that PcFKH1 positively controls antibiotic biosynthesis through the specific interaction with the promoter region of the penDE gene, thus regulating penDE mRNA levels. PcFKH1 also binds to the pcbC promoter, but with low affinity. In addition, it also controls other ancillary genes of the penicillin biosynthetic process, such as phlA (encoding phenylacetyl CoA ligase) and ppt (encoding phosphopantetheinyl transferase). PcFKH1 also plays a role in conidiation and spore pigmentation, but it does not seem to be involved in hyphal morphology or cell division in the improved laboratory reference strain Wisconsin 54-1255. A genome-wide analysis of processes putatively coregulated by PcFKH1 and PcRFX1 (another winged-helix transcription factor) in P. chrysogenum provided evidence of the global effect of these transcription factors in P. chrysogenum metabolism.

  17. Expanding the Regulatory Network Governed by the Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor σH in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Koichi; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor σH is responsible for the heat and oxidative stress response in Corynebacterium glutamicum. Due to the hierarchical nature of the regulatory network, previous transcriptome analyses have not been able to discriminate between direct and indirect targets of σH. Here, we determined the direct genome-wide targets of σH using chromatin immunoprecipitation with microarray technology (ChIP-chip) for analysis of a deletion mutant of rshA, encoding an anti-σ factor of σH. Seventy-five σH-dependent promoters, including 39 new ones, were identified. σH-dependent, heat-inducible transcripts for several of the new targets, including ilvD encoding a labile Fe-S cluster enzyme, dihydroxy-acid dehydratase, were detected, and their 5′ ends were mapped to the σH-dependent promoters identified. Interestingly, functional internal σH-dependent promoters were found in operon-like gene clusters involved in the pentose phosphate pathway, riboflavin biosynthesis, and Zn uptake. Accordingly, deletion of rshA resulted in hyperproduction of riboflavin and affected expression of Zn-responsive genes, possibly through intracellular Zn overload, indicating new physiological roles of σH. Furthermore, sigA encoding the primary σ factor was identified as a new target of σH. Reporter assays demonstrated that the σH-dependent promoter upstream of sigA was highly heat inducible but much weaker than the known σA-dependent one. Our ChIP-chip analysis also detected the σH-dependent promoters upstream of rshA within the sigH-rshA operon and of sigB encoding a group 2 σ factor, supporting the previous findings of their σH-dependent expression. Taken together, these results reveal an additional layer of the sigma factor regulatory network in C. glutamicum. PMID:25404703

  18. Selection of terrestrial transfer factors for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Y.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter value for a radioecological assessment model is not a single value but a distribution of values about a central value. The sources that contribute to the variability of transfer factors to predict foodchain transport of radionuclides are enumerated. Knowledge of these sources, judgement in interpreting the available data, consideration of collateral information, and established criteria that specify the desired level of conservatism in the resulting predictions are essential elements when selecting appropriate parameter values for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides. 39 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  19. Discovery of transcription factors and regulatory regions driving in vivo tumor development by ATAC-seq and FAIRE-seq open chromatin profiling.

    PubMed

    Davie, Kristofer; Jacobs, Jelle; Atkins, Mardelle; Potier, Delphine; Christiaens, Valerie; Halder, Georg; Aerts, Stein

    2015-02-01

    Genomic enhancers regulate spatio-temporal gene expression by recruiting specific combinations of transcription factors (TFs). When TFs are bound to active regulatory regions, they displace canonical nucleosomes, making these regions biochemically detectable as nucleosome-depleted regions or accessible/open chromatin. Here we ask whether open chromatin profiling can be used to identify the entire repertoire of active promoters and enhancers underlying tissue-specific gene expression during normal development and oncogenesis in vivo. To this end, we first compare two different approaches to detect open chromatin in vivo using the Drosophila eye primordium as a model system: FAIRE-seq, based on physical separation of open versus closed chromatin; and ATAC-seq, based on preferential integration of a transposon into open chromatin. We find that both methods reproducibly capture the tissue-specific chromatin activity of regulatory regions, including promoters, enhancers, and insulators. Using both techniques, we screened for regulatory regions that become ectopically active during Ras-dependent oncogenesis, and identified 3778 regions that become (over-)activated during tumor development. Next, we applied motif discovery to search for candidate transcription factors that could bind these regions and identified AP-1 and Stat92E as key regulators. We validated the importance of Stat92E in the development of the tumors by introducing a loss of function Stat92E mutant, which was sufficient to rescue the tumor phenotype. Additionally we tested if the predicted Stat92E responsive regulatory regions are genuine, using ectopic induction of JAK/STAT signaling in developing eye discs, and observed that similar chromatin changes indeed occurred. Finally, we determine that these are functionally significant regulatory changes, as nearby target genes are up- or down-regulated. In conclusion, we show that FAIRE-seq and ATAC-seq based open chromatin profiling, combined with motif

  20. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy and regeneration: interplay between the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) pathways.

    PubMed

    Zanou, Nadège; Gailly, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Adult skeletal muscle can regenerate in response to muscle damage. This ability is conferred by the presence of myogenic stem cells called satellite cells. In response to stimuli such as injury or exercise, these cells become activated and express myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs), i.e., transcription factors of the myogenic lineage including Myf5, MyoD, myogenin, and Mrf4 to proliferate and differentiate into myofibers. The MRF family of proteins controls the transcription of important muscle-specific proteins such as myosin heavy chain and muscle creatine kinase. Different growth factors are secreted during muscle repair among which insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are the only ones that promote both muscle cell proliferation and differentiation and that play a key role in muscle regeneration and hypertrophy. Different isoforms of IGFs are expressed during muscle repair: IGF-IEa, IGF-IEb, or IGF-IEc (also known as mechano growth factor, MGF) and IGF-II. MGF is expressed first and is observed in satellite cells and in proliferating myoblasts whereas IGF-Ia and IGF-II expression occurs at the state of muscle fiber formation. Interestingly, several studies report the induction of MRFs in response to IGFs stimulation. Inversely, IGFs expression may also be regulated by MRFs. Various mechanisms are proposed to support these interactions. In this review, we describe the general process of muscle hypertrophy and regeneration and decipher the interactions between the two groups of factors involved in the process.

  1. Modulation of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signaling by Human Herpesvirus 8 Interferon Regulatory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Keun Young

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial lipid raft-like microdomains, experimentally also termed mitochondrial detergent-resistant membrane fractions (mDRM), play a role as platforms for recruiting signaling molecules involved in antiviral responses such as apoptosis and innate immunity. Viruses can modulate mitochondrial functions for their own survival and replication. However, viral regulation of the antiviral responses via mDRM remains incompletely understood. Here, we report that human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) gene product viral interferon regulatory factor 1 (vIRF-1) is targeted to mDRM during virus replication and negatively regulates the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS)-mediated antiviral responses. The N-terminal region of vIRF-1 interacts directly with membrane lipids, including cardiolipin. In addition, a GxRP motif within the N terminus of vIRF-1, conserved in the mDRM-targeting region of mitochondrial proteins, including PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and MAVS, was found to be important for vIRF-1 association with mitochondria. Furthermore, MAVS, which has the potential to promote vIRF-1 targeting to mDRM possibly by inducing cardiolipin exposure on the outer membrane of mitochondria, interacts with vIRF-1, which, in turn, inhibits MAVS-mediated antiviral signaling. Consistent with these results, vIRF-1 targeting to mDRM contributes to promotion of HHV-8 productive replication and inhibition of associated apoptosis. Combined, our results suggest novel molecular mechanisms for negative-feedback regulation of MAVS by vIRF-1 during virus replication. IMPORTANCE Successful virus replication is in large part achieved by the ability of viruses to counteract apoptosis and innate immune responses elicited by infection of host cells. Recently, mitochondria have emerged to play a central role in antiviral signaling. In particular, mitochondrial lipid raft-like microdomains appear to function as platforms in cell apoptosis signaling. However, viral regulation

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus BGLF4 Kinase Suppresses the Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Signaling Pathway▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiin-Tarng; Doong, Shin-Lian; Teng, Shu-Chun; Lee, Chung-Pei; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Mei-Ru

    2009-01-01

    The BGLF4 protein kinase of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a member of the conserved family of herpesvirus protein kinases which, to some extent, have a function similar to that of the cellular cyclin-dependent kinase in regulating multiple cellular and viral substrates. In a yeast two-hybrid screening assay, a splicing variant of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) was found to interact with the BGLF4 protein. This interaction was defined further by coimmunoprecipitation in transfected cells and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down in vitro. Using reporter assays, we show that BGLF4 effectively suppresses the activities of the poly(I:C)-stimulated IFN-β promoter and IRF3-responsive element. Moreover, BGLF4 represses the poly(I:C)-stimulated expression of endogenous IFN-β mRNA and the phosphorylation of STAT1 at Tyr701. In searching for a possible mechanism, BGLF4 was shown not to affect the dimerization, nuclear translocation, or CBP recruitment of IRF3 upon poly(I:C) treatment. Notably, BGLF4 reduces the amount of active IRF3 recruited to the IRF3-responsive element containing the IFN-β promoter region in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. BGLF4 phosphorylates GST-IRF3 in vitro, but Ser339-Pro340 phosphorylation-dependent, Pin1-mediated downregulation is not responsible for the repression. Most importantly, we found that three proline-dependent phosphorylation sites at Ser123, Ser173, and Thr180, which cluster in a region between the DNA binding and IRF association domains of IRF3, contribute additively to the BGLF4-mediated repression of IRF3(5D) transactivation activity. IRF3 signaling is activated in reactivated EBV-positive NA cells, and the knockdown of BGLF4 further stimulates IRF3-responsive reporter activity. The data presented here thus suggest a novel mechanism by which herpesviral protein kinases suppress host innate immune responses and facilitate virus replication. PMID:19052084

  3. Identification of a novel regulatory sequence of actin nucleation promoting factor encoded by Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Zhang, Yongli; Han, Shili; Hu, Xue; Zhou, Yuan; Mu, Jingfang; Pei, Rongjuan; Wu, Chunchen; Chen, Xinwen

    2015-04-10

    Actin polymerization induced by nucleation promoting factors (NPFs) is one of the most fundamental biological processes in eukaryotic cells. NPFs contain a conserved output domain (VCA domain) near the C terminus, which interacts with and activates the cellular actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) to induce actin polymerization and a diverse regulatory domain near the N terminus. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) nucleocapsid protein P78/83 is a virus-encoded NPF that contains a C-terminal VCA domain and induces actin polymerization in virus-infected cells. However, there is no similarity between the N terminus of P78/83 and that of other identified NPFs, suggesting that P78/83 may possess a unique regulatory mechanism. In this study, we identified a multifunctional regulatory sequence (MRS) located near the N terminus of P78/83 and determined that one of its functions is to serve as a degron to mediate P78/83 degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In AcMNPV-infected cells, the MRS also binds to another nucleocapsid protein, BV/ODV-C42, which stabilizes P78/83 and modulates the P78/83-Arp2/3 interaction to orchestrate actin polymerization. In addition, the MRS is also essential for the incorporation of P78/83 into the nucleocapsid, ensuring virion mobility powered by P78/83-induced actin polymerization. The triple functions of the MRS enable P78/83 to serve as an essential viral protein in the AcMNPV replication cycle, and the possible roles of the MRS in orchestrating the virus-induced actin polymerization and viral genome decapsidation are discussed.

  4. Transcription factor MITF and remodeller BRG1 define chromatin organisation at regulatory elements in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Laurette, Patrick; Strub, Thomas; Koludrovic, Dana; Keime, Céline; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Seberg, Hannah; Van Otterloo, Eric; Imrichova, Hana; Siddaway, Robert; Aerts, Stein; Cornell, Robert A; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2015-03-24

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is the master regulator of the melanocyte lineage. To understand how MITF regulates transcription, we used tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry to define a comprehensive MITF interactome identifying novel cofactors involved in transcription, DNA replication and repair, and chromatin organisation. We show that MITF interacts with a PBAF chromatin remodelling complex comprising BRG1 and CHD7. BRG1 is essential for melanoma cell proliferation in vitro and for normal melanocyte development in vivo. MITF and SOX10 actively recruit BRG1 to a set of MITF-associated regulatory elements (MAREs) at active enhancers. Combinations of MITF, SOX10, TFAP2A, and YY1 bind between two BRG1-occupied nucleosomes thus defining both a signature of transcription factors essential for the melanocyte lineage and a specific chromatin organisation of the regulatory elements they occupy. BRG1 also regulates the dynamics of MITF genomic occupancy. MITF-BRG1 interplay thus plays an essential role in transcription regulation in melanoma.

  5. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs

    PubMed Central

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-01-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.—Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. PMID:27451412

  6. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

    PubMed

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.-Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

  7. The role of gene regulatory factors in the evolutionary history of humans.

    PubMed

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Kanton, Sabina; Walter, Maria Beatriz C; Nowick, Katja

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the molecular basis of how modern human phenotypes have evolved is one of the most fascinating challenges in biology. Here, we will focus on the roles of gene regulatory factors (GRFs), in particular transcription factors (TFs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) during human evolution. We will present examples of TFs and lncRNAs that have changed or show signs of positive selection in humans compared to chimpanzees, in modern humans compared to archaic humans, or within modern human populations. On the basis of current knowledge about the functions of these GRF genes, we speculate that they have been involved in speciation as well as in shaping phenotypes such as brain functions, skeletal morphology, and metabolic processes.

  8. Role of non-coding RNA transcription around gene regulatory elements in transcription factor recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Kunihiro

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Eukaryotic cells produce a variety of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), many of which have been shown to play pivotal roles in biological processes such as differentiation, maintenance of pluripotency of stem cells, and cellular response to various stresses. Genome-wide analyses have revealed that many ncRNAs are transcribed around regulatory DNA elements located proximal or distal to gene promoters, but their biological functions are largely unknown. Recently, it has been demonstrated in yeast and mouse that ncRNA transcription around gene promoters and enhancers facilitates DNA binding of transcription factors to their target sites. These results suggest universal roles of promoter/enhancer-associated ncRNAs in the recruitment of transcription factors to their binding sites. PMID:27763805

  9. Uncertainty analysis in regulatory programs: Application factors versus probabilistic methods in ecological risk assessments of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.R.J.; Elliot, B.

    1995-12-31

    In assessments of toxic chemicals, sources of uncertainty may be dealt with by two basic approaches: application factors and probabilistic methods. In regulatory programs, the most common approach is to calculate a quotient by dividing the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) by the predicted no effects concentration (PNEC). PNECs are usually derived from laboratory bioassays, thus requiring the use of application factors to account for uncertainty introduced by the extrapolation from the laboratory to the field, and from measurement to assessment endpoints. Using this approach, often with worst-case assumptions about exposure and species sensitivities, the hope is that chemicals with a quotient of less than one will have a very low probability of causing adverse ecological effects. This approach has received widespread criticism recently, particularly because it tends to be overly conservative and does not adequately estimate the magnitude and probability of causing adverse effects. On the plus side, application factors are simple to use, accepted worldwide, and may be used with limited effects data in a quotient calculation. The alternative approach is to use probabilistic methods such as Monte Carlo simulation, Baye`s theorem or other techniques to estimate risk. Such methods often have rigorous statistical assumptions and may have large data requirements. Stating an effect in probabilistic terms, however, forces the identification of sources of uncertainty and quantification of their impact on risk estimation. In this presentation the authors discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using application factors and probabilistic methods in dealing with uncertainty in ecological risk assessments of chemicals. Based on this analysis, recommendations are presented to assist in choosing the appropriate approach for different types of regulatory programs dealing with toxic chemicals.

  10. Interferon regulatory factor 5 gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hammad, A; Mossad, Y M; Nasef, N; Eid, R

    2017-01-01

    Background Increased expression of interferon-inducible genes is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is one of the transcription factors regulating interferon and was proved to be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE in different populations. Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between polymorphisms of the IRF5 gene and SLE susceptibility in a cohort of Egyptian children and to investigate their association with clinico-pathological features, especially lupus nephritis. Subjects and methods Typing of interferon regulatory factor 5 rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714 polymorphisms were done using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism for 100 children with SLE and 100 matched healthy controls. Results Children with SLE had more frequent T allele and TT genotype of rs2004640 ( Pc = 0.003 and 0.024, respectively) compared to controls. Patients with nephritis had more frequent T allele of rs2004640 compared to controls ( Pc = 0.003). However the allele and genotype frequencies of the three studied polymorphisms did not show any difference in patients with nephritis in comparison to those without nephritis. Haplotype GTA of rs10954213, rs2004640 and rs2280714, respectively, was more frequent in lupus patients in comparison to controls ( p = 0.01) while the haplotype GGG was more frequent in controls than lupus patients ( p = 0.011). Conclusion The rs2004640 T allele and TT genotype and GTA haplotype of rs rs10954213, rs2004640, and rs2280714, respectively, can be considered as risk factors for the development of SLE. The presence of the rs2004640 T allele increases the risk of nephritis development in Egyptian children with SLE.

  11. The GAGA factor regulatory network: Identification of GAGA factor associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Blokhina, Tatiana; Wolle, Daniel; Aoki, Tsutomu; Ryabykh, Vladimir; Yates, John R.; Shidlovskii, Yulii V.; Georgiev, Pavel; Schedl, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The Drosophila GAGA factor (GAF) has an extraordinarily diverse set of functions that include the activation and silencing of gene expression, nucleosome organization and remodeling, higher order chromosome architecture and mitosis. One hypothesis that could account for these diverse activities is that GAF is able to interact with partners that have specific and dedicated functions. To test this possibility we used affinity purification coupled with high throughput mass spectrometry to identify GAF associated partners. Consistent with this hypothesis the GAF interacting network includes a large collection of factors and complexes that have been implicated in many different aspects of gene activity, chromosome structure and function. Moreover, we show that GAF interactions with a small subset of partners is direct; however for many others the interactions could be indirect, and depend upon intermediates that serve to diversify the functional capabilities of the GAF protein. PMID:28296955

  12. A Consensus Network of Gene Regulatory Factors in the Human Frontal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Berto, Stefano; Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Gerighausen, Daniel; Qin, Jing; Nowick, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive abilities, such as memory, learning, language, problem solving, and planning, involve the frontal lobe and other brain areas. Not much is known yet about the molecular basis of cognitive abilities, but it seems clear that cognitive abilities are determined by the interplay of many genes. One approach for analyzing the genetic networks involved in cognitive functions is to study the coexpression networks of genes with known importance for proper cognitive functions, such as genes that have been associated with cognitive disorders like intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Because many of these genes are gene regulatory factors (GRFs) we aimed to provide insights into the gene regulatory networks active in the human frontal lobe. Using genome wide human frontal lobe expression data from 10 independent data sets, we first derived 10 individual coexpression networks for all GRFs including their potential target genes. We observed a high level of variability among these 10 independently derived networks, pointing out that relying on results from a single study can only provide limited biological insights. To instead focus on the most confident information from these 10 networks we developed a method for integrating such independently derived networks into a consensus network. This consensus network revealed robust GRF interactions that are conserved across the frontal lobes of different healthy human individuals. Within this network, we detected a strong central module that is enriched for 166 GRFs known to be involved in brain development and/or cognitive disorders. Interestingly, several hubs of the consensus network encode for GRFs that have not yet been associated with brain functions. Their central role in the network suggests them as excellent new candidates for playing an essential role in the regulatory network of the human frontal lobe, which should be investigated in future studies. PMID:27014338

  13. A Consensus Network of Gene Regulatory Factors in the Human Frontal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Berto, Stefano; Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Gerighausen, Daniel; Qin, Jing; Nowick, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive abilities, such as memory, learning, language, problem solving, and planning, involve the frontal lobe and other brain areas. Not much is known yet about the molecular basis of cognitive abilities, but it seems clear that cognitive abilities are determined by the interplay of many genes. One approach for analyzing the genetic networks involved in cognitive functions is to study the coexpression networks of genes with known importance for proper cognitive functions, such as genes that have been associated with cognitive disorders like intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Because many of these genes are gene regulatory factors (GRFs) we aimed to provide insights into the gene regulatory networks active in the human frontal lobe. Using genome wide human frontal lobe expression data from 10 independent data sets, we first derived 10 individual coexpression networks for all GRFs including their potential target genes. We observed a high level of variability among these 10 independently derived networks, pointing out that relying on results from a single study can only provide limited biological insights. To instead focus on the most confident information from these 10 networks we developed a method for integrating such independently derived networks into a consensus network. This consensus network revealed robust GRF interactions that are conserved across the frontal lobes of different healthy human individuals. Within this network, we detected a strong central module that is enriched for 166 GRFs known to be involved in brain development and/or cognitive disorders. Interestingly, several hubs of the consensus network encode for GRFs that have not yet been associated with brain functions. Their central role in the network suggests them as excellent new candidates for playing an essential role in the regulatory network of the human frontal lobe, which should be investigated in future studies.

  14. Forkhead transcription factor 1 inhibits endometrial cancer cell proliferation via sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifang; Zhang, Lili; Sun, Hengzi; Lv, Qingtao; Qiu, Chunping; Che, Xiaoxia; Liu, Zhiming; Jiang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality associated with endometrial cancer (EC) has increased in recent years. Regarded as a tumor suppressor, forkhead transcription factor 1 (FOXO1) has various biological activities and participates in cell cycle progression, apoptosis and differentiation. Notably, FOXO1 also functions in the regulation of lipogenesis and energy metabolism. Lipogenesis is a feature of cancer and is upregulated in EC. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) is a transcription factor that is also able to regulate lipogenesis. Increased expression of SREBP1 is directly correlated with malignant transformation of tumors. A previous study demonstrated that SREBP1 was highly expressed in EC and directly resulted in tumorigenesis. However, the association between FOXO1 and SREBP1 in EC is not clear. In the present study, lentiviruses overexpressing FOXO1 were used in cell transfection and transduction. Cell viability assays demonstrated that the overexpression of FOXO1 was able to suppress cell proliferation significantly in Ishikawa and AN3 CA cell lines. In addition, FOXO1 overexpression significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion ability in vitro. In xenograft models, overexpression of FOXO1 suppressed cell tumorigenesis, and western blot analysis demonstrated that SREBP1 expression was markedly reduced in the FOXO1-overexpressing cells. It may therefore be concluded that FOXO1 is able to inhibit the proliferative capacity of cells in vitro and in vivo, in addition to the migratory and invasive capacities in vitro by directly targeting SREBP1. PMID:28356952

  15. Medusa structure of the gene regulatory network: dominance of transcription factors in cancer subtype classification.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchun; Feng, Ying; Trivedi, Niraj S; Huang, Sui

    2011-05-01

    Gene expression profiles consisting of ten thousands of transcripts are used for clustering of tissue, such as tumors, into subtypes, often without considering the underlying reason that the distinct patterns of expression arise because of constraints in the realization of gene expression profiles imposed by the gene regulatory network. The topology of this network has been suggested to consist of a regulatory core of genes represented most prominently by transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs, that influence the expression of other genes, and of a periphery of 'enslaved' effector genes that are regulated but not regulating. This 'medusa' architecture implies that the core genes are much stronger determinants of the realized gene expression profiles. To test this hypothesis, we examined the clustering of gene expression profiles into known tumor types to quantitatively demonstrate that TFs, and even more pronounced, microRNAs, are much stronger discriminators of tumor type specific gene expression patterns than a same number of randomly selected or metabolic genes. These findings lend support to the hypothesis of a medusa architecture and of the canalizing nature of regulation by microRNAs. They also reveal the degree of freedom for the expression of peripheral genes that are less stringently associated with a tissue type specific global gene expression profile.

  16. Network component analysis provides quantitative insights on an Arabidopsis transcription factor-gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are models of molecule-gene interactions instrumental in the coordination of gene expression. Transcription factor (TF)-GRNs are an important subset of GRNs that characterize gene expression as the effect of TFs acting on their target genes. Although such networks can qualitatively summarize TF-gene interactions, it is highly desirable to quantitatively determine the strengths of the interactions in a TF-GRN as well as the magnitudes of TF activities. To our knowledge, such analysis is rare in plant biology. A computational methodology developed for this purpose is network component analysis (NCA), which has been used for studying large-scale microbial TF-GRNs to obtain nontrivial, mechanistic insights. In this work, we employed NCA to quantitatively analyze a plant TF-GRN important in floral development using available regulatory information from AGRIS, by processing previously reported gene expression data from four shoot apical meristem cell types. Results The NCA model satisfactorily accounted for gene expression measurements in a TF-GRN of seven TFs (LFY, AG, SEPALLATA3 [SEP3], AP2, AGL15, HY5 and AP3/PI) and 55 genes. NCA found strong interactions between certain TF-gene pairs including LFY → MYB17, AG → CRC, AP2 → RD20, AGL15 → RAV2 and HY5 → HLH1, and the direction of the interaction (activation or repression) for some AGL15 targets for which this information was not previously available. The activity trends of four TFs - LFY, AG, HY5 and AP3/PI as deduced by NCA correlated well with the changes in expression levels of the genes encoding these TFs across all four cell types; such a correlation was not observed for SEP3, AP2 and AGL15. Conclusions For the first time, we have reported the use of NCA to quantitatively analyze a plant TF-GRN important in floral development for obtaining nontrivial information about connectivity strengths between TFs and their target genes as well as TF

  17. Transcription factors GAF and HSF act at distinct regulatory steps to modulate stress-induced gene activation.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Fabiana M; Fuda, Nicholas J; Mahat, Dig B; Core, Leighton J; Guertin, Michael J; Lis, John T

    2016-08-01

    The coordinated regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level is fundamental to development and homeostasis. Inducible systems are invaluable when studying transcription because the regulatory process can be triggered instantaneously, allowing the tracking of ordered mechanistic events. Here, we use precision run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) to examine the genome-wide heat shock (HS) response in Drosophila and the function of two key transcription factors on the immediate transcription activation or repression of all genes regulated by HS. We identify the primary HS response genes and the rate-limiting steps in the transcription cycle that GAGA-associated factor (GAF) and HS factor (HSF) regulate. We demonstrate that GAF acts upstream of promoter-proximally paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) formation (likely at the step of chromatin opening) and that GAF-facilitated Pol II pausing is critical for HS activation. In contrast, HSF is dispensable for establishing or maintaining Pol II pausing but is critical for the release of paused Pol II into the gene body at a subset of highly activated genes. Additionally, HSF has no detectable role in the rapid HS repression of thousands of genes.

  18. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, ‘Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli’ (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  19. The expression of myogenic regulatory factors and muscle growth factors in the masticatory muscles of dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice.

    PubMed

    Spassov, Alexander; Gredes, Tomasz; Gedrange, Tomasz; Lucke, Silke; Pavlovic, Dragan; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2011-06-01

    The activities of myogenic regulatory factors (MRF) and muscle growth factors increase in muscle that is undergoing regeneration, and may correspond to some specific changes. Little is known about the role of MRFs in masticatory muscles in mdx mice (the model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy) and particularly about their mRNA expression during the process of muscle regeneration. Using Taqman RT-PCR, we examined the mRNA expression of the MRFs myogenin and MyoD1 (myogenic differentiation 1), and of the muscle growth factors myostatin, IGF1 (insulin-like growth factor) and MGF (mechano-growth factor) in the masseter, temporal and tongue masticatory muscles of mdx mice (n = 6 to 10 per group). The myogenin mRNA expression in the mdx masseter and temporal muscle was found to have increased (P < 0.05), whereas the myostatin mRNA expressions in the mdx masseter (P < 0.005) and tongue (P < 0.05) were found to have diminished compared to those for the controls. The IGF and MGF mRNA amounts in the mdx mice remained unchanged. Inside the mdx animal group, gender-related differences in the mRNA expressions were also found. A higher mRNA expression of myogenin and MyoD1 in the mdx massterer and temporal muscles was found in females in comparison to males, and the level of myostatin was higher in the masseter and tongue muscle (P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Similar gender-related differences were also found within the control groups. This study reveals the intermuscular differences in the mRNA expression pattern of myogenin and myostatin in mdx mice. The existence of these differences implies that dystrophinopathy affects the skeletal muscles differentially. The finding of gender-related differences in the mRNA expression of the examined factors may indicate the importance of hormonal influences on muscle regeneration.

  20. Dietary non-nutritive factors in targeting of regulatory molecules in colorectal cancer: an update.

    PubMed

    Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Esa, Norhaizan Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), a complex multi-step process involving progressive disruption of homeostatic mechanisms controlling intestinal epithelial proliferation/inflammation, differentiation, and programmed cell death, is the third most common malignant neoplasm worldwide. A number of promising targets such as inducible nitric acid (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Wnt/β-catenin, Notch and apoptotic signaling have been identified by researchers as useful targets to prevent or therapeutically inhibit colon cancer development. In this review article, we aimed to explore the current targets available to eliminate colon cancer with an update of dietary and non-nutritional compounds that could be of potential use for interaction with regulatory molecules to prevent CRC.

  1. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? 658.34 Section 658.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... STUDIES AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 658.34 What additional...

  2. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? 658.34 Section 658.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... STUDIES AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 658.34 What additional...

  3. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? 658.34 Section 658.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... STUDIES AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 658.34 What additional...

  4. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? 658.34 Section 658.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... STUDIES AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 658.34 What additional...

  5. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? 658.34 Section 658.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... STUDIES AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 658.34 What additional...

  6. Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Functions as a Novel Negative Regulator of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Heng; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Chen, Ke; Gao, Lu; Peng, Juan; Gong, Hui; Chen, Yingjie; Yang, Qinglin; Liu, Peter P.; Fan, Guo-Chang; Zou, Yunzeng; Li, Hongliang

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a complex pathological process that involves multiple factors including inflammation and apoptosis. Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is a multifunctional regulator that participates in immune regulation, cell differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. However, the role of IRF7 in cardiac hypertrophy remains unclear. We performed aortic banding in cardiac-specific IRF7 transgenic mice, IRF7 knockout mice, and the wild-type littermates of these mice. Our results demonstrated that IRF7 was downregulated in aortic banding–induced animal hearts and cardiomyocytes that had been treated with angiotensin II or phenylephrine for 48 hours. Accordingly, heart-specific overexpression of IRF7 significantly attenuated pressure overload–induced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction, whereas loss of IRF7 led to opposite effects. Moreover, IRF7 protected against angiotensin II–induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Mechanistically, we identified that IRF7-dependent cardioprotection was mediated through IRF7 binding to inhibitor of κB kinase-β, and subsequent nuclear factor-κB inactivation. In fact, blocking nuclear factor-κB signaling with cardiac-specific inhibitors of κBαS32A/S36A super-repressor transgene counteracted the adverse effect of IRF7 deficiency. Conversely, activation of nuclear factor-κB signaling via a cardiac-specific conditional inhibitor of κB kinase-βS177E/S181E (constitutively active) transgene negated the antihypertrophic effect of IRF7 overexpression. Our data demonstrate that IRF7 acts as a novel negative regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signaling and may constitute a potential therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:24396025

  7. Individual interferon regulatory factor-3 thiol residues are not critical for its activation following virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Nicolas; Williams, Virginie; Grandvaux, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    The interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 transcription factor plays a central role in the capacity of the host to mount an efficient innate antiviral immune defense, mainly through the regulation of type I Interferon genes. A tight regulation of IRF-3 is crucial for an adapted intensity and duration of the response. Redox-dependent processes are now well known to regulate signaling cascades. Recent reports have revealed that signaling molecules upstream of IRF-3, including the mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein (MAVS) and the TNF receptor associated factors (TRAFs) adaptors, are sensitive to redox regulation. In the present study, we assessed whether redox regulation of thiol residues contained in IRF-3, which are priviledged redox sensors, play a role in its regulation following Sendai virus infection, using a combination of mutation of Cysteine (Cys) residues into Alanine and thiols alkylation using N-ethyl maleimide. Alkylation of IRF-3 on Cys289 appears to destabilize IRF-3 dimer in vitro. However, a detailed analysis of IRF-3 phosphorylation, dimerization, nuclear accumulation, and induction of target gene promoter in vivo led us to conclude that IRF-3 specific, individual Cys residues redox status does not play an essential role in its activation in vivo.

  8. Individual Interferon Regulatory Factor-3 Thiol Residues Are Not Critical for Its Activation Following Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zucchini, Nicolas; Williams, Virginie

    2012-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-3 transcription factor plays a central role in the capacity of the host to mount an efficient innate antiviral immune defense, mainly through the regulation of type I Interferon genes. A tight regulation of IRF-3 is crucial for an adapted intensity and duration of the response. Redox-dependent processes are now well known to regulate signaling cascades. Recent reports have revealed that signaling molecules upstream of IRF-3, including the mitochondrial antiviral-signalling protein (MAVS) and the TNF receptor associated factors (TRAFs) adaptors, are sensitive to redox regulation. In the present study, we assessed whether redox regulation of thiol residues contained in IRF-3, which are priviledged redox sensors, play a role in its regulation following Sendai virus infection, using a combination of mutation of Cysteine (Cys) residues into Alanine and thiols alkylation using N-ethyl maleimide. Alkylation of IRF-3 on Cys289 appears to destabilize IRF-3 dimer in vitro. However, a detailed analysis of IRF-3 phosphorylation, dimerization, nuclear accumulation, and induction of target gene promoter in vivo led us to conclude that IRF-3 specific, individual Cys residues redox status does not play an essential role in its activation in vivo. PMID:22817838

  9. Cloning, chromosomal mapping and characterization of the human metal-regulatory transcription factor MTF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Brugnera, E; Georgiev, O; Radtke, F; Heuchel, R; Baker, E; Sutherland, G R; Schaffner, W

    1994-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small cysteine-rich proteins that bind heavy metal ions such as zinc, cadmium and copper with high affinity, and have been functionally implicated in heavy metal detoxification and radical scavenging. Transcription of metallothioneins genes is induced by exposure of cells to heavy metals. This induction is mediated by metal-responsive promoter elements (MREs). We have previously cloned the cDNA of an MRE-binding transcription factor (MTF-1) from the mouse. Here we present the human cDNA equivalent of this metal-regulatory factor. Human MTF-1 is a protein of 753 amino acids with 93% amino acid sequence identity to mouse MTF-1 and has an extension of 78 amino acids at the C-terminus without counterpart in the mouse. The factors of both species have the same overall structure including six zinc fingers in the DNA binding domain. We have physically mapped the human MTF-1 gene to human chromosome 1 where it localizes to the short arm in the region 1p32-34, most likely 1p33. Both human and mouse MTF-1 when produced in transfected mammalian cells strongly bind to a consensus MRE of metallothionein promoters. However, human MTF-1 is more effective than the mouse MTF-1 clone in mediating zinc-induced transcription. Images PMID:8065932

  10. Behavioral and regulatory abnormalities in mice deficient in the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Erbel-Sieler, Claudia; Dudley, Carol; Zhou, Yudong; Wu, Xinle; Estill, Sandi Jo; Han, Tina; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven; McKnight, Steven L

    2004-09-14

    Laboratory mice bearing inactivating mutations in the genes encoding the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors have been shown to exhibit a spectrum of behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities. Behavioral abnormalities included diminished startle response, as measured by prepulse inhibition, and impaired social recognition. NPAS1/NPAS3-deficient mice also exhibited stereotypic darting behavior at weaning and increased locomotor activity. Immunohistochemical staining assays showed that the NPAS1 and NPAS3 proteins are expressed in inhibitory interneurons and that the viability and anatomical distribution of these neurons are unaffected by the absence of either transcription factor. Adult brain tissues from NPAS3- and NPAS1/NPAS3-deficient mice exhibited a distinct reduction in reelin, a large, secreted protein whose expression has been reported to be attenuated in the postmortem brain tissue of patients with schizophrenia. These observations raise the possibility that a regulatory program controlled in inhibitory interneurons by the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors may be either substantively or tangentially relevant to psychosis.

  11. A novel tumor necrosis factor-responsive transcription factor which recognizes a regulatory element in hemopoietic growth factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, M.F.; Pell, L.M.; Kuczek, E.S.; Occhiodoro, F.S.; Dunn, S.M.; Vadas, M.A. ); Lenardo, M.J. )

    1990-06-01

    A conserved DNA sequence element, termed cytokine 1 (CK-1), is found in the promoter regions of many hemopoietic growth factor (HGF) genes. Mutational analyses and modification interference experiments show that this sequence specifically binds a nuclear transcription factor, NF-GMa, which is a protein with a molecular mass of 43 kilodaltons. It interacts with different affinities with the CK-1-like sequence from a number of HGF genes, including granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte (G)-CSF, interleukin 3 (IL-3), and IL-5. The authors show that the level of NF-GMa binding is induced in embryonic fibroblasts by tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) treatment and that the CK-1 sequence from the G-CSF gene is a TNF-{alpha}-responsive enhancer in these cells.

  12. Integrated genome analysis suggests that most conserved non-coding sequences are regulatory factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Hemberg, Martin; Gray, Jesse M.; Cloonan, Nicole; Kuersten, Scott; Grimmond, Sean; Greenberg, Michael E.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    More than 98% of a typical vertebrate genome does not code for proteins. Although non-coding regions are sprinkled with short (<200 bp) islands of evolutionarily conserved sequences, the function of most of these unannotated conserved islands remains unknown. One possibility is that unannotated conserved islands could encode non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs); alternatively, unannotated conserved islands could serve as promoter-distal regulatory factor binding sites (RFBSs) like enhancers. Here we assess these possibilities by comparing unannotated conserved islands in the human and mouse genomes to transcribed regions and to RFBSs, relying on a detailed case study of one human and one mouse cell type. We define transcribed regions by applying a novel transcript-calling algorithm to RNA-Seq data obtained from total cellular RNA, and we define RFBSs using ChIP-Seq and DNAse-hypersensitivity assays. We find that unannotated conserved islands are four times more likely to coincide with RFBSs than with unannotated ncRNAs. Thousands of conserved RFBSs can be categorized as insulators based on the presence of CTCF or as enhancers based on the presence of p300/CBP and H3K4me1. While many unannotated conserved RFBSs are transcriptionally active to some extent, the transcripts produced tend to be unspliced, non-polyadenylated and expressed at levels 10 to 100-fold lower than annotated coding or ncRNAs. Extending these findings across multiple cell types and tissues, we propose that most conserved non-coding genomic DNA in vertebrate genomes corresponds to promoter-distal regulatory elements. PMID:22684627

  13. Robust dynamic balance of AP-1 transcription factors in a neuronal gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The octapeptide Angiotensin II is a key hormone that acts via its receptor AT1R in the brainstem to modulate the blood pressure control circuits and thus plays a central role in the cardiac and respiratory homeostasis. This modulation occurs via activation of a complex network of signaling proteins and transcription factors, leading to changes in levels of key genes and proteins. AT1R initiated activity in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), which regulates blood pressure, has been the subject of extensive molecular analysis. But the adaptive network interactions in the NTS response to AT1R, plausibly related to the development of hypertension, are not understood. Results We developed and analyzed a mathematical model of AT1R-activated signaling kinases and a downstream gene regulatory network, with structural basis in our transcriptomic data analysis and literature. To our knowledge, our report presents the first computational model of this key regulatory network. Our simulations and analysis reveal a dynamic balance among distinct dimers of the AP-1 family of transcription factors. We investigated the robustness of this behavior to simultaneous perturbations in the network parameters using a novel multivariate approach that integrates global sensitivity analysis with decision-tree methods. Our analysis implicates a subset of Fos and Jun dependent mechanisms, with dynamic sensitivities shifting from Fos-regulating kinase (FRK)-mediated processes to those downstream of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Decision-tree analysis indicated that while there may be a large combinatorial functional space feasible for neuronal states and parameters, the network behavior is constrained to a small set of AP-1 response profiles. Many of the paths through the combinatorial parameter space lead to a dynamic balance of AP-1 dimer forms, yielding a robust AP-1 response counteracting the biological variability. Conclusions Based on the simulation and analysis results, we

  14. Restricted maternal nutrition alters myogenic regulatory factor expression in satellite cells of ovine offspring.

    PubMed

    Raja, J S; Hoffman, M L; Govoni, K E; Zinn, S A; Reed, S A

    2016-07-01

    Poor maternal nutrition inhibits muscle development and postnatal muscle growth. Satellite cells are myogenic precursor cells that contribute to postnatal muscle growth, and their activity can be evaluated by the expression of several transcription factors. Paired-box (Pax)7 is expressed in quiescent and active satellite cells. MyoD is expressed in activated and proliferating satellite cells and myogenin is expressed in terminally differentiating cells. Disruption in the expression pattern or timing of expression of myogenic regulatory factors negatively affects muscle development and growth. We hypothesized that poor maternal nutrition during gestation would alter the in vitro temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin in satellite cells from offspring at birth and 3 months of age. Ewes were fed 100% or 60% of NRC requirements from day 31±1.3 of gestation. Lambs from control-fed (CON) or restricted-fed (RES) ewes were euthanized within 24 h of birth (birth; n=5) or were fed a control diet until 3 months of age (n=5). Satellite cells isolated from the semitendinosus muscle were used for gene expression analysis or cultured for 24, 48 or 72 h and immunostained for Pax7, MyoD or myogenin. Fusion index was calculated from a subset of cells allowed to differentiate. Compared with CON, temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin was altered in cultured satellite cells isolated from RES lambs at birth. The percent of cells expressing MyoD was greater in RES than CON (P=0.03) after 24 h in culture. After 48 h of culture, there was a greater percent of cells expressing myogenin in RES compared with CON (P0.05). In satellite cells from RES lambs at 3 months of age, the percent of cells expressing MyoD and myogenin were greater than CON after 72 h in culture (P<0.05). Fusion index was reduced in RES lambs at 3 months of age compared with CON (P<0.001). Restricted nutrition during gestation alters the temporal expression of myogenic regulatory factors in satellite cells of the

  15. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 controls TH1 cell effector function and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mahnke, Justus; Schumacher, Valéa; Ahrens, Stefanie; Käding, Nadja; Feldhoff, Lea Marie; Huber, Magdalena; Rupp, Jan; Raczkowski, Friederike; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) is essential for TH2 and TH17 cell formation and controls peripheral CD8+ T cell differentiation. We used Listeria monocytogenes infection to characterize the function of IRF4 in TH1 responses. IRF4−/− mice generated only marginal numbers of listeria-specific TH1 cells. After transfer into infected mice, IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells failed to differentiate into TH1 cells as indicated by reduced T-bet and IFN-γ expression, and showed limited proliferation. Activated IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells exhibited diminished uptake of the glucose analog 2-NBDG, limited oxidative phosphorylation and strongly reduced aerobic glycolysis. Insufficient metabolic adaptation contributed to the limited proliferation and TH1 differentiation of IRF4−/− CD4+ T cells. Our study identifies IRF4 as central regulator of TH1 responses and cellular metabolism. We propose that this function of IRF4 is fundamental for the initiation and maintenance of all TH cell responses. PMID:27762344

  16. Origin of a novel regulatory module by duplication and degeneration of an ancient plant transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Sandra K; Ryan, Joseph G; Conway, Stephanie J; Brenner, Eric; Burris, Kellie P; Burris, Jason N; Chen, Tao; Edger, Patrick P; Graham, Sean W; Leebens-Mack, James H; Pires, J Chris; Rothfels, Carl J; Sigel, Erin M; Stevenson, Dennis W; Neal Stewart, C; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Bowman, John L

    2014-12-01

    It is commonly believed that gene duplications provide the raw material for morphological evolution. Both the number of genes and size of gene families have increased during the diversification of land plants. Several small proteins that regulate transcription factors have recently been identified in plants, including the LITTLE ZIPPER (ZPR) proteins. ZPRs are post-translational negative regulators, via heterodimerization, of class III Homeodomain Leucine Zipper (C3HDZ) proteins that play a key role in directing plant form and growth. We show that ZPR genes originated as a duplication of a C3HDZ transcription factor paralog in the common ancestor of euphyllophytes (ferns and seed plants). The ZPRs evolved by degenerative mutations resulting in loss all of the C3HDZ functional domains, except the leucine zipper that modulates dimerization. ZPRs represent a novel regulatory module of the C3HDZ network unique to the euphyllophyte lineage, and their origin correlates to a period of rapid morphological changes and increased complexity in land plants. The origin of the ZPRs illustrates the significance of gene duplications in creating developmental complexity during land plant evolution that likely led to morphological evolution.

  17. Antiviral Activity of Porcine Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 against Swine Viruses in Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Chang, Hongtao; Yang, Xia; Zhao, Yongxiang; Chen, Lu; Wang, Xinwei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Chuanqing; Zhao, Jun

    2015-11-17

    Interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1), as an important transcription factor, is abundantly induced upon virus infections and participates in host antiviral immune responses. However, the roles of porcine IRF1 (poIRF1) in host antiviral defense remain poorly understood. In this study, we determined that poIRF1 was upregulated upon infection with viruses and distributed in nucleus in porcine PK-15 cells. Subsequently, we tested the antiviral activities of poIRF1 against several swine viruses in cells. Overexpression of poIRF1 can efficiently suppress the replication of viruses, and knockdown of poIRF1 promotes moderately viral replication. Interestingly, overexpression of poIRF1 enhances dsRNA-induced IFN-β and IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) promoter activation, whereas knockdown of poIRF1 cannot significantly affect the activation of IFN-β promoter induced by RNA viruses. This study suggests that poIRF1 plays a significant role in cellular antiviral response against swine viruses, but might be dispensable for IFN-β induction triggered by RNA viruses in PK-15 cells. Given these results, poIRF1 plays potential roles in cellular antiviral responses against swine viruses.

  18. SNP2TFBS – a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/. PMID:27899579

  19. Protective role of interferon regulatory factor 3-mediated signaling against prion infection.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Daisuke; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Honda, Kenya; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2012-05-01

    Abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)) generated from the cellular isoform of PrP (PrP(C)) is assumed to be the main or sole component of the pathogen, called prion, of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). Because PrP is a host-encoded protein, acquired immune responses are not induced in TSE. Meanwhile, activation of the innate immune system has been suggested to partially block the progression of TSE; however, the mechanism is not well understood. To further elucidate the role of the innate immune system in prion infection, we investigated the function of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor of the MyD88-independent type I interferon (IFN) production pathway. We found that IRF3-deficient mice exhibited significantly earlier onset with three murine TSE strains, namely, 22L, FK-1, and murine bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE), following intraperitoneal transmission, than with wild-type controls. Moreover, overexpression of IRF3 attenuated prion infection in the cell culture system, while PrP(Sc) was increased in prion-infected cells treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against IRF3, suggesting that IRF3 negatively regulates PrP(Sc) formation. Our findings provide new insight into the role of the host innate immune system in the pathogenesis of prion diseases.

  20. Protective Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Mediated Signaling against Prion Infection

    PubMed Central

    Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Fuse, Takayuki; Nakagaki, Takehiro; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Honda, Kenya; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) generated from the cellular isoform of PrP (PrPC) is assumed to be the main or sole component of the pathogen, called prion, of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). Because PrP is a host-encoded protein, acquired immune responses are not induced in TSE. Meanwhile, activation of the innate immune system has been suggested to partially block the progression of TSE; however, the mechanism is not well understood. To further elucidate the role of the innate immune system in prion infection, we investigated the function of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), a key transcription factor of the MyD88-independent type I interferon (IFN) production pathway. We found that IRF3-deficient mice exhibited significantly earlier onset with three murine TSE strains, namely, 22L, FK-1, and murine bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mBSE), following intraperitoneal transmission, than with wild-type controls. Moreover, overexpression of IRF3 attenuated prion infection in the cell culture system, while PrPSc was increased in prion-infected cells treated with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against IRF3, suggesting that IRF3 negatively regulates PrPSc formation. Our findings provide new insight into the role of the host innate immune system in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. PMID:22379081

  1. Ikkepsilon regulates viral-induced interferon regulatory factor-3 activation via a redox-sensitive pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Indukuri, Hemalatha; Castro, Shawn M.; Liao, S.-M.; Feeney, Lee Ann; Dorsch, Marion; Coyle, Anthony J.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Brasier, Allan R.; Casola, Antonella . E-mail: ancasola@utmb.edu

    2006-09-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced chemokine gene expression occurs through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)-3. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to RSV-induced IRF-3 activation and whether it is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Our results show that RSV infection induces expression and catalytic activity of IKK{epsilon}, a noncanonical IKK-like kinase. Expression of a kinase-inactive IKK{epsilon} blocks RSV-induced IRF-3 serine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA-binding, leading to inhibition of RANTES gene transcription, mRNA expression and protein synthesis. Treatment of alveolar epithelial cells with antioxidants or with NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors abrogates RSV-induced chemokine secretion, IRF-3 phosphorylation and IKK{epsilon} induction, indicating that ROS generation plays a fundamental role in the signaling pathway leading to IRF-3 activation, therefore, identifying a novel molecular target for the development of strategies aimed to modify the inflammatory response associated with RSV infection of the lung.

  2. SNP2TFBS - a database of regulatory SNPs affecting predicted transcription factor binding site affinity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Ambrosini, Giovanna; Bucher, Philipp

    2017-01-04

    SNP2TFBS is a computational resource intended to support researchers investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory variation in the human genome. The database essentially consists of a collection of text files providing specific annotations for human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely whether they are predicted to abolish, create or change the affinity of one or several transcription factor (TF) binding sites. A SNP's effect on TF binding is estimated based on a position weight matrix (PWM) model for the binding specificity of the corresponding factor. These data files are regenerated at regular intervals by an automatic procedure that takes as input a reference genome, a comprehensive SNP catalogue and a collection of PWMs. SNP2TFBS is also accessible over a web interface, enabling users to view the information provided for an individual SNP, to extract SNPs based on various search criteria, to annotate uploaded sets of SNPs or to display statistics about the frequencies of binding sites affected by selected SNPs. Homepage: http://ccg.vital-it.ch/snp2tfbs/.

  3. Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Promoted Glioblastoma Progression and Stemness by Modulating IL-6 Expression in Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zongze; Huang, Qiming; Chen, Heping; Lin, Zhiqin; Zhao, Meng; Jiang, Zhongli

    2017-01-01

    Background: Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 (IRF7) is associated with chronic inflammation initiated by the activation of microglia. However it remains poorly defined how IRF7 activates microglia to initiate inflammatory microenvironment, and thus promotes the growth and malignancy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This study investigated the role of IRF7 expression in microglia which increases GBM progression. Methods: We established stable human microglia (HMs) over-expressing IRF-7 or empty vector by lentiviral transduction and stable selection. These HM-IRF-7 cells were co-cultured with U87-MG to examine their influence on GBM, in terms of cell proliferation, apoptosis and stemness of U87-MG. By qRT-PCR and ELISA assays, the expression of key genes and secretion of inflammatory factors were identified in inflammatory signal pathway respectively. We also analyzed whether the expression of IRF7 and its target gene IL-6 correlated with PFS (progression-free survival) and OS (overall survival) in clinical samples by Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Results: HMs can be engineered to stably express high level of IFR7 with IRF7 lentivirus, and was found to promote U87-MG growth and inhibit its apoptosis in co-culture. Meanwhile, U87-MG seemed to show stem cell character with ALDH1 expression. These results may be related to IRF7 initiating IL-6 expression and secretion in both HM and U87-MG cells. The IRF7 and IL-6 were highly expressed in GBM tissues, and IL-6 secretion was high in GBM serums, both of which were significantly correlated with PFS and OS. Conclusions: The immune function of HMs was changed while it expressed IRF7 genes. The results demonstrated for the first time that IRF7 of microglia promoted GBM growth and stemness by mediating IL-6 expression, and revealed that IRF-7 and IL-6 were independent factors affecting the overall survival probability. PMID:28243325

  4. 34 CFR 648.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 648.32 Section 648.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION GRADUATE ASSISTANCE IN AREAS OF NATIONAL...

