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Sample records for additional regulatory factors

  1. POEM: Identifying Joint Additive Effects on Regulatory Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Botzman, Maya; Nachshon, Aharon; Brodt, Avital; Gat-Viks, Irit

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) mapping tackles the problem of identifying variation in DNA sequence that have an effect on the transcriptional regulatory network. Major computational efforts are aimed at characterizing the joint effects of several eQTLs acting in concert to govern the expression of the same genes. Yet, progress toward a comprehensive prediction of such joint effects is limited. For example, existing eQTL methods commonly discover interacting loci affecting the expression levels of a module of co-regulated genes. Such “modularization” approaches, however, are focused on epistatic relations and thus have limited utility for the case of additive (non-epistatic) effects. Results: Here we present POEM (Pairwise effect On Expression Modules), a methodology for identifying pairwise eQTL effects on gene modules. POEM is specifically designed to achieve high performance in the case of additive joint effects. We applied POEM to transcription profiles measured in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells across a population of genotyped mice. Our study reveals widespread additive, trans-acting pairwise effects on gene modules, characterizes their organizational principles, and highlights high-order interconnections between modules within the immune signaling network. These analyses elucidate the central role of additive pairwise effect in regulatory circuits, and provide computational tools for future investigations into the interplay between eQTLs. Availability: The software described in this article is available at csgi.tau.ac.il/POEM/. PMID:27148351

  2. A compendium of Caenhorabditis elegans regulatory transcription factors: a resource for mapping transcription regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Deplancke, Bart; Shingles, Jane; Grove, Christian A; Hope, Ian A; Walhout, Albertha JM

    2005-01-01

    Background Transcription regulatory networks are composed of interactions between transcription factors and their target genes. Whereas unicellular networks have been studied extensively, metazoan transcription regulatory networks remain largely unexplored. Caenorhabditis elegans provides a powerful model to study such metazoan networks because its genome is completely sequenced and many functional genomic tools are available. While C. elegans gene predictions have undergone continuous refinement, this is not true for the annotation of functional transcription factors. The comprehensive identification of transcription factors is essential for the systematic mapping of transcription regulatory networks because it enables the creation of physical transcription factor resources that can be used in assays to map interactions between transcription factors and their target genes. Results By computational searches and extensive manual curation, we have identified a compendium of 934 transcription factor genes (referred to as wTF2.0). We find that manual curation drastically reduces the number of both false positive and false negative transcription factor predictions. We discuss how transcription factor splice variants and dimer formation may affect the total number of functional transcription factors. In contrast to mouse transcription factor genes, we find that C. elegans transcription factor genes do not undergo significantly more splicing than other genes. This difference may contribute to differences in organism complexity. We identify candidate redundant worm transcription factor genes and orthologous worm and human transcription factor pairs. Finally, we discuss how wTF2.0 can be used together with physical transcription factor clone resources to facilitate the systematic mapping of C. elegans transcription regulatory networks. Conclusion wTF2.0 provides a starting point to decipher the transcription regulatory networks that control metazoan development and function

  3. Search for regulatory factors of the pituitary-specific transcription factor PROP1 gene

    PubMed Central

    NISHIMURA, Naoto; UEHARU, Hiroki; NISHIHARA, Hiroto; SHIBUYA, Shiori; YOSHIDA, Saishu; HIGUCHI, Masashi; KANNO, Naoko; HORIGUCHI, Kotaro; KATO, Takako; KATO, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary-specific transcription factor PROP1, a factor important for pituitary organogenesis, appears on rat embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) in SOX2-expressing stem/progenitor cells and always coexists with SOX2 throughout life. PROP1-positive cells at one point occupy all cells in Rathke’s pouch, followed by a rapid decrease in their number. Their regulatory factors, except for RBP-J, have not yet been clarified. This study aimed to use the 3 kb upstream region and 1st intron of mouse prop1 to pinpoint a group of factors selected on the basis of expression in the early pituitary gland for expression of Prop1. Reporter assays for SOX2 and RBP-J showed that the stem/progenitor marker SOX2 has cell type-dependent inhibitory and activating functions through the proximal and distal upstream regions of Prop1, respectively, while RBP-J had small regulatory activity in some cell lines. Reporter assays for another 39 factors using the 3 kb upstream regions in CHO cells ultimately revealed that 8 factors, MSX2, PAX6, PIT1, PITX1, PITX2, RPF1, SOX8 and SOX11, but not RBP-J, regulate Prop1 expression. Furthermore, a synergy effect with SOX2 was observed for an additional 10 factors, FOXJ1, HES1, HEY1, HEY2, KLF6, MSX1, RUNX1, TEAD2, YBX2 and ZFP36Ll, which did not show substantial independent action. Thus, we demonstrated 19 candidates, including SOX2, to be regulatory factors of Prop1 expression. PMID:26640231

  4. Search for regulatory factors of the pituitary-specific transcription factor PROP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naoto; Ueharu, Hiroki; Nishihara, Hiroto; Shibuya, Shiori; Yoshida, Saishu; Higuchi, Masashi; Kanno, Naoko; Horiguchi, Kotaro; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-02-20

    Pituitary-specific transcription factor PROP1, a factor important for pituitary organogenesis, appears on rat embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) in SOX2-expressing stem/progenitor cells and always coexists with SOX2 throughout life. PROP1-positive cells at one point occupy all cells in Rathke's pouch, followed by a rapid decrease in their number. Their regulatory factors, except for RBP-J, have not yet been clarified. This study aimed to use the 3 kb upstream region and 1st intron of mouse prop1 to pinpoint a group of factors selected on the basis of expression in the early pituitary gland for expression of Prop1. Reporter assays for SOX2 and RBP-J showed that the stem/progenitor marker SOX2 has cell type-dependent inhibitory and activating functions through the proximal and distal upstream regions of Prop1, respectively, while RBP-J had small regulatory activity in some cell lines. Reporter assays for another 39 factors using the 3 kb upstream regions in CHO cells ultimately revealed that 8 factors, MSX2, PAX6, PIT1, PITX1, PITX2, RPF1, SOX8 and SOX11, but not RBP-J, regulate Prop1 expression. Furthermore, a synergy effect with SOX2 was observed for an additional 10 factors, FOXJ1, HES1, HEY1, HEY2, KLF6, MSX1, RUNX1, TEAD2, YBX2 and ZFP36Ll, which did not show substantial independent action. Thus, we demonstrated 19 candidates, including SOX2, to be regulatory factors of Prop1 expression. PMID:26640231

  5. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Sigova, Alla A.; Abraham, Brian J.; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M.; Eric Guo, Yang; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Young, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and distal DNA elements in order to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA-binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF YY1 binds to both gene regulatory elements and also to their associated RNA species genome-wide. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  6. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  7. Circuitry and dynamics of human transcription factor regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Neph, Shane; Stergachis, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Alex; Sandstrom, Richard; Borenstein, Elhanan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The combinatorial cross-regulation of hundreds of sequence-specific transcription factors defines a regulatory network that underlies cellular identity and function. Here we use genome-wide maps of in vivo DNaseI footprints to assemble an extensive core human regulatory network comprising connections among 475 sequence-specific transcription factors, and to analyze the dynamics of these connections across 41 diverse cell and tissue types. We find that human transcription factor networks are highly cell-selective and are driven by cohorts of factors that include regulators with previously unrecognized roles in control of cellular identity. Moreover, we identify many widely expressed factors that impact transcriptional regulatory networks in a cell-selective manner. Strikingly, in spite of their inherent diversity, all cell type regulatory networks independently converge on a common architecture that closely resembles the topology of living neuronal networks. Together, our results provide the first description of the circuitry, dynamics, and organizing principles of the human transcription factor regulatory network. PMID:22959076

  8. Foxo transcription factors control regulatory T cell development and function

    PubMed Central

    Kerdiles, Yann M.; Stone, Erica L.; Beisner, Daniel L.; McGargill, Maureen A.; Ch'en, Irene L.; Stockmann, Christian; Katayama, Carol D.; Hedrick, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Foxo transcription factors integrate extrinsic signals to regulate cell division, differentiation and survival, and specific functions of lymphoid and myeloid cells. Here we showed the absence of Foxo1 severely curtailed the development of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, and those that developed were nonfunctional in vivo. The loss of function included diminished CTLA-4 receptor expression as the Ctla4 gene was a direct target of Foxo1. T cell specific loss of Foxo1 resulted in exocrine pancreatitis, hind limb paralysis, multi-organ lymphocyte infiltration, anti-nuclear antibodies and expanded germinal centers. Foxo-mediated control over Treg cell specification was further revealed by the inability of TGF-β cytokine to suppress T-bet transcription factor in the absence of Foxo1, resulting in IFN-γ-secretion. In addition the absence of Foxo3 exacerbated the effects of the loss of Foxo1. Thus, Foxo transcription factors guide the contingencies of T cell differentiation and specific functions of effector cell populations. PMID:21167754

  9. Regulatory factors of induced pluripotency: current status

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Bo; Qian, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through enforced expression of four transcription factors [Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc (OSKM)]; however, the reprogramming efficiency is extremely low. This finding raises fundamental questions about the regulators that influence the change in epigenetic stability and endowment of dedifferentiation potential during reprogramming. Identification of such regulators is critical to removing the roadblocks impeding the efficient generation of safe iPSCs and their successful translation into clinical therapies. In this review, we summarize the current progress that has been made in understanding cellular reprogramming, with an emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic regulators in induced pluripotency.

  10. Putative regulatory factors associated with intramuscular fat content.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Aline S M; Regitano, Luciana C A; Koltes, James E; Fritz-Waters, Eric R; Lanna, Dante P D; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mourão, Gerson B; Oliveira, Priscila S N; Reecy, James M; Coutinho, Luiz L

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content is related to insulin resistance, which is an important prediction factor for disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes in human. At the same time, it is an economically important trait, which influences the sensorial and nutritional value of meat. The deposition of IMF is influenced by many factors such as sex, age, nutrition, and genetics. In this study Nellore steers (Bos taurus indicus subspecies) were used to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in IMF content. This was accomplished by identifying differentially expressed genes (DEG), biological pathways and putative regulatory factors. Animals included in this study had extreme genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) for IMF. RNA-seq analysis, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and co-expression network methods, such as partial correlation coefficient with information theory (PCIT), regulatory impact factor (RIF) and phenotypic impact factor (PIF) were utilized to better understand intramuscular adipogenesis. A total of 16,101 genes were analyzed in both groups (high (H) and low (L) GEBV) and 77 DEG (FDR 10%) were identified between the two groups. Pathway Studio software identified 13 significantly over-represented pathways, functional classes and small molecule signaling pathways within the DEG list. PCIT analyses identified genes with a difference in the number of gene-gene correlations between H and L group and detected putative regulatory factors involved in IMF content. Candidate genes identified by PCIT include: ANKRD26, HOXC5 and PPAPDC2. RIF and PIF analyses identified several candidate genes: GLI2 and IGF2 (RIF1), MPC1 and UBL5 (RIF2) and a host of small RNAs, including miR-1281 (PIF). These findings contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie fat content and energy balance in muscle and provide important information for the production of healthier beef for human consumption. PMID:26042666

  11. Putative Regulatory Factors Associated with Intramuscular Fat Content

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Aline S. M.; Regitano, Luciana C. A.; Koltes, James E.; Fritz-Waters, Eric R.; Lanna, Dante P. D.; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mourão, Gerson B.; Oliveira, Priscila S. N.; Reecy, James M.; Coutinho, Luiz L.

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular fat (IMF) content is related to insulin resistance, which is an important prediction factor for disorders, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes in human. At the same time, it is an economically important trait, which influences the sensorial and nutritional value of meat. The deposition of IMF is influenced by many factors such as sex, age, nutrition, and genetics. In this study Nellore steers (Bos taurus indicus subspecies) were used to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in IMF content. This was accomplished by identifying differentially expressed genes (DEG), biological pathways and putative regulatory factors. Animals included in this study had extreme genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) for IMF. RNA-seq analysis, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and co-expression network methods, such as partial correlation coefficient with information theory (PCIT), regulatory impact factor (RIF) and phenotypic impact factor (PIF) were utilized to better understand intramuscular adipogenesis. A total of 16,101 genes were analyzed in both groups (high (H) and low (L) GEBV) and 77 DEG (FDR 10%) were identified between the two groups. Pathway Studio software identified 13 significantly over-represented pathways, functional classes and small molecule signaling pathways within the DEG list. PCIT analyses identified genes with a difference in the number of gene-gene correlations between H and L group and detected putative regulatory factors involved in IMF content. Candidate genes identified by PCIT include: ANKRD26, HOXC5 and PPAPDC2. RIF and PIF analyses identified several candidate genes: GLI2 and IGF2 (RIF1), MPC1 and UBL5 (RIF2) and a host of small RNAs, including miR-1281 (PIF). These findings contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie fat content and energy balance in muscle and provide important information for the production of healthier beef for human consumption. PMID:26042666

  12. Regulatory role of the respiratory supercomplex factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rydström Lundin, Camilla; Ott, Martin; Ädelroth, Pia; Brzezinski, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory supercomplex factors (Rcf) 1 and 2 mediate supramolecular interactions between mitochondrial complexes III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase; cyt. bc1) and IV (cytochrome c oxidase; CytcO). In addition, removal of these polypeptides results in decreased activity of CytcO, but not of cyt. bc1. In the present study, we have investigated the kinetics of ligand binding, the single-turnover reaction of CytcO with O2, and the linked cyt. bc1-CytcO quinol oxidation-oxygen-reduction activities in mitochondria in which Rcf1 or Rcf2 were removed genetically (strains rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ, respectively). The data show that in the rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ strains, in a significant fraction of the population, ligand binding occurs over a time scale that is ∼100-fold faster (τ ≅ 100 μs) than observed with the wild-type mitochondria (τ ≅ 10 ms), indicating structural changes. This effect is specific to removal of Rcf and not dissociation of the cyt. bc1–CytcO supercomplex. Furthermore, in the rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ strains, the single-turnover reaction of CytcO with O2 was incomplete. This observation indicates that the lower activity of CytcO is caused by a fraction of inactive CytcO rather than decreased CytcO activity of the entire population. Furthermore, the data suggest that the Rcf1 polypeptide mediates formation of an electron-transfer bridge from cyt. bc1 to CytcO via a tightly bound cyt. c. We discuss the significance of the proposed regulatory mechanism of Rcf1 and Rcf2 in the context of supramolecular interactions between cyt. bc1 and CytcO. PMID:27432958

  13. Regulatory role of the respiratory supercomplex factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rydström Lundin, Camilla; von Ballmoos, Christoph; Ott, Martin; Ädelroth, Pia; Brzezinski, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The respiratory supercomplex factors (Rcf) 1 and 2 mediate supramolecular interactions between mitochondrial complexes III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase; cyt. bc1) and IV (cytochrome c oxidase; CytcO). In addition, removal of these polypeptides results in decreased activity of CytcO, but not of cyt. bc1 In the present study, we have investigated the kinetics of ligand binding, the single-turnover reaction of CytcO with O2, and the linked cyt. bc1-CytcO quinol oxidation-oxygen-reduction activities in mitochondria in which Rcf1 or Rcf2 were removed genetically (strains rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ, respectively). The data show that in the rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ strains, in a significant fraction of the population, ligand binding occurs over a time scale that is ∼100-fold faster (τ ≅ 100 μs) than observed with the wild-type mitochondria (τ ≅ 10 ms), indicating structural changes. This effect is specific to removal of Rcf and not dissociation of the cyt. bc1-CytcO supercomplex. Furthermore, in the rcf1Δ and rcf2Δ strains, the single-turnover reaction of CytcO with O2 was incomplete. This observation indicates that the lower activity of CytcO is caused by a fraction of inactive CytcO rather than decreased CytcO activity of the entire population. Furthermore, the data suggest that the Rcf1 polypeptide mediates formation of an electron-transfer bridge from cyt. bc1 to CytcO via a tightly bound cyt. c We discuss the significance of the proposed regulatory mechanism of Rcf1 and Rcf2 in the context of supramolecular interactions between cyt. bc1 and CytcO. PMID:27432958

  14. The effect of hyperammonemia on myostatin and myogenic regulatory factor gene expression in broiler embryos

    PubMed Central

    Stern, R.A.; Ashwell, C.M.; Dasarathy, S.; Mozdziak, P.E.

    2015-01-01

    Myogenesis is facilitated by four myogenic regulatory factors and is significantly inhibited by myostatin. The objective of the current study was to examine embryonic gene regulation of myostatin/myogenic regulatory factors, and subsequent manipulations of protein synthesis, in broiler embryos under induced hyperammonemia. Broiler eggs were injected with ammonium acetate solution four times over 48 hours beginning on either embryonic day (ED) 15 or 17. Serum ammonia concentration was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in ammonium acetate injected embryos for both ED17 and ED19 collected samples when compared to sham-injected controls. Expression of mRNA, extracted from pectoralis major of experimental and control embryos, was measured using real-time quantitative PCR for myostatin, myogenic regulatory factors myogenic factor 5, myogenic determination factor 1, myogenin, myogenic regulatory factor 4, and paired box 7. A significantly lower (P < 0.01) myostatin expression was accompanied by a higher serum ammonia concentration in both ED17 and ED19 collected samples. Myogenic factor 5 expression was higher (P < 0.05) in ED17 collected samples administered ammonium acetate. In both ED17 and ED19 collected samples, myogenic regulatory factor 4 was lower (P ≤ 0.05) in ammonium acetate injected embryos. No significant difference was seen in myogenic determination factor 1, myogenin, or paired box 7 expression between treatment groups for either age of sample collection. Additionally, there was no significant difference in BrdU staining of histological samples taken from treated and control embryos. Myostatin protein levels were evaluated by Western blot analysis, and also showed lower myostatin expression (P < 0.05). Overall, it appears possible to inhibit myostatin expression through hyperammonemia, which is expected to have a positive effect on embryonic myogenesis and postnatal muscle growth. PMID:25689990

  15. Novel alleles of the transforming growth factor β-1 regulatory region and exon 1.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Bolaños, E; Madrigal, J A; Shaw, B E

    2015-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β-1, encoded by the TGFB1 gene, is a cytokine that plays a central role in many physiologic and pathogenic processes with pleiotropic effects. Regulatory activity for this gene has been shown for 3.0 kb between positions -2665 and +423 from its translational start site. At least 17 TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles have been defined on the basis of 18 polymorphic sites. Polymorphisms in TGFB1's regulatory region have been associated with differential levels of expression of this cytokine and to genetic risk in cancer and transplantation. In this report, we present 19 novel TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles: p018-p036. Amplification of TGFB1's regulatory region was performed with an in-house protocol, and novel alleles were defined by either allele-specific amplification and/or molecular cloning of the amplicons, followed by sequencing in isolation. Three of these novel alleles (p018, p019, and p020) are shown to be formed by novel combinations of the aforementioned known polymorphic positions. Another 16 novel alleles are shown to carry additional known and unknown single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Polymorphism in TGFB1's regulatory region could have an impact on important processes, including embryogenesis, hematopoiesis, carcinogenesis, angiogenesis, fibrosis, immune responses, and transplantation, making its characterization necessary. PMID:25808355

  16. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  17. Interaction between Major Nitrogen Regulatory Protein NIT2 and Pathway-Specific Regulatory Factor NIT4 Is Required for Their Synergistic Activation of Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bo; Marzluf, George A.

    1998-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the major nitrogen regulatory protein, NIT2, a member of the GATA family of transcription factors, controls positively the expression of numerous genes which specify nitrogen catabolic enzymes. Expression of the highly regulated structural gene nit-3, which encodes nitrate reductase, is dependent upon a synergistic interaction of NIT2 with a pathway-specific control protein, NIT4, a member of the GAL4 family of fungal regulatory factors. The NIT2 and NIT4 proteins both bind at specific recognition elements in the nit-3 promoter, but, in addition, we show that a direct protein-protein interaction between NIT2 and NIT4 is essential for optimal expression of the nit-3 structural gene. Neurospora possesses at least five different GATA factors which control different areas of cellular function, but which have a similar DNA binding specificity. Significantly, only NIT2, of the several Neurospora GATA factors examined, interacts with NIT4. We propose that protein-protein interactions of the individual GATA factors with additional pathway-specific regulatory factors determine each of their specific regulatory functions. PMID:9632783

  18. Regulatory module network of basic/helix-loop-helix transcription factors in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Liu, Zijing J; Pan, Yuchun C; Liu, Qi; Fu, Xing; Cooper, Nigel GF; Li, Yixue; Qiu, Mengsheng; Shi, Tieliu

    2007-01-01

    Background The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are important components of the transcriptional regulatory network, controlling a variety of biological processes, especially the development of the central nervous system. Until now, reports describing the regulatory network of the bHLH transcription factor (TF) family have been scarce. In order to understand the regulatory mechanisms of bHLH TFs in mouse brain, we inferred their regulatory network from genome-wide gene expression profiles with the module networks method. Results A regulatory network comprising 15 important bHLH TFs and 153 target genes was constructed. The network was divided into 28 modules based on expression profiles. A regulatory-motif search shows the complexity and diversity of the network. In addition, 26 cooperative bHLH TF pairs were also detected in the network. This cooperation suggests possible physical interactions or genetic regulation between TFs. Interestingly, some TFs in the network regulate more than one module. A novel cross-repression between Neurod6 and Hey2 was identified, which may control various functions in different brain regions. The presence of TF binding sites (TFBSs) in the promoter regions of their target genes validates more than 70% of TF-target gene pairs of the network. Literature mining provides additional support for five modules. More importantly, the regulatory relationships among selected key components are all validated in mutant mice. Conclusion Our network is reliable and very informative for understanding the role of bHLH TFs in mouse brain development and function. It provides a framework for future experimental analyses. PMID:18021424

  19. Ectopic expression of interferon regulatory factor-1 potentiates granulocytic differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Coccia, E M; Stellacci, E; Valtieri, M; Masella, B; Feccia, T; Marziali, G; Hiscott, J; Testa, U; Peschle, C; Battistini, A

    2001-01-01

    Numerous transcription factors allow haematopoietic cells to respond to lineage- and stage-specific cytokines and to act as their effectors. It is increasingly evident that the interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) transcription factor can selectively regulate different sets of genes depending on the cell type and/or the nature of cellular stimuli, evoking distinct responses in each. In the present study, we investigated mechanisms underlying the differentiation-inducing properties of granulocytic colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and whether IRF transcription factors are functionally relevant in myeloid differentiation. Both normal human progenitors and murine 32Dcl3 myeloblasts induced to differentiate along the granulocytic pathway showed an up-regulation of IRF-1 expression. Ectopic expression of IRF-1 did not abrogate the growth factor requirement of 32Dcl3 cells, although a small percentage of cells that survived cytokine deprivation differentiated fully to neutrophils. Moreover, in the presence of G-CSF, granulocytic differentiation of IRF-1-expressing cells was accelerated, as assessed by morphology and expression of specific differentiation markers. Down-modulation of c-Myb protein and direct stimulation of lysozyme promoter activity by IRF-1 were also observed. Conversely, constitutive expression of IRF-2, a repressor of IRF-1 transcriptional activity, completely abrogated the G-CSF-induced neutrophilic maturation. We conclude that IRF-1 exerts a pivotal role in granulocytic differentiation and that its induction by G-CSF represents a limiting step in the early events of differentiation. PMID:11716756

  20. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jia; Zhang, Jianqiu(Michelle); Qi, Yuan(Alan); Chen, Yidong; Huang, Yufei

    2010-12-01

    The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM) is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status and Estrogen Receptor negative ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status, respectively.

  1. INTERFERON REGULATORY FACTOR 4 AND 8 IN B CELL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Runqing

    2010-01-01

    IRF4 and 8 are members of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors and have been shown to be essential for the development and function of T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. A series of recent studies have further demonstrated critical functions for IRF4 and 8 at several stages of B cell development including pre-B cell development, receptor editing, germinal center reaction and plasma cell generation. Collectively, these new studies provide molecular insights into the function of IRF4 and 8 and underscore a requirement for IRF4 and 8 throughout B cell development. This review focuses on the recent advances on roles of IRF4 and 8 in B cell development. PMID:18775669

  2. Bayesian non-negative factor analysis for reconstructing transcription factor mediated regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcriptional regulation by transcription factor (TF) controls the time and abundance of mRNA transcription. Due to the limitation of current proteomics technologies, large scale measurements of protein level activities of TFs is usually infeasible, making computational reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory network a difficult task. Results We proposed here a novel Bayesian non-negative factor model for TF mediated regulatory networks. Particularly, the non-negative TF activities and sample clustering effect are modeled as the factors from a Dirichlet process mixture of rectified Gaussian distributions, and the sparse regulatory coefficients are modeled as the loadings from a sparse distribution that constrains its sparsity using knowledge from database; meantime, a Gibbs sampling solution was developed to infer the underlying network structure and the unknown TF activities simultaneously. The developed approach has been applied to simulated system and breast cancer gene expression data. Result shows that, the proposed method was able to systematically uncover TF mediated transcriptional regulatory network structure, the regulatory coefficients, the TF protein level activities and the sample clustering effect. The regulation target prediction result is highly coordinated with the prior knowledge, and sample clustering result shows superior performance over previous molecular based clustering method. Conclusions The results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach in reconstructing transcriptional networks mediated by TFs through simulated systems and real data. PMID:22166063

  3. Clinical trials in "emerging markets": regulatory considerations and other factors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Romi; Wang, Ouhong

    2013-11-01

    Clinical studies are being placed in emerging markets as part of global drug development programs to access large pool of eligible patients and to benefit from a cost effective structure. However, over the last few years, the definition of "emerging markets" is being revisited, especially from a regulatory perspective. For purposes of this article, countries outside US, EU and the traditional "western countries" are discussed. Multiple factors are considered for placement of clinical studies such as adherence to Good Clinical Practice (GCP), medical infrastructure & standard of care, number of eligible patients, etc. This article also discusses other quantitative factors such as country's GDP, patent applications, healthcare expenditure, healthcare infrastructure, corruption, innovation, etc. These different factors and indexes are correlated to the number of clinical studies ongoing in the "emerging markets". R&D, healthcare expenditure, technology infrastructure, transparency, and level of innovation, show a significant correlation with the number of clinical trials being conducted in these countries. This is the first analysis of its kind to evaluate and correlate the various other factors to the number of clinical studies in a country. PMID:24070788

  4. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell-suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Dietmar M W; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Roovers, Rob C; Coffer, Paul J; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2013-02-21

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, mast cell-derived AREG fully restored optimal Treg cell function. These findings reveal EGFR as a component in the regulation of local immune responses and establish a link between mast cells and Treg cells. Targeting of this immune regulatory mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic successes of EGFR-targeting treatments in cancer patients. PMID:23333074

  5. The Regulatory Role of Activating Transcription Factor 2 in Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Li, Yong Jun; Bian, Ai Hong; Zuo, Hui Bin; Zhu, Ti Wen; Ji, Sheng Xiang; Kong, Fanming; Yin, De Qing; Wang, Chuan Bao; Wang, Zi Fu; Wang, Hong Qun; Yang, Yanyan; Yoo, Byong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) is a member of the leucine zipper family of DNA-binding proteins and is widely distributed in tissues including the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney. Like c-Jun and c-Fos, ATF2 responds to stress-related stimuli and may thereby influence cell proliferation, inflammation, apoptosis, oncogenesis, neurological development and function, and skeletal remodeling. Recent studies clarify the regulatory role of ATF2 in inflammation and describe potential inhibitors of this protein. In this paper, we summarize the properties and functions of ATF2 and explore potential applications of ATF2 inhibitors as tools for research and for the development of immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:25049453

  6. Pervasive Variation of Transcription Factor Orthologs Contributes to Regulatory Network Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nadimpalli, Shilpa; Persikov, Anton V.; Singh, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Differences in transcriptional regulatory networks underlie much of the phenotypic variation observed across organisms. Changes to cis-regulatory elements are widely believed to be the predominant means by which regulatory networks evolve, yet examples of regulatory network divergence due to transcription factor (TF) variation have also been observed. To systematically ascertain the extent to which TFs contribute to regulatory divergence, we analyzed the evolution of the largest class of metazoan TFs, Cys2-His2 zinc finger (C2H2-ZF) TFs, across 12 Drosophila species spanning ~45 million years of evolution. Remarkably, we uncovered that a significant fraction of all C2H2-ZF 1-to-1 orthologs in flies exhibit variations that can affect their DNA-binding specificities. In addition to loss and recruitment of C2H2-ZF domains, we found diverging DNA-contacting residues in ~44% of domains shared between D. melanogaster and the other fly species. These diverging DNA-contacting residues, found in ~70% of the D. melanogaster C2H2-ZF genes in our analysis and corresponding to ~26% of all annotated D. melanogaster TFs, show evidence of functional constraint: they tend to be conserved across phylogenetic clades and evolve slower than other diverging residues. These same variations were rarely found as polymorphisms within a population of D. melanogaster flies, indicating their rapid fixation. The predicted specificities of these dynamic domains gradually change across phylogenetic distances, suggesting stepwise evolutionary trajectories for TF divergence. Further, whereas proteins with conserved C2H2-ZF domains are enriched in developmental functions, those with varying domains exhibit no functional enrichments. Our work suggests that a subset of highly dynamic and largely unstudied TFs are a likely source of regulatory variation in Drosophila and other metazoans. PMID:25748510

  7. Identification of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules based on interactions between transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J; Qian, Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Background Evolutionary conservation has been used successfully to help identify cis-acting DNA regions that are important in regulating tissue-specific gene expression. Motivated by increasing evidence that some DNA regulatory regions are not evolutionary conserved, we have developed an approach for cis-regulatory region identification that does not rely upon evolutionary sequence conservation. Results The conservation-independent approach is based on an empirical potential energy between interacting transcription factors (TFs). In this analysis, the potential energy is defined as a function of the number of TF interactions in a genomic region and the strength of the interactions. By identifying sets of interacting TFs, the analysis locates regions enriched with the binding sites of these interacting TFs. We applied this approach to 30 human tissues and identified 6232 putative cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) regulating 2130 tissue-specific genes. Interestingly, some genes appear to be regulated by different CRMs in different tissues. Known regulatory regions are highly enriched in our predicted CRMs. In addition, DNase I hypersensitive sites, which tend to be associated with active regulatory regions, significantly overlap with the predicted CRMs, but not with more conserved regions. We also find that conserved and non-conserved CRMs regulate distinct gene groups. Conserved CRMs control more essential genes and genes involved in fundamental cellular activities such as transcription. In contrast, non-conserved CRMs, in general, regulate more non-essential genes, such as genes related to neural activity. Conclusion These results demonstrate that identifying relevant sets of binding motifs can help in the mapping of DNA regulatory regions, and suggest that non-conserved CRMs play an important role in gene regulation. PMID:17996093

  8. Reconstructing genome-wide regulatory network of E. coli using transcriptome data and predicted transcription factor activities

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks play essential roles in living organisms to control growth, keep internal metabolism running and respond to external environmental changes. Understanding the connections and the activity levels of regulators is important for the research of gene regulatory networks. While relevance score based algorithms that reconstruct gene regulatory networks from transcriptome data can infer genome-wide gene regulatory networks, they are unfortunately prone to false positive results. Transcription factor activities (TFAs) quantitatively reflect the ability of the transcription factor to regulate target genes. However, classic relevance score based gene regulatory network reconstruction algorithms use models do not include the TFA layer, thus missing a key regulatory element. Results This work integrates TFA prediction algorithms with relevance score based network reconstruction algorithms to reconstruct gene regulatory networks with improved accuracy over classic relevance score based algorithms. This method is called Gene expression and Transcription factor activity based Relevance Network (GTRNetwork). Different combinations of TFA prediction algorithms and relevance score functions have been applied to find the most efficient combination. When the integrated GTRNetwork method was applied to E. coli data, the reconstructed genome-wide gene regulatory network predicted 381 new regulatory links. This reconstructed gene regulatory network including the predicted new regulatory links show promising biological significances. Many of the new links are verified by known TF binding site information, and many other links can be verified from the literature and databases such as EcoCyc. The reconstructed gene regulatory network is applied to a recent transcriptome analysis of E. coli during isobutanol stress. In addition to the 16 significantly changed TFAs detected in the original paper, another 7 significantly changed TFAs have been detected by

  9. Rgg influences the expression of multiple regulatory loci to coregulate virulence factor expression in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Chaussee, Michael S; Sylva, Gail L; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Smoot, Laura M; Graham, Morag R; Watson, Robert O; Musser, James M

    2002-02-01

    The human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes secretes many proteins to the cell wall and extracellular environment that contribute to virulence. Rgg regulates the expression of several exoproteins including a cysteine protease (SPE B), a nuclease (MF-1), a putative nuclease (MF-3), and autolysin. The functional heterogeneity of Rgg-regulated exoproteins and the lack of a conserved regulatory motif in the promoter regions of the genes suggested that Rgg interacts with additional regulatory networks to influence gene expression. DNA microarrays were used to test this hypothesis by comparing genomewide transcript profiles of S. pyogenes NZ131 and isogenic derivative NZ131 rgg during the exponential phase of growth. Transcripts of known and putative virulence-associated genes were more abundant in the rgg mutant, including emm, scpA, orfX, scl1, hasAB, slo, sagA, ska, speH, grab, mac, mf-1, and mf-3. Increased transcription of emm, scpA, and orfX in the rgg mutant was associated with increased production of the corresponding proteins. Differences in the expression of virulence-associated genes were associated with changes in the expression of several regulatory genes, including mga, sagA, csrRS, and fasBCA. The results show that Rgg influences the expression of multiple regulatory networks to coregulate virulence factor expression in S. pyogenes. PMID:11796609

  10. Inferring the role of transcription factors in regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Veber, Philippe; Guziolowski, Carito; Le Borgne, Michel; Radulescu, Ovidiu; Siegel, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Background Expression profiles obtained from multiple perturbation experiments are increasingly used to reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks, from well studied, simple organisms up to higher eukaryotes. Admittedly, a key ingredient in developing a reconstruction method is its ability to integrate heterogeneous sources of information, as well as to comply with practical observability issues: measurements can be scarce or noisy. In this work, we show how to combine a network of genetic regulations with a set of expression profiles, in order to infer the functional effect of the regulations, as inducer or repressor. Our approach is based on a consistency rule between a network and the signs of variation given by expression arrays. Results We evaluate our approach in several settings of increasing complexity. First, we generate artificial expression data on a transcriptional network of E. coli extracted from the literature (1529 nodes and 3802 edges), and we estimate that 30% of the regulations can be annotated with about 30 profiles. We additionally prove that at most 40.8% of the network can be inferred using our approach. Second, we use this network in order to validate the predictions obtained with a compendium of real expression profiles. We describe a filtering algorithm that generates particularly reliable predictions. Finally, we apply our inference approach to S. cerevisiae transcriptional network (2419 nodes and 4344 interactions), by combining ChIP-chip data and 15 expression profiles. We are able to detect and isolate inconsistencies between the expression profiles and a significant portion of the model (15% of all the interactions). In addition, we report predictions for 14.5% of all interactions. Conclusion Our approach does not require accurate expression levels nor times series. Nevertheless, we show on both data, real and artificial, that a relatively small number of perturbation experiments are enough to determine a significant portion of

  11. Improvement of modal scaling factors using mass additive technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Qiang; Allemang, Randall J.; Wei, Max L.; Brown, David L.

    1987-01-01

    A general investigation into the improvement of modal scaling factors of an experimental modal model using additive technique is discussed. Data base required by the proposed method consists of an experimental modal model (a set of complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors) of the original structure and a corresponding set of complex eigenvalues of the mass-added structure. Three analytical methods,i.e., first order and second order perturbation methods, and local eigenvalue modification technique, are proposed to predict the improved modal scaling factors. Difficulties encountered in scaling closely spaced modes are discussed. Methods to compute the necessary rotational modal vectors at the mass additive points are also proposed to increase the accuracy of the analytical prediction.

  12. Arabidopsis Ensemble Reverse-Engineered Gene Regulatory Network Discloses Interconnected Transcription Factors in Oxidative Stress[W

    PubMed Central

    Vermeirssen, Vanessa; De Clercq, Inge; Van Parys, Thomas; Van Breusegem, Frank; Van de Peer, Yves

    2014-01-01

    The abiotic stress response in plants is complex and tightly controlled by gene regulation. We present an abiotic stress gene regulatory network of 200,014 interactions for 11,938 target genes by integrating four complementary reverse-engineering solutions through average rank aggregation on an Arabidopsis thaliana microarray expression compendium. This ensemble performed the most robustly in benchmarking and greatly expands upon the availability of interactions currently reported. Besides recovering 1182 known regulatory interactions, cis-regulatory motifs and coherent functionalities of target genes corresponded with the predicted transcription factors. We provide a valuable resource of 572 abiotic stress modules of coregulated genes with functional and regulatory information, from which we deduced functional relationships for 1966 uncharacterized genes and many regulators. Using gain- and loss-of-function mutants of seven transcription factors grown under control and salt stress conditions, we experimentally validated 141 out of 271 predictions (52% precision) for 102 selected genes and mapped 148 additional transcription factor-gene regulatory interactions (49% recall). We identified an intricate core oxidative stress regulatory network where NAC13, NAC053, ERF6, WRKY6, and NAC032 transcription factors interconnect and function in detoxification. Our work shows that ensemble reverse-engineering can generate robust biological hypotheses of gene regulation in a multicellular eukaryote that can be tested by medium-throughput experimental validation. PMID:25549671

  13. [Requirements for drug approval and additional benefits assessment: Regulatory aspects and experiences].

    PubMed

    Broich, K; Löbker, W; Schulte, A; Beinlich, P; Müller, T

    2016-04-01

    The early assessment of benefits of newly approved drugs with novel active substances or new applications, which came into force on 1 January 2011 still represents a challenge to all parties involved. This article highlights the definitions, regulatory requirements and interaction between drug marketing approval and early assessment of benefits in Germany. The constellation of an extensively harmonized European and even international drug authorization process with a predominantly national regulation of drug reimbursement situation inevitably causes friction, which could be markedly reduced through early joint advisory discussions during the planning phase for pivotal clinical trials. During the year 2015 the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) carried out 300 scientific advice procedures of which 34 were concerned with applications in the field of indications for the central nervous system (CNS). In comparison 98 advisory meetings were held by the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) of which the BfArM provided advice in 12 instances and in 2 cases on CNS indications. Study design, endpoints and appropriate comparative therapies are the key issues in exchanges and discussions between the BfArM, the G‑BA and applicants. Under these aspects the BfArM and G‑BA promote an early and consistent involvement in early advice procedures regarding the prerequisites for drug approval and assessment of additional benefits. PMID:27003322

  14. CaMKII in addition to MLCK contributes to phosphorylation of regulatory light chain in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Eikemo, Hilde; Moltzau, Lise Román; Hussain, Rizwan I; Nguyen, Cam H T; Qvigstad, Eirik; Levy, Finn Olav; Skomedal, Tor; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn

    2016-02-26

    The aim was to identify kinase activities involved in the phosphorylation of regulatory light chain (RLC) in situ in cardiomyocytes. In electrically stimulated rat cardiomyocytes, phosphatase inhibition by calyculin A unmasked kinase activities evoking an increase of phosphorylated RLC (P-RLC) from about 16% to about 80% after 80 min. The phosphorylation rate in cardiomyocytes was reduced by about 40% by the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor, ML-7. In rat ventricular muscle strips, calyculin A induced a positive inotropic effect that correlated with P-RLC levels. The inotropic effect and P-RLC elevation were abolished by ML-7 treatment. The kinase activities phosphorylating RLC in cardiomyocytes were reduced by about 60% by the non-selective kinase inhibitor staurosporine and by about 50% by the calmodulin antagonist W7. W7 eliminated the inhibitory effect of ML-7, suggesting that the cardiac MLCK is Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent. The CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 attenuated the calyculin A-induced RLC phosphorylation by about 40%, indicating a contribution from CaMKII. The residual phosphorylation in the presence of W7 indicated that also CaM-independent kinase activities might contribute. RLC phosphorylation was insensitive to protein kinase C inhibition. In conclusion, in addition to MLCK, CaMKII phosphorylates RLC in cardiomyocytes. Involvement of other kinases cannot be excluded. PMID:26809094

  15. Biosynthesis of nitric oxide activates iron regulatory factor in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Drapier, J C; Hirling, H; Wietzerbin, J; Kaldy, P; Kühn, L C

    1993-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine modulates activity of iron-dependent enzymes, including mitochondrial acontiase, an [Fe-S] protein. We examined the effect of NO on the activity of iron regulatory factor (IRF), a cytoplasmic protein which modulates both ferritin mRNA translation and transferrin receptor mRNA stability by binding to specific mRNA sequences called iron responsive elements (IREs). Murine macrophages were activated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide to induce NO synthase activity and cultured in the presence or absence of NG-substituted analogues of L-arginine which served as selective inhibitors of NO synthesis. Measurement of the nitrite concentration in the culture medium was taken as an index of NO production. Mitochondria-free cytosols were then prepared and aconitase activity as well as IRE binding activity and induction of IRE binding activity were correlated and depended on NO synthesis after IFN-gamma and/or LPS stimulation. Authentic NO gas as well as the NO-generating compound 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) also conversely modulated aconitase and IRE binding activities of purified recombinant IRF. These results provide evidence that endogenously produced NO may modulate the post-transcriptional regulation of genes involved in iron homeostasis and support the hypothesis that the [Fe-S] cluster of IRF mediates iron-dependent regulation. Images PMID:7504626

  16. Vav family exchange factors: an integrated regulatory and functional view.

    PubMed

    Bustelo, Xosé R

    2014-01-01

    The Vav family is a group of tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated signal transduction molecules hierarchically located downstream of protein tyrosine kinases. The main function of these proteins is to work as guanosine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for members of the Rho GTPase family. In addition, they can exhibit a variety of catalysis-independent roles in specific signaling contexts. Vav proteins play essential signaling roles for both the development and/or effector functions of a large variety of cell lineages, including those belonging to the immune, nervous, and cardiovascular systems. They also contribute to pathological states such as cancer, immune-related dysfunctions, and atherosclerosis. Here, I will provide an integrated view about the evolution, regulation, and effector properties of these signaling molecules. In addition, I will discuss the pros and cons for their potential consideration as therapeutic targets. PMID:25483299

  17. Vav family exchange factors: an integrated regulatory and functional view

    PubMed Central

    Bustelo, Xosé R

    2014-01-01

    The Vav family is a group of tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated signal transduction molecules hierarchically located downstream of protein tyrosine kinases. The main function of these proteins is to work as guanosine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for members of the Rho GTPase family. In addition, they can exhibit a variety of catalysis-independent roles in specific signaling contexts. Vav proteins play essential signaling roles for both the development and/or effector functions of a large variety of cell lineages, including those belonging to the immune, nervous, and cardiovascular systems. They also contribute to pathological states such as cancer, immune-related dysfunctions, and atherosclerosis. Here, I will provide an integrated view about the evolution, regulation, and effector properties of these signaling molecules. In addition, I will discuss the pros and cons for their potential consideration as therapeutic targets. PMID:25483299

  18. Increments and Duplication Events of Enzymes and Transcription Factors Influence Metabolic and Regulatory Diversity in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Núñez, Mario Alberto; Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the content of enzymes and DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) in 794 non-redundant prokaryotic genomes was evaluated. The identification of enzymes was based on annotations deposited in the KEGG database as well as in databases of functional domains (COG and PFAM) and structural domains (Superfamily). For identifications of the TFs, hidden Markov profiles were constructed based on well-known transcriptional regulatory families. From these analyses, we obtained diverse and interesting results, such as the negative rate of incremental changes in the number of detected enzymes with respect to the genome size. On the contrary, for TFs the rate incremented as the complexity of genome increased. This inverse related performance shapes the diversity of metabolic and regulatory networks and impacts the availability of enzymes and TFs. Furthermore, the intersection of the derivatives between enzymes and TFs was identified at 9,659 genes, after this point, the regulatory complexity grows faster than metabolic complexity. In addition, TFs have a low number of duplications, in contrast to the apparent high number of duplications associated with enzymes. Despite the greater number of duplicated enzymes versus TFs, the increment by which duplicates appear is higher in TFs. A lower proportion of enzymes among archaeal genomes (22%) than in the bacterial ones (27%) was also found. This low proportion might be compensated by the interconnection between the metabolic pathways in Archaea. A similar proportion was also found for the archaeal TFs, for which the formation of regulatory complexes has been proposed. Finally, an enrichment of multifunctional enzymes in Bacteria, as a mechanism of ecological adaptation, was detected. PMID:23922780

  19. Identification of Neurodegenerative Factors Using Translatome-Regulatory Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brichta, Lars; Shin, William; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Blesa, Javier; Yap, Ee-Lynn; Walker, Zachary; Zhang, Jack; Roussarie, Jean-Pierre; Alvarez, Mariano J.; Califano, Andrea; Przedborski, Serge; Greengard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    For degenerative disorders of the central nervous system, the major obstacle to therapeutic advancement has been the challenge of identifying the key molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal loss. We developed a combinatorial approach including translational profiling and brain regulatory network analysis to search for key determinants of neuronal survival or death. Following the generation of transgenic mice for cell type-specific profiling of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, we established and compared translatome libraries reflecting the molecular signature of these cells at baseline or under degenerative stress. Analysis of these libraries by interrogating a context-specific brain regulatory network led to the identification of a repertoire of intrinsic upstream regulators that drive the dopaminergic stress response. The altered activity of these regulators was not associated with changes in their expression levels. This strategy can be generalized for the elucidation of novel molecular determinants involved in the degeneration of other classes of neurons. PMID:26214373

  20. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  1. Translational repression by the human iron-regulatory factor (IRF) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, C C; Goossen, B; Zanchin, N I; McCarthy, J E; Hentze, M W; Stripecke, R

    1993-01-01

    The regulation of the synthesis of ferritin and erythroid 5-aminolevulinate synthase in mammalian cells is mediated by the interaction of the iron regulatory factor (IRF) with a specific recognition site, the iron responsive element (IRE), in the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of the respective mRNAs. A new modular expression system was designed to allow reconstruction of this regulatory system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This comprised two components: a constitutively expressed reporter gene (luc; encoding luciferase) preceded by a 5' UTR including an IRE sequence, and an inducibly expressed cDNA encoding human IRF. Induction of the latter led to the in vivo synthesis of IRF, which in turn showed IRE-binding activity and also repressed translation of the luc mRNA bearing an IRE-containing 5' UTR. The upper stem-loop region of an IRE, with no further IRE-specific flanking sequences, sufficed for recognition and repression by IRF. Translational regulation of IRE-bearing mRNAs could also be demonstrated in cell-free yeast extracts. This work defines a minimal system for IRF/IRE translational regulation in yeast that requires no additional mammalian-specific components, thus providing direct proof that IRF functions as a translational repressor in vivo. It should be a useful tool as the basis for more detailed studies of eukaryotic translational regulation. Images PMID:8265343

  2. Tumor suppressor properties of the splicing regulatory factor RBM10.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Jordi; Bechara, Elias; Schlesinger, Doerte; Delgado, Javier; Serrano, Luis; Valcárcel, Juan

    2016-04-01

    RBM10 is an RNA binding protein and alternative splicing regulator frequently mutated in lung adenocarcinomas. Recent results indicate that RBM10 inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells by promoting skipping of exon 9 of the gene NUMB, a frequent alternative splicing change in lung cancer generating a negative regulator of Notch signaling. Complementing these observations, we show that knock down of RBM10 in human cancer cells enhances growth of mouse tumor xenografts, confirming that RBM10 acts as a tumor suppressor, while knock down of an oncogenic mutant version of RBM10 reduces xenograft tumor growth. A RBM10 mutation found in lung cancer cells, V354E, disrupts RBM10-mediated regulation of NUMB alternative splicing, inducing the cell proliferation-promoting isoform. We now show that 2 natural RBM10 isoforms that differ by the presence or absence of V354 in the second RNA Recognition Motif (RRM2), display similar regulatory effects on NUMB alternative splicing, suggesting that V354E actively disrupts RBM10 activity. Structural modeling localizes V354 in the outside surface of one α-helix opposite to the RNA binding surface of RBM10, and we show that the mutation does not compromise binding of the RRM2 domain to NUMB RNA regulatory sequences. We further show that other RBM10 mutations found in lung adenocarcinomas also compromise regulation of NUMB exon 9. Collectively, our previous and current results reveal that RBM10 is a tumor suppressor that represses Notch signaling and cell proliferation through the regulation of NUMB alternative splicing. PMID:26853560

  3. Tumor suppressor properties of the splicing regulatory factor RBM10

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Jordi; Bechara, Elias; Schlesinger, Doerte; Delgado, Javier; Serrano, Luis; Valcárcel, Juan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT RBM10 is an RNA binding protein and alternative splicing regulator frequently mutated in lung adenocarcinomas. Recent results indicate that RBM10 inhibits proliferation of lung cancer cells by promoting skipping of exon 9 of the gene NUMB, a frequent alternative splicing change in lung cancer generating a negative regulator of Notch signaling. Complementing these observations, we show that knock down of RBM10 in human cancer cells enhances growth of mouse tumor xenografts, confirming that RBM10 acts as a tumor suppressor, while knock down of an oncogenic mutant version of RBM10 reduces xenograft tumor growth. A RBM10 mutation found in lung cancer cells, V354E, disrupts RBM10-mediated regulation of NUMB alternative splicing, inducing the cell proliferation-promoting isoform. We now show that 2 natural RBM10 isoforms that differ by the presence or absence of V354 in the second RNA Recognition Motif (RRM2), display similar regulatory effects on NUMB alternative splicing, suggesting that V354E actively disrupts RBM10 activity. Structural modeling localizes V354 in the outside surface of one α-helix opposite to the RNA binding surface of RBM10, and we show that the mutation does not compromise binding of the RRM2 domain to NUMB RNA regulatory sequences. We further show that other RBM10 mutations found in lung adenocarcinomas also compromise regulation of NUMB exon 9. Collectively, our previous and current results reveal that RBM10 is a tumor suppressor that represses Notch signaling and cell proliferation through the regulation of NUMB alternative splicing. PMID:26853560

  4. AP-42 ADDITIONS AND REVISIONS - TRANSPORTABILITY FACTORS FOR FUGITIVE DUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The product is a table of factors, one for each county in the US, reflecting the portion of fugitive dust removed very close to the source via impaction on vegetation and similar mechanisms. Factors were based on land cover in area (county or grid cell) A praft final product was...

  5. Regulatory Components of the Alternative Complement Pathway in Endothelial Cell Cytoplasm, Factor H and Factor I, Are Not Packaged in Weibel-Palade Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Nancy A.; Sartain, Sarah E.; Hui, Shiu-Ki; Moake, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    It was recently reported that factor H, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway, is stored with von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the Weibel-Palade bodies of endothelial cells. If this were to be the case, it would have therapeutic importance for patients with the atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome that can be caused either by a heterozygous defect in the factor H gene or by the presence of an autoantibody against factor H. The in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, des-amino-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP), would be expected to increase transiently the circulating factor H levels, in addition to increasing the circulating levels of VWF. We describe experiments demonstrating that factor H is released from endothelial cell cytoplasm without a secondary storage site. These experiments showed that factor H is not stored with VWF in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies, and is not secreted in response in vitro in response to the Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, histamine. Furthermore, the in vivo Weibel-Palade body secretagogue, DDAVP does not increase the circulating factor H levels concomitantly with DDAVP-induced increased VWF. Factor I, a regulatory component of the alternative complement pathway that is functionally related to factor H, is also located in endothelial cell cytoplasm, and is also not present in endothelial cell Weibel-Palade bodies. Our data demonstrate that the factor H and factor I regulatory proteins of the alternative complement pathway are not stored in Weibel-Palade bodies. DDAVP induces the secretion into human plasma of VWF —- but not factor H. PMID:25803806

  6. Regulatory network analysis of transcription factors, microRNAs, target genes and host genes in human multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuoyan; Xu, Zhiwen; Kunhao Wang, Kunhao Wang; Wang, Ning; Wang, Shang

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, molecular biologists have achieved great advance in micro RNA (miRNA) and gene investigation about the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM). Existing research data of the transcription factors (TFs) and miRNAs is disperse and unorganized, which prevents researchers from investigating the mechanism and analyze regulatory pathways of MM systematically. In our research, regulatory interactions among miRNAs, TFs, host genes and target genes were imported to construct regulatory networks at three levels, including the abnormally expressed network and the related network as well as the global network. The abnormally expressed network was primary investigated cause it was an experimentally validated topological network, and it systematically explained the regulatory mechanism of MM. Its outstanding significance lies in that if we correct each abnormally expressed gene and miRNA to normal expression level by transcriptional control adjustment, thus the whole genetic expression network will return to normal state, and MM may not relapse. Additionally, analyses and comparisons to upstream as well as downstream of abnormally expressed miRNAs and genes in three networks highlighted some important regulators and key signaling pathways. For example, STAT3 and hsa-miR-125b, PIAS3 and hsa-miR-21 respectively formed self adaptation feedback regulations. The current research proposed a novel perspective to systematically explained the regulatory mechanism of MM and may contribute to further research and therapy of carcinomas. PMID:26687742

  7. Effect of multiplicative and additive noise on genetic transcriptional regulatory mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Mei; Xie, Hui-Zhang; Liu, Liang-Gang; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2009-02-01

    A multiplicative noise and an additive noise are introduced in the kinetic model of Smolen-Baxter-Byrne [P. Smolen, D.A. Baxter, J.H. Byrne, Amer. J. Physiol. Cell. Physiol. 274 (1998) 531], in which the expression of gene is controlled by protein concentration of transcriptional activator. The Fokker-Planck equation is solved and the steady-state probability distribution is obtained numerically. It is found that the multiplicative noise converts the bistability to monostability that can be regarded as a noise-induced transition. The additive noise reduces the transcription efficiency. The correlation between the multiplicative noise and the additive noise works as a genetic switch and regulates the gene transcription effectively.

  8. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture. PMID:17961129

  9. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-08-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP‑1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP‑1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12‑myristate 13‑acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co‑localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN‑γ stimulation‑induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  10. Mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via downregulating interferon regulatory factor 5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhiquan; Yan, Li; Chen, Yixin; Bao, Chuanhong; Deng, Jing; Deng, Jiagang

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural polyphenol and the predominant effective component of Mangifera indica Linn. leaves. For hundreds of years, Mangifera indica Linn. leaf has been used as an ingredient in numerous traditional Chinese medicine preparations for the treatment of bronchitis. However, the pharmacological mechanism of mangiferin in the treatment of bronchitis remains to be elucidated. Macrophage classical activation is important role in the process of bronchial airway inflammation, and interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been identified as a key regulatory factor for macrophage classical activation. The present study used the THP-1 human monocyte cell line to investigate whether mangiferin inhibits macrophage classical activation via suppressing IRF5 expression in vitro. THP-1 cells were differentiated to macrophages by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macrophages were polarized to M1 macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Flow cytometric analysis was conducted to detect the M1 macrophages. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to investigate cellular IRF5 gene expression. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines and IRF5 were assessed following cell culture and cellular homogenization using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IRF5 protein and nuclei co-localization was performed in macrophages with laser scanning confocal microscope immunofluorescence analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that mangiferin significantly inhibits LPS/IFN-γ stimulation-induced classical activation of macrophages in vitro and markedly decreases proinflammatory cytokine release. In addition, cellular IRF5 expression was markedly downregulated. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of mangiferin on classical activation of macrophages may be exerted via downregulation of cellular IRF5 expression levels. PMID:27277156

  11. Reconstruction and topological characterization of the sigma factor regulatory network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Rinki; Ravi, Janani; Datta, Pratik; Chen, Tianlong; Schnappinger, Dirk; Bassler, Kevin E; Balázsi, Gábor; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    Accessory sigma factors, which reprogram RNA polymerase to transcribe specific gene sets, activate bacterial adaptive responses to noxious environments. Here we reconstruct the complete sigma factor regulatory network of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis by an integrated approach. The approach combines identification of direct regulatory interactions between M. tuberculosis sigma factors in an E. coli model system, validation of selected links in M. tuberculosis, and extensive literature review. The resulting network comprises 41 direct interactions among all 13 sigma factors. Analysis of network topology reveals (i) a three-tiered hierarchy initiating at master regulators, (ii) high connectivity and (iii) distinct communities containing multiple sigma factors. These topological features are likely associated with multi-layer signal processing and specialized stress responses involving multiple sigma factors. Moreover, the identification of overrepresented network motifs, such as autoregulation and coregulation of sigma and anti-sigma factor pairs, provides structural information that is relevant for studies of network dynamics. PMID:27029515

  12. Reconstruction and topological characterization of the sigma factor regulatory network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Rinki; Ravi, Janani; Datta, Pratik; Chen, Tianlong; Schnappinger, Dirk; Bassler, Kevin E.; Balázsi, Gábor; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2016-01-01

    Accessory sigma factors, which reprogram RNA polymerase to transcribe specific gene sets, activate bacterial adaptive responses to noxious environments. Here we reconstruct the complete sigma factor regulatory network of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis by an integrated approach. The approach combines identification of direct regulatory interactions between M. tuberculosis sigma factors in an E. coli model system, validation of selected links in M. tuberculosis, and extensive literature review. The resulting network comprises 41 direct interactions among all 13 sigma factors. Analysis of network topology reveals (i) a three-tiered hierarchy initiating at master regulators, (ii) high connectivity and (iii) distinct communities containing multiple sigma factors. These topological features are likely associated with multi-layer signal processing and specialized stress responses involving multiple sigma factors. Moreover, the identification of overrepresented network motifs, such as autoregulation and coregulation of sigma and anti-sigma factor pairs, provides structural information that is relevant for studies of network dynamics. PMID:27029515

  13. Loregic: A Method to Characterize the Cooperative Logic of Regulatory Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daifeng; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Sisu, Cristina; Cheng, Chao; Rozowsky, Joel; Meyerson, William; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    The topology of the gene-regulatory network has been extensively analyzed. Now, given the large amount of available functional genomic data, it is possible to go beyond this and systematically study regulatory circuits in terms of logic elements. To this end, we present Loregic, a computational method integrating gene expression and regulatory network data, to characterize the cooperativity of regulatory factors. Loregic uses all 16 possible two-input-one-output logic gates (e.g. AND or XOR) to describe triplets of two factors regulating a common target. We attempt to find the gate that best matches each triplet’s observed gene expression pattern across many conditions. We make Loregic available as a general-purpose tool (github.com/gersteinlab/loregic). We validate it with known yeast transcription-factor knockout experiments. Next, using human ENCODE ChIP-Seq and TCGA RNA-Seq data, we are able to demonstrate how Loregic characterizes complex circuits involving both proximally and distally regulating transcription factors (TFs) and also miRNAs. Furthermore, we show that MYC, a well-known oncogenic driving TF, can be modeled as acting independently from other TFs (e.g., using OR gates) but antagonistically with repressing miRNAs. Finally, we inter-relate Loregic’s gate logic with other aspects of regulation, such as indirect binding via protein-protein interactions, feed-forward loop motifs and global regulatory hierarchy. PMID:25884877

  14. Mapping regulatory factors by immunoprecipitation from native chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Guillermo A.; Kasinathan, Sivakanthan; Zentner, Gabriel E.; Henikoff, Steven; Ahmad, Kami

    2015-01-01

    Occupied Regions of Genomes from Affinity-purified Naturally Isolated Chromatin (ORGANIC) is a high-resolution method that can be used to quantitatively map protein-DNA interactions with high specificity and sensitivity. This method uses micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion of chromatin and low-salt solubilization to preserve protein-DNA complexes followed by immunoprecipitation and paired-end sequencing for genome-wide mapping of binding sites. In this Unit, we describe methods for isolation of nuclei and MNase digestion of unfixed chromatin, immunoprecipitation of protein-DNA complexes, and high-throughput sequencing to map sites of bound factors. PMID:25827087

  15. Transcription factor binding predictions using TRAP for the analysis of ChIP-seq data and regulatory SNPs.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Hufton, Andrew; Heinig, Matthias; O'Keeffe, Sean; Masri, Nassim El; Roider, Helge G; Manke, Thomas; Vingron, Martin

    2011-12-01

    The transcription factor affinity prediction (TRAP) method calculates the affinity of transcription factors for DNA sequences on the basis of a biophysical model. This method has proven to be useful for several applications, including for determining the putative target genes of a given factor. This protocol covers two other applications: (i) determining which transcription factors have the highest affinity in a set of sequences (illustrated with chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) peaks), and (ii) finding which factor is the most affected by a regulatory single-nucleotide polymorphism. The protocol describes how to use the TRAP web tools to address these questions, and it also presents a way to run TRAP on random control sequences to better estimate the significance of the results. All of the tools are fully available online and do not need any additional installation. The complete protocol takes about 45 min, but each individual tool runs in a few minutes. PMID:22051799

  16. Decreased Transcription Factor Binding Levels Nearby Primate Pseudogenes Suggest Regulatory Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Gavin M; Wilson, Michael D; Moses, Alan M

    2016-06-01

    Characteristics of pseudogene degeneration at the coding level are well-known, such as a shift toward neutral rates of nonsynonymous substitutions and gain of frameshift mutations. In contrast, degeneration of pseudogene transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here, we test two predictions of regulatory degeneration along a pseudogenized lineage: 1) Decreased transcription factor (TF) binding and 2) accelerated evolution in putative cis-regulatory regions.We find evidence for decreased TF binding levels nearby two primate pseudogenes compared with functional liver genes. However, the majority of TF-bound sequences nearby pseudogenes do not show evidence for lineage-specific accelerated rates of evolution. We conclude that decreases in TF binding level could be a marker for regulatory degeneration, while sequence degeneration in primate cis-regulatory modules may be obscured by background rates of TF binding site turnover. PMID:26882985

  17. Decreased Transcription Factor Binding Levels Nearby Primate Pseudogenes Suggest Regulatory Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Gavin M.; Wilson, Michael D.; Moses, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of pseudogene degeneration at the coding level are well-known, such as a shift toward neutral rates of nonsynonymous substitutions and gain of frameshift mutations. In contrast, degeneration of pseudogene transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here, we test two predictions of regulatory degeneration along a pseudogenized lineage: 1) Decreased transcription factor (TF) binding and 2) accelerated evolution in putative cis-regulatory regions. We find evidence for decreased TF binding levels nearby two primate pseudogenes compared with functional liver genes. However, the majority of TF-bound sequences nearby pseudogenes do not show evidence for lineage-specific accelerated rates of evolution. We conclude that decreases in TF binding level could be a marker for regulatory degeneration, while sequence degeneration in primate cis-regulatory modules may be obscured by background rates of TF binding site turnover. PMID:26882985

  18. Intracellular Signaling Molecules Activated by Epstein-Barr Virus for Induction of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luwen; Wu, Lihong; Hong, Ke; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1) is the principal oncogenic protein in the EBV transformation process. LMP-1 induces the expression of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7) and activates IRF-7 protein by phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. LMP-1 is an integral membrane protein with two regions in its C terminus that initiate signaling processes, the C-terminal activator regions 1 (CTAR-1) and CTAR-2. Here, genetic analysis of LMP-1 has determined that the PXQXT motif that governs the interaction between LMP-1 CTAR-1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) is needed to induce the expression of IRF-7. Mutations in the PXQXT motif in CTAR-1 that disrupt the interaction between LMP-1 and TRAFs abolished the induction of IRF-7. Also, dominant-negative mutants of TRAFs inhibited the induction of IRF-7 by CTAR-1. The last three amino acids (YYD) of CTAR-2 are also important for the induction of IRF-7. When both PXQXT and YYD were mutated (LMP-DM), the LMP-1 mutant failed to induce IRF-7. Also, LMP-DM blocked the induction of IRF-7 by wild-type LMP-1. These data strongly suggest that both CTAR-1 and CTAR-2 of LMP-1 independently induce the expression of IRF-7. In addition, NF-κB is involved in the induction of IRF-7. A superrepressor of IκB (sr-IκB) could block the induction of IRF-7 by LMP-1, and overexpression of NF-κB (p65 plus p50) could induce the expression of IRF-7. In addition, we have found that human IRF-7 is a stable protein, and sodium butyrate, a modifier of chromatin structure, induces IRF-7. PMID:11711629

  19. Sparse Additive Ordinary Differential Equations for Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hulin; Lu, Tao; Xue, Hongqi; Liang, Hua

    2014-04-01

    The gene regulation network (GRN) is a high-dimensional complex system, which can be represented by various mathematical or statistical models. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) model is one of the popular dynamic GRN models. High-dimensional linear ODE models have been proposed to identify GRNs, but with a limitation of the linear regulation effect assumption. In this article, we propose a sparse additive ODE (SA-ODE) model, coupled with ODE estimation methods and adaptive group LASSO techniques, to model dynamic GRNs that could flexibly deal with nonlinear regulation effects. The asymptotic properties of the proposed method are established and simulation studies are performed to validate the proposed approach. An application example for identifying the nonlinear dynamic GRN of T-cell activation is used to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method. PMID:25061254

  20. Specific detection of interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5): A case of antibody inequality

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; De, Saurav; Li, Dan; Song, Su; Matta, Bharati; Barnes, Betsy J.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is a member of the IRF family of transcription factors. IRF5 was first identified and characterized as a transcriptional regulator of type I interferon expression after virus infection. In addition to its critical role(s) in the regulation and development of host immunity, subsequent studies revealed important roles for IRF5 in autoimmunity, cancer, obesity, pain, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism. Based on these important disease-related findings, a large number of commercial antibodies have become available to study the expression and function of IRF5. Here we validate a number of these antibodies for the detection of IRF5 by immunoblot, flow cytometry, and immunofluorescence or immunohistochemistry using well-established positive and negative controls. Somewhat surprising, the majority of commercial antibodies tested were unable to specifically recognize human or mouse IRF5. We present data on antibodies that do specifically recognize human or mouse IRF5 in a particular application. These findings reiterate the importance of proper controls and molecular weight standards for the analysis of protein expression. Given that dysregulated IRF5 expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, including autoimmune and cancer, results indicate that caution should be used in the evaluation and interpretation of IRF5 expression analysis. PMID:27481535

  1. Aberrant expression of interferon regulatory factor 3 in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Takayuki; Naruke, Yuki; Shigematsu, Sayuri; Kohno, Tomoko; Yasui, Kiyoshi; Ma, Yuhua; Chua, Koon Jiew; Katayama, Ikuo; Nakamura, Takashi; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Koji, Takehiko; Yatabe, Yasushi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Fujita, Takashi; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; and others

    2010-06-25

    We analyzed the subcellular distributions and gene structures of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) transcription factor in 50 cases of human primary lung cancer. The immunohistochemical analyses revealed substantially aberrant IRF3 expression specific to the cancer lesions (2 and 6 tumors with nuclear staining, and 4 and 5 tumors with negative staining, in adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, respectively), while the morphologically normal region around the tumors exhibited only cytoplasmic staining. In addition, we determined the sequence of the entire IRF3 coding region, and found two novel variants with the amino acid changes (S{sup 175}(AGC) {yields} R{sup 175}(CGC) and A{sup 208}(GCC) {yields} D{sup 208}(GAC)). The R{sup 175} variant was also detected in a morphologically normal region around the nuclear staining squamous cell carcinoma, and exhibited almost the same functions as the wild type IRF3. On the other hand, the D{sup 208} variant, found in the negative staining squamous cell carcinoma cases, reduced the nuclear translocation in response to I{kappa}B kinase {epsilon} stimulation, as compared to the wild type IRF3, but the same variant was detected in the surrounding morphologically normal region. The aberrant expression of IRF3 and the novel D{sup 208} variant may provide clues to elucidate the etiology of primary lung cancer.