  5. 34 CFR 490.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 490.22 Section 490.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LIFE SKILLS FOR STATE AND...

  6. 34 CFR 490.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 490.22 Section 490.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LIFE SKILLS FOR STATE AND...

  7. 34 CFR 490.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 490.22 Section 490.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LIFE SKILLS FOR STATE AND...

  8. 34 CFR 490.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 490.22 Section 490.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LIFE SKILLS FOR STATE AND...

  9. 34 CFR 490.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 490.22 Section 490.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LIFE SKILLS FOR STATE AND...

  10. 34 CFR 491.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 491.22 Section 491.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION FOR THE...

  11. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  12. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  13. 34 CFR 477.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 477.22 Section 477.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE PROGRAM ANALYSIS ASSISTANCE...

  14. The ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8(+) T cells and regulatory CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Teh, Hung-Sia

    2014-03-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor ThPOK plays a crucial role in CD4 T-cell development and CD4/CD8 lineage decision. In ThPOK-deficient mice, developing T cells expressing MHC class II-restricted T-cell receptors are redirected into the CD8 T-cell lineage. In this study, we investigated whether the ThPOK transgene affected the development and function of two additional types of T cells, namely self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells. Self-specific CD8 T cells are characterized by high expression of CD44, CD122, Ly6C, 1B11 and proliferation in response to either IL-2 or IL-15. The ThPOK transgene converted these self-specific CD8 T cells into CD4 T cells. The converted CD4(+) T cells are no longer self-reactive, lose the characteristics of self-specific CD8 T cells, acquire the properties of conventional CD4 T cells and survive poorly in peripheral lymphoid organs. By contrast, the ThPOK transgene promoted the development of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells resulting in an increased recovery of CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells that expressed higher transforming growth factor-β-dependent suppressor activity. These studies indicate that the ThPOK transcription factor differentially affects the development and function of self-specific CD8 T cells and CD4(+) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells.

  15. MTHFR homozygous mutation and additional risk factors for cerebral infarction in a large Italian family.

    PubMed

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Spalice, Alberto; Perla, Massimo; Properzi, Enrico; Iannetti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Several cases with cerebral infarctions associated with the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have been reported. Given the large number of asymptomatic individuals with the MTHFR mutation, additional risk factors for cerebral infarction should be considered. This study describes a large family with the MTHFR mutation and a combination of heterozygous factor V Leiden mutations and different additional exogenous and endogenous thrombogenic risk factors. Psychomotor retardation and a left fronto-insular infarct associated with the MTHFR mutation together with diminished factor VII and low level of protein C was documented in the first patient. In the second patient, generalized epilepsy and a malacic area in the right nucleus lenticularis was associated with the MTHFR mutation and a low level of protein C. In the third patient, right hemiparesis and a left fronto-temporal porencephalic cyst were documented, together with the MTHFR mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. An extensive search of additional circumstantial and genetic thrombogenic risk factors should be useful for prophylaxis and prognosis of infants with cerebral infarctions associated with the MTHFR mutation and of their related family members.

  16. Developmental appearance of factors that bind specifically to cis-regulatory sequences of a gene expressed in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Calzone, F J; Thézé, N; Thiebaud, P; Hill, R L; Britten, R J; Davidson, E H

    1988-09-01

    Previous gene-transfer experiments have identified a 2500-nucleotide 5' domain of the CyIIIa cytoskeletal actin gene, which contains cis-regulatory sequences that are necessary and sufficient for spatial and temporal control of CyIIIa gene expression during embryogenesis. This gene is activated in late cleavage, exclusively in aboral ectoderm cell lineages. In this study, we focus on interactions demonstrated in vitro between sequences of the regulatory domain and proteins present in crude extracts derived from sea urchin embryo nuclei and from unfertilized eggs. Quantitative gel-shift measurements are utilized to estimate minimum numbers of factor molecules per embryo at 24 hr postfertilization, when the CyIIIa gene is active, at 7 hr, when it is still silent, and in the unfertilized egg. We also estimate the binding affinity preferences (Kr) of the various factors for their respective sites, relative to their affinity for synthetic DNA competitors. At least 14 different specific interactions occur within the regulatory regions, some of which produce multiple DNA-protein complexes. Values of Kr range from approximately 2 x 10(4) to approximately 2 x 10(6) for these factors under the conditions applied. With one exception, the minimum factor prevalences that we measured in the 400-cell 24-hr embryo nuclear extracts fell within the range of 2 x 10(5) to 2 x 10(6) molecules per embryo, i.e., a few hundred to a few thousand molecules per nucleus. Three developmental patterns were observed with respect to factor prevalence: Factors reacting at one site were found in unfertilized egg cytoplasm at about the same level per egg or embryo as in 24-hr embryo nuclei; factors reacting with five other regions of the regulatory domain are not detectable in egg cytoplasm but in 7-hr mid-cleavage-stage embryo, nuclei are already at or close to their concentrations in the 24-hr embryo nuclei; and factors reacting with five additional regions are not detectable in egg cytoplasm and

  17. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, J M; Uwimpuhwe, H; Ballo, R; Kaur, M; Bajic, V B; Prince, S

    2009-01-01

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular muscle (EOM) dysfunction among African MG subjects reported earlier may result from altered DAF expression. To test this hypothesis, we screened the DAF gene sequences relevant to the classical complement pathway and found an association between myasthenics with EOM paresis and the DAF regulatory region c.-198C>G SNP (odds ratio=8.6; P=0.0003). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in a twofold activation of a DAF 5′-flanking region luciferase reporter transfected into three different cell lines. Direct matching of the surrounding SNP sequence within the DAF regulatory region with the known transcription factor-binding sites suggests a loss of an Sp1-binding site. This was supported by the observation that the c.-198C>G SNP did not show the normal lipopolysaccharide-induced DAF transcriptional upregulation in lymphoblasts from four patients. Our findings suggest that at critical periods during autoimmune MG, this SNP may result in inadequate DAF upregulation with consequent complement-mediated EOM damage. Susceptible individuals may benefit from anti-complement therapy in addition to immunosuppression. PMID:19675582

  18. A functional SNP in the regulatory region of the decay-accelerating factor gene associates with extraocular muscle pareses in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, J M; Uwimpuhwe, H; Ballo, R; Kaur, M; Bajic, V B; Prince, S

    2010-01-01

    Complement activation in myasthenia gravis (MG) may damage muscle endplate and complement regulatory proteins such as decay-accelerating factor (DAF) or CD55 may be protective. We hypothesize that the increased prevalence of severe extraocular muscle (EOM) dysfunction among African MG subjects reported earlier may result from altered DAF expression. To test this hypothesis, we screened the DAF gene sequences relevant to the classical complement pathway and found an association between myasthenics with EOM paresis and the DAF regulatory region c.-198C>G SNP (odds ratio=8.6; P=0.0003). This single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) results in a twofold activation of a DAF 5'-flanking region luciferase reporter transfected into three different cell lines. Direct matching of the surrounding SNP sequence within the DAF regulatory region with the known transcription factor-binding sites suggests a loss of an Sp1-binding site. This was supported by the observation that the c.-198C>G SNP did not show the normal lipopolysaccharide-induced DAF transcriptional upregulation in lymphoblasts from four patients. Our findings suggest that at critical periods during autoimmune MG, this SNP may result in inadequate DAF upregulation with consequent complement-mediated EOM damage. Susceptible individuals may benefit from anti-complement therapy in addition to immunosuppression.

  19. Interferon regulatory factor 4 attenuates Notch signaling to suppress the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Vipul; Shukla, Ashima; Joshi, Shantaram S; Lu, Runqing

    2016-07-05

    Molecular pathogenesis of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is not fully elucidated. Genome wide association studies have linked Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF4) to the development of CLL. We recently established a causal relationship between low levels of IRF4 and development of CLL. However, the molecular mechanism through which IRF4 suppresses CLL development remains unclear. Deregulation of Notch signaling pathway has been identified as one of the most recurrent molecular anomalies in the pathogenesis of CLL. Yet, the role of Notch signaling as well as its regulation during CLL development remains poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that IRF4 deficient mice expressing immunoglobulin heavy chain Vh11 (IRF4-/-Vh11) developed spontaneous CLL with complete penetrance. In this study, we show that elevated Notch2 expression and the resulting hyperactivation of Notch signaling are common features of IRF4-/-Vh11 CLL cells. Our studies further reveal that Notch signaling is indispensable for CLL development in the IRF4-/-Vh11 mice. Moreover, we identify E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4, which targets Notch for degradation, as a direct target of IRF4 in CLL cells and their precursors. Collectively, our studies provide the first in vivo evidence for an essential role of Notch signaling in the development of CLL and establish IRF4 as a critical regulator of Notch signaling during CLL development.

  20. Functional studies of the Ciona intestinalis myogenic regulatory factor reveal conserved features of chordate myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Izzi, Stephanie A; Colantuono, Bonnie J; Sullivan, Kelly; Khare, Parul; Meedel, Thomas H

    2013-04-15

    Ci-MRF is the sole myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, an invertebrate chordate. In order to investigate its properties we developed a simple in vivo assay based on misexpressing Ci-MRF in the notochord of Ciona embryos. We used this assay to examine the roles of three structural motifs that are conserved among MRFs: an alanine-threonine (Ala-Thr) dipeptide of the basic domain that is known in vertebrates as the myogenic code, a cysteine/histidine-rich (C/H) domain found just N-terminal to the basic domain, and a carboxy-terminal amphipathic α-helix referred to as Helix III. We show that the Ala-Thr dipeptide is necessary for normal Ci-MRF function, and that while eliminating the C/H domain or Helix III individually has no demonstrable effect on Ci-MRF, simultaneous loss of both motifs significantly reduces its activity. Our studies also indicate that direct interaction between CiMRF and an essential E-box of Ciona Troponin I is required for the expression of this muscle-specific gene and that multiple classes of MRF-regulated genes exist in Ciona. These findings are consistent with substantial conservation of MRF-directed myogenesis in chordates and demonstrate for the first time that the Ala/Thr dipeptide of the basic domain of an invertebrate MRF behaves as a myogenic code.

  1. MYCN promotes neuroblastoma malignancy by establishing a regulatory circuit with transcription factor AP4

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chengyuan; Yu, Denise M.T.; Gherardi, Samuele; Koach, Jessica; Milazzo, Giorgio; Gamble, Laura; Liu, Bing; Valli, Emanuele; Russell, Amanda J.; London, Wendy B.; Liu, Tao; Cheung, Belamy B.; Marshall, Glenn M.; Perini, Giovanni; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D.

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of the MYCN oncogene, a member of the MYC family of transcriptional regulators, is one of the most powerful prognostic markers identified for poor outcome in neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid cancer in childhood. While MYCN has been established as a key driver of malignancy in neuroblastoma, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Transcription factor activating enhancer binding protein-4 (TFAP4) has been reported to be a direct transcriptional target of MYC. We show for the first time that high expression of TFAP4 in primary neuroblastoma patients is associated with poor clinical outcome. siRNA-mediated suppression of TFAP4 in MYCN-expressing neuroblastoma cells led to inhibition of cell proliferation and migration. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that TFAP4 expression is positively regulated by MYCN. Microarray analysis identified genes regulated by both MYCN and TFAP4 in neuroblastoma cells, including Phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate synthetase-2 (PRPS2) and Syndecan-1 (SDC1), which are involved in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Overall this study suggests a regulatory circuit in which MYCN by elevating TFAP4 expression, cooperates with it to control a specific set of genes involved in tumor progression. These findings highlight the existence of a MYCN-TFAP4 axis in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets for aggressive forms of this disease. PMID:27448979

  2. Are good ideas enough? The impact of socio-economic and regulatory factors on GMO commercialisation.

    PubMed

    Vàzquez-Salat, Núria

    2013-01-01

    In recent years scientific literature has seen an increase in publications describing new transgenic applications. Although technically-sound, these promising developments might not necessarily translate into products available to the consumer. This article highlights the impact of external factors on the commercial viability of Genetically Modified (GM) animals in the pharmaceutical and food sectors. Through the division of the production chain into three Policy Domains -Science, Market and Public- I present an overview of the broad range of regulatory and socio-economic components that impacts on the path towards commercialisation of GM animals. To further illustrate the unique combination of forces that influence each application, I provide an in-depth analysis of two real cases: GM rabbits producing human polyclonal antibodies (pharmaceutical case study) and GM cows producing recombinant human lactoferrin (food case study). The inability to generalise over the commercial success of a given transgenic application should encourage researchers to perform these type of exercises early in the R & D process. Furthermore, through the analysis of these case studies we can observe a change in the biopolitics of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Contrary to the GM plant biopolitical landscape, developing states such as China and Argentina are placing themselves as global leaders in GM animals. The pro-GM attitude of these states is likely to cause a shift in the political evolution of global GMO governance.

  3. Effect of various stress-regulatory factors on biomass and lipid production in microalga Haematococcus pluvialis.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sushanta Kumar; McHugh, Edward; Hayes, Jeremiah; Moane, Siobhan; Walsh, Daniel; Murray, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    To maximize the biomass and lipid production for applications in food or biofuel feedstock, nine stress conditions were tested considering N and/or P limitations, light intensity & quality, for Haematococcus pluvialis SCCAP K-0084 cultivation. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), warm white light emitting diode (WWLED), and white light emitting diode (WLED) at illumination of 240 μmol photons m(-2) sec(-1) were the best stress-regulatory factors. PAR without P & low N conditions yielded high biomass with 33% lipids containing increased C16:0 and C18:0 saturated fatty acids, and reduced unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) (oleic, linoleic, and α/γ-linolenic). WWLED and WLED without P conditions also yielded high biomass, but 25% lipids with increased amounts of UFAs. Red light emitting diode (RLED) without P & low N conditions yielded 46% lipids with lowest biomass. PAR and WWLED & WLED illuminated conditions were found suitable respectively for biodiesel feedstock lipids and UFA-rich lipids for multiple applications.

  4. Zinc regulates a key transcriptional pathway for epileptogenesis via metal-regulatory transcription factor 1

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Schaub, Christina; Pitsch, Julika; Kulbida, Rebecca; Opitz, Thoralf; Ekstein, Dana; Dalal, Adam; Urbach, Horst; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal seizure disorder in adults. In many patients, transient brain insults, including status epilepticus (SE), are followed by a latent period of epileptogenesis, preceding the emergence of clinical seizures. In experimental animals, transcriptional upregulation of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+-channels, resulting in an increased propensity for burst discharges of hippocampal neurons, is an important trigger for epileptogenesis. Here we provide evidence that the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) mediates the increase of CaV3.2 mRNA and intrinsic excitability consequent to a rise in intracellular Zn2+ that is associated with SE. Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) transfer of MTF1 into murine hippocampi leads to increased CaV3.2 mRNA. Conversely, rAAV-mediated expression of a dominant-negative MTF1 abolishes SE-induced CaV3.2 mRNA upregulation and attenuates epileptogenesis. Finally, data from resected human hippocampi surgically treated for pharmacoresistant TLE support the Zn2+-MTF1-CaV3.2 cascade, thus providing new vistas for preventing and treating TLE. PMID:26498180

  5. Auditory-motor entrainment in vocal mimicking species: Additional ontogenetic and phylogenetic factors.

    PubMed

    Schachner, Adena

    2010-05-01

    We have recently found robust evidence of motor entrainment to auditory stimuli in multiple species of non-human animal, all of which were capable of vocal mimicry. In contrast, the ability remained markedly absent in many closely related species incapable of vocal mimicry. This suggests that vocal mimicry may be a necessary precondition for entrainment. However, within the vocal mimicking species, entrainment appeared non-randomly, suggesting that other components besides vocal mimicry play a role in the capacity and tendency to entrain. Here we discuss potential additional factors involved in entrainment. New survey data show that both male and female parrots are able to entrain, and that the entrainment capacity appears throughout the lifespan. We suggest routes for future study of entrainment, including both developmental studies in species known to entrain and further work to detect entrainment in species not well represented in our dataset. These studies may shed light on additional factors necessary for entrainment in addition to vocal mimicry.

  6. Characterization of Amphioxus IFN Regulatory Factor Family Reveals an Archaic Signaling Framework for Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Peiyi; Yang, Rirong; Ruan, Jie; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Zhenxin; Xu, Anlong

    2015-12-15

    The IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress response, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Although the origin of the IRF family has been dated back to multicellular organisms, invertebrate IRFs differ from vertebrate IRFs in genomic structure and gene synteny, and little is known about their functions. Through comparison of multiple amphioxus genomes, in this study we suggested that amphioxus contains nine IRF members, whose orthologs are supposed to be shared among three amphioxus species. As the orthologs to the vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 subgroups, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt)IRF1 and bbtIRF8 bind the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and were upregulated when amphioxus intestinal cells were stimulated with poly(I:C). As amphioxus-specific IRFs, both bbtIRF3 and bbtIRF7 bind ISRE. When activated, they can be phosphorylated by bbtTBK1 and then translocate into nucleus for target gene transcription. As transcriptional repressors, bbtIRF2 and bbtIRF4 can inhibit the transcriptional activities of bbtIRF1, 3, 7, and 8 by competing for the binding of ISRE. Interestingly, amphioxus IRF2, IRF8, and Rel were identified as target genes of bbtIRF1, bbtIRF7, and bbtIRF3, respectively, suggesting a dynamic feedback regulation among amphioxus IRF and NF-κB. Collectively, to our knowledge we present for the first time an archaic IRF signaling framework in a basal chordate, shedding new insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate IFN-based antiviral networks.

  7. Regulatory SNPs Alter the Gene Expression of Diabetic Retinopathy Associated Secretary Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chian-Feng; Liou, Shiow-Wen; Wu, Hsin-Han; Lin, Chin-Hui; Huang, Li-Shan; Woung, Lin-Chung; Tsai, Ching-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a common microvascular complication in both type I and type II diabetes. Several previous reports indicated the serum centration of some secretary factors were highly associated with DR. Therefore, we hypothesis regulatory SNPs (rSNPs) genotype in secretary factors may alter these gene expression and lead to DR. Methods: At first, pyrosequencing were applying to screen the SNPs which present allele frequency different in DR and DNR. Then individual genotyping was processed by Taqman assays in Taiwanese DR and DNR patients. To evaluate the effect of SNP allele on transcriptional activity, we measured promoter activity using luciferase reporter constructs. Results: We found the frequencies of the CC, CG, and GG genotype of the rs2010963 polymorphism were 15.09%, 47.14%, and 37.74% in DR and 12.90%, 19.35%, and 67.74% in DNR, respectively (p = 0.0205). The prevalence of DR was higher (p = 0.00793) in patients with the CC or CG genotype (62.26% and 32.26% for DR and DNR, respectively) compared with the patients with the GG genotype. To evaluate the effect of rs2010963-C allele on transcriptional activity, we measured promoter activity using luciferase reporter constructs. The rs2010963-C reporter showed 1.6 to 2-fold higher luciferase activity than rs2010963-G in 3 cell lines. Conclusion: Our data proposed rs2010963-C altered the expression level of VEGFA in different tissues. We suggested small increase but long term exposure to VEGFA may lead to DR finally. PMID:27648002

  8. Evolutionary conservation of regulatory strategies for the sex determination factor transformer-2.

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, D; McGuffin, M E; Piskur, J; Yao, J; Baker, B S; Mattox, W

    1997-01-01

    Sex determination in Drosophila melanogaster is regulated by a cascade of splicing factors which direct the sex-specific expression of gene products needed for male and female differentiation. The splicing factor TRA-2 affects sex-specific splicing of multiple pre-mRNAs involved in sexual differentiation. The tra-2 gene itself expresses a complex set of mRNAs generated through alternative processing that collectively encode three distinct protein isoforms. The expression of these isoforms differs in the soma and germ line. In the male germ line the ratio of two isoforms present is governed by autoregulation of splicing. However, the functional significance of multiple TRA-2 isoforms has remained uncertain. Here we have examined whether the structure, function, and regulation of tra-2 are conserved in Drosophila virilis, a species diverged from D. melanogaster by over 60 million years. We find that the D. virilis homolog of tra-2 produces alternatively spliced RNAs encoding a set of protein isoforms analogous to those found in D. melanogaster. When introduced into the genome of D. melanogaster, this homolog can functionally replace the endogenous tra-2 gene for both normal female sexual differentiation and spermatogenesis. Examination of alternative mRNAs produced in D. virilis testes suggests that germ line-specific autoregulation of tra-2 function is accomplished by a strategy similar to that used in D. melanogaster. The similarity in structure and function of the tra-2 genes in these divergent Drosophila species supports the idea that sexual differentiation in D. melanogaster and D. virilis is accomplished under the control of similar regulatory pathways. PMID:9111363

  9. Regulatory Factor X (RFX)-mediated transcriptional rewiring of ciliary genes in animals.

    PubMed

    Piasecki, Brian P; Burghoorn, Jan; Swoboda, Peter

    2010-07-20

    Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) and were retained by most organisms spanning all extant eukaryotic lineages, including organisms in the Unikonta (Amoebozoa, fungi, choanoflagellates, and animals), Archaeplastida, Excavata, Chromalveolata, and Rhizaria. In certain animals, including humans, ciliary gene regulation is mediated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors (TFs). RFX TFs bind X-box promoter motifs and thereby positively regulate >50 ciliary genes. Though RFX-mediated ciliary gene regulation has been studied in several bilaterian animals, little is known about the evolutionary conservation of ciliary gene regulation. Here, we explore the evolutionary relationships between RFX TFs and cilia. By sampling the genome sequences of >120 eukaryotic organisms, we show that RFX TFs are exclusively found in unikont organisms (whether ciliated or not), but are completely absent from the genome sequences of all nonunikont organisms (again, whether ciliated or not). Sampling the promoter sequences of 12 highly conserved ciliary genes from 23 diverse unikont and nonunikont organisms further revealed that phylogenetic footprints of X-box promoter motif sequences are found exclusively in ciliary genes of certain animals. Thus, there is no correlation between cilia/ciliary genes and the presence or absence of RFX TFs and X-box promoter motifs in nonanimal unikont and in nonunikont organisms. These data suggest that RFX TFs originated early in the unikont lineage, distinctly after cilia evolved. The evolutionary model that best explains these observations indicates that the transcriptional rewiring of many ciliary genes by RFX TFs occurred early in the animal lineage.

  10. Myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) expression is affected by exercise in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huadong; Li, Diyan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Yiping; Yang, Zhiqin; Zhu, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 proteins belong to the family of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) and play important roles in skeletal muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy. We hypothesized that exercise would affect MRF mRNA and protein abundance in postnatal chicken skeletal muscle driving molecular changes that could ultimately lead to increased muscle fiber diameter. At day (d) 43, twelve hundred chickens with similar body weight were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range groups. The MRF mRNA abundance was measured in the pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d56, d70, and d84, and the protein levels of MRFs were determined from the thigh muscle at d84. The results showed no significant difference in mRNA of the MRFs among the three groups at d56 (P>0.05). At d84, chicken in the pen and free-range group showed higher MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 mRNA abundance compared to the caged chickens (P<0.05). Free-range chickens had higher Mrf4 and MyoG expression than those in penned ones (P<0.05). Protein abundances of all four factors were lowest in the caged group, and Mrf4 and MyoG protein quantities were greatest in free-range chickens (P<0.05), but Myf5 and MyoD1 protein abundance did not differ between penned and caged groups. The results suggested that exercise up-regulated MRF expression in the postnatal skeletal muscles, which led to an increase in muscle fiber diameter, and eventually affected the meat quality of the skeletal muscles in adult chickens.

  11. Genetic variation in metallothionein and metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 in relation to urinary cadmium, copper, and zinc

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Scott V.; Barrick, Brian; Freney, Emily P.; Shafer, Martin M.; Makar, Karen; Song, Xiaoling; Lampe, Johanna; Vilchis, Hugo; Ulery, April; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Metallothionein (MT) proteins play critical roles in the physiological handling of both essential (Cu and Zn) and toxic (Cd) metals. MT expression is regulated by metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1). Hence, genetic variation in the MT gene family and MTF1 might therefore influence excretion of these metals. Methods 321 women were recruited in Seattle, WA and Las Cruces, NM and provided demographic information, urine samples for measurement of metal concentrations by mass spectrometry and creatinine, and blood or saliva for extraction of DNA. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MTF1 gene region and the region of chromosome 16 encoding the MT gene family were selected for genotyping in addition to an ancestry informative marker panel. Linear regression was used to estimate the association of SNPs with urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn, adjusted for age, urinary creatinine, smoking history, study site, and ancestry. Results Minor alleles of rs28366003 and rs10636 near the MT2A gene were associated with lower urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn. Minor alleles of rs8044719 and rs1599823, near MT1A and MT1B, were associated with lower urinary Cd and Zn, respectively. Minor alleles of rs4653329 in MTF1 was associated with lower urinary Cd. Conclusions These results suggest that genetic variation in the MT gene region and MTF1 influences urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn excretion. PMID:26529669

  12. The nT1 translocation separates vulval regulatory elements from the egl-18 and elt-6 GATA factor genes.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kyunghee; Bernstein, Yelena; Sundaram, Meera V

    2004-03-01

    egl-18 and elt-6 are partially redundant, adjacent genes encoding GATA factors essential for viability, seam cell development, and vulval development in Caenorhabditis elegans. The nT1 reciprocal translocation causes a strong Vulvaless phenotype, and an nT1 breakpoint was previously mapped to the left arm of LGIV, where egl-18/elt-6 are located. Here we present evidence that the nT1 vulval phenotype is due to a disruption of egl-18/elt-6 function specifically in the vulva. egl-18 mutations do not complement nT1 for vulval defects, and the nT1 breakpoint on LGIV is located within approximately 800 bp upstream of a potential transcriptional start site of egl-18. In addition, we have identified a approximately 350-bp cis-regulatory region sufficient for vulval expression just upstream of the nT1 breakpoint. By examining the fusion state and division patterns of the cells in the developing vulva of nT1 mutants, we demonstrate that egl-18/elt-6 prevent fusion and promote cell proliferation at multiple steps of vulval development.

  13. Interferon Regulatory Factor 8 (IRF8) Interacts with the B Cell Lymphoma 6 (BCL6) Corepressor BCOR*

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jeongheon; Feng, Xianxum; Kim, Yong-Soo; Shin, Dong-Mi; Hatzi, Katerina; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C.

    2014-01-01

    B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) corepressor (BCOR) was discovered as a BCL6-interacting corepressor, but little is known about its other biological activities in normal B cell development and function. Previously, we found that interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8), also known as interferon consensus sequence-binding protein, directly targets a large number of genes in germinal center B cells including BCL6. In this study, we screened potential binding partners of IRF8 using a retrovirus-based protein complementation assay screen in a mouse pre-B cell line. We found that IRF8 interacts directly with BCOR and that the α-helical region of IRF8 and the BCL6 binding domain of BCOR are required for this interaction. In addition, IRF8 protein interacts directly with BCL6. Using an siRNA-mediated IRF8 knockdown mouse B cell lymphoma cell line, we showed that IRF8 represses Bcor and enhances Bcl6 transcription. Taken together, these data suggest that a complex comprising BCOR-BCL6-IRF8 modulates BCL6-associated transcriptional regulation of germinal center B cell function. PMID:25331958

  14. Isolation of an additional member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, FGFR-3

    SciTech Connect

    Keegan, K.; Hayman, M.J. ); Johnson, D.E.; Williams, L.T. )

    1991-02-15

    The fibroblast growth factors are a family of polypeptide growth factors involved in a variety of activities including mitogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have previously been identified in chicken, mouse, and human and have been shown to contain an extracellular domain with either two or three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain. The authors have isolated a human cDNA for another tyrosine kinase receptor that is highly homologous to the previously described FGFR. Expression of this receptor cDNA in COS cells directs the expression of a 125-kDa glycoprotein. They demonstrate that this cDNA encodes a biologically active receptor by showing that human acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors activate this receptor as measured by {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux assays. These data establish the existence of an additional member of the FGFR family that they have named FGFR-3.

  15. Additional regulatory activities of MrkH for the transcriptional expression of the Klebsiella pneumoniae mrk genes: Antagonist of H-NS and repressor

    PubMed Central

    Ares, Miguel A.; Fernández-Vázquez, José L.; Pacheco, Sabino; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I.; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma. Dolores; Torres, Javier; Alcántar-Curiel, María D.; González-y-Merchand, Jorge A.; De la Cruz, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. One of the main virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae is the type 3 pilus (T3P). T3P helps the bacterial interaction to both abiotic and biotic surfaces and it is crucial for the biofilm formation. T3P is genetically organized in three transcriptional units: the mrkABCDF polycistronic operon, the mrkHI bicistronic operon and the mrkJ gene. MrkH is a regulatory protein encoded in the mrkHI operon, which positively regulates the mrkA pilin gene and its own expression. In contrast, the H-NS nucleoid protein represses the transcriptional expression of T3P. Here we reported that MrkH and H-NS positively and negatively regulate mrkJ expression, respectively, by binding to the promoter of mrkJ. MrkH protein recognized a sequence located at position -63.5 relative to the transcriptional start site of mrkJ gene. Interestingly, our results show that, in addition to its known function as classic transcriptional activator, MrkH also positively controls the expression of mrk genes by acting as an anti-repressor of H-NS; moreover, our results support the notion that high levels of MrkH repress T3P expression. Our data provide new insights about the complex regulatory role of the MrkH protein on the transcriptional control of T3P in K. pneumoniae. PMID:28278272

  16. Additional regulatory activities of MrkH for the transcriptional expression of the Klebsiella pneumoniae mrk genes: Antagonist of H-NS and repressor.

    PubMed

    Ares, Miguel A; Fernández-Vázquez, José L; Pacheco, Sabino; Martínez-Santos, Verónica I; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma Dolores; Torres, Javier; Alcántar-Curiel, María D; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; De la Cruz, Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. One of the main virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae is the type 3 pilus (T3P). T3P helps the bacterial interaction to both abiotic and biotic surfaces and it is crucial for the biofilm formation. T3P is genetically organized in three transcriptional units: the mrkABCDF polycistronic operon, the mrkHI bicistronic operon and the mrkJ gene. MrkH is a regulatory protein encoded in the mrkHI operon, which positively regulates the mrkA pilin gene and its own expression. In contrast, the H-NS nucleoid protein represses the transcriptional expression of T3P. Here we reported that MrkH and H-NS positively and negatively regulate mrkJ expression, respectively, by binding to the promoter of mrkJ. MrkH protein recognized a sequence located at position -63.5 relative to the transcriptional start site of mrkJ gene. Interestingly, our results show that, in addition to its known function as classic transcriptional activator, MrkH also positively controls the expression of mrk genes by acting as an anti-repressor of H-NS; moreover, our results support the notion that high levels of MrkH repress T3P expression. Our data provide new insights about the complex regulatory role of the MrkH protein on the transcriptional control of T3P in K. pneumoniae.

  17. Expression and subcellular localization of myogenic regulatory factors during the differentiation of skeletal muscle C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Paola; Barbieri, Elena; Burattini, Sabrina; Guescini, Michele; D'Emilio, Alessandra; Biagiotti, Laura; Del Grande, Paolo; De Luca, Antonio; Stocchi, Vilberto; Falcieri, Elisabetta

    2009-12-15

    It is known that the MyoD family members (MyoD, Myf5, myogenin, and MRF4) play a pivotal role in the complex mechanism of skeletal muscle cell differentiation. However, fragmentary information on transcription factor-specific regulation is available and data on their post-transcriptional and post-translational behavior are still missing. In this work, we combined mRNA and protein expression analysis with their subcellular localization. Each myogenic regulator factor (MRF) revealed a specific mRNA trend and a protein quantitative analysis not overlapping, suggesting the presence of post-transcriptional mechanisms. In addition, each MRF showed a specific behavior in situ, characterized by a differentiation stage-dependent localization suggestive of a post-translational regulation also. Consistently with their transcriptional activity, immunogold electron microscopy data revealed MRFs distribution in interchromatin domains. Our results showed a MyoD and Myf5 contrasting expression profile in proliferating myoblasts, as well as myogenin and MRF4 opposite distribution in the terminally differentiated myotubes. Interestingly, MRFs expression and subcellular localization analysis during C2C12 cell differentiation stages showed two main MRFs regulation mechanisms: (i) the protein half-life regulation to modulate the differentiation stage-dependent transcriptional activity and (ii) the cytoplasmic retention, as a translocation process, to inhibit the transcriptional activity. Therefore, our results exhibit that MRFs nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking is involved in muscle differentiation and suggest that, besides the MRFs expression level, also MRFs subcellular localization, related to their functional activity, plays a key role as a regulatory step in transcriptional control mechanisms.

  18. Glucitol induction in Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a regulatory factor, GutR.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, R; Rehemtulla, S N; Wong, S L

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the glucitol dehydrogenase gene (gutB) is suggested to be regulated both positively and negatively in Bacillus subtilis. A mutation in the gutR locus results in the constitutive expression of gutB. The exact nature of this mutation and the function of gutR are still unknown. Cloning and characterization of gutR indicated that this gene is located immediately upstream of gutB and is transcribed in the opposite direction relative to gutB. GutR is suggested to be a 95-kDa protein with a putative helix-turn-helix motif and a nucleotide binding domain at the N-terminal region. At the C-terminal region, a short sequence of GutR shows homology with two proteins, Cyc8 (glucose repression mediator protein) and GsiA (glucose starvation-inducible protein), known to be directly or indirectly involved in catabolite repression. Part of the C-terminal conserved sequence from these proteins shows all the features observed in the tetratricopeptide motif found in many eucaryotic proteins. To study the functional role of gutR, chromosomal gutR was insertionally inactivated. A total loss of glucitol inducibility was observed. Reintroduction of a functional gutR to the GutR-deficient strain through integration at the amyE locus restores the inducibility. Therefore, GutR serves as a regulatory factor to modulate glucitol induction. The nature of the gutR1 mutation was also determined. A single amino acid change (serine-289 to arginine-289) near the putative nucleotide binding motif B in GutR is responsible for the observed phenotype. Possible models for the action of GutR are discussed. Images PMID:8195087

  19. Interferon regulatory factor 8 regulates pathways for antigen presentation in myeloid cells and during tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marquis, Jean-François; Kapoustina, Oxana; Langlais, David; Ruddy, Rebecca; Dufour, Catherine Rosa; Kim, Bae-Hoon; MacMicking, John D; Giguère, Vincent; Gros, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    IRF8 (Interferon Regulatory Factor 8) plays an important role in defenses against intracellular pathogens, including several aspects of myeloid cells function. It is required for ontogeny and maturation of macrophages and dendritic cells, for activation of anti-microbial defenses, and for production of the Th1-polarizing cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) in response to interferon gamma (IFNγ) and protection against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The transcriptional programs and cellular pathways that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ and that are important for defenses against M. tuberculosis are poorly understood. These were investigated by transcript profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation on microarrays (ChIP-chip). Studies in primary macrophages identified 368 genes that are regulated by IRF8 in response to IFNγ/CpG and that behave as stably segregating expression signatures (eQTLs) in F2 mice fixed for a wild-type or mutant allele at IRF8. A total of 319 IRF8 binding sites were identified on promoters genome-wide (ChIP-chip) in macrophages treated with IFNγ/CpG, defining a functional G/AGAAnTGAAA motif. An analysis of the genes bearing a functional IRF8 binding site, and showing regulation by IFNγ/CpG in macrophages and/or in M. tuberculosis-infected lungs, revealed a striking enrichment for the pathways of antigen processing and presentation, including multiple structural and enzymatic components of the Class I and Class II MHC (major histocompatibility complex) antigen presentation machinery. Also significantly enriched as IRF8 targets are the group of endomembrane- and phagosome-associated small GTPases of the IRG (immunity-related GTPases) and GBP (guanylate binding proteins) families. These results identify IRF8 as a key regulator of early response pathways in myeloid cells, including phagosome maturation, antigen processing, and antigen presentation by myeloid cells.

  20. Epithelial nuclear factor-κB signaling promotes lung carcinogenesis via recruitment of regulatory T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zaynagetdinov, R; Stathopoulos, G T; Sherrill, T P; Cheng, D-S; McLoed, A G; Ausborn, J A; Polosukhin, V V; Connelly, L; Zhou, W; Fingleton, B; Peebles, R S; Prince, L S; Yull, F E; Blackwell, T S

    2012-06-28

    The mechanisms by which chronic inflammatory lung diseases, particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, confer enhanced risk for lung cancer are not well-defined. To investigate whether nuclear factor (NF)-κB, a key mediator of immune and inflammatory responses, provides an interface between persistent lung inflammation and carcinogenesis, we utilized tetracycline-inducible transgenic mice expressing constitutively active IκB kinase β in airway epithelium (IKTA (IKKβ trans-activated) mice). Intraperitoneal injection of ethyl carbamate (urethane), or 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) was used to induce lung tumorigenesis. Doxycycline-treated IKTA mice developed chronic airway inflammation and markedly increased numbers of lung tumors in response to urethane, even when transgene expression (and therefore epithelial NF-κB activation) was begun after exposure to carcinogen. Studies using a separate tumor initiator/promoter model (MCA+BHT) indicated that NF-κB functions as an independent tumor promoter. Enhanced tumor formation in IKTA mice was preceded by increased proliferation and reduced apoptosis of alveolar epithelium, resulting in increased formation of premalignant lesions. Investigation of inflammatory cells in lungs of IKTA mice revealed a substantial increase in macrophages and lymphocytes, including functional CD4+/CD25+/FoxP3+ regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). Importantly, Treg depletion using repetitive injections of anti-CD25 antibodies limited excessive tumor formation in IKTA mice. At 6 weeks following urethane injection, antibody-mediated Treg depletion in IKTA mice reduced the number of premalignant lesions in the lungs in association with an increase in CD8 lymphocytes. Thus, persistent NF-κB signaling in airway epithelium facilitates carcinogenesis by sculpting the immune/inflammatory environment in the lungs.

  1. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Contributes to Transformation of v-Rel-Expressing Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hrdličková, Radmila; Nehyba, Jiří; Bose, Henry R.

    2001-01-01

    The avian homologue of the interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF-4) and a novel splice variant lacking exon 6, IRF-4ΔE6, were isolated and characterized. Chicken IRF-4 is expressed in lymphoid organs, less in small intestine, and lungs. IRF-4ΔE6 mRNA, though less abundant than full-length IRF-4, was detected in lymphoid tissues, with the highest levels observed in thymic cells. IRF-4 is highly expressed in v-Rel-transformed lymphocytes, and the expression of IRF-4 is increased in v-Rel- and c-Rel-transformed fibroblasts relative to control cells. The expression of IRF-4 from retrovirus vectors morphologically transformed primary fibroblasts, increased their saturation density, proliferation, and life span, and promoted their growth in soft agar. IRF-4 and v-Rel cooperated synergistically to transform fibroblasts. The expression of IRF-4 antisense RNA eliminated formation of soft agar colonies by v-Rel and reduced the proliferation of v-Rel-transformed cells. v-Rel-transformed fibroblasts produced interferon 1 (IFN1), which inhibits fibroblast proliferation. Infection of fibroblasts with retroviruses expressing v-Rel resulted in an increase in the mRNA levels of IFN1, the IFN receptor, STAT1, JAK1, and 2′,5′-oligo(A) synthetase. The exogenous expression of IRF-4 in v-Rel-transformed fibroblasts decreased the production of IFN1 and suppressed the expression of several genes in the IFN transduction pathway. These results suggest that induction of IRF-4 expression by v-Rel likely facilitates transformation of fibroblasts by decreasing the induction of this antiproliferative pathway. PMID:11533227

  2. Cloning and expression analysis of interferon regulatory factor 7 in the Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hang; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Mao, Mingguang; Huo, Yuan; Han, Yuzhe; Zhang, Saisai

    2016-02-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) plays an important role in regulating the response of type I interferon (IFN) to viral infection. To understand the mechanisms underlying immune reactions in the Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus, the gene encoding G. macrocephalus IRF7 was cloned and characterized. The cDNA of G. macrocephalus IRF7 was also cloned and sequenced. A cDNA sequence of 2032 bp was assembled using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. It contains an open reading frame of 1323 bp in length, which encoded a 440-amino acid polypeptide that comprised a DNA-binding domain (DBD), an IRF association domain (IAD), and a serine-rich domain (SRD). In the DBD, the tryptophan cluster consisted of only four tryptophans, which is a unique characteristic in fish IRF7. The mRNA of IRF7 was detected in various tissues, including in the spleen, thymus, kidney, intestine, and gills, using relative quantification PCR (R-qPCR). Dynamic expression of IRF7 was observed in larvae throughout post-hatching (ph) development, with the highest level detected at day of ph (dph) 25. Response to immune stimulation was examined by challenging larvae with polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC) to mimic viral infection and elicit an immune reaction. R-qPCR revealed that the expression of IRF7 significantly increased in pIC-treated groups relative to that in the control groups, in a time-dependent manner, with peak responses at 48 and 72 h after pIC-treatment. These results show that IRF7 is expressed in various tissues of adult fish and larvae and is sensitive to viral infection, suggesting that it plays a role in antiviral immune defense in G. macrocephalus.

  3. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  4. Comprehensive dissection of transcriptome data and regulatory factors in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Bijan; Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein; Wee, Ping; Mahdiuni, Hamid

    2017-04-12

    Features of pancreatic cancers include high mortality rates caused by rapid tumor progression and a lack of effective therapy. Underpinning the molecular mechanisms involved in the alteration of the gene expression program in the pancreatic cancer remains to be understood. In the current study we performed a comprehensive analysis using 282 pancreatic tumor and normal samples from seven independent expression data sets to provide a better view on the interactions between different transcription factors (TFs) and the most affected biological pathways in pancreatic cancer. We highlighted common differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and common affected processes within pancreatic cancer samples. We revealed 16 main DE-TFs that regulated gene expression alterations as well as the most significant processes in pancreatic cancer compared to normal cells. For example, we found the upregulated FOXM1 to be a top regulator of pancreatic cellular transformation based on results from different analyses, including from its regulation of gene regulatory networks, its presence in protein complex, its significant regulation of genes related to cancer pathways, and its regulation of most of the identified DE-TFs. Furthermore, we provided a model and assessed the role of different DE-TFs in the regulation of the most affected pancreatic- and cancer-specific processes. In conclusion, our bioinformatics meta-analysis of high throughput expression data sets, besides clarifying common affected genes and pathways, also showed the mechanisms involved in regulating these common profiles. Our results, especially for DE-TFs, could potentially be useful for screening for pancreatic cancer, and for confirming or determining novel pharmacological targets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancer Sequence Variants and Transcription Factor Deregulation Synergize to Construct Pathogenic Regulatory Circuits in B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Koues, Olivia I.; Kowalewski, Rodney A.; Chang, Li-Wei; Pyfrom, Sarah C.; Schmidt, Jennifer A.; Luo, Hong; Sandoval, Luis E.; Hughes, Tyler B.; Bednarski, Jeffrey J.; Cashen, Amanda F.; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Oltz, Eugene M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Most B cell lymphomas arise in the germinal center (GC), where humoral immune responses evolve from potentially oncogenic cycles of mutation, proliferation, and clonal selection. Although lymphoma gene expression diverges significantly from GC-B cells, underlying mechanisms that alter the activities of corresponding regulatory elements (REs) remain elusive. Here we define the complete pathogenic circuitry of human follicular lymphoma (FL), which activates or decommissions REs from normal GC-B cells and commandeers enhancers from other lineages. Moreover, independent sets of transcription factors, whose expression was deregulated in FL, targeted commandeered versus decommissioned REs. Our approach revealed two distinct subtypes of low-grade FL, whose pathogenic circuitries resembled GC-B or activated B cells. FL-altered enhancers also were enriched for sequence variants, including somatic mutations, which disrupt transcription factor binding and expression of circuit-linked genes. Thus, the pathogenic regulatory circuitry of FL reveals distinct genetic and epigenetic etiologies for GC-B transformation. PMID:25607463

  6. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus viral IFN regulatory factor 3 stabilizes hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha to induce vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young C; Joo, Chul-Hyun; Gack, Michaela U; Lee, Hye-Ra; Jung, Jae U

    2008-03-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is the master regulator of both developmental and pathologic angiogenesis, composed of an oxygen-sensitive alpha-subunit and a constitutively expressed beta-subunit. HIF-1 activity in tumors depends on the availability of the HIF-1 alpha subunit, the levels of which are increased under hypoxic conditions. Recent studies have shown that HIF-1 plays an important role in KSHV reactivation from latency and pathogenesis. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which KSHV activates HIF-1 activity. Specific interaction between KSHV viral IFN regulatory factor 3 (vIRF3) and the HIF-1 alpha subunit led to the HIF-1 alpha stabilization and transcriptional activation, which induced vascular endothelial growth factor expression and ultimately facilitated endothelial tube formation. Remarkably, the central domain of vIRF3, containing double alpha-helix motifs, was sufficient not only for binding to HIF-1 alpha but also for blocking its degradation in normoxic conditions. This indicates that KSHV has developed a unique mechanism to enhance HIF-1 alpha protein stability and transcriptional activity by incorporating a viral homologue of cellular IRF gene into its genome, which may contribute to viral pathogenesis.

  7. Identification of Regulatory Factors for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Salivary Epithelial Cells in a Co-Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yun-Jong; Koh, Jin; Gauna, Adrienne E.; Chen, Sixue; Cha, Seunghee

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Sjögren’s syndrome or head and neck cancer patients who have undergone radiation therapy suffer from severe dry mouth (xerostomia) due to salivary exocrine cell death. Regeneration of the salivary glands requires a better understanding of regulatory mechanisms by which stem cells differentiate into exocrine cells. In our study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were co-cultured with primary salivary epithelial cells from C57BL/6 mice. Co-cultured bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells clearly resembled salivary epithelial cells, as confirmed by strong expression of salivary gland epithelial cell-specific markers, such as alpha-amylase, muscarinic type 3 receptor, aquaporin-5, and cytokeratin 19. To identify regulatory factors involved in this differentiation, transdifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells were analyzed temporarily by two-dimensional-gel-electrophoresis, which detected 58 protein spots (>1.5 fold change, p<0.05) that were further categorized into 12 temporal expression patterns. Of those proteins only induced in differentiated mesenchymal stem cells, ankryin-repeat-domain-containing-protein 56, high-mobility-group-protein 20B, and transcription factor E2a were selected as putative regulatory factors for mesenchymal stem cell transdifferentiation based on putative roles in salivary gland development. Induction of these molecules was confirmed by RT-PCR and western blotting on separate sets of co-cultured mesenchymal stem cells. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify differentially expressed proteins that are implicated in mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into salivary gland epithelial cells. Further investigation to elucidate regulatory roles of these three transcription factors in mesenchymal stem cell reprogramming will provide a critical foundation for a novel cell-based regenerative therapy for patients with xerostomia. PMID:25402494

  8. SNPs in putative regulatory regions identified by human mouse comparative sequencing and transcription factor binding site data

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Poulabi; Bahlo, Melanie; Schwartz, Jody R.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Houston, Kathryn A.; Dubchak, Inna; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-01-01

    Genome wide disease association analysis using SNPs is being explored as a method for dissecting complex genetic traits and a vast number of SNPs have been generated for this purpose. As there are cost and throughput limitations of genotyping large numbers of SNPs and statistical issues regarding the large number of dependent tests on the same data set, to make association analysis practical it has been proposed that SNPs should be prioritized based on likely functional importance. The most easily identifiable functional SNPs are coding SNPs (cSNPs) and accordingly cSNPs have been screened in a number of studies. SNPs in gene regulatory sequences embedded in noncoding DNA are another class of SNPs suggested for prioritization due to their predicted quantitative impact on gene expression. The main challenge in evaluating these SNPs, in contrast to cSNPs is a lack of robust algorithms and databases for recognizing regulatory sequences in noncoding DNA. Approaches that have been previously used to delineate noncoding sequences with gene regulatory activity include cross-species sequence comparisons and the search for sequences recognized by transcription factors. We combined these two methods to sift through mouse human genomic sequences to identify putative gene regulatory elements and subsequently localized SNPs within these sequences in a 1 Megabase (Mb) region of human chromosome 5q31, orthologous to mouse chromosome 11 containing the Interleukin cluster.

  9. Genome-wide survey of tissue-specific microRNA and transcription factor regulatory networks in 12 tissues

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiyun; Maki, Miranda; Ding, Ruofan; Yang, Yalan; zhang, Bao; Xiong, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific miRNAs (TS miRNA) specifically expressed in particular tissues play an important role in tissue identity, differentiation and function. However, transcription factor (TF) and TS miRNA regulatory networks across multiple tissues have not been systematically studied. Here, we manually extracted 116 TS miRNAs and systematically investigated the regulatory network of TF-TS miRNA in 12 human tissues. We identified 2,347 TF-TS miRNA regulatory relations and revealed that most TF binding sites tend to enrich close to the transcription start site of TS miRNAs. Furthermore, we found TS miRNAs were regulated widely by non-tissue specific TFs and the tissue-specific expression level of TF have a close relationship with TF-genes regulation. Finally, we describe TSmiR (http://bioeng.swjtu.edu.cn/TSmiR), a novel and web-searchable database that houses interaction maps of TF-TS miRNA in 12 tissues. Taken together, these observations provide a new suggestion to better understand the regulatory network and mechanisms of TF-TS miRNAs underlying different tissues. PMID:24889152

  10. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M.; Imumorin, Ikhide G.; Peters, Sunday O.; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats’ populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima’s D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat

  11. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions: An Additional Layer of Gene Regulation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Immink, Richard G H; Angenent, Gerco C

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger protein complexes. The importance of protein-protein interactions between members of a particular plant TF family has long been recognised; however, a significant number of interfamily TF interactions has recently been reported. The biological implications and the molecular mechanisms involved in cross-family interactions have now started to be elucidated and the examples illustrate potential roles in the bridging of biological processes. Hence, cross-family TF interactions expand the molecular toolbox for plants with additional mechanisms to control and fine-tune robust gene expression patterns and to adapt to their continuously changing environment.