  2. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M.; Antony, Paul M.; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V.; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels

  3. Gene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tallam, Aravind; Perumal, Thaneer M; Antony, Paul M; Jäger, Christian; Fritz, Joëlle V; Vallar, Laurent; Balling, Rudi; Del Sol, Antonio; Michelucci, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels

  4. Statin effects on regulatory and proinflammatory factors in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Azor, M H; dos Santos, J C; Futata, E A; de Brito, C A; Maruta, C W; Rivitti, E A; da Silva Duarte, A J; Sato, M N

    2011-11-01

    Immunological dysfunction has been described to occur in chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU), most notably in association with an inflammatory process. Some pharmacological agents as statins--drugs used in hypercholesterolaemia--display a broad effect on the immune response and thus should be tested in vitro in CIU. Our main objectives were to evaluate the effects of statins on the innate and adaptive immune response in CIU. Simvastatin or lovastatin have markedly inhibited the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) proliferative response induced by T and B cell mitogens, superantigen or recall antigen. Simvastatin arrested phytohaemaglutinin (PHA)-induced T cells at the G0/G1 phase, inhibiting T helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-17A cytokine secretion in both patients and healthy control groups. Up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 (SOCS3) mRNA expression in PHA-stimulated PBMCs from CIU patients was not modified by simvastatin, in contrast to the enhancing effect in the control group. Statin exhibited a less efficient inhibition effect on cytokine production [IL-6 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α] induced by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, to which a statin preincubation step was required. Furthermore, statin did not affect the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated PBMC or CD14+ cells in CIU patients. In addition, LPS-activated PBMC from CIU patients showed impaired indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) mRNA expression compared to healthy control, which remained at decreased levels with statin treatment. Statins exhibited a marked down-regulatory effect in T cell functions, but were not able to control TLR-4 activation in CIU patients. The unbalanced regulatory SOCS3 and IDO expressions in CIU may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:21985375

  5. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Results Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. Conclusions In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs. PMID:22672438

  6. Transcription factor-microRNA synergistic regulatory network revealing the mechanism of polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HAI-YING; HUANG, YU-LING; LIU, JIAN-QIAO; HUANG, QING

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common type of endocrine disorder, affecting 5–11% of women of reproductive age worldwide. Transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs are considered to have crucial roles in the developmental process of several diseases and have synergistic regulatory actions. However, the effects of TFs and microRNAs, and the patterns of their cooperation in the synergistic regulatory network of PCOS, remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to determine the possible mechanism of PCOS, based on a TF-microRNA synergistic regulatory network. Initially, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in PCOS were identified using microarray data of the GSE34526 dataset. Subsequently, the TFs and microRNAs which regulated the DEGs of PCOS were identified, and a PCOS-associated TF-microRNA synergistic regulatory network was constructed. This network included 195 DEGs, 136 TFs and 283 microRNAs, and the DEGs were regulated by TFs and microRNAs. Based on topological and functional enrichment analyses, SP1, mir-355-5p and JUN were identified as potentially crucial regulators in the development of PCOS and in characterizing the regulatory mechanism. In conclusion, the TF-microRNA synergistic regulatory network constructed in the present study provides novel insight on the molecular mechanism of PCOS in the form of synergistic regulated model. PMID:27035648

  7. Insights into the Interferon Regulatory Factor Activation from the Crystal Structure of Dimeric IRF5

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Lam, S; Srinath, H; Jiang, Z; Correia, J; Schiffer, C; Fitzgerald, K; Lin, K; Royer, Jr., W

    2008-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are involved in the innate immune response and are activated by phosphorylation. The structure of a pseudophosphorylated IRF5 activation domain now reveals structural changes in the activated form that would turn an autoinhibitory region into a dimerization interface. In vivo analysis supports the relevance of such a dimer to transcriptional activation.

  8. Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)-4 regulates the expression of a subset of Th2 cytokines 1

    PubMed Central

    Ahyi, Ayele-Nati N.; Chang, Hua-Chen; Dent, Alexander L.; Nutt, Stephen L.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Th2 cells can be subdivided into subpopulations depending on the level of a cytokine and the subsets of cytokines they produce. We have recently identified the ETS family transcription factor PU.1 as regulating heterogeneity in Th2 populations. To define additional factors that might contribute to Th2 heterogeneity, we examined the PU.1 interacting protein IFN-regulatory factor (IRF)-4. When Th2 cells are separated based on levels of IL-10 secretion, IRF4 expression segregates into the subset of Th2 cells expressing high levels of IL-10. Infection of total Th2 cells, and IL-10 non-secreting cells, with retrovirus expressing IRF4, resulted in increased IL-4 and IL-10 expression, no change in IL-5 or IL-13 production and decreased Il9 transcription. Transfection of an IRF4-specific siRNA into Th2 cells decreases IL-10 production. IRF4 directly binds the Il10 gene as evidenced by ChIP assay, and regulates Il10 control elements in a reporter assay. IRF4 interacts with PU.1, and in PU.1-deficient T cells there was an increase in IRF4 binding to the Il10 gene, and in the ability of IRF4 to induce IL-10 production compared to wild type cells and Il10 promoter activity in a reporter assay. Further heterogeneity of IRF4 expression was observed in Th2 cells analyzed for expression of multiple Th2 cytokines. Thus, IRF4 promotes the expression of a subset of Th2 cytokines and contributes to Th2 heterogeneity. PMID:19592658

  9. Does the Transcription Factor NemR Use a Regulatory Sulfenamide Bond to Sense Bleach?

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael Jeffrey; Li, Yan; Leichert, Lars Ingo-Ole; Xu, Zhaohui; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-09-20

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS), such as hypochlorous acid (i.e., bleach), are antimicrobial oxidants produced by the innate immune system. Like many redox-regulated transcription factors, the Escherichia coli repressor NemR responds to RCS by using the reversible oxidation of highly conserved cysteines to alter its DNA-binding affinity. However, earlier work showed that RCS response in NemR does not depend on any commonly known oxidative cysteine modifications. We have now determined the crystal structure of NemR, showing that the regulatory cysteine, Cys106, is in close proximity to a highly conserved lysine (Lys175). We used crystallographic, biochemical, and mass spectrometric analyses to analyze the role of this lysine residue in RCS sensing. Based on our results, we hypothesize that RCS treatment of NemR results in the formation of a reversible Cys106-Lys175 sulfenamide bond. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of a protein whose function is regulated by a cysteine-lysine sulfenamide thiol switch, constituting a novel addition to the biological repertoire of functional redox switches. PMID:25867078

  10. Modulation of neoplastic gene regulatory pathways by the RNA-binding factor AUF1

    PubMed Central

    Zucconi, Beth E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    The mRNA-binding protein AUF1 regulates the expression of many key players in cancer including proto-oncogenes, regulators of apoptosis and the cell cycle, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, principally by directing the decay kinetics of their encoded mRNAs. Most studies support an mRNA-destabilizing role for AUF1, although other findings suggest additional functions for this factor. In this review, we explore how changes in AUF1 isoform distribution, subcellular localization, and post-translational protein modifications can influence the metabolism of targeted mRNAs. However, several lines of evidence also support a role for AUF1 in the initiation and/or development of cancer. Many AUF1-targeted transcripts encode products that control pro- and anti-oncogenic processes. Also, overexpression of AUF1 enhances tumorigenesis in murine models, and AUF1 levels are enhanced in some tumors. Finally, signaling cascades that modulate AUF1 function are deregulated in some cancerous tissues. Together, these features suggest that AUF1 may play a prominent role in regulating the expression of many genes that can contribute to tumorigenic phenotypes, and that this post-transcriptional regulatory control point may be subverted by diverse mechanisms in neoplasia. PMID:21622178

  11. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 Has a Protective Role in the Host Response to Endotoxic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Paige; Moreland, Jessica G.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF) 6, a member of the IRF family, is essential for epidermal and orofacial embryonic development. Irf6 is strongly expressed in keratinocytes, in which it regulates epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and migration. A recent role for Irf6 in Toll-like receptor 2-dependent chemokine gene expression was also reported in an epithelial cell line. However, a function for Irf6 in innate immune cells was not previously reported. In the present study, we investigated the expression and function of Irf6 in bone marrow-derived neutrophils and macrophages. We show here, using a conditional knockout of Irf6 in lysosymeM expressing cells, that Irf6 is required for resistance to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. In addition, Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived neutrophils exhibited increased chemotactic index and velocity compared with wild-type cells in vitro. TLR4-specific KC and IL6 secretions were upregulated in Irf6-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These cells also exhibited an increased level of phosphorylated IkBa. Collectively, our findings suggest a role for Irf6 in the resistance to endotoxic shock due to NFk-B-mediated alteration of cytokine production. PMID:27035130

  12. Coupling of tandem Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor (Smurf) WW domains modulates target specificity.

    PubMed

    Chong, P Andrew; Lin, Hong; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2010-10-26

    Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that participates in degradation of TGF-β receptors and other targets. Smurf2 WW domains recognize PPXY (PY) motifs on ubiquitin ligase target proteins or on adapters, such as Smad7, that bind to E3 target proteins. We previously demonstrated that the isolated WW3 domain of Smurf2, but not the WW2 domain, can directly bind to a Smad7 PY motif. We show here that the WW2 augments this interaction by binding to the WW3 and making auxiliary contacts with the PY motif and a novel E/D-S/T-P motif, which is N-terminal to all Smad PY motifs. The WW2 likely enhances the selectivity of Smurf2 for the Smad proteins. NMR titrations confirm that Smad1 and Smad2 are bound by Smurf2 with the same coupled WW domain arrangement used to bind Smad7. The analogous WW domains in the short isoform of Smurf1 recognize the Smad7 PY peptide using the same coupled mechanism. However, a longer Smurf1 isoform, which has an additional 26 residues in the inter-WW domain linker, is only partially able to use the coupled WW domain binding mechanism. The longer linker results in a decrease in affinity for the Smad7 peptide. Interdomain coupling of WW domains enhances selectivity and enables the tuning of interactions by isoform switching. PMID:20937913

  13. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF-4) Targets IRF-5 to Regulate Epstein-Barr Virus Transformation*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dongsheng; Meyer, Florencia; Ehlers, Erica; Blasnitz, Laura; Zhang, Luwen

    2011-01-01

    The cellular interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF-4), which is a member of IRF family, is involved in the development of multiple myeloma and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-mediated transformation of B lymphocytes. However, the molecular mechanism of IRF-4 in cellular transformation is unknown. We have found that knockdown of IRF-4 leads to high expression of IRF-5, a pro-apoptotic member in the IRF family. Overexpression of IRF-4 represses IRF-5 expression. Reduction of IRF-4 leads to growth inhibition, and the restoration of IRF-4 by exogenous plasmids correlates with the growth recovery and reduces IRF-5 expression. In addition, IRF-4 negatively regulates IRF-5 promoter reporter activities and binds to IRF-5 promoters in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of IRF-5 rescues IRF-4 knockdown-mediated growth inhibition, and IRF-5 overexpression alone is sufficient to induce cellular growth inhibition of EBV-transformed cells. Therefore, IRF-5 is one of the targets of IRF-4, and IRF-4 regulates the growth of EBV-transformed cells partially through IRF-5. This work provides insight on how IRFs interact with one another to participate in viral pathogenesis and transformation. PMID:21454650

  14. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element's Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns.

    PubMed

    Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Lamaze, Fabien C; Deschênes, Astrid; Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Belleau, Pascal; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a "gradient effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a "threshold effect" where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor. PMID:27538250

  15. From System-Wide Differential Gene Expression to Perturbed Regulatory Factors: A Combinatorial Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Gaurang; Mande, Shekhar C.

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput experiments such as microarrays and deep sequencing provide large scale information on the pattern of gene expression, which undergoes extensive remodeling as the cell dynamically responds to varying environmental cues or has its function disrupted under pathological conditions. An important initial step in the systematic analysis and interpretation of genome-scale expression alteration involves identification of a set of perturbed transcriptional regulators whose differential activity can provide a proximate hypothesis to account for these transcriptomic changes. In the present work, we propose an unbiased and logically natural approach to transcription factor enrichment. It involves overlaying a list of experimentally determined differentially expressed genes on a background regulatory network coming from e.g. literature curation or computational motif scanning, and identifying that subset of regulators whose aggregated target set best discriminates between the altered and the unaffected genes. In other words, our methodology entails testing of all possible regulatory subnetworks, rather than just the target sets of individual regulators as is followed in most standard approaches. We have proposed an iterative search method to efficiently find such a combination, and benchmarked it on E. coli microarray and regulatory network data available in the public domain. Comparative analysis carried out on artificially generated differential expression profiles, as well as empirical factor overexpression data for M. tuberculosis, shows that our methodology provides marked improvement in accuracy of regulatory inference relative to the standard method that involves evaluating factor enrichment in an individual manner. PMID:26562430

  16. metagene Profiles Analyses Reveal Regulatory Element’s Factor-Specific Recruitment Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Samb, Rawane; Lemaçon, Audrey; Bilodeau, Steve; Droit, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    ChIP-Sequencing (ChIP-Seq) provides a vast amount of information regarding the localization of proteins across the genome. The aggregation of ChIP-Seq enrichment signal in a metagene plot is an approach commonly used to summarize data complexity and to obtain a high level visual representation of the general occupancy pattern of a protein. Here we present the R package metagene, the graphical interface Imetagene and the companion package similaRpeak. Together, they provide a framework to integrate, summarize and compare the ChIP-Seq enrichment signal from complex experimental designs. Those packages identify and quantify similarities or dissimilarities in patterns between large numbers of ChIP-Seq profiles. We used metagene to investigate the differential occupancy of regulatory factors at noncoding regulatory regions (promoters and enhancers) in relation to transcriptional activity in GM12878 B-lymphocytes. The relationships between occupancy patterns and transcriptional activity suggest two different mechanisms of action for transcriptional control: i) a “gradient effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels follow transcription and ii) a “threshold effect” where the regulatory factor occupancy levels max out prior to reaching maximal transcription. metagene, Imetagene and similaRpeak are implemented in R under the Artistic license 2.0 and are available on Bioconductor. PMID:27538250

  17. [ASSESSMENT OF EXTREME FACTORS OF SHIFT WORK IN ARCTIC CONDITIONS BY WORKERS WITH DIFFERENT REGULATORY PROCESSES].

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Ya A; Simonova, N N

    2016-01-01

    A man working on a shift basis in the Arctic, every day is under the influence of various extreme factors which are inevitable for oil and gas indudtry. To adapt to shift work employees use various resources of the individual. The purpose of research is the determination of personal resources of shift workers to overcome the adverse factors of the environment in the Arctic. The study involved 191 builder of main gas pipelines, working in shifts in the Tyumen region (the length of the shift 52 days of arrival) at the age of 23 to 59 (mean age 34.9 ± 8.1) years. Methods: psychological testing, questioning, observation, descriptive statistics, discriminant step by step analysis. There was revealed the correlation between the subjective assessment of the majority of adverse climatic factors in the regulatory process "assessment of results"; production factors--regulatory processes such as flexibility, autonomy, simulation, and the general level of self-regulation; social factors are more associated with the severity of such regulatory processes, flexibility and evaluation of results. PMID:27430072

  18. Polymyxin Resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phoQ Mutants Is Dependent on Additional Two-Component Regulatory Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gutu, Alina D.; Sgambati, Nicole; Strasbourger, Pnina; Brannon, Mark K.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Haugen, Eric; Kaul, Rajinder K.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop resistance to polymyxin as a consequence of mutations in the PhoPQ regulatory system, mediated by covalent lipid A modification. Transposon mutagenesis of a polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutant defined 41 novel loci required for resistance, including two regulatory systems, ColRS and CprRS. Deletion of the colRS genes, individually or in tandem, abrogated the polymyxin resistance of a ΔphoQ mutant, as did individual or tandem deletion of cprRS. Individual deletion of colR or colS in a ΔphoQ mutant also suppressed 4-amino-l-arabinose addition to lipid A, consistent with the known role of this modification in polymyxin resistance. Surprisingly, tandem deletion of colRS or cprRS in the ΔphoQ mutant or individual deletion of cprR or cprS failed to suppress 4-amino-l-arabinose addition to lipid A, indicating that this modification alone is not sufficient for PhoPQ-mediated polymyxin resistance in P. aeruginosa. Episomal expression of colRS or cprRS in tandem or of cprR individually complemented the Pm resistance phenotype in the ΔphoQ mutant, while episomal expression of colR, colS, or cprS individually did not. Highly polymyxin-resistant phoQ mutants of P. aeruginosa isolated from polymyxin-treated cystic fibrosis patients harbored mutant alleles of colRS and cprS; when expressed in a ΔphoQ background, these mutant alleles enhanced polymyxin resistance. These results define ColRS and CprRS as two-component systems regulating polymyxin resistance in P. aeruginosa, indicate that addition of 4-amino-l-arabinose to lipid A is not the only PhoPQ-regulated biochemical mechanism required for resistance, and demonstrate that colRS and cprS mutations can contribute to high-level clinical resistance. PMID:23459479

  19. Characterizing the interplay betwen mulitple levels of organization within bacterial sigma factor regulatory networks

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Qiu; Nagarajan, Harish; Embree, Mallory; Shieu, Wendy; Abate, Elisa; Juarez, Katy; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Elkins, James G; Nevin, Kelly P.; Barrett, Christian; Lovley, Derek; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zengler, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria contain multiple sigma factors, each targeting diverse, but often overlapping sets of promoters, thereby forming a complex network. The layout and deployment of such a sigma factor network directly impacts global transcriptional regulation and ultimately dictates the phenotype. Here we integrate multi-omic data sets to determine the topology, the operational, and functional states of the sigma factor network in Geobacter sulfurreducens, revealing a unique network topology of interacting sigma factors. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network shows a highly modular structure with sN being the major regulator of energy metabolism. Surprisingly, the functional state of the network during the two most divergent growth conditions is nearly static, with sigma factor binding profiles almost invariant to environmental stimuli. This first comprehensive elucidation of the interplay between different levels of the sigma factor network organization is fundamental to characterize transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in bacteria.

  20. Identification of novel regulatory factor X (RFX) target genes by comparative genomics in Drosophila species

    PubMed Central

    Laurençon, Anne; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Efimenko, Evgeni; Grenier, Guillaume; Bissett, Ryan; Cortier, Elisabeth; Rolland, Vivien; Swoboda, Peter; Durand, Bénédicte

    2007-01-01

    Background Regulatory factor X (RFX) transcription factors play a key role in ciliary assembly in nematode, Drosophila and mouse. Using the tremendous advantages of comparative genomics in closely related species, we identified novel genes regulated by dRFX in Drosophila. Results We first demonstrate that a subset of known ciliary genes in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila are regulated by dRFX and have a conserved RFX binding site (X-box) in their promoters in two highly divergent Drosophila species. We then designed an X-box consensus sequence and carried out a genome wide computer screen to identify novel genes under RFX control. We found 412 genes that share a conserved X-box upstream of the ATG in both species, with 83 genes presenting a more restricted consensus. We analyzed 25 of these 83 genes, 16 of which are indeed RFX target genes. Two of them have never been described as involved in ciliogenesis. In addition, reporter construct expression analysis revealed that three of the identified genes encode proteins specifically localized in ciliated endings of Drosophila sensory neurons. Conclusion Our X-box search strategy led to the identification of novel RFX target genes in Drosophila that are involved in sensory ciliogenesis. We also established a highly valuable Drosophila cilia and basal body dataset. These results demonstrate the accuracy of the X-box screen and will be useful for the identification of candidate genes for human ciliopathies, as several human homologs of RFX target genes are known to be involved in diseases, such as Bardet-Biedl syndrome. PMID:17875208

  1. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional requirements for two-factor... Additional requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  2. Muscle regulatory factors regulate T1R3 taste receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Kokabu, Shoichiro; Lowery, Jonathan W; Toyono, Takashi; Seta, Yuji; Hitomi, Suzuro; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Enoki, Yuichiro; Okubo, Masahiko; Fukushima, Yosuke; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2015-12-25

    T1R3 is a T1R class of G protein-coupled receptors, composing subunit of the umami taste receptor when complexed with T1R1. T1R3 was originally discovered in gustatory tissue but is now known to be expressed in a wide variety of tissues and cell types such the intestine, pancreatic β-cells, skeletal muscle, and heart. In addition to taste recognition, the T1R1/T1R3 complex functions as an amino acid sensor and has been proposed to be a control mechanism for the secretion of hormones, such as cholecystokinin, insulin, and duodenal HCO3(-) and activates the mammalian rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1) to inhibit autophagy. T1R3 knockout mice have increased rate of autophagy in the heart, skeletal muscle and liver. Thus, T1R3 has multiple physiological functions and is widely expressed in vivo. However, the exact mechanisms regulating T1R3 expression are largely unknown. Here, we used comparative genomics and functional analyses to characterize the genomic region upstream of the annotated transcriptional start of human T1R3. This revealed that the T1R3 promoter in human and mouse resides in an evolutionary conserved region (ECR). We also identified a repressive element located upstream of the human T1R3 promoter that has relatively high degree of conservation with rhesus macaque. Additionally, the muscle regulatory factors MyoD and Myogenin regulate T1R3 expression and T1R3 expression increases with skeletal muscle differentiation of murine myoblast C2C12 cells. Taken together, our study raises the possibility that MyoD and Myogenin might control skeletal muscle metabolism and homeostasis through the regulation of T1R3 promoter activity. PMID:26545778

  3. Stable inhibitory activity of regulatory T cells requires the transcription factor Helios.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Barnitz, R Anthony; Kreslavsky, Taras; Brown, Flavian D; Moffett, Howell; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Kaygusuz, Yasemin; Meissner, Torsten; Holderried, Tobias A W; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Haining, W Nicholas; Cantor, Harvey

    2015-10-16

    The maintenance of immune homeostasis requires regulatory T cells (T(regs)). Given their intrinsic self-reactivity, T(regs) must stably maintain a suppressive phenotype to avoid autoimmunity. We report that impaired expression of the transcription factor (TF) Helios by FoxP3(+) CD4 and Qa-1-restricted CD8 T(regs) results in defective regulatory activity and autoimmunity in mice. Helios-deficient T(regs) develop an unstable phenotype during inflammatory responses characterized by reduced FoxP3 expression and increased effector cytokine expression secondary to diminished activation of the STAT5 pathway. CD8 T(regs) also require Helios-dependent STAT5 activation for survival and to prevent terminal T cell differentiation. The definition of Helios as a key transcription factor that stabilizes T(regs) in the face of inflammatory responses provides a genetic explanation for a core property of T(regs). PMID:26472910

  4. Ethylene Response Factors: A Key Regulatory Hub in Hormone and Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-09-01

    Ethylene is essential for many developmental processes and a key mediator of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. The ethylene signaling and response pathway includes Ethylene Response Factors (ERFs), which belong to the transcription factor family APETALA2/ERF. It is well known that ERFs regulate molecular response to pathogen attack by binding to sequences containing AGCCGCC motifs (the GCC box), a cis-acting element. However, recent studies suggest that several ERFs also bind to dehydration-responsive elements and act as a key regulatory hub in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we review some of the recent advances in our understanding of the ethylene signaling and response pathway, with emphasis on ERFs and their role in hormone cross talk and redox signaling under abiotic stresses. We conclude that ERFs act as a key regulatory hub, integrating ethylene, abscisic acid, jasmonate, and redox signaling in the plant response to a number of abiotic stresses. PMID:26103991

  5. Mining 3D genome structure populations identifies major factors governing the stability of regulatory communities

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chao; Li, Wenyuan; Tjong, Harianto; Hao, Shengli; Zhou, Yonggang; Li, Qingjiao; Chen, Lin; Zhu, Bing; Alber, Frank; Jasmine Zhou, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) genome structures vary from cell to cell even in an isogenic sample. Unlike protein structures, genome structures are highly plastic, posing a significant challenge for structure-function mapping. Here we report an approach to comprehensively identify 3D chromatin clusters that each occurs frequently across a population of genome structures, either deconvoluted from ensemble-averaged Hi-C data or from a collection of single-cell Hi-C data. Applying our method to a population of genome structures (at the macrodomain resolution) of lymphoblastoid cells, we identify an atlas of stable inter-chromosomal chromatin clusters. A large number of these clusters are enriched in binding of specific regulatory factors and are therefore defined as ‘Regulatory Communities.' We reveal two major factors, centromere clustering and transcription factor binding, which significantly stabilize such communities. Finally, we show that the regulatory communities differ substantially from cell to cell, indicating that expression variability could be impacted by genome structures. PMID:27240697

  6. Transcriptional Regulatory Network Analysis of MYB Transcription Factor Family Genes in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Smita, Shuchi; Katiyar, Amit; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Pandey, Dev M.; Bansal, Kailash C.

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcription factor (TF) is one of the largest TF families and regulates defense responses to various stresses, hormone signaling as well as many metabolic and developmental processes in plants. Understanding these regulatory hierarchies of gene expression networks in response to developmental and environmental cues is a major challenge due to the complex interactions between the genetic elements. Correlation analyses are useful to unravel co-regulated gene pairs governing biological process as well as identification of new candidate hub genes in response to these complex processes. High throughput expression profiling data are highly useful for construction of co-expression networks. In the present study, we utilized transcriptome data for comprehensive regulatory network studies of MYB TFs by “top-down” and “guide-gene” approaches. More than 50% of OsMYBs were strongly correlated under 50 experimental conditions with 51 hub genes via “top-down” approach. Further, clusters were identified using Markov Clustering (MCL). To maximize the clustering performance, parameter evaluation of the MCL inflation score (I) was performed in terms of enriched GO categories by measuring F-score. Comparison of co-expressed cluster and clads analyzed from phylogenetic analysis signifies their evolutionarily conserved co-regulatory role. We utilized compendium of known interaction and biological role with Gene Ontology enrichment analysis to hypothesize function of coexpressed OsMYBs. In the other part, the transcriptional regulatory network analysis by “guide-gene” approach revealed 40 putative targets of 26 OsMYB TF hubs with high correlation value utilizing 815 microarray data. The putative targets with MYB-binding cis-elements enrichment in their promoter region, functional co-occurrence as well as nuclear localization supports our finding. Specially, enrichment of MYB binding regions involved in drought-inducibility implying their regulatory role in drought

  7. Gene duplication of type-B ARR transcription factors systematically extends transcriptional regulatory structures in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung Hee; Hyeon, Do Young; Lee, ll Hwan; Park, Su Jin; Han, Seungmin; Lee, In Chul; Hwang, Daehee; Nam, Hong Gil

    2014-01-01

    Many of duplicated genes are enriched in signaling pathways. Recently, gene duplication of kinases has been shown to provide genetic buffering and functional diversification in cellular signaling. Transcription factors (TFs) are also often duplicated. However, how duplication of TFs affects their regulatory structures and functions of target genes has not been explored at the systems level. Here, we examined regulatory and functional roles of duplication of three major ARR TFs (ARR1, 10, and 12) in Arabidopsis cytokinin signaling using wild-type and single, double, and triple deletion mutants of the TFs. Comparative analysis of gene expression profiles obtained from Arabidopsis roots in wild-type and these mutants showed that duplication of ARR TFs systematically extended their transcriptional regulatory structures, leading to enhanced robustness and diversification in functions of target genes, as well as in regulation of cellular networks of target genes. Therefore, our results suggest that duplication of TFs contributes to robustness and diversification in functions of target genes by extending transcriptional regulatory structures. PMID:25425016

  8. Modular cis-regulatory organization of developmentally expressed genes: two genes transcribed territorially in the sea urchin embryo, and additional examples.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhamer, C V; Yuh, C H; Davidson, E H

    1996-01-01

    The cis-regulatory systems that control developmental expression of two sea urchin genes have been subjected to detailed functional analysis. Both systems are modular in organization: specific, separable fragments of the cis-regulatory DNA each containing multiple transcription factor target sites execute particular regulatory subfunctions when associated with reporter genes and introduced into the embryo. The studies summarized here were carried out on the CyIIIa gene, expressed in the embryonic aboral ectoderm and on the Endo16 gene, expressed in the embryonic vegetal plate, archenteron, and then midgut. The regulatory systems of both genes include modules that control particular aspects of temporal and spatial expression, and in both the territorial boundaries of expression depend on a combination of negative and positive functions. In both genes different regulatory modules control early and late embryonic expression. Modular cis-regulatory organization is widespread in developmentally regulated genes, and we present a tabular summary that includes many examples from mouse and Drosophila. We regard cis-regulatory modules as units of developmental transcription control, and also of evolution, in the assembly of transcription control systems. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8790328

  9. Dynamic Transcription Factor Activity Profiles Reveal Key Regulatory Interactions During Megakaryocytic and Erythroid Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Mark T.; Shin, Seungjin; Wu, Jia J.; Mays, Zachary; Weng, Stanley; Bagheri, Neda; Miller, William M.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2014-01-01

    The directed differentiation toward erythroid (E) or megakaryocytic (MK) lineages by the MK-E progenitor (MEP) could enhance the ex vivo generation of red blood cells and platelets for therapeutic transfusions. The lineage choice at the MEP bifurcation is controlled in large part by activity within the intracellular signal transduction network, the output of which determines the activity of transcription factors (TFs) and ultimately gene expression. Although many TFs have been implicated, E or MK differentiation is a complex process requiring multiple days, and the dynamics of TF activities during commitment and terminal maturation are relatively unexplored. Herein, we applied a living cell array for the large-scale, dynamic quantification of TF activities during MEP bifurcation. A panel of hematopoietic TFs (GATA-1, GATA-2, SCL/TAL1, FLI-1, NF-E2, PU.1, c-Myb) was characterized during E and MK differentiation of bipotent K562 cells. Dynamic TF activity profiles associated with differentiation towards each lineage were identified, and validated with previous reports. From these activity profiles, we show that GATA-1 is an important hub during early hemin- and PMA-induced differentiation, and reveal several characteristic TF interactions for E and MK differentiation that confirm regulatory mechanisms documented in the literature. Additionally, we highlight several novel TF interactions at various stages of E and MK differentiation. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which nicotinamide (NIC) promoted terminal MK maturation using an MK-committed cell line, CHRF-288-11 (CHRF). Concomitant with its enhancement of ploidy, NIC strongly enhanced the activity of three TFs with known involvement in terminal MK maturation: FLI-1, NF-E2, and p53. Dynamic profiling of TF activity represents a novel tool to complement traditional assays focused on mRNA and protein expression levels to understand progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:24853077

  10. Dynamic transcription factor activity profiles reveal key regulatory interactions during megakaryocytic and erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Mark T; Shin, Seungjin; Wu, Jia J; Mays, Zachary; Weng, Stanley; Bagheri, Neda; Miller, William M; Shea, Lonnie D

    2014-10-01

    The directed differentiation toward erythroid (E) or megakaryocytic (MK) lineages by the MK-E progenitor (MEP) could enhance the ex vivo generation of red blood cells and platelets for therapeutic transfusions. The lineage choice at the MEP bifurcation is controlled in large part by activity within the intracellular signal transduction network, the output of which determines the activity of transcription factors (TFs) and ultimately gene expression. Although many TFs have been implicated, E or MK differentiation is a complex process requiring multiple days, and the dynamics of TF activities during commitment and terminal maturation are relatively unexplored. Herein, we applied a living cell array for the large-scale, dynamic quantification of TF activities during MEP bifurcation. A panel of hematopoietic TFs (GATA-1, GATA-2, SCL/TAL1, FLI-1, NF-E2, PU.1, c-Myb) was characterized during E and MK differentiation of bipotent K562 cells. Dynamic TF activity profiles associated with differentiation towards each lineage were identified, and validated with previous reports. From these activity profiles, we show that GATA-1 is an important hub during early hemin- and PMA-induced differentiation, and reveal several characteristic TF interactions for E and MK differentiation that confirm regulatory mechanisms documented in the literature. Additionally, we highlight several novel TF interactions at various stages of E and MK differentiation. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which nicotinamide (NIC) promoted terminal MK maturation using an MK-committed cell line, CHRF-288-11 (CHRF). Concomitant with its enhancement of ploidy, NIC strongly enhanced the activity of three TFs with known involvement in terminal MK maturation: FLI-1, NF-E2, and p53. Dynamic profiling of TF activity represents a novel tool to complement traditional assays focused on mRNA and protein expression levels to understand progenitor cell differentiation. PMID:24853077

  11. Regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor-α genetic variations

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YANGZHOU; HAN, NING; LI, QINCHUAN; LI, ZENGCHUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms underlying sepsis progression in patients with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genetic variations. The GSE5760 expression profile data, which was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, contained 30 wild-type (WT) and 28 mutation (MUT) samples. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two types of samples were identified using the Student's t-test, and the corresponding microRNAs (miRNAs) were screened using WebGestalt software. An integrated miRNA-DEG network was constructed using the Cytoscape software, based on the interactions between the DEGs, as identified using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins database, and the correlation between miRNAs and their target genes. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were conducted for the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and the KEGG Orthology Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 390 DEGS between the WT and MUT samples, along with 11 -associated miRNAs, were identified. The integrated miRNA-DEG network consisted of 38 DEGs and 11 miRNAs. Within this network, COPS2 was found to be associated with transcriptional functions, while FUS was found to be involved in mRNA metabolic processes. Other DEGs, including FBXW7 and CUL3, were enriched in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway. In addition, miR-15 was predicted to target COPS2 and CUL3. The results of the present study suggested that COPS2, FUS, FBXW7 and CUL3 may be associated with sepsis in patients with TNF-α genetic variations. In the progression of sepsis, FBXW7 and CUL3 may participate in the ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway, whereas COPS2 may regulate the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of the FUS protein. Furthermore, COPS2 and CUL3 may be novel targets of miR-15. PMID:27347057

  12. IRF-7, a new interferon regulatory factor associated with Epstein-Barr virus latency.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Pagano, J S

    1997-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BamHI Q promoter (Qp) is the only promoter used for the transcription of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) mRNA in cells in the most restricted (type I) latent infection state. However, Qp is inactive in type III latency. With the use of the yeast one-hybrid system, a new cellular gene has been identified that encodes proteins which bind to sequence in Qp. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene has significant homology to the interferon regulatory factors (IRFs). This new gene and products including two splicing variants are designated IRF-7A, IRF-7B, and IRF-7C. The expression of IRF-7 is predominantly in spleen, thymus, and peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). IRF-7 proteins were identified in primary PBL with specific antiserum against IRF-7B protein. IRF-7s can bind to interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) sequence and repress transcriptional activation by both interferon and IRF-1. Additionally, a functional viral ISRE sequence, 5'-GCGAAAACGAAAGT-3', has been identified in Qp. Finally, the expression of IRF-7 is consistently high in type III latency cells and almost undetectable in type I latency, corresponding to the activity of endogenous Qp in these latency states and the ability of the IRF-7 proteins to repress Qp-reporter constructs. The identification of a functional viral ISRE and association of IRF-7 with type III latency may be relevant to the mechanism of regulation of Qp. PMID:9315633

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  14. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-06-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  15. Roles of transcription factors and epigenetic modifications in differentiation and maintenance of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Takashi; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Lu, Qianjin; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are an essential cell subset for the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Treg cells are characterized by a distinct pattern of gene expression, including the upregulation of immune-suppressive genes and the silencing of inflammatory genes. The molecular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of Tregs have been extensively investigated. We have identified essential transcription factors NR4a and Smad2/3 in the development of thymic Tregs and induced Tregs, respectively. This article reviews the roles of transcription factors in the differentiation, maintenance, and function of Treg cells. PMID:26970203

  16. 34 CFR 477.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE PROGRAM ANALYSIS ASSISTANCE AND POLICY STUDIES PROGRAM How Does the Secretary Make an Award? § 477.22 What additional factors does the... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary...

  17. Rel Induces Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF-4) Expression in Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grumont, Raelene J.; Gerondakis, Steve

    2000-01-01

    In lymphocytes, the Rel transcription factor is essential in establishing a pattern of gene expression that promotes cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Here we show that mitogen-induced expression of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 4 (IRF-4), a lymphoid-specific member of the IFN family of transcription factors, is Rel dependent. Consistent with IRF-4 functioning as a repressor of IFN-induced gene expression, the absence of IRF-4 expression in c-rel−/− B cells coincided with a greater sensitivity of these cells to the antiproliferative activity of IFNs. In turn, enforced expression of an IRF-4 transgene restored IFN modulated c-rel−/− B cell proliferation to that of wild-type cells. This cross-regulation between two different signaling pathways represents a novel mechanism that Rel/nuclear factor κB can repress the transcription of IFN-regulated genes in a cell type–specific manner. PMID:10770796

  18. An Arabidopsis Transcriptional Regulatory Map Reveals Distinct Functional and Evolutionary Features of Novel Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinpu; He, Kun; Tang, Xing; Li, Zhe; Lv, Le; Zhao, Yi; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2015-07-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in both development and stress responses. By integrating into and rewiring original systems, novel TFs contribute significantly to the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. Here, we report a high-confidence transcriptional regulatory map covering 388 TFs from 47 families in Arabidopsis. Systematic analysis of this map revealed the architectural heterogeneity of developmental and stress response subnetworks and identified three types of novel network motifs that are absent from unicellular organisms and essential for multicellular development. Moreover, TFs of novel families that emerged during plant landing present higher binding specificities and are preferentially wired into developmental processes and these novel network motifs. Further unveiled connection between the binding specificity and wiring preference of TFs explains the wiring preferences of novel-family TFs. These results reveal distinct functional and evolutionary features of novel TFs, suggesting a plausible mechanism for their contribution to the evolution of multicellular organisms. PMID:25750178

  19. The transcription factors Sox10 and Myrf define an essential regulatory network module in differentiating oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hornig, Julia; Fröb, Franziska; Vogl, Michael R; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Tamm, Ernst R; Wegner, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Myelin is essential for rapid saltatory conduction and is produced by Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system and oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system. In both cell types the transcription factor Sox10 is an essential component of the myelin-specific regulatory network. Here we identify Myrf as an oligodendrocyte-specific target of Sox10 and map a Sox10 responsive enhancer to an evolutionarily conserved element in intron 1 of the Myrf gene. Once induced, Myrf cooperates with Sox10 to implement the myelination program as evident from the physical interaction between both proteins and the synergistic activation of several myelin-specific genes. This is strongly reminiscent of the situation in Schwann cells where Sox10 first induces and then cooperates with Krox20 during myelination. Our analyses indicate that the regulatory network for myelination in oligodendrocytes is organized along similar general principles as the one in Schwann cells, but is differentially implemented. PMID:24204311

  20. Expanding the Regulatory Network Governed by the Extracytoplasmic Function Sigma Factor σH in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Koichi; Teramoto, Haruhiko; Yukawa, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor σH is responsible for the heat and oxidative stress response in Corynebacterium glutamicum. Due to the hierarchical nature of the regulatory network, previous transcriptome analyses have not been able to discriminate between direct and indirect targets of σH. Here, we determined the direct genome-wide targets of σH using chromatin immunoprecipitation with microarray technology (ChIP-chip) for analysis of a deletion mutant of rshA, encoding an anti-σ factor of σH. Seventy-five σH-dependent promoters, including 39 new ones, were identified. σH-dependent, heat-inducible transcripts for several of the new targets, including ilvD encoding a labile Fe-S cluster enzyme, dihydroxy-acid dehydratase, were detected, and their 5′ ends were mapped to the σH-dependent promoters identified. Interestingly, functional internal σH-dependent promoters were found in operon-like gene clusters involved in the pentose phosphate pathway, riboflavin biosynthesis, and Zn uptake. Accordingly, deletion of rshA resulted in hyperproduction of riboflavin and affected expression of Zn-responsive genes, possibly through intracellular Zn overload, indicating new physiological roles of σH. Furthermore, sigA encoding the primary σ factor was identified as a new target of σH. Reporter assays demonstrated that the σH-dependent promoter upstream of sigA was highly heat inducible but much weaker than the known σA-dependent one. Our ChIP-chip analysis also detected the σH-dependent promoters upstream of rshA within the sigH-rshA operon and of sigB encoding a group 2 σ factor, supporting the previous findings of their σH-dependent expression. Taken together, these results reveal an additional layer of the sigma factor regulatory network in C. glutamicum. PMID:25404703

  1. PcFKH1, a novel regulatory factor from the forkhead family, controls the biosynthesis of penicillin in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Santos, Rebeca; García-Estrada, Carlos; Kosalková, Katarina; Prieto, Carlos; Santamarta, Irene; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum (re-identified as Penicillium rubens) is a good example of a biological process subjected to complex global regulatory networks and serves as a model to study fungal secondary metabolism. The winged-helix family of transcription factors recently described, which includes the forkhead type of proteins, is a key type of regulatory proteins involved in this process. In yeasts and humans, forkhead transcription factors are involved in different processes (cell cycle regulation, cell death control, pre-mRNA processing and morphogenesis); one member of this family of proteins has been identified in the P. chrysogenum genome (Pc18g00430). In this work, we have characterized this novel transcription factor (named PcFKH1) by generating knock-down mutants and overexpression strains. Results clearly indicate that PcFKH1 positively controls antibiotic biosynthesis through the specific interaction with the promoter region of the penDE gene, thus regulating penDE mRNA levels. PcFKH1 also binds to the pcbC promoter, but with low affinity. In addition, it also controls other ancillary genes of the penicillin biosynthetic process, such as phlA (encoding phenylacetyl CoA ligase) and ppt (encoding phosphopantetheinyl transferase). PcFKH1 also plays a role in conidiation and spore pigmentation, but it does not seem to be involved in hyphal morphology or cell division in the improved laboratory reference strain Wisconsin 54-1255. A genome-wide analysis of processes putatively coregulated by PcFKH1 and PcRFX1 (another winged-helix transcription factor) in P. chrysogenum provided evidence of the global effect of these transcription factors in P. chrysogenum metabolism. PMID:26049046

  2. REACTIN: Regulatory activity inference of transcription factors underlying human diseases with application to breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic alterations of transcription factors (TFs) have been implicated in the tumorigenesis of cancers. In many cancers, alteration of TFs results in aberrant activity of them without changing their gene expression level. Gene expression data from microarray or RNA-seq experiments can capture the expression change of genes, however, it is still challenge to reveal the activity change of TFs. Results Here we propose a method, called REACTIN (REgulatory ACTivity INference), which integrates TF binding data with gene expression data to identify TFs with significantly differential activity between disease and normal samples. REACTIN successfully detect differential activity of estrogen receptor (ER) between ER+ and ER- samples in 10 breast cancer datasets. When applied to compare tumor and normal breast samples, it reveals TFs that are critical for carcinogenesis of breast cancer. Moreover, Reaction can be utilized to identify transcriptional programs that are predictive to patient survival time of breast cancer patients. Conclusions REACTIN provides a useful tool to investigate regulatory programs underlying a biological process providing the related case and control gene expression data. Considering the enormous amount of cancer gene expression data and the increasingly accumulating ChIP-seq data, we expect wide application of REACTIN for revealing the regulatory mechanisms of various diseases. PMID:23885756

  3. The Ets-1 transcription factor controls the development and function of natural regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Mouly, Enguerran; Chemin, Karine; Nguyen, Hai Vu; Chopin, Martine; Mesnard, Laurent; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Burlen-defranoux, Odile; Bandeira, Antonio; Bories, Jean-Christophe

    2010-09-27

    Regulatory T cells (T reg cells) constitute a population of CD4(+) T cells that limits immune responses. The transcription factor Foxp3 is important for determining the development and function of T reg cells; however, the molecular mechanisms that trigger and maintain its expression remain incompletely understood. In this study, we show that mice deficient for the Ets-1 transcription factor (Ets-1(-/-)) developed T cell-mediated splenomegaly and systemic autoimmunity that can be blocked by functional wild-type T reg cells. Spleens of Ets-1(-/-) mice contained mostly activated T cells, including Th2-polarized CD4(+) cells and had reduced percentages of T reg cells. Splenic and thymic Ets-1(-/-) T reg cells expressed low levels of Foxp3 and displayed the CD103 marker that characterizes antigen-experienced T reg cells. Thymic development of Ets-1(-/-) T reg cells appeared intrinsically altered as Foxp3-expressing cells differentiate poorly in mixed fetal liver reconstituted chimera and fetal thymic organ culture. Ets-1(-/-) T reg cells showed decreased in vitro suppression activity and did not protect Rag2(-/-) hosts from naive T cell-induced inflammatory bowel disease. Furthermore, in T reg cells, Ets-1 interacted with the Foxp3 intronic enhancer and was required for demethylation of this regulatory sequence. These data demonstrate that Ets-1 is required for the development of natural T reg cells and suggest a role for this transcription factor in the regulation of Foxp3 expression. PMID:20855499

  4. Regulatory network of microRNAs, target genes, transcription factors and host genes in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lu-Chen; Xu, Zhi-Wen; Wang, Kun-Hao; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Wang, Shang

    2015-01-01

    Genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in human oncology. However, most of the biological factors are reported in disperse form which makes it hard to discover the pathology. In this study, genes and miRNAs involved in human endometrial cancer(EC) were collected and formed into regulatory networks following their interactive relations, including miRNAs targeting genes, transcription factors (TFs) regulating miRNAs and miRNAs included in their host genes. Networks are constructed hierarchically at three levels: differentially expressed, related and global. Among the three, the differentially expressed network is the most important and fundamental network that contains the key genes and miRNAs in EC. The target genes, TFs and miRNAs are differentially expressed in EC so that any mutation in them may impact on EC development. Some key pathways in networks were highlighted to analyze how they interactively influence other factors and carcinogenesis. Upstream and downstream pathways of the differentially expressed genes and miRNAs were compared and analyzed. The purpose of this study was to partially reveal the deep regulatory mechanisms in EC using a new method that combines comprehensive genes and miRNAs together with their relationships. It may contribute to cancer prevention and gene therapy of EC. PMID:25684474

  5. Selection of terrestrial transfer factors for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Y.C.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1983-01-01

    A parameter value for a radioecological assessment model is not a single value but a distribution of values about a central value. The sources that contribute to the variability of transfer factors to predict foodchain transport of radionuclides are enumerated. Knowledge of these sources, judgement in interpreting the available data, consideration of collateral information, and established criteria that specify the desired level of conservatism in the resulting predictions are essential elements when selecting appropriate parameter values for radioecological assessment models and regulatory guides. 39 references, 4 figures, 5 tables.

  6. Direct lineage reprogramming via pioneer factors; a detour through developmental gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Morris, Samantha A

    2016-08-01

    Although many approaches have been employed to generate defined fate in vitro, the resultant cells often appear developmentally immature or incompletely specified, limiting their utility. Growing evidence suggests that current methods of direct lineage conversion may rely on the transition through a developmental intermediate. Here, I hypothesize that complete conversion between cell fates is more probable and feasible via reversion to a developmentally immature state. I posit that this is due to the role of pioneer transcription factors in engaging silent, unmarked chromatin and activating hierarchical gene regulatory networks responsible for embryonic patterning. Understanding these developmental contexts will be essential for the precise engineering of cell identity. PMID:27486230

  7. The Armadillo Repeat-containing Protein, ARMCX3, Physically and Functionally Interacts with the Developmental Regulatory Factor Sox10*

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Zhongming; Tapper, Andrew R.; Gardner, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Sox10 is a member of the group E Sox transcription factor family and plays key roles in neural crest development and subsequent cellular differentiation. Sox10 binds to regulatory sequences in target genes via its conserved high mobility group domain. In most cases, Sox10 exerts its transcriptional effects in concert with other DNA-binding factors, adaptor proteins, and nuclear import proteins. These interactions can lead to synergistic gene activation and can be cell type-specific. In earlier work, we demonstrated that Sox10 transactivates the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α3 and β4 subunit genes and does so only in neuronal-like cell lines, raising the possibility that Sox10 mediates its effects via interactions with co-regulatory factors. Here we describe the identification of the armadillo repeat-containing protein, ARMCX3, as a Sox10-interacting protein. Biochemical analyses indicate that ARMCX3 is an integral membrane protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Others have shown that Sox10 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein. We extend this observation and demonstrate that, in the cytoplasm, Sox10 is peripherally associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane. Both Sox10 and ARMCX3 are expressed in mouse brain and spinal cord as well as several cell lines. Overexpression of ARMCX3 increased the amount of mitochondrially associated Sox10. In addition, although ARMCX3 does not possess intrinsic transcriptional activity, it does enhance transactivation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α3 and β4 subunit gene promoters by Sox10. These results suggest that Sox10 is a membrane-associated factor whose transcriptional function is increased by direct interactions with ARMCX3 and raise the possibility of a signal transduction cascade between the nucleus and mitochondria through Sox10/ARMCX3 interactions. PMID:19304657

  8. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models

    PubMed Central

    Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Imrichova, Hana; Fiers, Mark; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME). We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a “gain-of-target” for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. PMID:26562774

  9. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

    PubMed

    Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Imrichova, Hana; Fiers, Mark; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Aerts, Stein

    2015-11-01

    Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME). We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. PMID:26562774

  10. Discovery of Transcription Factors and Regulatory Regions Driving In Vivo Tumor Development by ATAC-seq and FAIRE-seq Open Chromatin Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Davie, Kristofer; Jacobs, Jelle; Atkins, Mardelle; Potier, Delphine; Christiaens, Valerie; Halder, Georg; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Genomic enhancers regulate spatio-temporal gene expression by recruiting specific combinations of transcription factors (TFs). When TFs are bound to active regulatory regions, they displace canonical nucleosomes, making these regions biochemically detectable as nucleosome-depleted regions or accessible/open chromatin. Here we ask whether open chromatin profiling can be used to identify the entire repertoire of active promoters and enhancers underlying tissue-specific gene expression during normal development and oncogenesis in vivo. To this end, we first compare two different approaches to detect open chromatin in vivo using the Drosophila eye primordium as a model system: FAIRE-seq, based on physical separation of open versus closed chromatin; and ATAC-seq, based on preferential integration of a transposon into open chromatin. We find that both methods reproducibly capture the tissue-specific chromatin activity of regulatory regions, including promoters, enhancers, and insulators. Using both techniques, we screened for regulatory regions that become ectopically active during Ras-dependent oncogenesis, and identified 3778 regions that become (over-)activated during tumor development. Next, we applied motif discovery to search for candidate transcription factors that could bind these regions and identified AP-1 and Stat92E as key regulators. We validated the importance of Stat92E in the development of the tumors by introducing a loss of function Stat92E mutant, which was sufficient to rescue the tumor phenotype. Additionally we tested if the predicted Stat92E responsive regulatory regions are genuine, using ectopic induction of JAK/STAT signaling in developing eye discs, and observed that similar chromatin changes indeed occurred. Finally, we determine that these are functionally significant regulatory changes, as nearby target genes are up- or down-regulated. In conclusion, we show that FAIRE-seq and ATAC-seq based open chromatin profiling, combined with motif

  11. Total Binding Affinity Profiles of Regulatory Regions Predict Transcription Factor Binding and Gene Expression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Molineris, Ivan; Provero, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors regulate gene expression by binding regulatory DNA. Understanding the rules governing such binding is an essential step in describing the network of regulatory interactions, and its pathological alterations. We show that describing regulatory regions in terms of their profile of total binding affinities for transcription factors leads to increased predictive power compared to methods based on the identification of discrete binding sites. This applies both to the prediction of transcription factor binding as revealed by ChIP-seq experiments and to the prediction of gene expression through RNA-seq. Further significant improvements in predictive power are obtained when regulatory regions are defined based on chromatin states inferred from histone modification data. PMID:26599758

  12. Molecular cloning and expression of an additional epidermal growth factor receptor-related gene.

    PubMed Central

    Plowman, G D; Whitney, G S; Neubauer, M G; Green, J M; McDonald, V L; Todaro, G J; Shoyab, M

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and amphiregulin are structurally and functionally related growth regulatory proteins. These secreted polypeptides all bind to the 170-kDa cell-surface EGF receptor, activating its intrinsic kinase activity. However, amphiregulin exhibits different activities than EGF and TGF-alpha in a number of biological assays. Amphiregulin only partially competes with EGF for binding EGF receptor, and amphiregulin does not induce anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney cells (NRK) in the presence of TGF-beta. Amphiregulin also appears to abrogate the stimulatory effect of TGF-alpha on the growth of several aggressive epithelial carcinomas that overexpress EGF receptor. These findings suggest that amphiregulin may interact with a separate receptor in certain cell types. Here we report the cloning of another member of the human EGF receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which we have named "HER3/ERRB3." The cDNA was isolated from a human carcinoma cell line, and its 6-kilobase transcript was identified in various human tissues. We have generated peptide-specific antisera that recognizes the 160-kDa HER3 protein when transiently expressed in COS cells. These reagents will allow us to determine whether HER3 binds amphiregulin or other growth regulatory proteins and what role HER3 protein plays in the regulation of cell growth. Images PMID:2164210

  13. Positive Regulatory Domain I-Binding Factor 1 mediates repression of the MHC Class II Transactivator (CIITA) type IV promoter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Gilbert, Carolyn A.; Hudson, John A.; Bolick, Sophia C.; Wright, Kenneth L.; Piskurich, Janet F.

    2006-01-01

    MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), a co-activator that controls MHC class II (MHC II) transcription, functions as the master regulator of MHC II expression. Persistent activity of the CIITA type III promoter (pIII), one of the four potential promoters of this gene, is responsible for constitutive expression of MHC II by B lymphocytes. In addition, IFN-γ induces expression of CIITA in these cells through the type IV promoter (pIV). Positive regulatory domain 1-binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), called B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) in mice, represses the expression of CIITA pIII in plasma and multiple myeloma cells. To investigate regulation of CIITA pIV expression by PRDI-BF1 in the B lymphocyte lineage, protein/DNA binding studies, and functional promoter analyses were performed. PRDI-BF1 bound to the IRF-E site in CIITA pIV. Ectopic expression of either PRDI-BF1 or Blimp-1 repressed this promoter in B lymphocytes. In vitro binding and functional analyses of CIITA pIV demonstrated that the IFN regulatory factor-element (IRF-E) is the target of this repression. In vivo genomic footprint analysis demonstrated protein binding at the IRF-E site of CIITA pIV in U266 myeloma cells, which express PRDI-BF1. PRDI-BF1β, a truncated form of PRDI-BF1 that is co-expressed in myeloma cells, also bound to the IRF-E site and repressed CIITA pIV. These findings demonstrate for the first time that, in addition to silencing expression of CIITA pIII in B lymphocytes, PRDI-BF1 is capable of binding and suppressing CIITA pIV. PMID:16765445

  14. The regulatory role of hepatoma-derived growth factor as an angiogenic factor in the eye

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Michelle E.; Wang, Weiwen; Chen, Xiuping; Ji, Yanli; Shakya, Akhalesh; Shen, Chen; Zhang, Chenming; Gonzalez, Vivianne; Brewer, Megan; Ma, Jian-xing; Wen, Rong; Zhang, Fangliang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a mitogen that promotes endothelial proliferation and neuronal survival. Using a unique technology of ligandomics, we recently identified HDGF as a retinal endothelial binding protein. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of HDGF in regulating ocular vasculature and the expression of HDGF in the retina. Methods HDGF expression in the retinal was analyzed with western blot and immunohistochemistry. Angiogenic activity was investigated in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMVECs) with in vitro endothelial proliferation, migration, and permeability assays. In vivo angiogenic activity was quantified with a corneal pocket assay. The Evans blue assay and western blot using anti-mouse albumin were performed to detect the capacity of HDGF to induce retinal vascular leakage. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed that HDGF is expressed in the retina with a distinct pattern. HDGF was detected in retinal ganglion cells and the inner nuclear layer but not in the inner plexiform layer, suggesting that HDGF is expressed in the nucleus, but not in the cytoplasm, of retinal neurons. In contrast to family member HDGF-related protein 3 (HRP-3) that has no expression in photoreceptors, HDGF is also present in the outer nuclear layer and the inner and outer segments of photoreceptors. This suggests that HDGF is expressed in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm of photoreceptors. In vitro functional assays showed that HDGF induced the proliferation, migration, and permeability of HRMVECs. Corneal pocket assay indicated that HDGF directly stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Intravitreal injection of HDGF significantly induced retinal vascular leakage. Conclusions These results suggest that HDGF is an angiogenic factor that regulates retinal vasculature in physiologic and pathological conditions. Identification of HDGF by ligandomics and its independent characterization in this study also support the validity of this

  15. Transcription factor MITF and remodeller BRG1 define chromatin organisation at regulatory elements in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Laurette, Patrick; Strub, Thomas; Koludrovic, Dana; Keime, Céline; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Seberg, Hannah; Van Otterloo, Eric; Imrichova, Hana; Siddaway, Robert; Aerts, Stein; Cornell, Robert A; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2015-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is the master regulator of the melanocyte lineage. To understand how MITF regulates transcription, we used tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry to define a comprehensive MITF interactome identifying novel cofactors involved in transcription, DNA replication and repair, and chromatin organisation. We show that MITF interacts with a PBAF chromatin remodelling complex comprising BRG1 and CHD7. BRG1 is essential for melanoma cell proliferation in vitro and for normal melanocyte development in vivo. MITF and SOX10 actively recruit BRG1 to a set of MITF-associated regulatory elements (MAREs) at active enhancers. Combinations of MITF, SOX10, TFAP2A, and YY1 bind between two BRG1-occupied nucleosomes thus defining both a signature of transcription factors essential for the melanocyte lineage and a specific chromatin organisation of the regulatory elements they occupy. BRG1 also regulates the dynamics of MITF genomic occupancy. MITF-BRG1 interplay thus plays an essential role in transcription regulation in melanoma. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06857.001 PMID:25803486

  16. Identification and functional analysis of interferon regulatory factor 3 in Lateolabrax maculatus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Wu; Wei, Qun; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Chun-Lei; Bi, Yan-Hui; Gu, Yi-Feng

    2016-10-01

    The interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is a member of the IFN regulatory transcription factor family, which binds to the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) within the promoter of IFN genes and IFN-stimulated genes. In this study, the IRF3 cDNA of sea perch Lateolabrax maculatus (SpIRF3) was identified, which contained 1781 bp with an open reading frame of 1398 bp that coded a 465 amino acid protein. The SpIRF3 protein shared conserved characterizations with its homologues and displayed the conserved DNA-binding domain, IRF association domain, serine-rich C-terminal domain, and tryptophan residue cluster. Phylogenetic analysis illustrated that SpIRF3 belonged to the IRF3 subfamily. Subcellular localization analysis showed that SpIRF3 mainly resided in the cytoplasm without stimuli but translocated into nuclei in the presence of poly I:C. Real-time PCR data indicated that SpIRF3 was transcriptionally up-regulated by poly I:C stimulation in various organs. Moreover, reporter assay revealed that SpIRF3 functioned as a modulator in triggering the IFN response by inducing the activity of IFN and ISRE-containing promoter. These data revealed that SpIRF3 was a potential molecule in the IFN immune defense system against viral infection. PMID:27181713

  17. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  18. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  19. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  20. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? In addition to applying the selection criteria in, as appropriate §§ 658.31, 658.32, and 658.33, the Secretary, to the extent practicable and... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  1. MicroRNA-17 Modulates Regulatory T Cell Function by Targeting Co-regulators of the Foxp3 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huang-Yu; Barbi, Joseph; Wu, Chao-Yi; Zheng, Ying; Vignali, Paolo D A; Wu, Xingmei; Tao, Jin-Hui; Park, Benjamin V; Bandara, Shashika; Novack, Lewis; Ni, Xuhao; Yang, Xiaoping; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Wu, Ren-Chin; Zhang, Junran; Yang, Chih-Wei; Pardoll, Drew M; Li, Huabin; Pan, Fan

    2016-07-19

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are important in maintaining self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. The Treg cell transcription factor Foxp3 works in concert with other co-regulatory molecules, including Eos, to determine the transcriptional signature and characteristic suppressive phenotype of Treg cells. Here, we report that the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) actively repressed Eos expression through microRNA-17 (miR-17). miR-17 expression increased in Treg cells in the presence of IL-6, and its expression negatively correlated with that of Eos. Treg cell suppressive activity was diminished upon overexpression of miR-17 in vitro and in vivo, which was mitigated upon co-expression of an Eos mutant lacking miR-17 target sites. Also, RNAi of miR-17 resulted in enhanced suppressive activity. Ectopic expression of miR-17 imparted effector-T-cell-like characteristics to Treg cells via the de-repression of genes encoding effector cytokines. Thus, miR-17 provides a potent layer of Treg cell control through targeting Eos and additional Foxp3 co-regulators. PMID:27438767

  2. Lineage-Specific Modulation of Interleukin 4 Signaling by Interferon Regulatory Factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjay; Jiang, Man; Anthony, Alissa; Pernis, Alessandra B.

    1999-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-4 is an immunoregulatory cytokine that exerts distinct biological activities on different cell types. Our studies indicate that interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-4 is both a target and a modulator of the IL-4 signaling cascade. IRF-4 expression is strongly upregulated upon costimulation of B cells with CD40 and IL-4. Furthermore, we find that IRF-4 can interact with signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)6 and drive the expression of IL-4–inducible genes. The transactivating ability of IRF-4 is blocked by the repressor factor BCL-6. Since expression of IRF-4 is mostly confined to lymphoid cells, these data provide a potential mechanism by which IL-4–inducible genes can be regulated in a lineage-specific manner. PMID:10601358

  3. The role of gene regulatory factors in the evolutionary history of humans.

    PubMed

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Kanton, Sabina; Walter, Maria Beatriz C; Nowick, Katja

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the molecular basis of how modern human phenotypes have evolved is one of the most fascinating challenges in biology. Here, we will focus on the roles of gene regulatory factors (GRFs), in particular transcription factors (TFs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) during human evolution. We will present examples of TFs and lncRNAs that have changed or show signs of positive selection in humans compared to chimpanzees, in modern humans compared to archaic humans, or within modern human populations. On the basis of current knowledge about the functions of these GRF genes, we speculate that they have been involved in speciation as well as in shaping phenotypes such as brain functions, skeletal morphology, and metabolic processes. PMID:25215414

  4. Interferon regulatory factor 5 in human autoimmunity and murine models of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Eames, Hayley L; Corbin, Alastair L; Udalova, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) has been demonstrated as a key transcription factor of the immune system, playing important roles in modulating inflammatory immune responses in numerous cell types including dendritic cells, macrophages, and B cells. As well as driving the expression of type I interferon in antiviral responses, IRF5 is also crucial for driving macrophages toward a proinflammatory phenotype by regulating cytokine and chemokine expression and modulating B-cell maturity and antibody production. This review highlights the functional importance of IRF5 in a disease setting, by discussing polymorphic mutations at the human Irf5 locus that lead to susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In concordance with this, we also discuss lessons in IRF5 functionality learned from murine in vivo models of autoimmune disease and inflammation and hypothesize that modulation of IRF5 activity and expression could provide potential therapeutic benefits in the clinic. PMID:26207886

  5. Uncertainty analysis in regulatory programs: Application factors versus probabilistic methods in ecological risk assessments of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.R.J.; Elliot, B.

    1995-12-31

    In assessments of toxic chemicals, sources of uncertainty may be dealt with by two basic approaches: application factors and probabilistic methods. In regulatory programs, the most common approach is to calculate a quotient by dividing the predicted environmental concentration (PEC) by the predicted no effects concentration (PNEC). PNECs are usually derived from laboratory bioassays, thus requiring the use of application factors to account for uncertainty introduced by the extrapolation from the laboratory to the field, and from measurement to assessment endpoints. Using this approach, often with worst-case assumptions about exposure and species sensitivities, the hope is that chemicals with a quotient of less than one will have a very low probability of causing adverse ecological effects. This approach has received widespread criticism recently, particularly because it tends to be overly conservative and does not adequately estimate the magnitude and probability of causing adverse effects. On the plus side, application factors are simple to use, accepted worldwide, and may be used with limited effects data in a quotient calculation. The alternative approach is to use probabilistic methods such as Monte Carlo simulation, Baye`s theorem or other techniques to estimate risk. Such methods often have rigorous statistical assumptions and may have large data requirements. Stating an effect in probabilistic terms, however, forces the identification of sources of uncertainty and quantification of their impact on risk estimation. In this presentation the authors discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using application factors and probabilistic methods in dealing with uncertainty in ecological risk assessments of chemicals. Based on this analysis, recommendations are presented to assist in choosing the appropriate approach for different types of regulatory programs dealing with toxic chemicals.

  6. Different papillomaviruses have different repertoires of transcription factor binding sites: convergence and divergence in the upstream regulatory region

    PubMed Central

    García-Vallvé, Santiago; Iglesias-Rozas, José R; Alonso, Ángel; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2006-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses (PVs) infect stratified squamous epithelia in warm-blooded vertebrates and have undergone a complex evolutionary process. The control of the expression of the early ORFs in PVs depends on the binding of cellular and viral transcription factors to the upstream regulatory region (URR) of the virus. It is believed that there is a core of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) common to all PVs, with additional individual differences, although most of the available information focuses only on a handful of viruses. Results We have studied the URR of sixty-one PVs, covering twenty different hosts. We have predicted the TFBS present in the URR and analysed these results by principal component analysis and genetic algorithms. The number and nature of TFBS in the URR might be much broader than thus far described, and different PVs have different repertoires of TFBS. Conclusion There are common fingerprints in the URR in PVs that infect primates, although the ancestors of these viruses diverged a long time ago. Additionally, there are obvious differences between the URR of alpha and beta PVs, despite these PVs infect similar histological cell types in the same host, i.e. human. A thorough analysis of the TFBS in the URR might provide crucial information about the differential biology of cancer-associated PVs. PMID:16526953

  7. A Consensus Network of Gene Regulatory Factors in the Human Frontal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Berto, Stefano; Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Gerighausen, Daniel; Qin, Jing; Nowick, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive abilities, such as memory, learning, language, problem solving, and planning, involve the frontal lobe and other brain areas. Not much is known yet about the molecular basis of cognitive abilities, but it seems clear that cognitive abilities are determined by the interplay of many genes. One approach for analyzing the genetic networks involved in cognitive functions is to study the coexpression networks of genes with known importance for proper cognitive functions, such as genes that have been associated with cognitive disorders like intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Because many of these genes are gene regulatory factors (GRFs) we aimed to provide insights into the gene regulatory networks active in the human frontal lobe. Using genome wide human frontal lobe expression data from 10 independent data sets, we first derived 10 individual coexpression networks for all GRFs including their potential target genes. We observed a high level of variability among these 10 independently derived networks, pointing out that relying on results from a single study can only provide limited biological insights. To instead focus on the most confident information from these 10 networks we developed a method for integrating such independently derived networks into a consensus network. This consensus network revealed robust GRF interactions that are conserved across the frontal lobes of different healthy human individuals. Within this network, we detected a strong central module that is enriched for 166 GRFs known to be involved in brain development and/or cognitive disorders. Interestingly, several hubs of the consensus network encode for GRFs that have not yet been associated with brain functions. Their central role in the network suggests them as excellent new candidates for playing an essential role in the regulatory network of the human frontal lobe, which should be investigated in future studies. PMID:27014338

  8. A Consensus Network of Gene Regulatory Factors in the Human Frontal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Berto, Stefano; Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Gerighausen, Daniel; Qin, Jing; Nowick, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive abilities, such as memory, learning, language, problem solving, and planning, involve the frontal lobe and other brain areas. Not much is known yet about the molecular basis of cognitive abilities, but it seems clear that cognitive abilities are determined by the interplay of many genes. One approach for analyzing the genetic networks involved in cognitive functions is to study the coexpression networks of genes with known importance for proper cognitive functions, such as genes that have been associated with cognitive disorders like intellectual disability (ID) or autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Because many of these genes are gene regulatory factors (GRFs) we aimed to provide insights into the gene regulatory networks active in the human frontal lobe. Using genome wide human frontal lobe expression data from 10 independent data sets, we first derived 10 individual coexpression networks for all GRFs including their potential target genes. We observed a high level of variability among these 10 independently derived networks, pointing out that relying on results from a single study can only provide limited biological insights. To instead focus on the most confident information from these 10 networks we developed a method for integrating such independently derived networks into a consensus network. This consensus network revealed robust GRF interactions that are conserved across the frontal lobes of different healthy human individuals. Within this network, we detected a strong central module that is enriched for 166 GRFs known to be involved in brain development and/or cognitive disorders. Interestingly, several hubs of the consensus network encode for GRFs that have not yet been associated with brain functions. Their central role in the network suggests them as excellent new candidates for playing an essential role in the regulatory network of the human frontal lobe, which should be investigated in future studies. PMID:27014338

  9. Global characterization of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) genes in vertebrates: Glimpse of the diversification in evolution

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), which can be identified based on a unique helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain (DBD) are a large family of transcription factors involved in host immune response, haemotopoietic differentiation and immunomodulation. Despite the identification of ten IRF family members in mammals, and some recent effort to identify these members in fish, relatively little is known in the composition of these members in other classes of vertebrates, and the evolution and probably the origin of the IRF family have not been investigated in vertebrates. Results Genome data mining has been performed to identify any possible IRF family members in human, mouse, dog, chicken, anole lizard, frog, and some teleost fish, mainly zebrafish and stickleback, and also in non-vertebrate deuterostomes including the hemichordate, cephalochordate, urochordate and echinoderm. In vertebrates, all ten IRF family members, i.e. IRF-1 to IRF-10 were identified, with two genes of IRF-4 and IRF-6 identified in fish and frog, respectively, except that in zebrafish exist three IRF-4 genes. Surprisingly, an additional member in the IRF family, IRF-11 was found in teleost fish. A range of two to ten IRF-like genes were detected in the non-vertebrate deuterostomes, and they had little similarity to those IRF family members in vertebrates as revealed in genomic structure and in phylogenetic analysis. However, the ten IRF family members, IRF-1 to IRF-10 showed certain degrees of conservation in terms of genomic structure and gene synteny. In particular, IRF-1, IRF-2, IRF-6, IRF-8 are quite conserved in their genomic structure in all vertebrates, and to a less degree, some IRF family members, such as IRF-5 and IRF-9 are comparable in the structure. Synteny analysis revealed that the gene loci for the ten IRF family members in vertebrates were also quite conservative, but in zebrafish conserved genes were distributed in a much longer distance in chromosomes. Furthermore

  10. Are major behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors for mortality additive or multiplicative in their effects?

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil; Preston, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    All individuals are subject to multiple risk factors for mortality. In this paper, we consider the nature of interactions between certain major sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors associated with all-cause mortality in the United States. We develop the formal logic pertaining to two forms of interaction between risk factors, additive and multiplicative relations. We then consider the general circumstances in which additive or multiplicative relations might be expected. We argue that expectations about interactions among socio-demographic variables, and their relation to behavioral variables, have been stated in terms of additivity. However, the statistical models typically used to estimate the relation between risk factors and mortality assume that risk factors act multiplicatively. We examine empirically the nature of interactions among five major risk factors associated with all-cause mortality: smoking, obesity, race, sex, and educational attainment. Data were drawn from the cross-sectional NHANES III (1988-1994) and NHANES 1999-2010 surveys, linked to death records through December 31, 2011. Our analytic sample comprised 35,604 respondents and 5369 deaths. We find that obesity is additive with each of the remaining four variables. We speculate that its additivity is a reflection of the fact that obese status is generally achieved later in life. For all pairings of socio-demographic variables, risks are multiplicative. For survival chances, it is much more dangerous to be poorly educated if you are black or if you are male. And it is much riskier to be a male if you are black. These traits, established at birth or during childhood, literally result in deadly combinations. We conclude that the identification of interactions among risk factors can cast valuable light on the nature of the process being studied. It also has public health implications by identifying especially vulnerable groups and by properly identifying the proportion of deaths

  11. The Transcription Factor Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 Is Expressed after Cerebral Ischemia and Contributes to Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino; Salkowski, Cindy A.; Zhang, Fangyi; Aber, Tracy; Nagayama, Masao; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Elizabeth Ross, M.

    1999-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) is involved in the molecular mechanisms of inflammation and apoptosis, processes that contribute to ischemic brain injury. In this study, the induction of IRF-1 in response to cerebral ischemia and its role in ischemic brain injury were investigated. IRF-1 gene expression was markedly upregulated within 12 h of occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in C57BL/6 mice. The expression reached a peak 4 d after ischemia (6.0 ± 1.8-fold; P < 0.001) and was restricted to the ischemic regions of the brain. The volume of ischemic injury was reduced by 23 ± 3% in IRF-1+/− and by 46 ± 9% in IRF-1−/− mice (P < 0.05). The reduction in infarct volume was paralleled by a substantial attenuation in neurological deficits. Thus, IRF-1 is the first nuclear transacting factor demonstrated to contribute directly to cerebral ischemic damage and may be a novel therapeutic target in ischemic stroke. PMID:9989987

  12. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, ‘Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli’ (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  13. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  14. The Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Cistrome: GATA Factor-Dependent cis-Regulatory Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, K J; Johnson, K D; Gao, X; Keles, S; Bresnick, E H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators mediate the genesis and function of the hematopoietic system by binding complex ensembles of cis-regulatory elements to establish genetic networks. While thousands to millions of any given cis-element resides in a genome, how transcriptional regulators select these sites and how site attributes dictate functional output is not well understood. An instructive system to address this problem involves the GATA family of transcription factors that control vital developmental and physiological processes and are linked to multiple human pathologies. Although GATA factors bind DNA motifs harboring the sequence GATA, only a very small subset of these abundant motifs are occupied in genomes. Mechanistic studies revealed a unique configuration of a GATA factor-regulated cis-element consisting of an E-box and a downstream GATA motif separated by a short DNA spacer. GATA-1- or GATA-2-containing multiprotein complexes at these composite elements control transcription of genes critical for hematopoietic stem cell emergence in the mammalian embryo, hematopoietic progenitor cell regulation, and erythroid cell maturation. Other constituents of the complex include the basic helix-loop-loop transcription factor Scl/TAL1, its heterodimeric partner E2A, and the Lim domain proteins LMO2 and LDB1. This chapter reviews the structure/function of E-box-GATA composite cis-elements, which collectively constitute an important sector of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell cistrome. PMID:27137654

  15. Adenovirus Induction of an Interferon-Regulatory Factor during Entry into the Late Phase of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Feigenblum, David; Walker, Robert; Schneider, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Virus infection of animal cells can induce intracellular antiviral responses mediated by the induction of interferon-regulatory transcription factors (IRFs), which bind to and control genes directed by the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE). The purpose of this study was to determine whether adenovirus (Ad) induces IRFs during infection, because they might play a role in promoting viral pathogenesis. Here we show that after the late phase of infection, Ad induces a transcription factor related to the IRF family of factors. The IRF is induced shortly after Ad entry into late phase and is shown to stimulate ISRE-directed transcription, to require activation by protein tyrosine kinase signalling, and to be induced several hours prior to the inhibition of cell protein synthesis. Inhibition of tyrosine kinase activity blocks Ad induction and activation of the IRF. Attempts to identify the Ad-induced factor immunologically and by photo-UV cross-linking indicate that it is likely a novel member of the IRF family. Finally, several independent lines of evidence also suggest that Ad induction of the IRF might correlate with the ability of the virus to block host cell protein synthesis later during infection. PMID:9765473

  16. Transcription factors GAF and HSF act at distinct regulatory steps to modulate stress-induced gene activation

    PubMed Central

    Fuda, Nicholas J.; Mahat, Dig B.; Core, Leighton J.; Guertin, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level is fundamental to development and homeostasis. Inducible systems are invaluable when studying transcription because the regulatory process can be triggered instantaneously, allowing the tracking of ordered mechanistic events. Here, we use precision run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) to examine the genome-wide heat shock (HS) response in Drosophila and the function of two key transcription factors on the immediate transcription activation or repression of all genes regulated by HS. We identify the primary HS response genes and the rate-limiting steps in the transcription cycle that GAGA-associated factor (GAF) and HS factor (HSF) regulate. We demonstrate that GAF acts upstream of promoter-proximally paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) formation (likely at the step of chromatin opening) and that GAF-facilitated Pol II pausing is critical for HS activation. In contrast, HSF is dispensable for establishing or maintaining Pol II pausing but is critical for the release of paused Pol II into the gene body at a subset of highly activated genes. Additionally, HSF has no detectable role in the rapid HS repression of thousands of genes. PMID:27492368

  17. Regulatory elements responsible for inducible expression of the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor gene in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, M; Nagata, S

    1990-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) plays an essential role in granulopoiesis during bacterial infection. Macrophages produce G-CSF in response to bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To elucidate the mechanism of the induction of G-CSF gene in macrophages or macrophage-monocytes, we have examined regulatory cis elements in the promoter of mouse G-CSF gene. Analyses of linker-scanning and internal deletion mutants of the G-CSF promoter by the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay have indicated that at least three regulatory elements are indispensable for the LPS-induced expression of the G-CSF gene in macrophages. When one of the three elements was reiterated and placed upstream of the TATA box of the G-CSF promoter, it mediated inducibility as a tissue-specific and orientation-independent enhancer. Although this element contains a conserved NF-kappa B-like binding site, the gel retardation assay and DNA footprint analysis with nuclear extracts from macrophage cell lines demonstrated that nuclear proteins bind to the DNA sequence downstream of the NF-kappa B-like element, but not to the conserved element itself. The DNA sequence of the binding site was found to have some similarities to the LPS-responsive element which was recently identified in the promoter of the mouse class II major histocompatibility gene. Images PMID:1691438

  18. Engineering Synthetic cis-Regulatory Elements for Simultaneous Recognition of Three Transcriptional Factors in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2015-12-18

    Recognition of cis-regulatory elements by transcription factors (TF) at target promoters is crucial to gene regulation in bacteria. In this process, binding of TFs to their cognate sequences depends on a set of physical interactions between these proteins and specific nucleotides in the operator region. Previously, we showed that in silico optimization algorithms are able to generate short sequences that are recognized by two different TFs of Escherichia coli, namely, CRP and IHF, thus generating an AND logic gate. Here, we expanded this approach in order to engineer DNA sequences that can be simultaneously recognized by three unrelated TFs (CRP, IHF, and Fis). Using in silico optimization and experimental validation strategies, we were able to obtain a candidate promoter (Plac-CFI1) regulated by only two TFs with an AND logic, thus demonstrating a limitation in the design. Subsequently, we modified the algorithm to allow the optimization of extended sequences, and were able to design two synthetic promoters (PCFI20-1 and PCFI22-5) that were functional in vivo. Expression assays in E. coli mutant strains for each TF revealed that while CRP positively regulates the promoter activities, IHF and Fis are strong repressors of both the promoter variants. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential of in silico strategies in bacterial synthetic promoter engineering. Furthermore, the study also shows how small modifications in cis-regulatory elements can drastically affect the final logic of the resulting promoter. PMID:26305598

  19. An alternative QSAR-based approach for predicting the bioconcentration factor for regulatory purposes.

    PubMed

    Gissi, Andrea; Gadaleta, Domenico; Floris, Matteo; Olla, Stefania; Carotti, Angelo; Novellino, Ettore; Benfenati, Emilio; Nicolotti, Orazio

    2014-01-01

    The REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and restriction of Chemicals) and BPR (Biocide Product Regulation) regulations strongly promote the use of non-animal testing techniques to evaluate chemical risk. This has renewed the interest towards alternative methods such as QSAR in the regulatory context. The assessment of Bioconcentration Factor (BCF) required by these regulations is expensive, in terms of costs, time, and laboratory animal sacrifices. Herein, we present QSAR models based on the ANTARES dataset, which is a large collection of known and verified experimental BCF data. Among the models developed, the best results were obtained from a nine-descriptor highly predictive model. This model was derived from a training set of 608 chemicals and challenged against a validation and blind set containing 152 and 76 chemicals. The model's robustness was further controlled through several validation strategies and the implementation of a multi-step approach for the applicability domain. Suitable safety margins were used to increase sensitivity. The easy interpretability of the model is ensured by the use of meaningful biokinetics descriptors. The satisfactory predictive power for external compounds suggests that the new models could represent a reliable alternative to the in vivo assay, helping the registrants to fulfill regulatory requirements in compliance with the ethical and economic necessity to reduce animal testing. PMID:24247988

  20. Mutant Huntingtin Downregulates Myelin Regulatory Factor-Mediated Myelin Gene Expression and Affects Mature Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brenda; Wei, Wenjie; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A.; Feng, Yue; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Growing evidence indicates that non-neuronal mutant huntingtin toxicity plays an important role in Huntington’s disease (HD); however, whether and how mutant huntingtin affects oligodendrocytes, which are vitally important for neural function and axonal integrity, remain unclear. We first verified the presence of mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes in HD140Q knock-in mice. We then established transgenic mice (PLP-150Q) that selectively express mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes. PLP-150Q mice show progressive neurological symptoms and early death, as well as age-dependent demyelination and reduced expression of myelin genes that are downstream of myelin regulatory factor (MYRF or MRF), a transcriptional regulator that specifically activates and maintains the expression of myelin genes in mature oligodendrocytes. Consistently, mutant huntingtin binds abnormally to MYRF and affects its transcription activity. Our findings suggest that dysfunction of mature oligodendrocytes is involved in HD pathogenesis and may also make a good therapeutic target. PMID:25789755

  1. Interferon regulatory factor 9 is critical for neointima formation following vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Min; Zhu, Li-Hua; Chen, Hou-Zao; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Peng; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Gao, Lu; Tian, Song; Wang, Lang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Pi-Xiao; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, De-Pei; Li, Hongliang

    2014-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) has various biological functions and regulates cell survival; however, its role in vascular biology has not been explored. Here we demonstrate a critical role for IRF9 in mediating neointima formation following vascular injury. Notably, in mice, IRF9 ablation inhibits the proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and attenuates intimal thickening in response to injury, whereas IRF9 gain-of-function promotes VSMC proliferation and migration, which aggravates arterial narrowing. Mechanistically, we show that the transcription of the neointima formation modulator SIRT1 is directly inhibited by IRF9. Importantly, genetic manipulation of SIRT1 in smooth muscle cells or pharmacological modulation of SIRT1 activity largely reverses the neointima-forming effect of IRF9. Together, our findings suggest that IRF9 is a vascular injury-response molecule that promotes VSMC proliferation and implicate a hitherto unrecognized 'IRF9-SIRT1 axis' in vasculoproliferative pathology modulation. PMID:25319116

  2. Mutant huntingtin downregulates myelin regulatory factor-mediated myelin gene expression and affects mature oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Brenda; Wei, WenJie; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A; Feng, Yue; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2015-03-18

    Growing evidence indicates that non-neuronal mutant huntingtin toxicity plays an important role in Huntington's disease (HD); however, whether and how mutant huntingtin affects oligodendrocytes, which are vitally important for neural function and axonal integrity, remains unclear. We first verified the presence of mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes in HD140Q knockin mice. We then established transgenic mice (PLP-150Q) that selectively express mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes. PLP-150Q mice show progressive neurological symptoms and early death, as well as age-dependent demyelination and reduced expression of myelin genes that are downstream of myelin regulatory factor (MYRF or MRF), a transcriptional regulator that specifically activates and maintains the expression of myelin genes in mature oligodendrocytes. Consistently, mutant huntingtin binds abnormally to MYRF and affects its transcription activity. Our findings suggest that dysfunction of mature oligodendrocytes is involved in HD pathogenesis and may also make a good therapeutic target. PMID:25789755

  3. Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 and CREB-Binding Protein/p300 Are Subunits of Double-Stranded RNA-Activated Transcription Factor DRAF1

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Brian K.; Kumar, K. Prasanna; Reich, Nancy C.

    1998-01-01

    Cells respond to viral infection or double-stranded RNA with the transcriptional induction of a subset of alpha/beta interferon-stimulated genes by a pathway distinct from the interferon signal pathway. The transcriptional induction is mediated through a DNA sequence containing the alpha/beta interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE). We previously identified a novel transcription factor, designated double-stranded RNA-activated factor 1 (DRAF1), that recognizes this response element. The DNA-binding specificity of DRAF1 correlates with transcriptional induction, thereby distinguishing it as a positive regulator of alpha/beta interferon-stimulated genes. Two of the components of DRAF1 have now been identified as interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300. We demonstrate that IRF-3 preexists in the cytoplasm of uninfected cells and translocates to the nucleus following viral infection. Translocation of IRF-3 is accompanied by an increase in serine and threonine phosphorylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses of endogenous proteins demonstrate an association of IRF-3 with the transcriptional coactivators CBP and p300 only subsequent to infection. In addition, antibodies to the IRF-3, CBP, and p300 molecules react with DRAF1 bound to the ISRE target site of induced genes. The cellular response that leads to DRAF1 activation and specific gene expression may serve to increase host survival during viral infection. PMID:9488451

  4. Genetic effects of polymorphisms in myogenic regulatory factors on chicken muscle fiber traits.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Qin; Qing, Ying; Zhu, Qing; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Yan; Li, Di-Yan; Liu, Yi-Ping; Yin, Hua-Dong

    2015-06-01

    The myogenic regulatory factors is a family of transcription factors that play a key role in the development of skeletal muscle fibers, which are the main factors to affect the meat taste and texture. In the present study, we performed candidate gene analysis to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MyoD, Myf5, MyoG, and Mrf4 genes using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism in 360 Erlang Mountain Chickens from three different housing systems (cage, pen, and free-range). The general linear model procedure was used to estimate the statistical significance of association between combined genotypes and muscle fiber traits of chickens. Two polymorphisms (g.39928301T>G and g.11579368C>T) were detected in the Mrf4 and MyoD gene, respectively. The diameters of thigh and pectoralis muscle fibers were higher in birds with the combined genotypes of GG-TT and TT-CT (p<0.05). Moreover, the interaction between housing system and combined genotypes has no significant effect on the traits of muscle fiber (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that the combined genotypes of TT-CT and GG-TT might be advantageous for muscle fiber traits, and could be the potential genetic markers for breeding program in Erlang Mountain Chickens. PMID:25925055

  5. Intracellular Concentrations of 65 Species of Transcription Factors with Known Regulatory Functions in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kori, Ayako; Koshio, Etsuko; Yamada, Kayoko; Maeda, Hiroto; Shimada, Tomohiro; Makinoshima, Hideki; Iwata, Akira; Fujita, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The expression pattern of the Escherichia coli genome is controlled in part by regulating the utilization of a limited number of RNA polymerases among a total of its approximately 4,600 genes. The distribution pattern of RNA polymerase changes from modulation of two types of protein-protein interactions: the interaction of core RNA polymerase with seven species of the sigma subunit for differential promoter recognition and the interaction of RNA polymerase holoenzyme with about 300 different species of transcription factors (TFs) with regulatory functions. We have been involved in the systematic search for the target promoters recognized by each sigma factor and each TF using the newly developed Genomic SELEX system. In parallel, we developed the promoter-specific (PS)-TF screening system for identification of the whole set of TFs involved in regulation of each promoter. Understanding the regulation of genome transcription also requires knowing the intracellular concentrations of the sigma subunits and TFs under various growth conditions. This report describes the intracellular levels of 65 species of TF with known function in E. coli K-12 W3110 at various phases of cell growth and at various temperatures. The list of intracellular concentrations of the sigma factors and TFs provides a community resource for understanding the transcription regulation of E. coli under various stressful conditions in nature. PMID:24837290

  6. Inferring regulatory element landscapes and transcription factor networks from cancer methylomes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lijing; Shen, Hui; Laird, Peter W; Farnham, Peggy J; Berman, Benjamin P

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that DNA methylation can be used to identify transcriptional enhancers, but no systematic approach has been developed for genome-wide identification and analysis of enhancers based on DNA methylation. We describe ELMER (Enhancer Linking by Methylation/Expression Relationships), an R-based tool that uses DNA methylation to identify enhancers and correlates enhancer state with expression of nearby genes to identify transcriptional targets. Transcription factor motif analysis of enhancers is coupled with expression analysis of transcription factors to infer upstream regulators. Using ELMER, we investigated more than 2,000 tumor samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We identified networks regulated by known cancer drivers such as GATA3 and FOXA1 (breast cancer), SOX17 and FOXA2 (endometrial cancer), and NFE2L2, SOX2, and TP63 (squamous cell lung cancer). We also identified novel networks with prognostic associations, including RUNX1 in kidney cancer. We propose ELMER as a powerful new paradigm for understanding the cis-regulatory interface between cancer-associated transcription factors and their functional target genes. PMID:25994056

  7. Regulation of Antisense Transcription by NuA4 Histone Acetyltransferase and Other Chromatin Regulatory Factors.

    PubMed

    Uprety, Bhawana; Kaja, Amala; Ferdoush, Jannatul; Sen, Rwik; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2016-01-01

    NuA4 histone lysine (K) acetyltransferase (KAT) promotes transcriptional initiation of TATA-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor (TAF)-dependent ribosomal protein genes. TAFs have also been recently found to enhance antisense transcription from the 3' end of the GAL10 coding sequence. However, it remains unknown whether, like sense transcription of the ribosomal protein genes, TAF-dependent antisense transcription of GAL10 also requires NuA4 KAT. Here, we show that NuA4 KAT associates with the GAL10 antisense transcription initiation site at the 3' end of the coding sequence. Such association of NuA4 KAT depends on the Reb1p-binding site that recruits Reb1p activator to the GAL10 antisense transcription initiation site. Targeted recruitment of NuA4 KAT to the GAL10 antisense transcription initiation site promotes GAL10 antisense transcription. Like NuA4 KAT, histone H3 K4/36 methyltransferases and histone H2B ubiquitin conjugase facilitate GAL10 antisense transcription, while the Swi/Snf and SAGA chromatin remodeling/modification factors are dispensable for antisense, but not sense, transcription of GAL10. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the roles of NuA4 KAT and other chromatin regulatory factors in controlling antisense transcription, thus illuminating chromatin regulation of antisense transcription. PMID:26755557

  8. Genetic Effects of Polymorphisms in Myogenic Regulatory Factors on Chicken Muscle Fiber Traits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Qin; Qing, Ying; Zhu, Qing; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Yan; Li, Di-Yan; Liu, Yi-Ping; Yin, Hua-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The myogenic regulatory factors is a family of transcription factors that play a key role in the development of skeletal muscle fibers, which are the main factors to affect the meat taste and texture. In the present study, we performed candidate gene analysis to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MyoD, Myf5, MyoG, and Mrf4 genes using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism in 360 Erlang Mountain Chickens from three different housing systems (cage, pen, and free-range). The general linear model procedure was used to estimate the statistical significance of association between combined genotypes and muscle fiber traits of chickens. Two polymorphisms (g.39928301T>G and g.11579368C>T) were detected in the Mrf4 and MyoD gene, respectively. The diameters of thigh and pectoralis muscle fibers were higher in birds with the combined genotypes of GG-TT and TT-CT (p<0.05). Moreover, the interaction between housing system and combined genotypes has no significant effect on the traits of muscle fiber (p>0.05). Our findings suggest that the combined genotypes of TT-CT and GG-TT might be advantageous for muscle fiber traits, and could be the potential genetic markers for breeding program in Erlang Mountain Chickens. PMID:25925055

  9. Behavioral and regulatory abnormalities in mice deficient in the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Erbel-Sieler, Claudia; Dudley, Carol; Zhou, Yudong; Wu, Xinle; Estill, Sandi Jo; Han, Tina; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven; McKnight, Steven L

    2004-09-14

    Laboratory mice bearing inactivating mutations in the genes encoding the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors have been shown to exhibit a spectrum of behavioral and neurochemical abnormalities. Behavioral abnormalities included diminished startle response, as measured by prepulse inhibition, and impaired social recognition. NPAS1/NPAS3-deficient mice also exhibited stereotypic darting behavior at weaning and increased locomotor activity. Immunohistochemical staining assays showed that the NPAS1 and NPAS3 proteins are expressed in inhibitory interneurons and that the viability and anatomical distribution of these neurons are unaffected by the absence of either transcription factor. Adult brain tissues from NPAS3- and NPAS1/NPAS3-deficient mice exhibited a distinct reduction in reelin, a large, secreted protein whose expression has been reported to be attenuated in the postmortem brain tissue of patients with schizophrenia. These observations raise the possibility that a regulatory program controlled in inhibitory interneurons by the NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors may be either substantively or tangentially relevant to psychosis. PMID:15347806

  10. Interferon-Regulatory Factor 5-Dependent Signaling Restricts Orthobunyavirus Dissemination to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Proenca-Modena, Jose Luiz; Hyde, Jennifer L.; Sesti-Costa, Renata; Lucas, Tiffany; Pinto, Amelia K.; Richner, Justin M.; Gorman, Matthew J.; Lazear, Helen M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon (IFN)-regulatory factor 5 (IRF-5) is a transcription factor that induces inflammatory responses after engagement and signaling by pattern recognition receptors. To define the role of IRF-5 during bunyavirus infection, we evaluated Oropouche virus (OROV) and La Crosse virus (LACV) pathogenesis and immune responses in primary cells and in mice with gene deletions in Irf3, Irf5, and Irf7 or in Irf5 alone. Deletion of Irf3, Irf5, and Irf7 together resulted in uncontrolled viral replication in the liver and spleen, hypercytokinemia, extensive liver injury, and an early-death phenotype. Remarkably, deletion of Irf5 alone resulted in meningoencephalitis and death on a more protracted timeline, 1 to 2 weeks after initial OROV or LACV infection. The clinical signs in OROV-infected Irf5−/− mice were associated with abundant viral antigen and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in several regions of the brain. Circulating dendritic cell (DC) subsets in Irf5−/− mice had higher levels of OROV RNA in vivo yet produced lower levels of type I IFN than wild-type (WT) cells. This result was supported by data obtained in vitro, since a deficiency of IRF-5 resulted in enhanced OROV infection and diminished type I IFN production in bone marrow-derived DCs. Collectively, these results indicate a key role for IRF-5 in modulating the host antiviral response in peripheral organs that controls bunyavirus neuroinvasion in mice. IMPORTANCE Oropouche virus (OROV) and La Crosse virus (LACV) are orthobunyaviruses that are transmitted by insects and cause meningitis and encephalitis in subsets of individuals in the Americas. Recently, we demonstrated that components of the type I interferon (IFN) induction pathway, particularly the regulatory transcription factors IRF-3 and IRF-7, have key protective roles during OROV infection. However, the lethality in Irf3−/− Irf7−/− (DKO) mice infected with OROV

  11. 34 CFR 658.34 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in selecting grant recipients? 658.34 Section 658.34 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE...

  12. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION... Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider...

  13. 34 CFR 490.22 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 490.22 Section 490.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION LIFE SKILLS FOR STATE AND...

  14. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  15. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  16. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  17. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  18. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  19. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  20. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  1. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  2. 34 CFR 401.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 401.22 Section 401.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INDIAN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM...

  3. 34 CFR 411.22 - What additional factors may the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors may the Secretary consider? 411.22 Section 411.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION VOCATIONAL EDUCATION RESEARCH...

  4. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  5. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  6. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  7. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  8. 34 CFR 472.23 - What additional factor does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What additional factor does the Secretary consider? 472.23 Section 472.23 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NATIONAL WORKPLACE LITERACY PROGRAM...

  9. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 655.32 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  10. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 655.32 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  11. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does the Secretary Make a Grant? § 655.32 What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? Except for 34 CFR parts 656, 657, and 661, to the extent... making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  12. 34 CFR 655.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grant awards? 655.32 Section 655.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS How Does...

  13. 34 CFR 477.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider? 477.22 Section 477.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE PROGRAM ANALYSIS ASSISTANCE...

  14. MTHFR homozygous mutation and additional risk factors for cerebral infarction in a large Italian family.

    PubMed

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Spalice, Alberto; Perla, Massimo; Properzi, Enrico; Iannetti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Several cases with cerebral infarctions associated with the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have been reported. Given the large number of asymptomatic individuals with the MTHFR mutation, additional risk factors for cerebral infarction should be considered. This study describes a large family with the MTHFR mutation and a combination of heterozygous factor V Leiden mutations and different additional exogenous and endogenous thrombogenic risk factors. Psychomotor retardation and a left fronto-insular infarct associated with the MTHFR mutation together with diminished factor VII and low level of protein C was documented in the first patient. In the second patient, generalized epilepsy and a malacic area in the right nucleus lenticularis was associated with the MTHFR mutation and a low level of protein C. In the third patient, right hemiparesis and a left fronto-temporal porencephalic cyst were documented, together with the MTHFR mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. An extensive search of additional circumstantial and genetic thrombogenic risk factors should be useful for prophylaxis and prognosis of infants with cerebral infarctions associated with the MTHFR mutation and of their related family members. PMID:19068258

  15. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma synergistically activate the RANTES promoter through nuclear factor kappaB and interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H; Hong, J H; Seo, Y S

    2000-08-15

    Inflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) synergistically activate expression of the RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) gene, which plays a crucial role in the chemoattraction of leukocytes during the inflammatory response. To understand at the molecular level the mechanism by which the two cytokines activate RANTES gene expression, we determined the requirement of cis-acting elements in the RANTES promoter and trans-acting factors. The murine RANTES promoter contained one putative interferon regulatory factor, IRF, and three putative nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) binding sites. Specific destruction of the IRF binding site and one of the three NF-kappaB binding sites abolished the inducibility of promoter activity by IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, respectively. In contrast, mutation of the other two putative NF-kappaB binding sites did not affect RANTES promoter activity significantly. In addition, the RANTES promoter was stimulated by co-transfection of plasmids that expressed either p65, an NF-kappaB family protein, or the IRF-1 transcription factor. RANTES promoters with mutations in the NF-kappaB or IRF binding sites were not stimulated by p65 or IRF-1 expression, respectively. In electrophoretic mobility-shift and immunologic assays, we showed that IRF-1 was induced after cells were treated with IFN-gamma and that NF-kappaB was activated by TNF-alpha treatment. These results demonstrate that both NF-kappaB and IRF-1 transcription factors mediate the induction of RANTES expression via their cognate cis-acting elements when cells are stimulated by TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. PMID:10926836

  16. Overexpression of the Dominant-Negative Form of Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 in Oligodendrocytes Protects against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhihua; Wang, Yan; Tao, Duan; Liebenson, David; Liggett, Thomas; Goswami, Rajendra; Clarke, Robert; Stefoski, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) is a transcription factor that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the human autoimmune demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and in its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The goal of the present study was to directly examine the role of IRF-1 in oligodendrocyte injury and inflammatory demyelination. For the purpose of this study, we generated a transgenic mouse line (CNP/dnIRF-1) that overexpresses the dominant-negative form of IRF-1 (dnIRF1) specifically in oligodendrocytes. CNP/dnIRF-1 mice exhibited no phenotypic abnormalities but displayed suppressed IRF-1 signaling in oligodendrocytes. The major finding of our study was that the CNP/dnIRF-1 mice, compared with the wild-type mice, were protected against EAE, a phenomenon associated with significant reduction of inflammatory demyelination and with oligodendrocyte and axonal preservation. The observed protection was related to suppressed IRF-1 signaling and impaired expression of immune and proapoptotic genes in oligodendrocytes. No significant differences in the peripheral immune responses between the wild-type and the CNP/dnIRF-1 mice were identified throughout the experiments. This study indicates that IRF-1 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of EAE by mediating oligodendrocyte response to inflammation and injury. It also suggests that oligodendrocytes are actively involved in the neuroimmune network, and that exploring oligodendrocyte-related pathogenic mechanisms, in addition to the conventional immune-based ones, may have important therapeutic implications in MS. PMID:21653838

  17. Restricted maternal nutrition alters myogenic regulatory factor expression in satellite cells of ovine offspring.

    PubMed

    Raja, J S; Hoffman, M L; Govoni, K E; Zinn, S A; Reed, S A

    2016-07-01

    Poor maternal nutrition inhibits muscle development and postnatal muscle growth. Satellite cells are myogenic precursor cells that contribute to postnatal muscle growth, and their activity can be evaluated by the expression of several transcription factors. Paired-box (Pax)7 is expressed in quiescent and active satellite cells. MyoD is expressed in activated and proliferating satellite cells and myogenin is expressed in terminally differentiating cells. Disruption in the expression pattern or timing of expression of myogenic regulatory factors negatively affects muscle development and growth. We hypothesized that poor maternal nutrition during gestation would alter the in vitro temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin in satellite cells from offspring at birth and 3 months of age. Ewes were fed 100% or 60% of NRC requirements from day 31±1.3 of gestation. Lambs from control-fed (CON) or restricted-fed (RES) ewes were euthanized within 24 h of birth (birth; n=5) or were fed a control diet until 3 months of age (n=5). Satellite cells isolated from the semitendinosus muscle were used for gene expression analysis or cultured for 24, 48 or 72 h and immunostained for Pax7, MyoD or myogenin. Fusion index was calculated from a subset of cells allowed to differentiate. Compared with CON, temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin was altered in cultured satellite cells isolated from RES lambs at birth. The percent of cells expressing MyoD was greater in RES than CON (P=0.03) after 24 h in culture. After 48 h of culture, there was a greater percent of cells expressing myogenin in RES compared with CON (P0.05). In satellite cells from RES lambs at 3 months of age, the percent of cells expressing MyoD and myogenin were greater than CON after 72 h in culture (P<0.05). Fusion index was reduced in RES lambs at 3 months of age compared with CON (P<0.001). Restricted nutrition during gestation alters the temporal expression of myogenic regulatory factors in satellite cells of the

  18. Imbalanced signal transduction in regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dapeng; Farache, Julia; Mingueneau, Michael; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells have a fundamental role in immunological tolerance, with transcriptional and functional phenotypes that demarcate them from conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconv). Differences between these two lineages in the signaling downstream of T-cell receptor-triggered activation have been reported, and there are different requirements for some signaling factors. Seeking a comprehensive view, we found that Treg cells have a broadly dampened activation of several pathways and signaling nodes upon TCR-mediated activation, with low phosphorylation of CD3ζ, SLP76, Erk1/2, AKT, or S6 and lower calcium flux. In contrast, STAT phosphorylation triggered by interferons, IL2 or IL6, showed variations between Treg and Tconv in magnitude or choice of preferential STAT activation but no general Treg signaling defect. Much, but not all, of the Treg/Tconv difference in TCR-triggered responses could be attributed to lower responsiveness of antigen-experienced cells with CD44(hi) or CD62L(lo) phenotypes, which form a greater proportion of the Treg pool. Candidate regulators were tested, but the Treg/Tconv differential could not be explained by overexpression in Treg cells of the signaling modulator CD5, the coinhibitors PD-1 and CTLA4, or the regulatory phosphatase DUSP4. However, transcriptome profiling in Dusp4-deficient mice showed that DUSP4 enhances the expression of a segment of the canonical Treg transcriptional signature, which partially overlaps with the TCR-dependent Treg gene set. Thus, Treg cells, likely because of their intrinsically higher reactivity to self, tune down TCR signals but seem comparatively more attuned to cytokines or other intercellular signals. PMID:26627244

  19. An essential regulatory role for macrophage migration inhibitory factor in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, M; Metz, C N; Calandra, T; Mayer, K; Chesney, J; Lohoff, M; Gemsa, D; Donnelly, T; Bucala, R

    1996-01-01

    The protein known as macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was one of the first cytokines to be discovered and was described 30 years ago to be a T-cell-derived factor that inhibited the random migration of macrophages in vitro. A much broader role for MIF has emerged recently as a result of studies that have demonstrated it to be released from the anterior pituitary gland in vivo. MIF also is the first protein that has been identified to be secreted from monocytes/macrophages upon glucocorticoid stimulation. Once released, MIF acts to "override" or counter-regulate the suppressive effects of glucocorticoids on macrophage cytokine production. We report herein that MIF plays an important regulatory role in the activation of T cells induced by mitogenic or antigenic stimuli. Activated T cells produce MIF and neutralizing anti-MIF antibodies inhibit T-cell proliferation and interleukin 2 production in vitro, and suppress antigen-driven T-cell activation and antibody production in vivo. T cells also release MIF in response to glucocorticoid stimulation and MIF acts to override glucocorticoid inhibition of T-cell proliferation and interleukin 2 and interferon gamma production. These studies indicate that MIF acts in concert with glucocorticoids to control T-cell activation and assign a previously unsuspected but critical role for MIF in antigen-specific immune responses. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8755565

  20. IκB Kinase ε Targets Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 in Activated T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sgarbanti, Marco; Marsili, Giulia; Remoli, Anna Lisa; Stellacci, Emilia; Mai, Antonello; Rotili, Dante; Perrotti, Edvige; Acchioni, Chiara; Orsatti, Roberto; Iraci, Nunzio; Ferrari, Mathieu; Borsetti, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    IκB kinase ε (IKK-ε) has an essential role as a regulator of innate immunity, functioning downstream of pattern recognition receptors to modulate NF-κB and interferon (IFN) signaling. In the present study, we investigated IKK-ε activation following T cell receptor (TCR)/CD28 stimulation of primary CD4+ T cells and its role in the stimulation of a type I IFN response. IKK-ε was activated following TCR/CD28 stimulation of primary CD4+ T cells; however, in T cells treated with poly(I·C), TCR/CD28 costimulation blocked induction of IFN-β transcription. We demonstrated that IKK-ε phosphorylated the transcription factor IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) at amino acid (aa) 215/219/221 in primary CD4+ T cells and blocked its transcriptional activity. At the mechanistic level, IRF-1 phosphorylation impaired the physical interaction between IRF-1 and the NF-κB RelA subunit and interfered with PCAF-mediated acetylation of NF-κB RelA. These results demonstrate that TCR/CD28 stimulation of primary T cells stimulates IKK-ε activation, which in turn contributes to suppression of IFN-β production. PMID:24396068

  1. 5-Azacytidine modulates interferon regulatory factor 1 in macrophages to exert a cardioprotective effect.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hye-yun; Kang, Wan Seok; Hong, Moon Hwa; Jeong, Hae Chang; Shin, Myun-Geun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Yong Sook; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are actively involved in inflammatory responses during the progression of cardiac injury, including myocardial infarction (MI). A previous study showed that 5-azacytidine (5AZ), a DNA methylation inhibitor, can ameliorate cardiac injury by shifting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype via iNOS inhibition. Here, we show that the beneficial effect of 5AZ is associated with sumoylation of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) in macrophages. IRF1 is a critical transcription factor for iNOS induction and is antagonized by IRF2. In the stimulated macrophages, IRF1 accumulated in the nucleus without degradation by 5AZ treatment. In animal study, 5AZ administration resulted in significant improvements in cardiac function and fibrosis. IRF1-expressing macrophages were more abundant in the 5AZ-treated MI group than in the PBS-treated MI group. Because sumoylated IRF1 is known to mimic IRF2, we examined the IRF1 sumoylation. Sumoylated IRF1 was resistant to degradation and significantly increased in the 5AZ-treated MI group. Collectively, 5AZ had a protective effect after MI by potentiation of IRF1 sumoylation and is suggested as a novel therapeutic intervention for cardiac repair. PMID:26510961

  2. 5-Azacytidine modulates interferon regulatory factor 1 in macrophages to exert a cardioprotective effect

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hye-yun; Kang, Wan Seok; Hong, Moon Hwa; Jeong, Hae Chang; Shin, Myun-Geun; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Yong Sook; Ahn, Youngkeun

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are actively involved in inflammatory responses during the progression of cardiac injury, including myocardial infarction (MI). A previous study showed that 5-azacytidine (5AZ), a DNA methylation inhibitor, can ameliorate cardiac injury by shifting macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory phenotype via iNOS inhibition. Here, we show that the beneficial effect of 5AZ is associated with sumoylation of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF1) in macrophages. IRF1 is a critical transcription factor for iNOS induction and is antagonized by IRF2. In the stimulated macrophages, IRF1 accumulated in the nucleus without degradation by 5AZ treatment. In animal study, 5AZ administration resulted in significant improvements in cardiac function and fibrosis. IRF1-expressing macrophages were more abundant in the 5AZ-treated MI group than in the PBS-treated MI group. Because sumoylated IRF1 is known to mimic IRF2, we examined the IRF1 sumoylation. Sumoylated IRF1 was resistant to degradation and significantly increased in the 5AZ-treated MI group. Collectively, 5AZ had a protective effect after MI by potentiation of IRF1 sumoylation and is suggested as a novel therapeutic intervention for cardiac repair. PMID:26510961

  3. Ikkepsilon regulates viral-induced interferon regulatory factor-3 activation via a redox-sensitive pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Indukuri, Hemalatha; Castro, Shawn M.; Liao, S.-M.; Feeney, Lee Ann; Dorsch, Marion; Coyle, Anthony J.; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Brasier, Allan R.; Casola, Antonella . E-mail: ancasola@utmb.edu

    2006-09-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced chemokine gene expression occurs through the activation of a subset of transcription factors, including Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)-3. In this study, we have investigated the signaling pathway leading to RSV-induced IRF-3 activation and whether it is mediated by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Our results show that RSV infection induces expression and catalytic activity of IKK{epsilon}, a noncanonical IKK-like kinase. Expression of a kinase-inactive IKK{epsilon} blocks RSV-induced IRF-3 serine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and DNA-binding, leading to inhibition of RANTES gene transcription, mRNA expression and protein synthesis. Treatment of alveolar epithelial cells with antioxidants or with NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors abrogates RSV-induced chemokine secretion, IRF-3 phosphorylation and IKK{epsilon} induction, indicating that ROS generation plays a fundamental role in the signaling pathway leading to IRF-3 activation, therefore, identifying a novel molecular target for the development of strategies aimed to modify the inflammatory response associated with RSV infection of the lung.

  4. DNA binding and transcription activation by chicken interferon regulatory factor-3 (chIRF-3)

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Caroline E.; May, Donna L.; Deeley, Roger G.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors involved in the cellular response to interferons and viral infection. Previously we isolated an IRF from a chicken embryonic liver cDNA library. Using a PCR-based binding site selection assay, we have characterised the binding specificity of chIRF-3. The optimal binding site (OBS) fits within the consensus interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) but the specificity of chIRF-3 binding allows less variation in nucleotides outside the core IRF-binding sequence. A comparison of IRF-1 and chIRF-3 binding to ISREs in electrophoretic mobility shift assays confirmed that the binding specificity of chIRF-3 was clearly distinguishable from IRF-1. The selection assay also showed that chIRF-3 is capable of binding an inverted repeat of two half OBSs separated by 10–13 nt. ChIRF-3 appears to bind both the OBS and inverted repeat sites as a dimer with the protein–protein interaction requiring a domain between amino acids 117 and 311. In transfection experiments expression of chIRF-3 strongly activated a promoter containing the OBS. The activation domain was mapped to between amino acids 138 and 221 and a domain inhibitory to activation was also mapped to the C-terminal portion of chIRF-3. PMID:11095692

  5. Interferon regulatory factor 7 is activated by a viral oncoprotein through RIP-dependent ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Huye, Leslie E; Ning, Shunbin; Kelliher, Michelle; Pagano, Joseph S

    2007-04-01

    As a key mediator of type I interferon (IFN) (IFN-alpha/beta) responses, IFN regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is essential to host immune defenses. Activation of IRF7 generally requires virus-induced C-terminal phosphorylation, which leads to its nuclear accumulation and activation of target genes. Here we use the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) oncoprotein LMP1, which activates IRF7, to identify factors involved in IRF7 activation. We demonstrate for the first time that RIP activates IRF7 and that RIP and IRF7 interact under physiological conditions in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells. We provide evidence that both RIP and IRF7 are ubiquitinated in these cells and that IRF7 preferentially interacts with ubiquitinated RIP. RIP is required for full activation of IRF7 by LMP1, with LMP1 stimulating the ubiquitination of RIP and its interaction with IRF7. Moreover, LMP1 stimulates RIP-dependent K63-linked ubiquitination of IRF7, which regulates protein function rather than proteasomal degradation of proteins. We suggest that RIP may serve as a general activator of IRF7, responding to and transmitting the signals from various stimuli, and that ubiquitination may be a general mechanism for enhancing the activity of IRF7. PMID:17296724

  6. Tissue-specific targeting of cell fate regulatory genes by E2f factors.

    PubMed

    Julian, L M; Liu, Y; Pakenham, C A; Dugal-Tessier, D; Ruzhynsky, V; Bae, S; Tsai, S-Y; Leone, G; Slack, R S; Blais, A

    2016-04-01

    Cell cycle proteins are important regulators of diverse cell fate decisions, and in this capacity have pivotal roles in neurogenesis and brain development. The mechanisms by which cell cycle regulation is integrated with cell fate control in the brain and other tissues are poorly understood, and an outstanding question is whether the cell cycle machinery regulates fate decisions directly or instead as a secondary consequence of proliferative control. Identification of the genes targeted by E2 promoter binding factor (E2f) transcription factors, effectors of the pRb/E2f cell cycle pathway, will provide essential insights into these mechanisms. We identified the promoter regions bound by three neurogenic E2f factors in neural precursor cells in a genome-wide manner. Through bioinformatic analyses and integration of published genomic data sets we uncovered hundreds of transcriptionally active E2f-bound promoters corresponding to genes that control cell fate processes, including key transcriptional regulators and members of the Notch, fibroblast growth factor, Wnt and Tgf-β signaling pathways. We also demonstrate a striking enrichment of the CCCTC binding factor transcription factor (Ctcf) at E2f3-bound nervous system-related genes, suggesting a potential regulatory co-factor for E2f3 in controlling differentiation. Finally, we provide the first demonstration of extensive tissue specificity among E2f target genes in mammalian cells, whereby E2f3 promoter binding is well conserved between neural and muscle precursors at genes associated with cell cycle processes, but is tissue-specific at differentiation-associated genes. Our findings implicate the cell cycle pathway as a widespread regulator of cell fate genes, and suggest that E2f3 proteins control cell type-specific differentiation programs by regulating unique sets of target genes. This work significantly enhances our understanding of how the cell cycle machinery impacts cell fate and differentiation, and will

  7. Diversity and distribution of transcription factors: their partner domains play an important role in regulatory plasticity in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Gómez, Nancy; Segovia, Lorenzo; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2011-08-01

    The ability of bacteria to deal with diverse environmental changes depends on their repertoire of genes and their ability to regulate their expression. In this process, DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) have a fundamental role because they affect gene expression positively and/or negatively depending on operator context and ligand-binding status. Here, we show an exhaustive analysis of winged helix-turn-helix domains (wHTHs), a class of DNA-binding TFs. These proteins were identified in high proportions and widely distributed in bacteria, representing around half of the total TFs identified so far. In addition, we evaluated the repertoire of wHTHs in terms of their partner domains (PaDos), identifying a similar trend, as with TFs, i.e. they are abundant and widely distributed in bacteria. Based on the PaDos, we defined three main groups of families: (i) monolithic, those families with little PaDo diversity, such as LysR; (ii) promiscuous, those families with a high PaDo diversity; and (iii) monodomain, with families of small sizes, such as MarR. These findings suggest that PaDos have a very important role in the diversification of regulatory responses in bacteria, probably contributing to their regulatory complexity. Thus, the TFs discriminate over longer regions on the DNA through their diverse DNA-binding domains. On the other hand, the PaDos would allow a great flexibility for transcriptional regulation due to their ability to sense diverse stimuli through a variety of ligand-binding compounds. PMID:21636649

  8. Fibroblast Growth Factor-23-mediated Inhibition of Renal Phosphate Transport in Mice Requires Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger Regulatory Factor-1 (NHERF-1) and Synergizes with Parathyroid Hormone*

    PubMed Central

    Weinman, Edward J.; Steplock, Deborah; Shenolikar, Shirish; Biswas, Rajatsubhra

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) inhibits sodium-dependent phosphate transport in brush border membrane vesicles derived from hormone-treated kidney slices of the mouse and in mouse proximal tubule cells by processes involving mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not protein kinase A (PKA) or protein kinase C (PKC). By contrast, phosphate transport in brush border membrane vesicles and proximal tubule cells from sodium-hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1)-null mice were resistant to the inhibitory effect of FGF-23 (10−9 m). Infection of NHERF-1-null proximal tubule cells with wild-type adenovirus-GFP-NHERF-1 increased basal phosphate transport and restored the inhibitory effect of FGF-23. Infection with adenovirus-GFP-NHERF-1 containing a S77A or T95D mutation also increased basal phosphate transport, but the cells remained resistant to FGF-23 (10−9 m). Low concentrations of FGF-23 (10−13 m) and PTH (10−11 m) individually did not inhibit phosphate transport or activate PKA, PKC, or MAPK. When combined, however, these hormones markedly inhibited phosphate transport associated with activation of PKC and PKA but not MAPK. These studies indicate that FGF-23 inhibits phosphate transport in the mouse kidney by processes that involve the scaffold protein NHERF-1. In addition, FGF-23 synergizes with PTH to inhibit phosphate transport by facilitating the activation of the PTH signal transduction pathway. PMID:21908609

  9. The COP9 Signalosome Interacts with and Regulates Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Korczeniewska, Justyna

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) exerts crucial functions in the regulation of host immunity against extracellular pathogens, DNA damage-induced apoptosis, death receptor signaling, and macrophage polarization. Tight regulation of IRF5 is thus warranted for an efficient response toward extracellular stressors and for limiting autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Here we report that the COP9 signalosome (CSN), a general modulator of diverse cellular and developmental processes, associates constitutively with IRF5 and promotes its protein stability. The constitutive CSN/IRF5 interaction was identified using proteomics and confirmed by endogenous immunoprecipitations. The CSN/IRF5 interaction occurred on the carboxyl and amino termini of IRF5; a single internal deletion from amino acids 455 to 466 (Δ455-466) was found to significantly reduce IRF5 protein stability. CSN subunit 3 (CSN3) was identified as a direct interacting partner of IRF5, and knockdown of this subunit with small interfering RNAs resulted in enhanced degradation. Degradation was further augmented by knockdown of CSN1 and CSN3 together. The ubiquitin E1 inhibitor UBEI-41 or the proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented IRF5 degradation, supporting the idea that its stability is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Importantly, activation of IRF5 by the death receptor ligand tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) resulted in enhanced degradation via loss of the CSN/IRF5 interaction. This study defines CSN to be a new interacting partner of IRF5 that controls its stability. PMID:23275442

  10. A Rhesus Rhadinovirus Viral Interferon (IFN) Regulatory Factor Is Virion Associated and Inhibits the Early IFN Antiviral Response

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Gabriela; Robinson, Bridget A.; Rogers, Kelsey S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The interferon (IFN) response is the earliest host immune response dedicated to combating viral infection. As such, viruses have evolved strategies to subvert this potent antiviral response. Two closely related gammaherpesviruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and rhesus macaque rhadinovirus (RRV), are unique in that they express viral homologues to cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), termed viral IRFs (vIRFs). Cellular IRFs are a family of transcription factors that are particularly important for the transcription of type I IFNs. Here, we demonstrate a strategy employed by RRV to ensure rapid inhibition of virus-induced type I IFN induction. We found that RRV vIRF R6, when expressed ectopically, interacts with a transcriptional coactivator, CREB-binding protein (CBP), in the nucleus. As a result, phosphorylated IRF3, an important transcriptional regulator in beta interferon (IFN-β) transcription, fails to effectively bind to the IFN-β promoter, thus inhibiting the activation of IFN-β genes. In addition, we found R6 within RRV virion particles via immunoelectron microscopy and, furthermore, that virion-associated R6 is capable of inhibiting the type I IFN response by preventing efficient binding of IRF3/CBP complexes to the IFN-β promoter in the context of infection. The work shown here is the first example of a vIRF being associated with either the KSHV or RRV virion. The presence of this immunomodulatory protein in the RRV virion provides the virus with an immediate mechanism to evade the host IFN response, thus enabling the virus to effectively establish an infection within the host. IMPORTANCE Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and the closely related rhesus macaque rhadinovirus (RRV) are the only viruses known to encode viral homologues to cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), known as vIRFs. In KSHV, these proteins have been shown to play major roles in a variety of cellular processes and are

  11. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-07-15

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  12. Improved Growth Factor Directed Vascularization into Fibrin Constructs Through Inclusion of Additional Extracellular Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Smith, JD; Melhem, ME; Magge, KT; Waggoner, AS; Campbell, PG

    2009-01-01

    Using the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM) and a novel histological technique we investigated the ability of blood vessels to directly invade fibrin-based scaffolds. In our initial experiments utilizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165) we found no direct invasion. Instead, the fibrin was completely degraded and replaced with highly vascularized new tissue. Addition of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), or platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) to the fibrin construct also did not result in construct vascularization. Because natural and regenerating tissues exhibit complex extracellular matrices (ECMs), we hypothesized that a more complex scaffold may improve blood vessel invasion. Addition of fibronectin, hyaluronic acid, and collagen type I within 20 mg/mL fibrin constructs resulted in no significant improvement. However, the same additive concentrations within 10 mg/mL fibrin constructs resulted in dramatic improvements, specifically with hyaluronic acid. Overall, we believe these results indicate the importance of structural and functional cues of not only in the initial scaffold but also as the construct is degraded and remodeled. Furthermore, the CAM assay may represent a useful model for understanding ECM interactions as well as for screening and designing tissue engineered scaffolds. PMID:17223139

  13. Pre-treatment factors associated with detecting additional brain metastases at stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wardak, Zabi; Augustyn, Alexander; Zhu, Hong; Mickey, Bruce E; Whitworth, Louis A; Madden, Christopher J; Barnett, Samuel L; Abdulrahman, Ramzi E; Nedzi, Lucien A; Timmerman, Robert D; Choe, Kevin S

    2016-06-01

    The number of brain metastases identified on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key factor in consideration of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). However, additional lesions are often detected on high-resolution SRS-planning MRI. We investigated pre-treatment clinical characteristics that are associated with finding additional metastases at SRS. Patients treated with SRS for brain metastases between the years of 2009-2014 comprised the study cohort. All patients underwent frame-fixed, 1 mm thick MRI on the day of SRS. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed for an association with increase in number of metastases identified on SRS-planning MRI. 289 consecutive SRS cases were analyzed. 725 metastases were identified on pre-treatment MRI and 1062 metastases were identified on SRS-planning MRI. An increase in the number of metastases occurred in 34 % of the cases. On univariate analysis, more than four metastases and the diameter of the largest lesion were significantly associated with an increase in number of metastases on SRS-planning MRI. When stratified by the diameter of the largest lesion into <2, 2-3, or ≥3 cm, additional metastases were identified in 37, 29, and 18 %, respectively. While this increase in the number of metastases is largely due to the difference in imaging technique, the number and size of the metastases were also associated with finding additional lesions. These clinical factors may be considered when determining treatment options for brain metastases. PMID:26966096

  14. Zinc regulates a key transcriptional pathway for epileptogenesis via metal-regulatory transcription factor 1.

    PubMed

    van Loo, Karen M J; Schaub, Christina; Pitsch, Julika; Kulbida, Rebecca; Opitz, Thoralf; Ekstein, Dana; Dalal, Adam; Urbach, Horst; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal seizure disorder in adults. In many patients, transient brain insults, including status epilepticus (SE), are followed by a latent period of epileptogenesis, preceding the emergence of clinical seizures. In experimental animals, transcriptional upregulation of CaV3.2 T-type Ca(2+)-channels, resulting in an increased propensity for burst discharges of hippocampal neurons, is an important trigger for epileptogenesis. Here we provide evidence that the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) mediates the increase of CaV3.2 mRNA and intrinsic excitability consequent to a rise in intracellular Zn(2+) that is associated with SE. Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) transfer of MTF1 into murine hippocampi leads to increased CaV3.2 mRNA. Conversely, rAAV-mediated expression of a dominant-negative MTF1 abolishes SE-induced CaV3.2 mRNA upregulation and attenuates epileptogenesis. Finally, data from resected human hippocampi surgically treated for pharmacoresistant TLE support the Zn(2+)-MTF1-CaV3.2 cascade, thus providing new vistas for preventing and treating TLE. PMID:26498180

  15. Zinc regulates a key transcriptional pathway for epileptogenesis via metal-regulatory transcription factor 1

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Schaub, Christina; Pitsch, Julika; Kulbida, Rebecca; Opitz, Thoralf; Ekstein, Dana; Dalal, Adam; Urbach, Horst; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal seizure disorder in adults. In many patients, transient brain insults, including status epilepticus (SE), are followed by a latent period of epileptogenesis, preceding the emergence of clinical seizures. In experimental animals, transcriptional upregulation of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+-channels, resulting in an increased propensity for burst discharges of hippocampal neurons, is an important trigger for epileptogenesis. Here we provide evidence that the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) mediates the increase of CaV3.2 mRNA and intrinsic excitability consequent to a rise in intracellular Zn2+ that is associated with SE. Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) transfer of MTF1 into murine hippocampi leads to increased CaV3.2 mRNA. Conversely, rAAV-mediated expression of a dominant-negative MTF1 abolishes SE-induced CaV3.2 mRNA upregulation and attenuates epileptogenesis. Finally, data from resected human hippocampi surgically treated for pharmacoresistant TLE support the Zn2+-MTF1-CaV3.2 cascade, thus providing new vistas for preventing and treating TLE. PMID:26498180

  16. Interferon regulatory factor 3 controls interleukin-17 expression in CD8 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ysebrant de Lendonck, Laure; Tonon, Sandrine; Nguyen, Muriel; Vandevenne, Patricia; Welsby, Iain; Martinet, Valerie; Molle, Céline; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Leo, Oberdan; Goriely, Stanislas

    2013-08-20

    IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 3 plays a key role in innate responses against viruses. Herein we assessed its contribution to T-cell activation. We observed that poly(I:C)-induced IRF3 activation in CD8 T cells represses IL-17 expression in a type I IFN-independent fashion. Even in the absence of poly(I:C), polyclonally activated naïve IRF3(-/-) CD8 T cells expressed high levels of IL-17 and IL-23R in comparison with wild-type cells. Furthermore, IRF3(-/-) OT1 cells adoptively transferred into wild-type hosts also produced higher IL-17 levels upon immunization than their wild-type counterparts. This phenotype could be reversed by ectopic expression of IRF3, confirming that this effect is intrinsic to T cells. We show that IRF3 directly interacts with RORγt in the cytoplasm through its IRF interaction domain and limits its ability to bind and transactivate the IL-17 promoter. These observations uncover an unexpected role of IRF3 in the control of CD8 T-cell polarization. PMID:23918362

  17. Positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 silences class II transactivator expression in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, N; Gyory, I; Wright, G; Wood, J; Wright, K L

    2001-05-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) acts as a master switch to activate expression of the genes required for MHC-II antigen presentation. During B-cell to plasma cell differentiation, MHC-II expression is actively silenced, but the mechanism has been unknown. In plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma the repression of MHC-II is associated with the loss of CIITA. We have identified that positive regulatory domain I binding factor 1 (PRDI-BF1), a transcriptional repressor, inhibits CIITA expression in multiple myeloma cell lines. Repression of CIITA depends on the DNA binding activity of PRDI-BF1 and its specific binding site in the CIITA promoter. Deletion of a histone deacetylase recruitment domain in PRDI-BF1 does not inhibit repression of CIITA nor does blocking histone deacetylase activity. This is in contrast to PRDI-BF1 repression of the c-myc promoter. Repression of CIITA requires either the N-terminal acidic and conserved PR motif or the proline-rich domain. PRDI-BF1 has been shown to be a key regulator of B-cell and macrophage differentiation. These findings now indicate that PRDI-BF1 has at least two mechanisms of repression whose function is dependent on the nature of the target promoter. Importantly, PRDI-BF1 is defined as the key molecule in silencing CIITA and thus MHC-II in multiple myeloma cells. PMID:11279146

  18. Are good ideas enough? The impact of socio-economic and regulatory factors on GMO commercialisation.

    PubMed

    Vàzquez-Salat, Núria

    2013-01-01

    In recent years scientific literature has seen an increase in publications describing new transgenic applications. Although technically-sound, these promising developments might not necessarily translate into products available to the consumer. This article highlights the impact of external factors on the commercial viability of Genetically Modified (GM) animals in the pharmaceutical and food sectors. Through the division of the production chain into three Policy Domains -Science, Market and Public- I present an overview of the broad range of regulatory and socio-economic components that impacts on the path towards commercialisation of GM animals. To further illustrate the unique combination of forces that influence each application, I provide an in-depth analysis of two real cases: GM rabbits producing human polyclonal antibodies (pharmaceutical case study) and GM cows producing recombinant human lactoferrin (food case study). The inability to generalise over the commercial success of a given transgenic application should encourage researchers to perform these type of exercises early in the R & D process. Furthermore, through the analysis of these case studies we can observe a change in the biopolitics of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs). Contrary to the GM plant biopolitical landscape, developing states such as China and Argentina are placing themselves as global leaders in GM animals. The pro-GM attitude of these states is likely to cause a shift in the political evolution of global GMO governance. PMID:24510133

  19. Insulin-like growth factor-1 stimulates regulatory T cells and suppresses autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Daniel; Luciani, Luisa; Johannesson, Bjarki; Piszczek, Agnieszka; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    The recent precipitous rise in autoimmune diseases is placing an increasing clinical and economic burden on health systems worldwide. Current therapies are only moderately efficacious, often coupled with adverse side effects. Here, we show that recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) stimulates proliferation of both human and mouse regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and when delivered systemically via continuous minipump, it halts autoimmune disease progression in mouse models of type 1 diabetes (STZ and NOD) and multiple sclerosis (EAE) in vivo. rhIGF-1 administration increased Treg cells in affected tissues, maintaining their suppressive properties. Genetically, ablation of the IGF-1 receptor specifically on Treg cell populations abrogated the beneficial effects of rhIGF-1 administration on the progression of multiple sclerotic symptoms in the EAE model, establishing a direct effect of IGF-1 on Treg cell proliferation. These results establish systemically delivered rhIGF-1 as a specific, effective stimulator of Treg cell action, underscoring the clinical feasibility of manipulating natural tolerance mechanisms to suppress autoimmune disease. PMID:25339185

  20. Aging Impairs Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Upregulation in Plasmacytoid DCs during TLR9 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Stout-Delgado, Heather W.; Yang, Xin; Walker, Wendy E.; Tesar, Bethany M.; Goldstein, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are innate sensors that produce IFN-α in response to viral infections. Determining how aging alters the cellular and molecular function of these cells may provide an explanation of increased susceptibility of older people to viral infections. Hence, we examined whether aging critically impairs pDC function during infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), a viral pathogen that activates TLR9. We found that impaired IFN-α production by aged murine pDCs led to impaired viral clearance with aging. Upon TLR9 activation, aged pDCs displayed defective upregulation of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7), a key adaptor in the type I IFN pathway, as compared to younger counterparts. Aged pDCs had more oxidative stress, and reducing oxidative stress in aged pDCs partly recovered the age-induced IFN-α defect during TLR9 activation. In sum, aging impairs the type I IFN pathway in pDCs, and this alteration may contribute to the increased susceptibility of older people to certain viral infections. PMID:18981092

  1. Activation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Is Inhibited by the Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Talon, Julie; Horvath, Curt M.; Polley, Rosalind; Basler, Christopher F.; Muster, Thomas; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2000-01-01