  12. Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 in Type I Interferon Responses in Rotavirus-Infected Dendritic Cells and Fibroblasts▿

    PubMed Central

    Douagi, Iyadh; McInerney, Gerald M.; Hidmark, Åsa S.; Miriallis, Vassoula; Johansen, Kari; Svensson, Lennart; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2007-01-01

    The main pathway for the induction of type I interferons (IFN) by viruses is through the recognition of viral RNA by cytosolic receptors and the subsequent activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), which drives IFN-α/β transcription. In addition to their role in inducing an antiviral state, type I IFN also play a role in modulating adaptive immune responses, in part via their effects on dendritic cells (DCs). Many viruses have evolved mechanisms to interfere with type I IFN induction, and one recently reported strategy for achieving this is by targeting IRF-3 for degradation, as shown for rotavirus nonstructural protein 1 (NSP1). It was therefore of interest to investigate whether rotavirus-exposed DCs would produce type I IFN and/or mature in response to the virus. Our results demonstrate that IRF-3 was rapidly degraded in rotavirus-infected mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and type I IFN was not detected in these cultures. In contrast, rotavirus induced type I IFN production in myeloid DCs (mDCs), resulting in their activation. Type I IFN induction in response to rotavirus was reduced in mDCs from IRF-3−/− mice, indicating that IRF-3 was important for mediating the response. Exposure of mDCs to UV-treated rotavirus induced significantly higher type I IFN levels, suggesting that rotavirus-encoded functions also antagonized the response in DCs. However, in contrast to MEFs, this action was not sufficient to completely abrogate type I IFN induction, consistent with a role for DCs as sentinels for virus infection. PMID:17215281

  13. Role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the regulatory T cell response of tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Susanna; Kim, Hang-Rae; Leng, Lin; Kang, Insoo; Jorgensen, William L.; Cho, Chul-Soo; Bucala, Richard; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is involved in tumorigenesis by facilitating tumor proliferation and evasion of apoptosis; however, its role in tumor immunity is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of MIF on the progression of the syngenic, CT26 colon carcinoma and the generation of tumor regulatory T cells (Tregs). The results showed that the tumor growth rate was significantly lower in MIF knockout (MIF−/−) mice than in wild type (MIF+/+) mice. Flow cytometric analysis of both spleen and tumor cells revealed that MIF−/− mice had significantly lower levels of tumor-associated CD4+Tregs than MIF+/+ mice. The splenic cells of MIF−/− mice also showed a decrease in CD8+Tregs, which was accompanied by an increase in CD8-induced tumor cytotoxicity. Interestingly, the inducible Treg response in spleen cells to anti-CD3/CD28+IL-2+TGF-β was greater in MIF−/− mice than in MIF+/+ mice. Spleen cells of MIF−/− mice, stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28, produced lower levels of IL-2, but not TGF-β, than those of MIF+/+ mice, which was recovered by the addition of recombinant MIF. Conversely, a neutralizing anti-MIF Ab blocked anti-CD3-induced IL-2 production by splenocytes of MIF+/+ mice and suppressed the inducible Treg generation. Moreover, the administration of IL-2 into tumor-bearing MIF−/− mice restored the generation of Tregs and tumor growth. Taken together, our data suggest that MIF promotes tumor growth by increasing Tregs generation through the modulation of IL-2 production. Thus, anti-MIF treatment might be useful in enhancing the adaptive immune response to colon cancers. PMID:22972922

  14. Regulatory Lymphocytes Are Key Factors in MHC-Independent Resistance to EAE

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nieves; Mecha, Miriam; Espejo, Carmen; Mestre, Leyre; Eixarch, Herena; Montalban, Xavier; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C.; Guaza, Carmen; Villar, Luisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Resistant and susceptible mouse strains to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inducible demyelinating experimental disease serving as animal model for multiple sclerosis, have been described. We aimed to explore MHC-independent mechanisms inducing resistance to EAE. Methods. For EAE induction, female C57BL/6 (susceptible strain) and CD1 (resistant outbred strain showing heterogeneous MHC antigens) mice were immunized with the 35–55 peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35−55). We studied T cell proliferation, regulatory and effector cell subpopulations, intracellular and serum cytokine patterns, and titers of anti-MOG serum antibodies. Results. Upon immunization with MOG35−55, T lymphocytes from susceptible mice but not that of resistant strain were capable of proliferating when stimulated with MOG35−55. Accordingly, resistant mice experienced a rise in regulatory B cells (P = 0.001) and, to a lower extent, in regulatory T cells (P = 0.02) compared with C57BL/6 susceptible mice. As a consequence, MOG35−55-immunized C57BL/6 mice showed higher percentages of CD4+ T cells producing both IFN-gamma (P = 0.02) and IL-17 (P = 0.009) and higher serum levels of IL-17 (P = 0.04) than resistant mice. Conclusions. Expansion of regulatory B and T cells contributes to the induction of resistance to EAE by an MHC-independent mechanism. PMID:24868560

  15. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael K.; de Velde, Jan Van; O'Shea, Charlotte; Heyndrickx, Ken S.; Workman, Christopher T.; Vandepoele, Klaas; Skriver, Karen; Masi, Federico De

    2014-01-01

    Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve the DNA-binding preferences of individual members. Here, we present a TF-target gene identification workflow based on the integration of novel protein binding microarray data with gene expression and multi-species promoter sequence conservation to identify the DNA-binding specificities and the gene regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together with the workflow associated with functional modules offer a strong resource to unravel the regulatory potential of NAC genes and that this workflow could be used to study other families of transcription factors. PMID:24914054

  16. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-10-13

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5'-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism.

  17. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5′-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism. PMID:26459861

  18. Identification of the transcription factor ZEB1 as a central component of the adipogenic gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Gubelmann, Carine; Schwalie, Petra C; Raghav, Sunil K; Röder, Eva; Delessa, Tenagne; Kiehlmann, Elke; Waszak, Sebastian M; Corsinotti, Andrea; Udin, Gilles; Holcombe, Wiebke; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Trono, Didier; Wolfrum, Christian; Deplancke, Bart

    2014-08-27

    Adipose tissue is a key determinant of whole body metabolism and energy homeostasis. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying adipogenesis is therefore highly relevant from a biomedical perspective. Our current understanding of fat cell differentiation is centered on the transcriptional cascades driven by the C/EBP protein family and the master regulator PPARγ. To elucidate further components of the adipogenic gene regulatory network, we performed a large-scale transcription factor (TF) screen overexpressing 734 TFs in mouse pre-adipocytes and probed their effect on differentiation. We identified 22 novel pro-adipogenic TFs and characterized the top ranking TF, ZEB1, as being essential for adipogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, its expression levels correlate with fat cell differentiation potential in humans. Genomic profiling further revealed that this TF directly targets and controls the expression of most early and late adipogenic regulators, identifying ZEB1 as a central transcriptional component of fat cell differentiation.

  19. Addition and correction: the NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity observed in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts is due to the GBF transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Traincard, F; Ponte, E; Pun, J; Coukell, B; Veron, M

    2001-10-01

    We have previously reported that a NF-kappa B transduction pathway was likely to be present in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. This conclusion was based on several observations, including the detection of developmentally regulated DNA binding proteins in Dictyostelium nuclear extracts that bound to bona fide kappa B sequences. We have now performed additional experiments which demonstrate that the protein responsible for this NF-kappa B-like DNA binding activity is the Dictyostelium GBF (G box regulatory element binding factor) transcription factor. This result, along with the fact that no sequence with significant similarity to components of the mammalian NF-kappa B pathway can be found in Dictyostelium genome, now almost entirely sequenced, led us to reconsider our previous conclusion on the occurrence of a NF-kappa B signal transduction pathway in Dictyostelium.

  20. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Juli D; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-04-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints.

  1. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Juli D.; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-01-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints. PMID:27058369

  2. Regulatory review time for approval of oncology drugs in Japan between 2001 and 2014. Considerations of changes, factors that affect review time, and difference with the United States.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we comprehensively and historically studied the review time of oncology drugs approved by the regulatory authorities in Japan with publicly available information. A total of 120 applications of oncology drugs were approved in Japan between April 2001 and July 2014. The review time peaked with 732.0 days (24.4 months) in 2005, and showed a tendency to decline gradually each year thereafter. After 2012, a significant reduction of the review time was seen in comparison to the median of 13-year median time. In addition, we compared the review time with that in the United States. The median review time lag with the United States was significantly peaked in 2005. After 2005, the review time lag with the FDA has decreased, but lag did not significantly reduce by 2014. We also examined factors influencing the review time in Japan with multiple regression analysis. It was found that the factors related to a use of overseas data and expedited program for accelerating the reviews influenced the direction of shortening the review time. We consider that regulatory authorities in Japan need to keep making efforts to reduce the review time further and eliminate the review time lag with the United States.

  3. Iron- and Quorum-sensing Signals Converge on Small Quorum-regulatory RNAs for Coordinated Regulation of Virulence Factors in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yancheng; Kim, In Hwang; Kim, Kun-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a marine bacterium that causes human infections resulting in high mortality. This pathogen harbors five quorum-regulatory RNAs (Qrr1-5) that affect the expression of pathogenicity genes by modulating the expression of the master regulator SmcR. The qrr genes are activated by phosphorylated LuxO to different degrees; qrr2 is strongly activated; qrr3 and qrr5 are moderately activated, and qrr1 and qrr4 are marginally activated and are the only two that do not respond to cell density-dependent regulation. Qrrs function redundantly to inhibit SmcR at low cell density and fully repress when all five are activated. In this study, we found that iron inhibits qrr expression in three distinct ways. First, the iron-ferric uptake regulator (Fur) complex directly binds to qrr promoter regions, inhibiting LuxO activation by competing with LuxO for cis-acting DNA elements. Second, qrr transcription is repressed by iron independently of Fur. Third, LuxO expression is repressed by iron independently of Fur. We also found that, under iron-limiting conditions, the five Qrrs functioned additively, not redundantly, to repress SmcR, suggesting that cells lacking iron enter a high cell density mode earlier and could thereby modulate expression of virulence factors sooner. This study suggests that iron and quorum sensing, along with their cognate regulatory circuits, are linked together in the coordinated expression of virulence factors.

  4. Store-operated Ca2+ Entry-associated Regulatory factor (SARAF) Plays an Important Role in the Regulation of Arachidonate-regulated Ca2+ (ARC) Channels.

    PubMed

    Albarran, Letizia; Lopez, Jose J; Woodard, Geoffrey E; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-03-25

    The store-operated Ca(2+)entry-associated regulatory factor (SARAF) has recently been identified as a STIM1 regulatory protein that facilitates slow Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of store-operated Ca(2+)entry (SOCE). Both the store-operated channels and the store-independent arachidonate-regulated Ca(2+)(ARC) channels are regulated by STIM1. In the present study, we show that, in addition to its location in the endoplasmic reticulum, SARAF is constitutively expressed in the plasma membrane, where it can interact with plasma membrane (PM)-resident ARC forming subunits in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Using siRNA-based and overexpression approaches we report that SARAF negatively regulates store-independent Ca(2+)entry via the ARC channels. Arachidonic acid (AA) increases the association of PM-resident SARAF with Orai1. Finally, our results indicate that SARAF modulates the ability of AA to promote cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. In addition to revealing new insight into the biology of ARC channels in neuroblastoma cells, these findings provide evidence for an unprecedented location of SARAF in the plasma membrane.

  5. Soluble factors secreted by glioblastoma cell lines facilitate recruitment, survival, and expansion of regulatory T cells: implications for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Courtney A.; Ahn, Brian J.; Han, Seunggu J.; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    In patients with glioma, the tumor microenvironment can significantly impact pro-inflammatory immune cell functions. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly defined. Because immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Treg) are over represented in the tumor microenvironment compared with peripheral blood, we hypothesized that the tumor may have an effect on Treg survival, migration, expansion, and/or induction of a regulatory phenotype from non-Treg conventional CD4+ T cells. We defined the impact of soluble factors produced by tumor cells on Treg from healthy patients in vitro to determine mechanisms by which gliomas influence T cell populations. We found that tumor-derived soluble factors allowed for preferential proliferation and increased chemotaxis of Treg, compared with conventional T cells, indicating that these mechanisms may contribute to the increased Treg in the tumor microenvironment. Conventional T cells also exhibited a significantly increased expression of pro-apoptotic transcripts in the presence of tumor-derived factors, indicating that survival of Treg in the tumor site is driven by exposure to soluble factors produced by the tumor. Together, these data suggest that tumor burden may induce increased Treg infiltration, proliferation, and survival, negating productive anti-tumor immune responses in patients treated with immunotherapies. Collectively, our data indicate that several mechanisms of Treg recruitment and retention in the tumor microenvironment exist and may need to be addressed to improve the specificity of immunotherapies seeking to eliminate Treg in patients with glioma. PMID:22406925

  6. Brucella abortus down-regulates MHC class II by the IL-6-dependent inhibition of CIITA through the downmodulation of IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1).

    PubMed

    Velásquez, Lis N; Milillo, M Ayelén; Delpino, M Victoria; Trotta, Aldana; Fernández, Pablo; Pozner, Roberto G; Lang, Roland; Balboa, Luciana; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H; Barrionuevo, Paula

    2017-03-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular pathogen capable of surviving inside of macrophages. The success of B. abortus as a chronic pathogen relies on its ability to orchestrate different strategies to evade the adaptive CD4(+) T cell responses that it elicits. Previously, we demonstrated that B. abortus inhibits the IFN-γ-induced surface expression of MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on human monocytes, and this phenomenon correlated with a reduction in antigen presentation. However, the molecular mechanisms, whereby B. abortus is able to down-regulate the expression of MHC-II, remained to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that B. abortus infection inhibits the IFN-γ-induced transcription of MHC-II, transactivator (CIITA) and MHC-II genes. Accordingly, we observed that the synthesis of MHC-II proteins was also diminished. B. abortus was not only able to reduce the expression of mature MHC-II, but it also inhibited the expression of invariant chain (Ii)-associated immature MHC-II molecules. Outer membrane protein 19 (Omp19), a prototypical B. abortus lipoprotein, diminished the expression of MHC-II and CIITA transcripts to the same extent as B. abortus infection. IL-6 contributes to these down-regulatory phenomena. In addition, B. abortus and its lipoproteins, through IL-6 secretion, induced the transcription of the negative regulators of IFN-γ signaling, suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1 and -3, without interfering with STAT1 activation. Yet, B. abortus lipoproteins via IL-6 inhibit the expression of IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), a critical regulatory transcription factor for CIITA induction. Overall, these results indicate that B. abortus inhibits the expression of MHC-II molecules at very early points in their synthesis and in this way, may prevent recognition by T cells establishing a chronic infection.

  7. Factors which Limit the Value of Additional Redundancy in Human Rated Launch Vehicle Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Joel M.; Stott, James E.; Ring, Robert W.; Hatfield, Spencer; Kaltz, Gregory M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has embarked on an ambitious program to return humans to the moon and beyond. As NASA moves forward in the development and design of new launch vehicles for future space exploration, it must fully consider the implications that rule-based requirements of redundancy or fault tolerance have on system reliability/risk. These considerations include common cause failure, increased system complexity, combined serial and parallel configurations, and the impact of design features implemented to control premature activation. These factors and others must be considered in trade studies to support design decisions that balance safety, reliability, performance and system complexity to achieve a relatively simple, operable system that provides the safest and most reliable system within the specified performance requirements. This paper describes conditions under which additional functional redundancy can impede improved system reliability. Examples from current NASA programs including the Ares I Upper Stage will be shown.

  8. Prediction of cis-regulatory elements for drug-activated transcription factors in the regulation of drug-metabolising enzymes and drug transporters.

    PubMed

    Podvinec, Michael; Meyer, Urs A

    2006-06-01

    The expression of drug-metabolising enzymes is affected by many endogenous and exogenous factors, including sex, age, diet and exposure to xenobiotics and drugs. To understand fully how the organism metabolises a drug, these alterations in gene expression must be taken into account. The central process, the definition of likely regulatory elements in the genes coding for enzymes and transporters involved in drug disposition, can be vastly accelerated using existing and emerging bioinformatics methods to unravel the regulatory networks causing drug-mediated induction of genes. Here, various approaches to predict transcription factor interactions with regulatory DNA elements are reviewed.

  9. Fatigue risk management: Organizational factors at the regulatory and industry/company level.

    PubMed

    Gander, Philippa; Hartley, Laurence; Powell, David; Cabon, Philippe; Hitchcock, Edward; Mills, Ann; Popkin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    This paper focuses on the development of fatigue risk management systems (FRMS) in the transport sector. The evolution of regulatory frameworks is traced, from uni-dimensional hours of service regulations through to frameworks that enable multi-dimensional FRMS. These regulatory changes reflect advances in understanding of human error in the aetiology of accidents, and in fatigue and safety science. Implementation of FRMS shifts the locus of responsibility for safety away from the regulator towards companies and individuals, and requires changes in traditional roles. Organizational, ethnic, and national culture need to be considered. Recent trends in the work environment have potential to adversely affect FRMS, including precarious employment and shortages of skilled labour. Essential components of an FRMS, and examples of FRMS in different transport modes, are described. It is vital that regulators, employer, and employees have an understanding of the causes and consequences of fatigue that is sufficient for them to meet their responsibilities in relation to FRMS. While there is a strong evidence base supporting the principles of FRMS, experience with implementation is more limited. The evidence base for effective implementation will expand, since FRMS is data-driven, and ongoing evaluation is integral. We strongly advocate that experience be shared wherever possible.

  10. Immune regulatory gene polymorphisms as predisposing risk factors for the development of factor VIII inhibitors in Indian severe haemophilia A patients.

    PubMed

    Pinto, P; Ghosh, K; Shetty, S

    2012-09-01

    Development of inhibitors to factor VIII, a serious complication of replacement therapy in haemophilia A patients, leads to increased bleeding, morbidity and mortality. There is no data on the risk factors for inhibitor development in Indian patients with severe haemophilia A. Our aim was to study the role of immune regulatory gene polymorphisms in the development of inhibitors. Fourteen immune regulatory gene polymorphisms (IL1β, IL4, IL10, TNFA and CTLA4) were analysed in 120 patients with severe haemophilia A, i.e. 50 inhibitor positive patients, and 70 inhibitor negative control patients, by PCR-RFLP, DNA sequencing and allele-specific PCRs. The IL10 promoter 'GCC' haplotypes overall (P: 0.002, OR: 3.452, 95% CI: 1.607-7.416), and 'GCC/ATA' (P: 0.011, OR: 3.492, 95% CI: 1.402-8.696) haplotype, associated with high and intermediate IL10 production, respectively, were significantly higher in inhibitor positive patients, whereas the 'non-GCC' haplotypes overall (P: 0.002,OR: 0.290, 95% CI 0.135-0.622) and 'ATA/ATA' haplotype (P: 0.025, OR: 0.278, 95% CI: 0.096-0.802), associated with low IL10 synthesis, were significantly higher among inhibitor negative patients. The TNFA rs1799724 C/T heterozygote prevalence was significantly higher in the inhibitor positive group (P: 0.021, OR: 3.190, 95% CI: 1.273-7.990), whereas the other polymorphisms showed no statistically significant association with the presence of inhibitors. Different immune regulatory gene polymorphisms play a significant role as possible risk factors for the development of inhibitors in severe haemophilia A patients.

  11. A local regulatory network around three NAC transcription factors in stress responses and senescence in Arabidopsis leaves

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Richard; Hill, Claire; Penfold, Christopher A; Breeze, Emily; Bowden, Laura; Moore, Jonathan D; Zhang, Peijun; Jackson, Alison; Cooke, Emma; Bewicke-Copley, Findlay; Mead, Andrew; Beynon, Jim; Wild, David L; Denby, Katherine J; Ott, Sascha; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky

    2013-01-01

    Summary A model is presented describing the gene regulatory network surrounding three similar NAC transcription factors that have roles in Arabidopsis leaf senescence and stress responses. ANAC019, ANAC055 and ANAC072 belong to the same clade of NAC domain genes and have overlapping expression patterns. A combination of promoter DNA/protein interactions identified using yeast 1-hybrid analysis and modelling using gene expression time course data has been applied to predict the regulatory network upstream of these genes. Similarities and divergence in regulation during a variety of stress responses are predicted by different combinations of upstream transcription factors binding and also by the modelling. Mutant analysis with potential upstream genes was used to test and confirm some of the predicted interactions. Gene expression analysis in mutants of ANAC019 and ANAC055 at different times during leaf senescence has revealed a distinctly different role for each of these genes. Yeast 1-hybrid analysis is shown to be a valuable tool that can distinguish clades of binding proteins and be used to test and quantify protein binding to predicted promoter motifs. PMID:23578292

  12. Integrating products of Bessel functions with an additional exponential or rational factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deun, Joris; Cools, Ronald

    2008-04-01

    We provide two MATLAB programs to compute integrals of the form ex∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dxand 0∞xr+x∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dx with Jν_i(x) the Bessel function of the first kind and (real) order ν. The parameter m is a real number such that ∑ν+m>-1 (to assure integrability near zero), r is real and the numbers c and a are all strictly positive. The program can deliver accurate error estimates. Program summaryProgram title: BESSELINTR, BESSELINTC Catalogue identifier: AEAH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1601 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 161 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab (version ⩾6.5), Octave (version ⩾2.1.69) Computer: All supporting Matlab or Octave Operating system: All supporting Matlab or Octave RAM: For k Bessel functions our program needs approximately ( 500+140k) double precision variables Classification: 4.11 Nature of problem: The problem consists in integrating an arbitrary product of Bessel functions with an additional rational or exponential factor over a semi-infinite interval. Difficulties arise from the irregular oscillatory behaviour and the possible slow decay of the integrand, which prevents truncation at a finite point. Solution method: The interval of integration is split into a finite and infinite part. The integral over the finite part is computed using Gauss-Legendre quadrature. The integrand on the infinite part is approximated using asymptotic expansions and this approximation is integrated exactly with the aid of the upper incomplete gamma function. In the case where a rational factor is present, this factor is first expanded in a Taylor series around infinity. Restrictions: Some (and eventually all

  13. The regulatory factor PcRFX1 controls the expression of the three genes of β-lactam biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Santos, Rebeca; Martín, Juan-Francisco; Kosalková, Katarina; Prieto, Carlos; Ullán, Ricardo V; García-Estrada, Carlos

    2012-11-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis is subjected to a complex regulatory network of signalling molecules that may serve as model for other secondary metabolites. The information provided by the new "omics" era about Penicillium chrysogenum and the advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms responsible for improved productivity, make this fungus an excellent model to decipher the mechanisms controlling the penicillin biosynthetic pathway. In this work, we have characterized a novel transcription factor PcRFX1, which is an ortholog of the Acremonium chrysogenum CPCR1 and Penicillium marneffei RfxA regulatory proteins. PcRFX1 DNA binding sequences were found in the promoter region of the pcbAB, pcbC and penDE genes. We show in this article that these motifs control the expression of the β-galactosidase lacZ reporter gene, indicating that they may direct the PcRFX1-mediated regulation of the penicillin biosynthetic genes. By means of Pcrfx1 gene knock-down and overexpression techniques we confirmed that PcRFX1 controls penicillin biosynthesis through the regulation of the pcbAB, pcbC and penDE transcription. Morphology and development seemed not to be controlled by this transcription factor under the conditions studied and only sporulation was slightly reduced after the silencing of the Pcrfx1 gene. A genome-wide analysis of processes putatively regulated by this transcription factor was carried out in P. chrysogenum. Results suggested that PcRFX1, in addition to regulate penicillin biosynthesis, is also involved in the control of several pathways of primary metabolism.

  14. Mice devoid of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) show normal expression of type I interferon genes.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, L F; Ruffner, H; Stark, G; Aguet, M; Weissmann, C

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) binds tightly to the interferon (IFN)-beta promoter and has been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs. We generated mice devoid of functional IRF-1 by targeted gene disruption. As reported by others, IRF-1-deficient mice showed a discrete phenotype: the CD4/CD8 ratio was increased and IFN-gamma-induced levels of macrophage iNO synthase mRNA were strongly diminished. However, type I IFN induction in vivo by virus or double-stranded RNA was unimpaired, as evidenced by serum IFN titers and IFN mRNA levels in spleen, liver and lung. There was also no impairment in the response of type I IFN-inducible genes. Therefore, IRF-1 is not essential for these processes in vivo. Images PMID:7957048

  15. Evaluation of additives required for periodontal disease formulation using basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuhiko; Oba, Takuma; Natori, Nobuyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2010-12-01

    To design a suitable periodontal disease formulation using basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), legally available thickeners were evaluated focusing on their viscosity, extrusive force from a syringe, flow property and inertness to bFGF. Thirteen candidate thickeners showed appropriate viscosity (about 1×10⁴ mPa·s), and further evaluations were conducted on them. Flow property was evaluated by the tilting test tube method. As a result, most thickener solutions with the optimum viscosity showed appropriate flow time (about 100 s) and the flow time did not depend on thickener concentration, whereas the extrusive force from a syringe depended on thickener concentration despite the thickener type and grade. Thickener solutions of 2-3% showed ideal result (10-20 N) and thickener solutions prepared outside of the concentration range (2-3%) were found to show unsuitable extrusive force. Consequently, to obtain required properties for a dental drug formulation, thickener solutions needed to show adequate viscosity (about 1×10⁴ mPa·s) at 2-3% thickener concentration. In addition, several types of cellulose derivatives showed inertness to the bFGF because of their structure, without strong ionic dissociable groups, and neutral pH. Overall, the present work demonstrates that some water-soluble cellulose derivatives, such as hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC), were suggested to have required properties for a dental drug formulation including bFGF.

  16. Bladder explosion during transurethral resection of prostate: Bladder diverticula as an additional risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, D. Paul

    2017-01-01

    Vesical explosion during transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is a very rare occurrence. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. The literature was reviewed pertaining to the etiology of bladder explosion during transurethral resection. The underlying mechanism for intravesical explosion is the generation and trapping of explosive gasses under the dome of the bladder which eventually detonates when it comes into contact with the cautery electrode during TURP. Various techniques have been suggested to prevent this dreaded complication. A 75-year-old male with chronic retention of urine underwent TURP. There was Grade 2 trilobar enlargement of the prostate. There were multiple diverticula with one large diverticulum in the dome of the bladder. During hemostasis, there was a loud pop sound and the bladder exploded. Lower midline laparotomy was performed and the intraperitoneal bladder rupture was repaired. He had an uneventful postoperative recovery, and he is asymptomatic at 6 months of follow-up. Even though all the precautions were taken to avoid this complication, bladder rupture was encountered. The presence of multiple diverticula is being suggested as an additional risk factor for this complication as the bladder is thinned out and also possibly due to trapping of air bubble within the diverticulum. In such cases where there are multiple bladder diverticula, the employment of a suprapubic trocar for continuous drainage of the air bubble, could well be a practical consideration. PMID:28216933

  17. Model-driven experimental approach reveals the complex regulatory distribution of p53 by the circadian factor Period 2

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Tetsuya; Liu, Jingjing; Vila-Caballer, Marian; Stauffer, Philip E.; Tyson, John J.; Finkielstein, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock and cell cycle networks are interlocked on the molecular level, with the core clock loop exerting a multilevel regulatory role over cell cycle components. This is particularly relevant to the circadian factor Period 2 (Per2), which modulates the stability of the tumor suppressor p53 in unstressed cells and transcriptional activity in response to genotoxic stress. Per2 binding prevents Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and, therefore, its degradation, and oscillations in the peaks of Per2 and p53 were expected to correspond. However, our findings showed that Per2 and p53 rhythms were significantly out-of-phase relative to each other in cell lysates and in purified cytoplasmic fractions. These seemingly conflicting experimental data motivated the use of a combined theoretical and experimental approach focusing on the role played by Per2 in dictating the phase of p53 oscillations. Systematic modeling of all possible regulatory scenarios predicted that the observed phase relationship between Per2 and p53 could be simulated if (i) p53 was more stable in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm, (ii) Per2 associates to various ubiquitinated forms of p53, and (iii) Per2 mediated p53 nuclear import. These predictions were supported by a sevenfold increase in p53’s half-life in the nucleus and by in vitro binding of Per2 to the various ubiquitinated forms of p53. Last, p53’s nuclear shuttling was significantly favored by ectopic expression of Per2 and reduced because of Per2 down-regulation. Our combined theoretical/mathematical approach reveals how clock regulatory nodes can be inferred from oscillating time course data. PMID:27834218

  18. The Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 (IRF1) in Overcoming Antiestrogen Resistance in the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, J. L.; Shajahan, A. N.; Clarke, R.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy is common among breast cancer patients with estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ER+) tumors and limits the success of this therapeutic strategy. While the mechanisms that regulate endocrine responsiveness and cell fate are not fully understood, interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) is strongly implicated as a key regulatory node in the underlying signaling network. IRF1 is a tumor suppressor that mediates cell fate by facilitating apoptosis and can do so with or without functional p53. Expression of IRF1 is downregulated in endocrine-resistant breast cancer cells, protecting these cells from IRF1-induced inhibition of proliferation and/or induction of cell death. Nonetheless, when IRF1 expression is induced following IFNγ treatment, antiestrogen sensitivity is restored by a process that includes the inhibition of prosurvival BCL2 family members and caspase activation. These data suggest that a combination of endocrine therapy and compounds that effectively induce IRF1 expression may be useful for the treatment of many ER+ breast cancers. By understanding IRF1 signaling in the context of endocrine responsiveness, we may be able to develop novel therapeutic strategies and better predict how patients will respond to endocrine therapy. PMID:22295238

  19. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity.

    PubMed

    Read, Timothy; Richmond, Phillip A; Dowell, Robin D

    2016-01-01

    Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s) that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant.

  20. Identification of the transcription factor ZEB1 as a central component of the adipogenic gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Gubelmann, Carine; Schwalie, Petra C; Raghav, Sunil K; Röder, Eva; Delessa, Tenagne; Kiehlmann, Elke; Waszak, Sebastian M; Corsinotti, Andrea; Udin, Gilles; Holcombe, Wiebke; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Trono, Didier; Wolfrum, Christian; Deplancke, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a key determinant of whole body metabolism and energy homeostasis. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying adipogenesis is therefore highly relevant from a biomedical perspective. Our current understanding of fat cell differentiation is centered on the transcriptional cascades driven by the C/EBP protein family and the master regulator PPARγ. To elucidate further components of the adipogenic gene regulatory network, we performed a large-scale transcription factor (TF) screen overexpressing 734 TFs in mouse pre-adipocytes and probed their effect on differentiation. We identified 22 novel pro-adipogenic TFs and characterized the top ranking TF, ZEB1, as being essential for adipogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, its expression levels correlate with fat cell differentiation potential in humans. Genomic profiling further revealed that this TF directly targets and controls the expression of most early and late adipogenic regulators, identifying ZEB1 as a central transcriptional component of fat cell differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03346.001 PMID:25163748

  1. Cleavage of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 by Enterovirus 71 3C Suppresses Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Xue, Qinghua; Jin, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a positive-stranded RNA virus which is capable of inhibiting innate immunity. Among virus-encoded proteins, the 3C protein compromises the type I interferon (IFN-I) response mediated by retinoid acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) or Toll-like receptor 3 that activates interferon regulatory 3 (IRF3) and IRF7. In the present study, we report that enterovirus 71 downregulates IRF7 through the 3C protein, which inhibits the function of IRF7. When expressed in mammalian cells, the 3C protein mediates cleavage of IRF7 rather than that of IRF3. This process is insensitive to inhibitors of caspase, proteasome, lysosome, and autophagy. H40D substitution in the 3C active site abolishes its activity, whereas R84Q or V154S substitution in the RNA binding motif has no effect. Furthermore, 3C-mediated cleavage occurs at the Q189-S190 junction within the constitutive activation domain of IRF7, resulting in two cleaved IRF7 fragments that are incapable of activating IFN expression. Ectopic expression of wild-type IRF7 limits EV71 replication. On the other hand, expression of the amino-terminal domain of IRF7 enhances EV71 infection, which correlates with its ability to interact with and inhibit IRF3. These results suggest that control of IRF7 by the 3C protein may represent a viral mechanism to escape cellular responses. PMID:23175366

  2. Shielding hospital rooms for brachytherapy patients: design, regulatory and cost/benefit factors.

    PubMed

    Gitterman, M; Webster, E W

    1984-03-01

    The current regulations of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) normally require limitation of radiation exposure in any part of unrestricted occupied areas to 2 mrem in any one hour and to 100 mrem in 7 days. To meet these limits when patients are treated therapeutically with radioactive materials, it is advisable to designate specific rooms in a hospital and often necessary to incorporate substantial costly shielding into one or more walls and the room door. Plans have been formulated for shielding existing hospital rooms housing brachytherapy patients receiving 192Ir and 137Cs therapy in order to meet the above NRC requirements for adjacent corridors and rooms. Typical shielding thicknesses required are 4-6 in. of concrete for certain walls and 1/4 in. of lead in the doors. Shielding costs are approx. $6000 per room for one shielded wall and a shielded door. Applying recent estimates of the cancer risk from low-level gamma radiation, the cost of shielding per cancer fatality averted has been estimated to range from $1.8 million to $10.9 million. Cost/benefit comparisons with many other life-saving activities suggest that these costs and the application of the 2 mrem/hr limit which necessitated them are not justified.

  3. Dynamic control of gene regulatory logic by seemingly redundant transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    AkhavanAghdam, Zohreh; Sinha, Joydeb; Tabbaa, Omar P; Hao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors co-express with their homologs to regulate identical target genes, however the advantages of such redundancies remain elusive. Using single-cell imaging and microfluidics, we study the yeast general stress response transcription factor Msn2 and its seemingly redundant homolog Msn4. We find that gene regulation by these two factors is analogous to logic gate systems. Target genes with fast activation kinetics can be fully induced by either factor, behaving as an 'OR' gate. In contrast, target genes with slow activation kinetics behave as an 'AND' gate, requiring distinct contributions from both factors, upon transient stimulation. Furthermore, such genes become an 'OR' gate when the input duration is prolonged, suggesting that the logic gate scheme is not static but rather dependent on the input dynamics. Therefore, Msn2 and Msn4 enable a time-based mode of combinatorial gene regulation that might be applicable to homologous transcription factors in other organisms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18458.001 PMID:27690227

  4. Insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein during olanzapine administration: effects of the antidiabetic metformin.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; Sandia, Ignacio; Lacruz, Anny; Rangel, Nairy; de Mendoza, Soaira; Beaulieu, Serge; Contreras, Quilianio; Galeazzi, Tatiana; Vargas, Doritza

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the Authors assessed some insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein after olanzapine administration, and the effect of metformin on these variables, 37 patients with chronic schizophrenia were given olanzapine (10 mg/day for 14 weeks). Nineteen patients received metformin (850-2550 mg/day) and 18 received placebo in a randomized, double-blind protocol. The following variables were quantified before and after olanzapine: cortisol, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, glucagon, growth hormone, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein. Results were correlated with the changes in body weight and the insulin resistance index. We have reported elsewhere that metformin did not prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain, and the insulin resistance index significantly decreased after metformin and placebo; Baptista T, et al. Can J Psychiatry 2006; 51: 192-196. Cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and fibrinogen levels significantly decreased in both groups. Glucagon significantly increased after metformin (P=0.03). Leptin tended to increase after placebo (P=0.1) and displayed a small nonsignificant reduction after metformin. The C-reactive protein did not change significantly in any group. Contrarily to most published studies, olanzapine was associated with decreased insulin resistance. Decrements in cortisol, fibrinogen and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels point to an improvement in the metabolic profile. The trend for leptin to increase after placebo, but not after metformin in spite of similar weight gain suggests a beneficial effect of this antidiabetic agent.

  5. Comparative analysis of transcription factor gene families from Papaver somniferum: identification of regulatory factors involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Parul; Pathak, Sumya; Lakhwani, Deepika; Gupta, Parul; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), known for biosynthesis of several therapeutically important benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), has emerged as the premier organism to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The most prominent molecules produced in opium poppy include narcotic analgesic morphine, the cough suppressant codeine, the muscle relaxant papaverine and the anti-microbial agent sanguinarine and berberine. Despite several health benefits, biosynthesis of some of these molecules is very low due to tight temporal and spatial regulation of the genes committed to their biosynthesis. Transcription factors, one of the prime regulators of secondary plant product biosynthesis, might be involved in controlled biosynthesis of BIAs in P. somniferum. In this study, identification of members of different transcription factor gene families using transcriptome datasets of 10 cultivars of P. somniferum with distinct chemoprofile has been carried out. Analysis suggests that most represented transcription factor gene family in all the poppy cultivars is WRKY. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed differential expression pattern of the members of a set of transcription factor gene families among 10 cultivars. Through analysis, two members of WRKY and one member of C3H gene family were identified as potential candidates which might regulate thebaine and papaverine biosynthesis, respectively, in poppy.

  6. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  7. Relative Importance and Additive Effects of Maternal and Infant Risk Factors on Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; James, Kristina; Escobar, Gabriel; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Li, Sherian Xu; Carroll, Kecia N.; Walsh, Eileen; Mitchel, Edward; Das, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh; Yu, Chang; Dupont, William D.; Hartert, Tina V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures that occur in utero and during early life may contribute to the development of childhood asthma through alteration of the human microbiome. The objectives of this study were to estimate the cumulative effect and relative importance of environmental exposures on the risk of childhood asthma. Methods We conducted a population-based birth cohort study of mother-child dyads who were born between 1995 and 2003 and were continuously enrolled in the PRIMA (Prevention of RSV: Impact on Morbidity and Asthma) cohort. The individual and cumulative impact of maternal urinary tract infections (UTI) during pregnancy, maternal colonization with group B streptococcus (GBS), mode of delivery, infant antibiotic use, and older siblings at home, on the risk of childhood asthma were estimated using logistic regression. Dose-response effect on childhood asthma risk was assessed for continuous risk factors: number of maternal UTIs during pregnancy, courses of infant antibiotics, and number of older siblings at home. We further assessed and compared the relative importance of these exposures on the asthma risk. In a subgroup of children for whom maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy information was available, the effect of maternal antibiotic use on the risk of childhood asthma was estimated. Results Among 136,098 singleton birth infants, 13.29% developed asthma. In both univariate and adjusted analyses, maternal UTI during pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18, 1.25; adjusted OR [AOR] 1.04, 95%CI 1.02, 1.07 for every additional UTI) and infant antibiotic use (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.20, 1.22; AOR 1.16, 95%CI 1.15, 1.17 for every additional course) were associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, while having older siblings at home (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.91, 0.93; AOR 0.85, 95%CI 0.84, 0.87 for each additional sibling) was associated with a decreased risk of childhood asthma, in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with vaginal

  8. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  9. A multi-functional role of interferon regulatory factor-8 in solid tumor and myeloid cell biology.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Scott I

    2010-03-01

    Understanding mechanisms of tumor escape are critically important not only to improving our knowledge of cancer biology, but also for the overall development of more effective anti-neoplastic therapies. Our laboratory focuses on mechanisms of apoptotic resistance, with emphasis on Fas loss of function as an important determinant of tumor progression. Our work in solid tumor systems has led to the identification of interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8) as a differentially expressed gene important for tumor cell response to cytotoxicity, including Fas-mediated apoptosis and host-anti-tumor immunosurveillance mechanisms. Although IRF-8 was originally identified in the regulation of normal and neoplastic myeloid cell development, these findings revealed a new functional role for IRF-8 in non-hematopoietic malignancies and establish a molecular basis for its potential manipulation during cancer therapy.

  10. Asynchronous combinatorial action of four regulatory factors activates Bcl11b for T cell commitment

    PubMed Central

    Kueh, Hao Yuan; Yui, Mary A.; Ng, Kenneth K.H.; Pease, Shirley S.; Zhang, Jingli A.; Damle, Sagar S.; Freedman, George; Siu, Sharmayne; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Elowitz, Michael B.; Rothenberg, Ellen V.

    2016-01-01

    During T cell development, multipotent progenitors relinquish competence for other fates and commit to the T cell lineage by turning on the transcription factor Bcl11b. To clarify lineage commitment mechanisms, we followed developing T cells at single-cell level using Bcl11b knock-in fluorescent reporter mice. Notch signaling and Notch-activated transcription factors collaborate to activate Bcl11b expression, irrespective of Notch-dependent proliferation. These inputs work via three distinct, asynchronous mechanisms: an early locus poising function dependent on TCF-1 and GATA-3; a stochastic permissivity function dependent on Notch signaling; and a separate amplitude-control function dependent on Runx1, a factor already present in multipotent progenitors. Despite all being necessary for Bcl11b activation, these inputs act in a stage specific manner, providing a multi-tiered mechanism for developmental gene regulation. PMID:27376470

  11. T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokine production by mast cells: a key factor in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mai; Sato, Yasuharu; Ohno, Kyotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Gion, Yuka; Orita, Yorihisa; Ito, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Tomoyasu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic disorder with unique clinicopathological features and uncertain etiological features and is frequently related to allergic disease. T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokines have been reported to be upregulated in the affected tissues; thus, the production of these cytokines by T helper 2 and regulatory T cells has been suggested as an important factor in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease. However, it is not yet clear which cells produce these cytokines in IgG4-related disease, and some aspects of the disorder cannot be completely explained by T-cell-related processes. To address this, we analyzed paraffin-embedded sections of tissues from nine cases of IgG4-related submandibular gland disease, five cases of submandibular sialolithiasis, and six cases of normal submandibular gland in order to identify potential key players in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the significant upregulation of interleukin (IL)4, IL10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) in IgG4-related disease. Interestingly, immunohistochemical studies indicated the presence of mast cells expressing these cytokines in diseased tissues. In addition, dual immunofluorescence assays identified cells that were double-positive for each cytokine and for KIT, which is expressed by mast cells. In contrast, the distribution of T cells did not correlate with cytokine distribution in affected tissues. We also found that the mast cells were strongly positive for IgE. This observation supports the hypothesis that mast cells are involved in IgG4-related disease, as mast cells are known to be closely related to allergic reactions and are activated in the presence of elevated non-specific IgE levels. In conclusion, our results indicate that mast cells produce T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokines in tissues affected by IgG4-related disease and possibly have an important role in disease

  12. Heparin affin regulatory peptide/pleiotrophin mediates fibroblast growth factor 2 stimulatory effects on human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hatziapostolou, Maria; Polytarchou, Christos; Katsoris, Panagiotis; Courty, Jose; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2006-10-27

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a pleiotropic growth factor that has been implicated in prostate cancer formation and progression. In the present study we found that exogenous FGF2 significantly increased human prostate cancer LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) or pleiotrophin seems to be an important mediator of FGF2 stimulatory effects, since the latter had no effect on stably transfected LNCaP cells that did not express HARP. Moreover, FGF2, through FGF receptors (FGFRs), significantly induced HARP expression and secretion by LNCaP cells and increased luciferase activity of a reporter gene vector carrying the full-length promoter of HARP gene. Using a combination of Western blot analyses, as well as genetic and pharmacological inhibitors, we found that activation of FGFR by FGF2 in LNCaP cells leads to NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent hydrogen peroxide production, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38, activation of AP-1, increased expression and secretion of HARP, and, finally, increased cell proliferation and migration. These results establish the role and the mode of activity of FGF2 in LNCaP cells and support an interventional role of HARP in FGF2 effects, providing new insights on the interplay among growth factor pathways within prostate cancer cells.

  13. Regulatory role of the 90-kDa-heat-shock protein (Hsp90) and associated factors on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Toneatto, Judith; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-02-01

    The term molecular chaperone was first used to describe the ability of nucleoplasmin to prevent the aggregation of histones with DNA during the assembly of nucleosomes. Subsequently, the name was extended to proteins that mediate the post-translational assembly of oligomeric complexes protecting them from denaturation and/or aggregation. Hsp90 is a 90-kDa molecular chaperone that represents the major soluble protein of the cell. In contrast to most conventional chaperones, Hsp90 functions as a refined sensor of protein function and its principal role in the cell is to facilitate biological activity to properly folded client proteins that already have a preserved tertiary structure. Consequently, Hsp90 is related to basic cell functions such as cytoplasmic transport of soluble proteins, translocation of client proteins to organelles, and regulation of the biological activity of key signaling factors such as protein kinases, ubiquitin ligases, steroid receptors, cell cycle regulators, and transcription factors. A growing amount of evidence links the protective action of this molecular chaperone to mechanisms related to posttranslational modifications of soluble nuclear factors as well as histones. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the regulatory action of Hsp90 on transcriptional regulation and how this effect could have impacted genetic assimilation mechanism in some organisms.

  14. Transcription Factor Binding Probabilities in Orthologous Promoters: An Alignment-Free Approach to the Inference of Functional Regulatory Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Clarke, Neil D.

    Using a physically principled method of scoring genomic sequences for the potential to be bound by transcription factors, we have developed an algorithm for assessing the conservation of predicted binding occupancy that does not rely on sequence alignment of promoters. The method, which we call ortholog-weighting, assesses the degree to which the predicted binding occupancy of a transcription factor in a reference gene is also predicted in the promoters of orthologous genes. The analysis was performed separately for over 100 different transcription factors in S. cerevisiae. Statistical significance was evaluated by simulation using permuted versions of the position weight matrices. Ortholog-weighting produced about twice as many significantly high scoring genes as were obtained from the S. cerevisiae genome alone. Gene Ontology analysis found a similar two-fold enrichment of genes. Both analyses suggest that ortholog-weighting improves the prediction of true regulatory targets. Interestingly, the method has only a marginal effect on the prediction of binding by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. We suggest several possibilities for reconciling this result with the improved enrichment that we observe for functionally related promoters and for promoters that are under positive selection.

  15. Medicago truncatula ERN transcription factors: regulatory interplay with NSP1/NSP2 GRAS factors and expression dynamics throughout rhizobial infection.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Marion R; Frances, Lisa; Laloum, Tom; Auriac, Marie-Christine; Niebel, Andreas; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Barker, David G; Fournier, Joëlle; de Carvalho-Niebel, Fernanda

    2012-12-01

    Rhizobial nodulation factors (NFs) activate a specific signaling pathway in Medicago truncatula root hairs that involves the complex interplay of Nodulation Signaling Pathway1 (NSP1)/NSP2 GRAS and Ethylene Response Factor Required for Nodulation1 (ERN1) transcription factors (TFs) to achieve full ENOD11 transcription. ERN1 acts as a direct transcriptional regulator of ENOD11 through the activation of the NF-responsive "NF box." Here, we show that NSP1, when combined with NSP2, can act as a strong positive regulator of ERN1 and ENOD11 transcription. Although ERN1 and NSP1/NSP2 both activate ENOD11, two separate promoter regions are involved that regulate expression during consecutive symbiotic stages. Our findings indicate that ERN1 is required to activate NF-elicited ENOD11 expression exclusively during early preinfection, while NSP1/NSP2 mediates ENOD11 expression during subsequent rhizobial infection. The relative contributions of ERN1 and the closely related ERN2 to the rhizobial symbiosis were then evaluated by comparing their regulation and in vivo dynamics. ERN1 and ERN2 exhibit expression profiles compatible with roles during NF signaling and subsequent infection. However, differences in expression levels and spatiotemporal profiles suggest specialized functions for these two TFs, ERN1 being involved in stages preceding and accompanying infection thread progression while ERN2 is only involved in certain stages of infection. By cross complementation, we show that ERN2, when expressed under the control of the ERN1 promoter, can restore both NF-elicited ENOD11 expression and nodule formation in an ern1 mutant background. This indicates that ERN1 and ERN2 possess similar biological activities and that functional diversification of these closely related TFs relies primarily on changes in tissue-specific expression patterns.

  16. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  17. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  18. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  19. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  20. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  1. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., such as a password or response to a challenge question. (2) Something the practitioner is, biometric... modules or one-time-password devices. (c) If one factor is a biometric, the biometric subsystem...

  2. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., such as a password or response to a challenge question. (2) Something the practitioner is, biometric... modules or one-time-password devices. (c) If one factor is a biometric, the biometric subsystem...

  3. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., such as a password or response to a challenge question. (2) Something the practitioner is, biometric... modules or one-time-password devices. (c) If one factor is a biometric, the biometric subsystem...

  4. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., such as a password or response to a challenge question. (2) Something the practitioner is, biometric... modules or one-time-password devices. (c) If one factor is a biometric, the biometric subsystem...

  5. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., such as a password or response to a challenge question. (2) Something the practitioner is, biometric... modules or one-time-password devices. (c) If one factor is a biometric, the biometric subsystem...

  6. T-box transcription factors and their roles in regulatory hierarchies in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Stennard, Fiona A; Harvey, Richard P

    2005-11-01

    T-box transcription factors are important players in the molecular circuitry that generates lineage diversity and form in the developing embryo. At least seven family members are expressed in the developing mammalian heart, and the human T-box genes TBX1 and TBX5 are mutated in cardiac congenital anomaly syndromes. Here, we review T-box gene function during mammalian heart development in the light of new insights into heart morphogenesis. We see for the first time how hierarchies of transcriptional activation and repression involving multiple T-box factors play out in three-dimensional space to establish the cardiac progenitors fields, to define their subservient lineages, and to generate heart form and function.

  7. Interferon regulatory factor 3 is a key regulation factor for inducing the expression of SAMHD1 in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen; Zhan, Yuan; Zhou, Yanjun; Jiang, Yifeng; Zheng, Xuchen; Yu, Lingxue; Tong, Wu; Gao, Fei; Li, Liwei; Huang, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhiyong; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a type I interferon (IFN) inducible host innate immunity restriction factor that inhibits an early step of the viral life cycle. The underlying mechanisms of SAMHD1 transcriptional regulation remains elusive. Here, we report that inducing SAMHD1 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response via TLR3 and RIG-I/MDA5 agonists that ultimately induce the nuclear translocation of the interferon regulation factor 3 (IRF3) protein. Further studies show that IRF3 plays a major role in upregulating endogenous SAMHD1 expression in a mechanism that is independent of the classical IFN-induced JAK-STAT pathway. Both overexpression and activation of IRF3 enhanced the SAMHD1 promoter luciferase activity, and activated IRF3 was necessary for upregulating SAMHD1 expression in a type I IFN cascade. We also show that the SAMHD1 promoter is a direct target of IRF3 and an IRF3 binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to stimulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that upregulation of endogenous SAMHD1 expression is attributed to the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 and we suggest that type I IFN induction and induced SAMHD1 expression are coordinated. PMID:27411355

  8. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and regulatory cytokines as predictors of clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Carolina; Diaz, Maria Ines; Valdivia, Alejandra; Godoy, Alex; Peña, Alfredo; Rollan, Antonio; Kirberg, Arturo; Hebel, Eduardo; Fierro, Jaqueline; Klapp, Gerardo; Venegas, Alejandro; Harris, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    H. pylori infection is highly prevalent in Chile (73%). Usually a minority of infected patients develops complications such as ulcers and gastric cancer that have been associated with the presence of virulence factors (cagA, vacA) and host T helper response (Th1/Th2). Our aim was to evaluate the relationship between strain virulence and host immune response, using a multiple regression approach for the development of a model based on data collected from H. pylori infected patients in Chile. We analyzed levels of selected cytokines determined by ELISA (IL-12, IL-10, IFN-γ and IL-4) and the presence of cagA and vacA alleles polymorphisms determined by PCR in antral biopsies of 41 patients referred to endoscopy. By multiple regression analysis we established a correlation between bacterial and host factors using clinical outcome (gastritis and duodenal ulcer) as dependent variables. The selected model was described by: clinical outcome = 0.867491 (cagA) + 0.0131847 (IL-12/IL-10) + 0.0103503 (IFN-γ/IL-4) and it was able to explain over 90% of clinical outcomes observations (R2=96.4). This model considers that clinical outcomes are better explained by the interaction of host immune factors and strain virulence as a complex and interdependent mechanism. PMID:17336120

  9. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Assay to Identify Genomic Binding Sites of Regulatory Factors.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Meike; Jung, Johannes; Koslowski, Michael; Türeci, Özlem; Tiwari, Vijay K; Sahin, Ugur

    2016-01-01

    DNA-protein interactions are vital to fundamental cellular events including transcription, replication, DNA repair, and recombination. Thus, their study holds the key to our understanding of mechanisms underlying normal development and homeostasis as well as disease. Transcriptional regulation is a highly complex process that involves recruitment of numerous factors resulting in formation of multi-protein complexes at gene promoters to regulate gene expression. The studied proteins can be, for example, transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, co-activators, co-repressors, or ligand-activated nuclear receptors as estrogen receptor-α (ERα) bound either directly to the DNA or indirectly by interaction with other DNA-bound factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay is a powerful method to study interactions of proteins and a specific genomic DNA region. Recruitment of ERα to promoters of estrogen-dependent genes is a common mechanism to activate or enhance gene transcription in breast cancer thus promoting tumor progression. In this chapter, we demonstrate a stepwise protocol for ChIP assay using binding of ERα to its genomic targets after stimulation with 17β-estradiol (E2) in breast cancer cells as an example.