    We present a novel mechanism by which viruses may inhibit the alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) cascade. The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding protein NS1 of influenza virus is shown to prevent the potent antiviral interferon response by inhibiting the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), a key regulator of IFN-α/β gene expression. IRF-3 activation and, as a consequence, IFN-β mRNA induction are inhibited in wild-type (PR8) influenza virus-infected cells but not in cells infected with an isogenic virus lacking the NS1 gene (delNS1 virus). Furthermore, NS1 is shown to be a general inhibitor of the interferon signaling pathway. Inhibition of IRF-3 activation can be achieved by the expression of wild-type NS1 in trans, not only in delNS1 virus-infected cells but also in cells infected with a heterologous RNA virus (Newcastle disease virus). We propose that inhibition of IRF-3 activation by a dsRNA binding protein significantly contributes to the virulence of influenza A viruses and possibly to that of other viruses. PMID:10933707

  2. STAT-Phosphorylation–Independent Induction of Interferon Regulatory Factor-9 by Interferon-β

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN)-dependent STAT1 and STAT2 activation requires specific tyrosine residues (337Y and 512Y) located in the cytoplasmic domain of IFNAR-2c, the β-subunit of the human type I IFN receptor. To identify STAT activation-independent induction of ISGs, we used a mutant cell line in which both 337Y and 512Y were substituted with phenylalanine (337F512F or FF mutant). In these cells, type I IFN failed to activate STAT1, STAT2, and STAT3 did not induce well-characterized ISGs and did not exert antiviral or antiproliferative effects. Using Oligonucleotide array (Affymetrix™) analysis, we showed that interferon regulatory factor-9 (IRF-9) was the only gene induced by IFN-β in FF cells. Transient transfection analysis using an IRF-9 promoter–reporter luciferase construct in FF cells confirmed induction of the IRF-9 transcription unit by IFN-β. EMSA analysis using an IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-like sequence on the IRF-9 promoter detected 2 novel DNA-binding complexes induced in nuclear extracts of IFN-β-treated FF cells. Supershift experiments identified the proteins IRF-1 and C/EBP-β in the complex. These studies provide the first evidence that signaling pathways leading to gene transcription are activated by IFN-β independent of STAT phosphorylation. PMID:20038197

  3. FootprintDB: Analysis of Plant Cis-Regulatory Elements, Transcription Factors, and Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Sebastian, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    FootprintDB is a database and search engine that compiles regulatory sequences from open access libraries of curated DNA cis-elements and motifs, and their associated transcription factors (TFs). It systematically annotates the binding interfaces of the TFs by exploiting protein-DNA complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Each entry in footprintDB is thus a DNA motif linked to the protein sequence of the TF(s) known to recognize it, and in most cases, the set of predicted interface residues involved in specific recognition. This chapter explains step-by-step how to search for DNA motifs and protein sequences in footprintDB and how to focus the search to a particular organism. Two real-world examples are shown where this software was used to analyze transcriptional regulation in plants. Results are described with the aim of guiding users on their interpretation, and special attention is given to the choices users might face when performing similar analyses. PMID:27557773

  4. Myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) expression is affected by exercise in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huadong; Li, Diyan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Yiping; Yang, Zhiqin; Zhu, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 proteins belong to the family of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) and play important roles in skeletal muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy. We hypothesized that exercise would affect MRF mRNA and protein abundance in postnatal chicken skeletal muscle driving molecular changes that could ultimately lead to increased muscle fiber diameter. At day (d) 43, twelve hundred chickens with similar body weight were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range groups. The MRF mRNA abundance was measured in the pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d56, d70, and d84, and the protein levels of MRFs were determined from the thigh muscle at d84. The results showed no significant difference in mRNA of the MRFs among the three groups at d56 (P>0.05). At d84, chicken in the pen and free-range group showed higher MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 mRNA abundance compared to the caged chickens (P<0.05). Free-range chickens had higher Mrf4 and MyoG expression than those in penned ones (P<0.05). Protein abundances of all four factors were lowest in the caged group, and Mrf4 and MyoG protein quantities were greatest in free-range chickens (P<0.05), but Myf5 and MyoD1 protein abundance did not differ between penned and caged groups. The results suggested that exercise up-regulated MRF expression in the postnatal skeletal muscles, which led to an increase in muscle fiber diameter, and eventually affected the meat quality of the skeletal muscles in adult chickens. PMID:25701607

  5. Immune regulatory and neuroprotective properties of preimplantation factor: From newborn to adult.

    PubMed

    Barnea, E R; Almogi-Hazan, O; Or, R; Mueller, M; Ria, F; Weiss, L; Paidas, M J

    2015-12-01

    Embryonic-maternal interaction from the earliest stages of gestation has a key, sustained role in neurologic development, persisting into adulthood. Early adverse events may be detrimental in adulthood. Protective factors present during gestation could significantly impact post-natal therapy. The role of PreImplantation Factor (PIF) within this context is herein examined. Secreted by viable early embryos, PIF establishes effective embryonic-maternal communication and exerts essential trophic and protective roles by reducing oxidative stress and protein misfolding and by blunting the nocive let-7 microRNA related pathway. PIF's effects on systemic immunity lead to comprehensive immune modulation, not immune suppression. We examine PIF's role in protecting embryos from adverse maternal environment, which can lead to neurological disorders that may only manifest post-nataly: Synthetic PIF successfully translates endogenous PIF features in both pregnant and non-pregnant clinically relevant models. Specifically PIF has neuroprotective effects in neonatal prematurity. In adult relapsing-remitting neuroinflammation, PIF reverses advanced paralysis while promoting neurogenesis. PIF reversed Mycobacterium smegmatis induced brain infection. In graft-vs.-host disease, PIF reduced skin ulceration, liver inflammation and colon ulceration while maintaining beneficial anti-cancer, graft-vs.-leukemia effect. Clinical-grade PIF has high-safety profile even at supraphysiological doses. The FDA awarded Fast-Track designation, and university-sponsored clinical trials for autoimmune disorder are ongoing. Altogether, PIF properties point to its determining regulatory role in immunity, inflammation and transplant acceptance. Specific plans for using PIF for the treatment of complex neurological disorders (ie. traumatic brain injury, progressive paralysis), including neuroprotection from newborn to adult, are presented. PMID:26546485

  6. Identification of the Staphylococcus aureus vfrAB Operon, a Novel Virulence Factor Regulatory Locus

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Seth M.; Hall, Pamela R.; Bayles, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    During a screen of the Nebraska Transposon Mutant Library, we identified 71 mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus genome that altered hemolysis on blood agar medium. Although many of these mutations disrupted genes known to affect the production of alpha-hemolysin, two of them were associated with an apparent operon, designated vfrAB, that had not been characterized previously. Interestingly, a ΔvfrB mutant exhibited only minor effects on the transcription of the hla gene, encoding alpha-hemolysin, when grown in broth, as well as on RNAIII, a posttranscriptional regulatory RNA important for alpha-hemolysin translation, suggesting that VfrB may function at the posttranscriptional level. Indeed, a ΔvfrB mutant had increased aur and sspAB protease expression under these conditions. However, disruption of the known secreted proteases in the ΔvfrB mutant did not restore hemolytic activity in the ΔvfrB mutant on blood agar. Further analysis revealed that, in contrast to the minor effects of VfrB on hla transcription when strains were cultured in liquid media, the level of hla transcription was decreased 50-fold in the absence of VfrB on solid media. These results demonstrate that while VfrB represses protease expression when strains are grown in broth, hla regulation is highly responsive to factors associated with growth on solid media. Intriguingly, the ΔvfrB mutant displayed increased pathogenesis in a model of S. aureus dermonecrosis, further highlighting the complexity of VfrB-dependent virulence regulation. The results of this study describe a phenotype associated with a class of highly conserved yet uncharacterized proteins found in Gram-positive bacteria, and they shed new light on the regulation of virulence factors necessary for S. aureus pathogenesis. PMID:24549328

  7. Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 expression is enhanced in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts from burned children

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C; He, Jing; Herndon, David N

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) plays a key role in hypertrophic scar formation. A lot of studies have shown that TGF-β1 stimulates fibroblast proliferation, collagen production, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, inhibits matrix degradation and eventually leads to scar formation. Smad proteins are important intracellular mediators of TGF-β1 signaling, and Smad ubiquitination regulatory factor 2 (Smurf2), an ubiquitin ligase for Smads, plays critical roles in the regulation of TGF-β1/Smad signaling. It was reported that Smurf2 was abnormally expressed during the process of liver fibrosis and lung fibrosis. Hypertrophic scarring is a fibroproliferative disorder of the dermis that occurs following wounding. However, little is known about the expression of Smurf2 in hypertrophic scarring. We hypothesized that TGF-β1 signaling cannot be disrupted after wound epithelialization probably due to abnormal expression of Smurf2 in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. In the present study, we found that hypertrophic scar fibroblasts exhibited increased Smurf2 protein and mRNA levels compared with normal fibroblasts, and the expression of Smurf2 gradually increased in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts after TGF-β1 stimulation. Furthermore, we transfected Smurf2 siRNA into hypertrophic scar fibroblasts, and we found that silencing the expression of Smurf2 in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts dramatically reduced TGF-β1 production, inhibited TGF-β1-induced α-SMA expression and inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen I synthesis. Our results suggest that the enhanced expression of Smurf2 is involved in the progression of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:21920670

  8. The Ebola Virus VP35 Protein Inhibits Activation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Basler, Christopher F.; Mikulasova, Andrea; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Paragas, Jason; Mühlberger, Elke; Bray, Mike; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2003-01-01

    The Ebola virus VP35 protein was previously found to act as an interferon (IFN) antagonist which could complement growth of influenza delNS1 virus, a mutant influenza virus lacking the influenza virus IFN antagonist protein, NS1. The Ebola virus VP35 could also prevent the virus- or double-stranded RNA-mediated transcriptional activation of both the beta IFN (IFN-β) promoter and the IFN-stimulated ISG54 promoter (C. Basler et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97:12289-12294, 2000). We now show that VP35 inhibits virus infection-induced transcriptional activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3)-responsive mammalian promoters and that VP35 does not block signaling from the IFN-α/β receptor. The ability of VP35 to inhibit this virus-induced transcription correlates with its ability to block activation of IRF-3, a cellular transcription factor of central importance in initiating the host cell IFN response. We demonstrate that VP35 blocks the Sendai virus-induced activation of two promoters which can be directly activated by IRF-3, namely, the ISG54 promoter and the ISG56 promoter. Further, expression of VP35 prevents the IRF-3-dependent activation of the IFN-α4 promoter in response to viral infection. The inhibition of IRF-3 appears to occur through an inhibition of IRF-3 phosphorylation. VP35 blocks virus-induced IRF-3 phosphorylation and subsequent IRF-3 dimerization and nuclear translocation. Consistent with these observations, Ebola virus infection of Vero cells activated neither transcription from the ISG54 promoter nor nuclear accumulation of IRF-3. These data suggest that in Ebola virus-infected cells, VP35 inhibits the induction of antiviral genes, including the IFN-β gene, by blocking IRF-3 activation. PMID:12829834

  9. Characterization of Amphioxus IFN Regulatory Factor Family Reveals an Archaic Signaling Framework for Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaochun; Zheng, Tingting; Li, Peiyi; Yang, Rirong; Ruan, Jie; Huang, Shengfeng; Wu, Zhenxin; Xu, Anlong

    2015-12-15

    The IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family encodes transcription factors that play important roles in immune defense, stress response, reproduction, development, and carcinogenesis. Although the origin of the IRF family has been dated back to multicellular organisms, invertebrate IRFs differ from vertebrate IRFs in genomic structure and gene synteny, and little is known about their functions. Through comparison of multiple amphioxus genomes, in this study we suggested that amphioxus contains nine IRF members, whose orthologs are supposed to be shared among three amphioxus species. As the orthologs to the vertebrate IRF1 and IRF4 subgroups, Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense (bbt)IRF1 and bbtIRF8 bind the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and were upregulated when amphioxus intestinal cells were stimulated with poly(I:C). As amphioxus-specific IRFs, both bbtIRF3 and bbtIRF7 bind ISRE. When activated, they can be phosphorylated by bbtTBK1 and then translocate into nucleus for target gene transcription. As transcriptional repressors, bbtIRF2 and bbtIRF4 can inhibit the transcriptional activities of bbtIRF1, 3, 7, and 8 by competing for the binding of ISRE. Interestingly, amphioxus IRF2, IRF8, and Rel were identified as target genes of bbtIRF1, bbtIRF7, and bbtIRF3, respectively, suggesting a dynamic feedback regulation among amphioxus IRF and NF-κB. Collectively, to our knowledge we present for the first time an archaic IRF signaling framework in a basal chordate, shedding new insights into the origin and evolution of vertebrate IFN-based antiviral networks. PMID:26573836

  10. Interferon regulatory factor 5 genetic variants are associated with cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex polygenic inflammatory disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular (CV) disease risk. Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is a regulator of type I interferon induction. Recently, researchers have described an association between multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the IRF5 gene and some rheumatic disorders. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether three different haplotype blocks within the IRF5 locus which have been shown to alter the protein function are involved in the risk of CV events occurring in Spanish RA patients. Methods Three IRF5 polymorphisms (rs2004640, rs2070197 and rs10954213) representative of each haplotype group were genotyped by performing TaqMan assays using a 7900HT Fast Real-Time PCR System with tissue from a total of 2,137 Spanish patients diagnosed with RA. Among them, 390 (18.2%) had experienced CV events. The relationship of IRF5 genotypes and haplotypes to CV events was tested using Cox regression. Results Male sex, age at RA diagnosis and most traditional risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia and smoking habit) were associated with increased risk for CV events in the RA population. Interestingly, a protective effect of both IRF5 rs2004640 GG and IRF5 rs10954213 GG genotypes against the risk for CV events after adjusting the results for sex, age at RA diagnosis and traditional CV disease risk factors was observed (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38 to 0.92, P = 0.02; and HR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.36 to 0.95, P = 0.03, respectively). Moreover, we detected a protective effect of the GTG haplotype against the risk for CV events after adjusting the results for potential confounding factors (HR = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.56 to 0.93, P = 0.012). Conclusions Our results reveal that IRF5 gene variants are associated with risk of CV events in patients with RA. PMID:25011482

  11. Structural and Functional Analysis of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3: Localization of the Transactivation and Autoinhibitory Domains

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rongtuan; Mamane, Yael; Hiscott, John

    1999-01-01

    The interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) gene encodes a 55-kDa protein which is expressed constitutively in all tissues. In unstimulated cells, IRF-3 is present in an inactive cytoplasmic form; following Sendai virus infection, IRF-3 is posttranslationally modified by protein phosphorylation at multiple serine and threonine residues located in the carboxy terminus. Virus-induced phosphorylation of IRF-3 leads to cytoplasmic to nuclear translocation of phosphorylated IRF-3, association with the transcriptional coactivator CBP/p300, and stimulation of DNA binding and transcriptional activities of virus-inducible genes. Using yeast and mammalian one-hybrid analysis, we now demonstrate that an extended, atypical transactivation domain is located in the C terminus of IRF-3 between amino acids (aa) 134 and 394. We also show that the C-terminal domain of IRF-3 located between aa 380 and 427 participates in the autoinhibition of IRF-3 activity via an intramolecular association with the N-terminal region between aa 98 and 240. After Sendai virus infection, an intermolecular association between IRF-3 proteins is detected, demonstrating a virus-dependent formation of IRF-3 homodimers; this interaction is also observed in the absence of virus infection with a constitutively activated form of IRF-3. Substitution of the C-terminal Ser-Thr phosphorylation sites with the phosphomimetic Asp in the region ISNSHPLSLTSDQ between amino acids 395 and 407 [IRF-3(5D)], but not the adjacent S385 and S386 residues, generates a constitutively activated DNA binding form of IRF-3. In contrast, substitution of S385 and S386 with either Ala or Asp inhibits both DNA binding and transactivation activities of the IRF-3(5D) protein. These studies thus define the transactivation domain of IRF-3, two domains that participate in the autoinhibition of IRF-3 activity, and the regulatory phosphorylation sites controlling IRF-3 dimer formation, DNA binding activity, and association with the CBP/p300

  12. Nuclear factor 45 (NF45) is a regulatory subunit of complexes with NF90/110 involved in mitotic control.

    PubMed

    Guan, Deyu; Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Parrott, Andrew M; Arrigo, Cindy J; Li, Quan; Khaleduzzaman, Mohammed; Li, Hong; Lee, Chee-Gun; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear factor 90 (NF90) and its C-terminally extended isoform, NF110, have been isolated as DNA- and RNA-binding proteins together with the less-studied protein NF45. These complexes have been implicated in gene regulation, but little is known about their cellular roles and whether they are redundant or functionally distinct. We show that heterodimeric core complexes, NF90-NF45 and NF110-NF45, exist within larger complexes that are more labile and contain multiple NF90/110 isoforms and additional proteins. Depletion of the NF45 subunit by RNA interference is accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the levels of NF90 and NF110. Reciprocally, depletion of NF90 but not of NF110 greatly reduces the level of NF45. Coregulation of NF90 and NF45 is a posttranscriptional phenomenon, resulting from protein destabilization in the absence of partners. Depletion of NF90-NF45 complexes retards cell growth by inhibition of DNA synthesis. Giant multinucleated cells containing nuclei attached by constrictions accumulate when either NF45 or NF90, but not NF110, is depleted. This study identified NF45 as an unstable regulatory subunit of NF90-NF45 complexes and uncovered their critical role in normal cell division. Furthermore, the study revealed that NF90 is functionally distinct from NF110 and is more important for cell growth. PMID:18458058

  13. Role of Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein in Mediating Internal Initiation of Translation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 2 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Debojyoti; Venkataramana, Musturi; Ponnuswamy, Anand; Das, Saumitra

    2009-01-01

    Background Earlier we have reported translational control of interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) by internal initiation (Dhar et al, Nucleic Acids Res, 2007). The results implied possible role of IRF2 in controlling the intricate balance of cellular gene expression under stress conditions in general. Here we have investigated the secondary structure of the Internal Ribosome Entry Site of IRF2 RNA and demonstrated the role of PTB protein in ribosome assembly to facilitate internal initiation. Methodology/Principal Findings We have probed the putative secondary structure of the IRF2 5′UTR RNA using various enzymatic and chemical modification agents to constrain the secondary structure predicted from RNA folding algorithm Mfold. The IRES activity was found to be influenced by the interaction of trans-acting factor, polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB). Deletion of 25 nts from the 3′terminus of the 5′untranslated region resulted in reduced binding with PTB protein and also showed significant decrease in IRES activity compared to the wild type. We have also demonstrated putative contact points of PTB on the IRF2–5′UTR using primer extension inhibition assay. Majority of the PTB toe-prints were found to be restricted to the 3′end of the IRES. Additionally, Circular Dichroism (CD) spectra analysis suggested change in the conformation of the RNA upon PTB binding. Further, binding studies using S10 extract from HeLa cells, partially silenced for PTB gene expression, resulted in reduced binding by other trans-acting factors. Finally, we have demonstrated that addition of recombinant PTB enhances ribosome assembly on IRF2 IRES suggesting possible role of PTB in mediating internal initiation of translation of IRF2 RNA. Conclusion/Significance It appears that PTB binding to multiple sites within IRF2 5′UTR leads to a conformational change in the RNA that facilitate binding of other trans-acting factors to mediate internal initiation of translation. PMID

  14. Synergistic and additive killing by antimicrobial factors found in human airway surface liquid.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Tack, B F; McCray, P B; Welsh, M J

    2000-11-01

    Airway surface liquid contains multiple factors thought to provide a first line of defense against bacteria deposited in the airways. Although the antimicrobial action of individual factors has been studied, less is known about how they work in combination. We examined the combined action of six antimicrobial peptides found in airway surface liquid. The paired combinations of lysozyme-lactoferrin, lysozyme-secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and lactoferrin-SLPI were synergistic. The triple combination of lysozyme, lactoferrin, and SLPI showed even greater synergy. Other combinations involving the human beta-defensins, LL-37, and tobramycin (often administered to cystic fibrosis patients by inhalation) were additive. Because the airway surface liquid salt concentration may be elevated in cystic fibrosis patients, we examined the effect of salt on the synergistic combinations. As the ionic strength increased, synergistic interactions were lost. Our data suggest that the antibacterial potency of airway surface liquid may be significantly increased by synergistic and additive interactions between antimicrobial factors. These results also suggest that increased salt concentrations that may exist in cystic fibrosis could inhibit airway defenses by diminishing these synergistic interactions. PMID:11053013

  15. Antiviral factors and type I/III interferon expression associated with regulatory factors in the oral epithelial cells from HIV-1-serodiscordant couples.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Cesar A C; Oliveira, Luanda M S; Manfrere, Kelly C G; Lima, Josenilson F; Pereira, Natalli Z; Duarte, Alberto J S; Sato, Maria N

    2016-01-01

    Individuals who remain HIV-seronegative despite repeated unprotected exposure to the virus are defined as exposed seronegative (ESN) individuals. Innate and adaptive immunity, as well as genetic factors, provide ESNs with important advantages that allow for low infection susceptibility. The majority of HIV-1-infected individuals undergo antiretroviral therapy, which can decrease the level of HIV-1 exposure in ESNs. We analyzed type I interferon (IFN)-related antiviral and regulatory factors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and oral epithelial cells from serodiscordant couples. Our findings revealed that ESNs did not induce the expression of antiviral factors (APOBEC-3G, TRIM5-α, SAMDH1, STING, TBk1) or regulatory factors (Trex, Foxo3, Socs3, IL-10) in PBMCs, unlike their HIV-1-infected partners. In contrast, ESNs upregulated APOBEC-3G and type I/III IFNs (IFNs-α,-β/-λ) in oral mucosal epithelial cells similar to their HIV-infected partners. The serodiscordant groups exhibited an increased expression of type I IFN-induced regulators, such as Trex and Foxo3, in oral epithelial cells. TLR7, TLR8 and TLR9 were expressed in oral epithelial cells of both ESNs and HIV-1-infected subjects. These findings revealed evidence of antiviral factors, type I/III interferon and regulatory factor expression only in the oral mucosal compartment of ESNs, while HIV-1-infected partners systemically and oral mucosal expressed the antiviral profile. PMID:27168019

  16. Antiviral factors and type I/III interferon expression associated with regulatory factors in the oral epithelial cells from HIV-1-serodiscordant couples

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes, Cesar A. C.; Oliveira, Luanda M. S.; Manfrere, Kelly C. G.; Lima, Josenilson F.; Pereira, Natalli Z.; Duarte, Alberto J. S.; Sato, Maria N.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals who remain HIV-seronegative despite repeated unprotected exposure to the virus are defined as exposed seronegative (ESN) individuals. Innate and adaptive immunity, as well as genetic factors, provide ESNs with important advantages that allow for low infection susceptibility. The majority of HIV-1-infected individuals undergo antiretroviral therapy, which can decrease the level of HIV-1 exposure in ESNs. We analyzed type I interferon (IFN)-related antiviral and regulatory factors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and oral epithelial cells from serodiscordant couples. Our findings revealed that ESNs did not induce the expression of antiviral factors (APOBEC-3G, TRIM5-α, SAMDH1, STING, TBk1) or regulatory factors (Trex, Foxo3, Socs3, IL-10) in PBMCs, unlike their HIV-1-infected partners. In contrast, ESNs upregulated APOBEC-3G and type I/III IFNs (IFNs-α,-β/-λ) in oral mucosal epithelial cells similar to their HIV-infected partners. The serodiscordant groups exhibited an increased expression of type I IFN-induced regulators, such as Trex and Foxo3, in oral epithelial cells. TLR7, TLR8 and TLR9 were expressed in oral epithelial cells of both ESNs and HIV-1-infected subjects. These findings revealed evidence of antiviral factors, type I/III interferon and regulatory factor expression only in the oral mucosal compartment of ESNs, while HIV-1-infected partners systemically and oral mucosal expressed the antiviral profile. PMID:27168019

  17. Differential Regulation of Human Papillomavirus Type 8 by Interferon Regulatory Factors 3 and 7▿

    PubMed Central

    Oldak, Monika; Tolzmann, Liv; Wnorowski, Artur; Podgórska, Marta Justyna; Silling, Steffi; Lin, Rongtuan; Hiscott, John; Müller, Cornelia Sigrid Lissi; Vogt, Thomas; Smola, Hans; Smola, Sigrun

    2011-01-01

    The genus β human papillomavirus (HPV) type 8 is associated with nonmelanoma skin cancer in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, and evidence for its protumorigenic potential in the general population increases. To date, strategies to suppress genus β HPV infections are limited. Interferon regulatory factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 play key roles in the activation of the innate immune response to viral infections. In this study, we show for the first time that both IRF-3 and IRF-7 regulate transcription of a papillomavirus, but with opposing effects. IRF-7, expressed in the suprabasal layers of human epidermis, increased HPV8 late promoter activity via direct binding to viral DNA. UV-B light-induced activation of the HPV8 promoter involved IRF-7 as a downstream effector. In contrast, IRF-3, expressed in all layers of human epidermis, induced strong HPV8 suppression in primary keratinocytes. IRF-3-mediated suppression prevailed over IRF-7-induced HPV8 transcription. Unlike the E6 oncoprotein of the mucosal high-risk HPV16, the HPV8 E6 protein did not bind to IRF-3 and only weakly antagonized its activity. Strong antiviral activity was also observed, when keratinocytes were treated with potent IRF-3 activators, poly(I:C) or RNA bearing 5′ phosphates. In conclusion, we show that IRF-3 activation induces a state of cell-autonomous immunity against HPV in primary human keratinocytes. Our study suggests that local application of IRF-3-activating compounds might constitute an attractive novel therapeutic strategy against HPV8-associated diseases, particularly in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. PMID:20980500

  18. RARalpha is a regulatory factor for Am-80-induced cell growth inhibition of hematologic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Jimi, Shiro; Mashima, Kota; Matsumoto, Taichi; Hara, Shuji; Suzumiya, Junji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2007-08-01

    Retinoids are used for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Am-80, Tamibarotene, binds to retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) more specifically than all-trans retinoic acid. We studied the tumor cell suppressive effects of Am-80, with respect to cytotoxicity and growth inhibition using eight myeloid and lymphoid malignant cells in culture (HL-60, HL-60R, K-562, Kasumi-1, MEG01, Raji, U266B1, and U937). The effects of Am-80 were examined during 9 days of incubation with 10(-7)-10(-5) M of Am-80 in culture medium, which was changed every 3 days. HL-60 were the only cells sensitive to Am-80-induced cytotoxicity; the latter reached more than 95% after 9 days of incubation, and death was primarily through apoptosis. The total mass of RARalpha in HL-60 was significantly greater (p<0.006) than in ATRA-resistant HL-60 (HL-60R) as well as all of other cells tested. However, in all cells excluding HL-60, Am-80 induced time- and dose-dependent cell growth inhibition without noticeable cytotoxicity. TGF-beta2 was released into the media containing cells incubated with Am-80 for 3 days. A dose-dependent increment of phosphorylation of Smad-2 was also detected. The relative amount of secreted TGF-beta2 correlated with the growth inhibition rates in all cells tested excluding HL-60, and with the total mass of RARalpha in the cells (p=0.0137). Our results indicate that Am-80-induced cell-type non-specific growth inhibition is mediated by TGF-beta2, where the total mass of RARalpha could be an important regulatory factor in hematologic malignant cells. PMID:17611697

  19. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulates Myelination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Yuhei; Okabe, Shiko; Sasagawa, Shota; Murakami, Soichiro; Yuge, Mizuki; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS), and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs). Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs) might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp) promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation of zebrafish

  20. Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 Contributes to Transformation of v-Rel-Expressing Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hrdličková, Radmila; Nehyba, Jiří; Bose, Henry R.

    2001-01-01

    The avian homologue of the interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF-4) and a novel splice variant lacking exon 6, IRF-4ΔE6, were isolated and characterized. Chicken IRF-4 is expressed in lymphoid organs, less in small intestine, and lungs. IRF-4ΔE6 mRNA, though less abundant than full-length IRF-4, was detected in lymphoid tissues, with the highest levels observed in thymic cells. IRF-4 is highly expressed in v-Rel-transformed lymphocytes, and the expression of IRF-4 is increased in v-Rel- and c-Rel-transformed fibroblasts relative to control cells. The expression of IRF-4 from retrovirus vectors morphologically transformed primary fibroblasts, increased their saturation density, proliferation, and life span, and promoted their growth in soft agar. IRF-4 and v-Rel cooperated synergistically to transform fibroblasts. The expression of IRF-4 antisense RNA eliminated formation of soft agar colonies by v-Rel and reduced the proliferation of v-Rel-transformed cells. v-Rel-transformed fibroblasts produced interferon 1 (IFN1), which inhibits fibroblast proliferation. Infection of fibroblasts with retroviruses expressing v-Rel resulted in an increase in the mRNA levels of IFN1, the IFN receptor, STAT1, JAK1, and 2′,5′-oligo(A) synthetase. The exogenous expression of IRF-4 in v-Rel-transformed fibroblasts decreased the production of IFN1 and suppressed the expression of several genes in the IFN transduction pathway. These results suggest that induction of IRF-4 expression by v-Rel likely facilitates transformation of fibroblasts by decreasing the induction of this antiproliferative pathway. PMID:11533227

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) in Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Bin; Zhao, Ming-Yu; Lin, Jing-Yun; Liu, Qiu-Ming; Zhang, Shi-Cui

    2014-08-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) in mammals is known to be involved in antiviral response. In this study, we studied the structure, mRNA tissue distribution and regulation of IRF9 from Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. The cDNA sequence of IRF9 is 3305 bp long, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 1308 bp that encodes a peptide of 435 amino acids. The predicted protein sequence shares 33.7-72.0% identity to other fish IRF9s. Japanese flounder IRF9 possesses a DNA-binding domain (DBD), an IRF association domain (IAD), two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and a proline-rich domain (PRD). The IRF9 transcripts were detectable in all examined tissues of healthy Japanese flounders, with higher levels in the head kidney, kidney, liver and spleen. The IRF9 mRNA levels were up-regulated in the gills, head kidney, spleen and muscle when challenged with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C) or lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV). The up-regulations were stronger and arose earlier in the case of poly I:C treatment in most tested organs in a 7-day time course, with maximum increases ranging from 1.37- to 8.59-fold and peak time points from 3 h to 3 d post injection depending on different organs, relative to those in the case of LCDV treatment which ranged from 1.32- to 3.21-fold and from 18 h to 3 d post injection, respectively. The highest and earliest inductions were detected in the spleen in both challenge cases, while the inductions by LCDV in the muscle were quite faint. These results demonstrate a role of Japanese flounder IRF9 in the host's antiviral responses. PMID:24837327

  2. Rare double sex and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 regulatory variants in severe spermatogenic failure.

    PubMed

    Lima, A C; Carvalho, F; Gonçalves, J; Fernandes, S; Marques, P I; Sousa, M; Barros, A; Seixas, S; Amorim, A; Conrad, D F; Lopes, A M

    2015-09-01

    The double sex and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (DMRT1) gene has long been linked to sex-determining pathways across vertebrates and is known to play an essential role in gonadal development and maintenance of spermatogenesis in mice. In humans, the genomic region harboring the DMRT gene cluster has been implicated in disorders of sex development and recently DMRT1 deletions were shown to be associated with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). In this work, we have employed different methods to screen a cohort of Portuguese NOA patients for DMRT1 exonic insertions and deletions [by multiplex ligation probe assay (MLPA); n = 68] and point mutations (by Sanger sequencing; n = 155). We have found three novel patient-specific non-coding variants in heterozygosity that were absent from 357 geographically matched controls. One of these is a complex variant with a putative regulatory role (c.-223_-219CGAAA>T), located in the promoter region within a conserved sequence involved in Dmrt1 repression. Moreover, while DMRT1 domains are highly conserved across vertebrates and show reduced levels of diversity in human populations, two rare synonymous substitutions (rs376518776 and rs34946058) and two rare non-coding variants that potentially affect DMRT1 expression and splicing (rs144122237 and rs200423545) were overrepresented in patients when compared with 376 Portuguese controls (301 fertile and 75 normozoospermic). Overall our previous and present results suggest a role of changes in DMRT1 dosage in NOA potentially also through a process of gene misregulation, even though DMRT1 deleterious variants seem to be rare. PMID:26139570

  3. Rotavirus NSP1 Mediates Degradation of Interferon Regulatory Factors through Targeting of the Dimerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Michelle M.; Barro, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 can inhibit expression of interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated gene products by inducing proteasome-mediated degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs), including IRF3, IRF5, and IRF7. All IRF proteins share an N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD), and IRF3, IRF5, and IRF7 contain a similar C-proximal IRF association domain (IAD) that mediates IRF dimerization. An autoinhibitory domain (ID) at the extreme C terminus interacts with the IAD, burying residues necessary for IRF dimerization. Phosphorylation of serine/threonine residues in the ID induces charge repulsions that unmask the IAD, enabling IRF dimerization and subsequent nuclear translocation. To define the region of IRF proteins targeted for degradation by NSP1, we generated IRF3 and IRF7 truncation mutants and transiently expressed each with simian SA11-4F NSP1. These assays indicated that the IAD represented a necessary and sufficient target for degradation. Because NSP1 did not mediate degradation of truncated forms of the IAD, NSP1 likely requires a structurally intact IAD for recognition and targeting of IRF proteins. IRF9, which contains an IAD-like region that directs interactions with signal inducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins, was also targeted for degradation by NSP1, while IRF1, which lacks an IAD, was not. Analysis of mutant forms of IRF3 unable to undergo dimerization or that were constitutively dimeric showed that both were targeted for degradation by NSP1. These results indicate that SA11-4F NSP1 can induce degradation of inactive and activated forms of IAD-containing IRF proteins (IRF3 to IRF9), allowing a multipronged attack on IFN-based pathways that promote antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:23824805

  4. Glucitol induction in Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a regulatory factor, GutR.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, R; Rehemtulla, S N; Wong, S L

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the glucitol dehydrogenase gene (gutB) is suggested to be regulated both positively and negatively in Bacillus subtilis. A mutation in the gutR locus results in the constitutive expression of gutB. The exact nature of this mutation and the function of gutR are still unknown. Cloning and characterization of gutR indicated that this gene is located immediately upstream of gutB and is transcribed in the opposite direction relative to gutB. GutR is suggested to be a 95-kDa protein with a putative helix-turn-helix motif and a nucleotide binding domain at the N-terminal region. At the C-terminal region, a short sequence of GutR shows homology with two proteins, Cyc8 (glucose repression mediator protein) and GsiA (glucose starvation-inducible protein), known to be directly or indirectly involved in catabolite repression. Part of the C-terminal conserved sequence from these proteins shows all the features observed in the tetratricopeptide motif found in many eucaryotic proteins. To study the functional role of gutR, chromosomal gutR was insertionally inactivated. A total loss of glucitol inducibility was observed. Reintroduction of a functional gutR to the GutR-deficient strain through integration at the amyE locus restores the inducibility. Therefore, GutR serves as a regulatory factor to modulate glucitol induction. The nature of the gutR1 mutation was also determined. A single amino acid change (serine-289 to arginine-289) near the putative nucleotide binding motif B in GutR is responsible for the observed phenotype. Possible models for the action of GutR are discussed. Images PMID:8195087

  5. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets. PMID:26025535

  6. Effect of Addition of Chin Strap on PAP Compliance, Nightly Duration of Use, and Other Factors

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Shelley R.; O'Brien, Daniel T.; Zhang, Shiling; Devara, Anupama; Rowley, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: A chinstrap is potentially useful to reduce unintentional air leak by preventing mouth opening during PAP treatment. This study examines whether the addition of a chinstrap to PAP therapy has any effect on adherence, nightly duration of use, air leak, and residual AHI. Methods: This was a retrospective study performed at an AASM-accredited VAMC sleep center. Clinical sleep data of veterans (n = 124) prescribed PAP therapy for sleep apnea was evaluated, and the effect of chinstrap use vs non-use on the above parameters was assessed. Results: Chinstrap users had significantly greater PAP adherence, longer nightly duration of PAP use, lower residual AHI and lower leak compared to chinstrap non-users at first follow up visit. Conclusions: The addition of a chin strap to PAP therapy is a simple and inexpensive method of increasing PAP adherence. Citation: Knowles SR; O'Brien DT; Zhang S; Devara A; Rowley JA. Effect of addition of chin strap on PAP compliance, nightly duration of use, and other factors. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(4):377-383. PMID:24733982

  7. Genetic Variation of Goat Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Gene and Its Implication in Goat Evolution.

    PubMed

    Okpeku, Moses; Esmailizadeh, Ali; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Shu, Liping; Zhang, Yesheng; Wang, Yangzi; Sanni, Timothy M; Imumorin, Ikhide G; Peters, Sunday O; Zhang, Jiajin; Dong, Yang; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    The immune systems are fundamentally vital for evolution and survival of species; as such, selection patterns in innate immune loci are of special interest in molecular evolutionary research. The interferon regulatory factor (IRF) gene family control many different aspects of the innate and adaptive immune responses in vertebrates. Among these, IRF3 is known to take active part in very many biological processes. We assembled and evaluated 1356 base pairs of the IRF3 gene coding region in domesticated goats from Africa (Nigeria, Ethiopia and South Africa) and Asia (Iran and China) and the wild goat (Capra aegagrus). Five segregating sites with θ value of 0.0009 for this gene demonstrated a low diversity across the goats' populations. Fu and Li tests were significantly positive but Tajima's D test was significantly negative, suggesting its deviation from neutrality. Neighbor joining tree of IRF3 gene in domesticated goats, wild goat and sheep showed that all domesticated goats have a closer relationship than with the wild goat and sheep. Maximum likelihood tree of the gene showed that different domesticated goats share a common ancestor and suggest single origin. Four unique haplotypes were observed across all the sequences, of which, one was particularly common to African goats (MOCH-K14-0425, Poitou and WAD). In assessing the evolution mode of the gene, we found that the codon model dN/dS ratio for all goats was greater than one. Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) gave a ω0 (dN/dS) value of 0.067 with LnL value of -6900.3 for the first Model (M1) while ω2 = 1.667 in model M2 with LnL value of -6900.3 with positive selection inferred in 3 codon sites. Mechanistic empirical combination (MEC) model for evaluating adaptive selection pressure on particular codons also confirmed adaptive selection pressure in three codons (207, 358 and 408) in IRF3 gene. Positive diversifying selection inferred with recent evolutionary changes in domesticated goat IRF3

  8. Factors which Limit the Value of Additional Redundancy in Human Rated Launch Vehicle Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Joel M.; Stott, James E.; Ring, Robert W.; Hatfield, Spencer; Kaltz, Gregory M.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has embarked on an ambitious program to return humans to the moon and beyond. As NASA moves forward in the development and design of new launch vehicles for future space exploration, it must fully consider the implications that rule-based requirements of redundancy or fault tolerance have on system reliability/risk. These considerations include common cause failure, increased system complexity, combined serial and parallel configurations, and the impact of design features implemented to control premature activation. These factors and others must be considered in trade studies to support design decisions that balance safety, reliability, performance and system complexity to achieve a relatively simple, operable system that provides the safest and most reliable system within the specified performance requirements. This paper describes conditions under which additional functional redundancy can impede improved system reliability. Examples from current NASA programs including the Ares I Upper Stage will be shown.

  9. Mechanisms of immune suppression by interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta: the role of T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alison; Verhagen, Johan; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2006-04-01

    Specific immune suppression and induction of tolerance are essential processes in the regulation and circumvention of immune defence. The balance between allergen-specific type 1 regulatory (Tr1) cells and T helper (Th) 2 cells appears to be decisive in the development of allergy. Tr1 cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in healthy individuals. In contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific interleukin-4 (IL-4)-secreting T cells in allergic individuals. Allergen-specific immunotherapy can induce specific Tr1 cells that abolish allergen-induced proliferation of Th1 and Th2 cells, as well as their cytokine production. Tr1 cells utilize multiple suppressor mechanisms, such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) as secreted cytokines and various surface molecules, such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed death-1. IL-10 only inhibits T cells stimulated by low numbers of triggered T-cell receptors, which depend on CD28 costimulation. IL-10 inhibits CD28 tyrosine phosphorylation, preventing the binding of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 and consequently inhibiting the CD28 signalling pathway. In addition, IL-10 and TGF-beta secreted by Tr1 cells skew the antibody production from immunoglobulin E (IgE) towards the non-inflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. Induction of antigen-specific Tr1 cells can thus re-direct an inappropriate immune response against allergens or auto-antigens using a broad range of suppressor mechanisms. PMID:16556256

  10. The NF-κB transcription factor RelA is required for the tolerogenic function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Messina, Nicole; Fulford, Thomas; O'Reilly, Lorraine; Loh, Wen Xian; Motyer, Jessica M; Ellis, Darcy; McLean, Catriona; Naeem, Haroon; Lin, Ann; Gugasyan, Raffi; Slattery, Robyn M; Grumont, Raelene J; Gerondakis, Steve

    2016-06-01

    The properties of CD4(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets are dictated by distinct patterns of gene expression determined by FOXP3 and different combinations of various transcription factors. Here we show the NF-κB transcription factor RelA is constitutively active in naïve and effector Tregs. The conditional inactivation of Rela in murine FOXP3(+) cells induces a rapid onset, multi-focal autoimmune disease that depends on RelA being expressed in conventional T cells. In addition to promoting Treg lineage stability, RelA determines the size of the effector Treg population, a function influenced by the presence or absence of RelA in conventional T cells. These findings showing that RelA controls Treg stability and promotes the competitive fitness of effector Tregs highlight the importance of RelA activity in peripheral Treg induced tolerance. PMID:27068879

  11. Enhancement of antibody production by growth factor addition in perfusion and hollow-fiber culture systems.

    PubMed

    Omasa, T; Kobayashi, M; Nishikawa, T; Shioya, S; Suga, K; Uemura, S; Kitani, Y; Imamura, Y

    1995-12-20

    The effects of the high-molecular-weight growth factors, transferrin and bovine serum albumin (BSA), on antibody production were analyzed quantitatively in continuous hollow-fiber cultivation over a period of 60 days. Transferrin enhanced cell growth but had no significant effect on the specific antibody production rate, whereas BSA significantly enhanced antibody production. The antibody production rate was increased 4- and 14-fold respectively by feeding BSA at 2 and 5 g L(-1) into the EC side of the system (the side connected to the cell-containing outer part of the hollow-fiber unit) compared with the production achieved without BSA. Addition of 5 g L(1) BSA into the IC side of the system (the side connected to the inner part of the hollow-fiber unit) resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in the antibody production rate. The effect of BSA was also analyzed using the perfusion culture system with a separation unit. When fresh medium containing either 2 or 5 g L(-1) BSA was fed into the reactor, both the specific growth rate and specific death rate increased, while the specific antibody production rate was increased 2- and 25-fold, respectively, by feeding BSA at these two concentrations compared with no addition. Comparing the two systems, the increase in the antibody production rate achieved with the hollow-fiber system was threefold greater than that in the perfusion culture system with the same concentration of BSA feeding. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18623537

  12. Regulatory Lymphocytes Are Key Factors in MHC-Independent Resistance to EAE

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Nieves; Mecha, Miriam; Espejo, Carmen; Mestre, Leyre; Eixarch, Herena; Montalban, Xavier; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C.; Guaza, Carmen; Villar, Luisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Resistant and susceptible mouse strains to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inducible demyelinating experimental disease serving as animal model for multiple sclerosis, have been described. We aimed to explore MHC-independent mechanisms inducing resistance to EAE. Methods. For EAE induction, female C57BL/6 (susceptible strain) and CD1 (resistant outbred strain showing heterogeneous MHC antigens) mice were immunized with the 35–55 peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35−55). We studied T cell proliferation, regulatory and effector cell subpopulations, intracellular and serum cytokine patterns, and titers of anti-MOG serum antibodies. Results. Upon immunization with MOG35−55, T lymphocytes from susceptible mice but not that of resistant strain were capable of proliferating when stimulated with MOG35−55. Accordingly, resistant mice experienced a rise in regulatory B cells (P = 0.001) and, to a lower extent, in regulatory T cells (P = 0.02) compared with C57BL/6 susceptible mice. As a consequence, MOG35−55-immunized C57BL/6 mice showed higher percentages of CD4+ T cells producing both IFN-gamma (P = 0.02) and IL-17 (P = 0.009) and higher serum levels of IL-17 (P = 0.04) than resistant mice. Conclusions. Expansion of regulatory B and T cells contributes to the induction of resistance to EAE by an MHC-independent mechanism. PMID:24868560

  13. Activation of Vago by interferon regulatory factor (IRF) suggests an interferon system-like antiviral mechanism in shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaozheng; Li, Haoyang; Chen, Yixiao; Chen, Yonggui; Wang, Sheng; Weng, Shao-Ping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    There is a debate on whether invertebrates possess an antiviral immunity similar to the interferon (IFN) system of vertebrates. The Vago gene from arthropods encodes a viral-activated secreted peptide that restricts virus infection through activating the JAK-STAT pathway and is considered to be a cytokine functionally similar to IFN. In this study, the first crustacean IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-like gene was identified in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei. The L. vannamei IRF showed similar protein nature to mammalian IRFs and could be activated during virus infection. As a transcriptional regulatory factor, L. vannamei IRF could activate the IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE)-containing promoter to regulate the expression of mammalian type I IFNs and initiate an antiviral state in mammalian cells. More importantly, IRF could bind the 5′-untranslated region of L. vannamei Vago4 gene and activate its transcription, suggesting that shrimp Vago may be induced in a similar manner to that of IFNs and supporting the opinion that Vago might function as an IFN-like molecule in invertebrates. These suggested that shrimp might possess an IRF-Vago-JAK/STAT regulatory axis, which is similar to the IRF-IFN-JAK/STAT axis of vertebrates, indicating that invertebrates might possess an IFN system-like antiviral mechanism. PMID:26459861

  14. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) Contribute to Human Tooth Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Modesto, Adriana; Meira, Raquel; Barbosa, Anna Renata Schneider; Lidral, Andrew C.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    Phenotypic characteristics expressed in syndromes give clues to the factors involved in the cause of isolated forms of the same defects. We investigated two genes responsible for craniofacial syndromes, FGFR1 and IRF6, in a collection of families with isolated tooth agenesis. Cheek swab samples were obtained for DNA analysis from 116 case/parent trios. Probands had at least one developmentally missing tooth, excluding third molars. In addition, we studied 89 cases and 50 controls from Ohio to replicate any positive findings. Genotyping was performed by kinetic polymerase chain-reaction or TaqMan assays. Linkage disequilibrium analysis and transmission distortion of the marker alleles were performed. The same variants in the IRF6 gene that are associated with isolated orofacial clefts are also associated with human tooth agenesis (rs861019, P = 0.058; rs17015215—V274I, P = 0.0006; rs7802, P = 0.004). Mutations in IRF6 cause Van der Woude and popliteal pterygium syndromes. The craniofacial phenotypic characteristics of these syndromes include oral clefts and preferential tooth agenesis of incisors and premolars, besides pits on the lower lips. Also it appears that preferential premolar agenesis is associated with FGFR1 (P = 0.014) and IRF6 (P = 0.002) markers. There were statistically significant data suggesting that IRF6 interacts not only with MSX1 (P = 0.001), but also with TGFA (P = 0.03). PMID:17318851

  15. Human papillomavirus 16 E6 oncoprotein binds to interferon regulatory factor-3 and inhibits its transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Ronco, Lucienne V.; Karpova, Alla Y.; Vidal, Marc; Howley, Peter M.

    1998-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3) was found to specifically interact with HPV16 E6 in a yeast two-hybrid screen. IRF-3 is activated by the presence of double-stranded RNA or by virus infection to form a stable complex with other transcriptional regulators that bind to the regulatory elements of the IFNβ promoter. We show that IRF-3 is a potent transcriptional activator and demonstrate that HPV16 E6 can inhibit its transactivation function. The expression of HPV16 E6 in primary human keratinocytes inhibits the induction of IFNβ mRNA following Sendai virus infection. The binding of HPV16 E6 to IRF-3 does not result in its ubiquitination or degradation. We propose that the interaction of E6 with IRF-3 and the inhibition of IRF-3’s transcriptional activity may provide the virus a means to circumvent the normal antiviral response of an HPV16-infected cell. PMID:9649509

  16. Identification of the transcription factor ZEB1 as a central component of the adipogenic gene regulatory network.

    PubMed

    Gubelmann, Carine; Schwalie, Petra C; Raghav, Sunil K; Röder, Eva; Delessa, Tenagne; Kiehlmann, Elke; Waszak, Sebastian M; Corsinotti, Andrea; Udin, Gilles; Holcombe, Wiebke; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Trono, Didier; Wolfrum, Christian; Deplancke, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a key determinant of whole body metabolism and energy homeostasis. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying adipogenesis is therefore highly relevant from a biomedical perspective. Our current understanding of fat cell differentiation is centered on the transcriptional cascades driven by the C/EBP protein family and the master regulator PPARγ. To elucidate further components of the adipogenic gene regulatory network, we performed a large-scale transcription factor (TF) screen overexpressing 734 TFs in mouse pre-adipocytes and probed their effect on differentiation. We identified 22 novel pro-adipogenic TFs and characterized the top ranking TF, ZEB1, as being essential for adipogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, its expression levels correlate with fat cell differentiation potential in humans. Genomic profiling further revealed that this TF directly targets and controls the expression of most early and late adipogenic regulators, identifying ZEB1 as a central transcriptional component of fat cell differentiation. PMID:25163748

  17. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, Juli D.; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-01-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints. PMID:27058369

  18. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Juli D; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-04-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints. PMID:27058369

  19. Regulatory review time for approval of oncology drugs in Japan between 2001 and 2014. Considerations of changes, factors that affect review time, and difference with the United States.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we comprehensively and historically studied the review time of oncology drugs approved by the regulatory authorities in Japan with publicly available information. A total of 120 applications of oncology drugs were approved in Japan between April 2001 and July 2014. The review time peaked with 732.0 days (24.4 months) in 2005, and showed a tendency to decline gradually each year thereafter. After 2012, a significant reduction of the review time was seen in comparison to the median of 13-year median time. In addition, we compared the review time with that in the United States. The median review time lag with the United States was significantly peaked in 2005. After 2005, the review time lag with the FDA has decreased, but lag did not significantly reduce by 2014. We also examined factors influencing the review time in Japan with multiple regression analysis. It was found that the factors related to a use of overseas data and expedited program for accelerating the reviews influenced the direction of shortening the review time. We consider that regulatory authorities in Japan need to keep making efforts to reduce the review time further and eliminate the review time lag with the United States. PMID:25560978

  20. Soluble factors secreted by glioblastoma cell lines facilitate recruitment, survival, and expansion of regulatory T cells: implications for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Courtney A.; Ahn, Brian J.; Han, Seunggu J.; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    In patients with glioma, the tumor microenvironment can significantly impact pro-inflammatory immune cell functions. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly defined. Because immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Treg) are over represented in the tumor microenvironment compared with peripheral blood, we hypothesized that the tumor may have an effect on Treg survival, migration, expansion, and/or induction of a regulatory phenotype from non-Treg conventional CD4+ T cells. We defined the impact of soluble factors produced by tumor cells on Treg from healthy patients in vitro to determine mechanisms by which gliomas influence T cell populations. We found that tumor-derived soluble factors allowed for preferential proliferation and increased chemotaxis of Treg, compared with conventional T cells, indicating that these mechanisms may contribute to the increased Treg in the tumor microenvironment. Conventional T cells also exhibited a significantly increased expression of pro-apoptotic transcripts in the presence of tumor-derived factors, indicating that survival of Treg in the tumor site is driven by exposure to soluble factors produced by the tumor. Together, these data suggest that tumor burden may induce increased Treg infiltration, proliferation, and survival, negating productive anti-tumor immune responses in patients treated with immunotherapies. Collectively, our data indicate that several mechanisms of Treg recruitment and retention in the tumor microenvironment exist and may need to be addressed to improve the specificity of immunotherapies seeking to eliminate Treg in patients with glioma. PMID:22406925

  1. Regulatory T-cell suppressor program co-opts transcription factor IRF4 to control TH2 responses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ye; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Kas, Arnold; deRoos, Paul; Kim, Jeong M.; Chu, Tin-Tin; Corcoran, Lynn; Treuting, Piper; Klein, Ulf; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2010-01-01

    In the course of infection or autoimmunity, particular transcription factors orchestrate the differentiation of TH1, TH2 or TH17 effector cells, the responses of which are limited by a distinct lineage of suppressive regulatory T cells (Treg). Treg cell differentiation and function are guided by the transcription factor Foxp3, and their deficiency due to mutations in Foxp3 results in aggressive fatal autoimmune disease associated with sharply augmented TH1 and TH2 cytokine production1–3. Recent studies suggested that Foxp3 regulates the bulk of the Foxp3-dependent transcriptional program indirectly through a set of transcriptional regulators serving as direct Foxp3 targets4,5. Here we show that in mouse Treg cells, high amounts of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4), a transcription factor essential for TH2 effector cell differentiation, is dependent on Foxp3 expression. We proposed that IRF4 expression endows Treg cells with the ability to suppress TH2 responses. Indeed, ablation of a conditional Irf4 allele in Treg cells resulted in selective dysregulation of TH2 responses, IL4-dependent immunoglobulin isotype production, and tissue lesions with pronounced plasma cell infiltration, in contrast to the mononuclear-cell-dominated pathology typical of mice lacking Treg cells. Our results indicate that Treg cells use components of the transcriptional machinery, promoting a particular type of effector CD4+ T cell differentiation, to efficiently restrain the corresponding type of the immune response. PMID:19182775

  2. Store-operated Ca2+ Entry-associated Regulatory factor (SARAF) Plays an Important Role in the Regulation of Arachidonate-regulated Ca2+ (ARC) Channels.

    PubMed

    Albarran, Letizia; Lopez, Jose J; Woodard, Geoffrey E; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-03-25

    The store-operated Ca(2+)entry-associated regulatory factor (SARAF) has recently been identified as a STIM1 regulatory protein that facilitates slow Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of store-operated Ca(2+)entry (SOCE). Both the store-operated channels and the store-independent arachidonate-regulated Ca(2+)(ARC) channels are regulated by STIM1. In the present study, we show that, in addition to its location in the endoplasmic reticulum, SARAF is constitutively expressed in the plasma membrane, where it can interact with plasma membrane (PM)-resident ARC forming subunits in the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Using siRNA-based and overexpression approaches we report that SARAF negatively regulates store-independent Ca(2+)entry via the ARC channels. Arachidonic acid (AA) increases the association of PM-resident SARAF with Orai1. Finally, our results indicate that SARAF modulates the ability of AA to promote cell survival in neuroblastoma cells. In addition to revealing new insight into the biology of ARC channels in neuroblastoma cells, these findings provide evidence for an unprecedented location of SARAF in the plasma membrane. PMID:26817842

  3. Integrating products of Bessel functions with an additional exponential or rational factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Deun, Joris; Cools, Ronald

    2008-04-01

    We provide two MATLAB programs to compute integrals of the form ex∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dxand 0∞xr+x∏i=1kJν_i(ax)dx with Jν_i(x) the Bessel function of the first kind and (real) order ν. The parameter m is a real number such that ∑ν+m>-1 (to assure integrability near zero), r is real and the numbers c and a are all strictly positive. The program can deliver accurate error estimates. Program summaryProgram title: BESSELINTR, BESSELINTC Catalogue identifier: AEAH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAH_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1601 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 161 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab (version ⩾6.5), Octave (version ⩾2.1.69) Computer: All supporting Matlab or Octave Operating system: All supporting Matlab or Octave RAM: For k Bessel functions our program needs approximately ( 500+140k) double precision variables Classification: 4.11 Nature of problem: The problem consists in integrating an arbitrary product of Bessel functions with an additional rational or exponential factor over a semi-infinite interval. Difficulties arise from the irregular oscillatory behaviour and the possible slow decay of the integrand, which prevents truncation at a finite point. Solution method: The interval of integration is split into a finite and infinite part. The integral over the finite part is computed using Gauss-Legendre quadrature. The integrand on the infinite part is approximated using asymptotic expansions and this approximation is integrated exactly with the aid of the upper incomplete gamma function. In the case where a rational factor is present, this factor is first expanded in a Taylor series around infinity. Restrictions: Some (and eventually all

  4. Prediction of Regulatory Interactions from Genome Sequences Using a Biophysical Model for the Arabidopsis LEAFY Transcription Factor[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Moyroud, Edwige; Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Ott, Felix; Yant, Levi; Posé, David; Monniaux, Marie; Blanchet, Sandrine; Bastien, Olivier; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Weigel, Detlef; Schmid, Markus; Parcy, François

    2011-01-01

    Despite great advances in sequencing technologies, generating functional information for nonmodel organisms remains a challenge. One solution lies in an improved ability to predict genetic circuits based on primary DNA sequence in combination with detailed knowledge of regulatory proteins that have been characterized in model species. Here, we focus on the LEAFY (LFY) transcription factor, a conserved master regulator of floral development. Starting with biochemical and structural information, we built a biophysical model describing LFY DNA binding specificity in vitro that accurately predicts in vivo LFY binding sites in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Applying the model to other plant species, we could follow the evolution of the regulatory relationship between LFY and the AGAMOUS (AG) subfamily of MADS box genes and show that this link predates the divergence between monocots and eudicots. Remarkably, our model succeeds in detecting the connection between LFY and AG homologs despite extensive variation in binding sites. This demonstrates that the cis-element fluidity recently observed in animals also exists in plants, but the challenges it poses can be overcome with predictions grounded in a biophysical model. Therefore, our work opens new avenues to deduce the structure of regulatory networks from mere inspection of genomic sequences. PMID:21515819

  5. Synergetic regulatory networks mediated by oncogene-driven microRNAs and transcription factors in serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Although high-grade serous ovarian cancer (OVC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in women, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms in the cellular processes that lead to this cancer. Recently, accumulated lines of evidence have shown that the interplay between transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) is critical in cellular regulation during tumorigenesis. A comprehensive investigation of TFs and miRNAs, and their target genes, may provide a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in the pathology of OVC. In this study, we have integrated three complementary algorithms into a framework, aiming to infer the regulation by miRNAs and TFs in conjunction with gene expression profiles. We demonstrated the utility of our framework by inferring 67 OVC-specific regulatory feed-forward loops (FFL) initiated by miRNAs or TFs in high-grade serous OVC. By analyzing these regulatory behaviors, we found that all the 67 FFLs are consistent in their regulatory effects on genes that jointly targeted by miRNAs and TFs. Remarkably, we unveiled an unbalanced distribution of FFLs with different oncogenic effects. In total, 31 of the 67 coherent FFLs were mainly initiated by oncogenes. On the contrary, only 4 of the FFLs were initiated by tumor suppressor genes. These overwhelmingly observed oncogenic genes were further detected in a sub-network with 32 FFLs centered by miRNA let-7b and TF TCF7L1 to regulate cell differentiation. Closer inspection of 32 FFLs revealed that 75% of the miRNAs reportedly play functional roles in cell differentiation, especially when enriched in epithelial–mesenchymal transitions. This study provides a comprehensive pathophysiological overview of recurring coherent circuits in OVC that are co-regulated by miRNAs and TFs. The prevalence of oncogenic coherent FFLs in serous OVC suggests that oncogene-driven regulatory motifs could cooperatively act upon critical cellular process such as cell differentiation in a highly

  6. Fatigue risk management: Organizational factors at the regulatory and industry/company level.

    PubMed

    Gander, Philippa; Hartley, Laurence; Powell, David; Cabon, Philippe; Hitchcock, Edward; Mills, Ann; Popkin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    This paper focuses on the development of fatigue risk management systems (FRMS) in the transport sector. The evolution of regulatory frameworks is traced, from uni-dimensional hours of service regulations through to frameworks that enable multi-dimensional FRMS. These regulatory changes reflect advances in understanding of human error in the aetiology of accidents, and in fatigue and safety science. Implementation of FRMS shifts the locus of responsibility for safety away from the regulator towards companies and individuals, and requires changes in traditional roles. Organizational, ethnic, and national culture need to be considered. Recent trends in the work environment have potential to adversely affect FRMS, including precarious employment and shortages of skilled labour. Essential components of an FRMS, and examples of FRMS in different transport modes, are described. It is vital that regulators, employer, and employees have an understanding of the causes and consequences of fatigue that is sufficient for them to meet their responsibilities in relation to FRMS. While there is a strong evidence base supporting the principles of FRMS, experience with implementation is more limited. The evidence base for effective implementation will expand, since FRMS is data-driven, and ongoing evaluation is integral. We strongly advocate that experience be shared wherever possible. PMID:21130218

  7. Quantitative comparison of the expression of myogenic regulatory factors in flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) embryos and adult tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Tan, Xungang; Xu, Peng; Sun, Wei; Xu, Yongli; Zhang, Peijun

    2010-03-01

    MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin are myogenic regulatory factors that play important roles during myogenesis. It is thought that MyoD and Myf5 are required for myogenic determination, while myogenin is important for terminal differentiation and lineage maintenance. To better understand the function of myogenic regulatory factors in muscle development of flounder, an important economic fish in Asia, real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to characterize the expression patterns of MyoD, Myf5, and myogenin at early stages of embryo development, and in different tissues of the adult flounder. The results show that, Myf5 is the first gene to be expressed during the early stages of flounder development, followed by MyoD and myogenin. The expressions of Myf5, yoD, and myogenin at the early stages have a common characteristic: expression gradually increased to a peak level, and then gradually decreased to an extremely low level. In the adult flounder, the expression of the three genes in muscle is much higher than that in other tissues, indicating that they are important for muscle growth and maintenance of grown fish. During embryonic stages, the expression level of MyoD might serve an important role in the balance between muscle cell differentiation and proliferation. When the MyoD expression is over 30% of its highest level, the muscle cells enter the differentiation stage.

  8. Phosphorylation-Induced Dimerization of Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Unmasks DNA Binding and a Bipartite Transactivation Domain

    PubMed Central

    Marié, Isabelle; Smith, Eric; Prakash, Arun; Levy, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) is an interferon (IFN)-inducible transcription factor required for activation of a subset of IFN-α genes that are expressed with delayed kinetics following viral infection. IRF7 is synthesized as a latent protein and is posttranslationally modified by protein phosphorylation in infected cells. Phosphorylation required a carboxyl-terminal regulatory domain that controlled the retention of the active protein exclusively in the nucleus, as well as its binding to specific DNA target sequences, multimerization, and ability to induce target gene expression. Transcriptional activation by IRF7 mapped to two distinct regions, both of which were required for full activity, while all functions were masked in latent IRF7 by an autoinhibitory domain mapping to an internal region. A conditionally active form of IRF7 was constructed by fusing IRF7 with the ligand-binding and dimerization domain of estrogen receptor (ER). Hormone-dependent dimerization of chimeric IRF7-ER stimulated DNA binding and transcriptional transactivation of endogenous target genes. These studies demonstrate the regulation of IRF7 activity by phosphorylation-dependent allosteric changes that result in dimerization and that facilitate nuclear retention, derepress transactivation, and allow specific DNA binding. PMID:11073981

  9. Relative Importance and Additive Effects of Maternal and Infant Risk Factors on Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; James, Kristina; Escobar, Gabriel; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Li, Sherian Xu; Carroll, Kecia N.; Walsh, Eileen; Mitchel, Edward; Das, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh; Yu, Chang; Dupont, William D.; Hartert, Tina V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures that occur in utero and during early life may contribute to the development of childhood asthma through alteration of the human microbiome. The objectives of this study were to estimate the cumulative effect and relative importance of environmental exposures on the risk of childhood asthma. Methods We conducted a population-based birth cohort study of mother-child dyads who were born between 1995 and 2003 and were continuously enrolled in the PRIMA (Prevention of RSV: Impact on Morbidity and Asthma) cohort. The individual and cumulative impact of maternal urinary tract infections (UTI) during pregnancy, maternal colonization with group B streptococcus (GBS), mode of delivery, infant antibiotic use, and older siblings at home, on the risk of childhood asthma were estimated using logistic regression. Dose-response effect on childhood asthma risk was assessed for continuous risk factors: number of maternal UTIs during pregnancy, courses of infant antibiotics, and number of older siblings at home. We further assessed and compared the relative importance of these exposures on the asthma risk. In a subgroup of children for whom maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy information was available, the effect of maternal antibiotic use on the risk of childhood asthma was estimated. Results Among 136,098 singleton birth infants, 13.29% developed asthma. In both univariate and adjusted analyses, maternal UTI during pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18, 1.25; adjusted OR [AOR] 1.04, 95%CI 1.02, 1.07 for every additional UTI) and infant antibiotic use (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.20, 1.22; AOR 1.16, 95%CI 1.15, 1.17 for every additional course) were associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, while having older siblings at home (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.91, 0.93; AOR 0.85, 95%CI 0.84, 0.87 for each additional sibling) was associated with a decreased risk of childhood asthma, in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with vaginal

  10. Mice devoid of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) show normal expression of type I interferon genes.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, L F; Ruffner, H; Stark, G; Aguet, M; Weissmann, C

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) binds tightly to the interferon (IFN)-beta promoter and has been implicated in the induction of type I IFNs. We generated mice devoid of functional IRF-1 by targeted gene disruption. As reported by others, IRF-1-deficient mice showed a discrete phenotype: the CD4/CD8 ratio was increased and IFN-gamma-induced levels of macrophage iNO synthase mRNA were strongly diminished. However, type I IFN induction in vivo by virus or double-stranded RNA was unimpaired, as evidenced by serum IFN titers and IFN mRNA levels in spleen, liver and lung. There was also no impairment in the response of type I IFN-inducible genes. Therefore, IRF-1 is not essential for these processes in vivo. Images PMID:7957048

  11. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  12. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  13. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  14. 21 CFR 1311.115 - Additional requirements for two-factor authentication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... authentication. 1311.115 Section 1311.115 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... requirements for two-factor authentication. (a) To sign a controlled substance prescription, the electronic... authentication protocol that uses two of the following three factors: (1) Something only the practitioner...

  15. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  16. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  17. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  18. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  19. 34 CFR 377.22 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secretary considers the following factors in making grants under this program: (a) The diversity of... funded projects. (b) The diversity of clients to be served, in order to ensure that a variety...

  20. Comparative analysis of transcription factor gene families from Papaver somniferum: identification of regulatory factors involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Parul; Pathak, Sumya; Lakhwani, Deepika; Gupta, Parul; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), known for biosynthesis of several therapeutically important benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), has emerged as the premier organism to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The most prominent molecules produced in opium poppy include narcotic analgesic morphine, the cough suppressant codeine, the muscle relaxant papaverine and the anti-microbial agent sanguinarine and berberine. Despite several health benefits, biosynthesis of some of these molecules is very low due to tight temporal and spatial regulation of the genes committed to their biosynthesis. Transcription factors, one of the prime regulators of secondary plant product biosynthesis, might be involved in controlled biosynthesis of BIAs in P. somniferum. In this study, identification of members of different transcription factor gene families using transcriptome datasets of 10 cultivars of P. somniferum with distinct chemoprofile has been carried out. Analysis suggests that most represented transcription factor gene family in all the poppy cultivars is WRKY. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed differential expression pattern of the members of a set of transcription factor gene families among 10 cultivars. Through analysis, two members of WRKY and one member of C3H gene family were identified as potential candidates which might regulate thebaine and papaverine biosynthesis, respectively, in poppy. PMID:26108744

  1. PreImplantation factor (PIF*) regulates systemic immunity and targets protective regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins.

    PubMed

    Barnea, Eytan R; Hayrabedyan, Soren; Todorova, Krassimira; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Or, Reuven; Guingab, Joy; McElhinney, James; Fernandez, Nelson; Barder, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Secreted by viable embryos, PIF is expressed by the placenta and found in maternal circulation. It promotes implantation and trophoblast invasion, achieving systemic immune homeostasis. Synthetic PIF successfully transposes endogenous PIF features to non-pregnant immune and transplant models. PIF affects innate and activated PBMC cytokines and genes expression. We report that PIF targets similar proteins in CD14+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells instigating integrated immune regulation. PIF-affinity chromatography followed by mass-spectrometry, pathway and heatmap analysis reveals that SET-apoptosis inhibitor, vimentin, myosin-9 and calmodulin are pivotal for immune regulation. PIF acts on macrophages down-stream of LPS (lipopolysaccharide-bacterial antigen) CD14/TLR4/MD2 complex, targeting myosin-9, thymosin-α1 and 14-3-3eta. PIF mainly targets platelet aggregation in CD4+, and skeletal proteins in CD8+ cells. Pathway analysis demonstrates that PIF targets and regulates SET, tubulin, actin-b, and S100 genes expression. PIF targets systemic immunity and has a short circulating half-life. Collectively, PIF targets identified; protective, immune regulatory and cytoskeleton proteins reveal mechanisms involved in the observed efficacy against immune disorders. PMID:26944449

  2. Insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein during olanzapine administration: effects of the antidiabetic metformin.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Trino; Sandia, Ignacio; Lacruz, Anny; Rangel, Nairy; de Mendoza, Soaira; Beaulieu, Serge; Contreras, Quilianio; Galeazzi, Tatiana; Vargas, Doritza

    2007-03-01

    In this study, the Authors assessed some insulin counter-regulatory factors, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein after olanzapine administration, and the effect of metformin on these variables, 37 patients with chronic schizophrenia were given olanzapine (10 mg/day for 14 weeks). Nineteen patients received metformin (850-2550 mg/day) and 18 received placebo in a randomized, double-blind protocol. The following variables were quantified before and after olanzapine: cortisol, leptin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, glucagon, growth hormone, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein. Results were correlated with the changes in body weight and the insulin resistance index. We have reported elsewhere that metformin did not prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain, and the insulin resistance index significantly decreased after metformin and placebo; Baptista T, et al. Can J Psychiatry 2006; 51: 192-196. Cortisol, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and fibrinogen levels significantly decreased in both groups. Glucagon significantly increased after metformin (P=0.03). Leptin tended to increase after placebo (P=0.1) and displayed a small nonsignificant reduction after metformin. The C-reactive protein did not change significantly in any group. Contrarily to most published studies, olanzapine was associated with decreased insulin resistance. Decrements in cortisol, fibrinogen and tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels point to an improvement in the metabolic profile. The trend for leptin to increase after placebo, but not after metformin in spite of similar weight gain suggests a beneficial effect of this antidiabetic agent. PMID:17293706

  3. A direct regulatory interaction between chaperonin TRiC and stress-responsive transcription factor HSF1.

    PubMed

    Neef, Daniel W; Jaeger, Alex M; Gomez-Pastor, Rocio; Willmund, Felix; Frydman, Judith; Thiele, Dennis J

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that protects cells from protein-misfolding-induced stress and apoptosis. The mechanisms by which cytosolic protein misfolding leads to HSF1 activation have not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that HSF1 is directly regulated by TRiC/CCT, a central ATP-dependent chaperonin complex that folds cytosolic proteins. A small-molecule activator of HSF1, HSF1A, protects cells from stress-induced apoptosis, binds TRiC subunits in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits TRiC activity without perturbation of ATP hydrolysis. Genetic inactivation or depletion of the TRiC complex results in human HSF1 activation, and HSF1A inhibits the direct interaction between purified TRiC and HSF1 in vitro. These results demonstrate a direct regulatory interaction between the cytosolic chaperone machine and a critical transcription factor that protects cells from proteotoxicity, providing a mechanistic basis for signaling perturbations in protein folding to a stress-protective transcription factor. PMID:25437552

  4. Identification of the transcription factor ZEB1 as a central component of the adipogenic gene regulatory network

    PubMed Central

    Gubelmann, Carine; Schwalie, Petra C; Raghav, Sunil K; Röder, Eva; Delessa, Tenagne; Kiehlmann, Elke; Waszak, Sebastian M; Corsinotti, Andrea; Udin, Gilles; Holcombe, Wiebke; Rudofsky, Gottfried; Trono, Didier; Wolfrum, Christian; Deplancke, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a key determinant of whole body metabolism and energy homeostasis. Unraveling the regulatory mechanisms underlying adipogenesis is therefore highly relevant from a biomedical perspective. Our current understanding of fat cell differentiation is centered on the transcriptional cascades driven by the C/EBP protein family and the master regulator PPARγ. To elucidate further components of the adipogenic gene regulatory network, we performed a large-scale transcription factor (TF) screen overexpressing 734 TFs in mouse pre-adipocytes and probed their effect on differentiation. We identified 22 novel pro-adipogenic TFs and characterized the top ranking TF, ZEB1, as being essential for adipogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, its expression levels correlate with fat cell differentiation potential in humans. Genomic profiling further revealed that this TF directly targets and controls the expression of most early and late adipogenic regulators, identifying ZEB1 as a central transcriptional component of fat cell differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03346.001 PMID:25163748

  5. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Read, Timothy; Richmond, Phillip A.; Dowell, Robin D.

    2016-01-01

    Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s) that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant. PMID:26751950

  6. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance, and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils, and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite, on the other hand, can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer to the other inductor. Ferrite being a heavy compound of iron increases the inductor weight significantly and needs to be added judiciously. Four zones have been identified in the paper, which shows different sensitivity to addition of ferrite in terms of the two inductances and coupling factor. Simulation and measurement results are presented for different air gaps between the coils and at different gap distances between the ferrite base and added ferrite. This paper is beneficial in improving the coupling factor while adding minimum weight to wireless power transfer system.

  7. Calcifying nanoparticles (nanobacteria): an additional potential factor for urolithiasis in space flight crews.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeffrey A; Ciftcioglu, Neva; Schmid, Josef F; Barr, Yael R; Griffith, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced microgravity appears to be a risk factor for the development of urinary calculi, resulting in urolithiasis during and after spaceflight. Calcifying nanoparticles, or nanobacteria, multiply more rapidly in simulated microgravity and create external shells of calcium phosphate. The question arises whether calcifying nanoparticles are nidi for calculi and contribute to the development of clinically significant urolithiasis in those who are predisposed to the development of urinary calculi because of intrinsic or extrinsic factors. This case report describes a calculus recovered after flight from an astronaut that, on morphologic and immunochemical analysis (including specific monoclonal antibody staining), demonstrated characteristics of calcifying nanoparticles. PMID:18718644

  8. Asynchronous combinatorial action of four regulatory factors activates Bcl11b for T cell commitment.

    PubMed

    Kueh, Hao Yuan; Yui, Mary A; Ng, Kenneth K H; Pease, Shirley S; Zhang, Jingli A; Damle, Sagar S; Freedman, George; Siu, Sharmayne; Bernstein, Irwin D; Elowitz, Michael B; Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-08-01

    During T cell development, multipotent progenitors relinquish competence for other fates and commit to the T cell lineage by turning on Bcl11b, which encodes a transcription factor. To clarify lineage commitment mechanisms, we followed developing T cells at the single-cell level using Bcl11b knock-in fluorescent reporter mice. Notch signaling and Notch-activated transcription factors collaborate to activate Bcl11b expression irrespectively of Notch-dependent proliferation. These inputs work via three distinct, asynchronous mechanisms: an early locus 'poising' function dependent on TCF-1 and GATA-3, a stochastic-permissivity function dependent on Notch signaling, and a separate amplitude-control function dependent on Runx1, a factor already present in multipotent progenitors. Despite their necessity for Bcl11b expression, these inputs act in a stage-specific manner, providing a multitiered mechanism for developmental gene regulation. PMID:27376470

  9. Hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein-5A activates sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c through transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Zhonghua; Qiao, Ling; Zhou, Yan; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Liu, Qiang

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} A chimeric subgenomic HCV replicon expresses HCV-3a NS5A in an HCV-1b backbone. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A increases mature SREBP-1c protein level. {yields} HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription. {yields} Domain II of HCV-3a NS5A is more effective in SREBP-1c promoter activation. {yields} Transcription factor Sp1 is required for SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A. -- Abstract: Steatosis is an important clinical manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated steatosis are not well understood. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a key transcription factor which activates the transcription of lipogenic genes. Here we showed that the nuclear, mature SREBP-1c level increases in the nucleus of replicon cells expressing HCV-3a nonstructural protein-5A (NS5A). We further showed that HCV-3a NS5A up-regulates SREBP-1c transcription. Additional analysis showed that transcriptional factor Sp1 is involved in SREBP-1c activation by HCV-3a NS5A because inhibition of Sp1 activity by mithramycin A or a dominant-negative Sp1 construct abrogated SREBP-1c promoter activation by HCV-3a NS5A. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated enhanced binding of Sp1 on the SREBP-1c promoter in HCV-3a NS5A replicon cells. These results showed that HCV-3a NS5A activates SREBP-1c transcription through Sp1. Taken together, our results suggest that HCV-3a NS5A is a contributing factor for steatosis caused by HCV-3a infection.

  10. Control of the Streptomyces Subtilisin Inhibitor Gene by AdpA in the A-Factor Regulatory Cascade in Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Setsu; Kato, Jun-ya; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2006-01-01

    AdpA in the A-factor regulatory cascade in Streptomyces griseus activates a number of genes required for secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation, forming an AdpA regulon. The Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor (SSI) gene, sgiA, in S. griseus was transcribed in response to AdpA, showing that sgiA is a member of the AdpA regulon. AdpA bound a single site upstream of the sgiA promoter at approximately position −70 with respect to its transcriptional start point. Mutational analysis of the AdpA-binding site showed that the AdpA-binding site was essential for transcriptional activation. Mutants in which sgiA was disrupted had higher trypsin, chymotrypsin, metalloendopeptidase, and total protease activities than the wild-type strain, which showed that SgiA modulated the activities of these extracellularly produced proteases. Because a number of genes encoding chymotrypsins, trypsins, and metalloendopeptidases, most of which are SSI-sensitive proteases, are also under the control of AdpA, the A-factor regulatory cascade was thought to play a crucial role in modulating the extracellular protease activities by triggering simultaneous production of the proteases and their inhibitor at a specific timing during growth. Mutants in which sgiA was disrupted grew normally and formed aerial hyphae and spores with the same time course as the wild-type strain. However, exogenous addition of purified SgiA to substrate mycelium grown on agar medium resulted in a delay in aerial mycelium formation, indicating that SgiA is involved in aerial hypha formation in conjunction with proteases. PMID:16923887

  11. Control of the Streptomyces Subtilisin inhibitor gene by AdpA in the A-factor regulatory cascade in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Setsu; Kato, Jun-ya; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2006-09-01

    AdpA in the A-factor regulatory cascade in Streptomyces griseus activates a number of genes required for secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation, forming an AdpA regulon. The Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor (SSI) gene, sgiA, in S. griseus was transcribed in response to AdpA, showing that sgiA is a member of the AdpA regulon. AdpA bound a single site upstream of the sgiA promoter at approximately position -70 with respect to its transcriptional start point. Mutational analysis of the AdpA-binding site showed that the AdpA-binding site was essential for transcriptional activation. Mutants in which sgiA was disrupted had higher trypsin, chymotrypsin, metalloendopeptidase, and total protease activities than the wild-type strain, which showed that SgiA modulated the activities of these extracellularly produced proteases. Because a number of genes encoding chymotrypsins, trypsins, and metalloendopeptidases, most of which are SSI-sensitive proteases, are also under the control of AdpA, the A-factor regulatory cascade was thought to play a crucial role in modulating the extracellular protease activities by triggering simultaneous production of the proteases and their inhibitor at a specific timing during growth. Mutants in which sgiA was disrupted grew normally and formed aerial hyphae and spores with the same time course as the wild-type strain. However, exogenous addition of purified SgiA to substrate mycelium grown on agar medium resulted in a delay in aerial mycelium formation, indicating that SgiA is involved in aerial hypha formation in conjunction with proteases. PMID:16923887

  12. Interferon regulatory factor 3 is a key regulation factor for inducing the expression of SAMHD1 in antiviral innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shen; Zhan, Yuan; Zhou, Yanjun; Jiang, Yifeng; Zheng, Xuchen; Yu, Lingxue; Tong, Wu; Gao, Fei; Li, Liwei; Huang, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhiyong; Tong, Guangzhi

    2016-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a type I interferon (IFN) inducible host innate immunity restriction factor that inhibits an early step of the viral life cycle. The underlying mechanisms of SAMHD1 transcriptional regulation remains elusive. Here, we report that inducing SAMHD1 upregulation is part of an early intrinsic immune response via TLR3 and RIG-I/MDA5 agonists that ultimately induce the nuclear translocation of the interferon regulation factor 3 (IRF3) protein. Further studies show that IRF3 plays a major role in upregulating endogenous SAMHD1 expression in a mechanism that is independent of the classical IFN-induced JAK-STAT pathway. Both overexpression and activation of IRF3 enhanced the SAMHD1 promoter luciferase activity, and activated IRF3 was necessary for upregulating SAMHD1 expression in a type I IFN cascade. We also show that the SAMHD1 promoter is a direct target of IRF3 and an IRF3 binding site is sufficient to render this promoter responsive to stimulation. Collectively, these findings indicate that upregulation of endogenous SAMHD1 expression is attributed to the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IRF3 and we suggest that type I IFN induction and induced SAMHD1 expression are coordinated. PMID:27411355

  13. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  14. Distinct Roles of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded Viral Interferon Regulatory Factors in Inflammatory Response and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baresova, Petra; Pitha, Paula M.

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). Similar to other herpesviruses, KSHV has two life cycles, latency and lytic replication. In latency, the KSHV genome persists as a circular episome in the nucleus of the host cell and only a few viral genes are expressed. In this review, we focus on oncogenic, antiapoptotic, and immunomodulating properties of KSHV-encoded homologues of cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs)—viral IRF1 (vIRF1) to vIRF4—and their possible role in the KSHV-mediated antiviral response, apoptosis, and oncogenicity. PMID:23785197

  15. Interferon regulatory factor-8 modulates the development of tumour-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Trina J; Greeneltch, Kristy M; Reid, Julia E; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Liu, Kebin; Abrams, Scott I

    2009-09-01

    Tumour-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote immune suppression and mediate tumour progression. However, the molecular basis for the generation of MDSC, which in mice co-express the CD11b(+) and Gr-1(+) cell surface markers remains unclear. Because CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells expand during progressive tumour growth, this suggests that tumour-induced events alter signalling pathways that affect normal myeloid cell development. Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8), a member of the IFN-gamma regulatory factor family, is essential for normal myelopoiesis. We therefore examined whether IRF-8 modulated tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cell development or accumulation using both implantable (4T1) and transgenic (MMTV-PyMT) mouse models of mammary tumour growth. In the 4T1 model, both splenic and bone marrow-derived CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells of tumour-bearing mice displayed a marked reduction in IRF-8 expression compared to control populations. A causal link between IRF-8 expression and the emergence of tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells was explored in vivo using a double transgenic (dTg) mouse model designed to express transgenes for both IRF-8 and mammary carcinoma development. Despite the fact that tumour growth was unaffected, splenomegaly, as well as the frequencies and absolute numbers of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells were significantly lower in dTg mice when compared with single transgenic tumour-bearing mice. Overall, these data reveal that IRF-8 plays an important role in tumour-induced development and/or accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells, and establishes a molecular basis for the potential manipulation of these myeloid populations for cancer therapy. PMID:20196788

  16. Factor analysis models for structuring covariance matrices of additive genetic effects: a Bayesian implementation

    PubMed Central

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Gianola, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Multivariate linear models are increasingly important in quantitative genetics. In high dimensional specifications, factor analysis (FA) may provide an avenue for structuring (co)variance matrices, thus reducing the number of parameters needed for describing (co)dispersion. We describe how FA can be used to model genetic effects in the context of a multivariate linear mixed model. An orthogonal common factor structure is used to model genetic effects under Gaussian assumption, so that the marginal likelihood is multivariate normal with a structured genetic (co)variance matrix. Under standard prior assumptions, all fully conditional distributions have closed form, and samples from the joint posterior distribution can be obtained via Gibbs sampling. The model and the algorithm developed for its Bayesian implementation were used to describe five repeated records of milk yield in dairy cattle, and a one common FA model was compared with a standard multiple trait model. The Bayesian Information Criterion favored the FA model. PMID:17897592

  17. Hormonal regulatory role of eyestalk factors on growth of heart in mud crab, Scylla serrata

    PubMed Central

    Allayie, Sartaj Ahmad; Ravichandran, S.; Bhat, Bilal Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The present study was attempted to know the growth regulation of eyestalk factors on the growth of heart in Scylla serrata using eyestalk extractions and bilateral eyestalk ablations. The bilateral eyestalk ablation led to the maximum growth indices of the heart ((H) indices) to 0.162 and 0.158 in ablated male and female, respectively, in comparison to 0.153 and 0.167 in the control male and female and 0.147 and 0.157 in injected male and female, respectively. The data have shown that the heart of male crabs grows faster than female crabs. The study has also shown that bilateral eyestalk ablation resulted in a significant increase in the heart indices in males and has least effect on the growth of the female heart. The results presented strongly support a potential role of the eyestalk factors and molting hormone regulating the growth of the heart in S. serrata. PMID:23961136

  18. Regulatory roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced proteins (TNFAIPs) 3 and 9 in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Isao; Inoue, Asuka; Takai, Chinatsu; Umeda, Naoto; Tanaka, Yuki; Kurashima, Yuko; Sumida, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) have proved to be important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) because the outcome of RA has greatly improved with the recent availability of biologics targeting them. It is well accepted that these cytokines are involved in the activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway, but our understanding of the dependency of these pro-inflammatory cytokines and the link between them in RA is currently limited. Recently, we and others proved the importance of TNFα-induced protein (TNFAIP), due to the spontaneous development of arthritis in deficient animals that are dependent on IL-6. To date, nine TNFAIPs have been identified, and TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP9 were found to be clearly associated with mouse and human arthritis. In this review, we compare and discuss recent TNFAIP topics, especially focusing on TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP9 in autoimmune arthritis in mice and humans. PMID:24704577

  19. Genome-wide targeting of the epigenetic regulatory protein CTCF to gene promoters by the transcription factor TFII-I

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Hernández, Rodrigo; Marques, Maud; Hilmi, Khalid; Zhao, Teijun; Saad, Amine; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; del Rincon, Sonia V.; Ashworth, Todd; Roy, Ananda L.; Emerson, Beverly M.; Witcher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a key regulator of nuclear chromatin structure and gene regulation. The impact of CTCF on transcriptional output is highly varied, ranging from repression to transcriptional pausing and transactivation. The multifunctional nature of CTCF may be directed solely through remodeling chromatin architecture. However, another hypothesis is that the multifunctional nature of CTCF is mediated, in part, through differential association with protein partners having unique functions. Consistent with this hypothesis, our mass spectrometry analyses of CTCF interacting partners reveal a previously undefined association with the transcription factor general transcription factor II-I (TFII-I). Biochemical fractionation of CTCF indicates that a distinct CTCF complex incorporating TFII-I is assembled on DNA. Unexpectedly, we found that the interaction between CTCF and TFII-I is essential for directing CTCF to the promoter proximal regulatory regions of target genes across the genome, particularly at genes involved in metabolism. At genes coregulated by CTCF and TFII-I, we find knockdown of TFII-I results in diminished CTCF binding, lack of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) recruitment, and an attenuation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation at serine 5. Phenotypically, knockdown of TFII-I alters the cellular response to metabolic stress. Our data indicate that TFII-I directs CTCF binding to target genes, and in turn the two proteins cooperate to recruit CDK8 and enhance transcription initiation. PMID:25646466

  20. Regulatory role of the 90-kDa-heat-shock protein (Hsp90) and associated factors on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Erlejman, Alejandra G; Lagadari, Mariana; Toneatto, Judith; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Galigniana, Mario D

    2014-02-01

    The term molecular chaperone was first used to describe the ability of nucleoplasmin to prevent the aggregation of histones with DNA during the assembly of nucleosomes. Subsequently, the name was extended to proteins that mediate the post-translational assembly of oligomeric complexes protecting them from denaturation and/or aggregation. Hsp90 is a 90-kDa molecular chaperone that represents the major soluble protein of the cell. In contrast to most conventional chaperones, Hsp90 functions as a refined sensor of protein function and its principal role in the cell is to facilitate biological activity to properly folded client proteins that already have a preserved tertiary structure. Consequently, Hsp90 is related to basic cell functions such as cytoplasmic transport of soluble proteins, translocation of client proteins to organelles, and regulation of the biological activity of key signaling factors such as protein kinases, ubiquitin ligases, steroid receptors, cell cycle regulators, and transcription factors. A growing amount of evidence links the protective action of this molecular chaperone to mechanisms related to posttranslational modifications of soluble nuclear factors as well as histones. In this article, we discuss some aspects of the regulatory action of Hsp90 on transcriptional regulation and how this effect could have impacted genetic assimilation mechanism in some organisms. PMID:24389346

  1. MicroRNA-23a downregulates the expression of interferon regulatory factor-1 in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yihe; Liang, Zhihai; Du, Qiang; Yang, Muqing; Geller, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a tumor-suppressor gene induced by interferon-γ (IFNγ) and plays an important role in the cell death of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC tumors evade death in part by downregulating IRF-1 expression, yet the molecular mechanisms accounting for IRF-1 suppression in HCC have not yet been characterized. Previous studies have shown that microRNA-23a (miR-23a) can suppress apoptosis by targeting IRF-1. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-23a promotes HCC growth by down-regulating IRF-1. For the in vivo studies, 7 cases of resected HCC and adjacent liver samples were analyzed. For the in vitro studies, IRF-1 mRNA and protein were examined in HepG2 and Huh-7 HCC cells after IFNγ stimulation by real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. To determine the role of miR-23a in regulating IRF-1, HepG2 cells were transfected with an miR-23a mimic or inhibitor, and IRF-1 expression was examined. Binding of miR-23a was assessed by cloning the 528-bp human IRF-1 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR) into luciferase reporter plasmid pMIR-IRF-1-3′UTR. The results showed that IRF-1 mRNA expression was down-regulated in the human HCC tumor tissues compared to that in the adjacent background liver tissues. IFNγ-induced IRF-1 protein was less in the HepG2 tumor cells compared to that in the primary human hepatocytes. miR-23a expression was inversely correlated with IRF-1, and addition of the miR-23a inhibitor increased basal IRF-1 mRNA and protein. Likewise, the miR-23a mimic downregulated IFNγ-induced IRF-1 protein expression, while the miR-23a inhibitor increased IRF-1. Furthermore, the miR-23a mimic repressed IRF-1-3′UTR reporter activity, while the miR-23a inhibitor increased the reporter activity. These results demonstrated that IRF-1 expression is downregulated in human HCC tumors compared to that noted in the background liver. miR-23a downregulates the expression of IRF-1 in HCC cells, and the IRF-1 3′UTR has an miR-23a

  2. MicroRNA-23a downregulates the expression of interferon regulatory factor-1 in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yihe; Liang, Zhihai; Du, Qiang; Yang, Muqing; Geller, David A

    2016-08-01

    Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is a tumor-suppressor gene induced by interferon-γ (IFNγ) and plays an important role in the cell death of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC tumors evade death in part by downregulating IRF-1 expression, yet the molecular mechanisms accounting for IRF-1 suppression in HCC have not yet been characterized. Previous studies have shown that microRNA-23a (miR-23a) can suppress apoptosis by targeting IRF-1. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-23a promotes HCC growth by downregulating IRF-1. For the in vivo studies, 7 cases of resected HCC and adjacent liver samples were analyzed. For the in vitro studies, IRF-1 mRNA and protein were examined in HepG2 and Huh-7 HCC cells after IFNγ stimulation by real-time PCR and western blotting, respectively. To determine the role of miR-23a in regulating IRF-1, HepG2 cells were transfected with an miR-23a mimic or inhibitor, and IRF-1 expression was examined. Binding of miR-23a was assessed by cloning the 528-bp human IRF-1 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) into luciferase reporter plasmid pMIR-IRF-1-3'UTR. The results showed that IRF-1 mRNA expression was downregulated in the human HCC tumor tissues compared to that in the adjacent background liver tissues. IFNγ-induced IRF-1 protein was less in the HepG2 tumor cells compared to that in the primary human hepatocytes. miR-23a expression was inversely correlated with IRF-1, and addition of the miR-23a inhibitor increased basal IRF-1 mRNA and protein. Likewise, the miR-23a mimic downregulated IFNγ-induced IRF-1 protein expression, while the miR-23a inhibitor increased IRF-1. Furthermore, the miR-23a mimic repressed IRF-1-3'UTR reporter activity, while the miR-23a inhibitor increased the reporter activity. These results demonstrated that IRF-1 expression is downregulated in human HCC tumors compared to that noted in the background liver. miR-23a downregulates the expression of IRF-1 in HCC cells, and the IRF-1 3'UTR has an miR‑23a binding

  3. T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokine production by mast cells: a key factor in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mai; Sato, Yasuharu; Ohno, Kyotaro; Tanaka, Satoshi; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Gion, Yuka; Orita, Yorihisa; Ito, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Tomoyasu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic disorder with unique clinicopathological features and uncertain etiological features and is frequently related to allergic disease. T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokines have been reported to be upregulated in the affected tissues; thus, the production of these cytokines by T helper 2 and regulatory T cells has been suggested as an important factor in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease. However, it is not yet clear which cells produce these cytokines in IgG4-related disease, and some aspects of the disorder cannot be completely explained by T-cell-related processes. To address this, we analyzed paraffin-embedded sections of tissues from nine cases of IgG4-related submandibular gland disease, five cases of submandibular sialolithiasis, and six cases of normal submandibular gland in order to identify potential key players in the pathogenesis of IgG4-related disease. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the significant upregulation of interleukin (IL)4, IL10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) in IgG4-related disease. Interestingly, immunohistochemical studies indicated the presence of mast cells expressing these cytokines in diseased tissues. In addition, dual immunofluorescence assays identified cells that were double-positive for each cytokine and for KIT, which is expressed by mast cells. In contrast, the distribution of T cells did not correlate with cytokine distribution in affected tissues. We also found that the mast cells were strongly positive for IgE. This observation supports the hypothesis that mast cells are involved in IgG4-related disease, as mast cells are known to be closely related to allergic reactions and are activated in the presence of elevated non-specific IgE levels. In conclusion, our results indicate that mast cells produce T helper 2 and regulatory T-cell cytokines in tissues affected by IgG4-related disease and possibly have an important role in disease

  4. Additive relationship between serum fibroblast growth factor 21 level and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Expression and activity of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 hormone-like protein are associated with development of several metabolic disorders. This study was designed to investigate whether serum FGF21 level was also associated with the metabolic syndrome-related cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, and its clinical features in a Chinese cohort. Methods Two-hundred-and-fifty-three subjects visiting the Cardiology Department (Sixth People's Hospital affiliated to Shanghai JiaoTong University) were examined by coronary arteriography (to diagnose coronary artery disease (CAD)) and hepatic ultrasonography (to diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)). Serum FGF21 level was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and analyzed for correlation to subject and clinical characteristics. The independent factors of CAD were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Subjects with NAFLD showed significantly higher serum FGF21 than those without NAFLD (388.0 pg/mL (253.0-655.4) vs. 273.3 pg/mL (164.9-383.7), P < 0.01). Subjects with CAD showed significantly higher serum FGF21, regardless of NAFLD diagnosis (P < 0.05). Serum FGF21 level significantly elevated with the increasing number of metabolic disorders (P for trend < 0.01). After adjustment of age, sex, and BMI, FGF21 was positively correlated with total cholesterol (P < 0.05) and triglyceride (P < 0.01). FGF21 was identified as an independent factor of CAD (odds ratio = 2.984, 95% confidence interval: 1.014-8.786, P < 0.05). Conclusions Increased level of serum FGF21 is associated with NAFLD, metabolic disorders and CAD. PMID:23981342

  5. Homologous pairs of regulatory proteins control activity of Bacillus subtilis transcription factor sigma(b) in response to environmental stress.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, C M; Brody, M S; Akbar, S; Yang, X; Price, C W

    1996-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, activity of the general stress transcription factor sigma B is controlled posttranslationally by a regulatory network that transmits signals of environmental and metabolic stress. These signals include heat, ethanol, or osmotic challenge, or a sharp decrease in cellular energy levels, and all ultimately control sigma B activity by influencing the binding decision of the RsbW anti-sigma factor. In the absence of stress, RsbW binds to sigma B and prevents its association with RNA polymerase core enzyme. However, following stress, RsbW binds instead to the RsbV anti-anti-sigma factor, thereby releasing sigma B to direct transcription of its target genes. These two principal regulators of sigmaB activity are encoded in the eight-gene sigB operon, which has the gene order rsbR-rsbS-rsbT-rsbU-rsbV-rsbW-sig B-rsbX (where rsb stands for regulator of sigma B). Notably, the predicted rsbS product has significant amino acid identity to the RsbV anti-anti-sigma factor and the predicted rsbT product resembles the RsbW anti-sigma factor. To determine the roles of rsbS and rsbT, null or missense mutations were constructed in the chromosomal copies or each and tested for their effects on expression of a sigma B-dependent reporter fusion. On the basis of this genetic analysis, our principal conclusions are that (i) the rsbS product is a negative regulator of or" activity, (ii) the rsbT product is a positive regulator, (iii) RsbS requires RsbT for function, and (iv) the RsbS-RsbT and RsbV-RsbW pairs act hierarchically by a common mechanism in which key protein-protein interactions are controlled by phosphorylation events. PMID:8682789

  6. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program? 359.32 Section 359.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND...

  7. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program? 359.32 Section 359.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND...

  8. 34 CFR 359.32 - What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What additional factors does the Secretary consider in making a grant under this program? 359.32 Section 359.32 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DISABILITY AND...

  9. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  10. ZmGRF, a GA regulatory factor from maize, promotes flowering and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miaoyun; Lu, Yunming; Yang, Hongmei; He, Jingcheng; Hu, Zhiqiu; Hu, Xiaolong; Luan, Mingda; Zhang, Lan; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors that act as positive regulators of gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic genes in plants are not well understood. A nuclear-localized basic leucine zipper transcription factor, ZmGRF, was isolated from maize. The core DNA sequence motif recognized for binding by ZmGRF was CCANNTGGC. ZmGRF overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants promoted flowering, stem elongation, and cell expansion. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ZmGRF bound directly to the cis-element CCANNTGGC in the promoter of the Arabidopsis ent-kaurene oxidase (AtKO1) gene and promoted AtKO1 expression. GA4 content increased by 372-567% in transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing ZmGRF compared to wild-type control plants. The GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF1 gene, which encodes a GA receptor, was also upregulated and the growth-repressing DELLA protein gene GA INSENSITIVE was downregulated. Our results showed ZmGRF functioned through the GA-signaling pathway. PMID:25477078

  11. Regulatory role of neuron-restrictive silencing factor in expression of TRPC1

    SciTech Connect

    Ohba, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Nakayama, Shinnsuke; Satoh, Eisaku; Iino, Kenji; Sasano, Hironobu; Mori, Yasuo; Kuromitsu, Sadao; Imagawa, Keiichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Iijima, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroshi; Murakami, Manabu . E-mail: mmura0123@hotmail.co.jp

    2006-12-22

    Neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) binds its consensus element to repress the transcription of various genes. The dominant-negative form (dnNRSF) has a hypertrophic effect on cardiogenesis through an unidentified mechanism. We examined the involvement of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel proteins, using transgenic mice overexpressing dnNRSF (dnNRSF mice). Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays revealed an interaction between NRSF and a neuron-restrictive silencer element-like sequence in intron 4 of TRPC1 genomic DNA. According to RT-PCR and Western analyses, TRPC1 was up-regulated in dnNRSF mouse heart. Transient overexpression of TRPC1 in HEK 293T cells increased the activity of the nuclear factor in activated T cells (NFAT) promoter and stimulated store-operated Ca{sup 2+} channel (SOCC)-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry. Transfection of TRPC1 into primary cardiomyocytes increased NFAT activity, indicating a major role for TRPC1 in NFAT activation. Our findings strongly suggest that NRSF regulates TRP1 gene expression and causes changes in the levels of calcium entry through SOCCs.

  12. Additional thyroid dose factor from transportation sources in Russia after the Chernobyl disaster.

    PubMed Central

    Parshkov, E M; Chebotareva, I V; Sokolov, V A; Dallas, C E

    1997-01-01

    Beginning approximately 4 years after the Chernobyl nuclear accident a steady increase in the incidence of thyroid cancer was observed in children and adolescents of the Bryansk Oblast, which received the highest level of radionuclide contaminants in Russia. We examined the spatial relationship between the residence location of patients with identified thyroid cancer (0-18 years old at the time of the accident) and a number of geographic parameters to better account for the etiology of thyroid cancer spatial distribution. Geographic parameters analyzed included spatial distribution of 137Cs and 131I in soil, population demographics, measurements and reconstructions. of absorbed thyroid 131I doses in the population, and maps of major transportation arteries. An interesting finding is the lack of a consistent correlation between the spatial distribution of radionuclides in the soil and thyroid cancer incidence. Instead, most of the thyroid cancer cases were diagnosed in settlements situated on major railways and roads. Correlating population with thyroid cancer cases and transportation arteries reveals a much higher cancer rate on or near major roads and railways than at a distance from them, again independent of radionuclide soil concentration. There are other important factors, of course, that must be considered in future evaluations of this phenomenon. These include the influence of iodine endemic zones, genetic predisposition to thyroid cancer, and duration of residence time in contaminated areas. The feasibility of radionuclide transport on railways and roads is discussed, together with the vectors for transfer of the contaminants to the human population. Developing a model to reconstruct the radiation dose to the thyroid over time in this geographic region is proposed in light of the impact of transportation arteries. Specific studies are outlined to provide the data necessary to develop this model as well as to better characterize the feasibility and

  13. Regulatory role of the OsWOX3A transcription factor in rice root development.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Hwan; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2016-06-01

    WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) transcription factors play important roles in cell fate determination during plant development and function in the signaling pathways of phytohormones such as gibberellic acid (GA). In a recent study, we demonstrated that OsWOX3A directly binds to the promoter of the KAO gene, which encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase, an enzyme involved in GA biosynthesis, and represses KAO expression. Interestingly, we observed that OsWOX3A overexpression causes not only severe dwarfism, but also an increase in the number of lateral roots. Moreover, the expression of PIN-FORMED 1 (PIN1), involved in polar auxin transport, is significantly upregulated in OsWOX3A-OX plants. These findings indicate that OsWOX3A may be involved in modulation of GA-auxin crosstalk in rice root development. PMID:27171233

  14. Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor Proteome Reveals Chromatin-Regulatory Partners

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca, Rocío; Shoemaker, Christopher J.; Gucek, Marjan; Cole, Robert N.; Wilson, Katherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear lamin filaments and associated proteins form a nucleoskeletal (“lamina”) network required for transcription, replication, chromatin organization and epigenetic regulation in metazoans. Lamina defects cause human disease (“laminopathies”) and are linked to aging. Barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) is a mobile and essential component of the nuclear lamina that binds directly to histones, lamins and LEM-domain proteins, including the inner nuclear membrane protein emerin, and has roles in chromatin structure, mitosis and gene regulation. To understand BAF's mechanisms of action, BAF associated proteins were affinity-purified from HeLa cell nuclear lysates using BAF-conjugated beads, and identified by tandem mass spectrometry or independently identified and quantified using the iTRAQ method. We recovered A- and B-type lamins and core histones, all known to bind BAF directly, plus four human transcription factors (Requiem, NonO, p15, LEDGF), disease-linked proteins (e.g., Huntingtin, Treacle) and several proteins and enzymes that regulate chromatin. Association with endogenous BAF was independently validated by co-immunoprecipitation from HeLa cells for seven candidates including Requiem, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), retinoblastoma binding protein 4 (RBBP4), damage-specific DNA binding protein 1 (DDB1) and DDB2. Interestingly, endogenous BAF and emerin each associated with DDB2 and CUL4A in a UV- and time-dependent manner, suggesting BAF and emerin have dynamic roles in genome integrity and might help couple DNA damage responses to the nuclear lamina network. We conclude this proteome is a rich source of candidate partners for BAF and potentially also A- and B-type lamins, which may reveal how chromatin regulation and genome integrity are linked to nuclear structure. PMID:19759913

  15. Density and Duration of Pneumococcal Carriage Is Maintained by Transforming Growth Factor β1 and T Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coward, William R.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Richards, Luke; Garcia-Garcia, Francesc J.; Dotor, Javier; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a prerequisite for invasive disease, but the majority of carriage episodes are asymptomatic and self-resolving. Interactions determining the development of carriage versus invasive disease are poorly understood but will influence the effectiveness of vaccines or therapeutics that disrupt nasal colonization. Objectives: We sought to elucidate immunological mechanisms underlying noninvasive pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage. Methods: Pneumococcal interactions with human nasopharyngeal and bronchial fibroblasts and epithelial cells were investigated in vitro. A murine model of nasopharyngeal carriage and an experimental human pneumococcal challenge model were used to characterize immune responses in the airways during carriage. Measurements and Main Results: We describe the previously unknown immunological basis of noninvasive carriage and highlight mechanisms whose perturbation may lead to invasive disease. We identify the induction of active transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 by S. pneumoniae in human host cells and highlight the key role for TGF-β1 and T regulatory cells in the establishment and maintenance of nasopharyngeal carriage in mice and humans. We identify the ability of pneumococci to drive TGF-β1 production from nasopharyngeal cells in vivo and show that an immune tolerance profile, characterized by elevated TGF-β1 and high nasopharyngeal T regulatory cell numbers, is crucial for prolonged carriage of pneumococci. Blockade of TGF-β1 signaling prevents prolonged carriage and leads to clearance of pneumococci from the nasopharynx. Conclusions: These data explain the mechanisms by which S. pneumoniae colonize the human nasopharynx without inducing damaging host inflammation and provide insight into the role of bacterial and host constituents that allow and maintain carriage. PMID:24749506

  16. Suppression of preoptic sleep-regulatory neuronal activity during corticotropin-releasing factor-induced sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gvilia, Irma; Suntsova, Natalia; Kumar, Sunil; McGinty, Dennis; Szymusiak, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is implicated in sleep and arousal regulation. Exogenous CRF causes sleep suppression that is associated with activation of at least two important arousal systems: pontine noradrenergic and hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons. It is not known whether CRF also impacts sleep-promoting neuronal systems. We hypothesized that CRF-mediated changes in wake and sleep involve decreased activity of hypothalamic sleep-regulatory neurons localized in the preoptic area. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of CRF on sleep-wake measures and c-Fos expression in GABAergic neurons in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPN) and ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) in different experimental conditions. Administration of CRF (0.1 nmol) during baseline rest phase led to delayed sleep onset and decreases in total amount and mean duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Administration of CRF during acute sleep deprivation (SD) resulted in suppression of recovery sleep and decreased c-Fos expression in MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons. Compared with vehicle controls, intracerebroventricular CRF potentiated disturbances of both NREM and REM sleep in rats exposed to a species-specific psychological stressor, the dirty cage of a male conspecific. The number of MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons expressing c-Fos was reduced in the CRF-treated group of dirty cage-exposed rats. These findings confirm the involvement of CRF in wake-sleep cycle regulation and suggest that increased CRF signaling in the brain 1) negatively affects homeostatic responses to sleep loss, 2) exacerbates stress-induced disturbances of sleep, and 3) suppresses the activity of sleep-regulatory neurons of the MnPN and VLPO. PMID:26333784

  17. Maternal Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 is required for the differentiation of primary superficial epithelia in Danio and Xenopus embryos

    PubMed Central

    Sabel, Jaime L.; d’Alençon, Claudia; O’Brien, Erin K.; Van Otterloo, Eric; Lutz, Katie; Cuykendall, Tawny N.; Schutte, Brian C.; Houston, Douglas W.; Cornell, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Early in the development of animal embryos, superficial cells of the blastula form a distinct lineage and adopt an epithelial morphology. In different animals, the fate of these primary superficial epithelial (PSE) cells varies, and it is unclear whether pathways governing segregation of blastomeres into the PSE lineage are conserved. Mutations in the gene encoding Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) are associated with syndromic and non-syndromic forms of cleft lip and palate, consistent with a role for Irf6 in development of oral epithelia, and mouse Irf6 targeted null mutant embryos display abnormal differentiation of oral epithelia and skin. In Danio rerio (zebrafish) and Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog) embryos, zygotic irf6 transcripts are present in many epithelial tissues including the presumptive PSE cells and maternal irf6 transcripts are present throughout all cells at the blastula stage. Injection of antisense oligonucleotides with ability to disrupt translation of irf6 transcripts caused little or no effect on development. By contrast, injection of RNA encoding a putative dominant negative Irf6 caused epiboly arrest, loss of gene expression characteristic of the EVL, and rupture of the embryo at late gastrula stage. The dominant negative Irf6 disrupted EVL gene expression in a cell autonomous fashion. These results suggest Irf6 translated in the oocyte or unfertilized egg suffices for early development. Supporting the importance of maternal Irf6, we show that depletion of maternal irf6 transcripts in X. laevis embryos leads to gastrulation defects and rupture of the superficial epithelium. These experiments reveal a conserved role for maternally-encoded Irf6 in differentiation of a simple epithelium in X. laevis and D. rerio. This epithelium constitutes a novel model tissue in which to explore the Irf6 regulatory pathway. PMID:19013452

  18. Identification of cis-regulatory modules in promoters of human genes exploiting mutual positioning of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Soumyadeep; Blais, Alexandre; Ioshikhes, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    In higher organisms, gene regulation is controlled by the interplay of non-random combinations of multiple transcription factors (TFs). Although numerous attempts have been made to identify these combinations, important details, such as mutual positioning of the factors that have an important role in the TF interplay, are still missing. The goal of the present work is in silico mapping of some of such associating factors based on their mutual positioning, using computational screening. We have selected the process of myogenesis as a study case, and we focused on TF combinations involving master myogenic TF Myogenic differentiation (MyoD) with other factors situated at specific distances from it. The results of our work show that some muscle-specific factors occur together with MyoD within the range of ±100 bp in a large number of promoters. We confirm co-occurrence of the MyoD with muscle-specific factors as described in earlier studies. However, we have also found novel relationships of MyoD with other factors not specific for muscle. Additionally, we have observed that MyoD tends to associate with different factors in proximal and distal promoter areas. The major outcome of our study is establishing the genome-wide connection between biological interactions of TFs and close co-occurrence of their binding sites. PMID:23913413

  19. Characterization of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) FoxD5 and its function in regulating myogenic regulatory factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xungang; Zhang, Yuqing; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Peijun; Xu, Yongli

    2012-03-01

    As one member of winged helix domain transcription factors, FoxD5 was reported to be a trunk organizer. Recent study showed that zebrafish foxd5 is expressed in the somites. To further understand the function of FoxD5 in fish muscle development, the FoxD5 gene was isolated from flounder. Its expression pattern was analyzed by in situ hybridization, while its function in regulating myogenic regulatory factor, MyoD, was analyzed by ectopic expression. It showed that flounder FoxD5 was firstly expressed in the tailbud, adaxial cells, and neural plate of the head. In flounder embryo, FoxD5 is expressed not only in forebrain but also in somite cells that will form muscle in the future. When flounder FoxD5 was over-expressed in zebrafish by microinjection, the expression of zebrafish MyoD in the somites was reduced, suggesting that FoxD5 is involved in myogenesis by regulating the expression of MyoD.

  20. Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 promotes differentiation of the periderm by activating expression of Grainyhead-like 3

    PubMed Central

    de la Garza, Gabriel; Schleiffarth, Jack Robert; Dunnwald, Martine; Mankad, Anuj; Weirather, Jason L.; Bonde, Gregory; Butcher, Stephen; Mansour, Tamer A.; Kousa, Youssef A.; Fukazawa, Cindy F.; Houston, Douglas W.; Manak, J. Robert; Schutte, Brian C.; Wagner, Daniel; Cornell, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor 6 (IRF6) is a transcription factor that, in mammals, is required for the differentiation of skin, breast epithelium, and oral epithelium. However, the transcriptional targets that mediate these effects are currently unknown. In zebrafish and frog embryos Irf6 is necessary for differentiation of the embryonic superficial epithelium, or periderm. Here we use microarrays to identify genes that are expressed in the zebrafish periderm and whose expression is inhibited by a dominant-negative variant of Irf6 (dnIrf6). These methods identify Grhl3, an ancient regulator of the epidermal permeability barrier, as acting downstream of Irf6. In human keratinocytes, IRF6 binds conserved elements near the GHRL3 promoter. We show that one of these elements has enhancer activity in human keratinocytes and zebrafish periderm, suggesting that Irf6 directly stimulates Grhl3 expression in these tissues. Simultaneous inhibition of grhl1 and grhl3 disrupts periderm differentiation in zebrafish, and, intriguingly, forced grhl3 expression restores periderm markers in both zebrafish injected with dnIrf6 and frog embryos depleted of Irf6. Finally, in Irf6 deficient mouse embryos, Grhl3 expression in the periderm and oral epithelium is virtually absent. These results indicate that Grhl3 is a key effector of Irf6 in periderm differentiation. PMID:22931925

  1. Polymorphisms in the Tyrosine Kinase 2 and Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 Genes Are Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Nordmark, Gunnel; Göring, Harald H. H.; Lindroos, Katarina; Wiman, Ann-Christin; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Jönsen, Andreas; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Möller, Bozena; Kere, Juha; Koskenmies, Sari; Widén, Elisabeth; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Julkunen, Heikki; Kristjansdottir, Helga; Steinsson, Kristjan; Alm, Gunnar; Rönnblom, Lars; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Genome scans in families with SLE point to multiple potential chromosomal regions that harbor SLE susceptibility genes, and association studies in different populations have suggested several susceptibility alleles for SLE. Increased production of type I interferon (IFN) and expression of IFN-inducible genes is commonly observed in SLE and may be pivotal in the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. We analyzed 44 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 13 genes from the type I IFN pathway in 679 Swedish, Finnish, and Icelandic patients with SLE, in 798 unaffected family members, and in 438 unrelated control individuals for joint linkage and association with SLE. In two of the genes—the tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) and IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) genes—we identified SNPs that displayed strong signals in joint analysis of linkage and association (unadjusted P<10-7) with SLE. TYK2 binds to the type I IFN receptor complex and IRF5 is a regulator of type I IFN gene expression. Thus, our results support a disease mechanism in SLE that involves key components of the type I IFN system. PMID:15657875

  2. Global Identification of SMAD2 Target Genes Reveals a Role for Multiple Co-regulatory Factors in Zebrafish Early Gastrulas*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoting; Lin, Xiwen; Cai, Zhaoping; Zhang, Zhuqiang; Han, Chunsheng; Jia, Shunji; Meng, Anming; Wang, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    Nodal and Smad2/3 signals play pivotal roles in mesendoderm induction and axis determination during late blastulation and early gastrulation in vertebrate embryos. However, Smad2/3 direct target genes during those critical developmental stages have not been systematically identified. Here, through ChIP-chip assay, we show that the promoter/enhancer regions of 679 genes are bound by Smad2 in the zebrafish early gastrulas. Expression analyses confirm that a significant proportion of Smad2 targets are indeed subjected to Nodal/Smad2 regulation at the onset of gastrulation. The co-existence of DNA-binding sites of other transcription factors in the Smad2-bound regions allows the identification of well known Smad2-binding partners, such as FoxH1 and Lef1/β-catenin, as well as many previously unknown Smad2 partners, including Oct1 and Gata6, during embryogenesis. We demonstrate that Oct1 physically associates with and enhances the transcription and mesendodermal induction activity of Smad2, whereas Gata6 exerts an inhibitory role in Smad2 signaling and mesendodermal induction. Thus, our study systemically uncovers a large number of Smad2 targets in early gastrulas and suggests cooperative roles of Smad2 and other transcription factors in controlling target gene transcription, which will be valuable for studying regulatory cascades during germ layer formation and patterning of vertebrate embryos. PMID:21669877

  3. Aitchbone hanging and ageing period are additive factors influencing pork eating quality.

    PubMed

    Channon, H A; Taverner, M R; D'Souza, D N; Warner, R D

    2014-01-01

    The effects of abattoir, carcase weight (60 or 80 kg HCW), hanging method (Achilles or aitchbone) and ageing period (2 or 7 day post-slaughter) on eating quality attributes of pork were investigated in this 3×2×2×2 factorial study. A total of 144 Large White×Landrace female pigs were slaughtered at one of three abattoirs and sides hung from either the Achilles tendon or the aitchbone. After 24 h chilling, loin (M. longissimus thoracis et lumborum) and topside (M. semimembranosus) muscles were individually vacuum packaged and aged for 2 or 7 days post-slaughter. Consumers (n=852) evaluated eating quality. Neither abattoir nor carcase weight influenced tenderness, flavour or overall liking of pork. Improvements in tenderness, flavour and overall liking were found due to aitchbone hanging (P<0.001) and ageing (P<0.001) for 7 days compared with Achilles-hung carcases and pork aged for 2 days, respectively. This study demonstrated that aitchbone hanging and 7 day ageing can improve eating quality, but these effects were additive as the interaction term was not significant. PMID:24013699

  4. An in silico Approach Reveals Associations between Genetic and Epigenetic Factors within Regulatory Elements in B Cells from Primary Sjögren's Syndrome Patients.

    PubMed

    Konsta, Orsia D; Le Dantec, Christelle; Charras, Amandine; Brooks, Wesley H; Arleevskaya, Marina I; Bordron, Anne; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genetics have highlighted several regions and candidate genes associated with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS), a systemic autoimmune epithelitis that combines exocrine gland dysfunctions, and focal lymphocytic infiltrations. In addition to genetic factors, it is now clear that epigenetic deregulations are present during SS and restricted to specific cell type subsets, such as lymphocytes and salivary gland epithelial cells. In this study, 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with 43 SS gene risk factors were selected from publicly available and peer reviewed literature for further in silico analysis. SS risk variant location was tested revealing a broad distribution in coding sequences (5.6%), intronic sequences (55.6%), upstream/downstream genic regions (30.5%), and intergenic regions (8.3%). Moreover, a significant enrichment of regulatory motifs (promoter, enhancer, insulator, DNAse peak, and expression quantitative trait loci) characterizes SS risk variants (94.4%). Next, screening SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (r (2) ≥ 0.8 in Caucasians) revealed 645 new variants including 5 SNPs with missense mutations, and indicated an enrichment of transcriptionally active motifs according to the cell type (B cells > monocytes > T cells ≫ A549). Finally, we looked at SS risk variants for histone markers in B cells (GM12878), monocytes (CD14(+)) and epithelial cells (A548). Active histone markers were associated with SS risk variants at both promoters and enhancers in B cells, and within enhancers in monocytes. In conclusion and based on the obtained in silico results that need further confirmation, associations were observed between SS genetic risk factors and epigenetic factors and these associations predominate in B cells, such as those observed at the FAM167A-BLK locus. PMID:26379672

  5. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  6. Soil Pore Characteristics, an Underappreciated Regulatory Factor in GHGs Emission and C Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toosi, E. R.; Yu, J.; Doane, T. A.; Guber, A.; Rivers, M. L.; Marsh, T. L.; Ali, K.; Kravchenko, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Enduring challenges in understanding soil organic matter (SOM) stability and emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) from soil stem from complexities of soil processes, many of which occur at micro-scales. The goal of this study is to evaluate the interactive effects soil pore characteristics, soil moisture levels, inherent SOM levels and properties, and substrate quality, on GHGs emission, and accelerated decomposition of native SOM following addition of fresh substrate i.e. priming. Our core hypothesis is that soil pore characteristics play a major role as a mediator in (i) the decomposition of organic matter regardless of its source (i.e. litter vs. native SOM) or substrate quality, as well as in (ii) GHGs emissions. Samples with prevalence of small (<10 μm) vs. large (>30 μm) pores were prepared from soils with similar properties but under long-term contrasting management. The samples were incubated (110 d) at low and optimum soil moisture conditions after addition of high quality (13C-soybean) and low quality (13C-corn) substrate. Headspace gas was analyzed for 13C-CO2 and GHGs on a regularly basis (day 1, 3, 7, 14, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 90, and 110). Selected samples were scanned at the early stage of decomposition (7, 14, 24 d) at 2-6 μm resolutions using X-ray computed μ tomography in order to: (1) quantify soil pore characteristics; (2) visualize and quantify distribution of soil moisture within samples of different pore characteristics; and (3) to visualize and measure losses of decomposing plant residue. Initial findings indicate that, consistent with our hypotheses, pore characteristics influenced GHGs emission, and intensity and pattern of plant residue decomposition. The importance of pores was highly pronounced in presence of added plant residue where greater N2O emission occurred in samples with dominant large pores, in contrast to CO2. Further findings will be discussed upon completion of the study and analysis of the results.

  7. Mysm1 is required for interferon regulatory factor expression in maintaining HSC quiescence and thymocyte development.

    PubMed

    Huang, X F; Nandakumar, V; Tumurkhuu, G; Wang, T; Jiang, X; Hong, B; Jones, L; Won, H; Yoshii, H; Ozato, K; Masumi, A; Chen, S-Y

    2016-01-01

    Mysm1(-/-) mice have severely decreased cellularity in hematopoietic organs. We previously revealed that Mysm1 knockout impairs self-renewal and lineage reconstitution of HSCs by abolishing the recruitment of key transcriptional factors to the Gfi-1 locus, an intrinsic regulator of HSC function. The present study further defines a large LSKs in >8-week-old Mysm1(-/-) mice that exhibit increased proliferation and reduced cell lineage differentiation compared with those of WT LSKs. We found that IRF2 and IRF8, which are important for HSC homeostasis and commitment as transcription repressors, were expressed at lower levels in Mysm1(-/-) HSCs, and Mysm1 enhanced function of the IRF2 and IRF8 promoters, suggesting that Mysm1 governs the IRFs for HSC homeostasis. We further found that the lower expressions of IRF2 and IRF8 led to an enhanced transcription of p53 in Mysm1(-/-) HSCs, which was recently defined to have an important role in mediating Mysm1(-/-)-associated defects. The study also revealed that Mysm1(-/-) thymocytes exhibited lower IRF2 expression, but had higher Sca1 expression, which has a role in mediating thymocyte death. Furthermore, we found that the thymocytes from B16 melanoma-bearing mice, which display severe thymus atrophy at late tumor stages, exhibited reduced Mysm1 and IRF2 expression but enhanced Sca1 expression, suggesting that tumors may downregulate Mysm1 and IRF2 for thymic T-cell elimination. PMID:27277682

  8. The Regulatory Role of Nuclear Factor Kappa B in the Heart of Hereditary Hypertriglyceridemic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Vranková, Stanislava; Barta, Andrej; Klimentová, Jana; Dovinová, Ima; Líšková, Silvia; Dobešová, Zdenka; Pecháňová, Oľga; Kuneš, Jaroslav; Zicha, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) might induce transcription and expression of different antioxidant enzymes and also of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms. Thus, we aimed at studying the effect of NF-κB inhibition, caused by JSH-23 (4-methyl-N1-(3-phenyl-propyl)-benzene-1,2-diamine) injection, on ROS and NO generation in hereditary hypertriglyceridemic (HTG) rats. 12-week-old, male Wistar and HTG rats were treated with JSH-23 (bolus, 10 μmol, i.v.). After one week, blood pressure (BP), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, SOD1, endothelial NOS (eNOS), and NF-κB (p65) protein expressions were higher in the heart of HTG rats compared to control rats. On the other hand, NOS activity was decreased. In HTG rats, JSH-23 treatment increased BP and heart conjugated dienes (CD) concentration (measured as the marker of tissue oxidative damage). Concomitantly, SOD activity together with SOD1 expression was decreased, while NOS activity and eNOS protein expression were increased significantly. In conclusion, NF-κB inhibition in HTG rats led to decreased ROS degradation by SOD followed by increased oxidative damage in the heart and BP elevation. In these conditions, increased NO generation may represent rather a counterregulatory mechanism activated by ROS. Nevertheless, this mechanism was not sufficient enough to compensate BP increase in HTG rats. PMID:27148433

  9. Myogenic regulatory factors during regeneration of skeletal muscle in young, adult, and old rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, D. R.; Criswell, D. S.; Carson, J. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1997-01-01

    Myogenic factor mRNA expression was examined during muscle regeneration after bupivacaine injection in Fischer 344/Brown Norway F1 rats aged 3, 18, and 31 mo of age (young, adult, and old, respectively). Mass of the tibialis anterior muscle in the young rats had recovered to control values by 21 days postbupivacaine injection but in adult and old rats remained 40% less than that of contralateral controls at 21 and 28 days of recovery. During muscle regeneration, myogenin mRNA was significantly increased in muscles of young, adult, and old rats 5 days after bupivacaine injection. Subsequently, myogenin mRNA levels in young rat muscle decreased to postinjection control values by day 21 but did not return to control values in 28-day regenerating muscles of adult and old rats. The expression of MyoD mRNA was also increased in muscles at day 5 of regeneration in young, adult, and old rats, decreased to control levels by day 14 in young and adult rats, and remained elevated in the old rats for 28 days. In summary, either a diminished ability to downregulate myogenin and MyoD mRNAs in regenerating muscle occurs in old rat muscles, or the continuing myogenic effort includes elevated expression of these mRNAs.

  10. Transcription factor evolution in eukaryotes and the assembly of the regulatory toolkit in multicellular lineages

    PubMed Central

    de Mendoza, Alex; Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Šestak, Martin Sebastijan; Matejčić, Marija; Torruella, Guifré; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are the main players in transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes. However, it remains unclear what role TFs played in the origin of all of the different eukaryotic multicellular lineages. In this paper, we explore how the origin of TF repertoires shaped eukaryotic evolution and, in particular, their role into the emergence of multicellular lineages. We traced the origin and expansion of all known TFs through the eukaryotic tree of life, using the broadest possible taxon sampling and an updated phylogenetic background. Our results show that the most complex multicellular lineages (i.e., those with embryonic development, Metazoa and Embryophyta) have the most complex TF repertoires, and that these repertoires were assembled in a stepwise manner. We also show that a significant part of the metazoan and embryophyte TF toolkits evolved earlier, in their respective unicellular ancestors. To gain insights into the role of TFs in the development of both embryophytes and metazoans, we analyzed TF expression patterns throughout their ontogeny. The expression patterns observed in both groups recapitulate those of the whole transcriptome, but reveal some important differences. Our comparative genomics and expression data reshape our view on how TFs contributed to eukaryotic evolution and reveal the importance of TFs to the origins of multicellularity and embryonic development. PMID:24277850

  11. Electrical inhibition of lens epithelial cell proliferation: an additional factor in secondary cataract?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Entong; Reid, Brian; Lois, Noemi; Forrester, John V.; McCaig, Colin D.; Zhao, Min

    2005-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of blindness but is at least curable by surgery. Unfortunately, many patients gradually develop the complication of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) or secondary cataract. This arises from stimulated cell growth within the lens capsule and can greatly impair vision. It is not fully understood why residual lens epithelial cell growth occurs after surgery. We propose and show that cataract surgery might remove an important inhibitory factor for lens cell growth, namely electric fields. The lens generates a unique pattern of electric currents constantly flowing out from the equator and entering the anterior and posterior poles. We show here that cutting and removing part of the anterior capsule as in cataract surgery significantly decreases the equatorial outward electric currents. Application of electric fields in culture inhibits proliferation of human lens epithelial cells. This inhibitory effect is likely to be mediated through a cell cycle control mechanism that decreases entry of cells into S phase from G1 phase by decreasing the G1-specific cell cycle protein cyclin E and increasing the cyclin-Cdk complex inhibitor p27kip1. Capsulorrhexis in vivo, which reduced endogenous lens electric fields, significantly increased LEC growth. This, together with our previous findings that electric fields have significant effects on the direction of lens cell migration, points to a controlling mechanism for the aberrant cell growth in posterior capsule opacification. A novel approach to control growth of lens epithelial cells using electric fields combined with other controlling mechanisms may be more effective in the prevention and treatment of this common complication of cataract surgery. PMID:15764648

  12. Porcine complement regulatory protein CD46 and heparan sulfates are the major factors for classical swine fever virus attachment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dräger, Carolin; Beer, Martin; Blome, Sandra

    2015-03-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the causative agent of a severe multi-systemic disease of pigs. While several aspects of virus-host-interaction are known, the early steps of infection remain unclear. For the closely related bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a cellular receptor is known: bovine complement regulatory protein CD46. Given that these two pestiviruses are closely related, porcine CD46 is also a candidate receptor for CSFV. In addition to CD46, cell-culture-adapted CSFV strains have been shown to use heparan sulfates as an additional cellular factor. In the present study, the interaction of field-type and cell-culture-adapted CSFV with a permanent porcine cell line or primary macrophages was assessed using anti-porcine CD46 monoclonal antibodies and a heparan-sulfate-blocking compound, DSTP-27. The influence of receptor blocking was assessed using virus titration and quantitative PCR. Treatment of cells with monoclonal antibodies against porcine CD46 led to a reduction of viral growth in both cell types. The effect was most pronounced with field-type CSFV. The blocking could be enhanced by addition of DSTP-27, especially for cell-culture-adapted CSFV. The combined use of both blocking agents led to a significant reduction of viral growth but was also not able to abolish infection completely. The results obtained in this study showed that both porcine CD46 and heparan sulfates play a major role in the initial steps of CSFV infection. Additional receptors might also play a role for attachment and entry; however, their impact is obviously limited in vitro in comparison to CD46 and heparan sulfates. PMID:25559665

  13. Dosage Effects of Cohesin Regulatory Factor PDS5 on Mammalian Development: Implications for Cohesinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Chang, Jufang; Fu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Kashyap, Rakesh; Salavaggione, Ezequiel; Jain, Sanjay; Shashikant, Kulkarni; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Uzielli, Maria L. Giovannucci; Dorsett, Dale; Beebe, David C.; Jay, Patrick Y.; Heuckeroth, Robert O.; Krantz, Ian; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder caused by mutations in cohesion proteins, is characterized by multisystem developmental abnormalities. PDS5, a cohesion protein, is important for proper chromosome segregation in lower organisms and has two homologues in vertebrates (PDS5A and PDS5B). Pds5B mutant mice have developmental abnormalities resembling CdLS; however the role of Pds5A in mammals and the association of PDS5 proteins with CdLS are unknown. To delineate genetic interactions between Pds5A and Pds5B and explore mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability, we generated Pds5A-deficient mice. Curiously, these mice exhibit multiple abnormalities that were previously observed in Pds5B-deficient mice, including cleft palate, skeletal patterning defects, growth retardation, congenital heart defects and delayed migration of enteric neuron precursors. They also frequently display renal agenesis, an abnormality not observed in Pds5B−/− mice. While Pds5A−/− and Pds5B−/− mice die at birth, embryos harboring 3 mutant Pds5 alleles die between E11.5 and E12.5 most likely of heart failure, indicating that total Pds5 gene dosage is critical for normal development. In addition, characterization of these compound homozygous-heterozygous mice revealed a severe abnormality in lens formation that does not occur in either Pds5A−/− or Pds5B−/− mice. We further identified a functional missense mutation (R1292Q) in the PDS5B DNA-binding domain in a familial case of CdLS, in which affected individuals also develop megacolon. This study shows that PDS5A and PDS5B functions other than those involving chromosomal dynamics are important for normal development, highlights the sensitivity of key developmental processes on PDS5 signaling, and provides mechanistic insights into how PDS5 mutations may lead to CdLS. PMID:19412548

  14. Dosage effects of cohesin regulatory factor PDS5 on mammalian development: implications for cohesinopathies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chang, Jufang; Fu, Ming; Huang, Jie; Kashyap, Rakesh; Salavaggione, Ezequiel; Jain, Sanjay; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Shashikant, Kulkarni; Deardorff, Matthew A; Uzielli, Maria L Giovannucci; Dorsett, Dale; Beebe, David C; Jay, Patrick Y; Heuckeroth, Robert O; Krantz, Ian; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder caused by mutations in cohesion proteins, is characterized by multisystem developmental abnormalities. PDS5, a cohesion protein, is important for proper chromosome segregation in lower organisms and has two homologues in vertebrates (PDS5A and PDS5B). Pds5B mutant mice have developmental abnormalities resembling CdLS; however the role of Pds5A in mammals and the association of PDS5 proteins with CdLS are unknown. To delineate genetic interactions between Pds5A and Pds5B and explore mechanisms underlying phenotypic variability, we generated Pds5A-deficient mice. Curiously, these mice exhibit multiple abnormalities that were previously observed in Pds5B-deficient mice, including cleft palate, skeletal patterning defects, growth retardation, congenital heart defects and delayed migration of enteric neuron precursors. They also frequently display renal agenesis, an abnormality not observed in Pds5B(-/-) mice. While Pds5A(-/-) and Pds5B(-/-) mice die at birth, embryos harboring 3 mutant Pds5 alleles die between E11.5 and E12.5 most likely of heart failure, indicating that total Pds5 gene dosage is critical for normal development. In addition, characterization of these compound homozygous-heterozygous mice revealed a severe abnormality in lens formation that does not occur in either Pds5A(-/-) or Pds5B(-/-) mice. We further identified a functional missense mutation (R1292Q) in the PDS5B DNA-binding domain in a familial case of CdLS, in which affected individuals also develop megacolon. This study shows that PDS5A and PDS5B functions other than those involving chromosomal dynamics are important for normal development, highlights the sensitivity of key developmental processes on PDS5 signaling, and provides mechanistic insights into how PDS5 mutations may lead to CdLS. PMID:19412548

  15. Studying Dynamic Features in Myocardial Infarction Progression by Integrating miRNA-Transcription Factor Co-Regulatory Networks and Time-Series RNA Expression Data from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongbo; Zhang, Guangde; Wang, Jing; Wang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Cheng, Liang; Li, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a serious heart disease and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Although some molecules (genes, miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs)) associated with MI have been studied in a specific pathological context, their dynamic characteristics in gene expressions, biological functions and regulatory interactions in MI progression have not been fully elucidated to date. In the current study, we analyzed time-series RNA expression data from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We observed that significantly differentially expressed genes were sharply up- or down-regulated in the acute phase of MI, and then changed slowly until the chronic phase. Biological functions involved at each stage of MI were identified. Additionally, dynamic miRNA-TF co-regulatory networks were constructed based on the significantly differentially expressed genes and miRNA-TF co-regulatory motifs, and the dynamic interplay of miRNAs, TFs and target genes were investigated. Finally, a new panel of candidate diagnostic biomarkers (STAT3 and ICAM1) was identified to have discriminatory capability for patients with or without MI, especially the patients with or without recurrent events. The results of the present study not only shed new light on the understanding underlying regulatory mechanisms involved in MI progression, but also contribute to the discovery of true diagnostic biomarkers for MI. PMID:27367417

  16. Studying Dynamic Features in Myocardial Infarction Progression by Integrating miRNA-Transcription Factor Co-Regulatory Networks and Time-Series RNA Expression Data from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Xiaoxia; Cheng, Liang; Li, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a serious heart disease and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Although some molecules (genes, miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs)) associated with MI have been studied in a specific pathological context, their dynamic characteristics in gene expressions, biological functions and regulatory interactions in MI progression have not been fully elucidated to date. In the current study, we analyzed time-series RNA expression data from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We observed that significantly differentially expressed genes were sharply up- or down-regulated in the acute phase of MI, and then changed slowly until the chronic phase. Biological functions involved at each stage of MI were identified. Additionally, dynamic miRNA–TF co-regulatory networks were constructed based on the significantly differentially expressed genes and miRNA–TF co-regulatory motifs, and the dynamic interplay of miRNAs, TFs and target genes were investigated. Finally, a new panel of candidate diagnostic biomarkers (STAT3 and ICAM1) was identified to have discriminatory capability for patients with or without MI, especially the patients with or without recurrent events. The results of the present study not only shed new light on the understanding underlying regulatory mechanisms involved in MI progression, but also contribute to the discovery of true diagnostic biomarkers for MI. PMID:27367417

  17. Keratinocyte sensitization to tumour necrosis factor-induced nuclear factor kappa B activation by the E2 regulatory protein of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Boulabiar, Manel; Boubaker, Samir; Favre, Michel; Demeret, Caroline

    2011-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle requires extensive manipulation of cell signalling to provide conditions adequate for viral replication within the stratified epithelia. In this regard, we show that the E2 regulatory protein of α, β and μ-HPV genotypes enhances tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). This activation is mediated by the N-terminal domain of E2, but does not rely on its transcriptional properties. It is independent of the NF-κB regulator Tax1BP1, which nevertheless interacts with all the E2 proteins. E2 specifically activates NF-κB pathways induced by TNF, while interleukin-1-induced pathways are not affected. E2 stimulates the activating K63-linked ubiquitination of TRAF5, and interacts with both TRAF5 and TRAF6. Our data suggest that E2 potentiates TNF-induced NF-κB signalling mediated by TRAF5 activation through direct binding. Since NF-κB controls epithelial differentiation, this activity may be involved in the commitment of infected keratinocytes to proliferation arrest and differentiation, both required for the implementation of the productive viral cycle. PMID:21715600

  18. Tissue-specific factors additively increase the probability of the all-or-none formation of a hypersensitive site.

    PubMed Central

    Boyes, J; Felsenfeld, G

    1996-01-01

    DNase I-hypersensitive sites lack a canonical nucleosome and have binding sites for various transcription factors. To understand how the hypersensitivity is generated and maintained, we studied the chicken erythroid-specific beta(A)/epsilon globin gene enhancer, a region where both tissue-specific and ubiquitous transcription factors can bind. Constructions containing mutations of this enhancer were stably introduced into a chicken erythroid cell line. We found that the hypersensitivity was determined primarily by the erythroid factors and that their binding additively increased the accessibility. The fraction of accessible sites in clonal cell lines was quantitated using restriction endonucleases; these data implied that the formation of each hypersensitive site was an all-or-none phenomenon. Use of DNase I and micrococcal nuclease probes further indicated that the size of the hypersensitive site was influenced by the binding of transcription factors which then determined the length of the nucleosome-free gap. Our data are consistent with a model in which hypersensitive sites are generated stochastically: mutations that reduce the number of bound factors reduce the probability that these factors will prevail over a nucleosome; thus, the fraction of sites in the population that are accessible is also diminished. Images PMID:8665857

  19. Simple combinations of lineage-determining transcription factors prime cis-regulatory elements required for macrophage and B cell identities

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Sven; Benner, Christopher; Spann, Nathanael; Bertolino, Eric; Lin, Yin C.; Laslo, Peter; Cheng, Jason X.; Murre, Cornelis; Singh, Harinder; Glass, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Genome-scale studies have revealed extensive, cell type-specific co-localization of transcription factors, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate in macrophages and B cells that collaborative interactions of the common factor PU.1 with small sets of macrophage- or B celllineage-determining transcription factors establish cell-specific binding sites that are associated with the majority of promoter-distal H3K4me1-marked genomic regions. PU.1 binding initiates nucleosome remodeling followed by H3K4 monomethylation at large numbers of genomic regions associated with both broadly and specifically expressed genes. These locations serve as beacons for additional factors, exemplified by liver X receptors, which drive both cell-specific gene expression and signal-dependent responses. Together with analyses of transcription factor binding and H3K4me1 patterns in other cell types, these studies suggest that simple combinations of lineage-determining transcription factors can specify the genomic sites ultimately responsible for both cell identity and cell type-specific responses to diverse signaling inputs. PMID:20513432

  20. The Transcription Factors Grainyhead-like 2 and NK2-Homeobox 1 Form a Regulatory Loop That Coordinates Lung Epithelial Cell Morphogenesis and Differentiation*

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Saaket; Cao, Yuxia; Tagne, Jean-Bosco; Lakshminarayanan, Meenakshi; Li, Jun; Friedman, Thomas B.; Morell, Robert J.; Warburton, David; Kotton, Darrell N.; Ramirez, Maria I.