  10. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  11. Activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1; definition of regulatory domains within the alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Pugh, C W; O'Rourke, J F; Nagao, M; Gleadle, J M; Ratcliffe, P J

    1997-04-25

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a heterodimeric DNA binding complex composed of two basic-helix-loop-helix Per-AHR-ARNT-Sim proteins (HIF-1alpha and -1beta), is a key component of a widely operative transcriptional response activated by hypoxia, cobaltous ions, and iron chelation. To identify regions of HIF-1 subunits responsible for oxygen-regulated activity, we constructed chimeric genes in which portions of coding sequence from HIF-1 genes were either linked to a heterologous DNA binding domain or encoded between such a DNA binding domain and a constitutive activation domain. Sequences from HIF-1alpha but not HIF-1beta conferred oxygen-regulated activity. Two minimal domains within HIF-1alpha (amino acids 549-582 and amino acids 775-826) were defined by deletional analysis, each of which could act independently to convey inducible responses. Both these regions confer transcriptional activation, and in both cases adjacent sequences appeared functionally repressive in transactivation assays. The inducible operation of the first domain, but not the second, involved major changes in the level of the activator fusion protein in transfected cells, inclusion of this sequence being associated with a marked reduction of expressed protein level in normoxic cells, which was relieved by stimulation with hypoxia, cobaltous ions, or iron chelation. These results lead us to propose a dual mechanism of activation in which the operation of an inducible activation domain is amplified by regulation of transcription factor abundance, most likely occurring through changes in protein stability.

  12. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance, and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils, and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite, on the other hand, can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer to the other inductor. Ferrite being a heavy compound of iron increases the inductor weight significantly and needs to be added judiciously. Four zones have been identified in the paper, which shows different sensitivity to addition of ferrite in terms of the two inductances and coupling factor. Simulation and measurement results are presented for different air gaps between the coils and at different gap distances between the ferrite base and added ferrite. This paper is beneficial in improving the coupling factor while adding minimum weight to wireless power transfer system.

  13. Suppression of preoptic sleep-regulatory neuronal activity during corticotropin-releasing factor-induced sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gvilia, Irma; Suntsova, Natalia; Kumar, Sunil; McGinty, Dennis; Szymusiak, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is implicated in sleep and arousal regulation. Exogenous CRF causes sleep suppression that is associated with activation of at least two important arousal systems: pontine noradrenergic and hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons. It is not known whether CRF also impacts sleep-promoting neuronal systems. We hypothesized that CRF-mediated changes in wake and sleep involve decreased activity of hypothalamic sleep-regulatory neurons localized in the preoptic area. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of CRF on sleep-wake measures and c-Fos expression in GABAergic neurons in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPN) and ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) in different experimental conditions. Administration of CRF (0.1 nmol) during baseline rest phase led to delayed sleep onset and decreases in total amount and mean duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Administration of CRF during acute sleep deprivation (SD) resulted in suppression of recovery sleep and decreased c-Fos expression in MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons. Compared with vehicle controls, intracerebroventricular CRF potentiated disturbances of both NREM and REM sleep in rats exposed to a species-specific psychological stressor, the dirty cage of a male conspecific. The number of MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons expressing c-Fos was reduced in the CRF-treated group of dirty cage-exposed rats. These findings confirm the involvement of CRF in wake-sleep cycle regulation and suggest that increased CRF signaling in the brain 1) negatively affects homeostatic responses to sleep loss, 2) exacerbates stress-induced disturbances of sleep, and 3) suppresses the activity of sleep-regulatory neurons of the MnPN and VLPO.

  14. Risk Factors for Additional Surgery after Iatrogenic Perforations due to Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gi Jun; Ji, Jeong Seon; Kim, Byung Wook; Choi, Hwang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. Endoscopic resection (ER) is commonly performed to treat gastric epithelial neoplasms and subepithelial tumors. The aim of this study was to predict the risk factors for surgery after ER-induced perforation. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the data on patients who received gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) or endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) between January 2010 and March 2015. Patients who were confirmed to have perforation were classified into surgery and nonsurgery groups. We aimed to determine the risk factors for surgery in patients who developed iatrogenic gastric perforations. Results. A total of 1183 patients underwent ER. Perforation occurred in 69 (5.8%) patients, and 9 patients (0.8%) required surgery to manage the perforation. In univariate analysis, anterior location of the lesion, a subepithelial lesion, two or more postprocedure pain killers within 24 hrs, and increased heart rate within 24 hrs after the procedure were the factors related to surgery. In logistic regression analysis, the location of the lesion at the anterior wall and using two or more postprocedure pain killers within 24 hrs were risk factors for surgery. Conclusion. Most cases of perforations after ER can be managed conservatively. When a patient requires two or more postprocedure pain killers within 24 hrs and the lesion is located on the anterior wall, early surgery should be considered instead of conservative management. PMID:28316622

  15. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of porcine DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI).

    PubMed

    Xie, Lilan; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Cai, Kaimei; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-03-01

    The DNA-dependent activator of IFN-regulatory factors (DAI) is a recently identified DNA sensor for intracellular DNA that triggers a signal for the production of type I IFN. Here we report the cloning and characterization of porcine DAI (poDAI). The full-length of poDAI encodes 439 amino acids, contains two N-terminal DNA-binding domains and shows similarity to mouse, rat, dog, monkey, human, horse and cattle counterparts ranging from 44% to 67%. poDAI mRNA expression was mainly detected in spleen, lung, kidney and small intestine. Over-expression of poDAI activated transcription factors IRF3 and NF-kappaB and induced IFN-beta in different porcine cell lines, but to varying degrees. Deletion mutant analysis revealed that both the DNA-binding domains and the C-terminus are required for full activation of IFN-beta. siRNA targeting poDAI significantly decreased poly(dAT:dAT)- or Pseudorabies virus (PRV)-induced IFN-beta activation. These results indicate that DAI is an important immuno-regulator of the porcine innate immune system.

  16. Characterization of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) FoxD5 and its function in regulating myogenic regulatory factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xungang; Zhang, Yuqing; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Peijun; Xu, Yongli

    2012-03-01

    As one member of winged helix domain transcription factors, FoxD5 was reported to be a trunk organizer. Recent study showed that zebrafish foxd5 is expressed in the somites. To further understand the function of FoxD5 in fish muscle development, the FoxD5 gene was isolated from flounder. Its expression pattern was analyzed by in situ hybridization, while its function in regulating myogenic regulatory factor, MyoD, was analyzed by ectopic expression. It showed that flounder FoxD5 was firstly expressed in the tailbud, adaxial cells, and neural plate of the head. In flounder embryo, FoxD5 is expressed not only in forebrain but also in somite cells that will form muscle in the future. When flounder FoxD5 was over-expressed in zebrafish by microinjection, the expression of zebrafish MyoD in the somites was reduced, suggesting that FoxD5 is involved in myogenesis by regulating the expression of MyoD.

  17. Genetic Polymorphism of Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 (IRF5) Correlates with Allograft Acute Rejection of Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; Wei, Bajin; Dai, Yifan; Zhang, Min; Wu, Jian; Xu, Xiao; Jiang, Guoping; Zheng, Shusen; Zhou, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background Although liver transplantation is one of the most efficient curative therapies of end stage liver diseases, recipients may suffer liver graft loss opst-operation. IRF-5, a member of Interferon Regulatory Factors, functions as a key regulator in TLR4 cascade, and is capable of inducing inflammatory cytokines. Although TLR4 has been proved to contribute to acute allograft rejection, including after liver transplantation, the correlation between IRF5 gene and acute rejection has not been elucidated yet. Methods The study enrolled a total of 289 recipients, including 39 females and 250 males, and 39 recipients developed acute allograft rejection within 6 months post-transplantation. The allograft rejections were diagnosed by liver biopsies. Genome DNA of recipients was extracted from pre-operative peripheral blood. Genotyping of IRF-5, including rs3757385, rs752637 and rs11761199, was performed, followed by SNP frequency and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium analysis. Results The genetic polymorphism of rs3757385 was found associated with acute rejection. G/G homozygous individuals were at higher risk of acute rejection, with a P value of 0.042 (OR = 2.34 (1.07–5.10)). Conclusions IRF5, which transcriptionally activates inflammatory cytokines, is genetically associated with acute rejection and might function as a risk factor for acute rejection of liver transplantations. PMID:24788560

  18. Gene-specific factors determine mitotic expression and bookmarking via alternate regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Arampatzi, Panagiota; Gialitakis, Manolis; Makatounakis, Takis; Papamatheakis, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptional silencing during mitosis is caused by inactivation of critical transcriptional regulators and/or chromatin condensation. Inheritance of gene expression patterns through cell division involves various bookmarking mechanisms. In this report, we have examined the mitotic and post-mitotic expression of the DRA major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) gene in different cell types. During mitosis the constitutively MHCII-expressing B lymphoblastoid cells showed sustained occupancy of the proximal promoter by the cognate enhanceosome and general transcription factors. In contrast, although mitotic epithelial cells were depleted of these proteins irrespectively of their MHCII transcriptional activity, a distal enhancer selectively recruited the PP2A phosphatase via NFY and maintained chromatin accessibility. Based on our data, we propose a novel chromatin anti-condensation role for this element in mitotic bookmarking and timing of post-mitotic transcriptional reactivation. PMID:23303784

  19. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  20. Soil Pore Characteristics, an Underappreciated Regulatory Factor in GHGs Emission and C Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toosi, E. R.; Yu, J.; Doane, T. A.; Guber, A.; Rivers, M. L.; Marsh, T. L.; Ali, K.; Kravchenko, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Enduring challenges in understanding soil organic matter (SOM) stability and emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from soil stem from complexities of soil processes, many of which occur at micro-scales. The goal of this study is to evaluate the interactive effects soil pore characteristics, soil moisture levels, inherent SOM levels and properties, and substrate quality, on GHGs emission, and accelerated decomposition of native SOM following addition of fresh substrate i.e. priming. Our core hypothesis is that soil pore characteristics play a major role as a mediator in (i) the decomposition of organic matter regardless of its source (i.e. litter vs. native SOM) or substrate quality, as well as in (ii) GHGs emissions. Samples with prevalence of small (<10 μm) vs. large (>30 μm) pores were prepared from soils with similar properties but under long-term contrasting management. The samples were incubated (110 d) at low and optimum soil moisture conditions after addition of high quality (13C-soybean) and low quality (13C-corn) substrate. Headspace gas was analyzed for 13C-CO2 and GHGs on a regularly basis (day 1, 3, 7, 14, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 90, and 110). Selected samples were scanned at the early stage of decomposition (7, 14, 24 d) at 2-6 μm resolutions using X-ray computed μ tomography in order to: (1) quantify soil pore characteristics; (2) visualize and quantify distribution of soil moisture within samples of different pore characteristics; and (3) to visualize and measure losses of decomposing plant residue. Initial findings indicate that, consistent with our hypotheses, pore characteristics influenced GHGs emission, and intensity and pattern of plant residue decomposition. The importance of pores was highly pronounced in presence of added plant residue where greater N2O emission occurred in samples with dominant large pores, in contrast to CO2. Further findings will be discussed upon completion of the study and analysis of the results.

  1. Uncovering early response of gene regulatory networks in ES cells by systematic induction of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Akira; Xin, Li; Sharov, Alexei A.; Thomas, Marshall; Mowrer, Gregory; Meyers, Emily; Piao, Yulan; Mehta, Samir; Yee, Sarah; Nakatake, Yuhki; Stagg, Carole; Sharova, Lioudmila; Correa-Cerro, Lina S.; Bassey, Uwem; Hoang, Hien; Kim, Eugene; Tapnio, Richard; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood; Zalzman, Michal; Li, Manxiang; Falco, Geppino; Yang, Hsih-Te; Lee, Sung-Lim; Monti, Manuela; Stanghellini, Ilaria; Islam, Md. Nurul; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Goldberg, Ilya; Wang, Weidong; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY To examine transcription factor (TF) network(s), we created mouse ES cell lines, in each of which one of 50 TFs tagged with a FLAG moiety is inserted into a ubiquitously controllable tetracycline-repressible locus. Of the 50 TFs, Cdx2 provoked the most extensive transcriptome perturbation in ES cells, followed by Esx1, Sox9, Tcf3, Klf4, and Gata3. ChIP-Seq revealed that CDX2 binds to promoters of up-regulated target genes. By contrast, genes down-regulated by CDX2 did not show CDX2 binding, but were enriched with binding sites for POU5F1, SOX2, and NANOG. Genes with binding sites for these core TFs were also down-regulated by the induction of at least 15 other TFs, suggesting a common initial step for ES cell differentiation mediated by interference with the binding of core TFs to their target genes. These ES cell lines provide a fundamental resource to study biological networks in ES cells and mice. PMID:19796622

  2. Myogenic regulatory factors during regeneration of skeletal muscle in young, adult, and old rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, D. R.; Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Myogenic factor mRNA expression was examined during muscle regeneration after bupivacaine injection in Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats aged 3, 18, and 31 mo of age (young, adult, and old, respectively). Mass of the tibialis anterior muscle in the young rats had recovered to control values by 21 days postbupivacaine injection but in adult and old rats remained 40% less than that of contralateral controls at 21 and 28 days of recovery. During muscle regeneration, myogenin mRNA was significantly increased in muscles of young, adult, and old rats 5 days after bupivacaine injection. Subsequently, myogenin mRNA levels in young rat muscle decreased to postinjection control values by day 21 but did not return to control values in 28-day regenerating muscles of adult and old rats. The expression of MyoD mRNA was also increased in muscles at day 5 of regeneration in young, adult, and old rats, decreased to control levels by day 14 in young and adult rats, and remained elevated in the old rats for 28 days. In summary, either a diminished ability to downregulate myogenin and MyoD mRNAs in regenerating muscle occurs in old rat muscles, or the continuing myogenic effort includes elevated expression of these mRNAs.

  3. Sources and biology of regulatory factors active on mouse myeloid leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, D.

    1982-01-01

    The action of serum or cells in enforcing differentiation in mouse myelomonocytic leukemic cells was monitored in agar cultures of WEHI-3B leukemic cells. The repeated intravenous injection of 5 ..mu..g endotoxin initially increased serum differentiating activity but after the third injection responses to further injections decreased markedly. Congenitally athymic (nude) mice exhibited normal rises in serum differentiating activity when injected with endotoxin but C3H HeJ mice failed to respond to challenge with purified lipid A. Whole body irradiation up to 1,200 rads did not increase serum differentiating activity but did not suppress responses to challenge injection of endotoxin. Coculture of WEHI-3B cells with peritoneal cells from normal or irradiated BALB/c mice caused marked granulocytic differentiation in WEHI-3B colonies. This effect was not seen if leukemic cells were cultured with thymus, spleen, or bone marrow cells. The serum halflife of the factor in postendotoxin serum enforcing differentiation of WEHI-3B cells was shown to be 1.5-2.3 hr.

  4. Identification of cis-regulatory modules in promoters of human genes exploiting mutual positioning of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Soumyadeep; Blais, Alexandre; Ioshikhes, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    In higher organisms, gene regulation is controlled by the interplay of non-random combinations of multiple transcription factors (TFs). Although numerous attempts have been made to identify these combinations, important details, such as mutual positioning of the factors that have an important role in the TF interplay, are still missing. The goal of the present work is in silico mapping of some of such associating factors based on their mutual positioning, using computational screening. We have selected the process of myogenesis as a study case, and we focused on TF combinations involving master myogenic TF Myogenic differentiation (MyoD) with other factors situated at specific distances from it. The results of our work show that some muscle-specific factors occur together with MyoD within the range of ±100 bp in a large number of promoters. We confirm co-occurrence of the MyoD with muscle-specific factors as described in earlier studies. However, we have also found novel relationships of MyoD with other factors not specific for muscle. Additionally, we have observed that MyoD tends to associate with different factors in proximal and distal promoter areas. The major outcome of our study is establishing the genome-wide connection between biological interactions of TFs and close co-occurrence of their binding sites. PMID:23913413

  5. The Application of Additive Factors Methodology to Workload Assessment in a Dynamic System Monitoring Task.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    resources, task interference will be greater, and changes in the difficulty of one task will be more likely to derogate performance of the other. It...number of items in short term memory and response latency suggesting the presence of a comparison process between test stimulus onset and response...execution. Each additional item in memory adds approximately 38ms to the response latency. The essentially equivalent slopes for positive and negative

  6. Interlukin-18 Is a Pivot Regulatory Factor on Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Expression and Brain Astrocytic Migration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Hong; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Huang, Chien-Fang; Leung, Yuk-Man; Lai, Sheng-Wei; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chang, Pei-Chun; Lu, Dah-Yuu; Lin, Chingju

    2016-11-01

    The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) has been shown to be elevated in some pathophysiological conditions and is involved in the degradation of extracellular matrix in astrocytes. In current study, the function of MMP-13 was further investigated. The conditioned medium (CM) collected from activated microglia increased interleukin (IL)-18 production and enhanced MMP-13 expression in astrocytes. Furthermore, treatment with recombinant IL-18 increased MMP-13 protein and mRNA levels in astrocytes. Recombinant IL-18 stimulation also increased the enzymatic activity of MMP-13 and the migratory activity of astrocytes, while administration of MMP-13 or pan-MMP inhibitors antagonized IL-18-induced migratory activity of astrocytes. In addition, administration of recombinant IL-18 to astrocytes led to the phosphorylation of JNK, Akt, or PKCδ, and treatment of astrocytes with JNK, PI3 kinase/Akt, or PKCδ inhibitors significantly decreased the IL-18-induced migratory activity. Taken together, the results suggest that IL-18-induced MMP-13 expression in astrocytes is regulated by JNK, PI3 kinase/Akt, and PKCδ signaling pathways. These findings also indicate that IL-18 is an important regulator leading to MMP-13 expression and cell migration in astrocytes.

  7. Mysm1 is required for interferon regulatory factor expression in maintaining HSC quiescence and thymocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, X F; Nandakumar, V; Tumurkhuu, G; Wang, T; jiang, X; Hong, B; Jones, L; Won, H; Yoshii, H; Ozato, K; Masumi, A; Chen, S-Y

    2016-01-01

    Mysm1−/− mice have severely decreased cellularity in hematopoietic organs. We previously revealed that Mysm1 knockout impairs self-renewal and lineage reconstitution of HSCs by abolishing the recruitment of key transcriptional factors to the Gfi-1 locus, an intrinsic regulator of HSC function. The present study further defines a large LSKs in >8-week-old Mysm1−/− mice that exhibit increased proliferation and reduced cell lineage differentiation compared with those of WT LSKs. We found that IRF2 and IRF8, which are important for HSC homeostasis and commitment as transcription repressors, were expressed at lower levels in Mysm1−/− HSCs, and Mysm1 enhanced function of the IRF2 and IRF8 promoters, suggesting that Mysm1 governs the IRFs for HSC homeostasis. We further found that the lower expressions of IRF2 and IRF8 led to an enhanced transcription of p53 in Mysm1−/− HSCs, which was recently defined to have an important role in mediating Mysm1−/−-associated defects. The study also revealed that Mysm1−/− thymocytes exhibited lower IRF2 expression, but had higher Sca1 expression, which has a role in mediating thymocyte death. Furthermore, we found that the thymocytes from B16 melanoma-bearing mice, which display severe thymus atrophy at late tumor stages, exhibited reduced Mysm1 and IRF2 expression but enhanced Sca1 expression, suggesting that tumors may downregulate Mysm1 and IRF2 for thymic T-cell elimination. PMID:27277682

  8. Basolateral Na+/HCO3– cotransport activity is regulated by the dissociable Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Angelito A.; Kear, Felicidad T.; Santos, Anna V.P.; Ma, Jianfei; Steplock, Debra; Robey, R. Brooks; Weinman, Edward J.

    1999-01-01

    In the renal proximal tubule, the activities of the basolateral Na+/HCO3– cotransporter (NBC) and the apical Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE3) uniformly vary in parallel, suggesting that they are coordinately regulated. PKA-mediated inhibition of NHE3 is mediated by a PDZ motif–containing protein, the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHE-RF). Given the common inhibition of these transporters after protein kinase A (PKA) activation, we sought to determine whether NHE-RF also plays a role in PKA-regulated NBC activity. Renal cortex immunoblot analysis using anti-peptide antibodies directed against rabbit NHE-RF demonstrated the presence of this regulatory factor in both brush-border membranes (BBMs) and basolateral membranes (BLMs). Using a reconstitution assay, we found that limited trypsin digestion of detergent solubilized rabbit renal BLM preparations resulted in NBC activity that was unaffected by PKA activation. Co-reconstitution of these trypsinized preparations with a recombinant protein corresponding to wild-type rabbit NHE-RF restored the inhibitory effect of PKA on NBC activity in a concentration-dependent manner. NBC activity was inhibited 60% by 10–8M NHE-RF; this effect was not observed in the absence of PKA. Reconstitution with heat-denatured NHE-RF also failed to attenuate NBC activity. To establish further a physiologic role for NHE-RF in NBC regulation, the renal epithelial cell line B-SC-1, which lacks detectable endogenous NHE-RF expression, was engineered to express stably an NHE-RF transgene. NHE-RF–expressing B-SC-1 cells (B-SC-RF) exhibited markedly lower basal levels of NBC activity than did wild-type controls. Inhibition of NBC activity in B-SC-RF cells was enhanced after 10 μM of forskolin treatment, consistent with a postulated role for NHE-RF in mediating the inhibition of NBC activity by PKA. These findings not only suggest NHE-RF involvement in PKA-regulated NBC activity, but also provide a unique molecular mechanism whereby

  9. Additive relationship between serum fibroblast growth factor 21 level and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Expression and activity of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 hormone-like protein are associated with development of several metabolic disorders. This study was designed to investigate whether serum FGF21 level was also associated with the metabolic syndrome-related cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, and its clinical features in a Chinese cohort. Methods Two-hundred-and-fifty-three subjects visiting the Cardiology Department (Sixth People's Hospital affiliated to Shanghai JiaoTong University) were examined by coronary arteriography (to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD)) and hepatic ultrasonography (to diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)). Serum FGF21 level was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and analyzed for correlation to subject and clinical characteristics. The independent factors of CAD were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Subjects with NAFLD showed significantly higher serum FGF21 than those without NAFLD (388.0 pg/mL (253.0-655.4) vs. 273.3 pg/mL (164.9-383.7), P < 0.01). Subjects with CAD showed significantly higher serum FGF21, regardless of NAFLD diagnosis (P < 0.05). Serum FGF21 level significantly elevated with the increasing number of metabolic disorders (P for trend < 0.01). After adjustment of age, sex, and BMI, FGF21 was positively correlated with total cholesterol (P < 0.05) and triglyceride (P < 0.01). FGF21 was identified as an independent factor of CAD (odds ratio = 2.984, 95% confidence interval: 1.014-8.786, P < 0.05). Conclusions Increased level of serum FGF21 is associated with NAFLD, metabolic disorders and CAD. PMID:23981342

  10. Non-additive interactions involving two distinct elements mediate sloppy-paired regulation by pair-rule transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Prazak, Lisa; Fujioka, Miki; Gergen, J. Peter

    2010-01-01

    The relatively simple combinatorial rules responsible for establishing the initial metameric expression of sloppy-paired-1 (slp1) in the Drosophila blastoderm embryo make this system an attractive model for investigating the mechanism of regulation by pair rule transcription factors. This investigation of slp1 cis-regulatory architecture identifies two distinct elements, a proximal early stripe element (PESE) and a distal early stripe element (DESE) located from −3.1 kb to −2.5 kb and from −8.1 kb to −7.1 kb upstream of the slp1 promoter, respectively, that mediate this early regulation. The proximal element expresses only even-numbered stripes and mediates repression by Even-skipped (Eve) as well as by the combination of Runt and Fushi-tarazu (Ftz). A 272 basepair sub-element of PESE retains Eve-dependent repression, but is expressed throughout the even-numbered parasegments due to the loss of repression by Runt and Ftz. In contrast, the distal element expresses both odd and even-numbered stripes and also drives inappropriate expression in the anterior half of the odd-numbered parasegments due to an inability to respond to repression by Eve. Importantly, a composite reporter gene containing both early stripe elements recapitulates pair-rule gene-dependent regulation in a manner beyond what is expected from combining their individual patterns. These results indicate interactions involving distinct cis-elements contribute to the proper integration of pair-rule regulatory information. A model fully accounting for these results proposes that metameric slp1 expression is achieved through the Runt-dependent regulation of interactions between these two pair-rule response elements and the slp1 promoter. PMID:20435028

  11. Fungal colonization - an additional risk factor for diseased dogs and cats?

    PubMed

    Biegańska, Małgorzata; Dardzińska, Weronika; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the presented mini-review is to review the literature data referring to opportunistic mycoses in pet dogs and cats suffering from other concurrent diseases, comparable to human medical disorders with high risk of secondary mycoses. This review also presents the preliminary results of a project aimed at understanding the fungal colonization and occurrence of secondary mycoses in pets suffering from metabolic disorders, neoplasms and viral infections. The incidence of opportunistic mycoses is higher in such individuals, mostly because of their impaired immunity. The main risk factors are primary and secondary types of immunodeficiency connected with anti-cancer treatment or neoplastic disease itself. Moreover, literature data and the results of our investigations show that Candida yeasts are prevalent among diabetic animals and indicate that these fungi are the main etiological agents of secondary infections of the oral cavity, GI and urogenital tracts. Other important conditions possibly favoring the development of mycoses are concurrent infections of cats with FeLV and FIV viruses. Thus, in all cases of the mentioned underlying diseases, animals should be carefully monitored by repeated mycological examination, together with inspection of other parameters. Also, the prophylaxis of opportunistic mycoses should be carefully considered alike other factors influencing the prognosis and the outcome of primary diseases.

  12. Factors influencing the performance of English as an Additional Language nursing students: instructors' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Tam Truong; McKiel, Elaine; Hwang, Jihye

    2009-09-01

    The increasing number of immigrants in Canada has led to more nursing students for whom English is an additional language (EAL). Limited language skills, cultural differences, and a lack of support can pose special challenges for these students and the instructors who teach them. Using a qualitative research methodology, in-depth interviews with fourteen EAL nursing students and two focus group interviews with nine instructors were conducted. In this paper, the instructors' perspectives are presented. Data acquired from the instructors suggest that the challenges experienced by EAL students and instructors reside in a lack of awareness and support at the institutional and structural levels rather than solely on capacities of individual EAL students or instructors. From this study, identification of supportive activities for nurse educators and education sector decision makers emerged.

  13. Virulence factor regulation and regulatory networks in Streptococcus pyogenes and their impact on pathogen-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Kreikemeyer, Bernd; McIver, Kevin S; Podbielski, Andreas

    2003-05-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus, GAS) is a very important human pathogen with remarkable adaptation capabilities. Survival within the harsh host surroundings requires sensing potential on the bacterial side, which leads in particular to coordinately regulated virulence factor expression. GAS 'stand-alone' response regulators (RRs) and two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) link the signals from the host environment with adaptive responses of the bacterial cell. Numerous putative regulatory systems emerged from GAS genome sequences. Only three RRs [Mga, RofA-like protein (RALP) and Rgg/RopB] and three TCSs (CsrRS/CovRS, FasBCAX and Ihk/Irr) have been studied in some detail with respect to their growth-phase-dependent activity and their influence on GAS-host cell interaction. In particular, the Mga-, RALP- and Rgg/RopB-regulated pathways display interconnected activities that appear to influence GAS colonization, persistence and spreading mechanisms, in a growth-phase-related fashion. Here, we have summarized our current knowledge about these RRs and TCSs to highlight the questions that should be addressed in future research on GAS pathogenicity.

  14. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 signaling regulates the switch between autophagy and apoptosis to determine breast cancer cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz-Roberts, Jessica L.; Cook, Katherine L.; Chen, Chun; Shajahan-Haq, Ayesha N.; Axelrod, Margaret; Wärri, Anni; Riggins, Rebecca B.; Jin, Lu; Haddad, Bassem R.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.; Baumann, William T.; Clarke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) is a tumor suppressor that regulates cell fate in several cell types. Here we report an inverse correlation in expression of nuclear IRF1 and the autophagy regulator ATG7 in human breast cancer cells that directly impacts their cell fate. In mice harboring mutant Atg7, nuclear IRF1 was increased in mammary tumors, spleen, and kidney. Mechanistic investigations identified ATG7 and the cell death modulator Beclin-1 (BECN1) as negative regulators of IRF1. Silencing ATG7 or BECN1 caused estrogen receptor-α (ERα) to exit the nucleus at the time when IRF1 nuclear localization occurred. Conversely, silencing IRF1 promoted autophagy by increasing BECN1 and blunting IGF-1 receptor and mTOR survival signaling. Loss of IRF1 promoted resistance to anti-estrogens, whereas combined silencing of ATG7 and IRF1 restored sensitivity to these agents. Using a mathematical model to prompt signaling hypotheses, we developed evidence that ATG7 silencing could resensitize IRF1-attenuated cells to apoptosis through mechanisms that involve other estrogen-regulated genes. Overall, our work shows how inhibiting the autophagy proteins ATG7 and BECN1 can regulate IRF1 dependent and independent signaling pathways in ways that engender a new therapeutic strategy to attack breast cancer. PMID:25576084

  15. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanwei; Hu, Guojian; Breitel, Dario; Liu, Mingchun; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Fu, Yongyao; Aharoni, Asaph; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2) which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato. PMID:26716451

  16. Platelet-derived growth factor mediates survival of leukemic large granular lymphocytes via an autocrine regulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Liu, Xin; Nyland, Susan B; Zhang, Ranran; Ryland, Lindsay K; Broeg, Kathleen; Baab, Kendall Thomas; Jarbadan, Nancy Ruth; Irby, Rosalyn; Loughran, Thomas P

    2010-01-07

    Large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia results from chronic expansion of cytotoxic T cells or natural killer (NK) cells. Apoptotic resistance resulting from constitutive activation of survival signaling pathways is a fundamental pathogenic mechanism. Recent network modeling analyses identified platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) as a key master switch in controlling these survival pathways in T-cell LGL leukemia. Here we show that an autocrine PDGF regulatory loop mediates survival of leukemic LGLs of both T- and NK-cell origin. We found high levels of circulating PDGF-BB in platelet-poor plasma samples from LGL leukemia patients. Production of PDGF-BB by leukemic LGLs was demonstrated by immunocytochemical staining. Leukemic cells expressed much higher levels of PDGFR-beta transcripts than purified normal CD8(+) T cells or NK cells. We observed that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 kinase), Src family kinase (SFK), and downstream protein kinase B (PKB)/AKT pathways were constitutively activated in both T- and NK-LGL leukemia. Pharmacologic blockade of these pathways led to apoptosis of leukemic LGLs. Neutralizing antibody to PDGF-BB inhibited PKB/AKT phosphorylation induced by LGL leukemia sera. These results suggest that targeting of PDGF-BB, a pivotal regulator for the long-term survival of leukemic LGLs, may be an important therapeutic strategy.

  17. The PDZ Protein Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor-1 (NHERF1) Regulates Planar Cell Polarity and Motile Cilia Organization

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Donna B.; Tsang, Michael; Friedman, Peter A.; Romero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Directional flow of the cerebrospinal fluid requires coordinated movement of the motile cilia of the ependymal epithelium that lines the cerebral ventricles. Here we report that mice lacking the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1/Slc9a3r1, also known as EBP50) develop profound communicating hydrocephalus associated with fewer and disorganized ependymal cilia. Knockdown of NHERF1/slc9a3r1 in zebrafish embryos also causes severe hydrocephalus of the hindbrain and impaired ciliogenesis in the otic vesicle. Ultrastructural analysis did not reveal defects in the shape or organization of individual cilia. Similar phenotypes have been described in animals with deficiencies in Wnt signaling and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway. We show that NHERF1 binds the PCP core genes Frizzled (Fzd) and Vangl. We further show that NHERF1 assembles a ternary complex with Fzd4 and Vangl2 and promotes translocation of Vangl2 to the plasma membrane, in particular to the apical surface of ependymal cells. Taken together, these results strongly support an important role for NHERF1 in the regulation of PCP signaling and the development of functional motile cilia. PMID:27055101

  18. Three functional variants of IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) define risk and protective haplotypes for human lupus

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Robert R.; Kyogoku, Chieko; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Vlasova, Irina A.; Davies, Leela R. L.; Baechler, Emily C.; Plenge, Robert M.; Koeuth, Thearith; Ortmann, Ward A.; Hom, Geoffrey; Bauer, Jason W.; Gillett, Clarence; Burtt, Noel; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Onofrio, Robert; Petri, Michelle; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Rönnblom, Lars; Nordmark, Gunnel; Gregersen, Peter K.; Moser, Kathy; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Daly, Mark J.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Altshuler, David

    2007-01-01

    Systematic genome-wide studies to map genomic regions associated with human diseases are becoming more practical. Increasingly, efforts will be focused on the identification of the specific functional variants responsible for the disease. The challenges of identifying causal variants include the need for complete ascertainment of genetic variants and the need to consider the possibility of multiple causal alleles. We recently reported that risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is strongly associated with a common SNP in IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and that this variant altered spicing in a way that might provide a functional explanation for the reproducible association to SLE risk. Here, by resequencing and genotyping in patients with SLE, we find evidence for three functional alleles of IRF5: the previously described exon 1B splice site variant, a 30-bp in-frame insertion/deletion variant of exon 6 that alters a proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain region, and a variant in a conserved polyA+ signal sequence that alters the length of the 3′ UTR and stability of IRF5 mRNAs. Haplotypes of these three variants define at least three distinct levels of risk to SLE. Understanding how combinations of variants influence IRF5 function may offer etiological and therapeutic insights in SLE; more generally, IRF5 and SLE illustrates how multiple common variants of the same gene can together influence risk of common disease. PMID:17412832

  19. Does Positive Selection Drive Transcription Factor Binding Site Turnover? A Test with Drosophila Cis-Regulatory Modules

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin Z.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Maerkl, Sebastian J.; Kreitman, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factor binding site(s) (TFBS) gain and loss (i.e., turnover) is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM) evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s) driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time. PMID:21572512

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and interleukin 33 form a regulatory circuit to perpetuate the inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fanlei; Shi, Lianjie; Mu, Rong; Zhu, Jiaxin; Li, Yingni; Ma, Xiaoxu; Li, Chun; Jia, Rulin; Yang, Dongyue; Li, Yun; Li, Zhanguo

    2013-01-01

    Hyperplasia of synovial fibroblasts, infiltration with inflammatory cytokines, and tissue hypoxia are the major characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Interleukin 33 (IL-33) is a newly identified inflammatory cytokine exacerbating the disease severity of RA. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) showed increased expression in RA synovium and could regulate a number of inflammatory cytokine productions. Nevertheless, its correlation with IL-33 remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that elevated levels of IL-33 were demonstrated in RA patient synovial fluids, with upregulated expression of HIF-1α and IL-33 in the synovial fibroblasts. Knocking down HIF-1α compromised IL-33 expression in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASF), while enforcing HIF-1α expression in RASF substantially upregulated IL-33 levels. HIF-1α promoted the activation of the signalling pathways controlling IL-33 production, particularly the p38 and ERK pathways. Moreover, we showed for the first time that IL-33 in turn could induce more HIF-1α expression in RASF, thus forming a HIF-1α/IL-33 regulatory circuit that would perpetuate the inflammatory process in RA. Targeting this pathological pathway and HIF-1α may provide new therapeutic strategies for overcoming the persistent and chronic inflammatory disease.

  1. The prognostic value of the Na⁺/ H⁺ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) protein in cancer.

    PubMed

    Saponaro, Concetta; Malfettone, Andrea; Dell'Endice, Teresa Stefania; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Paradiso, Angelo; Mangia, Anita

    2014-01-01

    NHERF1 (Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger regulatory factor) is a scaffolding protein, consists of two tandem PDZ domains linked to a carboxyl-terminal ezrin-binding region. NHERF1 recruits macromolecular complexes at the apical membrane of epithelial cells in many epithelial tissues. It is involved in trafficking and regulation of transmembrane ion transporters and G protein-coupled receptors. Further, NHERF1 also linked other molecules involved in cell growth and cancer progression, such as PDGFR, PTEN, β-catenin, EGFR and HER2/neu. In this review, we focus on the role of NHERF1 during cancer development. Evidences of its involvement in cancer development are present in hepatocellular carcinoma, schwannoma, glioblastoma, colorectal cancer and particularly in breast cancer. Recent findings obtained from our laboratory show that cytoplasmic NHERF1 expression increases gradually in breast cancer during carcinogenesis, and its overexpression is associated with aggressive clinical parameters, unfavourable prognosis, and increased tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, also nuclear NHERF1 expression seems to play a role both in carcinogenesis and progression of colorectal cancer. These data suggest that NHERF1 could be a new biomarker of advanced malignancies.

  2. α-Lipoic acid (α-LA) inhibits the transcriptional activity of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) via SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Gao, Fuyu; Lin, Xiaoyan; Yu, Ruixiang; Zhao, Yong; Luan, Jingjie; Li, Hongyan; Song, Mingzhu

    2014-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), one of the most common joint disorders, is one of the leading causes of disability among the elderly. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, which is synthesized locally by synovial cells and chondrocytes, have been shown to play a critical role in sustaining cartilage damage in arthritis by creating an imbalance between cartilage degradation and the repair process. Alpha-lipoic acid (α-LA), which is synthesized in animal and plant tissues, has demonstrated its protective effects in a variety of diseases. However, whether or not LA has a protective effect in OA is still unknown. In this study, we found that α-LA inhibits the IL-1β-induced increase in matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP-3) and matrix metallopeptidase 13 (MMP-13) expression and activity. Our data also demonstrate that interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) participates in the induction of MMP-3 and MMP-13. However, α-LA treatment did not change IRF-1 levels. Importantly, we found that α-LA increases SUMOylation of IRF-1, which attenuates IRF-1's transcriptional activity. Finally, we found that α-LA treatment leads to an increase in SUMO-1, but not in SUMO-2 or SUMO-3. Taken together, this study shows that α-LA exerts anti-inflammatory effects in an IL-1β-stimulated chondrocyte model, thereby suggesting a potential protective effect of α-LA in OA.

  3. Dynamic Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factor-1 association and dissociation regulate parathyroid hormone receptor trafficking at membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Juan A; Wang, Bin; Watkins, Simon C; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Friedman, Peter A

    2011-10-07

    Na/H exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF1) is a cytoplasmic PDZ (postsynaptic density 95/disc large/zona occludens) protein that assembles macromolecular complexes and determines the localization, trafficking, and signaling of select G protein-coupled receptors and other membrane-delimited proteins. The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR), which regulates mineral ion homeostasis and bone turnover, is a G protein-coupled receptor harboring a PDZ-binding motif that enables association with NHERF1 and tethering to the actin cytoskeleton. NHERF1 interactions with the PTHR modify its trafficking and signaling. Here, we characterized by live cell imaging the mechanism whereby NHERF1 coordinates the interactions of multiple proteins, as well as the fate of NHERF1 itself upon receptor activation. Upon PTHR stimulation, NHERF1 rapidly dissociates from the receptor and induces receptor aggregation in long lasting clusters that are enriched with the actin-binding protein ezrin and with clathrin. After NHERF1 dissociates from the PTHR, ezrin then directly interacts with the PTHR to stabilize the PTHR at the cell membrane. Recruitment of β-arrestins to the PTHR is delayed until NHERF1 dissociates from the receptor, which is then trafficked to clathrin for internalization. The ability of NHERF to interact dynamically with the PTHR and cognate adapter proteins regulates receptor trafficking and signaling in a spatially and temporally coordinated manner.

  4. Identification of an additional ferric-siderophore uptake gene clustered with receptor, biosynthesis, and fur-like regulatory genes in fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain M114.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, D J; Morris, J; O'Gara, F

    1990-01-01

    Five cosmid clones with insert sizes averaging 22.6 kilobases (kb) were isolated after complementation of 22 Tn5-induced Sid- mutants of Pseudomonas sp. strain M114. One of these plasmids (pMS639) was also shown to encode ferric-siderophore receptor and dissociation functions. The receptor gene was located on this plasmid since introduction of the plasmid into three wild-type fluorescent pseudomonads enabled them to utilize the ferric-siderophore from strain M114. The presence of an extra iron-regulated protein in the outer membrane profile of one of these strains was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A ferric-siderophore dissociation gene was attributed to pMS639 since it complemented the ferric-siderophore uptake mutation in strain M114FR2. This mutant was not defective in the outer membrane receptor for ferric-siderophore but apparently accumulated ferric-siderophore internally. Since ferric-citrate alleviated the iron stress of the mutant, there was no defect in iron metabolism subsequent to release of iron from the ferric-siderophore complex. Consequently, this mutant was defective in ferric-siderophore dissociation. A fur-like regulatory gene also present on pMS639 was subcloned to a 7.0-kb BglII insert of pCUP5 and was located approximately 7.3 kb from the receptor region. These results established that the 27.2-kb insert of pMS639 encoded at least two siderophore biosynthesis genes, ferric-siderophore receptor and dissociation genes, and a fur-like regulatory gene from the biocontrol fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain M114. Images PMID:2143887

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits tissue engineering cartilage absorption via inducing the generation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chichi; Bi, Wei; Gong, Yiming; Ding, Xiaojun; Guo, Xuehua; Sun, Jian; Cui, Lei; Yu, Youcheng

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the mechanisms of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 inhibiting the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. We transfected TGF-β1 gene into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and co-cultured with interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes. We then characterized the morphological changes, apoptosis and characterization of chondrogenic-committed cells from TGF-β1(+) BMMSCs and explored their mechanisms. Results showed that BMMSCs apoptosis and tissue engineering cartilage absorption in the group with added IFN-γ and TNF-α were greater than in the control group. In contrast, there was little BMMSC apoptosis and absorption by tissue engineering cartilage in the group with added CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes; Foxp3(+) T cells and CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells were found. In contrast, no type II collagen or Foxp3(+) T cells or CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells was found in the TGF-β1(-) BMMSC group. The data suggest that IFN-γ and TNF-α induced BMMSCs apoptosis and absorption of tissue engineering cartilage, but the newborn regulatory T (Treg) cells inhibited the function of IFN-γ and TNF-α and protected BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage. TGF-β1not only played a cartilage inductive role, but also inhibited the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. The pathway proposed in our study may simulate the actual reaction procedure after implantation of BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage in vivo.

  6. The EBV Latent Antigen 3C Inhibits Apoptosis through Targeted Regulation of Interferon Regulatory Factors 4 and 8

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Lu, Jie; Cai, Qiliang; Saha, Abhik; Jha, Hem Chandra; Dzeng, Richard Kuo; Robertson, Erle S.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is linked to a broad spectrum of B-cell malignancies. EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) is an encoded latent antigen required for growth transformation of primary human B-lymphocytes. Interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) and 8 (IRF8) are transcription factors of the IRF family that regulate diverse functions in B cell development. IRF4 is an oncoprotein with anti-apoptotic properties and IRF8 functions as a regulator of apoptosis and tumor suppressor in many hematopoietic malignancies. We now demonstrate that EBNA3C can contribute to B-cell transformation by modulating the molecular interplay between cellular IRF4 and IRF8. We show that EBNA3C physically interacts with IRF4 and IRF8 with its N-terminal domain in vitro and forms a molecular complex in cells. We identified the Spi-1/B motif of IRF4 as critical for EBNA3C interaction. We also demonstrated that EBNA3C can stabilize IRF4, which leads to downregulation of IRF8 by enhancing its proteasome-mediated degradation. Further, si-RNA mediated knock-down of endogenous IRF4 results in a substantial reduction in proliferation of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), as well as augmentation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. IRF4 knockdown also showed reduced expression of its targeted downstream signalling proteins which include CDK6, Cyclin B1 and c-Myc all critical for cell proliferation. These studies provide novel insights into the contribution of EBNA3C to EBV-mediated B-cell transformation through regulation of IRF4 and IRF8 and add another molecular link to the mechanisms by which EBV dysregulates cellular activities, increasing the potential for therapeutic intervention against EBV-associated cancers. PMID:23658517

  7. Combined QSAR-based virtual screening and fluorescence binding assay to identify natural product mediators of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 (IRF-7) in pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Huang, L; Ye, H; Lv, X

    2016-11-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7) is involved in pulmonary infection and pneumonia. Here, a synthetic strategy that combined quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR)-based virtual screening and in vitro binding assay was described to identify new and potent mediator ligands of IRF-7 from natural products. In the procedure, a QSAR scoring function was developed and validated using Gaussian process (GP) regression and a structure-based set of protein-ligand affinity data. By integrating hotspot pocket prediction, pharmacokinetics profile analysis and molecular docking calculations, the scoring function was successfully applied to virtual screening against a large library of structurally diverse, drug-like natural products. With the method we were able to identify a number of potential hits, from which several compounds were found to have moderate or high affinity to IRF-7 using fluorescence binding assays, with dissociation constants Kd at micromolar level. We have also examined the structural basis and noncovalent interactions of computationally modelled IRF-7 complex with its potent ligands. It is revealed that hydrophobic forces and van der Waals contacts play a central role in stabilization of the complex architecture, while few hydrogen bonds confer additional specificity for the protein-ligand recognition.

  8. Insulin resistance: an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tushar P; Rawal, Komal; Bagchi, Ashim K; Akolkar, Gauri; Bernardes, Nathalia; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Gupta, Sarita; Singal, Pawan K

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary life style and high calorie dietary habits are prominent leading cause of metabolic syndrome in modern world. Obesity plays a central role in occurrence of various diseases like hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, which lead to insulin resistance and metabolic derangements like cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mediated by oxidative stress. The mortality rate due to CVDs is on the rise in developing countries. Insulin resistance (IR) leads to micro or macro angiopathy, peripheral arterial dysfunction, hampered blood flow, hypertension, as well as the cardiomyocyte and the endothelial cell dysfunctions, thus increasing risk factors for coronary artery blockage, stroke and heart failure suggesting that there is a strong association between IR and CVDs. The plausible linkages between these two pathophysiological conditions are altered levels of insulin signaling proteins such as IR-β, IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, Glut4 and PGC-1α that hamper insulin-mediated glucose uptake as well as other functions of insulin in the cardiomyocytes and the endothelial cells of the heart. Reduced AMPK, PFK-2 and elevated levels of NADP(H)-dependent oxidases produced by activated M1 macrophages of the adipose tissue and elevated levels of circulating angiotensin are also cause of CVD in diabetes mellitus condition. Insulin sensitizers, angiotensin blockers, superoxide scavengers are used as therapeutics in the amelioration of CVD. It evidently becomes important to unravel the mechanisms of the association between IR and CVDs in order to formulate novel efficient drugs to treat patients suffering from insulin resistance-mediated cardiovascular diseases. The possible associations between insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases are reviewed here.

  9. The carboxy-terminal domains of erbB-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor exert different regulatory effects on intrinsic receptor tyrosine kinase function and transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Di Fiore, P P; Segatto, O; Lonardo, F; Fazioli, F; Pierce, J H; Aaronson, S A

    1990-01-01

    The erbB-2 gene product, gp185erbB-2, displays a potent transforming effect when overexpressed in NIH 3T3 cells. In addition, it possesses constitutively high levels of tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of exogenously added ligand. In this study, we demonstrate that its carboxy-terminal domain exerts an enhancing effect on erbB-2 kinase and transforming activities. A premature termination mutant of the erbB-2 protein, lacking the entire carboxy-terminal domain (erbB-2 delta 1050), showed a 40-fold reduction in transforming ability and a lowered in vivo kinase activity for intracellular substrates. When the carboxy-terminal domain of erbB-2 was substituted for its analogous region in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (EGFR/erbB-2COOH chimera), it conferred erbB-2-like properties to the EGFR, including transforming ability in the absence of epidermal growth factor, elevated constitutive autokinase activity in vivo and in vitro, and constitutive ability to phosphorylate phospholipase C-gamma. Conversely, a chimeric erbB-2 molecule bearing an EGFR carboxy-terminal domain (erbB-2/EGFRCOOH chimera) showed reduced transforming and kinase activity with respect to the wild-type erbB-2 and was only slightly more efficient than the erbB-2 delta 1050 mutant. Thus, we conclude that the carboxy-terminal domains of erbB-2 and EGFR exert different regulatory effects on receptor kinase function and biological activity. The up regulation of gp185erbB-2 enzymatic activity exerted by its carboxy-terminal domain can explain, at least in part, its constitutive level of kinase activity. Images PMID:2188097

  10. Infliximab therapy balances regulatory T cells, tumour necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) expression and soluble TNFR2 in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Verwoerd, A; Hijdra, D; Vorselaars, A D M; Crommelin, H A; van Moorsel, C H M; Grutters, J C; Claessen, A M E

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology that most commonly affects the lungs. Although elevated levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs ) have been reported, the extent to which they play a role in sarcoidosis pathogenesis remains unclear. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is thought to be one of the driving forces behind granuloma formation, illustrated by the efficacy of infliximab in severe sarcoidosis. Tregs express TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) highly. Here, we examined the influence of infliximab therapy on Tregs and (soluble) TNFR2 levels in sarcoidosis, and correlated these with response to therapy. We observed that relative frequencies of Tregs were significantly higher in patients (n = 54) compared to healthy controls (n = 26; median 6·73 versus 4·36%; P < 0·001) and decreased following therapy (4·95; P < 0·001). Baseline TNFR2 expression on Tregs was increased significantly in patients versus controls (99·4 versus 96·2%; P = 0·031), and also in responders to therapy versus non-responders (99·6 versus 97·3%; P = 0·012). Furthermore, baseline soluble TNFR2 (sTNFR2) was higher in responders than in non-responders (mean 174 versus 107 pg/ml; P = 0·015). After treatment, responders showed a significant reduction in sTNFR2 levels in peripheral blood (-44·7 pg/ml; P < 0·001), in contrast to non-responders (+3·59 pg/ml). Our results demonstrated that Treg frequencies and TNFR2 expression on Tregs are increased in sarcoidosis, followed by a decline during infliximab therapy, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this T cell subset. Interestingly, sTNFR2 levels at baseline differed significantly between responders and non-responders, making it a potential marker in predicting which patients might benefit from infliximab.

  11. Drug Transporters and Na+/H+ Exchange Regulatory Factor PSD-95/Drosophila Discs Large/ZO-1 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Dustin R.; Nolin, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Drug transporters govern the absorption, distribution, and elimination of pharmacologically active compounds. Members of the solute carrier and ATP binding-cassette drug transporter family mediate cellular drug uptake and efflux processes, thereby coordinating the vectorial movement of drugs across epithelial barriers. To exert their physiologic and pharmacological function in polarized epithelia, drug transporters must be targeted and stabilized to appropriate regions of the cell membrane (i.e., apical versus basolateral). Despite the critical importance of drug transporter membrane targeting, the mechanisms that underlie these processes are largely unknown. Several clinically significant drug transporters possess a recognition sequence that binds to PSD-95/Drosophila discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) proteins. PDZ proteins, such as the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF) family, act to stabilize and organize membrane targeting of multiple transmembrane proteins, including many clinically relevant drug transporters. These PDZ proteins are normally abundant at apical membranes, where they tether membrane-delimited transporters. NHERF expression is particularly high at the apical membrane in polarized tissue such as intestinal, hepatic, and renal epithelia, tissues important to drug disposition. Several recent studies have highlighted NHERF proteins as determinants of drug transporter function secondary to their role in controlling membrane abundance and localization. Mounting evidence strongly suggests that NHERF proteins may have clinically significant roles in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of several pharmacologically active compounds and may affect drug action in cancer and chronic kidney disease. For these reasons, NHERF proteins represent a novel class of post-translational mediators of drug transport and novel targets for new drug development. PMID:26092975

  12. LGP2 downregulates interferon production during infection with seasonal human influenza A viruses that activate interferon regulatory factor 3.