    2012-01-01

    The Grainyhead family of transcription factors controls morphogenesis and differentiation of epithelial cell layers in multicellular organisms by regulating cell junction- and proliferation-related genes. Grainyhead-like 2 (Grhl2) is expressed in developing mouse lung epithelium and is required for normal lung organogenesis. The specific epithelial cells expressing Grhl2 and the genes regulated by Grhl2 in normal lungs are mostly unknown. In these studies we identified the NK2-homeobox 1 transcription factor (Nkx2-1) as a direct transcriptional target of Grhl2. By binding and transcriptional assays and by confocal microscopy we showed that these two transcription factors form a positive feedback loop in vivo and in cell lines and are co-expressed in lung bronchiolar and alveolar type II cells. The morphological changes observed in flattening lung alveolar type II cells in culture are associated with down-regulation of Grhl2 and Nkx2-1. Reduction of Grhl2 in lung epithelial cell lines results in lower expression levels of Nkx2-1 and of known Grhl2 target genes. By microarray analysis we identified that in addition to Cadherin1 and Claudin4, Grhl2 regulates other cell interaction genes such as semaphorins and their receptors, which also play a functional role in developing lung epithelium. Impaired collective cell migration observed in Grhl2 knockdown cell monolayers is associated with reduced expression of these genes and may contribute to the altered epithelial phenotype reported in Grhl2 mutant mice. Thus, Grhl2 functions at the nexus of a novel regulatory network, connecting lung epithelial cell identity, migration, and cell-cell interactions. PMID:22955271

  1. Direct, Interferon-Independent Activation of the CXCL10 Promoter by NF-κB and Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 during Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brownell, Jessica; Bruckner, Jacob; Wagoner, Jessica; Thomas, Emmanuel; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Gale, Michael; Liang, T. Jake

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection of hepatocytes leads to transcriptional induction of the chemokine CXCL10, which is considered an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene. However, we have recently shown that IFNs are not required for CXCL10 induction in hepatocytes during acute HCV infection. Since the CXCL10 promoter contains binding sites for several proinflammatory transcription factors, we investigated the contribution of these factors to CXCL10 transcriptional induction during HCV infection in vitro. Wild-type and mutant CXCL10 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs were used to identify critical sites of transcriptional regulation. The proximal IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and NF-κB binding sites positively regulated CXCL10 transcription during HCV infection as well as following exposure to poly(I·C) (a Toll-like receptor 3 [TLR3] stimulus) and 5′ poly(U) HCV RNA (a retinoic acid-inducible gene I [RIG-I] stimulus) from two viral genotypes. Conversely, binding sites for AP-1 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP-β) negatively regulated CXCL10 induction in response to TLR3 and RIG-I stimuli, while only C/EBP-β negatively regulated CXCL10 during HCV infection. We also demonstrated that interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) is transiently recruited to the proximal ISRE during HCV infection and localizes to the nucleus in HCV-infected primary human hepatocytes. Furthermore, IRF3 activated the CXCL10 promoter independently of type I or type III IFN signaling. The data indicate that sensing of HCV infection by RIG-I and TLR3 leads to direct recruitment of NF-κB and IRF3 to the CXCL10 promoter. Our study expands upon current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of CXCL10 induction in hepatocytes and lays the foundation for additional mechanistic studies that further elucidate the combinatorial and synergistic aspects of immune signaling pathways. PMID:24257594

  2. Regulatory SNPs and transcriptional factor binding sites in ADRBK1, AKT3, ATF3, DIO2, TBXA2R and VEGFA

    PubMed Central

    Buroker, Norman E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (rSNPs) which change the transcriptional factor binding sites (TFBS) for transcriptional factors (TFs) to bind DNA were reviewed for the ADRBK1 (GRK2), AKT3, ATF3, DIO2, TBXA2R and VEGFA genes. Changes in the TFBS where TFs attach to regulate these genes may result in human sickness and disease. The highlights of this previous work were reviewed for these genes. PMID:25483406

  3. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yanwei; Hu, Guojian; Breitel, Dario; Liu, Mingchun; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Fu, Yongyao; Aharoni, Asaph; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2) which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato. PMID:26716451

  4. Essential Requirement for IFN Regulatory Factor 7 in Autoantibody Production but Not Development of Nephritis in Murine Lupus.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Fumi; Tagaya, Yutaka; Ozato, Keiko; Asada, Hideo

    2016-09-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies against nuclear components. Recent genetic studies of SLE patients have revealed that IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 7 gene polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of SLE, but the precise role of IRF7 in SLE development is not fully understood. We investigated the role of IRF7 in the pathogenesis of SLE using a mouse model and saw a curious dissociation of autoantibody production and development of glomerulonephritis. SLE was chemically induced into IRF7-deficient mice, and glomerulonephritis with deposits of IgG and lipogranulomas were observed after 10 mo. However, these mice failed to produce anti-dsDNA, ssDNA, ribonucleoprotein, and Sm autoantibodies. Following the chemical induction, IRF7-deficient mice expressed substantially lower levels of IFN-stimulated genes than did wild-type mice, but NF-κB target genes were equally upregulated in both strains. Therefore, the type I IFN pathway seems critical for the autoantibody production, but the NF-κB activation is sufficient for the development of glomerulonephritis in this model. Our study thus demonstrates a specific requirement for IRF7 in autoantibody production and uncovers a new layer of complexity in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:27527596

  5. A Genome-wide Regulatory Network Identifies Key Transcription Factors for Memory CD8+ T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guangan; Chen, Jianzhu

    2014-01-01

    Memory CD8+ T cell development is defined by the expression of a specific set of memory signature genes (MSGs). Despite recent progress, many components of the transcriptional control of memory CD8+ T cell development are still unknown. To identify transcription factors (TFs) and their interactions in memory CD8+ T cell development, we construct a genome-wide regulatory network and apply it to identify key TFs that regulate MSGs. Most of the known TFs in memory CD8+ T cell development are rediscovered and about a dozen new TFs are also identified. Sox4, Bhlhe40, Bach2 and Runx2 are experimentally verified and Bach2 is further shown to promote both development and recall proliferation of memory CD8+ T cells through Prdm1 and Id3. Gene perturbation study identifies the mode of interactions among the TFs with Sox4 as a hub. The identified TFs and insights into their interactions should facilitate further dissection of molecular mechanisms underlying memory CD8+ T cell development. PMID:24335726

  6. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Mediates Alveolar Macrophage Pyroptosis During LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongdong; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lemeng; Qin, Qingwu; Tan, Hongyi; Huang, Li; Li, Yuanyuan

    2016-09-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that pyroptosis in alveolar macrophages (AMs) plays an essential role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Here, we show that the absence of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) in genetic knock-out mice strongly abrogates pyroptosis in AMs and alleviates the LPS-induced lung injury and systemic inflammation. Our study demonstrates that IRF-1 contributes to caspase-1 activation and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain pyroptosome formation in AMs and leads to downstream inflammatory cytokine release, including that of IL-1β, IL-18, and HMGB1. The nuclear translocation of IRF-1 is linked to the presence of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Our findings suggest that pyroptosis and the downstream inflammatory response in AMs induced by LPS is a process that is dependent on TLR4-mediated up-regulation of IRF-1. In summary, IRF-1 plays a key role in controlling caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis and inflammation. PMID:26939040

  7. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanwei; Hu, Guojian; Breitel, Dario; Liu, Mingchun; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Fu, Yongyao; Aharoni, Asaph; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2) which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato. PMID:26716451

  8. The PDZ Protein Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor-1 (NHERF1) Regulates Planar Cell Polarity and Motile Cilia Organization

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Donna B.; Tsang, Michael; Friedman, Peter A.; Romero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Directional flow of the cerebrospinal fluid requires coordinated movement of the motile cilia of the ependymal epithelium that lines the cerebral ventricles. Here we report that mice lacking the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1/Slc9a3r1, also known as EBP50) develop profound communicating hydrocephalus associated with fewer and disorganized ependymal cilia. Knockdown of NHERF1/slc9a3r1 in zebrafish embryos also causes severe hydrocephalus of the hindbrain and impaired ciliogenesis in the otic vesicle. Ultrastructural analysis did not reveal defects in the shape or organization of individual cilia. Similar phenotypes have been described in animals with deficiencies in Wnt signaling and the Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway. We show that NHERF1 binds the PCP core genes Frizzled (Fzd) and Vangl. We further show that NHERF1 assembles a ternary complex with Fzd4 and Vangl2 and promotes translocation of Vangl2 to the plasma membrane, in particular to the apical surface of ependymal cells. Taken together, these results strongly support an important role for NHERF1 in the regulation of PCP signaling and the development of functional motile cilia. PMID:27055101

  9. Decoding the trans-histone crosstalk: methods to analyze H2B ubiquitination, H3 methylation and their regulatory factors

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Mahesh B.; Huang, Fu; Sun, Zu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of histone H3 lysine 4 and 79 methylation by histone H2B lysine 123 monoubiquitination is an evolutionarily conserved trans-histone crosstalk mechanism, which demonstrates a functional role for histone ubiquitination within the cell. The regulatory enzymes, factors and processes involved in the establishment and dynamic modulation of these modifications and their genome-wide distribution patterns have been determined in many model systems. Rapid progress in understanding this trans-histone crosstalk has been made using the standard experimental tools of chromatin biology in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), a highly tractable model organism. Here, we provide a set of modified and refined experimental procedures that can be used to gain further insights into the underlying mechanisms that govern this crosstalk in budding yeast. Importantly, the improved procedures and their underlying principles can also be applied to other model organisms. Methods presented here provide a rapid and efficient means to prepare enriched protein extracts to better preserve and assess the steady state levels of histones, non-histone proteins and their modifications. Improved chromatin immunoprecipitation and double immunoprecipitation protocols are provided to measure the occupancy and distribution of proteins and their modified forms at specific chromatin regions or loci. A quick and easy method to measure overall protein abundance and changes in protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions on native chromatin is also described. PMID:21392582

  10. Glucocorticoid-Induced Tumour Necrosis Factor Receptor-Related Protein: A Key Marker of Functional Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, Simona; Ricci, Erika; Petrillo, Maria Grazia; Cari, Luigi; Migliorati, Graziella; Nocentini, Giuseppe; Riccardi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR, TNFRSF18, and CD357) is expressed at high levels in activated T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this review, we present data from mouse and human studies suggesting that GITR is a crucial player in the differentiation of thymic Tregs (tTregs), and expansion of both tTregs and peripheral Tregs (pTregs). The role of GITR in Treg expansion is confirmed by the association of GITR expression with markers of memory T cells. In this context, it is not surprising that GITR appears to be a marker of active Tregs, as suggested by the association of GITR expression with other markers of Treg activation or cytokines with suppressive activity (e.g., IL-10 and TGF-β), the presence of GITR+ cells in tissues where Tregs are active (e.g., solid tumours), or functional studies on Tregs. Furthermore, some Treg subsets including Tr1 cells express either low or no classical Treg markers (e.g., FoxP3 and CD25) and do express GITR. Therefore, when evaluating changes in the number of Tregs in human diseases, GITR expression must be evaluated. Moreover, GITR should be considered as a marker for isolating Tregs. PMID:25961057

  11. Three functional variants of IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) define risk and protective haplotypes for human lupus

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Robert R.; Kyogoku, Chieko; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Vlasova, Irina A.; Davies, Leela R. L.; Baechler, Emily C.; Plenge, Robert M.; Koeuth, Thearith; Ortmann, Ward A.; Hom, Geoffrey; Bauer, Jason W.; Gillett, Clarence; Burtt, Noel; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Onofrio, Robert; Petri, Michelle; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Rönnblom, Lars; Nordmark, Gunnel; Gregersen, Peter K.; Moser, Kathy; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Daly, Mark J.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Altshuler, David

    2007-01-01

    Systematic genome-wide studies to map genomic regions associated with human diseases are becoming more practical. Increasingly, efforts will be focused on the identification of the specific functional variants responsible for the disease. The challenges of identifying causal variants include the need for complete ascertainment of genetic variants and the need to consider the possibility of multiple causal alleles. We recently reported that risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is strongly associated with a common SNP in IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and that this variant altered spicing in a way that might provide a functional explanation for the reproducible association to SLE risk. Here, by resequencing and genotyping in patients with SLE, we find evidence for three functional alleles of IRF5: the previously described exon 1B splice site variant, a 30-bp in-frame insertion/deletion variant of exon 6 that alters a proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain region, and a variant in a conserved polyA+ signal sequence that alters the length of the 3′ UTR and stability of IRF5 mRNAs. Haplotypes of these three variants define at least three distinct levels of risk to SLE. Understanding how combinations of variants influence IRF5 function may offer etiological and therapeutic insights in SLE; more generally, IRF5 and SLE illustrates how multiple common variants of the same gene can together influence risk of common disease. PMID:17412832

  12. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Mediates Alveolar Macrophage Pyroptosis During LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lemeng; Qin, Qingwu; Tan, Hongyi; Huang, Li; Li, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, we demonstrated that pyroptosis in alveolar macrophages (AMs) plays an essential role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Here, we show that the absence of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) in genetic knock-out mice strongly abrogates pyroptosis in AMs and alleviates the LPS-induced lung injury and systemic inflammation. Our study demonstrates that IRF-1 contributes to caspase-1 activation and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain pyroptosome formation in AMs and leads to downstream inflammatory cytokine release, including that of IL-1β, IL-18, and HMGB1. The nuclear translocation of IRF-1 is linked to the presence of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Our findings suggest that pyroptosis and the downstream inflammatory response in AMs induced by LPS is a process that is dependent on TLR4-mediated up-regulation of IRF-1. In summary, IRF-1 plays a key role in controlling caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis and inflammation. PMID:26939040

  13. Reovirus μ2 Protein Inhibits Interferon Signaling through a Novel Mechanism Involving Nuclear Accumulation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 9▿

    PubMed Central

    Zurney, Jennifer; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Holm, Geoffrey H.; Dermody, Terence S.; Sherry, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The secreted cytokine alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) binds its receptor to activate the Jak-STAT signal transduction pathway, leading to formation of the heterotrimeric IFN-stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3) transcription complex for induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and establishment of an antiviral state. Many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit the IFN pathway, thereby subverting the innate antiviral response. Here, we demonstrate that the mildly myocarditic reovirus type 1 Lang (T1L), but not the nonmyocarditic reovirus type 3 Dearing, represses IFN induction of a subset of ISGs and that this repressor function segregates with the T1L M1 gene. Concordantly, the T1L M1 gene product, μ2, dramatically inhibits IFN-β-induced reporter gene expression. Surprisingly, T1L infection does not degrade components of the ISGF3 complex or interfere with STAT1 or STAT2 nuclear translocation as has been observed for other viruses. Instead, infection with T1L or reassortant or recombinant viruses containing the T1L M1 gene results in accumulation of interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) in the nucleus. This effect has not been previously described for any virus and suggests that μ2 modulates IRF9 interactions with STATs for both ISGF3 function and nuclear export. The M1 gene is a determinant of virus strain-specific differences in the IFN response, which are linked to virus strain-specific differences in induction of murine myocarditis. We find that virus-induced myocarditis is associated with repression of IFN function, providing new insights into the pathophysiology of this disease. Together, these data provide the first report of an increase in IRF9 nuclear accumulation associated with viral subversion of the IFN response and couple virus strain-specific differences in IFN antagonism to the pathogenesis of viral myocarditis. PMID:19109390

  14. Interferon regulatory factor 4 is activated through c-Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation in virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Ning, Shunbin

    2013-09-01

    The importance of the oncogenic transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) in hematological malignancies has been increasingly recognized. We have previously identified the B cell integration cluster (BIC), the gene encoding miR-155, as the first microRNA (miRNA)-encoding gene transcriptionally targeted by IRF4 in virus-transformed cancer cells. Activation of IRFs is prerequisite for their functions. However, how IRF4 is activated in cancer is an open question. Our phosphoproteome profiling has identified several tyrosine phosphorylation sites on IRF4 in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cells. Further, we show here that c-Src dramatically stimulates IRF4 phosphorylation and activity and that Y61 and Y124 are two key sites responding to c-Src-mediated activation. Consistently, c-Src is constitutively expressed and active in EBV-transformed cells. However, c-Src is unlikely to be a direct kinase for IRF4. Furthermore, we have a polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-IRF4(Y121/124) developed in rabbit. We have further shown that inhibition of c-Src activity reduces p-IRF4(Y121/124) and significantly represses transcription of the IRF4 target BIC in EBV-transformed cells. Our results therefore, for the first time, demonstrate that IRF4 is phosphorylated and activated through a c-Src-mediated pathway in virus-transformed cells. These findings will improve our understanding of IRF4 in neoplasia and will provide profound insights into the interaction of oncogenic viruses with IRF4 in the development of hematological malignancies. PMID:23804646

  15. Interferon regulatory factors and TFIIB cooperatively regulate interferon-responsive promoter activity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, I M; Blanco, J C; Tsai, S Y; Tsai, M J; Ozato, K

    1996-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) bind to the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE) and regulate interferon- and virus-mediated gene expression. IRF-1 acts as a transcriptional activator, while IRF-2 acts as a repressor. Here we show that IRF-1 and IRF-2 bind to both cellular TFIIB, a component of the basal transcription machinery, and recombinant TFIIB (rTFIIB) and that this protein-protein interaction facilitates binding of IRFs to the ISRE. A functional interaction between TFIIB and IRF was assessed by a newly established in vitro transcription assay in which recombinant IRF-1 (rIRF-1) stimulated transcription specifically from an ISRE-containing template. With this assay we show that rIRF-1 and rTFIIB cooperatively enhance the ISRE promoter in vitro. We found that the activity of an ISRE-containing promoter was cooperatively enhanced upon cotransfection of TFIIB and IRF-1 cDNAs into P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, further demonstrating functional interactions in vivo. The cooperative enhancement by TFIIB and IRF-1 was independent of the TATA sequence in the ISRE promoter but dependent on the initiator sequence (Inr) and was abolished when P19 cells were induced to differentiate by retinoic acid treatment. In contrast, cotransfection of TFIIB and IRF-1 into NIH 3T3 cells resulted in a dose-dependent repression of promoter activation which occurred in a TATA-dependent manner. Our results indicate the presence of a cell type-specific factor that mediates the functional interaction between IRFs and TFIIB and that acts in conjunction with the requirement of TATA and Inr for promoter activation. PMID:8887661

  16. Transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits tissue engineering cartilage absorption via inducing the generation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chichi; Bi, Wei; Gong, Yiming; Ding, Xiaojun; Guo, Xuehua; Sun, Jian; Cui, Lei; Yu, Youcheng

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the mechanisms of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 inhibiting the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. We transfected TGF-β1 gene into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and co-cultured with interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes. We then characterized the morphological changes, apoptosis and characterization of chondrogenic-committed cells from TGF-β1(+) BMMSCs and explored their mechanisms. Results showed that BMMSCs apoptosis and tissue engineering cartilage absorption in the group with added IFN-γ and TNF-α were greater than in the control group. In contrast, there was little BMMSC apoptosis and absorption by tissue engineering cartilage in the group with added CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes; Foxp3(+) T cells and CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells were found. In contrast, no type II collagen or Foxp3(+) T cells or CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells was found in the TGF-β1(-) BMMSC group. The data suggest that IFN-γ and TNF-α induced BMMSCs apoptosis and absorption of tissue engineering cartilage, but the newborn regulatory T (Treg) cells inhibited the function of IFN-γ and TNF-α and protected BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage. TGF-β1not only played a cartilage inductive role, but also inhibited the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. The pathway proposed in our study may simulate the actual reaction procedure after implantation of BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage in vivo. PMID:23868873

  17. Identification of the bases in the ompF regulatory region, which interact with the transcription factor OmpR.

    PubMed

    Huang, K J; Igo, M M

    1996-10-11

    Expression of the outer membrane protein OmpF of Escherichia coli K-12 is influenced by a variety of environmental signals. Most of the signals are thought to regulate OmpF expression at the level of transcription initiation. A key element of this regulation is the interaction between the transcriptional factor OmpR and the cis-acting regulatory region of ompF. In this study, we used a combination of DNase I, dimethyl sulfate and hydroxyl radical footprinting analysis and DNA migration retardation assays to identify the bases within the ompF regulatory region that are in contact with OmpR. Our results indicate that the -107 to -39 region of ompF contains three individual binding sites and that a single OmpR-binding site is capable of interacting with two OmpR molecules. We also establish that a single OmpR-binding site is composed of two half-sites and that both half-sites are required for the formation of stable OmpR/DNA complexes. Comparisons of the sequences protected by OmpR indicate that an OmpR-binding site spans approximately 18 bp and has two highly conserved G/C base-pairs that are separated by three nucleotides. Although the three OmpR-binding sites we identified exhibit limited sequence similarity, this may reflect the fact that two of the sites are incapable of binding OmpR independently and can bind OmpR only if adjacent to another OmpR-binding site. Finally, our DNA migration retardation assays suggest that phosphorylation stimulates the cooperative interactions between OmpR molecules bound at neighboring sites. Therefore, this study provides a detailed understanding of how OmpR interacts with its binding sites immediately upstream of ompF and serves as a foundation for studying how phosphorylation of OmpR results in the regulation of ompF expression in response to environmental signals. PMID:8876642

  18. Promoter analysis reveals cis-regulatory motifs associated with the expression of the WRKY transcription factor CrWRKY1 in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhirong; Patra, Barunava; Li, Runzhi; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling

    2013-12-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are emerging as an important group of regulators of plant secondary metabolism. However, the cis-regulatory elements associated with their regulation have not been well characterized. We have previously demonstrated that CrWRKY1, a member of subgroup III of the WRKY TF family, regulates biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloids in the ornamental and medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of the CrWRKY1 promoter. In silico analysis of the promoter sequence reveals the presence of several potential TF binding motifs, indicating the involvement of additional TFs in the regulation of the TIA pathway. The CrWRKY1 promoter can drive the expression of a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in native (C. roseus protoplasts and transgenic hairy roots) and heterologous (transgenic tobacco seedlings) systems. Analysis of 5'- or 3'-end deletions indicates that the sequence located between positions -140 to -93 bp and -3 to +113 bp, relative to the transcription start site, is critical for promoter activity. Mutation analysis shows that two overlapping as-1 elements and a CT-rich motif contribute significantly to promoter activity. The CrWRKY1 promoter is induced in response to methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment and the promoter region between -230 and -93 bp contains a putative MJ-responsive element. The CrWRKY1 promoter can potentially be used as a tool to isolate novel TFs involved in the regulation of the TIA pathway. PMID:23979312

  19. Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Is Associated with Epstein-Barr Virus-Transformed Central Nervous System Lymphoma and Has Oncogenic Properties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luwen; Zhang, Jun; Lambert, Que; Der, Channing J.; Del Valle, Luis; Miklossy, Judith; Khalili, Kamel; Zhou, You; Pagano, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF-7) is implicated in the regulation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency. EBV transforms primary B cells, and the major EBV oncoprotein, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP-1), is required for the process. LMP-1 both induces the expression of IRF-7 and activates the IRF-7 protein by phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Here we report that the expression of IRF-7 is increased in EBV-immortalized B lymphocytes compared with that in primary B cells. IRF-7 was phosphorylated and predominantly localized in the nucleus in the immortalized cells. The expression of IRF-7 was detected in 19 of 27 specimens of primary lymphomas of the human central nervous system by immunohistochemical analysis. The association between LMP-1 and IRF-7 was statistically highly significant for these specimens. An appreciable amount of the IRF-7 expressed in lymphoma cells was localized in the nucleus. Furthermore, IRF-7 promoted the anchorage-independent growth of NIH 3T3 cells. LMP-1 and IRF-7 showed additive effects on the growth transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. IRF-7-expressing NIH 3T3 cells formed tumors in athymic mice. Thus, IRF-7 has oncogenic properties and, along with LMP-1, may mediate or potentiate the EBV transformation process in the pathogenesis of EBV-associated lymphomas. PMID:15542650

  20. FoxO4 interacts with the sterol regulatory factor SREBP2 and the hypoxia inducible factor HIF2α at the CYP51 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Jiang, Xiangning; Chehab, Farid F.

    2014-01-01

    The late steps of cholesterol biosynthesis are oxygen demanding, requiring eleven oxygen molecules per synthesized cholesterol molecule. A key enzymatic reaction, which occurs at the top of the Bloch and Kandutsch-Russell pathways, is the demethylation of lanosterol and dihydrolanosterol (DHL). This reaction is catalyzed by lanosterol 14α demethylase (CYP51) and requires three oxygen molecules. Thus, it is the first step in the distal pathway to be susceptible to oxygen deprivation. Having previously identified that the forkhead transcription factor 4 (FoxO4) represses CYP51 expression, we aimed to characterize its role at the CYP51 promoter. Hypoxia-treated 3T3L1 cells showed decreased cholesterol biosynthesis, accumulation of lanosterol/DHL, and stimulation of FoxO4 expression and its cytoplasmic translocation to the nucleus. Transfection assays with a CYP51 promoter reporter gene revealed that FoxO4 and sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)2 exert a stimulatory effect, whereas FoxO4 and the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)2α repress CYP51 promoter activity. Electromobility shift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, pull-down, and coimmunoprecipitation assays show that FoxO4 interacts with SREBP2 and HIF2α to modulate CYP51 promoter activity. We also show an inverse correlation between FoxO4 and CYP51 in adipose tissue of ob/ob mice and mouse fetal cortical neurons exposed to hypoxia. Overall, these studies demonstrate a role for FoxO4 in the regulation of CYP51 expression. PMID:24353279

  1. The human complement regulatory factor-H-like protein 1, which represents a truncated form of factor H, displays cell-attachment activity.

    PubMed Central

    Hellwage, J; Kühn, S; Zipfel, P F

    1997-01-01

    Complement factor H (FH) and factor-H-like protein 1 (FHL-1) are human plasma proteins with regulatory functions in the alternative pathway of complement activation. FH and FHL-1 are organized in repetitive elements termed short consensus repeats (SCRs) and the seven SCRs of FHL-1 are identical with the N-terminal domain of the 20 SCRs of FH. The fourth SCR of both proteins (SCR 4) includes the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), a motif that is responsible for the major adhesive activity of matrix proteins like fibronectin. A synthetic hexapeptide with the sequence ERGDAV derived from the RGD domain of FH/FHL-1 interferes with cell attachment to a fibronectin matrix. Although the identical motif is present in both FH and FHL-1, only FHL-1 acts as a matrix for cell spreading and attachment, thus the two proteins differ in function. The adhesive activity of FHL-1 is localized to the RGD-containing SCR 4 by the use of recombinant fragments. All three analysed anchorage-dependent cell lines (CCl64, C32 and MRC-5) adhere to an FHL-1 matrix. The use of synthetic peptides in competition assays, on either FHL-1-derived or fibronectin matrices, shows that the cellular receptors binding to the FH/FHL-1-derived RGD motif are related to or identical with integrin receptors which interact with fibronectin. The identification of a functional adhesive domain in the FH/FHL-1 sequence demonstrates, at least for FHL-1, a role in cell attachment and adhesion. PMID:9291099

  2. Genomic characterization of interferon regulatory factor 5 from rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus) and its role in antiviral defense.

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; Wan, Qiang; Lim, Bong-Soo; Jung, Hyung-Bok; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Park, Myoung-Ae; Lee, Jehee; Whang, Ilson

    2014-04-01

    The interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is a key mediator of the Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR8 signaling pathways. In this study, we describe the identification of IRF5 (Rb-IRF5) from rock bream fish (Oplegnathus fasciatus) and its characteristics features at the genomic and expression levels. The full-length Rb-IRF5 sequence was identified from a cDNA library and its genomic sequence was obtained by screening and sequencing of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic DNA library of rock bream. The genomic sequence is comprised of 8 exons interrupted by 7 introns. The complete coding sequence of Rb-IRF5 is 1497 bp in length and encodes for 498 amino acids. The putative Rb-IRF5 protein consists of 3 important conserved domains: a DNA-binding domain (DBD) at the N-terminus, an IRF-associated domain (IAD), and a virus-activated domain (VAD) at the C-terminus. Based on pairwise sequence analysis, the highest sequence similarity/identity for Rb-IRF5 was observed with the IRF5 gene from turbot fish (>87%) and Japanese flounder (83%). Several important putative transcription factor-binding sites shared by the IRF gene family, including the NF-κB, Ap-1, IRF-1, and ICSBP/ISRE sites, were found in the 5' flanking region of Rb-IRF5. The predicted tertiary structure of the dimerized IAD and VAD of the Rb-IRF5 protein resembled that of its orthologs from humans. In healthy rock bream, the highest constitutive expression of Rb-IRF5 was detected in the liver. After iridovirus and polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) challenge, Rb-IRF5 expression was significantly induced in the head kidney. Furthermore, rock bream recombinant type I interferon (Rb-IFN1) was also found to be an efficient inducer of Rb-IRF5 in a head kidney primary cell culture model. Upon IRF5 transfection, rock bream Mx (Rb-Mx), interferon I (Rb-IFN1) and tumor-necrosis factor α (Rb-TNFα) genes get significantly upregulated in rock bream heart cells. The findings of the present study

  3. Interferon-regulatory factor 1 is an immediate-early gene under transcriptional regulation by prolactin in Nb2 T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Lee, L Y; Hrachovy, J A; Stevens, A M; Schwarz, L A

    1990-01-01

    The pituitary peptide hormone prolactin (Prl) is a potent inducer of Nb2 T lymphoma cell proliferation. To analyze the early genetic response to the mitogenic signals of Prl, a cDNA library was constructed from Nb2 T cells stimulated for 4 h with Prl and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Of 26 distinct clones isolated by differential screening, one clone, designated c25, exhibited extremely rapid but transient kinetics of induction by Prl and superinduction by Prl plus cycloheximide. Run-on transcription analysis indicated that c25 gene transcription was induced greater than 20-fold within 30 to 60 min of Prl stimulation. Surprisingly, DNA sequence analysis of c25 cDNA revealed that this Prl-inducible early-response gene is the rat homolog of the mouse transcription factor interferon-regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1), sharing 91% coding sequence similarity with mouse IRF-1. At the protein level, rat IRF-1 shares 97% and 92% homology with mouse IRF-1 and human IRF-1, respectively, suggesting that this molecule has been functionally conserved throughout evolution. Our studies show that the gene for IRF-1 is an immediate-early gene in Prl-stimulated T cells, which suggests that IRF-1 is a multifunctional molecule. In addition to its role in regulating growth-inhibitory interferon genes, IRF-1 may, therefore, also play a stimulatory role in cell proliferation. The gene for IRF-1 is one of the earliest genes known to be transcriptionally regulated by Prl. Images PMID:2342469

  4. Infliximab therapy balances regulatory T cells, tumour necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) expression and soluble TNFR2 in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Verwoerd, A; Hijdra, D; Vorselaars, A D M; Crommelin, H A; van Moorsel, C H M; Grutters, J C; Claessen, A M E

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology that most commonly affects the lungs. Although elevated levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs ) have been reported, the extent to which they play a role in sarcoidosis pathogenesis remains unclear. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is thought to be one of the driving forces behind granuloma formation, illustrated by the efficacy of infliximab in severe sarcoidosis. Tregs express TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) highly. Here, we examined the influence of infliximab therapy on Tregs and (soluble) TNFR2 levels in sarcoidosis, and correlated these with response to therapy. We observed that relative frequencies of Tregs were significantly higher in patients (n = 54) compared to healthy controls (n = 26; median 6·73 versus 4·36%; P < 0·001) and decreased following therapy (4·95; P < 0·001). Baseline TNFR2 expression on Tregs was increased significantly in patients versus controls (99·4 versus 96·2%; P = 0·031), and also in responders to therapy versus non-responders (99·6 versus 97·3%; P = 0·012). Furthermore, baseline soluble TNFR2 (sTNFR2) was higher in responders than in non-responders (mean 174 versus 107 pg/ml; P = 0·015). After treatment, responders showed a significant reduction in sTNFR2 levels in peripheral blood (-44·7 pg/ml; P < 0·001), in contrast to non-responders (+3·59 pg/ml). Our results demonstrated that Treg frequencies and TNFR2 expression on Tregs are increased in sarcoidosis, followed by a decline during infliximab therapy, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this T cell subset. Interestingly, sTNFR2 levels at baseline differed significantly between responders and non-responders, making it a potential marker in predicting which patients might benefit from infliximab. PMID:27158798

  5. Regulatory domains of the A-Myb transcription factor and its interaction with the CBP/p300 adaptor molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Facchinetti, V; Loffarelli, L; Schreek, S; Oelgeschläger, M; Lüscher, B; Introna, M; Golay, J

    1997-01-01

    The A-Myb transcription factor belongs to the Myb family of oncoproteins and is likely to be involved in the regulation of proliferation and/or differentiation of normal B cells and Burkitt's lymphoma cells. To characterize in detail the domains of A-Myb that regulate its function, we have generated a series of deletion mutants and have investigated their trans-activation potential as well as their DNA-binding activity. Our results have allowed us to delineate the trans-activation domain as well as two separate regulatory regions. The boundaries of the trans-activation domain (amino acid residues 218-319) are centred on a sequence rich in charged amino acids (residues 259-281). A region (residues 320-482) localized immediately downstream of the trans-activation domain and containing a newly identified conserved stretch of 48 residues markedly inhibits specific DNA binding. Finally the last 110 residues of A-Myb (residues 643-752), which include a sequence conserved in all mammalian myb genes (region III), negatively regulate the maximal trans-activation potential of A-Myb. We have also investigated the functional interaction between A-Myb and the nuclear adaptor molecule CBP [cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein]. We demonstrate that CBP synergizes with A-Myb in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this co-operative effect can be inhibited by E1A and can also be observed with the CBP homologue p300. We show that this functional synergism requires the presence of the A-Myb charged sequence and that it involves physical interaction between A-Myb and the CREB-binding domain of CBP. PMID:9210395

  6. MEK inhibition prevents tumour-shed transforming growth factor-β-induced T-regulatory cell augmentation in tumour milieu.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Dewan M S; Panda, Abir K; Chakrabarty, Sreeparna; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Kajal, Kirti; Mohanty, Suchismita; Sarkar, Irene; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Kar, Santosh K; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-04-01

    Tumour progression is associated with immune-suppressive conditions that facilitate the escape of tumour cells from the regimen of immune cells, subsequently paralysing the host defence mechanisms. Induction of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells has been implicated in the tumour immune escape mechanism, although the novel anti-cancer treatment strategies targeting Treg cells remain unknown. The focus of this study is to define the interaction between tumour and immune system, i.e. how immune tolerance starts and gradually leads to the induction of adaptive Treg cells in the tumour microenvironment. Our study identified hyperactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) -signalling as a potential target for reversing Treg cell augmentation in breast cancer patients. In more mechanistic detail, pharmacological inhibitors of MEK/ERK signalling inhibited transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in tumour cells that essentially blocked TGF-β-SMAD3/SMAD4-mediated induction of CD25/interleukin-2 receptor α on CD4(+) T-cell surface. As a result high-affinity binding of interleukin-2 on those cells was prohibited, causing lack of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/JAK3-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/STAT5 activation required for FoxP3 expression. Finally, for a more radical approach towards a safe MEK inhibitor, we validate the potential of multi-kinase inhibitor curcumin, especially the nano-curcumin made out of pure curcumin with greater bioavailability; in repealing tumour-shed TGF-β-induced Treg cell augmentation. PMID:25284464

  7. Molecular identification and functional characterisation of the interferon regulatory factor 1 in the blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Zhan, Fan-Bin; Liu, Han; Lai, Rui-Fang; Jakovlić, Ivan; Wang, Wen-Bin; Wang, Wei-Min

    2016-07-01

    Interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) play a key role in mediating the host response against pathogen infection and other important biological processes. This is the first report of an IRF family member in blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala. The complete cDNA of M. amblycephala (Ma) IRF1 gene has 1422 nucleotides (nt.), with an open reading frame of 858 nt, encoding a polypeptide of 285 amino acids. The putative MaIRF1 polypeptide shared significant structural homology with known IRF1 homologs: a conserved IRF domain was found at the N-terminal and an IRF association domain 2 at the C-terminal. Phylogenetic analysis showed that MaIRF1 amino acid sequence clustered with other teleost IRF1s, with a grass carp ortholog exhibiting the highest similarity. MaIRF1 mRNA expression patterns were studied using quantitative real-time PCR in healthy fish tissues and after a challenge with Aeromonas hydrophila bacterium. It was constitutively expressed in all examined tissues: the highest in blood, the lowest in muscle. The expression after A. hydrophila challenge was up-regulated in liver, spleen and kidney, but down-regulated in intestine and gills. At the protein level, similar expression patterns were observed in liver and gills. Patterns differed in intestine (up-regulation), spleen (down-regulation) and kidney (expression mostly unchanged). This study indicates that MaIRF1 gene plays an important role in the blunt snout bream immune system, hence providing an important base for further studies. PMID:27150048

  8. Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Mediated Apoptosis in the Establishment and Maintenance of Persistent Infection by Sendai Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Fensterl, Volker; Zhang, Ying; Veleeparambil, Manoj; Yamashita, Michifumi

    2013-01-01

    Infection of cultured cells by paramyxoviruses causes cell death, mediated by a newly discovered apoptotic pathway activated by virus infection. The key proapoptotic protein in this pathway is interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), which upon activation by virus infection binds BAX, translocates it to mitochondria, and triggers apoptosis. When IRF-3-knockdown cells were infected with Sendai virus (SeV), persistent infection (PI) was established. The PI cells produced infectious SeV continuously and constitutively expressed many innate immune genes. Interferon signaling was blocked in these cells. The elevated levels of IRF-3-driven genes in the PI cells indicated that the amount of residual IRF-3 activated by endogenous SeV was high enough to drive the transcriptional effects of IRF-3 but too low to trigger its apoptotic activity. We confirmed this IRF-3 threshold idea by generating a tetracycline (Tet)-inducible cell line for IRF-3 expression, which enabled us to express various levels of IRF-3. PI could be established in the Tet-off cell line, and as expected, when doxycycline was withdrawn, the cells underwent apoptosis. Finally, we tested for PI establishment in 12 mouse embryo fibroblasts by natural selection. Eleven lines became persistently infected; although seven out of them had low IRF-3 levels, four did not. When one of the latter four was further analyzed, we observed that it expressed a very low level of caspase 3, the final executor protease of the apoptotic pathway. These results demonstrated that SeV PI can arise from infection of normal wild-type cells, but only if they can find a way to impair the IRF-3-dependent apoptotic pathway. PMID:23077293

  9. Drug Transporters and Na+/H+ Exchange Regulatory Factor PSD-95/Drosophila Discs Large/ZO-1 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Dustin R.; Nolin, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Drug transporters govern the absorption, distribution, and elimination of pharmacologically active compounds. Members of the solute carrier and ATP binding-cassette drug transporter family mediate cellular drug uptake and efflux processes, thereby coordinating the vectorial movement of drugs across epithelial barriers. To exert their physiologic and pharmacological function in polarized epithelia, drug transporters must be targeted and stabilized to appropriate regions of the cell membrane (i.e., apical versus basolateral). Despite the critical importance of drug transporter membrane targeting, the mechanisms that underlie these processes are largely unknown. Several clinically significant drug transporters possess a recognition sequence that binds to PSD-95/Drosophila discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) proteins. PDZ proteins, such as the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF) family, act to stabilize and organize membrane targeting of multiple transmembrane proteins, including many clinically relevant drug transporters. These PDZ proteins are normally abundant at apical membranes, where they tether membrane-delimited transporters. NHERF expression is particularly high at the apical membrane in polarized tissue such as intestinal, hepatic, and renal epithelia, tissues important to drug disposition. Several recent studies have highlighted NHERF proteins as determinants of drug transporter function secondary to their role in controlling membrane abundance and localization. Mounting evidence strongly suggests that NHERF proteins may have clinically significant roles in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of several pharmacologically active compounds and may affect drug action in cancer and chronic kidney disease. For these reasons, NHERF proteins represent a novel class of post-translational mediators of drug transport and novel targets for new drug development. PMID:26092975

  10. The effects of genotype and infant weight on adult plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, and LDL cholesterol are additive.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, J A; Bolla, M; Osmond, C; Fall, C; Barker, D J; Humphries, S E

    1997-01-01

    High circulating levels of cholesterol, particularly low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and the clotting factors fibrinogen and factor VII, are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction. Variations in the plasma levels of these factors are determined in part by polymorphisms in the genes concerned and also by weight at 1 year (infant weight). We have looked at the possibility of interactions between these genetic factors and infant weight in a sample of 290 men and 192 women from Hertfordshire using the beta-fibrinogen G/A-455, factor VII R353Q, and ApoE polymorphisms. The rare allele frequencies of the three polymorphisms were 0.19 for beta-fibrinogen, 0.10 for factor VII, and 0.07 and 0.13 for the 2 and 4 alleles of ApoE, and these frequencies were not different in subjects of different infant weight. In this sample, the polymorphisms showed the expected effects on plasma levels of fibrinogen, factor VII, and LDL cholesterol. The A-455 allele was associated with higher fibrinogen levels but the effect was only statistically significant in women (p = 0.003). The R353 allele was associated with higher factor VII activity in both men and women (p < 0.0001 for both). The ApoE2 allele was associated with lower levels of LDL cholesterol (p = 0.03 in men, p = 0.006 in women), while the ApoE4 allele was associated with higher levels (p < 0.001 in men, not significant in women). In this sample of men and women the effect of low infant weight was only associated with significant effects on fibrinogen and LDL cholesterol in the group of men (p = 0.005 and p = 0.008 respectively). Compared with the E3E3 subjects, the LDL lowering effect of the E2 allele and the raising effect of the E4 allele was greater in those with low infant weight compared with those with high infant weight (low v high infant weight for E2: 12.7% v 9.4%; for E4 12.7% v 8.5%). Although in this sample the interactive effect did not reach statistical significance, the additive effect

  11. Enhancing Interferon Regulatory Factor 7 Mediated Antiviral Responses and Decreasing Nuclear Factor Kappa B Expression Limit HIV-1 Replication in Cervical Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rollenhage, Christiane; Macura, Sherrill L.; Lathrop, Melissa J.; Mackenzie, Todd A.; Doncel, Gustavo F.; Asin, Susana N.

    2015-01-01

    Establishment of a productive HIV-1 infection in the female reproductive tract likely depends on the balance between anti-viral and pro-inflammatory responses leading to activation and proliferation of HIV target cells. Immune modulators that boost anti-viral and depress pro-inflammatory immune responses may decrease HIV-1 infection or replication. Polyinosinic:polycytidylic [Poly (I:C)] has been reported to down-regulate HIV-1 replication in immune cell subsets and lymphoid tissues, yet the scope and mechanisms of poly (I:C) regulation of HIV-1 replication in the cervicovaginal mucosa, the main portal of viral entry in women remain unknown. Using a relevant, underexplored ex vivo cervical tissue model, we demonstrated that poly (I:C) enhanced Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF)7 mediated antiviral responses and decreased tissue Nuclear Factor Kappa B (NFκB) RNA expression. This pattern of cellular transcription factor expression correlated with decreased HIV-1 transcription and viral release. Reducing IRF7 expression up-regulated HIV-1 and NFκB transcription, providing proof of concept for the critical involvement of IRF7 in cervical tissues. By combining poly (I:C) with a suboptimal concentration of tenofovir, the leading anti-HIV prophylactic microbicide candidate, we demonstrated an earlier and greater decrease in HIV replication in poly (I:C)/tenofovir treated tissues compared with tissues treated with tenofovir alone, indicating overall improved efficacy. Poly (I:C) decreases HIV-1 replication by stimulating IRF7 mediated antiviral responses while reducing NFκB expression. Early during the infection, poly (I:C) improved the anti-HIV-1 activity of suboptimal concentrations of tenofovir likely to be present during periods of poor adherence i.e. inconsistent or inadequate drug use. Understanding interactions between anti-viral and pro-inflammatory immune responses in the genital mucosa will provide crucial insights for the identification of targets that can be

  12. A novel interferon regulatory factor family transcription factor, ICSAT/Pip/LSIRF, that negatively regulates the activity of interferon-regulated genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, T; Nishida, J; Tanaka, S; Sakai, R; Mitani, K; Yoshida, M; Taniguchi, T; Yazaki, Y; Hirai, H

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated a novel cDNA clone encoding interferon (IFN) consensus sequence-binding protein in adult T-cell leukemia cell line or activated T cells (ICSAT); this protein is the human homolog of the recently cloned Pip/LSIRF. ICSAT is structurally most closely related to the previously cloned ICSBP, a member of the IFN regulatory factor (IRF) family of proteins that binds to interferon consensus sequences (ICSs) found in many promoters of the IFN-regulated genes. Among T-cell lines investigated, ICSAT was abundantly expressed in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected T cells. When the HTLV-1 tax gene was expressed or phorbol myristake acetate-A23187 stimulation was used, ICSAT expression was induced in Jurkat cells which otherwise do not express ICSAT. When the binding of ICSAT to four different ICSs was tested, the relative differences in binding affinities for those ICSs were determined. To study the functional role of ICSAT, we performed cotransfection experiments with the human embryonal carcinoma cell line N-Tera2. ICSAT was demonstrated to possess repressive function over the gene activation induced by IFN stimulation or by IRF-1 cotransfection. Such repressive function is similar to that seen in IRF-2 or ICSBP. However, we have found that ICSAT has a different repressive effect from that of IRF-2 or ICSBP in some IFN-responsive reporter constructs. These results suggest that a novel mechanism of gene regulation by "differential repression" is used by multiple members of repressor proteins with different repressive effects on the IFN-responsive genes. PMID:8657101

  13. Interferon regulatory factor subcellular localization is determined by a bipartite nuclear localization signal in the DNA-binding domain and interaction with cytoplasmic retention factors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Joe F.; Parisien, Jean-Patrick; Horvath, Curt M.

    2000-01-01

    The transduction of type I interferon signals to the nucleus relies on activation of a protein complex, ISGF3, involving two signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, STAT1 and STAT2, and the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF) protein, p48/ISGF3γ. The STAT subunits are cytoplasmically localized in unstimulated cells and rapidly translocate to the nucleus of IFN-stimulated cells, but the p48/ISGF3γ protein is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, regardless of IFN stimulation. Here, we demonstrate that p48 is efficiently and constitutively targeted to the nucleus. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of green fluorescent protein-p48 fragments indicates that p48 contains a bipartite nuclear retention signal within its amino-terminal DNA-binding domain. This signal is preserved in two other IRF proteins involved in immune responses, ICSBP and IRF4. Mutations to clustered basic residues within amino acids 50–100 of p48 or IRF4 disrupt their nuclear accumulation, and DNA-binding ability is not required for nuclear targeting. This is the only example of a nuclear localization signal for any ISGF3 component and assigns a second function to the IRF DNA-binding domain. We also demonstrate that the nuclear distribution of p48 is dramatically altered by coexpression of the STAT2 protein, indicating that STAT2 forms a cytoplasmic complex with p48, overriding the intrinsic p48 nuclear targeting. Retention by STAT2 may serve to regulate the activity of free p48 and/or guarantee that cytoplasmic pools of preassociated STAT2:p48 are available for rapid activation of the IFN response. These findings suggest that analogous mechanisms may exist for regulating the distribution of other IRF proteins. PMID:10860992

  14. Effects of chondrogenic and osteogenic regulatory factors on composite constructs grown using human mesenchymal stem cells, silk scaffolds and bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Augst, Alexander; Marolt, Darja; Freed, Lisa E; Vepari, Charu; Meinel, Lorenz; Farley, Michelle; Fajardo, Robert; Patel, Nipun; Gray, Martha; Kaplan, David L; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2008-08-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) isolated from bone marrow aspirates were cultured on silk scaffolds in rotating bioreactors for three weeks with either chondrogenic or osteogenic medium supplements to engineer cartilage- or bone-like tissue constructs. Osteochondral composites formed from these cartilage and bone constructs were cultured for an additional three weeks in culture medium that was supplemented with chondrogenic factors, supplemented with osteogenic factors or unsupplemented. Progression of cartilage and bone formation and the integration between the two regions were assessed by medical imaging (magnetic resonance imaging and micro-computerized tomography imaging), and by biochemical, histological and mechanical assays. During composite culture (three to six weeks), bone-like tissue formation progressed in all three media to a markedly larger extent than cartilage-like tissue formation. The integration of the constructs was most enhanced in composites cultured in chondrogenic medium. The results suggest that tissue composites with well-mineralized regions and substantially less developed cartilage regions can be generated in vitro by culturing hMSCs on silk scaffolds in bioreactors, that hMSCs have markedly higher capacity for producing engineered bone than engineered cartilage, and that chondrogenic factors play major roles at early stages of bone formation by hMSCs and in the integration of the two tissue constructs into a tissue composite. PMID:18230586

  15. TCDD Induces the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF)-1α Regulatory Pathway in Human Trophoblastic JAR Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Tien-Ling; Chen, Su-Chee; Tzeng, Chii-Reuy; Kao, Shu-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The exposure to dioxin can compromise pregnancy outcomes and increase the risk of preterm births. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been demonstrated to induce placental hypoxia at the end of pregnancy in a rat model, and hypoxia has been suggested to be the cause of abnormal trophoblast differentiation and placental insufficiency syndromes. In this study, we demonstrate that the non-hypoxic stimulation of human trophoblastic cells by TCDD strongly increased hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) stabilization. TCDD exposure induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide. TCDD-induced HIF-1α stabilization and Akt phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor) or N-acetylcysteine (a ROS scavenger). The augmented HIF-1α stabilization by TCDD occurred via the ROS-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Additionally, a significant increase in invasion and metallomatrix protease-9 activity was found in TCDD-treated cells. The gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor was induced upon TCDD stimulation, whereas the protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), PPARγ coactivator-1α, mitochondrial transcription factor, and uncoupling protein 2 were decreased. Our results indicate that an activated HIF-1α pathway, elicited oxidative stress, and induced metabolic stress contribute to TCDD-induced trophoblastic toxicity. These findings may provide molecular insight into the TCDD-induced impairment of trophoblast function and placental development. PMID:25272228

  16. TCDD induces the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α regulatory pathway in human trophoblastic JAR cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Tien-Ling; Chen, Su-Chee; Tzeng, Chii-Reuy; Kao, Shu-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The exposure to dioxin can compromise pregnancy outcomes and increase the risk of preterm births. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) has been demonstrated to induce placental hypoxia at the end of pregnancy in a rat model, and hypoxia has been suggested to be the cause of abnormal trophoblast differentiation and placental insufficiency syndromes. In this study, we demonstrate that the non-hypoxic stimulation of human trophoblastic cells by TCDD strongly increased hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) stabilization. TCDD exposure induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide. TCDD-induced HIF-1α stabilization and Akt phosphorylation was inhibited by pretreatment with wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor) or N-acetylcysteine (a ROS scavenger). The augmented HIF-1α stabilization by TCDD occurred via the ROS-dependent activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Additionally, a significant increase in invasion and metallomatrix protease-9 activity was found in TCDD-treated cells. The gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor was induced upon TCDD stimulation, whereas the protein levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), PPARγ coactivator-1α, mitochondrial transcription factor, and uncoupling protein 2 were decreased. Our results indicate that an activated HIF-1α pathway, elicited oxidative stress, and induced metabolic stress contribute to TCDD-induced trophoblastic toxicity. These findings may provide molecular insight into the TCDD-induced impairment of trophoblast function and placental development. PMID:25272228

  17. Role of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 in forward trafficking of the type IIa Na+-Pi cotransporter

    PubMed Central

    Ketchem, Corey J.; Khundmiri, Syed J.; Gaweda, Adam E.; Murray, Rebecca; Clark, Barbara J.; Weinman, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1) plays a critical role in the renal transport of phosphate by binding to Na+-Pi cotransporter (NpT2a) in the proximal tubule. While the association between NpT2a and NHERF1 in the apical membrane is known, the role of NHERF1 to regulate the trafficking of NpT2a has not been studied. To address this question, we performed cell fractionation by sucrose gradient centrifugation in opossum kidney (OK) cells placed in low-Pi medium to stimulate forward trafficking of NpT2a. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated expression of NpT2a and NHERF1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/Golgi. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated a NpT2a-NHERF1 interaction in the ER/Golgi. Low-Pi medium for 4 and 8 h triggered a decrease in NHERF1 in the plasma membrane with a corresponding increase in the ER/Golgi. Time-lapse total internal reflection fluorescence imaging of OK cells placed in low-Pi medium, paired with particle tracking and mean square displacement analysis, indicated active directed movement of NHERF1 at early and late time points, whereas NpT2a showed active movement only at later times. Silence of NHERF1 in OK cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-NpT2a resulted in an intracellular accumulation of GFP-NpT2a. Transfection with GFP-labeled COOH-terminal (TRL) PDZ-binding motif deleted or wild-type NpT2a in OK cells followed by cell fractionation and immunoprecipitation confirmed that the interaction between NpT2a and NHERF1 was dependent on the TRL motif of NpT2a. We conclude that appropriate trafficking of NpT2a to the plasma membrane is dependent on the initial association between NpT2a and NHERF1 through the COOH-terminal TRL motif of NpT2a in the ER/Golgi and requires redistribution of NHERF1 to the ER/Golgi. PMID:25995109

  18. Role of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 in forward trafficking of the type IIa Na+-Pi cotransporter.

    PubMed

    Ketchem, Corey J; Khundmiri, Syed J; Gaweda, Adam E; Murray, Rebecca; Clark, Barbara J; Weinman, Edward J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2015-07-15

    Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1) plays a critical role in the renal transport of phosphate by binding to Na+-Pi cotransporter (NpT2a) in the proximal tubule. While the association between NpT2a and NHERF1 in the apical membrane is known, the role of NHERF1 to regulate the trafficking of NpT2a has not been studied. To address this question, we performed cell fractionation by sucrose gradient centrifugation in opossum kidney (OK) cells placed in low-Pi medium to stimulate forward trafficking of NpT2a. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated expression of NpT2a and NHERF1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)/Golgi. Coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated a NpT2a-NHERF1 interaction in the ER/Golgi. Low-Pi medium for 4 and 8 h triggered a decrease in NHERF1 in the plasma membrane with a corresponding increase in the ER/Golgi. Time-lapse total internal reflection fluorescence imaging of OK cells placed in low-Pi medium, paired with particle tracking and mean square displacement analysis, indicated active directed movement of NHERF1 at early and late time points, whereas NpT2a showed active movement only at later times. Silence of NHERF1 in OK cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-NpT2a resulted in an intracellular accumulation of GFP-NpT2a. Transfection with GFP-labeled COOH-terminal (TRL) PDZ-binding motif deleted or wild-type NpT2a in OK cells followed by cell fractionation and immunoprecipitation confirmed that the interaction between NpT2a and NHERF1 was dependent on the TRL motif of NpT2a. We conclude that appropriate trafficking of NpT2a to the plasma membrane is dependent on the initial association between NpT2a and NHERF1 through the COOH-terminal TRL motif of NpT2a in the ER/Golgi and requires redistribution of NHERF1 to the ER/Golgi. PMID:25995109

  19. 77 FR 71400 - Procurement List, Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 8/24/2012 (77 FR 51522-51523) and 10/5/2012 (77 FR 60969), the Committee.... Regulatory Flexibility Act Certification I certify that the following action will not have a significant impact on a substantial number of small entities. The major factors considered for this...

  20. Distal apolipoprotein C-III regulatory elements F to J act as a general modular enhancer for proximal promoters that contain hormone response elements. Synergism between hepatic nuclear factor-4 molecules bound to the proximal promoter and distal enhancer sites.

    PubMed

    Kardassis, D; Tzameli, I; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, M; Talianidis, I; Zannis, V

    1997-01-01

    Transient transfection assays have shown that the distal apoC-III promoter segments that contain the regulatory elements F to J enhance the strength of the tandemly linked proximal apoA-I promoter 5- to 13-fold in hepatic (HepG2) cells. Activation in intestinal (CaCo-2) cells to levels comparable to those obtained in HepG2 cells requires a larger apoA-I promoter sequence that extends to nucleotide -1500 as well as the presence of hepatic nuclear factor-4 (HNF-4). The distal apoC-III regulatory elements can also enhance 4- to 8-fold the strength of the heterologous apoB promoter in HepG2 and CaCo-2 cells. Finally, these elements in the presence of HNF-4 enhance 14.5- to 18.5-fold the strength of the minimal adenovirus major late promoter linked to two copies of the hormone response element (HRE) AID of apoA-I in both HepG2 and CaCo-2 cells. In vitro mutagenesis of the promoter/enhancer cluster established that the enhancer activity is lost by a mutation in the HRE present in the 3' end of the regulatory element I (-736 to -714) and is reduced significantly by point mutations or deletions in one or more of the regulatory elements F to J of the apoC-III enhancer. The enhancer activity also requires the HREs of the proximal apoA-I promoter. The apoC-III enhancer can also restore the activity of the proximal apoA-I and apoB promoters that have been inactivated by mutations in CCAAT/enhancers binding protein binding sites, indicating that C/EBP may not participate in the synergistic activation of the promoter/enhancer cluster. The findings suggest that the regulatory elements F to J of the apoC-III promoter act as a general modular enhancer that can potentiate the strength of proximal promoters that contain HREs. Such potentiation in the HepG2 cells can be accounted for by synergistic interactions between HNF-4 or other nuclear hormone receptors bound to the proximal and distal HREs and SP1 or other factors bound to the apoC-III enhancer. Additional factors may be

  1. Lentiviral hepatitis B pseudotype entry requires sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and additional hepatocyte-specific factors.