    PubMed

    Malur, Meghana; Gale, Michael; Krug, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    LGP2, a member of the RIG-I-like receptor family, lacks the amino-terminal caspase activation recruitment domains (CARDs) required for initiating the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and interferon (IFN) transcription. The role of LGP2 in virus infection is controversial, and the only LGP2 experiments previously carried out with mammalian influenza A viruses employed an attenuated, mouse-adapted H1N1 A/PR/8/34 (PR8) virus that does not encode the NS1 protein. Here we determine whether LGP2 has a role during infection with wild-type, nonattenuated influenza A viruses that have circulated in the human population, specifically two types of seasonal influenza A viruses: (i) H3N2 and H1N1 viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription and (ii) recent H1N1 viruses that block these two activations. In human cells infected with an H3N2 virus that activates IRF3, overexpression of LGP2 or its repressor domain decreased STAT1 activation and IFN-β transcription approximately 10-fold. Overexpression of LGP2 also caused a 10-fold decrease of STAT1 activation during infection with other seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3. Using LGP2(+/+) and LGP2(-/-) mouse cells, we show that endogenous LGP2 decreased IFN production during H3N2 virus infection 3- to 4-fold. In contrast, in both mouse and human cells infected with H1N1 viruses that do not activate IRF3, LGP2 had no detectable role. These results demonstrate that LGP2 downregulates IFN production during infection by seasonal influenza A viruses that activate IRF3 and IFN transcription. It is intriguing that LGP2, a host protein induced during influenza A virus infection, downregulates the host antiviral IFN response.

  13. Postnatal developmental expression of the PDZ scaffolds Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factors 1 and 2 in the rat cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Kanjhan, Refik; Hryciw, Deanne H.; Bellingham, Mark C.; Poronnik, Philip; Yun, C. Chris

    2006-01-01

    Sensory transduction in the mammalian cochlea requires the maintenance of specialized fluid compartments with distinct ionic compositions. This is achieved by the concerted action of diverse ion channels and transporters, some of which can interact with the PDZ scaffolds, Na+-H+ exchanger regulatory factors 1 and 2 (NHERF-1, NHERF-2). Here, we report that NHERF-1 and NHERF-2 are widely expressed in the rat cochlea, and that their expression is developmentally regulated. Reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting initially confirmed the RNA and protein expression of NHERFs. We then performed immunohistochemistry on cochlea during various stages of postnatal development. Prior to the onset of hearing (P8), NHERF-1 immunolabeling was prominently polarized to the apical membrane of cells lining the endolymphatic compartment, including the stereocilia and cuticular plates of the inner and outer hair cells, marginal cells of the stria vascularis, Reissner’s epithelia, and tectorial membrane. With maturation (P21, P70), NHERF-1 immunolabeling was reduced in the above structures, whereas labeling increased in the apical membrane of the interdental cells of the spiral limbus and the inner and outer sulcus cells, Hensen’s cells, the inner and outer pillar cells, Deiters cells, the inner border cells, spiral ligament fibrocytes, and spiral ganglion neurons (particularly type II). NHERF-1 expression in strial basal and intermediate cells was persistent. NHERF-2 immunolabeling was similar to that for NHERF-1 during postnatal development, with the exception of expression in the synaptic regions beneath the outer hair cells. NHERF-1 and NHERF-2 co-localized with glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin in glia. The cochlear localization of NHERF scaffolds suggests that they play important roles in the developmental regulation of ion transport, homeostasis, and auditory neurotransmission. PMID:16160858

  14. Conserved Gene Regulatory Function of the Carboxy-Terminal Domain of Dictyostelid C-Module-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Schmith, Anika; Groth, Marco; Ratka, Josephine; Gatz, Sara; Spaller, Thomas; Siol, Oliver; Glöckner, Gernot

    2013-01-01

    C-module-binding factor A (CbfA) is a jumonji-type transcription regulator that is important for maintaining the expression and mobility of the retrotransposable element TRE5-A in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. CbfA-deficient cells have lost TRE5-A retrotransposition, are impaired in the ability to feed on bacteria, and do not enter multicellular development because of a block in cell aggregation. In this study, we performed Illumina RNA-seq of growing CbfA mutant cells to obtain a list of CbfA-regulated genes. We demonstrate that the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA alone is sufficient to mediate most CbfA-dependent gene expression. The carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA from the distantly related social amoeba Polysphondylium pallidum restored the expression of CbfA-dependent genes in the D. discoideum CbfA mutant, indicating a deep conservation in the gene regulatory function of this domain in the dictyostelid clade. The CbfA-like protein CbfB displays ∼25% sequence identity with CbfA in the amino-terminal region, which contains a JmjC domain and two zinc finger regions and is thought to mediate chromatin-remodeling activity. In contrast to CbfA proteins, where the carboxy-terminal domains are strictly conserved in all dictyostelids, CbfB proteins have completely unrelated carboxy-terminal domains. Outside the dictyostelid clade, CbfA-like proteins with the CbfA-archetypical JmjC/zinc finger arrangement and individual carboxy-terminal domains are prominent in filamentous fungi but are not found in yeasts, plants, and metazoans. Our data suggest that two functional regions of the CbfA-like proteins evolved at different rates to allow the occurrence of species-specific adaptation processes during genome evolution. PMID:23355006

  15. Influence of parenteral administration routes and additional factors on vaccine safety and immunogenicity: a review of recent literature.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines have to be administered via an appropriate route, i.e. a route, which is optimal regarding safety, immunogenicity and practicability. In addition, there are factors, such as body site, needle length, injection technique, depth of injection, type of antigen, vaccine formulation, adjuvants, age, sex, race/ethnicity, body mass, and pre-existing immunity, which can have an impact on the reactogenicity and tolerability and/or on the immunogenicity of a given vaccine. For parenteral vaccine administration there are currently three routes licensed: intramuscular, subcutaneous and intradermal, either by using conventional hypodermic needles or by using alternative or needle-free injection devices. The factors potentially impacting on the 'performance' of a given route of administration, as reported in recent literature, are outlined and discussed in view of their importance. These factors need to be accounted and controlled for when designing vaccine studies and should be reported in a transparent and standardised way in publications.

  16. Molecular architecture of the regulatory Locus sae of Staphylococcus aureus and its impact on expression of virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Steinhuber, Andrea; Goerke, Christiane; Bayer, Manfred G; Döring, Gerd; Wolz, Christiane

    2003-11-01

    We characterized the sae operon, a global regulator for virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus. A Tn917 sae mutant was obtained by screening a Tn917 library of the agr mutant ISP479Mu for clones with altered hemolytic activity. Sequence analysis of the sae operon revealed two additional open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF3 and ORF4) upstream of the two-component regulatory genes saeR and saeS. Four overlapping sae-specific transcripts (T1 to T4) were detected by Northern blot analysis, and the transcriptional initiation points were mapped by primer extension analysis. The T1, T2, and T3 mRNAs are probably terminated at the same stem-loop sequence downstream of saeS. The T1 message (3.1 kb) initiates upstream of ORF4, T2 (2.4 kb) initiates upstream of ORF3, and T3 (2.0 kb) initiates in front of saeR. T4 (0.7 kb) represents a monocistronic mRNA encompassing ORF4 only. sae-specific transcripts were detectable in all of the 40 different clinical S. aureus isolates investigated. Transcript levels were at maximum during the post-exponential growth phase. The sae mutant showed a significantly reduced rate of invasion of human endothelial cells, consistent with diminished transcription and expression of fnbA. The expression of type 5 capsular polysaccharide is activated in the sae mutant of strain Newman, as shown by immunofluorescence and promoter-reporter fusion experiments. In summary, the sae operon constitutes a four-component regulator system which acts on virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  17. Sodium Benzoate, a Food Additive and a Metabolite of Cinnamon, Enriches Regulatory T Cells via STAT6-Mediated Upregulation of TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Madhuchhanda; Mondal, Susanta; Roy, Avik; Martinson, Jeffrey L; Pahan, Kalipada

    2016-10-15

    Upregulation and/or maintenance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during autoimmune insults may have therapeutic efficacy in autoimmune diseases. Earlier we have reported that sodium benzoate (NaB), a metabolite of cinnamon and a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug against urea cycle disorders, upregulates Tregs and protects mice from experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis. However, mechanisms by which NaB increases Tregs are poorly understood. Because TGF-β is an important inducer of Tregs, we examined the effect of NaB on the status of TGF-β. In this study, we demonstrated that NaB induced the expression of TGF-β mRNA and protein in normal as well as proteolipid protein-primed splenocytes. The presence of a consensus STAT6 binding site in the promoter of the TGF-β gene, activation of STAT6 in splenocytes by NaB, recruitment of STAT6 to the TGF-β promoter by NaB, and abrogation of NaB-induced expression of TGF-β in splenocytes by small interfering RNA knockdown of STAT6 suggest that NaB induces the expression of TGF-β via activation of STAT6. Furthermore, we demonstrated that blocking of TGF-β by neutralizing Abs abrogated NaB-mediated protection of Tregs and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. These studies identify a new function of NaB in upregulating TGF-β via activation of STAT6, which may be beneficial in MS patients.

  18. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis: regulatory roles of the cone-rod homeobox transcription factor in the rodent pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based induction of Aanat transcription. However, additional transcriptional control mechanisms exist. Homeobox genes, which are generally known to encode transcription factors controlling developmental processes, are also expressed in the mature rodent pineal gland. Among these, the cone-rod homeobox (CRX) transcription factor is believed to control pineal-specific Aanat expression. Based on recent advances in our understanding of Crx in the rodent pineal gland, we here suggest that homeobox genes play a role in adult pineal physiology both by ensuring pineal-specific Aanat expression and by facilitating cAMP response element-based circadian melatonin production.

  19. Regulatory roles of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta in monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-mediated pulmonary granuloma formation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Flory, C. M.; Jones, M. L.; Miller, B. F.; Warren, J. S.

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous infusion of particulate yeast cell wall glucan into rats results in the synchronous development of angiocentric pulmonary granulomas that are composed almost entirely of monocytes and macrophages. Previous studies indicate that locally produced monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is required for full granuloma development. Because tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 (IL-1) can induce MCP-1 production in a variety of cell types, we sought to determine their potential regulatory roles in this model. A single infusion of anti-TNF-alpha antibody at the time of glucan infusion (time 0) markedly reduced MCP-1 mRNA levels at 1 and 6 hours but not at later time points; there was no effect on granuloma size or number measured at 48 hours. When multiple infusions of anti-TNF-alpha antibody were administered over a 23-hour period (0 to 23 hours), MCP-1 mRNA was reduced through 24 hours, there was a significant reduction in peak bronchoalveolar lavage fluid MCP-1 activity at 48 hours, and there were marked reductions in granuloma size and number at 48 hours. Similar results were observed in animals that received infusions of anti-IL-1 beta. Infusion of anti-IL-1 beta at time 0 resulted in moderate reductions in MCP-1 mRNA at 1 and 6 hours and had no effect on granuloma size or number measured at 48 hours. When multiple infusions of anti-IL-1 beta were administered over a 23-hour period (0 to 23 hours), MCP-1 mRNA was reduced through 24 hours, there was a moderate reduction in peak bronchoalveolar lavage fluid MCP-1 activity at 48 hours, and there were marked reductions in granuloma size and number at 48 hours. A single infusion of anti-TNF-alpha and anti-IL-1 beta together at time 0 resulted in marked reductions in whole lung MCP-1 and mRNA at 1 and 6 hours, but not at 24 hours. Multiple combined infusions of anti-TNF-alpha and anti-IL-1 beta over a 23-hour period resulted in additive reductions in MCP-1 mRNA through 24 hours

  20. Additive effects of microRNAs and transcription factors on CCL2 production in human white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Kulyté, Agné; Belarbi, Yasmina; Lorente-Cebrián, Silvia; Bambace, Clara; Arner, Erik; Daub, Carsten O; Hedén, Per; Rydén, Mikael; Mejhert, Niklas; Arner, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation is present in insulin-resistant conditions. We recently proposed a network of microRNAs (miRNAs) and transcription factors (TFs) regulating the production of the proinflammatory chemokine (C-C motif) ligand-2 (CCL2) in adipose tissue. We presently extended and further validated this network and investigated if the circuits controlling CCL2 can interact in human adipocytes and macrophages. The updated subnetwork predicted that miR-126/-193b/-92a control CCL2 production by several TFs, including v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (avian) (ETS1), MYC-associated factor X (MAX), and specificity protein 12 (SP1). This was confirmed in human adipocytes by the observation that gene silencing of ETS1, MAX, or SP1 attenuated CCL2 production. Combined gene silencing of ETS1 and MAX resulted in an additive reduction in CCL2 production. Moreover, overexpression of miR-126/-193b/-92a in different pairwise combinations reduced CCL2 secretion more efficiently than either miRNA alone. However, although effects on CCL2 secretion by co-overexpression of miR-92a/-193b and miR-92a/-126 were additive in adipocytes, the combination of miR-126/-193b was primarily additive in macrophages. Signals for miR-92a and -193b converged on the nuclear factor-κB pathway. In conclusion, TF and miRNA-mediated regulation of CCL2 production is additive and partly relayed by cell-specific networks in human adipose tissue that may be important for the development of insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes.

  1. Effect on the healing of periapical perforations in dogs of the addition of growth factors to calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, M; Kim, B; Yoon, S

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of platelet-derived growth factor-BB and insulin-like growth factor-I to calcium hydroxide in the repair of apical perforations in dogs. Fifty-one premolar teeth of four beagle dogs were used. After developing periapical lesions root apices were artificially perforated. The teeth were divided into the three groups: group 1, the apical perforations were not sealed; group 2, the perforated areas were obturated with calcium hydroxide; and group 3, calcium hydroxide plus growth factors was applied to the sites of perforation. All canals were filled by a lateral condensation technique. Animals were killed 12 wk later, and sections were hematoxylin & eosin-stained and immunostained for osteonectin. The amount of inflammation was evaluated histomorphologically. The one-way ANOVA test demonstrated that the three groups were significantly different from one another. In group 3 there was no inflammatory reaction of apical tissue, and the connective tissue adjacent to the newly formed hard tissue was strongly immunostained for osteonectin. Most sections in group 1 showed no apical healing. Moderate healing was found in group 2. In conclusion the combination of platelet-derived growth factor-BB and insulin-like growth factor-I with calcium hydroxide improved healing of apical perforation in dogs.

  2. Two additional human serum proteins structurally related to complement factor H: Evidence for a family of factor H-related genes

    SciTech Connect

    Skerka, C.; Timmann, C.; Horstmann, R.D. ); Zipfel, P.F.

    1992-05-15

    The authors identify and characterize two human serum proteins with an apparent molecular mass of 24 and 29 kDa, which are antigenically related to complement factor H. These proteins represent differently glycosylated forms and are encoded by the same mRNA. The corresponding cDNA clone is 1051 bp in size and hybridized to a 1.4-kb mRNA derived from human liver. The predicted translation product represents a protein of 270 amino acids, which displays a hydrophobic leader sequence, indicative of a secreted protein. The secreted part is organized in four short consensus repeats (SCR) and has a single putative N-linked glycosylation site. The predicted sequence is closely related to that of the previously described factor H-related proteins h37 and h42, which are also derived from a 1.4-kb mRNA. Amino acid comparison of these factor H-related proteins showed identical leader sequences, an exchange of three amino acids in SCR1, identical sequences of SCR2, and a lower degree of homology between SCR3-4 (h24 and h29) and SCR4-5 (h37 and h42). In addition, SCR3-4 of h24 and h29 display homology to SCR19-20 of human complement factor H. The relatedness of structural elements of the factor H-related proteins h24, h29, h37, and h42 and of factor H, suggests a function common to these proteins and indicates the existence of a gene family consisting of factor H and at least two factor H-related genes. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. TCDD Induces the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF)-1α Regulatory Pathway in Human Trophoblastic JAR Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tien-Ling; Chen, Su-Chee; Tzeng, Chii-Reuy; Kao, Shu-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The exposure to dioxin can compromise pregnancy outcomes and increase the risk of preterm births. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been demonstrated to induce placental hypoxia at the end of pregnancy in a rat model, and hypoxia has been suggested to be the cause of abnormal trophoblast differentiation and placental insufficiency syndromes. In this study, we demonstrate that the non-hypoxic stimulation of human trophoblastic cells by TCDD strongly increased hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) stabilization. TCDD exposure induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide. TCDD-induced HIF-1α stabilization and Akt phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor) or N-acetylcysteine (a ROS scavenger). The augmented HIF-1α stabilization by TCDD occurred via the ROS-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Additionally, a significant increase in invasion and metallomatrix protease-9 activity was found in TCDD-treated cells. The gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor was induced upon TCDD stimulation, whereas the protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), PPARγ coactivator-1α, mitochondrial transcription factor, and uncoupling protein 2 were decreased. Our results indicate that an activated HIF-1α pathway, elicited oxidative stress, and induced metabolic stress contribute to TCDD-induced trophoblastic toxicity. These findings may provide molecular insight into the TCDD-induced impairment of trophoblast function and placental development. PMID:25272228

  4. Sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 expression and genetic polymorphism significantly affect intramuscular fat deposition in the longissimus muscle of Erhualian and Sutai pigs.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Yang, X J; Xia, D; Chen, J; Wegner, J; Jiang, Z; Zhao, R Q

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were performed to elucidate the role of sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1) in i.m. fat (IMF) deposition in pigs. In Exp. 1, LM samples were removed from 4 male and 4 female Erhualian piglets at 3, 20, and 45 d of age, and SREBF1 mRNA expression level and IMF content were measured. Intramuscular fat content and expression of SREBF1 mRNA was greater (P < 0.05) in females than males at all 3 stages of age, providing initial evidence that the level of SREBF1 mRNA expression is related to IMF deposition in muscle of suckling pigs. Additionally, in Exp. 2 there was a positive correlation between the SREBF1 mRNA level and IMF content (r = 0.67, P < 0.01) in 100 Sutai finishing pigs, a synthetic line produced by crossing Erhualian and Duroc pigs. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the reverse transcription PCR products of the SREBF1 gene revealed 3 genotypes in Sutai pigs with frequencies of 50% for AA, 36% for AB, and 14% for BB, respectively. Both SREBF1 mRNA level and IMF content in muscle were greater (P < 0.05) in AB and BB animals than in AA animals, whereas no difference in backfat thickness was observed among the 3 genotypes. Sequencing analysis identified 2 SNP at T1006C and C1033T within the open reading frame of the SREBF1 gene (NM_214157). Although both are silent mutations, they affected the secondary structure of SREBF1 mRNA. These results suggest that SREBF1 might play an important role in regulation of muscle fat deposition during postnatal growth of pigs. The SNP identified in the SREBF1 gene suggest that it could be used as a genetic marker to improve IMF content in pigs.

  5. Cloning and expression analyses of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and 7 genes in European eel, Anguilla anguilla with the identification of genes involved in IFN production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bei; Huang, Wen Shu; Nie, P

    2014-04-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7 have been identified as regulators of type I interferon (IFN) gene expression in mammals. In the present study, the two genes were cloned and characterized in the European eel, Anguilla anguilla. The full-length cDNA sequence of IRF3 and IRF7 in the European eel, named as AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 consists of 2879 and 2419 bp respectively. Multiple alignments showed that the two IRFs have a highly conserved DNA binding domain (DBD) in the N terminus, with the characteristic motif containing five tryptophan residues, which is a feature present in their mammalian homologues. But, IRF7 has only four of the five residues in other species of fish. The expression of AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 both displayed an obvious dose-dependent manner following polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) challenge. In vivo expression analysis showed that the mRNA level of AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 was significantly up-regulated in response to PolyI:C stimulation in all examined tissues/organs except in muscle, with a lower level of increase observed in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and Edwardsiella tarda infection, indicating that AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 may be more likely involved in antiviral immune response. In addition, some pattern recognition receptors genes related with the production of type I IFNs and those genes in response to type I IFNs were identified in the European eel genome database, indicating a relatively conserved system in the production of type I IFN and its signalling in the European eel.

  6. FoxO1 inhibits sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) gene expression via transcription factors Sp1 and SREBP-1c.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiong; Zhang, Wenwei; O-Sullivan, InSug; Williams, J Bradley; Dong, Qingming; Park, Edwards A; Raghow, Rajendra; Unterman, Terry G; Elam, Marshall B

    2012-06-08

    Induction of lipogenesis in response to insulin is critically dependent on the transcription factor, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). FoxO1, a forkhead box class-O transcription factor, is an important mediator of insulin action, but its role in the regulation of lipid metabolism has not been clearly defined. We examined the effects of FoxO1 on srebp1 gene expression in vivo and in vitro. In vivo studies showed that constitutively active (CA) FoxO1 (CA-FoxO1) reduced basal expression of SREBP-1c mRNA in liver by ∼60% and blunted induction of SREBP-1c in response to feeding. In liver-specific FoxO knock-out mice, SREBP-1c expression was increased ∼2-fold. Similarly, in primary hepatocytes, CA-FoxO1 suppressed SREBP1-c expression and inhibited basal and insulin-induced SREBP-1c promoter activity. SREBP-1c gene expression is induced by the liver X receptor (LXR), but CA-FoxO1 did not block the activation of SREBP-1c by the LXR agonist TO9. Insulin stimulates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1 and via "feed forward" regulation by newly synthesized SREBP-1c. CA-FoxO1 inhibited SREBP-1c by reducing the transactivational capacity of both Sp1 and SREBP-1c. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that FoxO1 can associate with the proximal promoter region of the srebp1 gene and disrupt the assembly of key components of the transcriptional complex of the SREBP-1c promoter. We conclude that FoxO1 inhibits SREBP-1c transcription via combined actions on multiple transcription factors and that this effect is exerted at least in part through reduced transcriptional activity of Sp1 and SREBP-1c and disrupted assembly of the transcriptional initiation complex on the SREBP-1c promoter.

  7. Regulatory skill as a resilience factor for adults with a history of foster care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Angela J; Tottenham, Nim

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of foster care (FC) are at elevated risk for emotion regulation-related mental illness. The purpose of the current study was to characterize regulatory function in a group of adults with a history of FC (N = 26) relative to those without a history of FC (N = 27) and how regulatory function moderates adverse caregiving-related outcomes (daily cortisol production and trait anxiety). Self-report items (anxiety, emotion regulation strategies, inhibitory control, caregiving history) were collected along with more objective measures (computerized task and salivary cortisol). Inhibitory control was assessed via self-report and a computerized task (emotional face go/nogo). Results showed that for adults with a history of FC, higher levels of inhibitory control were associated with higher accuracy on the emotional face go/nogo task and greater reported use of the emotion regulation strategy cognitive reappraisal. Greater use of cognitive reappraisal in turn was associated with healthier stress-related outcomes (decreased trait anxiety and steeper sloped cortisol production throughout the day). Dose-response associations were observed between self-reported regulatory skills and FC experiences (i.e., number of placements and age when exited foster care). These findings suggest that adverse caregiving can have long-term influences on mental health that extend into adulthood; however, individual differences in regulatory skills moderate these outcomes and may be an important target for intervention following caregiving adversity.

  8. Regulatory use of computational toxicology tools and databases at the United States Food and Drug Administration's Office of Food Additive Safety.

    PubMed

    Arvidson, Kirk B; Chanderbhan, Ronald; Muldoon-Jacobs, Kristi; Mayer, Julie; Ogungbesan, Adejoke

    2010-07-01

    Over 10 years ago, the Office of Food Additive Safety (OFAS) in the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition implemented the formal use of structure-activity relationship analysis and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis in the premarket review of food-contact substances. More recently, OFAS has implemented the use of multiple QSAR software packages and has begun investigating the use of metabolism data and metabolism predictive models in our QSAR evaluations of food-contact substances. In this article, we provide an overview of the programs used in OFAS as well as a perspective on how to apply multiple QSAR tools in the review process of a new food-contact substance.

  9. Adiponectin Provides Additional Information to Conventional Cardiovascular Risk Factors for Assessing the Risk of Atherosclerosis in Both Genders

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Kim, Sung-Kyung; Choi, Ho-June; Choi, Soo-In; Cha, So-Youn; Koh, Sang-Baek

    2013-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the relation between adiponectin and atherosclerosis in both genders, and investigated whether adiponectin provides useful additional information for assessing the risk of atherosclerosis. Methods We measured serum adiponectin levels and other cardiovascular risk factors in 1033 subjects (454 men, 579 women) from the Korean Genomic Rural Cohort study. Carotid intima–media-thickness (CIMT) was used as measure of atherosclerosis. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using multiple logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC), the category-free net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were calculated. Results After adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors, such as age, waist circumference, smoking history, low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure and insulin resistance, the ORs (95%CI) of the third tertile adiponectin group were 0.42 (0.25–0.72) in men and 0.47 (0.29–0.75) in women. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC analysis increased significantly by 0.025 in men and 0.022 in women when adiponectin was added to the logistic model of conventional cardiovascular risk factors (AUC in men: 0.655 to 0.680, p = 0.038; AUC in women: 0.654 to 0.676, p = 0.041). The NRI was 0.32 (95%CI: 0.13–0.50, p<0.001), and the IDI was 0.03 (95%CI: 0.01–0.04, p<0.001) for men. For women, the category-free NRI was 0.18 (95%CI: 0.02–0.34, p = 0.031) and the IDI was 0.003 (95%CI: −0.002–0.008, p = 0.189). Conclusion Adiponectin and atherosclerosis were significantly related in both genders, and these relationships were independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Furthermore, adiponectin provided additional information to conventional cardiovascular risk factors regarding the risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:24116054

  10. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  11. Inhibition by antioxidants of nitric oxide synthase expression in murine macrophages: role of nuclear factor kappa B and interferon regulatory factor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, M.; Preiss, C.; Klemm, P.; Busse, R.

    1996-01-01

    1. In view of the potential deleterious effects of high amounts of nitric oxide (NO) produced by the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS) in inflammation, the prevention of the expression of this enzyme represents an important therapeutic goal. In cytokine-stimulated cells, activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) is crucial for the increase in iNOS gene expression. Since NF-kappa B activation appears to involve a redox-sensitive step, we have investigated whether three structurally unrelated antioxidants, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin), 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin (DCI) and N-acetyl 5-hydroxytryptamine (N-acetylserotonin, NAS), affect iNOS expression in cultured RAW 264.7 monocyte/macrophages stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 140 ng ml-1) and interferon-gamma (IFN gamma, 5 u ml-1). 2. During a 6 h incubation period neither LPS nor IFN gamma alone exerted a significant effect but when combined, caused a prominent increase in nitrite formation, iNOS mRNA and protein abundance. Co-incubation with chrysin (50 microM), DCI (50 microM) or NAS (1 mM) markedly attenuated this increase in iNOS gene expression. 3. DCI, but not chrysin or NAS, prevented the activation of NF-kappa B in cells exposed to LPS plus IFN gamma for 30 min. In contrast, all three antioxidants significantly blunted the DNA-binding activity of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), which mediates the synergistic effect of IFN gamma on iNOS gene expression in cells treated for 2 h with LPS plus IFN gamma. 4. DCI thus appears to inhibit iNOS gene expression at the transcriptional level by preventing the activation of both NF-kappa B and IRF-1. The inhibitory effect of DCI on NF-kappa B activation, however, does not seem to be related to its antioxidative properties, since DCI, unlike chrysin or NAS, is a potent serine protease inhibitor which stabilizes the inactive NF-kappa B complex by protecting the inhibitory I kappa B-alpha subunit from proteolytic degradation. 5. The

  12. Working with Policy and Regulatory Factors to Implement Universal Design in the Built Environment: The Australian Experience.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Helen; Hitch, Danielle; Watchorn, Valerie; Ang, Susan

    2015-07-15

    Built environments that are usable by all provide opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. However, enabling them in day to day design processes and practice is problematic for relevant professions. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain greater understanding of the policy and regulatory influences that promote or hinder the uptake of universal design in built environments, to inform better future design. Focus groups or telephone interviews were undertaken with 28 key building industry and disability stakeholders in Australia. Four themes were identified: the difficulties of definition; the push or pull of regulations and policy; the role of formal standards; and, shifting the focus of design thinking. The findings highlight the complexity of working within policy and regulatory contexts when implementing universal design. Occupational therapists working with colleagues from other professions must be aware of these influences, and develop the skills to work with them for successful practice.

  13. Working with Policy and Regulatory Factors to Implement Universal Design in the Built Environment: The Australian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Helen; Hitch, Danielle; Watchorn, Valerie; Ang, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Built environments that are usable by all provide opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. However, enabling them in day to day design processes and practice is problematic for relevant professions. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain greater understanding of the policy and regulatory influences that promote or hinder the uptake of universal design in built environments, to inform better future design. Focus groups or telephone interviews were undertaken with 28 key building industry and disability stakeholders in Australia. Four themes were identified: the difficulties of definition; the push or pull of regulations and policy; the role of formal standards; and, shifting the focus of design thinking. The findings highlight the complexity of working within policy and regulatory contexts when implementing universal design. Occupational therapists working with colleagues from other professions must be aware of these influences, and develop the skills to work with them for successful practice. PMID:26184278

  14. Influence of the experimental design of gene expression studies on the inference of gene regulatory networks: environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The inference of gene regulatory networks gained within recent years a considerable interest in the biology and biomedical community. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence that environmental conditions can exhibit on the inference performance of network inference algorithms. Specifically, we study five network inference methods, Aracne, BC3NET, CLR, C3NET and MRNET, and compare the results for three different conditions: (I) observational gene expression data: normal environmental condition, (II) interventional gene expression data: growth in rich media, (III) interventional gene expression data: normal environmental condition interrupted by a positive spike-in stimulation. Overall, we find that different statistical inference methods lead to comparable, but condition-specific results. Further, our results suggest that non-steady-state data enhance the inferability of regulatory networks.

  15. Functional footprinting of regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vierstra, Jeff; Reik, Andreas; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Zhou, Yuan-Yue; Hinkley, Sarah J.; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, L.; Psatha, Nikoletta; Bendana, Yuri R.; O'Neill, Colleen M.; Song, Alex H.; Mich, Andrea; Liu, Pei-Qi; Lee, Gary; Bauer, Daniel E.; Holmes, Michael C.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory regions harbor multiple transcription factor recognition sites; however, the contribution of individual sites to regulatory function remains challenging to define. We describe a facile approach that exploits the error-prone nature of genome editing-induced double-strand break repair to map functional elements within regulatory DNA at nucleotide resolution. We demonstrate the approach on a human erythroid enhancer, revealing single TF recognition sites that gate the majority of downstream regulatory function. PMID:26322838

  16. Regulatory Skill as a Resilience Factor for Adults With a History of Foster Care: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Angela J; Tottenham, Nim

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of foster care (FC) are at elevated risk for emotion regulation-related mental illness. The purpose of the current study was to characterize regulatory function in a group of adults with a history of FC (N = 26) relative to those without a history of FC (N = 27) and how regulatory function moderates adverse caregiving-related outcomes (daily cortisol production and trait anxiety). Self-report items (anxiety, emotion regulation strategies, inhibitory control, caregiving history) were collected along with more objective measures (computerized task and salivary cortisol). Inhibitory control was assessed via self-report and a computerized task (emotional face go/nogo). Results showed that for adults with a history of FC, higher levels of inhibitory control were associated with higher accuracy on the emotional face go/nogo task and greater reported use of the emotion regulation strategy cognitive reappraisal. Greater use of cognitive reappraisal in turn was associated with healthier stress-related outcomes (decreased trait anxiety and steeper sloped cortisol production throughout the day). Dose-response associations were observed between self-reported regulatory skills and FC experiences (i.e., number of placements and age when exited foster care). These findings suggest that adverse caregiving can have long-term influences on mental health that extend into adulthood; however, individual differences in regulatory skills moderate these outcomes and may be an important target for intervention following caregiving adversity. © 2014 The Authors. Developmental Psychobiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 57: 1–16, 2015. PMID:25270099

  17. Phenotype and function of B cells and dendritic cells from interferon regulatory factor 5-deficient mice with and without a mutation in DOCK2

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5-deficient (IRF5 −/−) mice have been used for many studies of IRF5 biology. A recent report identifies a mutation in dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) as being responsible for the abnormal B-cell development phenotype observed in the IRF5 −/− line. Both dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) and IRF5 play important roles in immune cell function, raising the issue of whether immune effects previously associated with IRF5 are due to IRF5 or DOCK2. Here, we defined the insertion end-point of the DOCK2 mutation and designed a novel PCR to detect the mutation in genomic DNA. We confirmed the association of the DOCK2 mutation and the abnormal B-cell phenotype in our IRF5 −/− line and also established another IRF5 −/− line without the DOCK2 mutation. These two lines were used to compare the role of IRF5 in dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells in the presence or absence of the DOCK2 mutation. IRF5 deficiency reduces IFN-α, IFN-β and IL-6 production by Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)- and TLR7-stimulated DCs and reduces TLR7- and TLR9-induced IL-6 production by B cells to a similar extent in the two lines. Importantly however, IRF5 −/− mice with the DOCK2 mutation have higher serum levels of IgG1 and lower levels of IgG2b, IgG2a/c and IgG3 than IRF5 −/− mice without the DOCK2 mutation, suggesting that the DOCK2 mutation confers additional Th2-type effects. Overall, these studies help clarify the function of IRF5 in B cells and DCs in the absence of the DOCK2 mutation. In addition, the PCR described will be useful for other investigators using the IRF5−/− mouse line. PMID:23291967

  18. A mammary cell-specific enhancer in mouse mammary tumor virus DNA is composed of multiple regulatory elements including binding sites for CTF/NFI and a novel transcription factor, mammary cell-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, S; Härtig, E; Jennewein, P; Doppler, W; Cato, A C

    1992-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a milk-transmitted retrovirus involved in the neoplastic transformation of mouse mammary gland cells. The expression of this virus is regulated by mammary cell type-specific factors, steroid hormones, and polypeptide growth factors. Sequences for mammary cell-specific expression are located in an enhancer element in the extreme 5' end of the long terminal repeat region of this virus. This enhancer, when cloned in front of the herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter, endows the promoter with mammary cell-specific response. Using functional and DNA-protein-binding studies with constructs mutated in the MMTV long terminal repeat enhancer, we have identified two main regulatory elements necessary for the mammary cell-specific response. These elements consist of binding sites for a transcription factor in the family of CTF/NFI proteins and the transcription factor mammary cell-activating factor (MAF) that recognizes the sequence G Pu Pu G C/G A A G G/T. Combinations of CTF/NFI- and MAF-binding sites or multiple copies of either one of these binding sites but not solitary binding sites mediate mammary cell-specific expression. The functional activities of these two regulatory elements are enhanced by another factor that binds to the core sequence ACAAAG. Interdigitated binding sites for CTF/NFI, MAF, and/or the ACAAAG factor are also found in the 5' upstream regions of genes encoding whey milk proteins from different species. These findings suggest that mammary cell-specific regulation is achieved by a concerted action of factors binding to multiple regulatory sites. Images PMID:1328867

  19. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Two-Component Regulator CarSR Regulates Calcium Homeostasis and Calcium-Induced Virulence Factor Production through Its Regulatory Targets CarO and CarP

    PubMed Central

    Guragain, Manita; King, Michelle M.; Williamson, Kerry S.; Pérez-Osorio, Ailyn C.; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Khanam, Sharmily

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that causes severe, life-threatening infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), endocarditis, wounds, or artificial implants. During CF pulmonary infections, P. aeruginosa often encounters environments where the levels of calcium (Ca2+) are elevated. Previously, we showed that P. aeruginosa responds to externally added Ca2+ through enhanced biofilm formation, increased production of several secreted virulence factors, and by developing a transient increase in the intracellular Ca2+ level, followed by its removal to the basal submicromolar level. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for regulating Ca2+-induced virulence factor production and Ca2+ homeostasis are not known. Here, we characterized the genome-wide transcriptional response of P. aeruginosa to elevated [Ca2+] in both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Among the genes induced by CaCl2 in strain PAO1 was an operon containing the two-component regulator PA2656-PA2657 (here called carS and carR), while the closely related two-component regulators phoPQ and pmrAB were repressed by CaCl2 addition. To identify the regulatory targets of CarSR, we constructed a deletion mutant of carR and performed transcriptome analysis of the mutant strain at low and high [Ca2+]. Among the genes regulated by CarSR in response to CaCl2 are the predicted periplasmic OB-fold protein, PA0320 (here called carO), and the inner membrane-anchored five-bladed β-propeller protein, PA0327 (here called carP). Mutations in both carO and carP affected Ca2+ homeostasis, reducing the ability of P. aeruginosa to export excess Ca2+. In addition, a mutation in carP had a pleotropic effect in a Ca2+-dependent manner, altering swarming motility, pyocyanin production, and tobramycin sensitivity. Overall, the results indicate that the two-component system CarSR is responsible for sensing high levels of external Ca2+ and responding through its regulatory targets that

  20. Regulatory approaches to obesity prevention: A systematic overview of current laws addressing diet-related risk factors in the European Union and the United States.

    PubMed

    Sisnowski, Jana; Handsley, Elizabeth; Street, Jackie M

    2015-06-01

    High prevalence of overweight and obesity remains a significant international public health problem. Law has been identified as a tool for obesity prevention and selected high-profile measures have been reported. However, the nature and extent of enacted legislation internationally are unclear. This research provides an overview of regulatory approaches enacted in the United States, the European Union, and EU Member States since 2004. To this end, relevant databases of primary and secondary legislation were systematically searched to identify and explore laws addressing dietary risk factors for obesity. Across jurisdictions, current regulatory approaches to obesity prevention are limited in reach and scope. Target groups are rarely the general population, but instead sub-populations in government-supported settings. Consumer information provision is preferred over taxation and marketing restrictions other than the regulation of health and nutrition claims. In the EU in particular, product reformulation with industry consent has also emerged as a popular small-scale measure. While consistent and widespread use of law is lacking, governments have employed a range of regulatory measures in the name of obesity prevention, indicating that there is, in principle, political will. Results from this study may serve as a starting point for future research and policy development.

  1. “Pressured to prescribe” The impact of economic and regulatory factors on South-Eastern ED physicians when managing the drug seeking patient

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sharon; Johnson, Giffe T.; Harbison, Raymond D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to elicit the opinions of Emergency Department (ED) physicians, currently practicing in the United States, regarding the impact of economic and regulatory factors on their management of patients exhibiting “drug seeking” behavior. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study, utilizing a convenience sample of ED physicians located in Florida and Georgia was conducted for a period of 2 months. The inclusion criteria specified that any ED physician, currently practicing within the United States, could participate. Results: Of the ED physicians surveyed (n = 141), 71% reported a perceived pressure to prescribe opioid analgesics to avoid administrative and regulatory criticism and 98% related patient satisfaction scores as being too highly emphasized by reimbursement entities as a means of evaluating their patient management. Rising patient volumes and changes in the healthcare climate were cited by ED physicians as impacting their management of patients exhibiting “drug seeking” behavior. Conclusions: The ED physician faces unique challenges in changing healthcare and economic climates. Requirements to address pain as the “fifth vital sign,” patient satisfaction based reimbursement metrics and an economically driven rise in ED patient volume, may have inadvertently created an environment conducive to exploitation by prescription opioid abusers. There is an identified need for the development of continuing medical education and standardized regulatory and legislative protocols to assist ED physicians in the appropriate management of patients exhibiting “drug seeking” behavior. PMID:27162437

  2. The isolation and characterization of growth regulatory factors produced by a herpes simplex virus Type 2 transformed mouse tumor cell line, H238

    SciTech Connect

    Stagg, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    This study was performed in an attempt to associate HSV-2-transformation with specific growth factors in order to develop a testable model for HSV-2-transformation. We report here the isolation and characterization of four growth regulatory factors produced by H238, an HSV-2-transformed mouse tumor cell line. These factors were separated from the H238-CM by heparin-sepharose affinity chromatography into three peaks of mitogenic activity and a fourth containing inhibitory activity for splenocytes. The three peaks of mitogenic activity have been identified based on physiochemical characteristics: the first supported the anchorage-independent growth of EGF treated NRK-c-49 cells and resembles transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}); the second bound to lectin-coated sepharose beads and was sensitive to trypsin, neuroaminidase, and the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) and, resembled a platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-like factor; and the third displaced ({sup 125}I)-labeled basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in a dose-dependent fashion when tested with a radioimmune assay. The fourth peak was inhibitory for a variety of splenocyte function assays. A model for the interaction of these factors in vivo is presented with an emphasis on testability.

  3. Epithelial Expression of Human ABO Blood Group Genes Is Dependent upon a Downstream Regulatory Element Functioning through an Epithelial Cell-specific Transcription Factor, Elf5.

    PubMed

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Kubo, Rieko; Kobayashi, Momoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Takeshita, Haruo; Ogasawara, Kenichi; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-21

    The human ABO blood group system is of great importance in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO system is composed of complex carbohydrate structures that are biosynthesized by A- and B-transferases encoded by the ABO gene. However, the mechanisms regulating ABO gene expression in epithelial cells remain obscure. On the basis of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in and around ABO in epithelial cells, we prepared reporter plasmid constructs including these sites. Subsequent luciferase assays and histone modifications indicated a novel positive regulatory element, designated the +22.6-kb site, downstream from ABO, and this was shown to enhance ABO promoter activity in an epithelial cell-specific manner. Expression of ABO and B-antigen was reduced in gastric cancer KATOIII cells by biallelic deletion of the +22.6-kb site using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the site bound to an epithelial cell-specific transcription factor, Elf5. Mutation of the Ets binding motifs to abrogate binding of this factor reduced the regulatory activity of the +22.6-kb site. Furthermore, ELF5 knockdown with shRNA reduced both endogenous transcription from ABO and B-antigen expression in KATOIII cells. Thus, Elf5 appeared to be involved in the enhancer potential of the +22.6-kb site. These results support the contention that ABO expression is dependent upon a downstream positive regulatory element functioning through a tissue-restricted transcription factor, Elf5, in epithelial cells.

  4. The Addition of Vascular Calcification Scores to Traditional Risk Factors Improves Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diouf, Momar; Temmar, Mohamed; Renard, Cédric; Choukroun, Gabriel; Massy, Ziad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although a variety of non-invasive methods for measuring cardiovascular (CV) risk (such as carotid intima media thickness, pulse wave velocity (PWV), coronary artery and aortic calcification scores (measured either by CT scan or X-ray) and the ankle brachial index (ABI)) have been evaluated separately in chronic kidney disease (CKD) cohorts, few studies have evaluated these methods simultaneously. Here, we looked at whether the addition of non-invasive methods to traditional risk factors (TRFs) improves prediction of the CV risk in patients at different CKD stages. Methods We performed a prospective, observational study of the relationship between the outputs of non-invasive measurement methods on one hand and mortality and CV outcomes in 143 patients at different CKD stages on the other. During the follow-up period, 44 patients died and 30 CV events were recorded. We used Cox models to calculate the relative risk for outcomes. To assess the putative clinical value of each method, we also determined the categorical net reclassification improvement (NRI) and the integrated discrimination improvement. Results Vascular calcification, PWV and ABI predicted all-cause mortality and CV events in univariate analyses. However, after adjustment for TRFs, only aortic and coronary artery calcification scores were found to be significant, independent variables. Moreover, the addition of coronary artery calcification scores to TRFs improved the specificity of prediction by 20%. Conclusion The addition of vascular calcification scores (especially the coronary artery calcification score) to TRFs appears to improve CV risk assessment in a CKD population. PMID:26181592

  5. IL-36γ signaling controls the induced regulatory T cell-Th9 cell balance via NFκB activation and STAT transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Harusato, A; Abo, H; Ngo, V L; Yi, S W; Mitsutake, K; Osuka, S; Kohlmeier, J E; Li, J D; Gewirtz, A T; Nusrat, A; Denning, T L

    2017-03-22

    Regulatory and effector T helper (Th) cells are abundant at mucosal surfaces, especially in the intestine, where they control the critical balance between tolerance and inflammation. However, the key factors that reciprocally dictate differentiation along these specific lineages remain incompletely understood. Here we report that the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family member IL-36γ signals through IL-36 receptor, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, and nuclear factor-κBp50 in CD4(+) T cells to potently inhibit Foxp3-expressing induced regulatory T cell (Treg) development, while concomitantly promoting the differentiation of Th9 cells via a IL-2-STAT5- (signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 5) and IL-4-STAT6-dependent pathway. Consistent with these findings, mice deficient in IL-36γ were protected from Th cell-driven intestinal inflammation and exhibited increased colonic Treg cells and diminished Th9 cells. Our findings thus reveal a fundamental contribution for the IL-36/IL-36R axis in regulating the Treg-Th9 cell balance with broad implications for Th cell-mediated disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases and particularly ulcerative colitis.Mucosal Immunology (2017) 0, 000-000. doi:10.1038/mi.2017.21.

  6. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  7. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  8. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  9. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  10. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  11. Oral treatment with laquinimod augments regulatory T-cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and reduces injury in the CNS of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Aharoni, Rina; Saada, Ravit; Eilam, Raya; Hayardeny, Liat; Sela, Michael; Arnon, Ruth

    2012-10-15

    Laquinimod is an orally active molecule that showed efficacy in clinical trials in multiple sclerosis. We studied its effects in the CNS, when administered by therapeutic regimen to mice inflicted with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Laquinimod reduced clinical and inflammatory manifestations and elevated the prevalence of T-regulatory cells in the brain. In untreated mice, in the chronic disease stage, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression was impaired. Laquinimod treatment restored BDNF expression to its level in healthy controls. Furthermore, CNS injury, manifested by astrogliosis, demyelination and axonal damages, was significantly reduced following laquinimod treatment, indicating its immunomodulatory and neuroprotective activity.

  12. [Effects of silencing Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 on the function of human hypertrophic scar-derived fibroblasts].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Kuang, F; Liu, C L; Chen, B; Tang, W B; Li, X J

    2017-03-20

    Objective: To explore the effects of silencing Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) on the secretion of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β(1)), alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen type Ⅰ by human hypertrophic scar-derived fibroblasts. Methods: The human normal skin-derived fibroblasts and hypertrophic scar-derived fibroblasts were cultured with explant culture technique from the normal skin and hypertrophic scar tissue, which was obtained from 9 patients with hypertrophic scars after burn. Two kinds of fibroblasts of the third passage were both divided into 6 groups according to the random number table, with 9 wells in each group. Fibroblasts in blank control group were cultured for 72 h without transfection of any small interfering RNA (siRNA), fibroblasts in negative control group were for cultured for 72 h after transfected with non-target siRNA, fibroblasts in Smurf2 siRNA group were cultured for 72 h after transfected with 100 nmol/L Smurf2 siRNA, fibroblasts in blank control+ TGF-β(1) group were cultured for 72 h without transfection of any siRNA and then treated with 10 ng/mL TGF-β(1) for 6 h, fibroblasts in negative control+ TGF-β(1) group were cultured for 72 h after transfected with non-target siRNA and then treated with 10 ng/mL TGF-β(1) for 6 h, fibroblasts in Smurf2 siRNA+ TGF-β(1) group were cultured for 72 h after transfected with Smurf2 siRNA and then treated with 10 ng/mL TGF-β(1) for 6 h. (1) The protein and mRNA expression levels of Smurf2 of the two kinds of cells in blank control group, negative control group, and Smurf2 siRNA group were assessed by Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. (2) The content of TGF-β(1) in the cell culture supernatant of the two kinds of cells in blank control group and Smurf2 siRNA group was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). (3) The protein expression levels of α-SMA of the two kinds of cells in

  13. Targeting extracellular domains D4 and D7 of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 reveals allosteric receptor regulatory sites.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Caroline A C; Giese, Alexandra; Stuttfeld, Edward; Abram Saliba, Johan; Villemagne, Denis; Schleier, Thomas; Binz, H Kaspar; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt

    2012-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) activate three receptor tyrosine kinases, VEGFR-1, -2, and -3, which regulate angiogenic and lymphangiogenic signaling. VEGFR-2 is the most prominent receptor in angiogenic signaling by VEGF ligands. The extracellular part of VEGF receptors consists of seven immunoglobulin homology domains (Ig domains). Earlier studies showed that domains 2 and 3 (D23) mediate ligand binding, while structural analysis of dimeric ligand/receptor complexes by electron microscopy and small-angle solution scattering revealed additional homotypic contacts in membrane-proximal Ig domains D4 and D7. Here we show that D4 and D7 are indispensable for receptor signaling. To confirm the essential role of these domains in signaling, we isolated VEGFR-2-inhibitory "designed ankyrin repeat proteins" (DARPins) that interact with D23, D4, or D7. DARPins that interact with D23 inhibited ligand binding, receptor dimerization, and receptor kinase activation, while DARPins specific for D4 or D7 did not prevent ligand binding or receptor dimerization but effectively blocked receptor signaling and functional output. These data show that D4 and D7 allosterically regulate VEGFR-2 activity. We propose that these extracellular-domain-specific DARPins represent a novel generation of receptor-inhibitory drugs for in vivo applications such as targeting of VEGFRs in medical diagnostics and for treating vascular pathologies.

  14. Fas-associated factor 1 plays a negative regulatory role in the antibacterial immunity of Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    He, Z; Wang, P; Shi, H; Si, F; Hao, Y; Chen, B

    2013-08-01

    Insect immune responses are precisely regulated to maintain immune balance. In this study, the Fas-associated factor 1 (FAF1) gene of Locusta migratoria manilensis, a homologue of the caspar gene that functions as a specific negative regulator in the antibacterial immunity pathway, was cloned. Gene expression analysis showed that FAF1 was expressed throughout the developmental stages and in all tested tissues, but its transcription levels varied significantly. Thus, FAF1 appears to be tightly regulated and is probably involved in multiple physiological processes. In addition, the antimicrobial peptide gene prolixicin was cloned and characterized. After bacterial challenge, prolixicin was rapidly up-regulated, whereas FAF1 was markedly down-regulated. This result was consistent with the observation that prolixicin was hyperactivated when FAF1 was suppressed by RNA interference. Moreover, after bacterial infection, the survival rate of FAF1-knockdown locusts was much higher than that of the wild-type. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that FAF1 shares a similar function as caspar in Drosophila and may be involved in the negative regulation of antibacterial immunity in locusts.

  15. Targeting Extracellular Domains D4 and D7 of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 Reveals Allosteric Receptor Regulatory Sites

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Caroline A. C.; Giese, Alexandra; Stuttfeld, Edward; Abram Saliba, Johan; Villemagne, Denis; Schleier, Thomas; Binz, H. Kaspar

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) activate three receptor tyrosine kinases, VEGFR-1, -2, and -3, which regulate angiogenic and lymphangiogenic signaling. VEGFR-2 is the most prominent receptor in angiogenic signaling by VEGF ligands. The extracellular part of VEGF receptors consists of seven immunoglobulin homology domains (Ig domains). Earlier studies showed that domains 2 and 3 (D23) mediate ligand binding, while structural analysis of dimeric ligand/receptor complexes by electron microscopy and small-angle solution scattering revealed additional homotypic contacts in membrane-proximal Ig domains D4 and D7. Here we show that D4 and D7 are indispensable for receptor signaling. To confirm the essential role of these domains in signaling, we isolated VEGFR-2-inhibitory “designed ankyrin repeat proteins” (DARPins) that interact with D23, D4, or D7. DARPins that interact with D23 inhibited ligand binding, receptor dimerization, and receptor kinase activation, while DARPins specific for D4 or D7 did not prevent ligand binding or receptor dimerization but effectively blocked receptor signaling and functional output. These data show that D4 and D7 allosterically regulate VEGFR-2 activity. We propose that these extracellular-domain-specific DARPins represent a novel generation of receptor-inhibitory drugs for in vivo applications such as targeting of VEGFRs in medical diagnostics and for treating vascular pathologies. PMID:22801374

  16. Regulatory effects of introduction of an exogenous FGF2 gene on other growth factor genes in a healing tendon.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo; Chen, Chuan Hao; Zhou, You Lang; McKeever, Clarie; Liu, Paul Y

    2014-01-01

    In this study of a tendon injury model, we investigated how injection of a vector incorporating one growth factor gene changes expression levels of multiple growth factor genes in the healing process. The flexor tendon of chicken toes was completely cut and repaired surgically. The tendons in the experimental arm were injected with an adeno-associated virus-2 vector incorporating basic fibroblast growth-factor gene, whereas the tendons in the control arm were not injected or injected with sham vectors. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction, we found that, within the tendon healing period, a set of growth factor genes-transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and connective tissue growth factor-were significantly up-regulated. Expression of the platelet-derived growth factor-B gene was not changed, and the insulin-like growth factor was down-regulated. A tendon marker gene, scleraxis, was significantly up-regulated in the period. Our study revealed an intriguing finding that introduction of one growth factor gene in the healing tendon modulated expression of multiple growth factor genes. We believe this study may have significant implications in determining the approach of gene therapy, and the findings substantiate that gene therapy using a single growth factor could affect multiple growth factors.

  17. Sodium benzoate, a metabolite of cinnamon and a food additive, upregulates ciliary neurotrophic factor in astrocytes and oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Khushbu K.; Jana, Malabendu; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promyelinating trophic factor that plays an important role in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, mechanisms by which CNTF expression could be increased in the brain are poorly understood. Recently we have discovered anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities of sodium benzoate (NaB), a metabolite of cinnamon and a widely-used food additive. Here, we delineate that NaB is also capable of increasing the mRNA and protein expression of CNTF in primary mouse astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and primary human astrocytes. Accordingly, oral administration of NaB and cinnamon led to the upregulation of astroglial and oligodendroglial CNTF in vivo in mouse brain. Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, reduced the level of CNTF in the brain, which was restored by oral administration of cinnamon. While investigating underlying mechanisms, we observed that NaB induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated NaB-induced expression of CNTF. The activation of cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein by NaB, the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the CNTF promoter by NaB and the abrogation of NaB-induced expression of CNTF in astrocytes by siRNA knockdown of CREB suggest that NaB increases the expression of CNTF via the activation of CREB. These results highlight a novel myelinogenic property of NaB and cinnamon, which may be of benefit for MS and other demyelinating disorders. PMID:26399250

  18. A second common mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene: an additional risk factor for neural-tube defects?

    PubMed Central

    van der Put, N M; Gabreëls, F; Stevens, E M; Smeitink, J A; Trijbels, F J; Eskes, T K; van den Heuvel, L P; Blom, H J

    1998-01-01

    Recently, we showed that homozygosity for the common 677(C-->T) mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene, causing thermolability of the enzyme, is a risk factor for neural-tube defects (NTDs). We now report on another mutation in the same gene, the 1298(A-->C) mutation, which changes a glutamate into an alanine residue. This mutation destroys an MboII recognition site and has an allele frequency of .33. This 1298(A-->C) mutation results in decreased MTHFR activity (one-way analysis of variance [ANOVA] P < .0001), which is more pronounced in the homozygous than heterozygous state. Neither the homozygous nor the heterozygous state is associated with higher plasma homocysteine (Hcy) or a lower plasma folate concentration-phenomena that are evident with homozygosity for the 677(C-->T) mutation. However, there appears to be an interaction between these two common mutations. When compared with heterozygosity for either the 677(C-->T) or 1298(A-->C) mutations, the combined heterozygosity for the 1298(A-->C) and 677(C-->T) mutations was associated with reduced MTHFR specific activity (ANOVA P < .0001), higher Hcy, and decreased plasma folate levels (ANOVA P <.03). Thus, combined heterozygosity for both MTHFR mutations results in similar features as observed in homozygotes for the 677(C-->T) mutation. This combined heterozygosity was observed in 28% (n =86) of the NTD patients compared with 20% (n =403) among controls, resulting in an odds ratio of 2.04 (95% confidence interval: .9-4.7). These data suggest that the combined heterozygosity for the two MTHFR common mutations accounts for a proportion of folate-related NTDs, which is not explained by homozygosity for the 677(C-->T) mutation, and can be an additional genetic risk factor for NTDs. PMID:9545395

  19. Molecular basis of inherited antithrombin deficiency in Portuguese families: identification of genetic alterations and screening for additional thrombotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    David, Dezsö; Ribeiro, Sofia; Ferrão, Lénia; Gago, Teresa; Crespo, Francisco

    2004-06-01

    Antithrombin (AT), the most important coagulation serine proteases inhibitor, plays an important role in maintaining the hemostatic balance. Inherited AT deficiency, mainly characterized by predisposition to recurrent venous thromboembolism, is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. In this study, we analyzed the underlying genetic alterations in 12 unrelated Portuguese thrombophilic families with AT deficiency. At the same time, the modulating effect of the FV Leiden mutation, PT 20210A, PAI-1 4G, and MTHFR 677T allelic variants, on the thrombotic risk of AT deficient patients was also evaluated. Three novel frameshift alterations, a 4-bp deletion in exon 4 and two 1-bp insertions in exon 6, were identified in six unrelated type I AT deficient families. A novel missense mutation in exon 3a, which changes the highly conserved F147 residue, and a novel splice site mutation in the invariant acceptor AG dinucleotide of intron 2 were also identified in unrelated type I AT deficient families. In addition to these, two previously reported missense mutations changing the AT reactive site bond (R393-S394) and leading to type II-RS deficiency, and a previously reported cryptic splice site mutation (IVS4-14G-->A), were also identified. In these families, increased thrombotic risk associated with co-inheritance of the FV Leiden mutation and of the PAI-1 4G variant was also observed. In conclusion, we present the first data regarding the underlying genetic alterations in Portuguese thrombophilic families with AT deficiency, and confirm that the FV Leiden mutation and probably the PAI-1 4G variant represent additional thrombotic risk factors in these families.

  20. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of mammalian heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, is an alternative splicing factor that binds to UCUAUC splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Jennifer L; Barberan-Soler, Sergio; Zahler, Alan M

    2009-10-16

    Alternative splicing is regulated by cis sequences in the pre-mRNA that serve as binding sites for trans-acting alternative splicing factors. In a previous study, we used bioinformatics and molecular biology to identify and confirm that the intronic hexamer sequence UCUAUC is a nematode alternative splicing regulatory element. In this study, we used RNA affinity chromatography to identify trans factors that bind to this sequence. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, binds to UCUAUC in the context of unc-52 intronic regulatory sequences as well as to RNAs containing tandem repeats of this sequence. The three Us in the hexamer are the most important determinants of this binding specificity. We demonstrate, using RNA interference, that HRP-2 regulates the alternative splicing of two genes, unc-52 and lin-10, both of which have cassette exons flanked by an intronic UCUAUC motif. We propose that HRP-2 is a protein responsible for regulating alternative splicing through binding interactions with the UCUAUC sequence.

  1. Determination of a Comprehensive Alternative Splicing Regulatory Network and Combinatorial Regulation by Key Factors during the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yueqin; Park, Juw Won; Bebee, Thomas W.; Warzecha, Claude C.; Guo, Yang; Shang, Xuequn

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential biological process during embryonic development that is also implicated in cancer metastasis. While the transcriptional regulation of EMT has been well studied, the role of alternative splicing (AS) regulation in EMT remains relatively uncharacterized. We previously showed that the epithelial cell-type-specific proteins epithelial splicing regulatory proteins 1 (ESRP1) and ESRP2 are important for the regulation of many AS events that are altered during EMT. However, the contributions of the ESRPs and other splicing regulators to the AS regulatory network in EMT require further investigation. Here, we used a robust in vitro EMT model to comprehensively characterize splicing switches during EMT in a temporal manner. These investigations revealed that the ESRPs are the major regulators of some but not all AS events during EMT. We determined that the splicing factor RBM47 is downregulated during EMT and also regulates numerous transcripts that switch splicing during EMT. We also determined that Quaking (QKI) broadly promotes mesenchymal splicing patterns. Our study highlights the broad role of posttranscriptional regulation during the EMT and the important role of combinatorial regulation by different splicing factors to fine tune gene expression programs during these physiological and developmental transitions. PMID:27044866

  2. Are delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase inhibition and metal concentrations additional factors for the age-related cognitive decline?

    PubMed

    Baierle, Marília; Charão, Mariele F; Göethel, Gabriela; Barth, Anelise; Fracasso, Rafael; Bubols, Guilherme; Sauer, Elisa; Campanharo, Sarah C; Rocha, Rafael C C; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Bordignon, Suelen; Zibetti, Murilo; Trentini, Clarissa M; Avila, Daiana S; Gioda, Adriana; Garcia, Solange C

    2014-10-17

    Aging is often accompanied by cognitive impairments and influenced by oxidative status and chemical imbalances. Thus, this study was conducted to examine whether age-related cognitive deficit is associated with oxidative damage, especially with inhibition of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D), as well as to verify the influence of some metals in the enzyme activity and cognitive performance. Blood ALA-D activity, essential (Fe, Zn, Cu, Se) and non-essential metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, As, Cr, Ni, V) were measured in 50 elderly and 20 healthy young subjects. Cognitive function was assessed by tests from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) battery and other. The elderly group presented decreased ALA-D activity compared to the young group. The index of ALA-D reactivation was similar to both study groups, but negatively associated with metals. The mean levels of essential metals were within the reference values, while the most toxic metals were above them in both groups. Cognitive function impairments were observed in elderly group and were associated with decreased ALA-D activity, with lower levels of Se and higher levels of toxic metals (Hg and V). Results suggest that the reduced ALA-D activity in elderly can be an additional factor involved in cognitive decline, since its inhibition throughout life could lead to accumulation of the neurotoxic compound ALA. Toxic metals were found to contribute to cognitive decline and also to influence ALA-D reactivation.

  3. Are Delta-Aminolevulinate Dehydratase Inhibition and Metal Concentrations Additional Factors for the Age-Related Cognitive Decline?

    PubMed Central

    Baierle, Marília; Charão, Mariele F.; Göethel, Gabriela; Barth, Anelise; Fracasso, Rafael; Bubols, Guilherme; Sauer, Elisa; Campanharo, Sarah C.; Rocha, Rafael C. C.; Saint’Pierre, Tatiana D.; Bordignon, Suelen; Zibetti, Murilo; Trentini, Clarissa M.; Ávila, Daiana S.; Gioda, Adriana; Garcia, Solange C.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is often accompanied by cognitive impairments and influenced by oxidative status and chemical imbalances. Thus, this study was conducted to examine whether age-related cognitive deficit is associated with oxidative damage, especially with inhibition of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D), as well as to verify the influence of some metals in the enzyme activity and cognitive performance. Blood ALA-D activity, essential (Fe, Zn, Cu, Se) and non-essential metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, As, Cr, Ni, V) were measured in 50 elderly and 20 healthy young subjects. Cognitive function was assessed by tests from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease (CERAD) battery and other. The elderly group presented decreased ALA-D activity compared to the young group. The index of ALA-D reactivation was similar to both study groups, but negatively associated with metals. The mean levels of essential metals were within the reference values, while the most toxic metals were above them in both groups. Cognitive function impairments were observed in elderly group and were associated with decreased ALA-D activity, with lower levels of Se and higher levels of toxic metals (Hg and V). Results suggest that the reduced ALA-D activity in elderly can be an additional factor involved in cognitive decline, since its inhibition throughout life could lead to accumulation of the neurotoxic compound ALA. Toxic metals were found to contribute to cognitive decline and also to influence ALA-D reactivation. PMID:25329536

  4. A large-scale, in vivo transcription factor screen defines bivalent chromatin as a key property of regulatory factors mediating Drosophila wing development.

    PubMed

    Schertel, Claus; Albarca, Monica; Rockel-Bauer, Claudia; Kelley, Nicholas W; Bischof, Johannes; Hens, Korneel; van Nimwegen, Erik; Basler, Konrad; Deplancke, Bart

    2015-04-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of cell fate. The estimated 755 genes that encode DNA binding domain-containing proteins comprise ∼ 5% of all Drosophila genes. However, the majority has remained uncharacterized so far due to the lack of proper genetic tools. We generated 594 site-directed transgenic Drosophila lines that contain integrations of individual UAS-TF constructs to facilitate spatiotemporally controlled misexpression in vivo. All transgenes were expressed in the developing wing, and two-thirds induced specific phenotypic defects. In vivo knockdown of the same genes yielded a phenotype for 50%, with both methods indicating a great potential for misexpression to characterize novel functions in wing growth, patterning, and development. Thus, our UAS-TF library provides an important addition to the genetic toolbox of Drosophila research, enabling the identification of several novel wing development-related TFs. In parallel, we established the chromatin landscape of wing imaginal discs by ChIP-seq analyses of five chromatin marks and RNA Pol II. Subsequent clustering revealed six distinct chromatin states, with two clusters showing enrichment for both active and repressive marks. TFs that carry such "bivalent" chromatin are highly enriched for causing misexpression phenotypes in the wing, and analysis of existing expression data shows that these TFs tend to be differentially expressed across the wing disc. Thus, bivalently marked chromatin can be used as a marker for spatially regulated TFs that are functionally relevant in a developing tissue.

  5. A large-scale, in vivo transcription factor screen defines bivalent chromatin as a key property of regulatory factors mediating Drosophila wing development

    PubMed Central

    Schertel, Claus; Albarca, Monica; Rockel-Bauer, Claudia; Kelley, Nicholas W.; Bischof, Johannes; Hens, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of cell fate. The estimated 755 genes that encode DNA binding domain-containing proteins comprise ∼5% of all Drosophila genes. However, the majority has remained uncharacterized so far due to the lack of proper genetic tools. We generated 594 site-directed transgenic Drosophila lines that contain integrations of individual UAS-TF constructs to facilitate spatiotemporally controlled misexpression in vivo. All transgenes were expressed in the developing wing, and two-thirds induced specific phenotypic defects. In vivo knockdown of the same genes yielded a phenotype for 50%, with both methods indicating a great potential for misexpression to characterize novel functions in wing growth, patterning, and development. Thus, our UAS-TF library provides an important addition to the genetic toolbox of Drosophila research, enabling the identification of several novel wing development-related TFs. In parallel, we established the chromatin landscape of wing imaginal discs by ChIP-seq analyses of five chromatin marks and RNA Pol II. Subsequent clustering revealed six distinct chromatin states, with two clusters showing enrichment for both active and repressive marks. TFs that carry such “bivalent” chromatin are highly enriched for causing misexpression phenotypes in the wing, and analysis of existing expression data shows that these TFs tend to be differentially expressed across the wing disc. Thus, bivalently marked chromatin can be used as a marker for spatially regulated TFs that are functionally relevant in a developing tissue. PMID:25568052

  6. Structure of a Virulence Regulatory Factor CvfB Reveals a Novel Winged-helix RNA Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Xu, Qingping; Miyazaki, Shinya; Kaito, Chikara; Farr, Carol L.; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY CvfB is a conserved regulatory protein important for the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus. We show here that CvfB binds RNA. The crystal structure of the CvfB ortholog from Streptococcus pneumoniae at 1.4 Å resolution reveals a unique RNA binding protein that is formed from a concatenation of well-known structural modules that bind nucleic acids: three consecutive S1 RNA-binding domains and a winged-helix (WH) domain. The third S1 and the WH domains are required for cooperative RNA binding and form a continuous surface that likely contributes to the RNA interaction. The WH domain is critical to CvfB function and contains a unique structural motif. Thus CvfB represents a novel assembly of modules for binding RNA. PMID:20399190

  7. Hydrogen radical additions to unsaturated hydrocarbons and the reverse beta-scission reactions: modeling of activation energies and pre-exponential factors.

    PubMed

    Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Waroquier, Michel; Marin, Guy B

    2010-01-18

    The group additivity method for Arrhenius parameters is applied to hydrogen addition to alkenes and alkynes and the reverse beta-scission reactions, an important family of reactions in thermal processes based on radical chemistry. A consistent set of group additive values for 33 groups is derived to calculate the activation energy and pre-exponential factor for a broad range of hydrogen addition reactions. The group additive values are determined from CBS-QB3 ab-initio-calculated rate coefficients. A mean factor of deviation of only two between CBS-QB3 and experimental rate coefficients for seven reactions in the range 300-1000 K is found. Tunneling coefficients for these reactions were found to be significant below 400 K and a correlation accounting for tunneling is presented. Application of the obtained group additive values to predict the kinetics for a set of 11 additions and beta-scissions yields rate coefficients within a factor of 3.5 of the CBS-QB3 results except for two beta-scissions with severe steric effects. The mean factor of deviation with respect to experimental rate coefficients of 2.0 shows that the group additive method with tunneling corrections can accurately predict the kinetics and is at least as accurate as the most commonly used density functional methods. The constructed group additive model can hence be applied to predict the kinetics of hydrogen radical additions for a broad range of unsaturated compounds.

  8. The transcriptional regulatory network mediated by banana (Musa acuminata) dehydration-responsive element binding (MaDREB) transcription factors in fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jian-Fei; Chen, Jian-Ye; Liu, Xun-Cheng; Han, Yan-Chao; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Shan, Wei; Tang, Yang; Wu, Ke-Qiang; He, Jun-Xian; Lu, Wang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex, genetically programmed process involving the action of critical transcription factors (TFs). Despite the established significance of dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) TFs in plant abiotic stress responses, the involvement of DREBs in fruit ripening is yet to be determined. Here, we identified four genes encoding ripening-regulated DREB TFs in banana (Musa acuminata), MaDREB1, MaDREB2, MaDREB3, and MaDREB4, and demonstrated that they play regulatory roles in fruit ripening. We showed that MaDREB1-MaDREB4 are nucleus-localized, induced by ethylene and encompass transcriptional activation activities. We performed a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) experiment for MaDREB2 and identified 697 genomic regions as potential targets of MaDREB2. MaDREB2 binds to hundreds of loci with diverse functions and its binding sites are distributed in the promoter regions proximal to the transcriptional start site (TSS). Most of the MaDREB2-binding targets contain the conserved (A/G)CC(G/C)AC motif and MaDREB2 appears to directly regulate the expression of a number of genes involved in fruit ripening. In combination with transcriptome profiling (RNA sequencing) data, our results indicate that MaDREB2 may serve as both transcriptional activator and repressor during banana fruit ripening. In conclusion, our study suggests a hierarchical regulatory model of fruit ripening in banana and that the MaDREB TFs may act as transcriptional regulators in the regulatory network.

  9. Effects of Factor XIII Deficiency on Thromboelastography. Thromboelastography with Calcium and Streptokinase Addition is more Sensitive than Solubility Tests

    PubMed Central

    Martinuzzo, M.; Barrera, L.; Altuna, D.; Baña, F. Tisi; Bieti, J.; Amigo, Q.; D’Adamo, M.; López, M.S.; Oyhamburu, J.; Otaso, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Homozygous or double heterozygous factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency is characterized by soft tissue hematomas, intracranial and delayed spontaneous bleeding. Alterations of thromboelastography (TEG) parameters in these patients have been reported. The aim of the study was to show results of TEG, TEG Lysis (Lys 60) induced by subthreshold concentrations of streptokinase (SK), and to compare them to the clot solubility studies results in samples of a 1-year-old girl with homozygous or double heterozygous FXIII deficiency. Case A year one girl with a history of bleeding from the umbilical cord. During her first year of life, several hematomas appeared in soft upper limb tissue after punctures for vaccination and a gluteal hematoma. One additional sample of a heterozygous patient and three samples of acquired FXIII deficiency were also evaluated. Materials and Methods Clotting tests, von Willebrand factor (vWF) antigen and activity, plasma FXIII-A subunit (pFXIII-A) were measured by an immunoturbidimetric assay in a photo-optical coagulometer. Solubility tests were performed with Ca2+-5 M urea and thrombin-2% acetic acid. Basal and post-FXIII concentrate infusion samples were studied. TEG was performed with CaCl2 or CaCl2 + SK (3.2 U/mL) in a Thromboelastograph. Results Prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time, fibrinogen, factor VIIIc, vWF, and platelet aggregation were normal. Antigenic pFXIII-A subunit was < 2%. TEG, evaluated at diagnosis and post FXIII concentrate infusion (pFXIII-A= 37%), presented a normal reaction time (R), 8 min, prolonged k (14 and 11min respectively), a low Maximum-Amplitude (MA) ( 39 and 52 mm respectively), and Clot Lysis (Lys60) slightly increased (23 and 30% respectively). In the sample at diagnosis, clot solubility was abnormal, 50 and 45 min with Ca-Urea and thrombin-acetic acid, respectively, but normal (>16 hours) 1-day post-FXIII infusion. Analysis of FXIII deficient and normal

  10. Interleukin 10 acts on regulatory T cells to maintain expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 and suppressive function in mice with colitis.

    PubMed

    Murai, Masako; Turovskaya, Olga; Kim, Gisen; Madan, Rajat; Karp, Christopher L; Cheroutre, Hilde; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2009-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 suppress the activity of other cells. Here we show that interleukin 10 (IL-10) produced by CD11b(+) myeloid cells in recombination-activating gene 1-deficient (Rag1(-/-)) recipient mice was needed to prevent the colitis induced by transferred CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T cells. In Il10(-/-)Rag1(-/-) mice, T(reg) cells failed to maintain Foxp3 expression and regulatory activity. The loss of Foxp3 expression occurred only in recipients with colitis, which indicates that the requirement for IL-10 is manifested in the presence of inflammation. IL-10 receptor-deficient (Il10rb(-/-)) T(reg) cells also failed to maintain Foxp3 expression, which suggested that host IL-10 acted directly on the T(reg) cells. Our data indicate that IL-10 released from myeloid cells acts in a paracrine manner on T(reg) cells to maintain Foxp3 expression.

  11. 14-3-3 theta binding to cell cycle regulatory factors is enhanced by HIV-1 Vpr

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Diane L; Barnitz, Robert A; Sakai, Keiko; Lenardo, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite continuing advances in our understanding of AIDS pathogenesis, the mechanism of CD4+ T cell depletion in HIV-1-infected individuals remains unclear. The HIV-1 Vpr accessory protein causes cell death, likely through a mechanism related to its ability to arrest cells in the G2,M phase. Recent evidence implicated the scaffold protein, 14-3-3, in Vpr cell cycle blockade. Results We found that in human T cells, 14-3-3 plays an active role in mediating Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest and reveal a dramatic increase in the amount of Cdk1, Cdc25C, and CyclinB1 bound to 14-3-3 θ during Vprv-induced G2,M arrest. By contrast, a cell-cycle-arrest-dead Vpr mutant failed to augment 14-3-3 θ association with Cdk1 and CyclinB1. Moreover, G2,M arrest caused by HIV-1 infection strongly correlated with a disruption in 14-3-3 θ binding to centrosomal proteins, Plk1 and centrin. Finally, Vpr caused elevated levels of CyclinB1, Plk1, and Cdk1 in a complex with the nuclear transport and spindle assembly protein, importin β. Conclusion Thus, our data reveal a new facet of Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest involving previously unrecognized abnormal rearrangements of multiprotein assemblies containing key cell cycle regulatory proteins. Reviewers This article was reviewed by David Kaplan, Nathaniel R. Landau and Yan Zhou. PMID:18445273

  12. Regulatory T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Way, Sing Sing; Abbas, Abul K.

    2016-01-01

    Memory for antigen is a defining feature of adaptive immunity. Antigen-specific lymphocyte populations show an increase in number and function after antigen encounter and more rapidly re-expand upon subsequent antigen exposure. Studies of immune memory have primarily focused on effector B cells and T cells with microbial specificity, using prime challenge models of infection. However, recent work has also identified persistently expanded populations of antigen-specific regulatory T cells that protect against aberrant immune responses. In this Review, we consider the parallels between memory effector T cells and memory regulatory T cells, along with the functional implications of regulatory memory in autoimmunity, antimicrobial host defence and maternal fetal tolerance. In addition, we discuss emerging evidence for regulatory T cell memory in humans and key unanswered questions in this rapidly evolving field. PMID:26688349

  13. Construction and analysis of regulatory genetic networks in cervical cancer based on involved microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes

    PubMed Central

    WANG, NING; XU, ZHIWEN; WANG, KUNHAO; ZHU, MINGHUI; LI, YANG

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, genes and microRNA (miRNA/miR) have been considered as key biological factors in human carcinogenesis. During cancer development, genes may act as multiple identities, including target genes of miRNA, transcription factors and host genes. The present study concentrated on the regulatory networks consisting of the biological factors involved in cervical cancer in order to investigate their features and affect on this specific pathology. Numerous raw data was collected and organized into purposeful structures, and adaptive procedures were defined for application to the prepared data. The networks were therefore built with the factors as basic components according to their interacting associations. The networks were constructed at three levels of interdependency, including a differentially-expressed network, a related network and a global network. Comparisons and analyses were made at a systematic level rather than from an isolated gene or miRNA. Critical hubs were extracted in the core networks and notable features were discussed, including self-adaption feedback regulation. The present study expounds the pathogenesis from a novel point of view and is proposed to provide inspiration for further investigation and therapy. PMID:24944708

  14. Methanol emissions from maize: Ontogenetic dependence to varying light conditions and guttation as an additional factor constraining the flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffar, A.; Schoon, N.; Digrado, A.; Bachy, A.; Delaplace, P.; du Jardin, P.; Fauconnier, M.-L.; Aubinet, M.; Heinesch, B.; Amelynck, C.

    2017-03-01

    Because of its high abundance and long lifetime compared to other volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, methanol (CH3OH) plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry. Even though agricultural crops are believed to be a large source of methanol, emission inventories from those crop ecosystems are still scarce and little information is available concerning the driving mechanisms for methanol production and emission at different developmental stages of the plants/leaves. This study focuses on methanol emissions from Zea mays L. (maize), which is vastly cultivated throughout the world. Flux measurements have been performed on young plants, almost fully grown leaves and fully grown leaves, enclosed in dynamic flow-through enclosures in a temperature and light-controlled environmental chamber. Strong differences in the response of methanol emissions to variations in PPFD (Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density) were noticed between the young plants, almost fully grown and fully grown leaves. Moreover, young maize plants showed strong emission peaks following light/dark transitions, for which guttation can be put forward as a hypothetical pathway. Young plants' average daily methanol fluxes exceeded by a factor of 17 those of almost fully grown and fully grown leaves when expressed per leaf area. Absolute flux values were found to be smaller than those reported in the literature, but in fair agreement with recent ecosystem scale flux measurements above a maize field of the same variety as used in this study. The flux measurements in the current study were used to evaluate the dynamic biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emission model of Niinemets and Reichstein. The modelled and measured fluxes from almost fully grown leaves were found to agree best when a temperature and light dependent methanol production function was applied. However, this production function turned out not to be suitable for modelling the observed emissions from the young plants

  15. Characterization and analysis of the PikD regulatory factor in the pikromycin biosynthetic pathway of Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D J; Xue, Y; Reynolds, K A; Sherman, D H

    2001-06-01

    The Streptomyces venezuelae pikD gene from the pikromycin biosynthetic cluster was analyzed, and its deduced product (PikD) was found to have amino acid sequence homology with a small family of bacterial regulatory proteins. Database comparisons revealed two hypothetical domains, including an N-terminal triphosphate-binding domain and a C-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. Analysis of PikD was initiated by deletion of the corresponding gene (pikD) from the chromosome of S. venezuelae, resulting in complete loss of antibiotic production. Complementation by a plasmid carrying pikD restored macrolide biosynthesis, demonstrating that PikD is a positive regulator. Mutations were made in the predicted nucleotide triphosphate-binding domain, confirming the active-site amino acid residues of the Walker A and B motifs. Feeding of macrolide intermediates was carried out to gauge the points of operon control by PikD. Although the pikD mutant strain was unable to convert macrolactones (10-deoxymethynolide and narbonolide) to glycosylated products, macrolide intermediates (YC-17 and narbomycin) were hydroxylated with high efficiency. To study further the control of biosynthesis, presumed promoter regions from pik cluster loci were linked to the xylE reporter and placed in S. venezuelae wild-type and pikD mutant strains. This analysis demonstrated that PikD-mediated transcriptional regulation occurs at promoters controlling expression of pikRII, pikAI, and desI but not those controlling pikRI or pikC.

  16. [SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INFECTIOUS FACTORS THAT CAUSE THE REACTIVE ARTHRITIS DEVELOPMENT AND THEIR EFFECT ON ARGINASE-NO-SYNTHASE REGULATORY SYSTEM OF PERIPHERAL BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES].

    PubMed

    Kornijchuk, O P; Melnyk, O V; Vorobets, Z D

    2015-01-01

    The own observations results of urogenital, gastrointestinal and nasopharyngeal infectious factors that cause the development of reactive arthritis (PeA) are being presented. The greatest contribution to the development of this disease make Chlamidia trachomatis (36%), Streptococcus haemolyticus (pyogenes) (19%) and hepatitis viruses B and C (10%). As a result of the research a number of kinetic parameters of arginase and NO-synthase reactions in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with reactive arthritis was identified. The authentic increase of arginase activity in 3.3 times and eNO-synthase activity decrease by 1,9 times in peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with PeA, compared to practically healthy donors were determined. Increased activity of arginase and iNO-synthase of lymphocytes indicates changes in immune cells functional activity, which may be due to impaired metabolic and regulatory processes in these cells caused by a bacterial or viral infection.

  17. TFmiR: a web server for constructing and analyzing disease-specific transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Spaniol, Christian; Nazarieh, Maryam; Helms, Volkhard

    2015-07-01

    TFmiR is a freely available web server for deep and integrative analysis of combinatorial regulatory interactions between transcription factors, microRNAs and target genes that are involved in disease pathogenesis. Since the inner workings of cells rely on the correct functioning of an enormously complex system of activating and repressing interactions that can be perturbed in many ways, TFmiR helps to better elucidate cellular mechanisms at the molecular level from a network perspective. The provided topological and functional analyses promote TFmiR as a reliable systems biology tool for researchers across the life science communities. TFmiR web server is accessible through the following URL: http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/tfmir.

  18. Two distinct nuclear factors bind the conserved regulatory sequences of a rabbit major histocompatibility complex class II gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sittisombut, N

    1988-01-01

    The constitutive coexpression of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes in B lymphocytes requires positive, trans-acting transcriptional factors. The need for these trans-acting factors has been suggested by the reversion of the MHC class II-negative phenotype of rare B-lymphocyte mutants through somatic cell fusion with B cells or T-cell lines. The mechanism by which the trans-acting factors exert their effect on gene transcription is unknown. The possibility that two highly conserved DNA sequences, located 90 to 100 base pairs (bp) (the A sequence) and 60 to 70 bp (the B sequence) upstream of the transcription start site of the class II genes, are recognized by the trans-acting factors was investigated in this study. By using the gel electrophoresis retardation assay, a minimum of two proteins which specifically bound the conserved A or B sequence of a rabbit DP beta gene were identified in murine nuclear extracts of a B-lymphoma cell line, A20-2J. Fractionation of nuclear extract through a heparin-agarose column allowed the identification of one protein, designated NF-MHCIIB, which bound an oligonucleotide containing the B sequence and protected the entire B sequence in the DNase I protection analysis. Another protein, designated NF-MHCIIA, which bound an oligonucleotide containing the A sequence and partially protected the 3' half of this sequence, was also identified. NF-MHCIIB did not protect a CCAAT sequence located 17 bp downstream of the B sequence. The possible relationship between these DNA-binding factors and the trans-acting factors identified in the cell fusion experiments is discussed. Images PMID:3133552

  19. Compound mouse mutants of bZIP transcription factors Mafg and Mafk reveal a regulatory network of non-crystallin genes associated with cataract

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Smriti A.; Anand, Deepti; Siddam, Archana D.; Kakrana, Atul; Dash, Soma; Scheiblin, David A.; Dang, Christine A.; Terrell, Anne M.; Waters, Stephanie M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Lachke, Salil A.

    2015-01-01

    Although majority of the genes linked to early-onset cataract exhibit lens fiber cell-enriched expression, our understanding of gene regulation in these cells is limited to function of just eight transcription factors and largely in the context of crystallins. We report on small Maf transcription factors Mafg and Mafk as regulators of several non-crystallin human cataract-associated genes in fiber cells and establish their significance to this disease. We applied a bioinformatics tool for cataract gene discovery iSyTE to identify Mafg and its co-regulators in the lens, and generated various null-allelic combinations of Mafg:Mafk mouse mutants for phenotypic and molecular analysis. By age 4-months, Mafg−/−:Mafk+/− mutants exhibit lens defects that progressively develop into cataract. High-resolution phenotypic characterization of Mafg−/−:Mafk+/− mouse lens reveals severely disorganized fiber cells, while microarrays-based expression profiling identifies 97 differentially regulated genes (DRGs). Integrative analysis of Mafg−/−:Mafk+/− lens-DRGs with 1) binding-motifs and genomic targets of small Mafs and their regulatory partners, 2) iSyTE lens-expression data, and 3) interactions between DRGs in the String database, unravels a detailed small Maf regulatory network in the lens, several nodes of which are linked to cataract. This approach identifies 36 high-priority candidates from the original 97 DRGs. Significantly, 8/36 (22%) DRGs are associated with cataracts in human (GSTO1, MGST1, SC4MOL, UCHL1) or mouse (Aldh3a1, Crygf, Hspb1, Pcbd1), suggesting a multifactorial etiology that includes oxidative stress and mis-regulation of sterol synthesis. These data identify Mafg and Mafk as new cataract-associated candidates and define their function in regulating largely non-crystallin genes linked to human cataract. PMID:25896808

  20. Novel regulatory factors of HSF-1 activation: facts and perspectives regarding their involvement in the age-associated attenuation of the heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Shamovsky, Ilya; Gershon, David

    2004-01-01

    An attenuated response to stress is characteristic of senescence. Heat shock (HS), a significant form of stress, is delayed and reduced in aging organisms. In the response to heat shock, heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) is activated by trimerization of its monomeric subunits. This then initiates the transcription of a series of heat shock genes (hsp genes) that encode chaperone proteins protective against heat stress. Using a promoter binding electromobility shift assay (EMSA), we have found no activation of this transcription factor in the brains of old (36 months) rats in response to exposure to 41 degrees C for 1h while strong activation is elicited in young (6 months) animals. Since brains of young and old rats had approximately the same amount of HSF-1 subunits, we anticipated the presence of auxiliary regulatory factors essential for the activation of HSF-1 and the initiation of heat shock gene transcription. We describe three novel auxiliary factors--the proteins I-HSF [HSF inhibitor] and elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1alpha) and a large non-coding RNA (HSR)--that participate in regulation and activation of HSF-1 in early stages of heat shock gene transcription. I-HSF inhibits trimerization of HSF-1 at normal temperatures. HSR and EF-1alpha form a complex with HSF-1 and facilitate its trimerization and binding to heat shock element (HSE) in the promoters of hsps. It is proposed that structural changes in any one or a combination of these factors in response to heat shock may contribute to the age-associated attenuation in the response to stress.

  1. The Staphylococcus aureus SrrAB Regulatory System Modulates Hydrogen Peroxide Resistance Factors, Which Imparts Protection to Aconitase during Aerobic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mashruwala, Ameya A.; Boyd, Jeffrey M.

    2017-01-01

    The SrrAB two-component regulatory system (TCRS) positively influences the transcription of genes involved in aerobic respiration in response to changes in respiratory flux. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can arise as a byproduct of spontaneous interactions between dioxygen and components of respiratory pathways. H2O2 damages cellular factors including protein associated iron-sulfur cluster prosthetic groups. We found that a Staphylococcus aureus strain lacking the SrrAB two-component regulatory system (TCRS) is sensitive to H2O2 intoxication. We tested the hypothesis that SrrAB manages the mutually inclusive expression of genes required for aerobic respiration and H2O2 resistance. Consistent with our hypothesis, a ΔsrrAB strain had decreased transcription of genes encoding for H2O2 resistance factors (kat, ahpC, dps). SrrAB was not required for the inducing the transcription of these genes in cells challenged with H2O2. Purified SrrA bound to the promoter region for dps suggesting that SrrA directly influences dps transcription. The H2O2 sensitivity of the ΔsrrAB strain was alleviated by iron chelation or deletion of the gene encoding for the peroxide regulon repressor (PerR). The positive influence of SrrAB upon H2O2 metabolism bestowed protection upon the solvent accessible iron-sulfur (FeS) cluster of aconitase from H2O2 poisoning. SrrAB also positively influenced transcription of scdA (ytfE), which encodes for a FeS cluster repair protein. Finally, we found that SrrAB positively influences H2O2 resistance only during periods of high dioxygen-dependent respiratory activity. SrrAB did not influence H2O2 resistance when cellular respiration was diminished as a result of decreased dioxygen availability, and negatively influenced it in the absence of respiration (fermentative growth). We propose a model whereby SrrAB-dependent regulatory patterns facilitate the adaptation of cells to changes in dioxygen concentrations, and thereby aids in the prevention of H2O2

  2. Studies on a complex mechanism for the activation of plasminogen by kaolin and by chloroform: the participation of Hageman factor and additional cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Ogston, Derek; Ogston, C. Marie; Ratnoff, Oscar D.; Forbes, Charles D.

    1969-01-01

    As demonstrated by others, fibrinolytic activity was generated in diluted, acidified normal plasma exposed to kaolin, a process requiring Hageman factor (Factor XII). Generation was impaired by adsorbing plasma with glass or similar agents under conditions which did not deplete its content of Hageman factor or plasminogen. The defect could be repaired by addition of a noneuglobulin fraction of plasma or an agent or agents eluted from diatomaceous earth which had been exposed to normal plasma. The restorative agent, tentatively called Hageman factor-cofactor, was partially purified by chromatography and had an apparent molecular weight of approximately 165,000. It could be distinguished from plasma thromboplastin antecedent (Factor XI) and plasma kallikrein, other substrates of Hageman factor, and from the streptokinase-activated pro-activator of plasminogen. Evidence is presented that an additional component may be needed for the generation of fibrinolytic activity in mixtures containing Hageman factor, HF-cofactor, and plasminogen. The long-recognized generation of plasmin activity in chloroform-treated euglobulin fractions of plasma was found to be dependent upon the presence of Hageman factor. Whether chloroform activation of plasminogen requires Hageman factor-cofactor was not determined, but glass-adsorbed plasma, containing Hageman factor and plasminogen, did not generate appreciable fibrinolytic or caseinolytic activity. These studies emphasize the complex nature of the mechanisms which lead to the generation of plasmin in human plasma. PMID:4241814

  3. Activation of the human mitochondrial transcription factor A gene by nuclear respiratory factors: a potential regulatory link between nuclear and mitochondrial gene expression in organelle biogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Virbasius, J V; Scarpulla, R C

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA), the product of a nuclear gene, stimulates transcription from the two divergent mitochondrial promoters and is likely the principal activator of mitochondrial gene expression in vertebrates. Here we establish that the proximal promoter of the human mtTFA gene is highly dependent upon recognition sites for the nuclear respiratory factors, NRF-1 and NRF-2, for activity. These factors have been previously implicated in the activation of numerous nuclear genes that contribute to mitochondrial respiratory function. The affinity-purified factors from HeLa cells specifically bind to the mtTFA NRF-1 and NRF-2 sites through guanine nucleotide contacts that are characteristic for each site. Mutations in these contacts eliminate NRF-1 and NRF-2 binding and also dramatically reduce promoter activity in transfected cells. Although both factors contribute, NRF-1 binding appears to be the major determinant of promoter function. This dependence on NRF-1 activation is confirmed by in vitro transcription using highly purified recombinant proteins that display the same binding specificities as the HeLa cell factors. The activation of the mtTFA promoter by both NRF-1 and NRF-2 therefore provides a link between the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes and suggests a mechanism for their coordinate regulation during organelle biogenesis. Images PMID:8108407

  4. Characterization of the regulatory domains of the human skn-1a/Epoc-1/Oct-11 POU transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hildesheim, J; Foster, R A; Chamberlin, M E; Vogel, J C

    1999-09-10

    The Skn-1a POU transcription factor is primarily expressed in keratinocytes of murine embryonic and adult epidermis. Although some POU factors expressed in a tissue-specific manner are important for normal differentiation, the biological function of Skn-1a remains unknown. Previous in vitro studies indicate that Skn-1a has the ability to transactivate markers of keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we have characterized Skn-1a's transactivation domain(s) and engineered a dominant negative protein that lacked this transactivation domain. Deletional analysis of the human homologue of Skn-1a with three target promoters revealed the presence of two functional domains: a primary C-terminal transactivation domain and a combined N-terminal inhibitory domain and transactivation domain. Skn-1a lacking the C-terminal region completely lost transactivation ability, irrespective of the promoter tested, and was able to block transactivation by normal Skn-1a in competition assays. Compared with full-length, Skn-1a lacking the N-terminal region demonstrated either increased transactivation (bovine cytokeratin 6 promoter), comparable transactivation (human papillomavirus type 1a long control region), or loss of transactivation (human papillomavirus type 18 long control region). The identification of a primary C-terminal transactivation domain enabled us to generate a dominant negative Skn-1a factor, which will be useful in the quest for a better understanding of this keratinocyte-specific gene regulator.

  5. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain (“BEN-solo” factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  6. An Additional Potential Factor for Kidney Stone Formation during Space Flights: Calcifying Nanoparticles (Nanobacteria): A Case Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Ciftcioglu, Neva; Schmid, Joseph; Griffith, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced microgravity appears to be a risk factor for the development of urinary calculi due to skeletal calcium liberation and other undefined factors, resulting in stone disease in crewmembers during and after spaceflight. Calcifying nanoparticles, or nanobacteria, reproduce at a more rapid rate in simulated microgravity conditions and create external shells of calcium phosphate in the form of apatite. The questions arises whether calcifying nanoparticles are niduses for calculi and contribute to the development of clinical stone disease in humans, who possess environmental factors predisposing to the development of urinary calculi and potentially impaired immunological defenses during spaceflight. A case of a urinary calculus passed from an astronaut post-flight with morphological characteristics of calcifying nanoparticles and staining positive for a calcifying nanoparticle unique antigen, is presented.

  7. Regulatory mechanisms of interleukin-8 production induced by tumour necrosis factor-α in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaohui; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xiangdong; Xia, Jinglin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Interleukin (IL)-8 plays the critical role in the initiation of micro-environmental inflammation responsible for tumour growth and patient prognosis. This study aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms of IL-8 production from human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. The levels of IL-8 and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), ERK1/2 and Akt in MHCC-97H cells were measured by ELISA, Western blot and immunofluorescence. NF-κB p65 protein nuclear translocation was determined by non-radioactive NF-κB p50/p65 transcription factor activity kit and cell bio-behaviours were detected by the real-time cell-monitoring system. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) significantly induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, Akt and production of IL-8 from HCC cells, which were prevented by SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor), PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), LY294002 and Wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor) and SB328437 (CCR3 inhibitor). TNF-α could significantly increase the translocation of NF-κB p65 protein into the nucleus in a dose-dependent manner, while SB203580 partially inhibited. In inflammatory micro-environment, HCC auto-produced IL-8 through p38 MAPK, ERK and PI3K/Akt signalling pathways, where the p38 MAPK is a central factor to activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate the expression of IL-8 production. There was a potential cross-talking between receptors. PMID:21545687

  8. Isolation of SIP, a protein that interacts with SPB, a possible transcriptional regulatory factor in Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Ishida, Kazuhiro; Machiya, Yasuhiro; Takamiya, Ken-Ichiro

    2007-10-01

    SPB is a transcriptional factor in Rhodobacter sphaeroides that represses expression of the puf operon under aerobic or semi-aerobic light conditions. Here, we identified a 17,500 Da protein designated SIP (SPB interaction protein) that interacts with SPB, as determined by binding to an SPB-His(x6) fusion protein-Ni column. The SPB-SIP interaction in vivo was confirmed by an immunoprecipitation assay. The level of transcripts and protein of SIP did not differ for all growth conditions tested, indicating that regulation of the SIP-SPB interaction, if any, is not through modulation of sip or spb expression but rather by modification of the proteins.

  9. Linking Hematopoietic Differentiation to Co-Expressed Sets of Pluripotency-Associated and Imprinted Genes and to Regulatory microRNA-Transcription Factor Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Mohamed; Trumm, Johannes; Spaniol, Christian; Sethi, Riccha; Irhimeh, Mohammad R.; Fuellen, Georg; Paulsen, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance of cell pluripotency, differentiation, and reprogramming are regulated by complex gene regulatory networks (GRNs) including monoallelically-expressed imprinted genes. Besides transcriptional control, epigenetic modifications and microRNAs contribute to cellular differentiation. As a model system for studying the capacity of cells to preserve their pluripotency state and the onset of differentiation and subsequent specialization, murine hematopoiesis was used and compared to embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as a control. Using published microarray data, the expression profiles of two sets of genes, pluripotent and imprinted, were compared to a third set of known hematopoietic genes. We found that more than half of the pluripotent and imprinted genes are clearly upregulated in ESCs but subsequently repressed during hematopoiesis. The remaining genes were either upregulated in hematopoietic progenitors or in differentiated blood cells. The three gene sets each consist of three similarly behaving gene groups with similar expression profiles in various lineages of the hematopoietic system as well as in ESCs. To explain this co-regulation behavior, we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms of pluripotent and imprinted genes and their regulator/target miRNAs in six different hematopoietic lineages. Therewith, lineage-specific transcription factor (TF)-miRNA regulatory networks were generated and their topologies and functional impacts during hematopoiesis were analyzed. This led to the identification of TF-miRNA co-regulatory motifs, for which we validated the contribution to the cellular development of the corresponding lineage in terms of statistical significance and relevance to biological evidence. This analysis also identified key miRNAs and TFs/genes that might play important roles in the derived lineage networks. These molecular associations suggest new aspects of the cellular regulation of the onset of cellular differentiation and

  10. Bioinformatics annotation of the hypothetical proteins found by omics techniques can help to disclose additional virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Gómez, Antonio; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2009-10-01

    The advent of genomics should have facilitated the identification of microbial virulence factors, a key objective for vaccine design. When the bacterial pathogen infects the host it expresses a set of genes, a number of them being virulence factors. Among the genes identified by techniques as microarrays, in vivo expression technology, signature-tagged mutagenesis and differential fluorescence induction there are many related to cellular stress, basal metabolism, etc., which cannot be directly involved in virulence, or at least cannot be considered useful candidates to be deleted for designing a live attenuated vaccine. Among the genes disclosed by these methodologies there are a number of hypothetical or unknown proteins. As they can hide some true virulence factors, we have reannotated all of these hypothetical proteins from several respiratory pathogens by a careful and in-depth analysis of each one. Although some of the re-annotations match with functions that can be related to microbial virulence, the identification of virulence factors remains difficult.

  11. Employing Lead Thiocyanate Additive to Reduce the Hysteresis and Boost the Fill Factor of Planar Perovskite Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Weijun; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Zhao, Dewei; Xiao, Zewen; Schulz, Philip; Harvey, Steven P.; Liao, Weiqiang; Meng, Weiwei; Yu, Yue; Cimaroli, Alexander J.; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Zhu, Kai; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Fang, Guojia; Mitzi, David B.; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-05-04

    Lead thiocyanate in the perovskite precursor can increase the grain size of a perovskite thin film and reduce the conductivity of the grain boundaries, leading to perovskite solar cells with reduced hysteresis and enhanced fill factor. A planar perovskite solar cell with grain boundary and interface passivation achieves a steady-state efficiency of 18.42%.

  12. Interferon regulatory factor-two restricts expression of interferon-stimulated genes to the endometrial stroma and glandular epithelium of the ovine uterus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y; Johnson, G A; Burghardt, R C; Berghman, L R; Joyce, M M; Taylor, K M; Stewart, M D; Bazer, F W; Spencer, T E

    2001-10-01

    Interferon tau (IFNtau) is the signal for maternal recognition of pregnancy in ruminants. The positive effects of IFNtau on IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression are mediated by ISG factor 3 (ISGF3), which is composed of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 1, Stat 2, and IFN regulatory factor-9 (IRF-9), and by gamma-activated factor (GAF), which is a Stat 1 homodimer. Induction of ISGs, such as ISG17 and 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase, by IFNtau during pregnancy is limited to the endometrial stroma (S) and glandular epithelium (GE) of the ovine uterus. The IRF-2, a potent transcriptional repressor of ISG expression, is expressed in the luminal epithelium (LE). This study determined effects of the estrous cycle, pregnancy, and IFNtau on expression of Stat 1, Stat 2, IRF-9, IRF-1, and IRF-2 genes in the ovine endometrium. In cyclic ewes, Stat 1, Stat 2, IRF-1, and IRF-9 mRNA and protein were detected at low levels in the S and GE. During pregnancy, expression of these genes increased only in the S and GE. Expression of IRF-2 was detected only in the LE and superficial GE (sGE) of both cyclic and pregnant ewes. In cyclic ewes, intrauterine administration of IFNtau stimulated Stat 1, Stat 2, IRF-9, and IRF-1 expression in the endometrium. Ovine IRF-2 repressed transcriptional activity driven by IFN-stimulated response elements that bind ISGF3, but not by gamma-activation sequences that bind GAF. These results suggest that IRF-2 in the LE and sGE restricts IFNtau induction of ISGs to the S and GE. In the S and GE, IFNtau hyperactivation of ISG expression likely involves formation and actions of the transcription factors ISGF3 and, perhaps, IRF-1.

  13. Neurotropic arboviruses induce interferon regulatory factor 3-mediated neuronal responses that are cytoprotective, interferon independent, and inhibited by Western equine encephalitis virus capsid.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Daniel C; Lazear, Helen M; Farmer, Jocelyn R; Diamond, Michael S; Miller, David J

    2013-02-01

    Cell-intrinsic innate immune responses mediated by the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) are often vital for early pathogen control, and effective responses in neurons may be crucial to prevent the irreversible loss of these critical central nervous system cells after infection with neurotropic pathogens. To investigate this hypothesis, we used targeted molecular and genetic approaches with cultured neurons to study cell-intrinsic host defense pathways primarily using the neurotropic alphavirus western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV). We found that WEEV activated IRF-3-mediated neuronal innate immune pathways in a replication-dependent manner, and abrogation of IRF-3 function enhanced virus-mediated injury by WEEV and the unrelated flavivirus St. Louis encephalitis virus. Furthermore, IRF-3-dependent neuronal protection from virus-mediated cytopathology occurred independently of autocrine or paracrine type I interferon activity. Despite being partially controlled by IRF-3-dependent signals, WEEV also disrupted antiviral responses by inhibiting pattern recognition receptor pathways. This antagonist activity was mapped to the WEEV capsid gene, which disrupted signal transduction downstream of IRF-3 activation and was independent of capsid-mediated inhibition of host macromolecular synthesis. Overall, these results indicate that innate immune pathways have important cytoprotective activity in neurons and contribute to limiting injury associated with infection by neurotropic arboviruses.