    PubMed

    Meredith, L W; Hu, K; Cheng, X; Howard, C R; Baumert, T F; Balfe, P; van de Graaf, K F; Protzer, U; McKeating, J A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the world's major unconquered infections, resulting in progressive liver disease, and current treatments rarely cure infection. A limitation to discovering new therapies is our limited knowledge of HBV entry and dissemination pathways that hinders the development of in vitro culture systems. To address this gap in our understanding we optimized the genesis of infectious lentiviral pseudoparticles (HBVpps). The recent discovery that the bile salt transporter sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) acts as a receptor for HBV enabled us to assess the receptor dependency of HBVpp infection. HBVpps preferentially infect hepatoma cells expressing NTCP, whereas other non-liver cells engineered to express NTCP do not support infection, suggesting that additional hepatocyte-specific factors are required for HBVpp internalization. These results highlight the value of the HBVpp system to dissect the pathways of HBV entry and dissemination. PMID:26474824

  2. Insulin receptor isoform A and insulin-like growth factor II as additional treatment targets in human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Avnet, Sofia; Sciacca, Laura; Salerno, Manuela; Gancitano, Giovanni; Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Longhi, Alessandra; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Carboni, Joan M; Gottardis, Marco; Giunti, Armando; Pollak, Michael; Vigneri, Riccardo; Baldini, Nicola

    2009-03-15

    Despite the frequent presence of an insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGFIR)-mediated autocrine loop in osteosarcoma (OS), interfering with this target was only moderately effective in preclinical studies. Here, we considered other members of the IGF system that might be involved in the molecular pathology of OS. We found that, among 45 patients with OS, IGF-I and IGFBP-3 serum levels were significantly lower, and IGF-II serum levels significantly higher, than healthy controls. Increased IGF-II values were associated with a decreased disease-free survival. After tumor removal, both IGF-I and IGF-II levels returned to normal values. In 23 of 45 patients, we obtained tissue specimens and found that all expressed high mRNA level of IGF-II and >IGF-I. Also, isoform A of the insulin receptor (IR-A) was expressed at high level in addition to IGFIR and IR-A/IGFIR hybrids receptors (HR(A)). These receptors were also expressed in OS cell lines, and simultaneous impairment of IGFIR, IR, and Hybrid-Rs by monoclonal antibodies, siRNA, or the tyrosine kinase inhibitor BMS-536924, which blocks both IGFIR and IR, was more effective than selective anti-IGFIR strategies. Also, anti-IGF-II-siRNA treatment in low-serum conditions significantly inhibited MG-63 OS cells that have an autocrine circuit for IGF-II. In summary, IGF-II rather than IGF-I is the predominant growth factor produced by OS cells, and three different receptors (IR-A, HR(A), and IGFIR) act complementarily for an IGF-II-mediated constitutive autocrine loop, in addition to the previously shown IGFIR/IGF-I circuit. Cotargeting IGFIR and IR-A is more effective than targeting IGF-IR alone in inhibiting OS growth. PMID:19258511

  3. Regulation of IFN regulatory factor-7 and IFN-alpha production by enveloped virus and lipopolysaccharide in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jihong; Megjugorac, Nicholas J; Amrute, Sheela B; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Patricia

    2004-08-01

    Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are a major source of IFN-alpha upon exposure to enveloped viruses and TLR-7 and TLR-9 ligands. Although IFN regulatory factor-7 (IRF-7) is known to play an essential role in virus-activated transcription of IFN-alpha genes, the molecular mechanisms of IFN-alpha production in human PDC remain poorly understood. We and others have recently reported high constitutive levels of IRF-7 expression in PDC as compared with other PBMC. In this study, we demonstrate that both LPS and HSV up-regulate the expression of IRF-7 in PDC, and that this enhancement of IRF-7 is dependent on NF-kappa B activation. The NF-kappa B inhibitors MG132 and pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate efficiently inhibited the induction of IRF-7 by HSV or LPS, and also down-regulated the constitutive expression of IRF-7 in PDC and blocked the HSV-induced production of IFN-alpha. In addition, we found that nuclear translocation of IRF-7 occurred rapidly in response to HSV stimulation, but not in response to LPS, which is consistent with the stimulation of IFN-alpha production by virus and not by LPS. Although LPS by itself was not able to induce IFN-alpha production, it led to rapid up-regulation of TLR-4 on PDC and increased the magnitude and accelerated the kinetics of HSV-induced IFN-alpha production in PDC, providing a mechanism that might be operative in a scenario of mixed infection. In contrast to the current concept of IFN-alpha regulation established in cell lines, this study strongly supports the immediate availability of high constitutive levels of IRF-7 expression in PDC, and suggests an activation required for IRF-7 that contributes to IFN-alpha production in virus-stimulated PDC. PMID:15265881

  4. Cloning and expression analyses of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and 7 genes in European eel, Anguilla anguilla with the identification of genes involved in IFN production.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bei; Huang, Wen Shu; Nie, P

    2014-04-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3 and IRF7 have been identified as regulators of type I interferon (IFN) gene expression in mammals. In the present study, the two genes were cloned and characterized in the European eel, Anguilla anguilla. The full-length cDNA sequence of IRF3 and IRF7 in the European eel, named as AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 consists of 2879 and 2419 bp respectively. Multiple alignments showed that the two IRFs have a highly conserved DNA binding domain (DBD) in the N terminus, with the characteristic motif containing five tryptophan residues, which is a feature present in their mammalian homologues. But, IRF7 has only four of the five residues in other species of fish. The expression of AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 both displayed an obvious dose-dependent manner following polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C) challenge. In vivo expression analysis showed that the mRNA level of AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 was significantly up-regulated in response to PolyI:C stimulation in all examined tissues/organs except in muscle, with a lower level of increase observed in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge and Edwardsiella tarda infection, indicating that AaIRF3 and AaIRF7 may be more likely involved in antiviral immune response. In addition, some pattern recognition receptors genes related with the production of type I IFNs and those genes in response to type I IFNs were identified in the European eel genome database, indicating a relatively conserved system in the production of type I IFN and its signalling in the European eel. PMID:24565894

  5. Three Chymotrypsin Genes Are Members of the AdpA Regulon in the A-Factor Regulatory Cascade in Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Tomono, Ayami; Tsai, Yisan; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2005-01-01

    AdpA is a key transcriptional activator in the A-factor regulatory cascade in Streptomyces griseus, activating a number of genes required for secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation. Of the five chymotrypsin-type serine protease genes, sprA, sprB, and sprD were transcribed in response to AdpA, showing that these protease genes are members of the AdpA regulon. These proteases were predicted to play the same physiological role, since these protease genes were transcribed in a similar time course during growth and the matured enzymes showed high end-to-end similarity to one another. AdpA bound two sites upstream of the sprA promoter approximately at positions −375 and −50 with respect to the transcriptional start point of sprA. Mutational analysis of the AdpA-binding sites showed that both AdpA-binding sites were essential for transcriptional activation. AdpA bound a single site at position −50 in front of the sprB promoter and greatly enhanced the transcription of sprB. The AdpA-binding site at position −40 was essential for transcription of sprD, although there was an additional AdpA-binding site at position −180. Most chymotrypsin activity excreted by S. griseus was attributed to SprA and SprB, because mutant ΔsprAB, having a deletion in both sprA and sprB, lost almost all chymotrypsin activity, as did mutant ΔadpA. Even the double mutant ΔsprAB and triple mutant ΔsprABD grew normally and developed aerial hyphae and spores over the same time course as the wild-type strain. PMID:16159767

  6. Regulatory skill as a resilience factor for adults with a history of foster care: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Angela J; Tottenham, Nim

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of foster care (FC) are at elevated risk for emotion regulation-related mental illness. The purpose of the current study was to characterize regulatory function in a group of adults with a history of FC (N = 26) relative to those without a history of FC (N = 27) and how regulatory function moderates adverse caregiving-related outcomes (daily cortisol production and trait anxiety). Self-report items (anxiety, emotion regulation strategies, inhibitory control, caregiving history) were collected along with more objective measures (computerized task and salivary cortisol). Inhibitory control was assessed via self-report and a computerized task (emotional face go/nogo). Results showed that for adults with a history of FC, higher levels of inhibitory control were associated with higher accuracy on the emotional face go/nogo task and greater reported use of the emotion regulation strategy cognitive reappraisal. Greater use of cognitive reappraisal in turn was associated with healthier stress-related outcomes (decreased trait anxiety and steeper sloped cortisol production throughout the day). Dose-response associations were observed between self-reported regulatory skills and FC experiences (i.e., number of placements and age when exited foster care). These findings suggest that adverse caregiving can have long-term influences on mental health that extend into adulthood; however, individual differences in regulatory skills moderate these outcomes and may be an important target for intervention following caregiving adversity. PMID:25270099

  7. Pituitary Ets-1 and GABP bind to the growth factor regulatory sites of the rat prolactin promoter.

    PubMed

    Schweppe, R E; Gutierrez-Hartmann, A

    2001-03-01

    Ets factors play a critical role in oncogenic Ras- and growth factor-mediated regulation of the proximal rat prolactin (rPRL) promoter in pituitary cells. The rPRL promoter contains two key functional Ets binding sites (EBS): a composite EBS/Pit-1 element located at -212 and an EBS that co-localizes with the basal transcription element (BTE, or A-site) located at -96. Oncogenic Ras exclusively signals to the -212 site, which we have named the Ras response element (RRE); whereas the response of multiple growth factors (FGFs, EGF, IGF, insulin and TRH) maps to both EBSs. Although Ets-1 and GA binding protein (GABP) have been implicated in the Ras and insulin responses, respectively, the precise identity of the pituitary Ets factors that specifically bind to the RRE and BTE sites remains unknown. In order to identify the Ets factor(s) present in GH4 and GH3 nuclear extracts (GH4NE and GH3NE) that bind to the EBSs contained in the RRE and BTE, we used EBS-RRE and BTE oligonucleotides in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), antibody supershift assays, western blot analysis of partially purified fractions and UV-crosslinking studies. EMSAs, using either the BTE or EBS-RRE probes, identified a specific protein-DNA complex, designated complex A, which contains an Ets factor as determined by oligonucleotide competition studies. Using western blot analysis of GH3 nuclear proteins that bind to heparin-Sepharose, we have shown that Ets-1 and GABP, which are MAP kinase substrates, co-purify with complex A, and supershift analysis with specific antisera revealed that complex A contains Ets-1, GABPalpha and GABPbeta1. In addition, we show that recombinant full-length Ets-1 binds equivalently to BTE and EBS-RRE probes, while recombinant GABPalpha/beta preferentially binds to the BTE probe. Furthermore, comparing the DNA binding of GH4NE containing both Ets-1 and GABP and HeLa nuclear extracts devoid of Ets-1 but containing GABP, we were able to show that the EBS

  8. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  9. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  10. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  11. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  12. 25 CFR 39.1101 - Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School Equalization Formula in fiscal year 1982. 39.1101 Section 39.1101 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... Programs § 39.1101 Addition of pre-kindergarten as a weight factor to the Indian School...

  13. The Protein Phosphatase 2A Regulatory Subunit B56γ Mediates Suppression of T Cell Receptor (TCR)-induced Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Rebecca; Becker, Michael S.; Brechmann, Markus; Mock, Thomas; Arnold, Rüdiger; Krammer, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    NF-κB is an important transcription factor in the immune system, and aberrant NF-κB activity contributes to malignant diseases and autoimmunity. In T cells, NF-κB is activated upon TCR stimulation, and signal transduction to NF-κB activation is triggered by a cascade of phosphorylation events. However, fine-tuning and termination of TCR signaling are only partially understood. Phosphatases oppose the role of kinases by removing phosphate moieties. The catalytic activity of the protein phosphatase PP2A has been implicated in the regulation of NF-κB. PP2A acts in trimeric complexes in which the catalytic subunit is promiscuous and the regulatory subunit confers substrate specificity. To understand and eventually target NF-κB-specific PP2A functions it is essential to define the regulatory PP2A subunit involved. So far, the regulatory PP2A subunit that mediates NF-κB suppression in T cells remained undefined. By performing a siRNA screen in Jurkat T cells harboring a NF-κB-responsive luciferase reporter, we identified the PP2A regulatory subunit B56γ as negative regulator of NF-κB in TCR signaling. B56γ was strongly up-regulated upon primary human T cell activation, and B56γ silencing induced increased IκB kinase (IKK) and IκBα phosphorylation upon TCR stimulation. B56γ silencing enhanced NF-κB activity, resulting in increased NF-κB target gene expression including the T cell cytokine IL-2. In addition, T cell proliferation was increased upon B56γ silencing. These data help to understand the physiology of PP2A function in T cells and the pathophysiology of diseases involving PP2A and NF-κB. PMID:24719332

  14. Differential expression of complement proteins and regulatory decay accelerating factor in relation to differentiation of cultured human colon adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Bernet-Camard, M F; Coconnier, M H; Hudault, S; Servin, A L

    1996-01-01

    Self protection of host cells against inadvertent injury resulting from attack by autologous complement proteins is well reported for vascular epithelium. In intestinal epithelium, the expression of C complement proteins and regulatory proteins remains currently poorly reported. This study looked at the distribution of C complement proteins and regulatory decay accelerating factor (DAF) in four cultured human intestinal cell lines of embryogenic or colon cancer origins. C3 and C4 proteins and DAF were widely present in human colon adenocarcinoma T84, HT-29 glc-/+ cells compared with human embryonic INT407 cells. In contrast, no expression of C5, C5b-9, and CR1 was seen for any of the cell lines. Taking advantage of the Caco-2 cells, which spontaneously differentiate in culture, it was seen that the C3, C4, and DAF were present in undifferentiated cells and that their expression increased as a function of the cell differentiation. These results, taken together with other reports on the presence of C complement proteins and DAF in the intestinal cells infer that the expression of regulatory C complement proteins develops in parallel with the expression of C proteins to protect these cells against the potential injury resulting from the activation of these local C proteins. Moreover, the finding that the pathogenic C1845 Escherichia coli binds to the membrane bound DAF in the cultured human intestinal cells synthetising locally C proteins and regulatory C proteins supports the hypothesis that E coli could promote inflammatory disorders by blocking local regulatory protein function. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8801206

  15. Type 1 Diabetes in the Spanish Population: additional factors to Class II HLA-DR3 and -DR4

    PubMed Central

    Urcelay, Elena; Santiago, José L; de la Calle, Hermenegildo; Martínez, Alfonso; Méndez, Julián; Ibarra, José M; Maluenda, Carlos; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; de la Concha, Emilio G

    2005-01-01

    Background The Major Histocompatibility Complex is the main genetic contributor to susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D); genome-wide scans have consistently mapped increased predisposition to this region. The highest disease risk has been associated with HLA-DR3 and HLA-DR4. In particular, the DR3-positive ancestral haplotype 18.2 was reported as highly diabetogenic. We aimed to corroborate whether this haplotype increases the susceptibility conferred by the DQ2-DR3 alleles in a Mediterranean population. We also searched for additional susceptibility factors to the classic DQ2-DR3 and DQ8-DR4. Results Genetic MHC markers were analysed in a case-control study with 302 T1D patients and 529 ethnically matched controls. DR3-TNFa1b5 carrier rate was significantly higher in DR3-positive heterozygous T1D patients than in DR3-positive heterozygous controls (p = 0.0019; odds ratio OR [95% confidence interval CI] = 2.26 [1.3–3.93]). This data was confirmed analysing the allelic frequency, which includes the information corresponding to the DR3-homozygous individuals (p = 0.001; OR = 2.09) and by using the Arlequin software to check the DR3-positive haplotypes (p = 0.004;OR = 1.93). The present results provide strong evidence of a second susceptibility region in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 in the Spanish population. Moreover, we searched for T1D susceptibility factors in addition to the MHC classical ones, within the DR2-DQ6/DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 negative population. Several genetic markers in both MHC class II (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501 [p = 0.007;OR = 2.81], DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202 [p = 0.03; OR = 2.35]) and III (TNFa2b1 [p = 0.01 OR = 2.74], BAT-2*2 [p = 0.004; OR = 3.19]) were found. These different alleles associated with T1D were not independent and we observed linkage disequilibrium among them leading us to describe two new risk haplotypes (DQA1*0101-DQB1*0501-TNFa2b1 and DQA1*0201-DQB1*0202- BAT-2*2). Finally, we studied a T1D susceptibility/protection marker located in

  16. Randomised Controlled Feasibility Trial of an Evidence-Informed Behavioural Intervention for Obese Adults with Additional Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sniehotta, Falko F.; Dombrowski, Stephan U.; Avenell, Alison; Johnston, Marie; McDonald, Suzanne; Murchie, Peter; Ramsay, Craig R.; Robertson, Kim; Araujo-Soares, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Background Interventions for dietary and physical activity changes in obese adults may be less effective for participants with additional obesity-related risk factors and co-morbidities than for otherwise healthy individuals. This study aimed to test the feasibility and acceptability of the recruitment, allocation, measurement, retention and intervention procedures of a randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve physical activity and dietary practices amongst obese adults with additional obesity related risk factors. Method Pilot single centre open-labelled outcome assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial of obese (Body Mass Index (BMI)≥30 kg/m2) adults (age≥18 y) with obesity related co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance or hypertension. Participants were randomly allocated to a manual-based group intervention or a leaflet control condition in accordance to a 2∶1 allocation ratio. Primary outcome was acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures, secondary outcomes included measures of body composition, physical activity, food intake and psychological process measures. Results Out of 806 potentially eligible individuals identified through list searches in two primary care general medical practices N = 81 participants (63% female; mean-age = 56.56(11.44); mean-BMI = 36.73(6.06)) with 2.35(1.47) co-morbidities were randomised. Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) was the only significant predictor of providing consent to take part in the study (higher chances of consent for invitees with lower levels of deprivation). Participant flowcharts, qualitative and quantitative feedback suggested good acceptance and feasibility of intervention procedures but 34.6% of randomised participants were lost to follow-up due to overly high measurement burden and sub-optimal retention procedures. Participants in the intervention group showed positive trends for most psychological, behavioural and body

  17. Sodium Benzoate, a Metabolite of Cinnamon and a Food Additive, Upregulates Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Modi, Khushbu K; Jana, Malabendu; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-11-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promyelinating trophic factor that plays an important role in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, mechanisms by which CNTF expression could be increased in the brain are poorly understood. Recently we have discovered anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities of sodium benzoate (NaB), a metabolite of cinnamon and a widely-used food additive. Here, we delineate that NaB is also capable of increasing the mRNA and protein expression of CNTF in primary mouse astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and primary human astrocytes. Accordingly, oral administration of NaB and cinnamon led to the upregulation of astroglial and oligodendroglial CNTF in vivo in mouse brain. Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS, reduced the level of CNTF in the brain, which was restored by oral administration of cinnamon. While investigating underlying mechanisms, we observed that NaB induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated NaB-induced expression of CNTF. The activation of cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein by NaB, the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the CNTF promoter by NaB and the abrogation of NaB-induced expression of CNTF in astrocytes by siRNA knockdown of CREB suggest that NaB increases the expression of CNTF via the activation of CREB. These results highlight a novel myelinogenic property of NaB and cinnamon, which may be of benefit for MS and other demyelinating disorders. PMID:26399250

  18. Working with Policy and Regulatory Factors to Implement Universal Design in the Built Environment: The Australian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Helen; Hitch, Danielle; Watchorn, Valerie; Ang, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Built environments that are usable by all provide opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. However, enabling them in day to day design processes and practice is problematic for relevant professions. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain greater understanding of the policy and regulatory influences that promote or hinder the uptake of universal design in built environments, to inform better future design. Focus groups or telephone interviews were undertaken with 28 key building industry and disability stakeholders in Australia. Four themes were identified: the difficulties of definition; the push or pull of regulations and policy; the role of formal standards; and, shifting the focus of design thinking. The findings highlight the complexity of working within policy and regulatory contexts when implementing universal design. Occupational therapists working with colleagues from other professions must be aware of these influences, and develop the skills to work with them for successful practice. PMID:26184278

  19. Working with Policy and Regulatory Factors to Implement Universal Design in the Built Environment: The Australian Experience.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Helen; Hitch, Danielle; Watchorn, Valerie; Ang, Susan

    2015-07-01

    Built environments that are usable by all provide opportunities for engagement in meaningful occupations. However, enabling them in day to day design processes and practice is problematic for relevant professions. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain greater understanding of the policy and regulatory influences that promote or hinder the uptake of universal design in built environments, to inform better future design. Focus groups or telephone interviews were undertaken with 28 key building industry and disability stakeholders in Australia. Four themes were identified: the difficulties of definition; the push or pull of regulations and policy; the role of formal standards; and, shifting the focus of design thinking. The findings highlight the complexity of working within policy and regulatory contexts when implementing universal design. Occupational therapists working with colleagues from other professions must be aware of these influences, and develop the skills to work with them for successful practice. PMID:26184278

  20. Regulatory Skill as a Resilience Factor for Adults With a History of Foster Care: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Angela J; Tottenham, Nim

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a history of foster care (FC) are at elevated risk for emotion regulation-related mental illness. The purpose of the current study was to characterize regulatory function in a group of adults with a history of FC (N = 26) relative to those without a history of FC (N = 27) and how regulatory function moderates adverse caregiving-related outcomes (daily cortisol production and trait anxiety). Self-report items (anxiety, emotion regulation strategies, inhibitory control, caregiving history) were collected along with more objective measures (computerized task and salivary cortisol). Inhibitory control was assessed via self-report and a computerized task (emotional face go/nogo). Results showed that for adults with a history of FC, higher levels of inhibitory control were associated with higher accuracy on the emotional face go/nogo task and greater reported use of the emotion regulation strategy cognitive reappraisal. Greater use of cognitive reappraisal in turn was associated with healthier stress-related outcomes (decreased trait anxiety and steeper sloped cortisol production throughout the day). Dose-response associations were observed between self-reported regulatory skills and FC experiences (i.e., number of placements and age when exited foster care). These findings suggest that adverse caregiving can have long-term influences on mental health that extend into adulthood; however, individual differences in regulatory skills moderate these outcomes and may be an important target for intervention following caregiving adversity. © 2014 The Authors. Developmental Psychobiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 57: 1–16, 2015. PMID:25270099

  1. Distinct Regulatory Changes Underlying Differential Expression of TEOSINTE BRANCHED1-CYCLOIDEA-PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR Genes Associated with Petal Variations in Zygomorphic Flowers of Petrocosmea spp. of the Family Gesneriaceae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xia; Zhao, Xiao-Ge; Li, Chao-Qun; Liu, Jing; Qiu, Zhi-Jing; Dong, Yang; Wang, Yin-Zheng

    2015-11-01

    CYCLOIDEA (CYC)-like genes, belonging to the plant-specific TCP transcription factor family that is named after TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 (TB1) from maize (Zea mays), CYC from Antirrhinum majus, and the PROLIFERATING CELL FACTORS (PCF) from rice (Oryza sativa), have conserved dorsal identity function in patterning floral zygomorphy mainly through specific expression in dorsal petals of a flower. Their expression changes are usually related to morphological diversity of zygomorphic flowers. However, it is still a challenge to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying their expression differentiation. It is also unknown whether CINCINNATA (CIN)-like TCP genes, locally controlling cell growth and proliferation, are involved in the evolution of floral zygomorphy. To address these questions, we selected two closely related species, i.e. Petrocosmea glabristoma and Petrocosmea sinensis, with distinct petal morphology to conduct expression, hybridization, mutant, and allele-specific expression analyses. The results show that the size change of the dorsal petals between the two species is mainly mediated by the expression differentiation of CYC1C and CYC1D, while the shape variation of all petals is related to the expression change of CIN1. In reciprocal F1 hybrids, the expression of CYC1C, CYC1D, and CIN1 conforms to an additive inheritance mode, consistent with the petal phenotypes of hybrids. Through allele-specific expression analyses, we find that the expression differentiation of these TCP genes is underlain by distinctly different types of regulatory changes. We suggest that highly redundant paralogs with identical expression patterns and interspecific expression differentiation may be controlled by remarkably different regulatory pathways because natural selection may favor different regulatory modifications rather than coding sequence changes of key developmental genes in generating morphological diversity. PMID:26351309

  2. Additional diagnostic and clinical value of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies compared with rheumatoid factor isotypes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vallbracht, Inka; Helmke, Klaus

    2005-07-01

    In the past decade significant advantages have been made in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and therapeutic strategies have changed a lot. These days, highly effective disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs enable intervention early in the disease process, in order to prevent major joint damage. For years, serological support in the diagnosis of RA has been limited to the presence of rheumatoid factors, although not very specific for RA. During the last years a variety of circulating non-RF antibodies have been discovered and reported to be of potential diagnostic value. CCP2 proved to be a very disease-specific and even sensitive marker for RA. In addition to the diagnostic properties, CCP showed to be a good prognostic marker, CCP helps to predict the erosive or nonerosive progression of the disease, and CCP is already present early in the disease. This diagnostic tool enables the clinician to choose the optimal therapeutic management for each single RA patient. PMID:16081030

  3. Are delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase inhibition and metal concentrations additional factors for the age-related cognitive decline?

    PubMed

    Baierle, Marília; Charão, Mariele F; Göethel, Gabriela; Barth, Anelise; Fracasso, Rafael; Bubols, Guilherme; Sauer, Elisa; Campanharo, Sarah C; Rocha, Rafael C C; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Bordignon, Suelen; Zibetti, Murilo; Trentini, Clarissa M; Avila, Daiana S; Gioda, Adriana; Garcia, Solange C

    2014-01-01

    Aging is often accompanied by cognitive impairments and influenced by oxidative status and chemical imbalances. Thus, this study was conducted to examine whether age-related cognitive deficit is associated with oxidative damage, especially with inhibition of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALA-D), as well as to verify the influence of some metals in the enzyme activity and cognitive performance. Blood ALA-D activity, essential (Fe, Zn, Cu, Se) and non-essential metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, As, Cr, Ni, V) were measured in 50 elderly and 20 healthy young subjects. Cognitive function was assessed by tests from Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) battery and other. The elderly group presented decreased ALA-D activity compared to the young group. The index of ALA-D reactivation was similar to both study groups, but negatively associated with metals. The mean levels of essential metals were within the reference values, while the most toxic metals were above them in both groups. Cognitive function impairments were observed in elderly group and were associated with decreased ALA-D activity, with lower levels of Se and higher levels of toxic metals (Hg and V). Results suggest that the reduced ALA-D activity in elderly can be an additional factor involved in cognitive decline, since its inhibition throughout life could lead to accumulation of the neurotoxic compound ALA. Toxic metals were found to contribute to cognitive decline and also to influence ALA-D reactivation. PMID:25329536

  4. Overexpression of E2F mRNAs Associated with Gastric Cancer Progression Identified by the Transcription Factor and miRNA Co-Regulatory Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, XiaoTian; Ni, ZhaoHui; Duan, ZiPeng; Xin, ZhuoYuan; Wang, HuaiDong; Tan, JiaYi; Wang, GuoQing; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated at the transcription and translation levels; thus, both transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNA) play roles in regulation of gene expression. This study profiled differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues to construct a TF and miRNA co-regulatory network in order to identify altered genes in gastric cancer progression. A total of 70 cases gastric cancer and paired adjacent normal tissues were subjected to cDNA and miRNA microarray analyses. We obtained 887 up-regulated and 93 down-regulated genes and 41 down-regulated and 4 up-regulated miRNAs in gastric cancer tissues. Using the Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database, we obtained 105 genes that are regulated by the E2F family of genes and using Targetscan, miRanda, miRDB and miRWalk tools, we predicted potential targeting genes of these 45 miRNAs. We then built up the E2F-related TF and miRNA co-regulatory gene network and identified 9 hub-genes. Furthermore, we found that levels of E2F1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 7 mRNAs associated with gastric cancer cell invasion capacity, and has associated with tumor differentiation. These data showed Overexpression of E2F mRNAs associated with gastric cancer progression. PMID:25646628

  5. “Pressured to prescribe” The impact of economic and regulatory factors on South-Eastern ED physicians when managing the drug seeking patient

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sharon; Johnson, Giffe T.; Harbison, Raymond D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to elicit the opinions of Emergency Department (ED) physicians, currently practicing in the United States, regarding the impact of economic and regulatory factors on their management of patients exhibiting “drug seeking” behavior. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study, utilizing a convenience sample of ED physicians located in Florida and Georgia was conducted for a period of 2 months. The inclusion criteria specified that any ED physician, currently practicing within the United States, could participate. Results: Of the ED physicians surveyed (n = 141), 71% reported a perceived pressure to prescribe opioid analgesics to avoid administrative and regulatory criticism and 98% related patient satisfaction scores as being too highly emphasized by reimbursement entities as a means of evaluating their patient management. Rising patient volumes and changes in the healthcare climate were cited by ED physicians as impacting their management of patients exhibiting “drug seeking” behavior. Conclusions: The ED physician faces unique challenges in changing healthcare and economic climates. Requirements to address pain as the “fifth vital sign,” patient satisfaction based reimbursement metrics and an economically driven rise in ED patient volume, may have inadvertently created an environment conducive to exploitation by prescription opioid abusers. There is an identified need for the development of continuing medical education and standardized regulatory and legislative protocols to assist ED physicians in the appropriate management of patients exhibiting “drug seeking” behavior. PMID:27162437

  6. Regulatory approaches to obesity prevention: A systematic overview of current laws addressing diet-related risk factors in the European Union and the United States.

    PubMed

    Sisnowski, Jana; Handsley, Elizabeth; Street, Jackie M

    2015-06-01

    High prevalence of overweight and obesity remains a significant international public health problem. Law has been identified as a tool for obesity prevention and selected high-profile measures have been reported. However, the nature and extent of enacted legislation internationally are unclear. This research provides an overview of regulatory approaches enacted in the United States, the European Union, and EU Member States since 2004. To this end, relevant databases of primary and secondary legislation were systematically searched to identify and explore laws addressing dietary risk factors for obesity. Across jurisdictions, current regulatory approaches to obesity prevention are limited in reach and scope. Target groups are rarely the general population, but instead sub-populations in government-supported settings. Consumer information provision is preferred over taxation and marketing restrictions other than the regulation of health and nutrition claims. In the EU in particular, product reformulation with industry consent has also emerged as a popular small-scale measure. While consistent and widespread use of law is lacking, governments have employed a range of regulatory measures in the name of obesity prevention, indicating that there is, in principle, political will. Results from this study may serve as a starting point for future research and policy development. PMID:25963556

  7. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  8. Tight Binding of the Phosphorylated α Subunit of Initiation Factor 2 (eIF2α) to the Regulatory Subunits of Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor eIF2B Is Required for Inhibition of Translation Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Thanuja; Pavitt, Graham D.; Zhang, Fan; Dever, Thomas E.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2001-01-01

    Translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) is a heterotrimeric protein that transfers methionyl-initiator tRNAMet to the small ribosomal subunit in a ternary complex with GTP. The eIF2 phosphorylated on serine 51 of its α subunit [eIF2(αP)] acts as competitive inhibitor of its guanine nucleotide exchange factor, eIF2B, impairing formation of the ternary complex and thereby inhibiting translation initiation. eIF2B is comprised of catalytic and regulatory subcomplexes harboring independent eIF2 binding sites; however, it was unknown whether the α subunit of eIF2 directly contacts any eIF2B subunits or whether this interaction is modulated by phosphorylation. We found that recombinant eIF2α (glutathione S-transferase [GST]–SUI2) bound to the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex in vitro, in a manner stimulated by Ser-51 phosphorylation. Genetic data suggest that this direct interaction also occurred in vivo, allowing overexpressed SUI2 to compete with eIF2(αP) holoprotein for binding to the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex. Mutations in SUI2 and in the eIF2B regulatory subunit GCD7 that eliminated inhibition of eIF2B by eIF2(αP) also impaired binding of phosphorylated GST-SUI2 to the eIF2B regulatory subunits. These findings provide strong evidence that tight binding of phosphorylated SUI2 to the eIF2B regulatory subcomplex is crucial for the inhibition of eIF2B and attendant downregulation of protein synthesis exerted by eIF2(αP). We propose that this regulatory interaction prevents association of the eIF2B catalytic subcomplex with the β and γ subunits of eIF2 in the manner required for GDP-GTP exchange. PMID:11438658

  9. A large-scale, in vivo transcription factor screen defines bivalent chromatin as a key property of regulatory factors mediating Drosophila wing development

    PubMed Central

    Schertel, Claus; Albarca, Monica; Rockel-Bauer, Claudia; Kelley, Nicholas W.; Bischof, Johannes; Hens, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are key regulators of cell fate. The estimated 755 genes that encode DNA binding domain-containing proteins comprise ∼5% of all Drosophila genes. However, the majority has remained uncharacterized so far due to the lack of proper genetic tools. We generated 594 site-directed transgenic Drosophila lines that contain integrations of individual UAS-TF constructs to facilitate spatiotemporally controlled misexpression in vivo. All transgenes were expressed in the developing wing, and two-thirds induced specific phenotypic defects. In vivo knockdown of the same genes yielded a phenotype for 50%, with both methods indicating a great potential for misexpression to characterize novel functions in wing growth, patterning, and development. Thus, our UAS-TF library provides an important addition to the genetic toolbox of Drosophila research, enabling the identification of several novel wing development-related TFs. In parallel, we established the chromatin landscape of wing imaginal discs by ChIP-seq analyses of five chromatin marks and RNA Pol II. Subsequent clustering revealed six distinct chromatin states, with two clusters showing enrichment for both active and repressive marks. TFs that carry such “bivalent” chromatin are highly enriched for causing misexpression phenotypes in the wing, and analysis of existing expression data shows that these TFs tend to be differentially expressed across the wing disc. Thus, bivalently marked chromatin can be used as a marker for spatially regulated TFs that are functionally relevant in a developing tissue. PMID:25568052

  10. Mutational Robustness of Gene Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aalt D. J.; van Mourik, Simon; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor – target gene interactions) but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive). In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence. PMID:22295094

  11. The IE2 regulatory protein of human cytomegalovirus induces expression of the human transforming growth factor beta1 gene through an Egr-1 binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Y D; Chiou, C J; Choi, K S; Yi, Y; Michelson, S; Kim, S; Hayward, G S; Kim, S J

    1996-01-01

    Increases in transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) mRNA and biological activity in the early phase of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in fibroblasts are paralleled by increased TGF-beta1-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene activity. To determine how CMV infection transactivates the TGF-beta1 promoter, we examined the effects of the cotransfected IE2 regulatory protein of human CMV on 5'-deleted TGF-beta1 promoter-CAT reporter genes in transient DNA transfection assays. Two upstream TGF-beta1 promoter regions each containing an Egr-1 consensus site were shown to be important for IE2-induced transactivation in a cell type that displayed greatly reduced nonspecific activity. Furthermore, transfer of an Egr-l site from between positions -125 and -98, but not point mutant versions of this site, to a heterologous promoter also conveyed IE2 responsiveness. Addition of an IE2 expression vector or use of the U373 A45 astrocytoma cell line expressing IE2 also produced synergistic stimulation of GAL4-Egr-l-mediated activation of a target promoter containing GAL4 binding sites. The 80-kDa IE2 protein present in A45 cells proved to selectively bind to glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Egr-1 beads. The results of in vitro protein binding assays also revealed that an intact in vitro-translated IE2 protein bound directly to the GST-Egr-1 fusion protein through the zinc finger domain of the Egr-1 protein and that this binding activity was abolished by deletion of parts of the zinc finger DNA-binding domain. Similarly, the Egr-1 protein was found to associate preferentially with a small region within the C-terminal half of the IE2 protein adjacent to the DNA-binding and dimerization domains that are important for both transactivation and downregulation. We conclude from these observations that IE2 may regulate transcription of the TGF-beta1 gene as well as other potential cellular targets by virtue of its ability to interact with the Egr-1 DNA

  12. Natural Disruption of Two Regulatory Networks in Serotype M3 Group A Streptococcus Isolates Contributes to the Virulence Factor Profile of This Hypervirulent Serotype

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tram N.; Liu, Zhuyun; Cao, Tran H.; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Treviño, Jeanette; Danger, Jessica L.; Beres, Stephen B.; Musser, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the public health challenges associated with the emergence of new pathogenic bacterial strains and/or serotypes, there is a dearth of information regarding the molecular mechanisms that drive this variation. Here, we began to address the mechanisms behind serotype-specific variation between serotype M1 and M3 strains of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A Streptococcus [GAS]). Spatially diverse contemporary clinical serotype M3 isolates were discovered to contain identical inactivating mutations within genes encoding two regulatory systems that control the expression of important virulence factors, including the thrombolytic agent streptokinase, the protease inhibitor-binding protein-G-related α2-macroglobulin-binding (GRAB) protein, and the antiphagocytic hyaluronic acid capsule. Subsequent analysis of a larger collection of isolates determined that M3 GAS, since at least the 1920s, has harbored a 4-bp deletion in the fasC gene of the fasBCAX regulatory system and an inactivating polymorphism in the rivR regulator-encoding gene. The fasC and rivR mutations in M3 isolates directly affect the virulence factor profile of M3 GAS, as evident by a reduction in streptokinase expression and an enhancement of GRAB expression. Complementation of the fasC mutation in M3 GAS significantly enhanced levels of the small regulatory RNA FasX, which in turn enhanced streptokinase expression. Complementation of the rivR mutation in M3 GAS restored the regulation of grab mRNA abundance but did not alter capsule mRNA levels. While important, the fasC and rivR mutations do not provide a full explanation for why serotype M3 strains are associated with unusually severe invasive infections; thus, further investigation is warranted. PMID:24516115

  13. Determination of a Comprehensive Alternative Splicing Regulatory Network and Combinatorial Regulation by Key Factors during the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yueqin; Park, Juw Won; Bebee, Thomas W; Warzecha, Claude C; Guo, Yang; Shang, Xuequn; Xing, Yi; Carstens, Russ P

    2016-06-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an essential biological process during embryonic development that is also implicated in cancer metastasis. While the transcriptional regulation of EMT has been well studied, the role of alternative splicing (AS) regulation in EMT remains relatively uncharacterized. We previously showed that the epithelial cell-type-specific proteins epithelial splicing regulatory proteins 1 (ESRP1) and ESRP2 are important for the regulation of many AS events that are altered during EMT. However, the contributions of the ESRPs and other splicing regulators to the AS regulatory network in EMT require further investigation. Here, we used a robust in vitro EMT model to comprehensively characterize splicing switches during EMT in a temporal manner. These investigations revealed that the ESRPs are the major regulators of some but not all AS events during EMT. We determined that the splicing factor RBM47 is downregulated during EMT and also regulates numerous transcripts that switch splicing during EMT. We also determined that Quaking (QKI) broadly promotes mesenchymal splicing patterns. Our study highlights the broad role of posttranscriptional regulation during the EMT and the important role of combinatorial regulation by different splicing factors to fine tune gene expression programs during these physiological and developmental transitions. PMID:27044866

  14. Distinctive Expression of Bcl-2 Factors in Regulatory T Cells Determines a Pharmacological Target to Induce Immunological Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Sarah Sharon; Bon, Nina; Chen, Jin; Wekerle, Thomas; Bushell, Andrew; Fehr, Thomas; Cippà, Pietro Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Distinctive molecular characteristics of functionally diverse lymphocyte populations may represent novel pharmacological targets for immunotherapy. The intrinsic apoptosis pathway is differently regulated among conventional and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Targeted pharmacological modulation of this pathway with a small molecule Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor (ABT-737) caused a selective depletion of effector T cells and a relative enrichment of Tregs in vivo. Treatment with ABT-737 resulted in a tolerogenic milieu, which was exploited to alleviate graft-versus-host disease, to prevent allograft rejection in a stringent fully MHC-mismatched skin transplantation model and to induce immunological tolerance in combination with bone marrow transplantation. This concept has the potential to find various applications for immunotherapy, since it allows pharmacologic exploitation of the immunomodulatory properties of Tregs without the need for cell manipulation ex vivo. PMID:26973650

  15. Valproic acid regulates erythro-megakaryocytic differentiation through the modulation of transcription factors and microRNA regulatory micro-networks.

    PubMed

    Trécul, Anne; Morceau, Franck; Gaigneaux, Anthoula; Schnekenburger, Michael; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2014-11-15

    Valproic acid (VPA) exhibits important pharmacological properties but has been reported to trigger side effects, notably on the hematological system. We previously reported that VPA affects hematopoietic homeostasis by inhibiting erythroid differentiation and promoting myeloid and megakaryocyte differentiation. Here, we analyzed the effect of VPA on regulatory factors involved in erythro-megakaryocytic differentiation pathways, including transcription factors and microRNAs (miRs). We demonstrate that VPA inhibited erythroid differentiation in erythropoietin (Epo)-stimulated TF1 leukemia cells and CD34(+)/hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and in aclacinomycin-(Acla)-treated K562 cells. Mir-144/451 gene expression was decreased in all erythroid and megakaryocyte models in correlation with GATA-1 inhibition. In Epo-stimulated CD34(+)/HSCs, VPA induced the expression of the ETS family transcription factors PU.1, ETS-1, GABP-α, Fli-1 and GATA-2, which are all known to be negative regulators of erythropoiesis, while it promoted the megakaryocytic pathway. PU.1 and ETS-1 expression were induced in correlation with miR-155 inhibition; however, the GATA-1/PU.1 interaction was promoted. Using megakaryoblastic Meg-01 cells, we demonstrated that VPA induced megakaryocyte morphological features and CD61 expression. GATA-2 and miR-27a expression were increased in correlation with a decrease in RUNX1 mRNA expression, suggesting megakaryocyte differentiation. Finally, by using valpromide and the Class I HDACi MS-275, we validated that the well-described HDACi activity of VPA is not required in the inhibitory effect on erythropoiesis. Overall, this report shows that VPA modulates the erythro-megakaryocytic differentiation program through regulatory micro-networks involving GATA and ETS transcription factors and miRNAs, notably the GATA-1/miR-144/451 axis. PMID:25241289

  16. Gene regulatory cascade of senescence-associated NAC transcription factors activated by ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE2-mediated leaf senescence signalling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Jung; Hong, Sung Hyun; Kim, You Wang; Lee, Il Hwan; Jun, Ji Hyung; Phee, Bong-Kwan; Rupak, Timilsina; Jeong, Hana; Lee, Yeonmi; Hong, Byoung Seok; Nam, Hong Gil; Woo, Hye Ryun; Lim, Pyung Ok

    2014-01-01

    Leaf senescence is a finely tuned and genetically programmed degeneration process, which is critical to maximize plant fitness by remobilizing nutrients from senescing leaves to newly developing organs. Leaf senescence is a complex process that is driven by extensive reprogramming of global gene expression in a highly coordinated manner. Understanding how gene regulatory networks involved in controlling leaf senescence are organized and operated is essential to decipher the mechanisms of leaf senescence. It was previously reported that the trifurcate feed-forward pathway involving EIN2, ORE1, and miR164 in Arabidopsis regulates age-dependent leaf senescence and cell death. Here, new components of this pathway have been identified, which enhances knowledge of the gene regulatory networks governing leaf senescence. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed six senescence-associated NAC transcription factors (TFs) (ANAC019, AtNAP, ANAC047, ANAC055, ORS1, and ORE1) as candidate downstream components of ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE2 (EIN2). EIN3, a downstream signalling molecule of EIN2, directly bound the ORE1 and AtNAP promoters and induced their transcription. This suggests that EIN3 positively regulates leaf senescence by activating ORE1 and AtNAP, previously reported as key regulators of leaf senescence. Genetic and gene expression analyses in the ore1 atnap double mutant revealed that ORE1 and AtNAP act in distinct and overlapping signalling pathways. Transient transactivation assays further demonstrated that ORE1 and AtNAP could activate common as well as differential NAC TF targets. Collectively, the data provide insight into an EIN2-mediated senescence signalling pathway that coordinates global gene expression during leaf senescence via a gene regulatory network involving EIN3 and senescence-associated NAC TFs. PMID:24659488

  17. Light-dependent and circadian clock-regulated activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein, X-box-binding protein 1, and heat shock factor pathways.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Megumi; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Iitsuka, Michiko; Kurabayashi, Nobuhiro; Haraguchi, Shogo; Kokame, Koichi; Sato, Ryuichiro; Nakai, Akira; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2011-03-22

    The circadian clock is phase-delayed or -advanced by light when given at early or late subjective night, respectively. Despite the importance of the time-of-day-dependent phase responses to light, the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we performed a comprehensive analysis of light-inducible genes in the chicken pineal gland, which consists of light-sensitive clock cells representing a prototype of the clock system. Light stimulated expression of 62 genes and 40 ESTs by >2.5-fold, among which genes responsive to the heat shock and endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as their regulatory transcription factors heat shock factor (HSF)1, HSF2, and X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) were strongly activated when a light pulse was given at late subjective night. In contrast, the light pulse at early subjective night caused prominent induction of E4bp4, a key regulator in the phase-delaying mechanism of the pineal clock, along with activation of a large group of cholesterol biosynthetic genes that are targets of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor. We found that the light pulse stimulated proteolytic formation of active SREBP-1 that, in turn, transactivated E4bp4 expression, linking SREBP with the light-input pathway of the pineal clock. As an output of light activation of cholesterol biosynthetic genes, we found light-stimulated pineal production of a neurosteroid, 7α-hydroxypregnenolone, demonstrating a unique endocrine function of the pineal gland. Intracerebroventricular injection of 7α-hydroxypregnenolone activated locomotor activities of chicks. Our study on the genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed time-of-day-dependent light activation of signaling pathways and provided molecular connection between gene expression and behavior through neurosteroid release from the pineal gland. PMID:21383147

  18. The ensembl regulatory build.

    PubMed

    Zerbino, Daniel R; Wilder, Steven P; Johnson, Nathan; Juettemann, Thomas; Flicek, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Most genomic variants associated with phenotypic traits or disease do not fall within gene coding regions, but in regulatory regions, rendering their interpretation difficult. We collected public data on epigenetic marks and transcription factor binding in human cell types and used it to construct an intuitive summary of regulatory regions in the human genome. We verified it against independent assays for sensitivity. The Ensembl Regulatory Build will be progressively enriched when more data is made available. It is freely available on the Ensembl browser, from the Ensembl Regulation MySQL database server and in a dedicated track hub. PMID:25887522

  19. Stress-dependent and -independent expression of the myogenic regulatory factors and the MARP genes after eccentric contractions in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hentzen, Eric R; Lahey, Michele; Peters, David; Mathew, Liby; Barash, Ilona A; Fridén, Jan; Lieber, Richard L

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between muscle mechanical conditions and gene expression was investigated by varying both stress and contraction mode imposed upon rat dorsiflexors (n = 25), activating them at high or low frequencies (150 Hz or 40 Hz) either eccentrically or isometrically. Muscle physiological, immunohistochemical and gene expression changes were then measured 24 h after the exercise bout. Peak stress was the best predictor of muscle injury, independent of contraction mode (i.e. eccentric or isometric). When peak stresses were matched, no physiological or immunohistochemical differences were detected between isometric and eccentric contractions. The expression of certain myogenic regulatory and muscle ankyrin repeat protein (MARP) genes (myoD, myogenin, MLP and CARP) depended both on peak muscle stress achieved during contraction and contraction mode. In contrast, Arpp/Ankrd2 was dramatically upregulated only by eccentric contractions, but not by isometric contractions, even though the stress level of the eccentric contractions varied over a three-fold range and overlapped with that of the isometric group. The role that Arpp/Ankrd2 upregulation plays in the biological response to eccentric contraction remains to be determined, as does the control mechanism whereby the expression of certain genes (such as myoD, myogenin, MLP and CARP) is sensitive to muscle stress while another (Arpp/Ankrd2) is sensitive only to contraction mode. PMID:16239282

  20. Regulation of alternative splicing of liver scavenger receptor class B gene by estrogen and the involved regulatory splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Moor, Andrea N; Merkler, Kathleen A; Liu, Qiyuan; McLean, Mark P

    2007-11-01

    The scavenger receptor class B isoforms (SR-B) type I and type II mediate the selective uptake of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and promote reverse cholesterol transport, an important atherosclerosis protection mechanism, in the liver. Previously it was shown that the hepatic expression of SR-BI and SR-BII is regulated by estrogen. In the present study, we demonstrate that estrogen differentially regulates expression of the glycosylated and nonglycosylated forms of SR-BI and SR-BII in rat liver and hepatic cells. We report that estrogen mainly induces the down-regulation of glycosylated SR-BI and the up-regulation of nonglycosylated SR-BII. To study how estrogen regulates expression of the SR-B isoforms, we constructed a SR-B minigene containing minimal genomic sequences and were able to demonstrate that estrogen directly regulates the pre-mRNA alternative splicing of the exogenously expressed SR-B minigene in hepatic cells. Furthermore, we showed that the overexpression of splicing factors alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2, Transformer (Tra)-2alpha, and Tra2beta changes the splicing pattern of SR-B dramatically, whereas other splicing factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein-G, SC-35, and arginine/serine-rich p40, had no effect. We also demonstrate that estrogen regulates Tra2beta expression levels in liver cells. These studies suggest that estrogen may regulate SR-B isoform expression at both the RNA splicing and posttranslational modification levels and that, for alternative splicing regulation, estrogen may function by regulating the expression of the splicing factors alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2, Tra2alpha, and especially Tra2beta. PMID:17673517

  1. An Additional Potential Factor for Kidney Stone Formation during Space Flights: Calcifying Nanoparticles (Nanobacteria): A Case Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; Ciftcioglu, Neva; Schmid, Joseph; Griffith, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced microgravity appears to be a risk factor for the development of urinary calculi due to skeletal calcium liberation and other undefined factors, resulting in stone disease in crewmembers during and after spaceflight. Calcifying nanoparticles, or nanobacteria, reproduce at a more rapid rate in simulated microgravity conditions and create external shells of calcium phosphate in the form of apatite. The questions arises whether calcifying nanoparticles are niduses for calculi and contribute to the development of clinical stone disease in humans, who possess environmental factors predisposing to the development of urinary calculi and potentially impaired immunological defenses during spaceflight. A case of a urinary calculus passed from an astronaut post-flight with morphological characteristics of calcifying nanoparticles and staining positive for a calcifying nanoparticle unique antigen, is presented.

  2. Na/H Exchange Regulatory Factor 1, a Novel AKT-associating Protein, Regulates Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Signaling through a B-Raf–Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Yang, Yanmei

    2008-01-01

    Na/H exchange regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) is a scaffolding protein that regulates signaling and trafficking of several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including the parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R). GPCRs activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 through different mechanisms. Here, we characterized NHERF1 regulation of PTH1R-stimulated ERK1/2. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation by a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent, but protein kinase C-, cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate-, and Rap1-independent pathway in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the PTH1R and engineered to express NHERF1 under the control of tetracycline. NHERF1 blocked PTH-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation downstream of PKA. This suggested that NHERF1 inhibitory effects on ERK1/2 occur at a postreceptor locus. Forskolin activated ERK1/2, and this effect was blocked by NHERF1. NHERF1 interacted with AKT and inhibited ERK1/2 activation by decreasing the stimulatory effect of 14-3-3 binding to B-Raf, while increasing the inhibitory influence of AKT negative regulation on ERK1/2 activation. This novel regulatory mechanism provides a new model by which cytoplasmic adapter proteins modulate ERK1/2 activation through a receptor-independent mechanism involving B-Raf. PMID:18272783

  3. Characterization of a cell-type-restricted negative regulatory activity of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, J K; Guerra, J J; Nguyen, C Y; Indes, J E; Gasson, J C; Nimer, S D

    1994-01-01

    Human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) stimulates the proliferation and maturation of normal myeloid progenitor cells and can also stimulate the growth of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts. GM-CSF is not normally produced by resting cells but is expressed by a variety of activated cells including T lymphocytes, macrophages, and certain cytokine-stimulated fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Production of GM-CSF by cultured AML cells has been demonstrated, and GM-CSF expression by normal myeloid progenitors has been postulated to play a role in myelopoiesis. We have investigated the regulation of expression of GM-CSF in AML cell lines, and our results demonstrate the presence of a strong constitutive promoter element contained within 53 bp upstream of the cap site. We have also identified a negative regulatory element located immediately upstream of the positive regulatory element (within 69 bp of the cap site) that is active in AML cell lines but not T cells or K562 CML cells. Competition transfection and mobility shift studies demonstrate that this activity correlates with binding of a 45-kDa protein. Images PMID:8114751

  4. HIRF: a novel nuclear factor that binds to the human T-cell leukemia virus type I internal regulatory element (HIRE).

    PubMed

    Ariumi, Y; Copeland, T D; Nosaka, T; Hatanaka, M

    1997-04-01

    The transcription of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) provirus starts from a promoter located in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR). We have identified a second promoter at the 3' end of the pol gene. This internal promoter expresses the Tax transactivator protein, but does not require Tax for its activity. Furthermore, we have found the novel enhancer motif AGTTCTGCCC, which are located near the initiation site. We have named the sequence HIRE (HTLV-I internal regulatory element). The HIRE binding protein is a ubiquitous protein. We purified this protein from the HTLV-I producing cell line MT-2 cells by DNA affinity chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed four major bands (70, 85, 115 and more than 200 kDa) and some minor bands on the gel. We renatured each major protein and showed the 70 and 115 kDa proteins bind to DNA, although the 115 kDa protein seemed to bind nonspecifically. We have designated these components as HIRF (HTLV-I internal regulatory factor). PMID:9209287

  5. Specific interactions between transcription factors and the promoter-regulatory region of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazal, P.; Lubon, H.; Hennighausen, L. )

    1988-03-01

    Repeat sequence motifs as well as unique sequences between nucleotides {minus}150 and {minus}22 of the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 gene interact in vitro with nuclear proteins. The authors show that a transcriptional element between nucleotides {minus}91 and {minus}65 stimulated promoter activity in vivo and in vitro by binding specific cellular transcription factors. Finally, a common sequence motif, (T)TGG/AC, present in 15 of the determined binding sites suggests a particular class of nuclear factors associated with the immediate-early 1 gene.

  6. Employing Lead Thiocyanate Additive to Reduce the Hysteresis and Boost the Fill Factor of Planar Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijun; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Saparov, Bayrammurad; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Zhao, Dewei; Xiao, Zewen; Schulz, Philip; Harvey, Steven P; Liao, Weiqiang; Meng, Weiwei; Yu, Yue; Cimaroli, Alexander J; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Zhu, Kai; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Fang, Guojia; Mitzi, David B; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-07-01

    Lead thiocyanate in the perovskite precursor can increase the grain size of a perovskite thin film and reduce the conductivity of the grain boundaries, leading to perovskite solar cells with reduced hysteresis and enhanced fill factor. A planar perovskite solar cell with grain boundary and interface passivation achieves a steady-state efficiency of 18.42%. PMID:27145346

  7. The Regulatory T Cell Lineage Factor Foxp3 Regulates Gene Expression through Several Distinct Mechanisms Mostly Independent of Direct DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Betz, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    The lineage factor Foxp3 is essential for the development and maintenance of regulatory T cells, but little is known about the mechanisms involved. Here, we demonstrate that an N-terminal proline-rich interaction region is crucial for Foxp3’s function. Subdomains within this key region link Foxp3 to several independent mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Our study suggests that Foxp3, even in the absence of its DNA-binding forkhead domain, acts as a bridge between DNA-binding interaction partners and proteins with effector function permitting it to regulate a large number of genes. We show that, in one such mechanism, Foxp3 recruits class I histone deacetylases to the promoters of target genes, counteracting activation-induced histone acetylation and thereby suppressing their expression. PMID:26107960

  8. TFmiR: a web server for constructing and analyzing disease-specific transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Mohamed; Spaniol, Christian; Nazarieh, Maryam; Helms, Volkhard

    2015-01-01

    TFmiR is a freely available web server for deep and integrative analysis of combinatorial regulatory interactions between transcription factors, microRNAs and target genes that are involved in disease pathogenesis. Since the inner workings of cells rely on the correct functioning of an enormously complex system of activating and repressing interactions that can be perturbed in many ways, TFmiR helps to better elucidate cellular mechanisms at the molecular level from a network perspective. The provided topological and functional analyses promote TFmiR as a reliable systems biology tool for researchers across the life science communities. TFmiR web server is accessible through the following URL: http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/tfmir. PMID:25943543

  9. TFmiR: a web server for constructing and analyzing disease-specific transcription factor and miRNA co-regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Spaniol, Christian; Nazarieh, Maryam; Helms, Volkhard

    2015-07-01

    TFmiR is a freely available web server for deep and integrative analysis of combinatorial regulatory interactions between transcription factors, microRNAs and target genes that are involved in disease pathogenesis. Since the inner workings of cells rely on the correct functioning of an enormously complex system of activating and repressing interactions that can be perturbed in many ways, TFmiR helps to better elucidate cellular mechanisms at the molecular level from a network perspective. The provided topological and functional analyses promote TFmiR as a reliable systems biology tool for researchers across the life science communities. TFmiR web server is accessible through the following URL: http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/tfmir. PMID:25943543

  10. Variants of Interferon Regulatory Factor 5 are Associated with Neither Neuromyelitis Optica Nor Multiple Sclerosis in the Southeastern Han Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi-Bing; Wu, Lei; Zhao, Gui-Xian; Cai, Ping-Ping; Li, Zhen-Xin; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are demyelinating disorders of the central nervous system. Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is a common susceptibility gene to different autoimmune disorders. However, the association of IRF5 variants with NMO and MS patients has not been well studied. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate whether IRF5 variants were associated with NMO and MS in the Southeastern Han Chinese population. Methods: Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected and genotyped by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry in 111 NMO patients, 145 MS patients and 300 controls from Southeastern China. Results: None of these 4 SNPs was associated with NMO or MS patients. Conclusions: Our preliminary study indicates that genetic variants in IRF5 may affect neither NMO nor MS in the Southeastern Han Chinese population. Further studies with a large sample size and diverse ancestry populations are needed to clarify this issue. PMID:26112714

  11. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 Inhibits Gamma Interferon and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Expression▿†

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Katharina; Wies, Effi; Neipel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) carries four genes with homology to human interferon regulatory factors (IRFs). One of these IRFs, the viral interferon regulatory factor 3 (vIRF-3), is expressed in latently infected primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cells and required for their continuous proliferation. Moreover, vIRF-3 is known to be involved in modulation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. We now show that vIRF-3 also interferes with the type II interferon system and antigen presentation to the adaptive immune system. Starting with an analysis of the transcriptome, we show that vIRF-3 inhibits expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) molecules: small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of vIRF-3 in KSHV-infected PEL cell lines resulted in increased MHC II levels; overexpression of vIRF-3 in KSHV-negative B cells leads to downmodulation of MHC II. This regulation could be traced back to inhibition of class II transactivator (CIITA) transcription by vIRF-3. Reporter assays revealed that the gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-sensitive CIITA promoters PIV and PIII were inhibited by vIRF-3. Consistently, IFN-γ levels increased upon vIRF-3 knockdown in PEL cells. IFN-γ regulation by vIRF-3 was confirmed in reporter assays as well as by upregulation of typical IFN-γ target genes upon knockdown of vIRF-3 in PEL cells. In summary, we conclude that vIRF-3 contributes to the viral immunoevasion by downregulation of IFN-γ and CIITA and thus MHC II expression. PMID:21345951

  12. Intra-articular nuclear factor-κB blockade ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by eliciting regulatory T cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Min, S-Y; Yan, M; Du, Y; Wu, T; Khobahy, E; Kwon, S-R; Taneja, V; Bashmakov, A; Nukala, S; Ye, Y; Orme, J; Sajitharan, D; Kim, H-Y; Mohan, C

    2013-05-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is a transcription factor implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we have examined the effect of intra-articular administration of the IKK inhibitor, NEMO-binding domain peptide (NBD), on the severity of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). NBD peptides were injected intra-articularly into the knee joints of DBA/1J mice after the onset of disease. Collagen-injected mice given a scrambled peptide served as controls. Arthritis severity was determined by visual examination of paws. Intra-articular NBD injection reduced the arthritis score and ameliorated morphological signs of bone destruction compared to the controls. Serum levels of type-II collagen-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibodies were lower in NBD-treated mice versus the control mice, whereas the levels of type-II collagen-specific IgG1 antibodies were increased by NBD treatment. NBD treatment diminished the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ in serum, but increased the regulatory cytokine IL-10. NBD-treated CIA mice exhibited significantly higher percentages and numbers of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+)) CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells than controls. Immunofluorescence analysis of NBD-treated mice revealed that FoxP3 and Ym1, a marker of alternatively activated macrophages, were juxtaposed to each other within draining inguinal lymph nodes. Intra-articular administration of NBD peptide is effective as an experimental therapy in a murine model of RA. Nevertheless, the intra-articular treatment modality is still associated with systemic effects on the immune system. PMID:23574318

  13. Overexpression of hepatocyte growth factor in SBMA model mice has an additive effect on combination therapy with castration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ying; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Huang, Zhe; Jiang, Yue-Mei; Kondo, Naohide; Iida, Madoka; Tohnai, Genki; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Sobue, Gen

    2015-12-25

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ)-encoding tract within the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic features of SBMA are motor neuron loss in the spinal cord and brainstem and diffuse nuclear accumulation and nuclear inclusions of mutant AR in residual motor neurons and certain visceral organs. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a polypeptide growth factor which has neuroprotective properties. To investigate whether HGF overexpression can affect disease progression in a mouse model of SBMA, we crossed SBMA transgenic model mice expressing an AR gene with an expanded CAG repeat with mice overexpressing HGF. Here, we report that high expression of HGF induces Akt phosphorylation and modestly ameliorated motor symptoms in an SBMA transgenic mouse model treated with or without castration. These findings suggest that HGF overexpression can provide a potential therapeutic avenue as a combination therapy with disease-modifying therapies in SBMA. PMID:26551462

  14. Smoking and polymorphisms in xenobiotic metabolism and DNA repair genes are additive risk factors affecting bladder cancer in Northern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rouissi, Kamel; Ouerhani, Slah; Hamrita, Bechr; Bougatef, Karim; Marrakchi, Raja; Cherif, Mohamed; Ben Slama, Mohamed Riadh; Bouzouita, Mohamed; Chebil, Mohamed; Ben Ammar Elgaaied, Amel

    2011-12-01

    Cancer epidemiology has undergone marked development since the nineteen-fifties. One of the most spectacular and specific contributions was the demonstration of the massive effect of smoking and genetic polymorphisms on the occurrence of bladder cancer. The tobacco carcinogens are metabolized by various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the super-families of N-acetyltransferases (NAT) and glutathione S-transferases (GST). DNA repair is essential to an individual's ability to respond to damage caused by tobacco carcinogens. Alterations in DNA repair genes may affect cancer risk by influencing individual susceptibility to this environmental exposure. Polymorphisms in NAT2, GST and DNA repair genes alter the ability of these enzymes to metabolize carcinogens or to repair alterations caused by this process. We have conducted a case-control study to assess the role of smoking, slow NAT2 variants, GSTM1 and GSTT1 null, and XPC, XPD, XPG nucleotide excision-repair (NER) genotypes in bladder cancer development in North Tunisia. Taken alone, each gene unless NAT2 did not appear to be a factor affecting bladder cancer susceptibility. For the NAT2 slow acetylator genotypes, the NAT2*5/*7 diplotype was found to have a 7-fold increased risk to develop bladder cancer (OR = 7.14; 95% CI: 1.30-51.41). However, in tobacco consumers, we have shown that Null GSTM1, Wild GSTT1, Slow NAT2, XPC (CC) and XPG (CC) are genetic risk factors for the disease. When combined together in susceptible individuals compared to protected individuals these risk factors give an elevated OR (OR = 61). So, we have shown a strong cumulative effect of tobacco and different combinations of studied genetic risk factors which lead to a great susceptibility to bladder cancer. PMID:21647780

  15. Characterization of the regulatory domains of the human skn-1a/Epoc-1/Oct-11 POU transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hildesheim, J; Foster, R A; Chamberlin, M E; Vogel, J C

    1999-09-10

    The Skn-1a POU transcription factor is primarily expressed in keratinocytes of murine embryonic and adult epidermis. Although some POU factors expressed in a tissue-specific manner are important for normal differentiation, the biological function of Skn-1a remains unknown. Previous in vitro studies indicate that Skn-1a has the ability to transactivate markers of keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we have characterized Skn-1a's transactivation domain(s) and engineered a dominant negative protein that lacked this transactivation domain. Deletional analysis of the human homologue of Skn-1a with three target promoters revealed the presence of two functional domains: a primary C-terminal transactivation domain and a combined N-terminal inhibitory domain and transactivation domain. Skn-1a lacking the C-terminal region completely lost transactivation ability, irrespective of the promoter tested, and was able to block transactivation by normal Skn-1a in competition assays. Compared with full-length, Skn-1a lacking the N-terminal region demonstrated either increased transactivation (bovine cytokeratin 6 promoter), comparable transactivation (human papillomavirus type 1a long control region), or loss of transactivation (human papillomavirus type 18 long control region). The identification of a primary C-terminal transactivation domain enabled us to generate a dominant negative Skn-1a factor, which will be useful in the quest for a better understanding of this keratinocyte-specific gene regulator. PMID:10473598

  16. Regulatory iNKT cells lack expression of the transcription factor PLZF and control the homeostasis of T(reg) cells and macrophages in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Lydia; Michelet, Xavier; Zhang, Sai; Brennan, Patrick J; Moseman, Ashley; Lester, Chantel; Besra, Gurdyal; Vomhof-Dekrey, Emilie E; Tighe, Mike; Koay, Hui-Fern; Godfrey, Dale I; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; von Andrian, Ulrich; Brenner, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are lipid-sensing innate T cells that are restricted by the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d and express the transcription factor PLZF. iNKT cells accumulate in adipose tissue, where they are anti-inflammatory, but the factors that contribute to their anti-inflammatory nature, as well as their targets in adipose tissue, are unknown. Here we found that iNKT cells in adipose tissue had a unique transcriptional program and produced interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-10. Unlike other iNKT cells, they lacked PLZF but expressed the transcription factor E4BP4, which controlled their IL-10 production. The adipose iNKT cells were a tissue-resident population that induced an anti-inflammatory phenotype in macrophages and, through the production of IL-2, controlled the number, proliferation and suppressor function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in adipose tissue. Thus, iNKT cells in adipose tissue are unique regulators of immunological homeostasis in this tissue. PMID:25436972

  17. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O.; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain (“BEN-solo” factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  18. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain ("BEN-solo" factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  19. A conserved alternative form of the purple sea urchin HEB/E2-2/E2A transcription factor mediates a switch in E-protein regulatory state in differentiating immune cells.