  14. Identification of a melanocyte-specific, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor-dependent regulatory element in the intronic duplication causing hair greying and melanoma in horses.

    PubMed

    Sundström, Elisabeth; Komisarczuk, Anna Z; Jiang, Lin; Golovko, Anna; Navratilova, Pavla; Rinkwitz, Silke; Becker, Thomas S; Andersson, Leif

    2012-01-01

    Greying with age in horses is an autosomal dominant trait, characterized by hair greying, high incidence of melanoma and vitiligo-like depigmentation. Previous studies have revealed that the causative mutation for this phenotype is a 4.6-kb intronic duplication in STX17 (Syntaxin 17). By using reporter constructs in transgenic zebrafish, we show that a construct containing two copies of the duplicated sequence acts as a strong enhancer in neural crest cells and has subsequent melanophore-specific activity during zebrafish embryonic development whereas a single copy of the duplicated sequence acts as a weak enhancer, consistent with the phenotypic manifestation of the mutation in horses. We further used luciferase assays to investigate regulatory regions in the duplication, to reveal tissue-specific activities of these elements. One region upregulated the reporter gene expression in a melanocyte-specific manner and contained two microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) binding sites, essential for the activity. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor regulates melanocyte development, and these binding sites are outstanding candidates for mediating the melanocyte-specific activity of the element. These results provide strong support for the causative nature of the duplication and constitute an explanation for the melanocyte-specific effects of the Grey allele.

  15. Decay-accelerating factor (CD55), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored complement regulatory protein, is a receptor for several echoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bergelson, J M; Chan, M; Solomon, K R; St John, N F; Lin, H; Finberg, R W

    1994-01-01

    Echoviruses are human pathogens belonging to the picornavirus family. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface protein that protects cells from lysis by autologous complement. Anti-DAF monoclonal antibodies prevented echovirus 7 attachment to susceptible cells and protected cells from infection. HeLa cells specifically lost the capacity to bind echovirus 7 when treated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme that releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, indicating that the virus receptor, like DAF, is a GPI-anchored protein. Although Chinese hamster ovary cells do not bind echovirus 7, transfectants expressing human DAF bound virus efficiently, and binding was prevented by pretreatment with an anti-DAF monoclonal antibody. Anti-DAF antibodies prevented infection by at least six echovirus serotypes. These results indicate that DAF is the receptor mediating attachment and infection by several echoviruses. Images PMID:7517044

  16. NAC transcription factor ORE1 and senescence-induced BIFUNCTIONAL NUCLEASE1 (BFN1) constitute a regulatory cascade in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Matallana-Ramirez, Lilian P; Rauf, Mamoona; Farage-Barhom, Sarit; Dortay, Hakan; Xue, Gang-Ping; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang; Lers, Amnon; Balazadeh, Salma; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    Senescence is a highly regulated process that involves the action of a large number of transcription factors. The NAC transcription factor ORE1 (ANAC092) has recently been shown to play a critical role in positively controlling senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana; however, no direct target gene through which it exerts its molecular function has been identified previously. Here, we report that BIFUNCTIONAL NUCLEASE1 (BFN1), a well-known senescence-enhanced gene, is directly regulated by ORE1. We detected elevated expression of BFN1 already 2 h after induction of ORE1 in estradiol-inducible ORE1 overexpression lines and 6 h after transfection of Arabidopsis mesophyll cell protoplasts with a 35S:ORE1 construct. ORE1 and BFN1 expression patterns largely overlap, as shown by promoter-reporter gene (GUS) fusions, while BFN1 expression in senescent leaves and the abscission zones of maturing flower organs was virtually absent in ore1 mutant background. In vitro binding site assays revealed a bipartite ORE1 binding site, similar to that of ORS1, a paralog of ORE1. A bipartite ORE1 binding site was identified in the BFN1 promoter; mutating the cis-element within the context of the full-length BFN1 promoter drastically reduced ORE1-mediated transactivation capacity in transiently transfected Arabidopsis mesophyll cell protoplasts. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrates in vivo binding of ORE1 to the BFN1 promoter. We also demonstrate binding of ORE1 in vivo to the promoters of two other senescence-associated genes, namely SAG29/SWEET15 and SINA1, supporting the central role of ORE1 during senescence.

  17. Overexpression of hepatocyte growth factor in SBMA model mice has an additive effect on combination therapy with castration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Huang, Zhe; Jiang, Yue-Mei; Kondo, Naohide; Iida, Madoka; Tohnai, Genki; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-25

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ)-encoding tract within the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic features of SBMA are motor neuron loss in the spinal cord and brainstem and diffuse nuclear accumulation and nuclear inclusions of mutant AR in residual motor neurons and certain visceral organs. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a polypeptide growth factor which has neuroprotective properties. To investigate whether HGF overexpression can affect disease progression in a mouse model of SBMA, we crossed SBMA transgenic model mice expressing an AR gene with an expanded CAG repeat with mice overexpressing HGF. Here, we report that high expression of HGF induces Akt phosphorylation and modestly ameliorated motor symptoms in an SBMA transgenic mouse model treated with or without castration. These findings suggest that HGF overexpression can provide a potential therapeutic avenue as a combination therapy with disease-modifying therapies in SBMA.

  18. Smoking and polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolism and DNA repair genes are additive risk factors affecting bladder cancer in Northern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rouissi, Kamel; Ouerhani, Slah; Hamrita, Bechr; Bougatef, Karim; Marrakchi, Raja; Cherif, Mohamed; Ben Slama, Mohamed Riadh; Bouzouita, Mohamed; Chebil, Mohamed; Ben Ammar Elgaaied, Amel

    2011-12-01

    Cancer epidemiology has undergone marked development since the nineteen-fifties. One of the most spectacular and specific contributions was the demonstration of the massive effect of smoking and genetic polymorphisms on the occurrence of bladder cancer. The tobacco carcinogens are metabolized by various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the super-families of N-acetyltransferases (NAT) and glutathione S-transferases (GST). DNA repair is essential to an individual's ability to respond to damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Alterations in DNA repair genes may affect cancer risk by influencing individual susceptibility to this environmental exposure. Polymorphisms in NAT2, GST and DNA repair genes alter the ability of these enzymes to metabolize carcinogens or to repair alterations caused by this process. We have conducted a case-control study to assess the role of smoking, slow NAT2 variants, GSTM1 and GSTT1 null, and XPC, XPD, XPG nucleotide excision-repair (NER) genotypes in bladder cancer development in North Tunisia. Taken alone, each gene unless NAT2 did not appear to be a factor affecting bladder cancer susceptibility. For the NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes, the NAT2*5/*7 diplotype was found to have a 7-fold increased risk to develop bladder cancer (OR = 7.14; 95% CI: 1.30-51.41). However, in tobacco consumers, we have shown that Null GSTM1, Wild GSTT1, Slow NAT2, XPC (CC) and XPG (CC) are genetic risk factors for the disease. When combined together in susceptible individuals compared to protected individuals these risk factors give an elevated OR (OR = 61). So, we have shown a strong cumulative effect of tobacco and different combinations of studied genetic risk factors which lead to a great susceptibility to bladder cancer.

  19. Regulatory and Functional Connection of Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor and Anti-Metastatic Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor in Melanoma1

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Barral, Asunción; Orgaz, Jose Luis; Baquero, Pablo; Ali, Zaheer; Moreno, Alberto; Tiana, María; Gómez, Valentí; Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica; Cañadas, Carmen; Zazo, Sandra; Bertolotto, Corine; Davidson, Irwin; Rodríguez-Peralto, Jose Luis; Palmero, Ignacio; Rojo, Federico; Jensen, Lasse Dahl; del Peso, Luis; Jiménez, Benilde

    2014-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily, has potent anti-metastatic effects in cutaneous melanoma through its direct actions on endothelial and melanoma cells. Here we show that PEDF expression positively correlates with microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) in melanoma cell lines and human samples. High PEDF and MITF expression is characteristic of low aggressive melanomas classified according to molecular and pathological criteria, whereas both factors are decreased in senescent melanocytes and naevi. Importantly, MITF silencing down-regulates PEDF expression in melanoma cell lines and primary melanocytes, suggesting that the correlation in the expression reflects a causal relationship. In agreement, analysis of Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) data sets revealed three MITF binding regions within the first intron of SERPINF1, and reporter assays demonstrated that the binding of MITF to these regions is sufficient to drive transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that exogenous PEDF expression efficiently halts in vitro migration and invasion, as well as in vivo dissemination of melanoma cells induced by MITF silencing. In summary, these results identify PEDF as a novel transcriptional target of MITF and support a relevant functional role for the MITF-PEDF axis in the biology of melanoma. PMID:25030625

  20. Prostaglandin E2 Suppresses Antifungal Immunity by Inhibiting Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Function and Interleukin-17 Expression in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Patricia A.; Vithayathil, Paul J.; Janelsins, Brian M.; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Williamson, Peter R.; Datta, Sandip K.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY T helper 17 (Th17) cells play an important role in mucosal host defense through production of the signature cytokines IL-17 and IL-22. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been shown to enhance IL-17 production by mature Th17 cells. However, when present during Th17 differentiation, we found that PGE2 inhibited the transcription factor IRF4 and suppressed production of IL-17 but not IL-22. We show that IRF4 was required for IL-17 expression but inhibited IL-22 expression, highlighting the potential for discordant regulation of these two cytokines in Th17 cells. The pathogenic fungus, Cryptococcus neoformans, produces PGE2 and we found that it uses PGE2- and IRF4-dependent mechanisms to specifically inhibit induction of IL-17 during Th17 differentiation. Blockade of host PGE2 during infection led to increased IL-17 production from CD4+T cells and increased survival of mice. These findings suggest that host- or pathogen-derived PGE2 can act directly on Th17 cells during differentiation to inhibit IL-17-dependent anti-microbial responses. PMID:22464170

  1. Intratumoral interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 but not IRF-2 is of relevance in predicting patient outcome in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeimet, Alain G; Reimer, Daniel; Wolf, Dominik; Fiegl, Heidi; Concin, Nicole; Wiedemair, Annemarie; Wolf, Anna M; Rumpold, Holger; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Marth, Christian

    2009-05-15

    IRF-1 and IRF-2 expression was determined by real-time PCR in 138 ovarian cancer samples and 30 healthy ovarian biopsies and was correlated with the expression of other relevant immunologic parameters and common clinicopathologic variables. Regulation of IRF-1 and IRF-2 was evaluated by cytokine treatment of various ovarian cancer cell lines, human peritoneal mesothelial cells and ovarian surface epithelium. IRF-1 but not IRF-2 was constitutively over-expressed in 5 of 7 ovarian cancer cell lines. Both IRFs were inducible with IFN-gamma and to a lesser extent with IL-1 or TNF-alpha, but not with IL-6. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment down-regulated both IRFs. In ovarian cancer samples only IRF-1, but not IRF-2 mRNA, was up-regulated when compared with healthy ovarian tissue. IRF-1 but not IRF-2 expression was significantly associated with interferon (IFN)-gamma and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3). In univariate survival analysis, strong expression of IRF-1 and IRF-2 predicted improved disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). In Cox regression analyses, IRF-1 retained independent prognostic significance for DFS and OS and IFN-gamma for OS. In contrast to other solid tumors, IRF-2 expression cannot be regarded as a classic oncoprotein associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer. Of the immunologic parameters investigated, intratumoral IRF-1 expression is the most powerful independent predictor of a favorable clinical outcome.

  2. Epstein–Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B.; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G.; Sinclair, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  3. Francisella tularensis modulates a distinct subset of regulatory factors and sustains mitochondrial integrity to impair human neutrophil apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Jenna M.; Kinkead, Lauren C.; McCaffrey, Ramona L.; Allen, Lee-Ann H.

    2016-01-01

    Tularemia is a disease characterized by profound neutrophil accumulation and tissue destruction. The causative organism, Francisella tularensis, is a facultative intracellular bacterium that replicates in neutrophil cytosol, inhibits caspase activation, and profoundly prolongs cell lifespan. Herein we identify unique features of this infection and provide fundamental insight into the mechanisms of apoptosis inhibition. Mitochondria are critical regulators of neutrophil apoptosis. We demonstrate that F. tularensis significantly inhibits Bax translocation and Bid processing through 24–48 h of infection, and in this manner sustains mitochondrial integrity. Downstream of mitochondria, XIAP and PCNA inhibit caspase-9 and caspase-3 by direct binding. Notably, we find that PCNA disappeared rapidly and selectively from infected cells, thereby demonstrating that it is not essential for neutrophil survival, whereas upregulation of calpastatin correlated with diminished calpain activity and reduced XIAP degradation. In addition, R-roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor developed for treatment of cancer that also induces neutrophil apoptosis and can promote resolution of several infectious and inflammatory disorders. Herein we confirm the ability of R-roscovitine to induce neutrophil apoptosis, yet also demonstrate that its efficacy is significantly impaired by F. tularensis. Collectively, our findings advance understanding of neutrophil apoptosis and its capacity to be manipulated by pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26906922

  4. Additive clinical value of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor for prediction of chronic heart failure outcome.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Shinpei; Shishido, Tetsuro; Honda, Yuki; Narumi, Taro; Otaki, Yoichiro; Kinoshita, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hiroki; Arimoto, Takanori; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Kubota, Isao

    2016-04-01

    The importance of the central nervous system in cardiovascular events has been recognized. Recently, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophic factor family, is involved in depression mechanisms and also in stress and anxiety. Because BDNF is reported about cardioprotective role, we elucidated whether BDNF is associated with cardiovascular events in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We examined serum BDNF levels in 134 patients with CHF and 23 control subjects. The patients were followed to register cardiac events for a median of 426 days. BDNF was significantly lower in CHF patients than in control subjects (25.8 ± 8.4 vs 14.7 ± 8.4, P < 0.0001). Serum BDNF was also lower in patients with cardiac events than in event-free patients (16.1 ± 8.0 vs 12.5 ± 8.5, P < 0.0001). The cutoff value of BDNF was determined by performing receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that patients with low levels of BDNF experienced higher rates of cardiac events than those with high levels of BDNF. Multivariate Cox hazard analysis demonstrated that low BDNF levels (≤12.4 ng/mL) were an independent prognostic factor for cardiac events (hazard ratio 2.932, 95 % confidence interval 1.622-5.301; P = 0.0004). Adding levels of BDNF to the model with BNP levels, age, and eGFR for the prediction of cardiac events yielded significant net reclassification improvement of 0.429 (P < 0.001) and an integrated discrimination improvement of 0.101 (P < 0.001). Low serum BDNF levels were found in patients with CHF, and these levels were found to be independently associated with an increased risk of cardiac events.

  5. Regulatory Action of Calcium Ion on Cyclic AMP-Enhanced Expression of Implantation-Related Factors in Human Endometrial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kusama, Kazuya; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Tamura, Kazuhiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Isaka, Keiichi; Tachikawa, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Decidualization of human endometrial stroma and gland development is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP), but the role of intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+) on cAMP mediated-signaling in human endometrial stroma and glandular epithelia has not been well-characterized. The present study was designed to investigate the role of intracellular Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-decidualization and gland maturation events, which can be identified by the up-regulation of prolactin and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)1 in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and glandular epithelial EM-1 cells. Increases in decidual prolactin and IGFBP-1 transcript levels, induced by cAMP-elevating agents forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, were inhibited by Ca2+ influx into ESCs with Ca2+ ionophores (alamethicin, ionomycin) in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibitors of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC), nifedipine and verapamil, enhanced the decidual gene expression. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ store, up-regulated prolactin and IGFBP-1 expression. Ca2+ ionophores decreased intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas nifedipine, verapamil or dantrolene increased cAMP concentrations in ESCs. In glandular epithelial cells, similar responses in COX2 expression and PGE2 production were found when intracellular cAMP levels were up-regulated by decreases in Ca2+ concentrations. Thus, a marked decrease in cytosolic Ca2+ levels caused the elevation of cAMP concentrations, resulting in enhanced expression of implantation-related factors including decidual markers. These findings suggest that fluctuation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations alters intracellular cAMP levels, which then regulate differentiation of endometrial stromal and glandular epithelial cells. PMID:26161798

  6. Regulatory Action of Calcium Ion on Cyclic AMP-Enhanced Expression of Implantation-Related Factors in Human Endometrial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kusama, Kazuya; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Tamura, Kazuhiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Isaka, Keiichi; Tachikawa, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Decidualization of human endometrial stroma and gland development is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP), but the role of intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+) on cAMP mediated-signaling in human endometrial stroma and glandular epithelia has not been well-characterized. The present study was designed to investigate the role of intracellular Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-decidualization and gland maturation events, which can be identified by the up-regulation of prolactin and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)1 in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and glandular epithelial EM-1 cells. Increases in decidual prolactin and IGFBP-1 transcript levels, induced by cAMP-elevating agents forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, were inhibited by Ca2+ influx into ESCs with Ca2+ ionophores (alamethicin, ionomycin) in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibitors of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC), nifedipine and verapamil, enhanced the decidual gene expression. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ store, up-regulated prolactin and IGFBP-1 expression. Ca2+ ionophores decreased intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas nifedipine, verapamil or dantrolene increased cAMP concentrations in ESCs. In glandular epithelial cells, similar responses in COX2 expression and PGE2 production were found when intracellular cAMP levels were up-regulated by decreases in Ca2+ concentrations. Thus, a marked decrease in cytosolic Ca2+ levels caused the elevation of cAMP concentrations, resulting in enhanced expression of implantation-related factors including decidual markers. These findings suggest that fluctuation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations alters intracellular cAMP levels, which then regulate differentiation of endometrial stromal and glandular epithelial cells.

  7. Mammals of Australia's tropical savannas: a conceptual model of assemblage structure and regulatory factors in the Kimberley region.

    PubMed

    Radford, Ian J; Dickman, Christopher R; Start, Antony N; Palmer, Carol; Carnes, Karin; Everitt, Corrin; Fairman, Richard; Graham, Gordon; Partridge, Thalie; Thomson, Allan

    2014-01-01

    We construct a state-and-transition model for mammals in tropical savannas in northern Australia to synthesize ecological knowledge and understand mammalian declines. We aimed to validate the existence of alternative mammal assemblage states similar to those in arid Australian grasslands, and to speculate on transition triggers. Based on the arid grassland model, we hypothesized that assemblages are partitioned across rainfall gradients and between substrates. We also predicted that assemblages typical of arid regions in boom periods would be prevalent in savannas with higher and more regular rainfall. Data from eight mammal surveys from the Kimberley region, Western Australia (1994 to 2011) were collated. Survey sites were partitioned across rainfall zones and habitats. Data allowed us to identify three assemblage states: State 0:--low numbers of mammals, State II:--dominated by omnivorous rodents and State III:--dominated by rodents and larger marsupials. Unlike arid grasslands, assemblage dominance by insectivorous dasyurids (State I) did not occur in savannas. Mammal assemblages were partitioned across rainfall zones and between substrates as predicted, but-unlike arid regions-were not related strongly to yearly rainfall. Mammal assemblage composition showed high regional stability, probably related to high annual rainfall and predictable wet season resource pulses. As a consequence, we speculate that perpetually booming assemblages in savannas allow top-down control of the ecosystem, with suppression of introduced cats by the dingo, the region's top predator. Under conditions of low or erratic productivity, imposed increasingly by intense fire regimes and introduced herbivore grazing, dingoes may not limit impacts of cats on native mammals. These interacting factors may explain contemporary declines of savanna mammals as well as historical declines in arid Australia. The cat-ecosystem productivity hypothesis raised here differs from the already-articulated cat

  8. Mammals of Australia's Tropical Savannas: A Conceptual Model of Assemblage Structure and Regulatory Factors in the Kimberley Region

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Ian J.; Dickman, Christopher R.; Start, Antony N.; Palmer, Carol; Carnes, Karin; Everitt, Corrin; Fairman, Richard; Graham, Gordon; Partridge, Thalie; Thomson, Allan

    2014-01-01

    We construct a state-and-transition model for mammals in tropical savannas in northern Australia to synthesize ecological knowledge and understand mammalian declines. We aimed to validate the existence of alternative mammal assemblage states similar to those in arid Australian grasslands, and to speculate on transition triggers. Based on the arid grassland model, we hypothesized that assemblages are partitioned across rainfall gradients and between substrates. We also predicted that assemblages typical of arid regions in boom periods would be prevalent in savannas with higher and more regular rainfall. Data from eight mammal surveys from the Kimberley region, Western Australia (1994 to 2011) were collated. Survey sites were partitioned across rainfall zones and habitats. Data allowed us to identify three assemblage states: State 0:- low numbers of mammals, State II:- dominated by omnivorous rodents and State III:- dominated by rodents and larger marsupials. Unlike arid grasslands, assemblage dominance by insectivorous dasyurids (State I) did not occur in savannas. Mammal assemblages were partitioned across rainfall zones and between substrates as predicted, but—unlike arid regions—were not related strongly to yearly rainfall. Mammal assemblage composition showed high regional stability, probably related to high annual rainfall and predictable wet season resource pulses. As a consequence, we speculate that perpetually booming assemblages in savannas allow top-down control of the ecosystem, with suppression of introduced cats by the dingo, the region's top predator. Under conditions of low or erratic productivity, imposed increasingly by intense fire regimes and introduced herbivore grazing, dingoes may not limit impacts of cats on native mammals. These interacting factors may explain contemporary declines of savanna mammals as well as historical declines in arid Australia. The cat-ecosystem productivity hypothesis raised here differs from the already

  9. Effects of transforming growth factor beta-1 on growth-regulatory genes in tumour-derived human oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, I. C.; Patel, V.; Sandy, J. R.; Prime, S. S.; Yeudall, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the effect of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta 1) on c-myc, RB1, junB and p53 expression together with pRb phosphorylation, in carcinoma-derived and normal human oral keratinocytes with a range of inhibitory responses to this ligand. Amplification of c-myc was observed in eight of eight tumour-derived cell lines and resulted in corresponding mRNA expression. The down-regulation of c-myc expression by TGF-beta 1 predominantly reflected growth inhibition by TGF-beta 1, but in two of eight tumour-derived cell lines which were partially responsive to TGF-beta 1 c-myc expression was unaltered by this ligand. While RB1 mRNA levels were unaltered by TGF-beta 1, the ligand caused the accumulation of the underphosphorylated form of the Rb protein in all cells irrespective of TGF-beta 1-induced growth arrest. junB expression was up-regulated by TGF-beta 1 in cells with a range of growth inhibitory responses. All cells contained mutant p53. TGF-beta 1 did not affect p53 mRNA expression in both tumour-derived and normal keratinocytes and there was no alteration in p53 protein levels in keratinocytes expressing stable p53 protein following TGF-beta 1 treatment. The data indicate that TGF-beta-induced growth control can exist independently of the presence of mutant p53 and the control of Rb phosphorylation and c-myc down-regulation. It may be that TGF-beta growth inhibition occurs via multiple mechanisms and that the loss of one pathway during tumour progression does not necessarily result in the abrogation of TGF-beta-induced growth control. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7547241

  10. [Helicobacter pylori infection as additional risk factor of the development of NSAID-gastropatia effects at the patients with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Samsonov, A A; Lezhneva, Iu A; Andreev, N G; Salova, L M

    2009-01-01

    Prevalence of osteoartrosis disease is high among the population. The main places in treatment of this pathology occupy NSAID. Intake of NSAID is lead to the development of NSAID-gastropatia. During last years H. pylori infection was numbered with risk factors of the NSAID-gastropatia development. In this review considered researches which are devoted to studying ties between H. pylori and NSAID. Data of the using eradication therapy with purpose of prevention and treatment of NSAID-gastropatia associated with H. pylori are shown in this review.

  11. Addition of Epidermal Growth Factor Improves the Rate of Sulfur Mustard Wound Healing in an In Vitro Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-26

    diabetic foot ulcers .41 A phase IV, postmarketing surveillance study of REGEN-D 150 confirmed faster healing of diabetic foot ulcers and an increase in...untreated control corneas . However, lower doses of KGF had no effect, nor did the 100 ng/mL of KGF dose, after the day 2 time point. This study also...recombinant human epidermal growth factor (REGEN-DTM 150) in healing diabetic foot ulcers . Wounds. 2006;18(7):186–96. 42. Mohan VK. Recombinant human

  12. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity.

  13. Association Study Between Metabolic Syndrome and rs8066560 Polymorphism in the Promoter Region of Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Transcription Factor 1 Gene in Iranian Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh-Mahabadi, Hajar; Emadi-Baygi, Modjtaba; Nikpour, Parvaneh; Kelishadi, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a prevalent disorder in pediatric age groups, described by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF-1) induces the expression of a family of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis. Moreover, dysregulation of miR-33b, which is located within the intron 17 of the SREBF-1 gene, disrupts fatty acid oxidation and insulin signaling, thus leading to MetS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between SREBF-1 rs8066560 polymorphism and MetS in Iranian children and adolescents. Methods: This study includes 100 MetS and 100 normal individuals aged 9–19 years. Anthropological and biochemical indexes were measured. The -1099G > A polymorphism was genotyped by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Significant differences were observed in anthropometric measurements and lipid profiles between MetS and normal children. There were no differences in the genotype frequencies or allele distribution for -1099G > A polymorphism between MetS and control groups. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the MetS GG group than in the A allele carrier group. The genotype AA controls had significantly increased cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels than AG genotypes. By logistic regression using different genetic models, no significant association was observed between SREBF-1 rs8066560 polymorphism and the risk of MetS. Conclusions: We conclude that the -1099G > A variant on SREBF-1 gene associated with serum lipid profiles, however, it may not be a major risk factor for the MetS in Iranian children and adolescents. PMID:27076879

  14. A new single nucleotide polymorphism in the insulin-like growth factor I regulatory region associates with colorectal cancer risk in singapore chinese.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hui-Lee; Delellis, Katherine; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Koh, Woon-Puay; Van Den Berg, David; Lee, Hin-Peng; Yu, Mimi C; Ingles, Sue A

    2005-01-01

    Elevated levels of plasma insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) are a potential risk factor for several cancers, including colorectal cancer. Physiologic levels of plasma IGF-I vary greatly; this variation may be in part genetically determined. We identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in perfect linkage disequilibrium with each other and in partial linkage disequilibrium with a previously studied cytosine-adenine microsatellite [-969(CA)(n)]. We investigated one of the SNPs, -533T/C,and the 969(CA)(n) in relation to the risk of colorectal cancer in a case-control study nested within a cohort of Singapore Chinese (cases/controls = 290:873). The (CA)(21) allele, rather than the previously implicated (CA)(19) allele, was associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (odds ratio for 21/21 versus all other genotypes, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.84). For the -533C/T SNP, persons carrying one or more copies of the C allele had a decreased in risk of colorectal cancer compared with noncarriers (odds ratio for CC/CT versus TT, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-0.82). This association was specific for colon, as opposed to rectal cancer and was modified by age. We also examined a functional insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3) promoter SNP, -202 A/C, previously reported to predict serum IGFBP3 levels. Although we were able to confirm this genotype-phenotype association, the -202A/C IGFBP3 SNP was not significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk. In conclusion, we report a novel SNP in the IGF-I regulatory region that is associated with colorectal cancer risk.

  15. Mapping the Regulatory Network for Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carol; Stringer, Anne M.; Mao, Chunhong; Palumbo, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) encodes proteins required for invasion of gut epithelial cells. The timing of invasion is tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network. The transcription factor (TF) HilD is the master regulator of this process and senses environmental signals associated with invasion. HilD activates transcription of genes within and outside SPI-1, including six other TFs. Thus, the transcriptional program associated with host cell invasion is controlled by at least 7 TFs. However, very few of the regulatory targets are known for these TFs, and the extent of the regulatory network is unclear. In this study, we used complementary genomic approaches to map the direct regulatory targets of all 7 TFs. Our data reveal a highly complex and interconnected network that includes many previously undescribed regulatory targets. Moreover, the network extends well beyond the 7 TFs, due to the inclusion of many additional TFs and noncoding RNAs. By comparing gene expression profiles of regulatory targets for the 7 TFs, we identified many uncharacterized genes that are likely to play direct roles in invasion. We also uncovered cross talk between SPI-1 regulation and other regulatory pathways, which, in turn, identified gene clusters that likely share related functions. Our data are freely available through an intuitive online browser and represent a valuable resource for the bacterial research community. PMID:27601571

  16. HlMyb3, a putative regulatory factor in hop (Humulus lupulus L.), shows diverse biological effects in heterologous transgenotes.

    PubMed

    Matousek, Jaroslav; Kocábek, Tomás; Patzak, Josef; Skopek, Josef; Maloukh, Lina; Heyerick, Arne; Fussy, Zoltán; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Keukeleire, Denis De

    2007-09-19

    A hop-specific cDNA library from glandular tissue-enriched hop cones was screened for Myb transcription factors. cDNA encoding for R2R3 Myb, designated HlMyb3, was cloned and characterized. According to the amino acid (aa) sequence, HlMyb3 shows the highest homology to GhMyb5 from cotton and is unrelated to the previously characterized HlMyb1 from the hop. Southern blot analyses indicated that HlMyb3 is a unique gene, which was detected in various Humulus lupulus cultivars, but not in Humulus japonicus. Reverse transcription and real-time PCR revealed the highest levels of HlMyb3 mRNA in hop cones at a late stage of maturation and in colored petiole epidermis, while the lowest levels were observed in hop flowers. Two alternative open reading frames starting in the N-terminal domain of HlMyb3, encoding for proteins having 269 and 265 amino acids with apparent molecular masses of 30.3 and 29.9 kDa, respectively, were analyzed as transgenes that were overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana benthamiana, and Petunia hybrida plants. Transformation with the longer 269 aa variant designated l-HlMyb3 led to a flowering delay and to a strong inhibition of seed germination in A. thaliana. Nearly complete flower sterility, dwarfing, and leaf curling of P. hybrida and N. benthamiana l-HlMyb3 transgenotes were noted. On the contrary, the shorter 265-aa-encoding s-HlMyb3 transgene led in A. thaliana to the stimulation of initial seed germination, to fast initiation of the lateral roots, and to quite specific branching phenotypes with many long lateral stems formed at angles near 90 degrees . Limited plant sterility but growth stimulation and rather branched phenotypes were evident for s-HlMyb3 transgenotes of P. hybrida and N. benthamiana. It was found that both HlMyb3 transgenes interfere in the accumulation and composition of flavonol glycosides and phenolic acids in transformed plants. These effects on heterologous transgenotes suggest that the HlMyb3 gene may

  17. Breeding site selection by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to large wood additions and factors that influence reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason B.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.; Lightcap, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) with respect to breeding behavior can be partitioned into at least four fitness components: survival to reproduction, competition for breeding sites, success of egg incubation, and suitability of the local environment near breeding sites for early rearing of juveniles. We evaluated the relative influences of habitat features linked to these fitness components with respect to selection of breeding sites by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). We also evaluated associations between breeding site selection and additions of large wood, as the latter were introduced into the study system as a means of restoring habitat conditions to benefit coho salmon. We used a model selection approach to organize specific habitat features into groupings reflecting fitness components and influences of large wood. Results of this work suggest that female coho salmon likely select breeding sites based on a wide range of habitat features linked to all four hypothesized fitness components. More specifically, model parameter estimates indicated that breeding site selection was most strongly influenced by proximity to pool-tail crests and deeper water (mean and maximum depths). Linkages between large wood and breeding site selection were less clear. Overall, our findings suggest that breeding site selection by coho salmon is influenced by a suite of fitness components in addition to the egg incubation environment, which has been the emphasis of much work in the past.

  18. Conservation and evolution of cis-regulatory systems in ascomycete fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Gasch, Audrey P.; Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Fraser, Hunter B.; Berardini, Mark; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-03-15

    Relatively little is known about the mechanisms through which gene expression regulation evolves. To investigate this, we systematically explored the conservation of regulatory networks in fungi by examining the cis-regulatory elements that govern the expression of coregulated genes. We first identified groups of coregulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes enriched for genes with known upstream or downstream cis-regulatory sequences. Reasoning that many of these gene groups are coregulated in related species as well, we performed similar analyses on orthologs of coregulated S. cerevisiae genes in 13 other ascomycete species. We find that many species-specific gene groups are enriched for the same flanking regulatory sequences as those found in the orthologous gene groups from S. cerevisiae, indicating that those regulatory systems have been conserved in multiple ascomycete species. In addition to these clear cases of regulatory conservation, we find examples of cis-element evolution that suggest multiple modes of regulatory diversification, including alterations in transcription factor-binding specificity, incorporation of new gene targets into an existing regulatory system, and cooption of regulatory systems to control a different set of genes. We investigated one example in greater detail by measuring the in vitro activity of the S. cerevisiae transcription factor Rpn4p and its orthologs from Candida albicans and Neurospora crassa. Our results suggest that the DNA binding specificity of these proteins has coevolved with the sequences found upstream of the Rpn4p target genes and suggest that Rpn4p has a different function in N. crassa.

  19. Complement regulatory proteins in early human fetal life: CD59, membrane co-factor protein (MCP) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF) are differentially expressed in the developing liver.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, K L; Houlihan, J M; Holmes, C H

    1993-01-01

    The human fetus appears to be capable of protecting itself from maternal complement (C) from an early stage in development by expressing the C regulatory proteins decay-accelerating factor (DAF), membrane co-factor protein (MCP) and CD59 on fetally derived trophoblast at the feto-maternal interface. In this study we have examined the ontogeny of these proteins within the fetus itself and have focused on the liver which represents a major site of haemopoiesis during development. Immunostaining revealed that DAF, MCP and CD59 are all expressed from at least 6 weeks of gestation in the liver but that these proteins display distinct distribution patterns. CD59 was broadly distributed both within the epithelial and haemopoietic compartments, but expression of C3 convertase regulators was more restricted. DAF expression was limited to isolated cells within haemopoietic nests and the epithelium was DAF-negative. Although MCP expression on haemopoietic cells was also limited, by contrast with DAF the developing hepatic epithelium was strongly MCP-positive. Typical CD59 and MCP components were observed in fetal liver extracts by immunoblotting, although liver MCP components consistently migrated 4000-5000 MW ahead of those observed on placental trophoblast. Differences in the distribution of these proteins were also observed between the fetal and adult liver. In particular, by comparison with fetal hepatic epithelium, there was an apparent loss of MCP expression from adult hepatocytes. Thus, MCP appears to be developmentally regulated in the human liver and is expressed in the absence of DAF on the early hepatic epithelium. Overall, this study suggests that C regulatory proteins, and in particular CD59 and MCP, are required from the very early stages of gestation within the fetus itself. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7505254

  20. Activated IL-1RI Signaling Pathway Induces Th17 Cell Differentiation via Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Signaling in Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Yonggang; Markovic-Plese, Silva

    2016-01-01

    IL-1β plays a crucial role in the differentiation of human Th17 cells. We report here that IL-1RI expression is significantly increased in both naive and memory CD4+ T cells derived from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RR MS) patients in comparison to healthy controls. Interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R)I expression is upregulated in the in vitro-differentiated Th17 cells from RR MS patients in comparison to the Th1 and Th2 cell subsets, indicating the role of IL-1R signaling in the Th17 cell differentiation in RR MS. When IL-1RI gene expression was silenced using siRNA, human naive CD4+ T cells cultured in the presence of Th17-polarizing cytokines had a significantly decreased expression of interleukin regulatory factor 4 (IRF4), RORc, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, IL-22, and IL-23R genes, confirming that IL-1RI signaling induces Th17 cell differentiation. Since IL-1R gene expression silencing inhibited IRF4 expression and Th17 differentiation, and IRF4 gene expression silencing inhibited Th17 cell differentiation, our results indicate that IL-1RI induces human Th17 cell differentiation in an IRF4-dependant manner. Our study has identified that IL-1RI-mediated signaling pathway is constitutively activated, leading to an increased Th17 cell differentiation in IRF4-dependent manner in patients with RR MS. PMID:27965670

  1. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase VHL Regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α to Maintain Regulatory T Cell Stability and Suppressive Capacity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee H; Elly, Chris; Park, Yoon; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2015-06-16

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a critical role in immune homeostasis; however, the mechanisms to maintain their function remain unclear. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase VHL is essential for Treg cell function. Mice with Foxp3-restricted VHL deletion displayed massive inflammation associated with excessive Treg cell interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production. VHL-deficient Treg cells failed to prevent colitis induction, but converted into Th1-like effector T cells. VHL intrinsically orchestrated such conversion under both steady and inflammatory conditions followed by Foxp3 downregulation, which was reversed by IFN-γ deficiency. Augmented hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-induced glycolytic reprogramming was required for IFN-γ production. Furthermore, HIF-1α bound directly to the Ifng promoter. HIF-1α knockdown or knockout could reverse the increased IFN-γ by VHL-deficient Treg cells and restore their suppressive function in vivo. These findings indicate that regulation of HIF-1α pathway by VHL is crucial to maintain the stability and suppressive function of Foxp3(+) T cells.

  2. E3 ubiquitin ligase VHL regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α to maintain regulatory T cell stability and suppressive capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee H.; Elly, Chris; Park, Yoon; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a critical role in immune homeostasis; however, the mechanisms to maintain their function remain unclear. Here, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase VHL is essential for Treg cell function. Mice with Foxp3-restricted VHL deletion displayed massive inflammation associated with excessive Treg cell interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production. VHL-deficient Treg cells failed to prevent colitis induction, but converted into Th1-like effector T cells. VHL intrinsically orchestrated such conversion under both steady and inflammatory conditions followed by Foxp3 downregulation, which was reversed by IFN-γ deficiency. Augmented hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-induced glycolytic reprogramming was required for IFN-γ production. Furthermore, HIF-1α bound directly to the Ifng promoter. HIF-1α knockdown or knockout could reverse the increased IFN-γ by VHL-deficient Treg cells and restore their suppressive function in vivo. These findings indicate that regulation of HIF-1α pathway by VHL is crucial to maintain the stability and suppressive function of Foxp3+ T cells. PMID:26084024

  3. Differentiated evolutionary relationships among chordates from comparative alignments of multiple sequences of MyoD and MyoG myogenic regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Oliani, L C; Lidani, K C F; Gabriel, J E

    2015-10-16

    MyoD and MyoG are transcription factors that have essential roles in myogenic lineage determination and muscle differentiation. The purpose of this study was to compare multiple amino acid sequences of myogenic regulatory proteins to infer evolutionary relationships among chordates. Protein sequences from Mus musculus (P10085 and P12979), human Homo sapiens (P15172 and P15173), bovine Bos taurus (Q7YS82 and Q7YS81), wild pig Sus scrofa (P49811 and P49812), quail Coturnix coturnix (P21572 and P34060), chicken Gallus gallus (P16075 and P17920), rat Rattus norvegicus (Q02346 and P20428), domestic water buffalo Bubalus bubalis (D2SP11 and A7L034), and sheep Ovis aries (Q90477 and D3YKV7) were searched from a non-redundant protein sequence database UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, and subsequently analyzed using the Mega6.0 software. MyoD evolutionary analyses revealed the presence of three main clusters with all mammals branched in one cluster, members of the order Rodentia (mouse and rat) in a second branch linked to the first, and birds of the order Galliformes (chicken and quail) remaining isolated in a third. MyoG evolutionary analyses aligned sequences in two main clusters, all mammalian specimens grouped in different sub-branches, and birds clustered in a second branch. These analyses suggest that the evolution of MyoD and MyoG was driven by different pathways.

  4. The cellular distribution of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 is determined by the PDZ-I domain and regulates the malignant progression of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guifang; Gu, Yanan; Hao, Chengcheng; Yuan, Zhu; He, Junqi; Jiang, Wen G.; Cheng, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic role of ectopic expression of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) was recently suggested. Here, we show that NHERF1 was upregulated in high grades compared with low grades. Increased NHERF1 expression was correlated with poor prognosis and poor survival. NHERF1 expression was higher in the nucleus of cancer cells than in contiguous non- mammary epithelial cells. A novel mutation, namely NHERF1 Y24S, was identified in human breast cancer tissues and shown to correspond to a conserved residue in the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1. Truncation and mutation of the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1 increased the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, and this redistribution was associated with the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells, including growth, migration, and adhesion. The present results suggest a role for NHERF1 in the progression of breast cancer mediated by the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, as determined by the truncation or key site mutation of the PDZ-I domain. PMID:27097111

  5. An interferon regulatory factor binding site in the U5 region of the bovine leukemia virus long terminal repeat stimulates Tax-independent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kiermer, V; Van Lint, C; Briclet, D; Vanhulle, C; Kettmann, R; Verdin, E; Burny, A; Droogmans, L

    1998-07-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) replication is controlled by both cis- and trans-acting elements. The virus-encoded transactivator, Tax, is necessary for efficient transcription from the BLV promoter, although it is not present during the early stages of infection. Therefore, sequences that control Tax-independent transcription must play an important role in the initiation of viral gene expression. This study demonstrates that the R-U5 sequence of BLV stimulates Tax-independent reporter gene expression directed by the BLV promoter. R-U5 was also stimulatory when inserted immediately downstream from the transcription initiation site of a heterologous promoter. Progressive deletion analysis of this region revealed that a 46-bp element corresponding to the 5' half of U5 is principally responsible for the stimulation. This element exhibited enhancer activity when inserted upstream or downstream from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. This enhancer contains a binding site for the interferon regulatory factors IRF-1 and IRF-2. A 3-bp mutation that destroys the IRF recognition site caused a twofold decrease in Tax-independent BLV long terminal repeat-driven gene expression. These observations suggest that the IRF binding site in the U5 region of BLV plays a role in the initiation of virus replication.

  6. Interferon regulatory factor-1 activates autophagy to aggravate hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury via the P38/P62 pathway in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yao; Li, Shipeng; Wang, Zhen; He, Jindan; Ding, Yijie; Zhang, Haiming; Yu, Wenli; Shi, Yiwei; Cui, Zilin; Wang, Ximo; Wang, Zhiliang; Sun, Liying; Zhang, Rongxin; Du, Hongyin; Zhu, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence has linked autophagy to a detrimental role in hepatic ischemia- reperfusion (IR) injury (IRI). Here we focus on the role of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) in regulating autophagy to aggravate hepatic IRI. We found that IRF-1 was up-regulated during hepatic IRI and was associated with an activation of the autophagic signaling. This increased IRF-1 expression, which was allied with high autophagic activity, amplified liver damage to IR, an effect which was abrogated by IRF-1 depletion. Moreover, IRF-1 contributed to P38 induced autophagic and apoptotic cell death, that can play a key role in liver dysfunction. The levels of P62 mRNA and protein were increased when P38 was activated and decreased when P38 was inhibited by SB203580. We conclude that IRF-1 functioned as a trigger to activate autophagy via P38 activation and that P62 was required for this P38-mediated autophagy. IRF-1 appears to exert a pivotal role in hepatic IRI, by predisposing hepatocytes to activate an autophagic pathway. Such an effect promotes autophagic cell death through the P38/P62 pathway. The identification of this novel pathway, that links expression levels of IRF-1 with autophagy, may provide new insights for the generation of novel protective therapies directed against hepatic IRI. PMID:28266555

  7. Changes of regulatory T cells, transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-10 in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yong-Chao; Shen, Jian; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Liang, Ling; Bo, Chao-Sheng; Sui, Yi; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-09-01

    Regulatory T lymphocyte cells (Treg) associated with interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) have implicated in the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), yet the existing evidence remains unclear. Hereby we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to characterize the changes in T1DM patients. A total of 1407 T1DM patients and 1373 healthy controls from 40 case-control studies were eventually included in the pooling analysis. Compared with the controls, T1DM patients had decreased frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg (p=0.0003), CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Treg (p=0.020), and the level of TGF-β (p=0.030). Decrease in IL-10 (p=0.14) was not significant. All the changes remained significant when the studies with low NOS scores and publication bias were excluded. In conclusion, peripheral Treg and serum TGF-β are reduced in type 1 diabetes mellitus whereas changes in serum IL-10 are not significant.

  8. 76 FR 6123 - Reducing Regulatory Burden

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... regulatory program more effective and less burdensome in achieving its regulatory objectives. DATES: Written... regulatory objectives, taking into account, among other things, and to the extent practicable, the costs of... by objective scientific evidence. Additionally, the Executive Order directs agencies to consider...

  9. 78 FR 44355 - Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... flexibility agenda. In addition, this document includes an agenda of regulatory actions the Commission expects... requirements of the Regulatory Flexibility Act and Executive Order 12866. DATES: The Commission welcomes... Secretary by July 31, 2013. ADDRESSES: Comments on the regulatory flexibility agenda should be...

  10. Contributions of two-component regulatory systems, alternative sigma factors, and negative regulators to Listeria monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne C; Hu, Yuewei; Chaturongakul, Soraya; Files, Kali D; Bowen, Barbara M; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2008-02-01

    The ability of Listeria monocytogenes to grow at refrigeration temperatures is critical for transmission of this foodborne pathogen. We evaluated the contributions of different transcriptional regulators and two-component regulatory systems to L. monocytogenes cold adaptation and cold growth. L. monocytogenes parent strain 10403S and selected isogenic null mutants in genes encoding four alternative sigma factors (sigB, sigH, sigC, and sigL), two regulators of sigmaB (rsbT and rsbV), two negative regulators (ctsR and hrcA), and 15 two-component response regulators were grown in brain heart infusion broth at 4 degrees C with (i) a high-concentration starting inoculum (10(8) CFU/ml), (ii) a low-concentration starting inoculum (102 CFU/ml), and (iii) a high-concentration starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells. With a starting inoculum of 10(8) CFU/ml, null mutants in genes encoding selected alternative sigma factors (DeltasigH, DeltasigC, and DeltasigL), a negative regulator (DeltactsR), regulators of sigmaB (DeltarsbT and DeltarsbV), and selected two-component response regulators (DeltalisR, Deltalmo1172, and Deltalmo1060) had significantly reduced growth (P < 0.05) compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4 degrees C. The growth defect for DeltasigL was limited and was not confirmed by optical density (OD600) measurement data. With a starting inoculum of 102 CFU/ml and after monitoring growth at 4 degrees C over 84 days, only the DeltactsR strain had a consistent but limited growth defect; the other mutant strains had either no growth defects or limited growth defects apparent at only one or two of the nine sampling points evaluated during the 84-day growth period (DeltasigB, DeltasigC, and Deltalmo1172). With a 10(8) CFU/ml starting inoculum of cold-adapted cells, none of the mutant strains that had a growth defect when inoculation was performed with cells pregrown at 37 degrees C had reduced growth as compared with the parent strain after 12 days at 4

  11. Improvement of low bioavailability of a novel factor Xa inhibitor through formulation of cationic additives in its oral dosage form.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshimine; Kanamaru, Taro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Shinji; Akashi, Mitsuru; Sakuma, Shinji

    2011-12-15

    A clinical trial of (2S)-2-[4-[[(3S)-1-acetimidoyl-3-pyrrolidinyl]oxy]phenyl]-3-(7-amidino-2-naphtyl) propanoic acid (DX-9065) revealed that its oral bioavailability was only 3% when it was administered as a conventional capsule formulation. The low bioavailability of DX-9065 was likely caused by both its poor membrane permeability and its electrostatic interaction with anionic bile acids. We hypothesized that DX-9065 absorption would be enhanced when the cationic drug was free from the complex through its replacement with other cationic substances. Polystyrene nanospheres coated with cationic poly(vinylamine) and cholestyramine, which is clinically used as a cholesterol-lowering agent, dramatically prevented DX-9065 from interacting with chenodeoxycholic acid in vitro. Successive animal experiments showed that bioavailability of DX-9065 administered with these cationic substances was 2-3 times that of DX-9065 administered solely. A dry syrup formulation with one-half of a minimal cholesterol-lowering equivalent dose of cholestyramine was designed, and the clinical trial was resumed. A 1.3-fold increase in bioavailability of DX-9065 was observed when the dry syrup was administered. We successfully demonstrated that DX-9065 absorption was enhanced when the drug was administered with cationic additives; however, it appeared that the absorption-enhancing function of cholestyramine largely depended on its dose. The dose escalation is probably prerequisite for the significant improvement of DX-9065 absorption in humans.

  12. Assessment of the frequency of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+CD127-) in children with hemophilia A: relation to factor VIII inhibitors and disease severity.

    PubMed

    El-Asrar, Mohamed Abo; Hamed, Ahmed El-Saeed; Darwish, Yasser Wagih; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Ismail, Noha Ali

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly growing evidence showed that regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in tolerance to coagulation factors and may be involved in the pathogenesis of inhibitor formation in patients with hemophilia. We determined the percentage of Tregs (CD4CD25CD127) in 45 children with hemophilia A compared with 45 healthy controls, and assessed their relation to the clinical characteristics of patients and factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. Patients were studied stressing on frequency of bleeding attacks, joint pain, history of viral hepatitis, and the received therapy (FVIII precipitate/cryotherapy). FVIII activity and FVIII inhibitors were assessed with flow cytometric analysis of CD4CD25CD127 Tregs. According to residual FVIII activity levels, 30 patients (66.7%) had mild/moderate hemophilia A, whereas 15 (33.3%) patients had severe hemophilia A. The frequency of Tregs was significantly lower among all patients with hemophilia A compared with controls (2.59 ± 1.1 versus 3.73 ± 1.12%; P = 0.002). Tregs were significantly decreased among patients with FVIII inhibitors compared with the inhibitor-negative group (P < 0.001). Patients with hematuria or severe hemophilia A had lower Tregs levels than those without (P = 0.34 and P = 0.011, respectively). A significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of Tregs and FVIII among hemophilia A patients. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of Tregs at 1.91% could differentiate patients with and without FVIII inhibitors, with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 91.3%. We suggest that alteration in the frequency of Tregs in young patients with hemophilia A may contribute to inhibitor formation and disease severity.

  13. Responsiveness of cytogenetically discrete human myeloma cell lines to lenalidomide: lack of correlation with cereblon and interferon regulatory factor 4 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Alexandra J; Walters, Denise K; Kumar, Shaji K; Vincent Rajkumar, S; Jelinek, Diane F

    2013-12-01

    The introduction of novel immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) has dramatically improved the survival of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). While it has been shown that patients with specific cytogenetic subtypes, namely t(4;14), have the best outcomes when treated with bortezomib-based regimens, the relationship between cytogenetic subtypes and response to IMiDs remains unclear. Using DNA synthesis assays, we investigated the relationship between cytogenetic subtype and lenalidomide response in a representative panel of human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs). We examined HMCL protein expression levels of the lenalidomide target cereblon (CRBN) and its downstream target interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4), which have previously been shown to be predictive of lenalidomide response in HMCLs. Our results reveal that lenalidomide response did not correlate with specific cytogenetic translocations. There were distinct groups of lenalidomide-responsive and non-responsive HMCLs, as defined by inhibition of cellular proliferation; notably, all of the hyperdiploid HMCLs fell into the latter category. Repeated dosing of lenalidomide significantly lowered the IC50 of the responsive HMCL ALMC-1 (IC50 = 2.6 μm vs. 0.005 μm, P < 0.0001), but did not have an effect on the IC50 of the non-responsive DP-6 HMCL (P > 0.05). Moreover, no association was found between lenalidomide responsiveness and CRBN and IRF4 expression. Our data indicate that lenalidomide sensitivity is independent of cytogenetic subtype in HMCLs. While CRBN and IRF4 have been shown to be associated with response to lenalidomide in patients, these findings do not translate back to HMCLs, which could be attributable to factors present in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  14. Virus-activated interferon regulatory factor 7 upregulates expression of the interferon-regulated BST2 gene independently of interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    Bego, Mariana G; Mercier, Johanne; Cohen, Eric A

    2012-04-01

    BST-2/tetherin is an interferon (IFN)-inducible host restriction factor that inhibits the release of many enveloped viruses and functions as a negative-feedback regulator of IFN production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Currently, mechanisms underlying BST2 transcriptional regulation by type I IFN remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the BST2 promoter is a secondary target of the IFN cascade and show that a single IRF binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to IFN-α. Interestingly, expression of IRF-1 or virus-activated forms of IRF-3 and IRF-7 stimulated the BST2 promoter even under conditions where type I IFN signaling was inhibited. Indeed, vesicular stomatitis virus could directly upregulate BST-2 during infection of mouse embryonic fibroblasts through a process that required IRF-7 but was independent from the type I IFN cascade; however, in order to achieve optimal BST-2 induction, the type I IFN cascade needed to be engaged through activation of IRF-3. Furthermore, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we show that BST-2 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response since TLR8 and TLR3 agonists, known to trigger pathways that mediate activation of IRF proteins, could upregulate BST-2 prior to engagement of the type I IFN pathway. Collectively, our findings reveal that BST2 is activated by the same signals that trigger type I IFN production, outlining a regulatory mechanism ensuring that production of type I IFN and expression of a host restriction factor involved in the IFN negative-feedback loop are closely coordinated.

  15. Differential regulation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-7 and IRF-9 gene expression in the central nervous system during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ousman, Shalina S; Wang, Jianping; Campbell, Iain L

    2005-06-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in the regulation of the interferons (IFNs) and other genes that may have an essential role in antiviral defense in the central nervous system, although this is currently not well defined. Therefore, we examined the regulation of IRF gene expression in the brain during viral infection. Several IRF genes (IRF-2, -3, -5, -7, and -9) were expressed at low levels in the brain of uninfected mice. Following intracranial infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), expression of the IRF-7 and IRF-9 genes increased significantly by day 2. IRF-7 and IRF-9 gene expression in the brain was widespread at sites of LCMV infection, with the highest levels in infiltrating mononuclear cells, microglia/macrophages, and neurons. IRF-7 and IRF-9 gene expression was increased in LCMV-infected brain from IFN-gamma knockout (KO) but not IFN-alpha/betaR KO animals. In the brain, spleen, and liver or cultured glial and spleen cells, IRF-7 but not IRF-9 gene expression increased with delayed kinetics in the absence of STAT1 but not STAT2 following LCMV infection or IFN-alpha treatment, respectively. The stimulation of IRF-7 gene expression by IFN-alpha in glial cell culture was prevented by cycloheximide. Thus, (i) many of the IRF genes were expressed constitutively in the mouse brain; (ii) the IRF-7 and IRF-9 genes were upregulated during viral infection, a process dependent on IFN-alpha/beta but not IFN-gamma; and (iii) IRF-7 but not IRF-9 gene expression can be stimulated in a STAT1-independent but STAT2-dependent fashion via unidentified indirect pathways coupled to the activation of the IFN-alpha/beta receptor.

  16. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2014-01-01

    1 lines. This suggests the possibility of further improvements in submergence tolerance by incorporating additional traits present in FR13A or other similar landraces. PMID:25281725

  17. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2014-10-03

    1 lines. This suggests the possibility of further improvements in submergence tolerance by incorporating additional traits present in FR13A or other similar landraces.

  18. Influence of the season on vitamin D levels and regulatory T cells in patients with polymorphic light eruption† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5pp00398a Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Schweintzger, N. A.; Gruber-Wackernagel, A.; Shirsath, N.; Quehenberger, F.; Obermayer-Pietsch, B.

    2016-01-01

    The exact mechanisms of photohardening in polymorphic light eruption (PLE) are still unknown, but medical photohardening was shown to increase regulatory T cell (Treg) numbers in the blood of PLE patients, similar to natural hardening. Furthermore, oral vitamin D supplementation increased peripheral Tregs in healthy individuals. We herein report on a post hoc analysis of 26 screened PLE patients of a clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov No. NCT01595893), in which the influence of the progressing season was investigated on baseline CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127– Treg numbers by flow cytometry and Treg suppressive function by co-culture assays with T effector cells as a secondary endpoint, together with 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) serum levels at the study's screening visit, taking place in the period from January to June. The mean 25(OH)D serum level of all patients was 33.2 ng ml–1. Ten of those patients (38.5%) were identified with low 25(OH)D levels (<30 ng ml–1). Significantly higher baseline 25(OH)D serum levels (plus 34.4%; P = 0.0182) as well as higher relative Treg percentages in CD4+ population (plus 62.8%; P = 0.0157) and in total lymphocyte population (plus 59.6%; P = 0.0372) and higher absolute Treg numbers (plus 100.2%; P = 0.0042) were observed in the late spring/early summer period (April to June) compared to the winter period (January to February). No significant relationship was observed when Treg numbers and function were correlated with 25(OH)D levels. These data indicate that in PLE patients Treg numbers and their suppressive function are independent of vitamin D serum levels and suggest that UV light and/or other seasonal factors may affect these cells via the non-vitamin D related pathway(s). PMID:26911519

  19. The effects of workplace psychosocial factors on whether Japanese dual-earner couples with preschool children have additional children: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    EGUCHI, Hisashi; SHIMAZU, Akihito; FUJIWARA, Takeo; IWATA, Noboru; SHIMADA, Kyoko; TAKAHASHI, Masaya; TOKITA, Masahito; WATAI, Izumi; KAWAKAMI, Norito

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effect of workplace psychosocial factors (job demand, job control, and workplace social support) on dual-earner couples in Japan having additional children, using a prospective study design. We conducted a 2-year prospective cohort study with 103 dual-earner couples with preschool children in Japan, as part of the Tokyo Work–Family Interface Study II. We used multivariable logistic regression analyses to evaluate the prospective association of job strain (categorized into low-strain job, active job, passive job, and strain job groups) and workplace social support (high and low) with couples having additional children during the follow-up period, adjusting for age, for men and women separately. Men in the active job group (i.e., with high job demands and high job control) had a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) of having additional children during the follow-up period, after controlling for age (OR 9.07, 95% confidence interval: 1.27–64.85). No significant association between any workplace psychosocial factor and having additional children was confirmed among women. Having an active job may have a positive influence on having additional children among men in dual-earner couples. PMID:27760893

  20. Herpes simplex virus 1-encoded tegument protein VP16 abrogates the production of beta interferon (IFN) by inhibiting NF-κB activation and blocking IFN regulatory factor 3 to recruit its coactivator CBP.

    PubMed

    Xing, Junji; Ni, Liwen; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Kezhen; Lin, Rongtuan; Zheng, Chunfu

    2013-09-01

    Host cells activate innate immune signaling pathways to defend against invading pathogens. To survive within an infected host, viruses have evolved intricate strategies to counteract host immune responses. Herpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), have large genomes and therefore have the capacity to encode numerous proteins that modulate host innate immune responses. Here we define the contribution of HSV-1 tegument protein VP16 in the inhibition of beta interferon (IFN-β) production. VP16 was demonstrated to significantly inhibit Sendai virus (SeV)-induced IFN-β production, and its transcriptional activation domain was not responsible for this inhibition activity. Additionally, VP16 blocked the activation of the NF-κB promoter induced by SeV or tumor necrosis factor alpha treatment and expression of NF-κB-dependent genes through interaction with p65. Coexpression analysis revealed that VP16 selectively blocked IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3)-mediated but not IRF-7-mediated transactivation. VP16 was able to bind to IRF-3 but not IRF-7 in vivo, based on coimmunoprecipitation analysis, but it did not affect IRF-3 dimerization, nuclear translocation, or DNA binding activity. Rather, VP16 interacted with the CREB binding protein (CBP) coactivator and efficiently inhibited the formation of the transcriptional complexes IRF-3-CBP in the context of HSV-1 infection. These results illustrate that VP16 is able to block the production of IFN-β by inhibiting NF-κB activation and interfering with IRF-3 to recruit its coactivator CBP, which may be important to the early events leading to HSV-1 infection.

  1. Effect of Ti/Al ratio and Cr, Nb, and Hf additions on material factors and mechanical properties in TiAl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, T.; Tamura, T.; Izumi, O.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the Ti/Al ratio and Cr, Nb, and Hf additions on material factors, such as the grain size, second phase, la tice parameters and the axial ratio, and on mechanical properties in TiAl-base alloys has been studied. The grain size was decreased by the deviation from the stoichiometric composition o the Ti-rich side and the addition of the third elements. The Cr element was contained a little more in Ti3Al phase than in TiAl phase in two-phase Ti-rich alloys. The lattice parameters, a and c, and the axial ratio, c/a, of the binary alloys varied linearly with decreasing Al content even in the dual-phase region. The Cr addition decreased the a and c and also c/a. The Nb addition increased weakly the a and c and c/a. On the contrary, the Hf addition increased the a and c but decreased the c/a ratio. In the Cr added alloys, the decrease of volume of a unit cell, due to the substitution of Cr atoms for Ti and Al atoms, was larger than that expected from the difference of atom sizes. The Nb addition should decrease the volume of a unit cell, but it increased the volume. The Hf addition caused a larger increase of volume of a unit cell than that expected from the difference of atom sizes. We suggested that the Cr addition increases and the Nb and Hf additions decrease the bond strength in TiAl. The deviation from stoichiometry and the addition of third elements caused an increase of work-hardening rate. The alloys with Ti-rich composition have superior mechanical properties compared to those of alloys vith Al-rich composition. The Cr addition resulted in high solution hardening, and the Ti-47A1 3Cr (in atomic percent) alloys had the highest fracture strain of 2.7 pct in all alloys tested. The Nb addition resulted in poor ductility in both Ti- and Al-rich alloys. The Hf additions to the Ti-rich composition caused better mechanical properties than those of Al-rich alloys. Thi; trend was also similar to the Nb-added alloys. In the Hf-added alloys, the Ti-49Al-2Hf

  2. Protein kinase C phosphorylation disrupts Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 autoinhibition and promotes cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator macromolecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianquan; Poulikakos, Poulikos I; Dai, Zhongping; Testa, Joseph R; Callaway, David J E; Bu, Zimei

    2007-09-14

    An emerging theme in cell signaling is that membrane-bound channels and receptors are organized into supramolecular signaling complexes for optimum function and cross-talk. In this study, we determined how protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation influences the scaffolding protein Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF) to assemble protein complexes of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride ion channel that controls fluid and electrolyte transport across cell membranes. NHERF directs polarized expression of receptors and ion transport proteins in epithelial cells, as well as organizes the homo- and hetero-association of these cell surface proteins. NHERF contains two modular PDZ domains that are modular protein-protein interaction motifs, and a C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that NHERF is a phosphoprotein, but how phosphorylation affects NHERF to assemble macromolecular complexes is unknown. We show that PKC phosphorylates two amino acid residues Ser-339 and Ser-340 in the C-terminal domain of NHERF, but a serine 162 of PDZ2 is specifically protected from being phosphorylated by the intact C-terminal domain. PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant S339D/S340D of NHERF has increased affinity and stoichiometry when binding to C-CFTR. Moreover, solution small angle x-ray scattering indicates that the PDZ2 and C-terminal domains contact each other in NHERF, but such intramolecular domain-domain interactions are released in the PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant indicating that PKC phosphorylation disrupts the autoinhibition interactions in NHERF. The results demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of NHERF functions as an intramolecular switch that regulates the binding capability of PDZ2, and thus controls the stoichiometry of NHERF to assemble protein complexes.

  3. Selection on cis-Regulatory Variation at B4galnt2 and Its Influence on von Willebrand Factor in House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Jill M.; Teschke, Meike; Pavlidis, Pavlos; McGee, Beth M.; Tautz, Diethard; Baines, John F.

    2009-01-01

    The RIIIS/J inbred mouse strain is a model for type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD), a common human bleeding disorder. Low von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels in RIIIS/J are due to a regulatory mutation, Mvwf1, which directs a tissue-specific switch in expression of a glycosyltransferase, B4GALNT2, from intestine to blood vessel. We recently found that Mvwf1 lies on a founder allele common among laboratory mouse strains. To investigate the evolutionary forces operating at B4galnt2, we conducted a survey of DNA sequence polymorphism and microsatellite variation spanning the B4galnt2 gene region in natural Mus musculus domesticus populations. Two divergent haplotypes segregate in these natural populations, one of which corresponds to the RIIIS/J sequence. Different local populations display dramatic differences in the frequency of these haplotypes, and reduced microsatellite variability near B4galnt2 within the RIIIS/J haplotype is consistent with the recent action of natural selection. The level and pattern of DNA sequence polymorphism in the 5′ flanking region of the gene significantly deviates from the neutral expectation and suggests that variation in B4galnt2 expression may be under balancing selection and/or arose from a recently introgressed allele that subsequently increased in frequency due to natural selection. However, coalescent simulations indicate that the heterogeneity in divergence between haplotypes is greater than expected under an introgression model. Analysis of a population where the RIIIS/J haplotype is in high frequency reveals an association between this haplotype, the B4galnt2 tissue-specific switch, and a significant decrease in plasma VWF levels. Given these observations, we propose that low VWF levels may represent a fitness cost that is offset by a yet unknown benefit of the B4galnt2 tissue-specific switch. Similar mechanisms may account for the variability in VWF levels and high prevalence of VWD in other mammals, including humans. PMID

  4. Muscle hypertrophy in heavy weight Japanese quail line: delayed muscle maturation and continued muscle growth with prolonged upregulation of myogenic regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y M; Suh, Y; Ahn, J; Lee, K

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the temporal expression of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms, Pax7, and myogenic regulatory factors (MRF) between heavy weight (HW) and random bred control (RBC) Japanese quail lines during muscle development to better understand the mechanisms leading to increased skeletal muscle mass in the HW quail line selected for a greater BW at 4 wk of age separated from RBC quail. Expression of neonatal MyHC isoform began at 3 and 7 d posthatch in RBC and HW quail lines, respectively. In the RBC quail line, adult MyHC isoform, as a marker for muscle maturation, was expressed at 28 d posthatch with sustained expression through 75 d posthatch, whereas this protein was detected only at 75 d posthatch in the HW quail line. Moreover, Pax7 expression continued from embryonic ages to 14 d posthatch in the HW quail line and to 7 d posthatch in the RBC quail line. These expression patterns of MyHC isoforms and Pax7 in the HW quail line were accompanied by delayed muscle maturation and prolonged growth compared with the RBC quail line. Temporal expressions of the primary MRF showed that higher expression levels of MyoD and Myf-5 were observed at 9 and 11 d embryo in the HW quail line compared with the RBC quail line (P < 0.05). The HW quail line exhibited approximately 2 times greater average levels of myogenin expression from 7 to 75 d posthatch (P < 0.05) than the RBC quail line. Prolonged upregulation of these primary and secondary MRF during muscle development is associated with delayed maturation and continued muscle growth, which consequently would permit muscle hypertrophic potentials in the HW quail line compared with the RBC quail line.

  5. IFN Regulatory Factor 8 Sensitizes Soft Tissue Sarcoma Cells to Death Receptor-initiated Apoptosis via Repression of FLICE-like Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dafeng; Wang, Suizhao; Brooks, Craig; Dong, Zheng; Schoenlein, Patricia; Kumar, Vijay; Ouyang, Xinshou; Xiong, Huabao; Lahat, Guy; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Lazar, Alexander; Pollock, Raphael; Lev, Dina; Liu, Kebin

    2008-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor 8 (IRF8) has been shown to suppress tumor development at least partly through regulating apoptosis of tumor cells; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying IRF8 regulation of apoptosis are still not fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that disrupting IRF8 function resulted in inhibition of cytochrome C release, caspases 9 and 3 activation, and PARP cleavage in soft tissue sarcoma (STS) cells. Inhibition of the mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis signaling cascade is apparently due to blockage of caspase 8 and Bid activation. Analysis of signaling events upstream of caspsse 8 revealed that disrupting IRF8 function dramatically increases FLIP mRNA stability, resulting in increased IRF8 protein level. Furthermore, primary myeloid cells isolated from IRF8 null mice also exhibited increased FLIP protein level, suggesting that IRF8 might be a general repressor of FLIP. Nuclear IRF8 protein was absent in 92% (55/60) of human STS specimens, and 99% (59/60) human STS specimens exhibited FLIP expression, suggesting that the nuclear IRF8 protein level is inversely correlated with FLIP level in vivo. Silencing FLIP expression significantly increased human sarcoma cells to both FasL and TRAIL-induced apoptosis, and ectopic expression of IRF8 also significantly increased the sensitivity of these human sarcoma cells to FasL and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest that IRF8 mediates FLIP expression level to regulate apoptosis and targeting IRF8 expression is a potentially effective therapeutic strategy to sensitize apoptosis-resistant human STS to apoptosis, thereby possibly overcoming chemoresistance of STS, currently a major obstacle in human STS therapy. PMID:19155307

  6. Regulation of expression and function of scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) by Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factors (NHERFs).

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhigang; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Zhonghua; Shen, Wen-Jun; Yun, C Chris; Berlot, Catherine H; Kraemer, Fredric B; Azhar, Salman

    2013-04-19

    Scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI) binds HDL and mediates selective delivery of cholesteryl esters (CEs) to the liver, adrenals, and gonads for product formation (bile acids and steroids). Because relatively little is known about SR-BI posttranslational regulation in steroidogenic cells, we examined the roles of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factors (NHERFs) in regulating SR-BI expression, SR-BI-mediated selective CE uptake, and steroidogenesis. NHERF1 and NHERF2 mRNA and protein are expressed at varying levels in model steroidogenic cell lines and the adrenal, with only low expression of PDZK1 (NHERF3) and NHERF4. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP decreased NHERF1 and NHERF2 and increased SR-BI mRNA expression in primary rat granulosa cells and MLTC-1 cells, whereas ACTH had no effect on NHERF1 and NHERF2 mRNA levels but decreased their protein levels in rat adrenals. Co-immunoprecipitation, colocalization, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and mutational analysis indicated that SR-BI associates with NHERF1 and NHERF2. NHERF1 and NHERF2 down-regulated SR-BI protein expression through inhibition of its de novo synthesis. NHERF1 and NHERF2 also inhibited SR-BI-mediated selective CE transport and steroidogenesis, which were markedly attenuated by partial deletions of the PDZ1 or PDZ2 domain of NHERF1, the PDZ2 domain of NHERF2, or the MERM domains of NHERF1/2 or by gene silencing of NHERF1/2. Moreover, an intact COOH-terminal PDZ recognition motif (EAKL) in SR-BI is needed. Transient transfection of hepatic cell lines with NHERF1 or NHERF2 caused a significant reduction in endogenous protein levels of SR-BI. Collectively, these data establish NHERF1 and NHERF2 as SR-BI protein binding partners that play a negative role in the regulation of SR-BI expression, selective CE transport, and steroidogenesis.

  7. Regulatory Forum.

    PubMed

    Peden, W Michael

    2016-12-01

    Revision of the International Council for Harmonization (ICH) S1 guidance for rat carcinogenicity studies to be more selective of compounds requiring a 2-year rat carcinogenicity study has been proposed following extensive evaluation of rat carcinogenicity and chronic toxicity studies by industry and drug regulatory authorities. To inform the ICH S1 expert working group in their potential revision of ICH S1, a prospective evaluation study was initiated in 2013, in which sponsors would assess the pharmacologic and toxicologic findings present in the chronic toxicity studies and predict a positive or negative carcinogenicity outcome using a weight of evidence argument (a carcinogenicity assessment document [CAD]). The Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee was asked by the Society of Toxicology Pathology (STP) executive committee to track these changes with ICH S1 and inform the STP membership of status changes. This commentary is intended to provide a brief summary of recent changes to the CAD guidance and highlight the importance of STP membership participation in the process of CAD submissions.

  8. Maps of context-dependent putative regulatory regions and genomic signal interactions.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Klev; Umer, Husen M; Kruczyk, Marcin; Dąbrowski, Michał J; Cavalli, Marco; Wadelius, Claes; Komorowski, Jan

    2016-11-02

    Gene transcription is regulated mainly by transcription factors (TFs). ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics provide global binding profiles of TFs, which can be used to identify regulatory regions. To this end we implemented a method to systematically construct cell-type and species-specific maps of regulatory regions and TF-TF interactions. We illustrated the approach by developing maps for five human cell-lines and two other species. We detected ∼144k putative regulatory regions among the human cell-lines, with the majority of them being ∼300 bp. We found ∼20k putative regulatory elements in the ENCODE heterochromatic domains suggesting a large regulatory potential in the regions presumed transcriptionally silent. Among the most significant TF interactions identified in the heterochromatic regions were CTCF and the cohesin complex, which is in agreement with previous reports. Finally, we investigated the enrichment of the obtained putative regulatory regions in the 3D chromatin domains. More than 90% of the regions were discovered in the 3D contacting domains. We found a significant enrichment of GWAS SNPs in the putative regulatory regions. These significant enrichments provide evidence that the regulatory regions play a crucial role in the genomic structural stability. Additionally, we generated maps of putative regulatory regions for prostate and colorectal cancer human cell-lines.

  9. Integrated module and gene-specific regulatory inference implicates upstream signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sushmita; Lagree, Stephen; Hou, Zhonggang; Thomson, James A; Stewart, Ron; Gasch, Audrey P

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory networks that control gene expression are important in diverse biological contexts including stress response and development. Each gene's regulatory program is determined by module-level regulation (e.g. co-regulation via the same signaling system), as well as gene-specific determinants that can fine-tune expression. We present a novel approach, Modular regulatory network learning with per gene information (MERLIN), that infers regulatory programs for individual genes while probabilistically constraining these programs to reveal module-level organization of regulatory networks. Using edge-, regulator- and module-based comparisons of simulated networks of known ground truth, we find MERLIN reconstructs regulatory programs of individual genes as well or better than existing approaches of network reconstruction, while additionally identifying modular organization of the regulatory networks. We use MERLIN to dissect global transcriptional behavior in two biological contexts: yeast stress response and human embryonic stem cell differentiation. Regulatory modules inferred by MERLIN capture co-regulatory relationships between signaling proteins and downstream transcription factors thereby revealing the upstream signaling systems controlling transcriptional responses. The inferred networks are enriched for regulators with genetic or physical interactions, supporting the inference, and identify modules of functionally related genes bound by the same transcriptional regulators. Our method combines the strengths of per-gene and per-module methods to reveal new insights into transcriptional regulation in stress and development.

  10. Integrated Module and Gene-Specific Regulatory Inference Implicates Upstream Signaling Networks

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sushmita; Lagree, Stephen; Hou, Zhonggang; Thomson, James A.; Stewart, Ron; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory networks that control gene expression are important in diverse biological contexts including stress response and development. Each gene's regulatory program is determined by module-level regulation (e.g. co-regulation via the same signaling system), as well as gene-specific determinants that can fine-tune expression. We present a novel approach, Modular regulatory network learning with per gene information (MERLIN), that infers regulatory programs for individual genes while probabilistically constraining these programs to reveal module-level organization of regulatory networks. Using edge-, regulator- and module-based comparisons of simulated networks of known ground truth, we find MERLIN reconstructs regulatory programs of individual genes as well or better than existing approaches of network reconstruction, while additionally identifying modular organization of the regulatory networks. We use MERLIN to dissect global transcriptional behavior in two biological contexts: yeast stress response and human embryonic stem cell differentiation. Regulatory modules inferred by MERLIN capture co-regulatory relationships between signaling proteins and downstream transcription factors thereby revealing the upstream signaling systems controlling transcriptional responses. The inferred networks are enriched for regulators with genetic or physical interactions, supporting the inference, and identify modules of functionally related genes bound by the same transcriptional regulators. Our method combines the strengths of per-gene and per-module methods to reveal new insights into transcriptional regulation in stress and development. PMID:24146602

  11. The nature of self-regulatory fatigue and “ego depletion”: Lessons from physical fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Daniel R.; Boggero, Ian A.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulation requires overriding a dominant response, and leads to temporary self-regulatory fatigue. Existing theories of the nature and causes of self-regulatory fatigue highlight physiological substrates such as glucose or psychological processes such as motivation, but these explanations are incomplete on their own. Historically, theories of physical fatigue demonstrate a similar pattern of useful but incomplete explanations, as recent views of physical fatigue emphasize the roles of both physiological and psychological factors. In addition to accounting for multiple inputs, these newer views also explain how fatigue can occur even in the presence of sufficient resources. Examining these newer theories of physical fatigue can serve as a foundation on which to build a more comprehensive understanding of self-regulatory fatigue that integrates possible neurobiological underpinnings of physical and self-regulatory fatigue, and suggests the possible function of self-regulatory fatigue. PMID:26228914

  12. Regulatory facility guide for Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.S.; Bock, R.E.; Francis, M.W.; Gove, R.M.; Johnson, P.E.; Kovac, F.M.; Mynatt, J.O.; Rymer, A.C.

    1994-02-28

    The Regulatory Facility Guide (RFG) has been developed for the DOE and contractor facilities located in the state of Ohio. It provides detailed compilations of international, federal, and state transportation-related regulations applicable to shipments originating at destined to Ohio facilities. This RFG was developed as an additional resource tool for use both by traffic managers who must ensure that transportation operations are in full compliance with all applicable regulatory requirements and by oversight personnel who must verify compliance activities.

  13. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  14. Regulatory Mechanisms of Hsp90

    PubMed Central

    Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2017-01-01

    The ability of Hsp90 to activate a disparate clientele implicates this chaperone in diverse biological processes. To accommodate such varied roles, Hsp90 requires a variety of regulatory mechanisms that are coordinated in order to modulate its activity appropriately. Amongst these, the master-regulator heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is critically important in upregulating Hsp90 during stress, but is also responsible, through interaction with specific transcription factors (such as STAT1 and Strap/p300) for the integration of a variety of biological signals that ultimately modulate Hsp90 expression. Additionally, transcription factors, such as STAT1, STAT3 (including STAT1-STAT3 oligomers), NF-IL6, and NF-kB, are known to influence Hsp90 expression directly. Co-chaperones offer another mechanism for Hsp90 regulation, and these can modulate the chaperone cycle appropriately for specific clientele. Co-chaperones include those that deliver specific clients to Hsp90, and others that regulate the chaperone cycle for specific Hsp90-client complexes by modulating Hsp90s ATPase activity. Finally, post-translational modification (PTM) of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones helps too further regulate the variety of different Hsp90 complexes found in cells. PMID:28289734

  15. The regulatory effect of SC-236 (4-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1-pyrazol-1-l] benzenesulfonamide) on stem cell factor induced migration of mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su-Jin; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Park, Rae-Kil; Lee, Kang-Min; Kim, Hyung-Min; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon . E-mail: jooklim@wonkwang.ac.kr

    2007-04-15

    SC-236 (4-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1-pyrazol-1-]benzenesulfonamide; C{sub 16}H{sub 11}ClF{sub 3}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}S), is a highly selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor. Recently, there have been reports that SC-236 protects against cartilage damage in addition to reducing inflammation and pain in osteoarthritis. However, the mechanism involved in the inflammatory allergic reaction has not been examined. Mast cells accumulation can be related to inflammatory conditions, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of SC-236 on stem cell factor (SCF)-induced migration, morphological alteration, and cytokine production of rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). We observed that SCF significantly induced the migration and morphological alteration. The ability of SCF to enhance migration and morphological alteration was abolished by treatment with SC-236. In addition, production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production induced by SCF was significantly inhibited by treatment with SC-236. Previous work has demonstrated that SCF-induced migration and cytokine production of mast cells require p38 MAPK activation. We also showed that SC-236 suppresses the SCF-induced p38 MAPK activation in RPMCs. These data suggest that SC-236 inhibits migration and cytokine production through suppression of p38 MAPK activation. These results provided new insight into the pharmacological actions of SC-236 and its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of inflammatory allergic diseases.

  16. Regulatory focus and work-related outcomes: a review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lanaj, Klodiana; Chang, Chu-Hsiang Daisy; Johnson, Russell E

    2012-09-01

    Regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997) has received growing attention in organizational psychology, necessitating a quantitative review that synthesizes its effects on important criteria. In addition, there is need for theoretical integration of regulatory focus theory with personality research. Theoretical integration is particularly relevant, since personality traits and dispositions are distal factors that are unlikely to have direct effects on work behaviors, yet they may have indirect effects via regulatory focus. The current meta-analysis introduces an integrative framework in which the effects of personality on work behaviors are best understood when considered in conjunction with more proximal motivational processes such as regulatory focus. Using a distal-proximal approach, we identify personality antecedents and work-related consequences of regulatory foci in a framework that considers both general and work-specific regulatory foci as proximal motivational processes. We present meta-analytic results for relations of regulatory focus with its antecedents (approach and avoid temperaments, conscientiousness, openness to experience, agreeableness, self-esteem, and self-efficacy) and its consequences (work behaviors and attitudes). In addition to estimates of bivariate relationships, we support a meta-analytic path model in which distal personality traits relate to work behaviors via the mediating effects of general and work-specific regulatory focus. Results from tests of incremental and relative validity indicated that regulatory foci predict unique variance in work behaviors after controlling for established personality, motivation, and attitudinal predictors. Consistent with regulatory focus theory and our integrative theoretical framework, regulatory focus has meaningful relations with work outcomes and is not redundant with other individual difference variables.

  17. The water factor and mortality from ischemic heart disease: a review and possible explanations for inconsistent findings with additional data from Manitoba.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zeid, H A

    1979-01-01

    The question of the relationship between water hardness and mortality from cardiovascular diseases is far from being settled. Marked discrepancies in the results of various studies in this area exist and there is a great need for closer examination of the reliability of measuring water hardness and other water characteristics. There is also a need for standardizing these measurements and for accounting for certain important questions in designing studies of this nature. This article reviews the results of various studies on the "water factor," points out their discrepancies, presents additional evidence from the Province of Manitoba against the "water factor;" and explains possible sources for discrepancies in the findings of various studies. Based on the evidence so far available, it is too early to universally accept the "water story" and to make recommendations for discouraging the softening of hard water as a measure for preventing cardiovascular disease mortality.

  18. The dependence of Ig class-switching on the nuclear export sequence of AID likely reflects interaction with factors additional to Crm1 exportin.

    PubMed

    Ellyard, Julia I; Benk, Amelie S; Taylor, Benjamin; Rada, Cristina; Neuberger, Michael S

    2011-02-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) is a B lymphocyte-specific DNA deaminase that triggers Ig class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation. It shuttles between cytoplasm and nucleus, containing a nuclear export sequence (NES) at its carboxyterminus. Intriguingly, the precise nature of this NES is critical to AID's function in CSR, though not in somatic hypermutation. Many alterations to the NES, while preserving its nuclear export function, destroy CSR ability. We have previously speculated that AID's ability to potentiate CSR may critically depend on the affinity of interaction between its NES and Crm1 exportin. Here, however, by comparing multiple AID NES mutants, we find that - beyond a requirement for threshold Crm1 binding - there is little correlation between CSR and Crm1 binding affinity. The results suggest that CSR, as well as the stabilisation of AID, depend on an interaction between the AID C-terminal decapeptide and factor(s) additional to Crm1.

  19. In vivo expansion of regulatory T cells with IL-2/IL-2 mAb complexes prevents anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice treated with factor VIII plasmid-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao-Lien; Ye, Peiqing; Yen, Benjamin C; Miao, Carol H

    2011-08-01

    Generation of transgene-specific immune responses can constitute a major complication following gene therapy treatment. An in vivo approach to inducing selective expansion of Regulatory T (Treg) cells by injecting interleukin-2 (IL-2) mixed with a specific IL-2 monoclonal antibody (JES6-1) was adopted to modulate anti-factor VIII (anti-FVIII) immune responses. Three consecutive IL-2 complexes treatments combined with FVIII plasmid injection prevented anti-FVIII formation and achieved persistent, therapeutic-level of FVIII expression in hemophilia A (HemA) mice. The IL-2 complexes treatment expanded CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells five- to sevenfold on peak day, and they gradually returned to normal levels within 7-14 days without changing other lymphocyte populations. The transiently expanded Treg cells are highly activated and display suppressive function in vitro. Adoptive transfer of the expanded Treg cells protected recipient mice from generation of high-titer antibodies following FVIII plasmid challenge. Repeated plasmid transfer is applicable in tolerized mice without eliciting immune responses. Mice treated with IL-2 complexes mounted immune responses against both T-dependent and T-independent neoantigens, indicating that IL-2 complexes did not hamper the immune system for long. These results demonstrate the important role of Treg cells in suppressing anti-FVIII immune responses and the potential of developing Treg cell expansion therapies that induce long-term tolerance to FVIII.

  20. Computational identification and functional validation of regulatory motifs in cartilage-expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Sherri R.; Chang, Li-Wei; Patra, Debabrata; Xing, Xiaoyun; Posey, Karen; Hecht, Jacqueline; Stormo, Gary D.; Sandell, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    Chondrocyte gene regulation is important for the generation and maintenance of cartilage tissues. Several regulatory factors have been identified that play a role in chondrogenesis, including the positive transacting factors of the SOX family such as SOX9, SOX5, and SOX6, as well as negative transacting factors such as C/EBP and delta EF1. However, a complete understanding of the intricate regulatory network that governs the tissue-specific expression of cartilage genes is not yet available. We have taken a computational approach to identify cis-regulatory, transcription factor (TF) binding motifs in a set of cartilage characteristic genes to better define the transcriptional regulatory networks that regulate chondrogenesis. Our computational methods have identified several TFs, whose binding profiles are available in the TRANSFAC database, as important to chondrogenesis. In addition, a cartilage-specific SOX-binding profile was constructed and used to identify both known, and novel, functional paired SOX-binding motifs in chondrocyte genes. Using DNA pattern-recognition algorithms, we have also identified cis-regulatory elements for unknown TFs. We have validated our computational predictions through mutational analyses in cell transfection experiments. One novel regulatory motif, N1, found at high frequency in the COL2A1 promoter, was found to bind to chondrocyte nuclear proteins. Mutational analyses suggest that this motif binds a repressive factor that regulates basal levels of the COL2A1 promoter. PMID:17785538

  1. A Simple Screening Approach To Prioritize Genes for Functional Analysis Identifies a Role for Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 in the Control of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Kaforou, Myrsini; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Ivanova, Maria; Huntley, Derek; Dorner, Marcus; Wright, Victoria J.; Levin, Michael; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Herberg, Jethro A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Greater understanding of the functions of host gene products in response to infection is required. While many of these genes enable pathogen clearance, some enhance pathogen growth or contribute to disease symptoms. Many studies have profiled transcriptomic and proteomic responses to infection, generating large data sets, but selecting targets for further study is challenging. Here we propose a novel data-mining approach combining multiple heterogeneous data sets to prioritize genes for further study by using respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection as a model pathogen with a significant health care impact. The assumption was that the more frequently a gene is detected across multiple studies, the more important its role is. A literature search was performed to find data sets of genes and proteins that change after RSV infection. The data sets were standardized, collated into a single database, and then panned to determine which genes occurred in multiple data sets, generating a candidate gene list. This candidate gene list was validated by using both a clinical cohort and in vitro screening. We identified several genes that were frequently expressed following RSV infection with no assigned function in RSV control, including IFI27, IFIT3, IFI44L, GBP1, OAS3, IFI44, and IRF7. Drilling down into the function of these genes, we demonstrate a role in disease for the gene for interferon regulatory factor 7, which was highly ranked on the list, but not for IRF1, which was not. Thus, we have developed and validated an approach for collating published data sets into a manageable list of candidates, identifying novel targets for future analysis. IMPORTANCE Making the most of “big data” is one of the core challenges of current biology. There is a large array of heterogeneous data sets of host gene responses to infection, but these data sets do not inform us about gene function and require specialized skill sets and training for their utilization. Here we

  2. Interferon regulatory factor 3 as key element of the interferon signature in plasmacytoid dendritic cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients: novel genetic associations in the Mexican mestizo population

    PubMed Central

    Santana-de Anda, K; Gómez-Martín, D; Monsivais-Urenda, A E; Salgado-Bustamante, M; González-Amaro, R; Alcocer-Varela, J

    2014-01-01

    Many genetic studies have found an association between interferon regulatory factors (IRF) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, specific dendritic cell (DC) alterations have not been assessed. The aim of the present study was to address the expression of IRF3 and IRF5 on different DC subsets from SLE patients, as well as their association with interferon (IFN)-α production and novel SNPs. For the genetic association analyses, 156 SLE patients and 272 healthy controls from the Mexican mestizo population were included. From these, 36 patients and 36 controls were included for functional analysis. Two IRF3 SNPs − rs2304206 and rs2304204 – were determined. We found an increased percentage of circulating pDC in SLE patients in comparison to controls (8·04 ± 1·48 versus 3·35 ± 0·8, P = 0·032). We also observed enhanced expression of IRF3 (64 ± 6·36 versus 36·1 ± 5·57, P = 0·004) and IRF5 (40 ± 5·25 versus 22·5 ± 2·6%, P = 0·010) restricted to this circulating pDC subset from SLE patients versus healthy controls. This finding was associated with higher IFN-α serum levels in SLE (160·2 ± 21 versus 106·1 ± 14 pg/ml, P = 0·036). Moreover, the IRF3 rs2304206 polymorphism was associated with increased susceptibility to SLE [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2·401 (1·187–4·858), P = 0·021] as well as enhanced levels of serum type I IFN in SLE patients who were positive for dsDNA autoantibodies. The IRF3 rs2304204 GG and AG genotypes conferred decreased risk for SLE. Our findings suggest that the predominant IRF3 expression on circulating pDC is a key element for the increased IFN-α activation based on the interplay between the rs2304206 gene variant and the presence of dsDNA autoantibodies in Mexican mestizo SLE patients. PMID:25130328

  3. Interferon Regulatory Factor-5 Deficiency Ameliorates Disease Severity in the MRL/lpr Mouse Model of Lupus in the Absence of a Mutation in DOCK2

    PubMed Central

    Kochar, Guneet S.; Wilson, Gabriella E.; Laskow, Bari; Richez, Christophe; Bonegio, Ramon G.; Rifkin, Ian R.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) polymorphisms are strongly associated with an increased risk of developing the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. In mouse lupus models, IRF5-deficiency was shown to reduce disease severity consistent with an important role for IRF5 in disease pathogenesis. However these mouse studies were confounded by the recent demonstration that the IRF5 knockout mouse line contained a loss-of-function mutation in the dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) gene. As DOCK2 regulates lymphocyte trafficking and Toll-like receptor signaling, this raised the possibility that some of the protective effects attributed to IRF5 deficiency in the mouse lupus models may instead have been due to DOCK2 deficiency. We have therefore here evaluated the effect of IRF5-deficiency in the MRL/lpr mouse lupus model in the absence of the DOCK2 mutation. We find that IRF5-deficient (IRF5−/−) MRL/lpr mice develop much less severe disease than their IRF5-sufficient (IRF5+/+) littermates. Despite markedly lower serum levels of anti-nuclear autoantibodies and reduced total splenocyte and CD4+ T cell numbers, IRF5−/− MRL/lpr mice have similar numbers of all splenic B cell subsets compared to IRF5+/+ MRL/lpr mice, suggesting that IRF5 is not involved in B cell development up to the mature B cell stage. However, IRF5−/− MRL/lpr mice have greatly reduced numbers of spleen plasmablasts and bone marrow plasma cells. Serum levels of B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) were markedly elevated in the MRL/lpr mice but no effect of IRF5 on serum BLyS levels was seen. Overall our data demonstrate that IRF5 contributes to disease pathogenesis in the MRL/lpr lupus model and that this is due, at least in part, to the role of IRF5 in plasma cell formation. Our data also suggest that combined therapy targeting both IRF5 and BLyS might be a particularly effective therapeutic approach in lupus. PMID:25076492

  4. Factors associated with regulatory action involving investigation of illnesses associated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in products regulated by the Food Safety and Inspection Service.

    PubMed

    Green, Alice L; Seys, Scott; Douris, Aphrodite; Levine, Jeoff; Robertson, Kis

    2014-07-01

    We described characteristics of the Escherichia coli O157 and Escherichia coli non-O157 illness investigations conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) during the 5-year period from 2006 through 2010. We created a multivariable logistic regression model to determine characteristics of these investigations that were associated with FSIS regulatory action, which was defined as having occurred if a product recall occurred or if FSIS personnel performed an environmental health assessment (Food Safety Assessment) at the implicated establishment. During this period, FSIS took regulatory action in 38 of 88 (43%) investigations. Illness investigations in which FoodNet states were involved were more likely to result in regulatory action. Illness investigations in which state and local traceback, or FSIS traceback occurred were more likely to result in regulatory action. Reasons for lack of action included evidence of cross-contamination after the product left a regulated establishment, delayed notification, lack of epidemiological information, and insufficient product information.

  5. Use of a generalized additive model to investigate key abiotic factors affecting microcystin cellular quotas in heavy bloom areas of Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Tao, Min; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Qin, Boqiang; Zhang, Dawen; Niu, Yuan; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Qing; Wu, Laiyan

    2012-01-01

    Lake Taihu is the third largest freshwater lake in China and is suffering from serious cyanobacterial blooms with the associated drinking water contamination by microcystin (MC) for millions of citizens. So far, most studies on MCs have been limited to two small bays, while systematic research on the whole lake is lacking. To explain the variations in MC concentrations during cyanobacterial bloom, a large-scale survey at 30 sites across the lake was conducted monthly in 2008. The health risks of MC exposure were high, especially in the northern area. Both Microcystis abundance and MC cellular quotas presented positive correlations with MC concentration in the bloom seasons, suggesting that the toxic risks during Microcystis proliferations were affected by variations in both Microcystis density and MC production per Microcystis cell. Use of a powerful predictive modeling tool named generalized additive model (GAM) helped visualize significant effects of abiotic factors related to carbon fixation and proliferation of Microcystis (conductivity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), water temperature and pH) on MC cellular quotas from recruitment period of Microcystis to the bloom seasons, suggesting the possible use of these factors, in addition to Microcystis abundance, as warning signs to predict toxic events in the future. The interesting relationship between macrophytes and MC cellular quotas of Microcystis (i.e., high MC cellular quotas in the presence of macrophytes) needs further investigation.

  6. Outpatient Management of Postbiopsy Pneumothorax with Small-Caliber Chest Tubes: Factors Affecting the Need for Prolonged Drainage and Additional Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay Hicks, Marshall E.; Wallace, Michael J.; Ahrar, Kamran; Madoff, David C.; Murthy, Ravi

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of outpatient management of postbiopsy pneumothoraces with small-caliber chest tubes and to assess the factors that influence the need for prolonged drainage or additional interventions.We evaluated the medical records of patients who were treated with small-caliber chest tubes attached to Heimlich valves for pneumothoraces resulting from image-guided transthoracic needle biopsy to determine the hospital admission rates, the number of days the catheters were left in place, and the need for further interventions. We also evaluated the patient, lesion, and biopsy technique characteristics to determine their influence on the need for prolonged catheter drainage or additional interventions. Of the 191 patients included in our study, 178 (93.2%) were treated as outpatients. Ten patients (5.2%) were admitted for chest tube-related problems, either for underwater suction (n = 8) or for pain control (n = 2). No further interventions were required in 146 patients (76.4%), with successful removal of the chest tubes the day after the biopsy procedure. Prolonged catheter drainage (mean, 4.3 days) was required in 44 patients (23%). Nineteen patients (9.9%) underwent additional interventions for management of pneumothorax. Presence of emphysema was noted more frequently in patients who required additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage than in those who did not (51.1% vs. 24.7%; p = 0.001).We conclude that use of the Heimlich valve allows safe and successful outpatient treatment of most patients requiring chest tube placement for postbiopsy pneumothorax. Additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage are needed more frequently in patients with emphysema in the needle path.

  7. The effect of nutritional status and myogenic satellite cell age on turkey satellite cell proliferation, differentiation, and expression of myogenic transcriptional regulatory factors and heparan sulfate proteoglycans syndecan-4 and glypican-1.

    PubMed

    Harthan, Laura B; McFarland, Douglas C; Velleman, Sandra G

    2014-01-01

    Posthatch satellite cell mitotic activity is a critical component of muscle development and growth. Satellite cells are myogenic stem cells that can be induced by nutrition to follow other cellular developmental pathways, and whose mitotic activity declines with age. The objective of the current study was to determine the effect of restricting protein synthesis on the proliferation and differentiation, expression of myogenic transcriptional regulatory factors myogenic determination factor 1, myogenin, and myogenic regulatory factor 4, and expression of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans syndecan-4 and glypican-1 in satellite cells isolated from 1-d-, 7-wk-, and 16-wk-old turkey pectoralis major muscle (1 d, 7 wk, and 16 wk cells, respectively) by using variable concentrations of Met and Cys. Four Met concentrations-30 (control), 7.5, 3, or 0 mg/L with 3.2 mg/L of Cys per 1 mg/L of Met-were used for culture of satellite cells to determine the effect of nutrition and age on satellite cell behavior during proliferation and differentiation. Proliferation was reduced by lower Met and Cys concentrations in all ages at 96 h of proliferation. Differentiation was increased in the 1 d Met-restricted cells, whereas the 7 wk cells treated with 3 mg/L of Met had decreased differentiation. Reduced Met and Cys levels from the control did not significantly affect the 16 wk cells at 72 h of differentiation. However, medium with no Met or Cys suppressed differentiation at all ages. The expression of myogenic determination factor 1, myogenin, myogenic regulatory factor 4, syndecan-4, and glypican-1 was differentially affected by age and Met or Cys treatment. These data demonstrate the age-specific manner in which turkey pectoralis major muscle satellite cells respond to nutritional availability and the importance of defining optimal nutrition to maximize satellite cell proliferation and differentiation for subsequent muscle mass accretion.

  8. Expression of PRX36, PMEI6 and SBT1.7 is controlled by complex transcription factor regulatory networks for proper seed coat mucilage extrusion

    PubMed Central

    Ranocha, Philippe; Francoz, Edith; Burlat, Vincent; Dunand, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Mucilage secretory cells (MSC) form an intriguing cell layer important for seed germination. In Arabidopsis thaliana, several master transcription factors (TFs) and “actor” proteins have already been identified as key players for seed coat differentiation including epidermal cell formation, mucilage production and extrusion. The regulation of the genes coding for MSC cell wall “actor” proteins by TFs needs to be better established. Here, the expression and the regulation of 3 known actors (PRX36, PMEI6, SBT1.7) and 2 additional putative actors (PRX56, DIR12) have been analyzed in T-DNA mutants affected in master TFs (ap2, egl3/gl3, gl2, myb5, tt8, ttg1, ttg2 and luh1/mum1). Genes with somehow similar function are differentially regulated and conversely, genes with different functions are regulated in similar manner. PMID:25531128

  9. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  10. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor NAC016 Promotes Drought Stress Responses by Repressing AREB1 Transcription through a Trifurcate Feed-Forward Regulatory Loop Involving NAP[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Kim, Ye-Sol; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Drought and other abiotic stresses negatively affect plant growth and development and thus reduce productivity. The plant-specific NAM/ATAF1/2/CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors have important roles in abiotic stress-responsive signaling. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana NAC016 is involved in drought stress responses; nac016 mutants have high drought tolerance, and NAC016-overexpressing (NAC016-OX) plants have low drought tolerance. Using genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis and MEME motif searches, we identified the NAC016-specific binding motif (NAC16BM), GATTGGAT[AT]CA, in the promoters of genes downregulated in nac016-1 mutants. The NAC16BM sequence does not contain the core NAC binding motif CACG (or its reverse complement CGTG). NAC016 directly binds to the NAC16BM in the promoter of ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN1 (AREB1), which encodes a central transcription factor in the stress-responsive abscisic acid signaling pathway and represses AREB1 transcription. We found that knockout mutants of the NAC016 target gene NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI (NAP) also exhibited strong drought tolerance; moreover, NAP binds to the AREB1 promoter and suppresses AREB1 transcription. Taking these results together, we propose that a trifurcate feed-forward pathway involving NAC016, NAP, and AREB1 functions in the drought stress response, in addition to affecting leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. PMID:26059204

  11. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor NAC016 Promotes Drought Stress Responses by Repressing AREB1 Transcription through a Trifurcate Feed-Forward Regulatory Loop Involving NAP.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Kim, Ye-Sol; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-06-01

    Drought and other abiotic stresses negatively affect plant growth and development and thus reduce productivity. The plant-specific NAM/ATAF1/2/CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors have important roles in abiotic stress-responsive signaling. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana NAC016 is involved in drought stress responses; nac016 mutants have high drought tolerance, and NAC016-overexpressing (NAC016-OX) plants have low drought tolerance. Using genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis and MEME motif searches, we identified the NAC016-specific binding motif (NAC16BM), GATTGGAT[AT]CA, in the promoters of genes downregulated in nac016-1 mutants. The NAC16BM sequence does not contain the core NAC binding motif CACG (or its reverse complement CGTG). NAC016 directly binds to the NAC16BM in the promoter of ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN1 (AREB1), which encodes a central transcription factor in the stress-responsive abscisic acid signaling pathway and represses AREB1 transcription. We found that knockout mutants of the NAC016 target gene NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI (NAP) also exhibited strong drought tolerance; moreover, NAP binds to the AREB1 promoter and suppresses AREB1 transcription. Taking these results together, we propose that a trifurcate feed-forward pathway involving NAC016, NAP, and AREB1 functions in the drought stress response, in addition to affecting leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

  12. Regulatory pathways for vaccines for developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Milstien, Julie; Belgharbi, Lahouari

    2004-01-01

    Vaccines that are designed for use only in developing countries face regulatory hurdles that may restrict their use. There are two primary reasons for this: most regulatory authorities are set up to address regulation of products for use only within their jurisdictions and regulatory authorities in developing countries traditionally have been considered weak. Some options for regulatory pathways for such products have been identified: licensing in the country of manufacture, file review by the European Medicines Evaluation Agency on behalf of WHO, export to a country with a competent national regulatory authority (NRA) that could handle all regulatory functions for the developing country market, shared manufacturing and licensing in a developing country with competent manufacturing and regulatory capacity, and use of a contracted independent entity for global regulatory approval. These options have been evaluated on the basis of five criteria: assurance of all regulatory functions for the life of the product, appropriateness of epidemiological assessment, applicability to products no longer used in the domestic market of the manufacturing country, reduction of regulatory risk for the manufacturer, and existing rules and regulations for implementation. No one option satisfies all criteria. For all options, national infrastructures (including the underlying regulatory legislative framework, particularly to formulate and implement local evidence-based vaccine policy) must be developed. WHO has led work to develop this capacity with some success. The paper outlines additional areas of action required by the international community to assure development and use of vaccines needed for the developing world. PMID:15042235

  13. Stretching human mesenchymal stromal cells on stiffness-customized collagen type I generates a smooth muscle marker profile without growth factor addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothdiener, Miriam; Hegemann, Miriam; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Walters, Brandan; Papugy, Piruntha; Nguyen, Phong; Claus, Valentin; Seeger, Tanja; Stoeckle, Ulrich; Boehme, Karen A.; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Stegemann, Jan P.; Hart, Melanie L.; Kurz, Bodo; Klein, Gerd; Rolauffs, Bernd

    2016-10-01

    Using matrix elasticity and cyclic stretch have been investigated for inducing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation towards the smooth muscle cell (SMC) lineage but not in combination. We hypothesized that combining lineage-specific stiffness with cyclic stretch would result in a significantly increased expression of SMC markers, compared to non-stretched controls. First, we generated dense collagen type I sheets by mechanically compressing collagen hydrogels. Atomic force microscopy revealed a nanoscale stiffness ra