    PubMed

    Schrankel, Catherine S; Solek, Cynthia M; Buckley, Katherine M; Anderson, Michele K; Rast, Jonathan P

    2016-08-01

    E-proteins are basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors with essential roles in animal development. In mammals, these are encoded by three loci: E2-2 (ITF-2/ME2/SEF2/TCF4), E2A (TCF3), and HEB (ME1/REB/TCF12). The HEB and E2-2 paralogs are expressed as alternative (Alt) isoforms with distinct N-terminal sequences encoded by unique exons under separate regulatory control. Expression of these alternative transcripts is restricted relative to the longer (Can) forms, suggesting distinct regulatory roles, although the functions of the Alt proteins remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize the single sea urchin E-protein ortholog (SpE-protein). The organization of the SpE-protein gene closely resembles that of the extended HEB/E2-2 vertebrate loci, including a transcript that initiates at a homologous alternative transcription start site (SpE-Alt). The existence of an Alt form in the sea urchin indicates that this feature predates the emergence of the vertebrates. We present additional evidence indicating that this transcript was present in the common bilaterian ancestor. In contrast to the widely expressed canonical form (SpE-Can), SpE-Alt expression is tightly restricted. SpE-Alt is expressed in two phases: first in aboral non-skeletogenic mesenchyme (NSM) cells and then in oral NSM cells preceding their differentiation and ingression into the blastocoel. Derivatives of these cells mediate immune response in the larval stage. Inhibition of SpE-Alt activity interferes with these events. Notably, although the two isoforms are initially co-expressed, as these cells differentiate, SpE-Can is excluded from the SpE-Alt(+) cell population. This mutually exclusive expression is dependent on SpE-Alt function, which reveals a previously undescribed negative regulatory linkage between the two E-protein forms. Collectively, these findings reorient our understanding of the evolution of this transcription factor family and highlight fundamental properties of E

  20. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  1. Breeding site selection by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to large wood additions and factors that influence reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason B.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.; Lightcap, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) with respect to breeding behavior can be partitioned into at least four fitness components: survival to reproduction, competition for breeding sites, success of egg incubation, and suitability of the local environment near breeding sites for early rearing of juveniles. We evaluated the relative influences of habitat features linked to these fitness components with respect to selection of breeding sites by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). We also evaluated associations between breeding site selection and additions of large wood, as the latter were introduced into the study system as a means of restoring habitat conditions to benefit coho salmon. We used a model selection approach to organize specific habitat features into groupings reflecting fitness components and influences of large wood. Results of this work suggest that female coho salmon likely select breeding sites based on a wide range of habitat features linked to all four hypothesized fitness components. More specifically, model parameter estimates indicated that breeding site selection was most strongly influenced by proximity to pool-tail crests and deeper water (mean and maximum depths). Linkages between large wood and breeding site selection were less clear. Overall, our findings suggest that breeding site selection by coho salmon is influenced by a suite of fitness components in addition to the egg incubation environment, which has been the emphasis of much work in the past.

  2. Next-generation sequencing of genomic DNA fragments bound to a transcription factor in vitro reveals its regulatory potential.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yukio; Makita, Yuko; Kawashima, Mika; Hamasaki, Hidefumi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Matsui, Minami

    2014-01-01

    Several transcription factors (TFs) coordinate to regulate expression of specific genes at the transcriptional level. In Arabidopsis thaliana it is estimated that approximately 10% of all genes encode TFs or TF-like proteins. It is important to identify target genes that are directly regulated by TFs in order to understand the complete picture of a plant's transcriptome profile. Here, we investigate the role of the LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) transcription factor that acts as a regulator of photomorphogenesis. We used an in vitro genomic DNA binding assay coupled with immunoprecipitation and next-generation sequencing (gDB-seq) instead of the in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-based methods. The results demonstrate that the HY5-binding motif predicted here was similar to the motif reported previously and that in vitro HY5-binding loci largely overlapped with the HY5-targeted candidate genes identified in previous ChIP-chip analysis. By combining these results with microarray analysis, we identified hundreds of HY5-binding genes that were differentially expressed in hy5. We also observed delayed induction of some transcripts of HY5-binding genes in hy5 mutants in response to blue-light exposure after dark treatment. Thus, an in vitro gDNA-binding assay coupled with sequencing is a convenient and powerful method to bridge the gap between identifying TF binding potential and establishing function. PMID:25534860

  3. Acetylation-dependent regulation of essential iPS-inducing factors: a regulatory crossroad for pluripotency and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiangpeng; Liu, Pengda; Lau, Alan W; Liu, Yueyong; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated from somatic cells by coexpression of four transcription factors: Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, and c-Myc. However, the low efficiency in generating iPS cells and the tendency of tumorigenesis hinder the therapeutic applications for iPS cells in treatment of human diseases. To this end, it remains largely unknown how the iPS process is subjected to regulation by upstream signaling pathway(s). Here, we report that Akt regulates the iPS process by modulating posttranslational modifications of these iPS factors in both direct and indirect manners. Specifically, Akt directly phosphorylates Oct4 to modulate the Oct4/Sox2 heterodimer formation. Furthermore, Akt either facilitates the p300-mediated acetylation of Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4, or stabilizes Klf4 by inactivating GSK3, thus indirectly modulating stemness. As tumorigenesis shares possible common features and mechanisms with iPS, our study suggests that Akt inhibition might serve as a cancer therapeutic approach to target cancer stem cells. PMID:25116380

  4. Fas-Associated Factor 1 Negatively Regulates the Antiviral Immune Response by Inhibiting Translocation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3 to the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Song, Soonhwa; Lee, Jae-Jin; Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jeong Yoon; Chang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    This study is designed to examine the cellular functions of human Fas-associated factor 1 (FAF1) containing multiple ubiquitin-related domains. Microarray analyses revealed that interferon-stimulated genes related to the antiviral response are significantly increased in FAF1-knockdown HeLa cells. Silencing FAF1 enhanced the poly(I·C)- and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-induced production of type I interferons (IFNs), the target genes of interferon regulator factor 3 (IRF3). IRF3 is a key transcription factor in IFN-β signaling responsible for the host innate immune response. This study also found that FAF1 and IRF3 physically associate with IPO5/importin-β3 and that overexpression of FAF1 reduces the interaction between IRF3 and IPO5/importin-β3. These findings suggest that FAF1 negatively regulates IRF3-mediated IFN-β production and the antiviral innate immune response by regulating nuclear translocation of IRF3. We conclude that FAF1 plays a novel role in negatively regulating virus-induced IFN-β production and the antiviral response by inhibiting the translocation of active, phosphorylated IRF3 from the cytosol to the nucleus. PMID:26811330

  5. Interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) gene variants are associated with multiple sclerosis in three distinct populations

    PubMed Central

    Kristjansdottir, G; Sandling, J K; Bonetti, A; Roos, I M; Milani, L; Wang, C; Gustafsdottir, S M; Sigurdsson, S; Lundmark, A; Tienari, P J; Koivisto, K; Elovaara, I; Pirttilä, T; Reunanen, M; Peltonen, L; Saarela, J; Hillert, J; Olsson, T; Landegren, U; Alcina, A; Fernández, O; Leyva, L; Guerrero, M; Lucas, M; Izquierdo, G; Matesanz, F; Syvänen, A-C

    2008-01-01

    Background: IRF5 is a transcription factor involved both in the type I interferon and the toll-like receptor signalling pathways. Previously, IRF5 has been found to be associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Here we investigated whether polymorphisms in the IRF5 gene would be associated with yet another disease with features of autoimmunity, multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We genotyped nine single nucleotide polymorphisms and one insertion-deletion polymorphism in the IRF5 gene in a collection of 2337 patients with MS and 2813 controls from three populations: two case–control cohorts from Spain and Sweden, and a set of MS trio families from Finland. Results: Two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) (rs4728142, rs3807306), and a 5 bp insertion-deletion polymorphism located in the promoter and first intron of the IRF5 gene, showed association signals with values of p<0.001 when the data from all cohorts were combined. The predisposing alleles were present on the same common haplotype in all populations. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays we observed allele specific differences in protein binding for the SNP rs4728142 and the 5 bp indel, and by a proximity ligation assay we demonstrated increased binding of the transcription factor SP1 to the risk allele of the 5 bp indel. Conclusion: These findings add IRF5 to the short list of genes shown to be associated with MS in more than one population. Our study adds to the evidence that there might be genes or pathways that are common in multiple autoimmune diseases, and that the type I interferon system is likely to be involved in the development of these diseases. PMID:18285424

  6. Cooperation between Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 and RTA To Activate a Subset of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xiangmei; Persson, Linda M.; O'Brien, Michael W.; Mohr, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The four Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded interferon (IFN) regulatory factor homologues (vIRF1 to vIRF4) are used to counter innate immune defenses and suppress p53. The vIRF genes are arranged in tandem but differ in function and expression. In KSHV-infected effusion lymphoma lines, K10.5/vIRF3 and K11/vIRF2 mRNAs are readily detected during latency, whereas K9/vIRF1 and K10/vIRF4 mRNAs are upregulated during reactivation. Here we show that the K10/vIRF4 promoter responds to the lytic switch protein RTA in KSHV-infected cells but is essentially unresponsive in uninfected cells. Coexpression of RTA with vIRF4 is sufficient to restore regulation, a property not shared by other vIRFs. The K9/vIRF1 promoter behaves similarly, and production of infectious virus is enhanced by the presence of vIRF4. Synergy requires the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and C-terminal IRF homology regions of vIRF4. Mutations of arginine residues within the putative DNA recognition helix of vIRF4 or the invariant cysteines of the adjacent CxxC motif abolish cooperation with RTA, in the latter case by preventing self-association. The oligomerization and transactivation functions of RTA are also essential for synergy. The K10/vIRF4 promoter contains two transcription start sites (TSSs), and a 105-bp fragment containing the proximal promoter is responsive to vIRF4/RTA. Binding of a cellular factor(s) to this fragment is altered when both viral proteins are present, suggesting a possible mechanism for transcriptional synergy. Reliance on coregulators encoded by either the host or viral genome provides an elegant strategy for expanding the regulatory potential of a master regulator, such as RTA. PMID:22090118

  7. Mutational analysis of the [4Fe-4S]-cluster converting iron regulatory factor from its RNA-binding form to cytoplasmic aconitase.

    PubMed Central

    Hirling, H; Henderson, B R; Kühn, L C

    1994-01-01

    The control of cellular iron homeostasis involves the coordinate post-transcriptional regulation of ferritin mRNA translation and transferring receptor mRNA stability. These regulatory events are mediated by a soluble cytoplasmic protein, iron regulatory factor (IRF), which binds specifically to mRNA hairpin structures, termed iron-responsive elements (IREs), in the respective mRNAs. IRF is modulated by variations of cellular iron levels and exists as either an apo-protein or a [4Fe-4S]-cluster protein. The two conformations show distinct, mutually exclusive functions. High-affinity IRE binding is observed with the apo-form induced by iron deprivation, but is lost under high iron conditions when IRF is converted to the [4Fe-4S]-cluster form which shows cytoplasmic aconitase activity. Moreover, IRE binding is inactivated by the sulfhydryl-oxidizing agent diamide and fully activated in vitro by 2% 2-mercapto-ethanol, whereas alkylation of IRF inhibits IRE binding. In the present study, we analyzed each of the above features using site-directed mutants of recombinant human IRF. The results support the bifunctional nature of IRF. We conclude that cysteines 437, 503 and 506 anchor the [4Fe-4S]-cluster, and are essential to the aconitase activity. Mutagenesis changing any of the cysteines to serine leads to constitutive RNA binding in 0.02% 2-mercaptoethanol. Cysteine 437 is particularly critical to the RNA-protein interaction. The spontaneous or diamide-induced formation of disulfide bonds between cysteines 437 and 503 or 437 and 506, in apo-IRF, as well as its alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide, inhibit binding to the IRE.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7508861

  8. Ubiquitin-associated Domain-containing Ubiquitin Regulatory X (UBX) Protein UBXN1 Is a Negative Regulator of Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Bo; Tan, Bo; Mu, Rui; Chang, Yan; Wu, Min; Tu, Hai-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Cheng; Guo, Sai-Sai; Qin, Xuan-He; Li, Tao; Li, Wei-Hua; Li, Ai-Ling; Zhang, Xue-Min; Li, Hui-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Excessive nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation should be precisely controlled as it contributes to multiple immune and inflammatory diseases. However, the negative regulatory mechanisms of NF-κB activation still need to be elucidated. Various types of polyubiquitin chains have proved to be involved in the process of NF-κB activation. Many negative regulators linked to ubiquitination, such as A20 and CYLD, inhibit IκB kinase activation in the NF-κB signaling pathway. To find new NF-κB signaling regulators linked to ubiquitination, we used a small scale siRNA library against 51 ubiquitin-associated domain-containing proteins and screened out UBXN1, which contained both ubiquitin-associated and ubiquitin regulatory X (UBX) domains as a negative regulator of TNFα-triggered NF-κB activation. Overexpression of UBXN1 inhibited TNFα-triggered NF-κB activation, although knockdown of UBXN1 had the opposite effect. UBX domain-containing proteins usually act as valosin-containing protein (VCP)/p97 cofactors. However, knockdown of VCP/p97 barely affected UBXN1-mediated NF-κB inhibition. At the same time, we found that UBXN1 interacted with cellular inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs), E3 ubiquitin ligases of RIP1 in the TNFα receptor complex. UBXN1 competitively bound to cIAP1, blocked cIAP1 recruitment to TNFR1, and sequentially inhibited RIP1 polyubiquitination in response to TNFα. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that UBXN1 is an important negative regulator of the TNFα-triggered NF-κB signaling pathway by mediating cIAP recruitment independent of VCP/p97. PMID:25681446

  9. p53 Tumor Suppressor Protein Stability and Transcriptional Activity Are Targeted by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Encoded Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 3

    PubMed Central

    Baresova, Petra; Musilova, Jana; Pitha, Paula M.

    2014-01-01

    Viruses have developed numerous strategies to counteract the host cell defense. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a DNA tumor virus linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma, Castleman's disease, and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). The virus-encoded viral interferon regulatory factor 3 (vIRF-3) gene is a latent gene which is involved in the regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle, antiviral immunity, and tumorigenesis. vIRF-3 was shown to interact with p53 and inhibit p53-mediated apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon has not been established. Here, we show that vIRF-3 associates with the DNA-binding domain of p53, inhibits p53 phosphorylation on serine residues S15 and S20, and antagonizes p53 oligomerization and the DNA-binding affinity. Furthermore, vIRF-3 destabilizes p53 protein by increasing the levels of p53 polyubiquitination and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. Consequently, vIRF-3 attenuates p53-mediated transcription of the growth-regulatory p21 gene. These effects of vIRF-3 are of biological relevance since the knockdown of vIRF-3 expression in KSHV-positive BC-3 cells, derived from PEL, leads to an increase in p53 phosphorylation, enhancement of p53 stability, and activation of p21 gene transcription. Collectively, these data suggest that KSHV evolved an efficient mechanism to downregulate p53 function and thus facilitate uncontrolled cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:24248600

  10. The Third Intron of the Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 Is an Initiator of Repressed Chromatin Restricting Its Expression in Non-Immune Cells.

    PubMed

    Khateb, Mamduh; Fourier, Nitsan; Barnea-Yizhar, Ofer; Ram, Sigal; Kovalev, Ekaterina; Azriel, Aviva; Rand, Ulfert; Nakayama, Manabu; Hauser, Hansjörg; Gepstein, Lior; Levi, Ben-Zion

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 (IRF-8) serves as a key factor in the hierarchical differentiation towards monocyte/dendritic cell lineages. While much insight has been accumulated into the mechanisms essential for its hematopoietic specific expression, the mode of restricting IRF-8 expression in non-hematopoietic cells is still unknown. Here we show that the repression of IRF-8 expression in restrictive cells is mediated by its 3rd intron. Removal of this intron alleviates the repression of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) IRF-8 reporter gene in these cells. Fine deletion analysis points to conserved regions within this intron mediating its restricted expression. Further, the intron alone selectively initiates gene silencing only in expression-restrictive cells. Characterization of this intron's properties points to its role as an initiator of sustainable gene silencing inducing chromatin condensation with suppressive histone modifications. This intronic element cannot silence episomal transgene expression underlining a strict chromatin-dependent silencing mechanism. We validated this chromatin-state specificity of IRF-8 intron upon in-vitro differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into cardiomyocytes. Taken together, the IRF-8 3rd intron is sufficient and necessary to initiate gene silencing in non-hematopoietic cells, highlighting its role as a nucleation core for repressed chromatin during differentiation. PMID:27257682

  11. The Third Intron of the Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 Is an Initiator of Repressed Chromatin Restricting Its Expression in Non-Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barnea-Yizhar, Ofer; Ram, Sigal; Kovalev, Ekaterina; Azriel, Aviva; Rand, Ulfert; Nakayama, Manabu; Hauser, Hansjörg; Gepstein, Lior; Levi, Ben-Zion

    2016-01-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 (IRF-8) serves as a key factor in the hierarchical differentiation towards monocyte/dendritic cell lineages. While much insight has been accumulated into the mechanisms essential for its hematopoietic specific expression, the mode of restricting IRF-8 expression in non-hematopoietic cells is still unknown. Here we show that the repression of IRF-8 expression in restrictive cells is mediated by its 3rd intron. Removal of this intron alleviates the repression of Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) IRF-8 reporter gene in these cells. Fine deletion analysis points to conserved regions within this intron mediating its restricted expression. Further, the intron alone selectively initiates gene silencing only in expression-restrictive cells. Characterization of this intron’s properties points to its role as an initiator of sustainable gene silencing inducing chromatin condensation with suppressive histone modifications. This intronic element cannot silence episomal transgene expression underlining a strict chromatin-dependent silencing mechanism. We validated this chromatin-state specificity of IRF-8 intron upon in-vitro differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into cardiomyocytes. Taken together, the IRF-8 3rd intron is sufficient and necessary to initiate gene silencing in non-hematopoietic cells, highlighting its role as a nucleation core for repressed chromatin during differentiation. PMID:27257682

  12. Pip, a lymphoid-restricted IRF, contains a regulatory domain that is important for autoinhibition and ternary complex formation with the Ets factor PU.1.

    PubMed

    Brass, A L; Kehrli, E; Eisenbeis, C F; Storb, U; Singh, H

    1996-09-15

    Pip is a lymphoid-restricted IRF transcription factor that is recruited to composite elements within immunoglobulin light-chain gene enhancers through a specific interaction with the Ets factor PU.1. We have examined the transcriptional regulatory properties of Pip as well as the requirements for its interaction with PU.1 and DNA to form a ternary complex. We demonstrate that Pip is a dichotomous regulator; it specifically stimulates transcription in conjunction with PU.1, but represses alpha/beta-interferon-inducible transcription in the absence of PU.1. Thus, during B-cell activation and differentiation, Pip may function both as an activator to promote B cell-specific gene expression and as a repressor to inhibit the antiproliferative effects of alpha/beta-interferons. Mutational analysis of Pip reveals a carboxy-terminal segment that is important for autoinhibition of DNA binding and ternary complex formation. A domain of Pip containing this segment confers autoinhibition and PU.1-dependent binding activity to the DNA-binding domain of the related IRF family member, p48. On the basis of these and other data we propose a model for PU.1/Pip ternary complex formation. PMID:8824592

  13. A novel function of interferon regulatory factor-1: inhibition of Th2 cells by down-regulating the Il4 gene during Listeria infection.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Saho; Kanoh, Makoto; Matsumoto, Akira; Kuwahara, Makoto; Yamashita, Masakatsu; Asano, Yoshihiro

    2015-03-01

    Infection with certain pathogens induces a shift of the Th subset balance to a Th1 dominant state. This, in turn, results in the suppression of Th2 responses. We focused on the involvement of interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) in the suppression of Th2 cells during Listeria infection. We found that the inhibition of IL-4 production by Th2 cells is mediated by a soluble factor (LmSN) produced by Listeria-infected antigen-presenting cells. The inhibition is not observed with T cells from Irf1 gene-targeted mice. IRF-1 suppresses transcription of the Il4 gene in Th2 cells. Under the influence of the LmSN, IRF-1 binds to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) region of the Il4 gene and down-regulates Il4 gene transcription. Finally, we identified IL-1α and IL-1β as the mediator of the LmSN activity. Signaling through IL-1R induces the stabilization and/or nuclear translocation of IRF-1. We propose that IRF-1 functions to induce the T-cell subset shift via a novel mechanism. Under the influence of IL-1, IRF-1 translocates into the nucleus and acts on the 3'UTR region of the Il4 gene, thus inhibiting its transcription in Th2 cells. As a result, the immune system shifts predominantly to a Th1 response during Listeria infection, resulting in effective protection of the host. PMID:25280793

  14. Improvement of low bioavailability of a novel factor Xa inhibitor through formulation of cationic additives in its oral dosage form.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshimine; Kanamaru, Taro; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Shinji; Akashi, Mitsuru; Sakuma, Shinji

    2011-12-15

    A clinical trial of (2S)-2-[4-[[(3S)-1-acetimidoyl-3-pyrrolidinyl]oxy]phenyl]-3-(7-amidino-2-naphtyl) propanoic acid (DX-9065) revealed that its oral bioavailability was only 3% when it was administered as a conventional capsule formulation. The low bioavailability of DX-9065 was likely caused by both its poor membrane permeability and its electrostatic interaction with anionic bile acids. We hypothesized that DX-9065 absorption would be enhanced when the cationic drug was free from the complex through its replacement with other cationic substances. Polystyrene nanospheres coated with cationic poly(vinylamine) and cholestyramine, which is clinically used as a cholesterol-lowering agent, dramatically prevented DX-9065 from interacting with chenodeoxycholic acid in vitro. Successive animal experiments showed that bioavailability of DX-9065 administered with these cationic substances was 2-3 times that of DX-9065 administered solely. A dry syrup formulation with one-half of a minimal cholesterol-lowering equivalent dose of cholestyramine was designed, and the clinical trial was resumed. A 1.3-fold increase in bioavailability of DX-9065 was observed when the dry syrup was administered. We successfully demonstrated that DX-9065 absorption was enhanced when the drug was administered with cationic additives; however, it appeared that the absorption-enhancing function of cholestyramine largely depended on its dose. The dose escalation is probably prerequisite for the significant improvement of DX-9065 absorption in humans. PMID:22001539

  15. The Regulatory Factor ZFHX3 Modifies Circadian Function in SCN via an AT Motif-Driven Axis

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Michael J.; Brancaccio, Marco; Sethi, Siddharth; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Satija, Rahul; Edwards, Jessica K.; Jagannath, Aarti; Couch, Yvonne; Finelli, Mattéa J.; Smyllie, Nicola J.; Esapa, Christopher; Butler, Rachel; Barnard, Alun R.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Saito, Shoko; Joynson, Greg; Wells, Sara; Foster, Russell G.; Oliver, Peter L.; Simon, Michelle M.; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Hastings, Michael H.; Nolan, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We identified a dominant missense mutation in the SCN transcription factor Zfhx3, termed short circuit (Zfhx3Sci), which accelerates circadian locomotor rhythms in mice. ZFHX3 regulates transcription via direct interaction with predicted AT motifs in target genes. The mutant protein has a decreased ability to activate consensus AT motifs in vitro. Using RNA sequencing, we found minimal effects on core clock genes in Zfhx3Sci/+ SCN, whereas the expression of neuropeptides critical for SCN intercellular signaling was significantly disturbed. Moreover, mutant ZFHX3 had a decreased ability to activate AT motifs in the promoters of these neuropeptide genes. Lentiviral transduction of SCN slices showed that the ZFHX3-mediated activation of AT motifs is circadian, with decreased amplitude and robustness of these oscillations in Zfhx3Sci/+ SCN slices. In conclusion, by cloning Zfhx3Sci, we have uncovered a circadian transcriptional axis that determines the period and robustness of behavioral and SCN molecular rhythms. PMID:26232227

  16. Regulatory Variation in HIV-1 Dependency Factor ZNRD1 Associates with Host Resistance to HIV-1 Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    An, Ping; Goedert, James J.; Donfield, Sharyne; Buchbinder, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D.; Detels, Roger; Winkler, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. ZNRD1 was identified as a host protein required for the completion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) lifecycle in a genome-wide screen using small interfering RNA gene silencing. Subsequently, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of host determinants for HIV-1 disease identified an association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ZNRD1 region with CD4+ T-cell depletion. Methods. We investigated the effects of SNPs in the ZNRD1 region on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and progression to clinical outcomes in 5 US-based HIV-1 longitudinal cohorts consisting of men who have sex with men, males with hemophilia, and injection drug users (IDUs) (n = 1865). SNP function was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and promoter luciferase assay. Results. A haplotype in the ZNRD1 gene showed significant association with a 35% decreased risk of HIV-1 acquisition (OR = 0.65, 95% CI, .47–.89), independent of HLA-C rs9264942, in European Americans. The SNP rs3132130 tagging this haplotype, located in the ZNRD1 5′ upstream region, caused a loss of nuclear factor binding and decrease in ZNRD1 promoter activity. ZNRD1 variants also affected HIV-1 disease progression in European- and African-American cohorts. Conclusions. This study provides novel evidence that ZNRD1 polymorphism may confer host resistance to HIV-1 acquisition. PMID:24842830

  17. Transcriptome analysis indicates TFEB1 and YEATS4 as regulatory transcription factors for drug resistance of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eum, Ki Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Jeong Won; Bae, Taejeong; Lee, Dae Ho; Choi, Jin Woo

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is an intractable disease because patients with ovarian cancer frequently develop drug resistance after long-term chemotherapy. Despite the availability of cumulative information on drug-resistant patients, strategies to reverse drug resistance have still not been established. In this study, we analyzed drug resistance-associated transcription factors (TFs) in ovarian cancer. Gene expression profiles of 15 drug-resistant and 11 drug-sensitive patients with ovarian cancer were compared. Our results showed that TFs TFEB1 and YEATS4 regulated the expression of downstream target genes. These 2 TFs have already been implicated in tumorigenesis or metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the involvement of these TFs in drug resistance of ovarian cancer. Interestingly, 70% knockdown of each of these TFs with siRNAs resulted in approximately 20%∼30% recovery of drug sensitivity. Further, combination treatment of ovarian cancer cells with TFEB1 and YEATS4 siRNAs resulted in 35% reversal of drug resistance. The effect of these TFs on chemoresistance seemed to be associated with intrinsic apoptosis-related pathways, such as p53 activation, and not with the suppression of drug transport. Thus, we suggest a novel approach to reverse chemoresistance of ovarian cancer by suppressing TFEB1 and YEATS4. PMID:26307679

  18. Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta acts through distal regulatory elements to directly control cellular gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanyan, Sharada; Osborn, Kay; Al-Mohammad, Rajaei; Naranjo Perez-Fernandez, Ijiel B; Zuo, Jianmin; Balan, Nicolae; Godfrey, Anja; Patel, Harshil; Peters, Gordon; Rowe, Martin; Jenner, Richard G; Sinclair, Alison J

    2015-04-20

    Lytic replication of the human gamma herpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an essential prerequisite for the spread of the virus. Differential regulation of a limited number of cellular genes has been reported in B-cells during the viral lytic replication cycle. We asked whether a viral bZIP transcription factor, Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1), drives some of these changes. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to next-generation DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) we established a map of Zta interactions across the human genome. Using sensitive transcriptome analyses we identified 2263 cellular genes whose expression is significantly changed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. Zta binds 278 of the regulated genes and the distribution of binding sites shows that Zta binds mostly to sites that are distal to transcription start sites. This differs from the prevailing view that Zta activates viral genes by binding exclusively at promoter elements. We show that a synthetic Zta binding element confers Zta regulation at a distance and that distal Zta binding sites from cellular genes can confer Zta-mediated regulation on a heterologous promoter. This leads us to propose that Zta directly reprograms the expression of cellular genes through distal elements. PMID:25779048

  19. Corticotropin-releasing factor receptors CRF1 and CRF2 exert both additive and opposing influences on defensive startle behavior.

    PubMed

    Risbrough, Victoria B; Hauger, Richard L; Roberts, Amanda L; Vale, Wylie W; Geyer, Mark A

    2004-07-21

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors (CRF1 and CRF2) are crucial mediators of physiological and behavioral responses to stress. In animals, CRF1 appears to primarily mediate CRF-induced anxiety-like responses, but the role of CRF2 during stress is still unclear. Here we report the effects of CRF1 and CRF2 on the magnitude and plasticity of defensive startle responses in mice. Startle plasticity is measured by inhibition of startle by sensory stimuli, i.e., prepulse inhibition (PPI), and is disrupted in patients with panic or posttraumatic stress disorders in which CRF neurotransmission may be overactive. Pharmacological blockade of CRF1 reversed both CRF-induced increases in startle and CRF-induced deficits in PPI. CRF2 blockade attenuated high-dose but not low-dose CRF-induced increases in startle and reduced PPI. Conversely, activation of CRF2 enhanced PPI. CRF had no effect on startle and increased PPI in CRF1 knock-out mice. These data indicate that CRF receptors act in concert to increase the magnitude of defensive startle yet in opposition to regulate the flexibility of startle. These data support a new model of respective CRF receptor roles in stress-related behavior such that, although both receptors enhance the magnitude of defensive responses, CRF1 receptors contravene, whereas CRF2 receptors enhance, the impact of sensory information on defensive behavior. We hypothesize that excessive CRF1 activation combined with reduced CRF2 signaling may contribute to information processing deficits seen in panic and posttraumatic stress disorder patients and support CRF1-specific pharmacotherapy. PMID:15269266

  20. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Ulrich F.O.; Carvalho, Livia S.; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha kleine; Cowing, Jill A.; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J.; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J.; Munro, Peter M.G.; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W.B.; Ali, Robin R.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype–genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1rd8/rd8 mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1rd8/rd8/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1rd8/rd8 lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1rd8/rd8 lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling—features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1rd8/rd8 line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1rd8/rd8 mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype–phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers. PMID:25147295

  1. The severity of retinal pathology in homozygous Crb1rd8/rd8 mice is dependent on additional genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Ulrich F O; Carvalho, Livia S; Holthaus, Sophia-Martha Kleine; Cowing, Jill A; Greenaway, Simon; Chu, Colin J; Herrmann, Philipp; Smith, Alexander J; Munro, Peter M G; Potter, Paul; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    Understanding phenotype-genotype correlations in retinal degeneration is a major challenge. Mutations in CRB1 lead to a spectrum of autosomal recessive retinal dystrophies with variable phenotypes suggesting the influence of modifying factors. To establish the contribution of the genetic background to phenotypic variability associated with the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation, we compared the retinal pathology of Crb1(rd8/rd8)/J inbred mice with that of two Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines backcrossed with C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. Topical endoscopic fundal imaging and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy fundus images of all three Crb1(rd8/rd8) lines showed a significant increase in the number of inferior retinal lesions that was strikingly variable between the lines. Optical coherence tomography, semithin, ultrastructural morphology and assessment of inflammatory and vascular marker by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the lesions were associated with photoreceptor death, Müller and microglia activation and telangiectasia-like vascular remodelling-features that were stable in the inbred, variable in the second, but virtually absent in the third Crb1(rd8/rd8) line, even at 12 months of age. This suggests that the Crb1(rd8/rd8) mutation is necessary, but not sufficient for the development of these degenerative features. By whole-genome SNP analysis of the genotype-phenotype correlation, a candidate region on chromosome 15 was identified. This may carry one or more genetic modifiers for the manifestation of the retinal pathology associated with mutations in Crb1. This study also provides insight into the nature of the retinal vascular lesions that likely represent a clinical correlate for the formation of retinal telangiectasia or Coats-like vasculopathy in patients with CRB1 mutations that are thought to depend on such genetic modifiers. PMID:25147295

  2. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2014-01-01

    1 lines. This suggests the possibility of further improvements in submergence tolerance by incorporating additional traits present in FR13A or other similar landraces. PMID:25281725

  3. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J.; Ismail, Abdelbagi M.

    2014-01-01

    1 lines. This suggests the possibility of further improvements in submergence tolerance by incorporating additional traits present in FR13A or other similar landraces. PMID:25281725

  4. Rapamycin can restore the negative regulatory function of transforming growth factor beta 1 in high grade lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sebestyén, Anna; Márk, Ágnes; Hajdu, Melinda; Nagy, Noémi; Molnár, Anna; Végső, Gyula; Barna, Gábor; Kopper, László

    2015-06-01

    TGF-β1 (transforming growth factor beta 1) is a negative regulator of lymphocytes, inhibiting proliferation and switching on the apoptotic program in normal lymphoid cells. Lymphoma cells often lose their sensitivity to proapoptotic/anti-proliferative regulators such as TGF-β1. Rapamycin can influence both mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and TGF-β signaling, and through these pathways it is able to enhance TGF-β induced anti-proliferative and apoptotic responses. In the present work we investigated the effect of rapamycin and TGF-β1 combination on cell growth and on TGF-β and mTOR signalling events in lymphoma cells. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1 (mTOR complex 1) did not elicit apoptosis in lymphoma cells; however, the combination of rapamycin with exogenous TGF-β1 induced apoptosis and restored TGF-β1 dependent apoptotic machinery in several lymphoma cell lines with reduced TGF-β sensitivity in vitro. In parallel, the phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) and ribosomal S6 protein, targets of mTORC1, was completely eliminated. Knockdown of Smad signalling by Smad4 siRNA had no influence on apoptosis induced by the rapamycin+TGF-β1, suggesting that this effect is independent of Smad signalling. However, apoptosis induction was dependent on early protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity, and in part on caspases. Rapamycin+TGF-β1 induced apoptosis was not completely eliminated by a caspase inhibitor. These results suggest that high mTOR activity contributes to TGF-β resistance and lowering mTORC1 kinase activity may provide a tool in high grade B-cell lymphoma therapy by restoring the sensitivity to normally available regulators such as TGF-β1. PMID:25794661

  5. Mammals of Australia's tropical savannas: a conceptual model of assemblage structure and regulatory factors in the Kimberley region.

    PubMed

    Radford, Ian J; Dickman, Christopher R; Start, Antony N; Palmer, Carol; Carnes, Karin; Everitt, Corrin; Fairman, Richard; Graham, Gordon; Partridge, Thalie; Thomson, Allan

    2014-01-01

    We construct a state-and-transition model for mammals in tropical savannas in northern Australia to synthesize ecological knowledge and understand mammalian declines. We aimed to validate the existence of alternative mammal assemblage states similar to those in arid Australian grasslands, and to speculate on transition triggers. Based on the arid grassland model, we hypothesized that assemblages are partitioned across rainfall gradients and between substrates. We also predicted that assemblages typical of arid regions in boom periods would be prevalent in savannas with higher and more regular rainfall. Data from eight mammal surveys from the Kimberley region, Western Australia (1994 to 2011) were collated. Survey sites were partitioned across rainfall zones and habitats. Data allowed us to identify three assemblage states: State 0:--low numbers of mammals, State II:--dominated by omnivorous rodents and State III:--dominated by rodents and larger marsupials. Unlike arid grasslands, assemblage dominance by insectivorous dasyurids (State I) did not occur in savannas. Mammal assemblages were partitioned across rainfall zones and between substrates as predicted, but-unlike arid regions-were not related strongly to yearly rainfall. Mammal assemblage composition showed high regional stability, probably related to high annual rainfall and predictable wet season resource pulses. As a consequence, we speculate that perpetually booming assemblages in savannas allow top-down control of the ecosystem, with suppression of introduced cats by the dingo, the region's top predator. Under conditions of low or erratic productivity, imposed increasingly by intense fire regimes and introduced herbivore grazing, dingoes may not limit impacts of cats on native mammals. These interacting factors may explain contemporary declines of savanna mammals as well as historical declines in arid Australia. The cat-ecosystem productivity hypothesis raised here differs from the already-articulated cat

  6. Mammals of Australia's Tropical Savannas: A Conceptual Model of Assemblage Structure and Regulatory Factors in the Kimberley Region

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Ian J.; Dickman, Christopher R.; Start, Antony N.; Palmer, Carol; Carnes, Karin; Everitt, Corrin; Fairman, Richard; Graham, Gordon; Partridge, Thalie; Thomson, Allan

    2014-01-01

    We construct a state-and-transition model for mammals in tropical savannas in northern Australia to synthesize ecological knowledge and understand mammalian declines. We aimed to validate the existence of alternative mammal assemblage states similar to those in arid Australian grasslands, and to speculate on transition triggers. Based on the arid grassland model, we hypothesized that assemblages are partitioned across rainfall gradients and between substrates. We also predicted that assemblages typical of arid regions in boom periods would be prevalent in savannas with higher and more regular rainfall. Data from eight mammal surveys from the Kimberley region, Western Australia (1994 to 2011) were collated. Survey sites were partitioned across rainfall zones and habitats. Data allowed us to identify three assemblage states: State 0:- low numbers of mammals, State II:- dominated by omnivorous rodents and State III:- dominated by rodents and larger marsupials. Unlike arid grasslands, assemblage dominance by insectivorous dasyurids (State I) did not occur in savannas. Mammal assemblages were partitioned across rainfall zones and between substrates as predicted, but—unlike arid regions—were not related strongly to yearly rainfall. Mammal assemblage composition showed high regional stability, probably related to high annual rainfall and predictable wet season resource pulses. As a consequence, we speculate that perpetually booming assemblages in savannas allow top-down control of the ecosystem, with suppression of introduced cats by the dingo, the region's top predator. Under conditions of low or erratic productivity, imposed increasingly by intense fire regimes and introduced herbivore grazing, dingoes may not limit impacts of cats on native mammals. These interacting factors may explain contemporary declines of savanna mammals as well as historical declines in arid Australia. The cat-ecosystem productivity hypothesis raised here differs from the already

  7. DNA binding and regulatory effects of transcription factors SP1 and USF at the rat amyloid precursor protein gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, P W; Chernak, J M

    1995-01-01

    Two DNA elements which we have termed SAA and GAG have been shown to control expression of the rat amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene, and the region containing the SAA element has been shown to interact with nuclear proteins [Hoffman and Chernak (1994) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 201, 610-617]. In this report we study DNA sequences and proteins which influence the activity of the SAA element. An oligonucleotide containing the SAA element is specifically bound by nuclear proteins derived from rat PC12 cells, consistently forming four complexes designated C25, C30, C35 and C40 in electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs). We demonstrate that the C25, C30 and C40 complexes involve the binding of nuclear proteins to an SP1 consensus sequence located within the SAA element and that the C25 complex contains a protein antigenically related to the human SP1 protein. We establish further that the C35 complex requires a USF recognition site located within the SAA element and contains a protein antigenically related to the human upstream stimulatory factor (USF) protein. Using APP promoter/luciferase reporter gene constructs, we demonstrate that both the SP1 and the USF sites can play a role in the transcriptional activity of the SAA element. Finally, we show that complexes similar to the C25, C30 and C35 complexes are formed by rat cortex nuclear extracts and the SAA element in EMSA experiments, suggesting the relevance of our in vitro observations to the in vivo functioning of the rat APP promoter. Images PMID:7610052

  8. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity. PMID:23831359

  9. Lactobacilli Modulate Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF)-1 Regulatory Pathway in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abedin-Do, Atieh; Mirfakhraie, Reza; Shirzad, Mahdieh; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Motevaseli, Elahe

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF)-1 plays an essential role in the body’s response to low oxygen concentrations and regulates expression of several genes implicated in homeostasis, vascularization, anaerobic metabolism as well as immunological responses. Increased levels of HIF-1α are associated with increased proliferation and more aggressive breast tumor development. Lactobacilli have been shown to exert anti-cancer effects on several malignancies including breast cancer. However, the exact mechanism of such effect is not clear yet. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of selected genes from HIF pathway in a triple negative breast cancer cell line (expressing no estrogen and progesterone receptors as well as HER-2/Neu), MDA-MB-231, following treatment with two lactobacilli culture supernatants. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we analyzed the expression of HIF-1α, SLC2A1, VHL, HSP90, XBP1 and SHARP1 genes from HIF pathway in MDA-MB-231 cells, before and after treatment with Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus culture supernatants (LCS and LRS, respectively) by means of quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Both LRS and LCS had cytotoxic effects on MDA-MB-231 cells, while the former type was more cytotoxic. LRS dramatically down-regulated expression levels of the HIF-1α, HSP90 and SLC2A1 in the MDA-MB-231 cells. LCS had similar effect on the expression of HSP90, to what was observed in the LRS treatment. The expression level of tumor suppressor genes VHL and SHARP1 were also decreased in LCS treated cells. Conclusion Although both LCS and LRS had cytotoxic effects on the MDA-MB-231 cells, it is proposed that LRS could be more appropriate for pathway directed treatment modalities, as it did not decrease expression of tumor suppressor genes involved in HIF pathway. Down-regulation of HIF pathway mediated oncogenes by LRS suggests that the cytotoxic effects of this

  10. Molecular characterization of global regulatory RNA species that control pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    PubMed

    Ma, W; Cui, Y; Liu, Y; Dumenyo, C K; Mukherjee, A; Chatterjee, A K

    2001-03-01

    rsmB(Ecc) specifies a nontranslatable RNA regulator that controls exoprotein production and pathogenicity in soft rot-causing Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. This effect of rsmB(Ecc) RNA is mediated mostly by neutralizing the function of RsmA(Ecc), an RNA-binding protein of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, which acts as a global negative regulator. To determine the occurrence of functional homologs of rsmB(Ecc) in non-soft-rot-causing Erwinia species, we cloned the rsmB genes of E. amylovora (rsmB(Ea)) and E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae (rsmB(Ehg)). We show that rsmB(Ea) in E. amylovora positively regulates extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production, motility, and pathogenicity. In E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae, rsmB(Ehg) elevates the levels of transcripts of a cytokinin (etz) gene and stimulates the production of EPS and yellow pigment as well as motility. RsmA(Ea) and RsmA(Ehg) have more than 93% identity to RsmA(Ecc) and, like the latter, function as negative regulators by affecting the transcript stability of the target gene. The rsmB genes reverse the negative effects of RsmA(Ea), RsmA(Ehg), and RsmA(Ecc), but the extent of reversal is highest with homologous combinations of rsm genes. These observations and findings that rsmB(Ea) and rsmB(Ehg) RNA bind RsmA(Ecc) indicate that the rsmB effect is channeled via RsmA. Additional support for this conclusion comes from the observation that the rsmB genes are much more effective as positive regulators in a RsmA(+) strain of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora than in its RsmA(-) derivative. E. herbicola pv. gypsophilae produces a 290-base rsmB transcript that is not subject to processing. By contrast, E. amylovora produces 430- and 300-base rsmB transcripts, the latter presumably derived by processing of the primary transcript as previously noted with the transcripts of rsmB(Ecc). Southern blot hybridizations revealed the presence of rsmB homologs in E. carotovora, E. chrysanthemi, E. amylovora, E. herbicola, E

  11. Canadian drug regulatory framework.

    PubMed

    Kelly, L; Lazzaro, M; Petersen, C

    2007-03-01

    The role of regulatory drug submission evaluators in Canada is to critically assess both the data submitted and the sponsor's interpretation of the data in order to reach an evidence-, and context-based recommendation as to the potential benefits and potential harms (i.e., risks) associated with taking the drug under the proposed conditions of use. The purpose of this document is to outline the regulatory framework in which this assessment occurs, including: defining what "authorization to market a drug in Canada" means, in terms of the role of the sponsor, the responsibility of Health Canada in applying the Food and Drugs Act prior to and after marketing authorization, and the distinction between regulatory authorization versus physician authorization; highlighting organizational, process and legal factors within Health Canada related to authorization of clinical trials and authorization to market a drug; considerations during the review process, such as regulatory and scientific issues related to the drug, patient populations and trial designs; application of international guidelines, and decisions from other jurisdictions; regulatory realities regarding drug authorization, including the requirement for wording in the Product Monograph to accurately reflect the information currently available on the safe and effective use of a drug, and that hypothesis-confirming studies are essential to regulatory endorsement; current issues related to the review of therapies for dementia, such as assessing preventative treatments, and therapies that have symptomatic versus disease-modifying effects, statistical issues regarding missing data, and trial design issues. PMID:17469674

  12. Apoptosis Induced by Mammalian Reovirus Is Beta Interferon (IFN) Independent and Enhanced by IFN Regulatory Factor 3- and NF-κB-Dependent Expression of Noxa

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Jonathan J.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2012-01-01

    A variety of signal transduction pathways are activated in response to viral infection, which dampen viral replication and transmission. These mechanisms involve both the induction of type I interferons (IFNs), which evoke an antiviral state, and the triggering of apoptosis. Mammalian orthoreoviruses are double-stranded RNA viruses that elicit apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. The transcription factors interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) and nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) are required for the expression of IFN-β and the efficient induction of apoptosis in reovirus-infected cells. However, it is not known whether IFN-β induction is required for apoptosis, nor have the genes induced by IRF-3 and NF-κB that are responsible for apoptosis been identified. To determine whether IFN-β is required for reovirus-induced apoptosis, we used type I IFN receptor-deficient cells, IFN-specific antibodies, and recombinant IFN-β. We found that IFN synthesis and signaling are dispensable for the apoptosis of reovirus-infected cells. These results indicate that the apoptotic response following reovirus infection is mediated directly by genes responsive to IRF-3 and NF-κB. Noxa is a proapoptotic BH3-domain-only protein of the Bcl-2 family that requires IRF-3 and NF-κB for efficient expression. We found that Noxa is strongly induced at late times (36 to 48 h) following reovirus infection in a manner dependent on IRF-3 and NF-κB. The level of apoptosis induced by reovirus is significantly diminished in cells lacking Noxa, indicating a key prodeath function for this molecule during reovirus infection. These results suggest that prolonged innate immune response signaling induces apoptosis by eliciting Noxa expression in reovirus-infected cells. PMID:22090144

  13. A Two-Component Regulatory System, CsrR-CsrS, Represses Expression of Three Streptococcus pyogenes Virulence Factors, Hyaluronic Acid Capsule, Streptolysin S, and Pyrogenic Exotoxin B

    PubMed Central

    Heath, Andrew; DiRita, Victor J.; Barg, Neil L.; Engleberg, N. Cary

    1999-01-01

    Certain Tn916 insertions in the chromosome of an M1-type, nonmucoid Streptococcus pyogenes isolate (MGAS166) were previously shown to result in stable mucoidy with increased expression of the capsular synthetic genes. The transposon insertions in these strains are directly upstream of an apparent operon encoding a two-component regulatory system, designated csrR-csrS. Compared with MGAS166, these mucoid mutants are more hemolytic and cause significantly more tissue damage in a murine model of skin infection. To extend these observations, we constructed an in-frame deletion in the gene encoding the response regulator, csrR, and we evaluated the expression of other known S. pyogenes virulence factors. We discovered that csrR mutants have enhanced transcription of sagA, a gene associated with streptolysin S (SLS) and speB, the gene encoding pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB). The mutants also express substantially higher SLS activity and SpeB antigen in late-exponential-phase cultures. There is no change in expression of emm, scpA, sic, or cpa (genes encoding other S. pyogenes virulence factors). CsrR− strains but not the wild-type parental strain produce necrotizing lesions in a mouse model of subcutaneous infection. A double mutant with deletions in both csrR and the capsular synthesis genes caused fewer and smaller necrotic skin lesions than the csrR mutants. However, this nonmucoid csrR strain was more likely than the wild type to yield necrotic lesions, suggesting that mucoidy contributes to virulence in this model of infection but that there are other csrR-regulated factors involved in the production of necrotic lesions. PMID:10496909

  14. A two-component regulatory system, CsrR-CsrS, represses expression of three Streptococcus pyogenes virulence factors, hyaluronic acid capsule, streptolysin S, and pyrogenic exotoxin B.

    PubMed

    Heath, A; DiRita, V J; Barg, N L; Engleberg, N C

    1999-10-01

    Certain Tn916 insertions in the chromosome of an M1-type, nonmucoid Streptococcus pyogenes isolate (MGAS166) were previously shown to result in stable mucoidy with increased expression of the capsular synthetic genes. The transposon insertions in these strains are directly upstream of an apparent operon encoding a two-component regulatory system, designated csrR-csrS. Compared with MGAS166, these mucoid mutants are more hemolytic and cause significantly more tissue damage in a murine model of skin infection. To extend these observations, we constructed an in-frame deletion in the gene encoding the response regulator, csrR, and we evaluated the expression of other known S. pyogenes virulence factors. We discovered that csrR mutants have enhanced transcription of sagA, a gene associated with streptolysin S (SLS) and speB, the gene encoding pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB). The mutants also express substantially higher SLS activity and SpeB antigen in late-exponential-phase cultures. There is no change in expression of emm, scpA, sic, or cpa (genes encoding other S. pyogenes virulence factors). CsrR- strains but not the wild-type parental strain produce necrotizing lesions in a mouse model of subcutaneous infection. A double mutant with deletions in both csrR and the capsular synthesis genes caused fewer and smaller necrotic skin lesions than the csrR mutants. However, this nonmucoid csrR strain was more likely than the wild type to yield necrotic lesions, suggesting that mucoidy contributes to virulence in this model of infection but that there are other csrR-regulated factors involved in the production of necrotic lesions. PMID:10496909

  15. Early exposure of interferon-γ inhibits signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 signalling and nuclear factor κB activation in a short-term monocyte-derived dendritic cell culture promoting ‘FAST’ regulatory dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Canales, D; Krishnan, R; Jessup, C F; Coates, P T

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ is a cytokine with immunomodulatory properties, which has been shown previously to enhance the generation of tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) when administered early ex vivo in 7-day monocyte-derived DC culture. To generate tolerogenic DC rapidly within 48 h, human monocytes were cultured for 24 h with interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the presence (IFN-γ-DC) or absence of IFN-γ (500 U/ml) (UT-DC). DC were matured for 24 h with TNF-α and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). DC phenotype, signal transducer and activator of transcription-6 (STAT-6) phosphorylation and promotion of CD4+CD25+CD127neg/lowforkhead box P3 (FoxP3)hi T cells were analysed by flow cytometry. DC nuclear factor (NF)-κB transcription factor reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homologue B (RELB) and IL-12p70 protein expression were also determined. Phenotypically, IFN-γ-DC displayed reduced DC maturation marker CD83 by 62% and co-stimulation molecules CD80 (26%) and CD86 (8%). IFN-γ treatment of monocytes inhibited intracellular STAT6, RELB nuclear translocation and IL-12p70 production. IFN-γ-DC increased the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127neg/lowfoxp3hi T cells compared to UT-DC from 12 to 23%. IFN-γ-DC primed T cells inhibited antigen-specific, autologous naive T cell proliferation by 70% at a 1:1 naive T cells to IFN-γ-DC primed T cell ratio in suppression assays. In addition, we examined the reported paradoxical proinflammatory effects of IFN-γ and confirmed in this system that late IFN-γ exposure does not inhibit DC maturation marker expression. Early IFN-γ exposure is critical in promoting the generation of regulatory DC. Early IFN-γ modulated DC generated in 48 h are maturation arrested and promote the generation of antigen-specific regulatory T cells, which may be clinically applicable as a novel cellular therapy for allograft rejection. PMID:22288588

  16. Genome-Wide Mapping of the Binding Sites and Structural Analysis of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 2 Reveal that It Is a DNA-Binding Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haidai; Dong, Jiazhen; Liang, Deguang; Gao, Zengqiang; Bai, Lei; Sun, Rui; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Heng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The oncogenic herpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is known to encode four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4) to subvert the host antiviral immune response, but their detailed DNA-binding profiles as transcription factors in the host remain uncharacterized. Here, we first performed genome-wide vIRF2-binding site mapping in the human genome using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq). vIRF2 was capable of binding to the promoter regions of 100 putative target genes. Importantly, we confirmed that vIRF2 can specifically interact with the promoters of the genes encoding PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL, which are associated with autophagosome formation or tumor progression and metastasis, and regulate their transcription in vivo. The crystal structure of the vIRF2 DNA-binding domain (DBD) (referred to here as vIRF2DBD) showed variable loop conformations and positive-charge distributions different from those of vIRF1 and cellular IRFs that are associated with DNA-binding specificities. Structure-based mutagenesis revealed that Arg82 and Arg85 are required for the in vitro DNA-binding activity of vIRF2DBD and can abolish the transcription regulation function of vIRF2 on the promoter reporter activity of PIK3C3, HMGCR, and HMGCL. Collectively, our study provided unique insights into the DNA-binding potency of vIRF2 and suggested that vIRF2 could act as a transcription factor of its target genes in the host antiviral immune response. IMPORTANCE The oncogenic herpesvirus KSHV is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV has developed a unique mechanism to subvert the host antiviral immune responses by encoding four homologues of cellular interferon regulatory factors (vIRF1 to -4). However, none of their DNA-binding profiles in the human genome have been characterized until now, and the structural basis for their diverse

  17. Interferon (IFN) Consensus Sequence-binding Protein, a Transcription Factor of the IFN Regulatory Factor Family, Regulates Immune Responses In Vivo through Control of Interleukin 12 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Giese, Nathalia A.; Gabriele, Lucia; Doherty, T. Mark; Klinman, Dennis M.; Tadesse-Heath, Lekidelu; Contursi, Christina; Epstein, Suzanne L.; Morse, Herbert C.

    1997-01-01

    Mice with a null mutation of the gene encoding interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP) develop a chronic myelogenous leukemia-like syndrome and mount impaired responses to certain viral and bacterial infections. To gain a mechanistic understanding of the contributions of ICSBP to humoral and cellular immunity, we characterized the responses of control and ICSBP−/− mice to infection with influenza A (flu) and Leishmania major (L. major). Mice of both genotypes survived infections with flu, but differed markedly in the isotype distribution of antiflu antibodies. In sera of normal mice, immunoglobulin (Ig)G2a antibodies were dominant over IgG1 antibodies, a pattern indicative of a T helper cell type 1 (Th1)-driven response. In sera of ICSBP−/− mice, however, IgG1 antibodies dominated over IgG2a antibodies, a pattern indicative of a Th2-driven response. The dominance of IgG1 and IgE over IgG2a was detected in the sera of uninfected mice as well. A seeming Th2 bias of ICSBP-deficient mice was also uncovered in their inability to control infection with L. major, where resistance is known to be dependent on IL-12 and IFN-γ as components of a Th1 response. Infected ICSBP-deficient mice developed fulminant, disseminated leishmaniasis as a result of failure to mount a Th1-mediated curative response, although T cells remained capable of secreting IFN-γ and macrophages of producing nitric oxide. Compromised Th1 differentiation in ICSBP−/− mice could not be attributed to hyporesponsiveness of CD4+ T cells to interleukin (IL)-12; however, the ability of uninfected and infected ICSBP-deficient mice to produce IL-12 was markedly impaired. This indicates that ICSBP is a deciding factor in Th responses governing humoral and cellular immunity through its role in regulating IL-12 expression. PMID:9348311

  18. Assessment of the Electronic Factors Determining the Thermodynamics of "Oxidative Addition" of C-H and N-H Bonds to Ir(I) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, David Y; Choliy, Yuriy; Haibach, Michael C; Hartwig, John F; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2016-01-13

    A study of electronic factors governing the thermodynamics of C-H and N-H bond addition to Ir(I) complexes was conducted. DFT calculations were performed on an extensive series of trans-(PH3)2IrXL complexes (L = NH3 and CO; X = various monodentate ligands) to parametrize the relative σ- and π-donating/withdrawing properties of the various ligands, X. Computed energies of oxidative addition of methane to a series of three- and four-coordinate Ir(I) complexes bearing an ancillary ligand, X, were correlated with the resulting (σ(X), π(X)) parameter set. Regression analysis indicates that the thermodynamics of addition of methane to trans-(PH3)2IrX are generally strongly disfavored by increased σ-donation from the ligand X, in contradiction to widely held views on oxidative addition. The trend for oxidative addition of methane to four-coordinate Ir(I) was closely related to that observed for the three-coordinate complexes, albeit slightly more complicated. The computational analysis was found to be consistent with the rates of reductive elimination of benzene from a series of isoelectronic Ir(III) phenyl hydride complexes, measured experimentally in this work and previously reported. Extending the analysis of ancillary ligand energetic effects to the oxidative addition of ammonia to three-coordinate Ir(I) complexes leads to the conclusion that increasing σ-donation by X also disfavors oxidative addition of N-H bonds to trans-(PH3)2IrX. However, coordination of NH3 to the Ir(I) center is disfavored even more strongly by increasing σ-donation by X, which explains why the few documented examples of H-NH2 oxidative addition to transition metals involve complexes with strongly σ-donating ligands situated trans to the site of addition. An orbital-based rationale for the observed results is presented. PMID:26652221

  19. Iron regulatory factor expressed from recombinant baculovirus: conversion between the RNA-binding apoprotein and Fe-S cluster containing aconitase.

    PubMed Central

    Emery-Goodman, A; Hirling, H; Scarpellino, L; Henderson, B; Kühn, L C

    1993-01-01

    Iron regulatory factor (IRF) is a cytoplasmic mRNA-binding protein that coordinates post-transcriptionally the expression of several important proteins in iron metabolism. Binding of IRF to iron-responsive elements (IRE) in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of ferritin and erythroid 5-aminolevulinic acid-synthase mRNAs inhibits their translation, whereas binding to IREs in the 3' UTR of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA prevents the degradation of this mRNA. IRF binds RNA strongly after iron deprivation, but is inactive, yet present, under conditions of high cellular iron supply. Recently, IRF was also shown to have aconitase activity indicating the existence of an Fe-S cluster in the protein. In the current study we expressed human IRF in insect cells from recombinant baculovirus and analysed IRE-binding and aconitase activities under various culture conditions. Newly made apoprotein, synthesized in the absence of iron, was fully active in IRE-binding, but showed no aconitase activity. In contrast, IRF made by cells grown in high iron medium bound RNA poorly, but exhibited high aconitase activity with a Km of 9.2 microM for cis-aconitate. Apo-IRF was converted in vitro to active aconitase by Fe-S cluster-generating conditions, and under the same conditions lost its RNA-binding capacity. These results indicate that the two activities are mutually exclusive and controlled through formation of the Fe-S cluster. Images PMID:8464737

  20. Differential Expression of Myogenic Regulatory Factor Genes in the Skeletal Muscles of Tambaqui Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier 1818) from Amazonian Black and Clear Water

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Costa, F. A.; Barbosa, C. M.; Aguiar, R. C. M.; Mareco, E. A.; Dal-Pai-Silva, M.

    2013-01-01

    Hypothesizing that the Amazonian water system differences would affect the expression of muscle growth-related genes in juvenile tambaqui Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier 1818), this study aimed to analyze the morphometric data and expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) in the white and red muscle from tambaqui obtained from clear and black Amazonian water systems. All of the MRF transcript levels (myod, myf5, myogenin, and mrf4) were significantly lower in the red muscle from black water fish in comparison to clear water fish. However, in white muscle, only the myod transcript level was significantly decreased in the black water tambaqui. The changes in MRFs gene expression in muscle fibers of tambaqui from black water system provide relevant information about the environmental influence as that of water systems on gene expression of muscle growth related genes in the C. macropomum. Our results showed that the physical and chemical water characteristics change the expression of genes that promote muscle growth, and these results may be also widely applicable to future projects that aim to enhance muscle growth in fish that are of substantial interest to the aquaculture. PMID:24350238

  1. Differential Expression of Myogenic Regulatory Factor Genes in the Skeletal Muscles of Tambaqui Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier 1818) from Amazonian Black and Clear Water.

    PubMed

    Alves-Costa, F A; Barbosa, C M; Aguiar, R C M; Mareco, E A; Dal-Pai-Silva, M

    2013-01-01

    Hypothesizing that the Amazonian water system differences would affect the expression of muscle growth-related genes in juvenile tambaqui Colossoma macropomum (Cuvier 1818), this study aimed to analyze the morphometric data and expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) in the white and red muscle from tambaqui obtained from clear and black Amazonian water systems. All of the MRF transcript levels (myod, myf5, myogenin, and mrf4) were significantly lower in the red muscle from black water fish in comparison to clear water fish. However, in white muscle, only the myod transcript level was significantly decreased in the black water tambaqui. The changes in MRFs gene expression in muscle fibers of tambaqui from black water system provide relevant information about the environmental influence as that of water systems on gene expression of muscle growth related genes in the C. macropomum. Our results showed that the physical and chemical water characteristics change the expression of genes that promote muscle growth, and these results may be also widely applicable to future projects that aim to enhance muscle growth in fish that are of substantial interest to the aquaculture. PMID:24350238

  2. An interferon regulatory factor binding site in the U5 region of the bovine leukemia virus long terminal repeat stimulates Tax-independent gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kiermer, V; Van Lint, C; Briclet, D; Vanhulle, C; Kettmann, R; Verdin, E; Burny, A; Droogmans, L

    1998-07-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) replication is controlled by both cis- and trans-acting elements. The virus-encoded transactivator, Tax, is necessary for efficient transcription from the BLV promoter, although it is not present during the early stages of infection. Therefore, sequences that control Tax-independent transcription must play an important role in the initiation of viral gene expression. This study demonstrates that the R-U5 sequence of BLV stimulates Tax-independent reporter gene expression directed by the BLV promoter. R-U5 was also stimulatory when inserted immediately downstream from the transcription initiation site of a heterologous promoter. Progressive deletion analysis of this region revealed that a 46-bp element corresponding to the 5' half of U5 is principally responsible for the stimulation. This element exhibited enhancer activity when inserted upstream or downstream from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter. This enhancer contains a binding site for the interferon regulatory factors IRF-1 and IRF-2. A 3-bp mutation that destroys the IRF recognition site caused a twofold decrease in Tax-independent BLV long terminal repeat-driven gene expression. These observations suggest that the IRF binding site in the U5 region of BLV plays a role in the initiation of virus replication. PMID:9621009

  3. Differentiated evolutionary relationships among chordates from comparative alignments of multiple sequences of MyoD and MyoG myogenic regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Oliani, L C; Lidani, K C F; Gabriel, J E

    2015-01-01

    MyoD and MyoG are transcription factors that have essential roles in myogenic lineage determination and muscle differentiation. The purpose of this study was to compare multiple amino acid sequences of myogenic regulatory proteins to infer evolutionary relationships among chordates. Protein sequences from Mus musculus (P10085 and P12979), human Homo sapiens (P15172 and P15173), bovine Bos taurus (Q7YS82 and Q7YS81), wild pig Sus scrofa (P49811 and P49812), quail Coturnix coturnix (P21572 and P34060), chicken Gallus gallus (P16075 and P17920), rat Rattus norvegicus (Q02346 and P20428), domestic water buffalo Bubalus bubalis (D2SP11 and A7L034), and sheep Ovis aries (Q90477 and D3YKV7) were searched from a non-redundant protein sequence database UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, and subsequently analyzed using the Mega6.0 software. MyoD evolutionary analyses revealed the presence of three main clusters with all mammals branched in one cluster, members of the order Rodentia (mouse and rat) in a second branch linked to the first, and birds of the order Galliformes (chicken and quail) remaining isolated in a third. MyoG evolutionary analyses aligned sequences in two main clusters, all mammalian specimens grouped in different sub-branches, and birds clustered in a second branch. These analyses suggest that the evolution of MyoD and MyoG was driven by different pathways. PMID:26505406

  4. Stabilizing rescued surface-localized δf508 CFTR by potentiation of its interaction with Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1.

    PubMed

    Arora, Kavisha; Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Penmatsa, Himabindu; Ren, Aixia; Sinha, Chandrima; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in CFTR, a plasma-membrane-localized anion channel. The most common mutation in CFTR, deletion of phenylalanine at residue 508 (ΔF508), causes misfolding of CFTR resulting in little or no protein at the plasma membrane. The CFTR corrector VX-809 shows promise for treating CF patients homozygous for ΔF508. Here, we demonstrate the significance of protein-protein interactions in enhancing the stability of the ΔF508 CFTR mutant channel protein at the plasma membrane. We determined that VX-809 prolongs the stability of ΔF508 CFTR at the plasma membrane. Using competition-based assays, we demonstrated that ΔF508 CFTR interacts poorly with Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) compared to wild-type CFTR, and VX-809 significantly increased this binding affinity. We conclude that stabilized CFTR-NHERF1 interaction is a determinant of the functional efficiency of rescued ΔF508 CFTR. Our results demonstrate the importance of macromolecular-complex formation in stabilizing rescued mutant CFTR at the plasma membrane and suggest this to be foundational for the development of a new generation of effective CFTR-corrector-based therapeutics. PMID:24945463

  5. Stabilizing Rescued Surface-Localized ΔF508 CFTR by Potentiation of Its Interaction with Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in CFTR, a plasma-membrane-localized anion channel. The most common mutation in CFTR, deletion of phenylalanine at residue 508 (ΔF508), causes misfolding of CFTR resulting in little or no protein at the plasma membrane. The CFTR corrector VX-809 shows promise for treating CF patients homozygous for ΔF508. Here, we demonstrate the significance of protein–protein interactions in enhancing the stability of the ΔF508 CFTR mutant channel protein at the plasma membrane. We determined that VX-809 prolongs the stability of ΔF508 CFTR at the plasma membrane. Using competition-based assays, we demonstrated that ΔF508 CFTR interacts poorly with Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) compared to wild-type CFTR, and VX-809 significantly increased this binding affinity. We conclude that stabilized CFTR–NHERF1 interaction is a determinant of the functional efficiency of rescued ΔF508 CFTR. Our results demonstrate the importance of macromolecular-complex formation in stabilizing rescued mutant CFTR at the plasma membrane and suggest this to be foundational for the development of a new generation of effective CFTR-corrector-based therapeutics. PMID:24945463

  6. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Han, Xiangdong; Zhan, Ge; Zhao, Zhenfang; Feng, Yongjun; Wu, Cunxiang

    2015-01-01

    The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD) and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD). Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building. PMID:26404246

  7. Transforming growth factor-β1 sustains the survival of Foxp3(+) regulatory cells during late phase of oropharyngeal candidiasis infection.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, N; Quigley, C; Weinberg, A; Huang, A; Popkin, D; Pandiyan, P

    2016-07-01

    As CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) play crucial immunomodulatory roles during infections, one key question is how these cells are controlled during antimicrobial immune responses. Mechanisms controlling their homeostasis are central to ensure efficient protection against pathogens, as well as to control infection-associated immunopathology. Here we studied how their viability is regulated in the context of mouse oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) infection, and found that these cells show increased protection from apoptosis during late phase of infection and reinfection. Tregs underwent reduced cell death because they are refractory to T cell receptor restimulation-induced cell death (RICD). We confirmed their resistance to RICD, using mouse and human Tregs in vitro, and by inducing α-CD3 antibody-mediated apoptosis in vivo. The enhanced viability is dependent on increased transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling that results in upregulation of cFLIP (cellular FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein) in Tregs. Protection from cell death is abrogated in the absence of TGF-β1 signaling in Tregs during OPC infection. Taken together, our data unravel the previously unrecognized role of TGF-β1 in promoting Treg viability, coinciding with the pronounced immunomodulatory role of these cells during later phase of OPC infection, and possibly other mucosal infections. PMID:26530137

  8. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Han, Xiangdong; Zhan, Ge; Zhao, Zhenfang; Feng, Yongjun; Wu, Cunxiang

    2015-01-01

    The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD) and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD). Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. T