Science.gov

Sample records for additional research needed

  1. Additional Research Needs to Support the GENII Biosphere Models

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Arimescu, Carmen

    2013-11-30

    In the course of evaluating the current parameter needs for the GENII Version 2 code (Snyder et al. 2013), areas of possible improvement for both the data and the underlying models have been identified. As the data review was implemented, PNNL staff identified areas where the models can be improved both to accommodate the locally significant pathways identified and also to incorporate newer models. The areas are general data needs for the existing models and improved formulations for the pathway models. It is recommended that priorities be set by NRC staff to guide selection of the most useful improvements in a cost-effective manner. Suggestions are made based on relatively easy and inexpensive changes, and longer-term more costly studies. In the short term, there are several improved model formulations that could be applied to the GENII suite of codes to make them more generally useful. • Implementation of the separation of the translocation and weathering processes • Implementation of an improved model for carbon-14 from non-atmospheric sources • Implementation of radon exposure pathways models • Development of a KML processor for the output report generator module data that are calculated on a grid that could be superimposed upon digital maps for easier presentation and display • Implementation of marine mammal models (manatees, seals, walrus, whales, etc.). Data needs in the longer term require extensive (and potentially expensive) research. Before picking any one radionuclide or food type, NRC staff should perform an in-house review of current and anticipated environmental analyses to select “dominant” radionuclides of interest to allow setting of cost-effective priorities for radionuclide- and pathway-specific research. These include • soil-to-plant uptake studies for oranges and other citrus fruits, and • Development of models for evaluation of radionuclide concentration in highly-processed foods such as oils and sugars. Finally, renewed

  2. Regulating tissue research: do we need additional rules to protect research participants?

    PubMed

    Wright, Jessica; Ploem, Corrette; Sliwka, Marcin; Gevers, Sjef

    2010-12-01

    This article explores whether additional rules are needed for the regulation of tissue research in Europe. A human rights-based approach (referring to international documents and illustrative examples from national legislation) is taken to address the question: what is so special about tissue, in particular when compared to personal data? The existing regimes in Europe on data protection and clinical trials are presented and examined for their suitability to govern tissue research, taking into account the differences between data and tissue. Six recommendations are outlined, highlighting important points future legislation on tissue research must take into account.

  3. ANTHRAX REMEDIATION RESEARCH NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has initiated a research program to respond to the immediate needs arising from the recent Bacillus anthracis bioterrorism events. Although the program has a strong emphasis on anthrax, other pathogens and chemical agents, including toxic indu...

  4. More Arctic research needed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    The desire to achieve a balance between Arctic and Antarctic study was the message of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, which heard testimony on the need for more Arctic research on April 24. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) noted that since 1986, study in the area has not increased as the National Science Foundation has claimed, but rather, owing to inflation, has merely kept pace. Robert Correll, assistant director of geosciences at NSF and chair of the Interagency Arctic Oceans Working Group, gave several reasons why the Arctic is an important area for study by the scientific community. Its unique environment, he said, makes it a natural laboratory. And due to its environmental sensitivity, it may provide one of the earliest indicators of global climate change. Also, its geographic location makes it a “window on space,” some of the world's largest mineral and petroleum resources are in the Arctic, and the region has great strategic and military importance.

  5. When Research Needs Rescue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Anne; Culp, Gordon C.

    1981-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems involved in funding research is that of providing for the unexpected. The Biomedical Research Support Grants program of the National Institutes of Health has provided this type of funding but the amount has dwindled to two percent. (MLW)

  6. Research Papers Sponsored by the Commission on Private Philanthropy and Public Needs. Volume II: Philanthropic Fields of Interest, Part II-Additional Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    Twelve papers discuss future changes and trends in philanthropic giving and activities. The report is Volume II, Part II of a five volume series examining the relationship between nonprofit institutions and their donors. The opening paper reviews the needs for better definition of the government's role in contracting and grant making, and for…

  7. Needs for Research in Indexing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milstead, Jessica L.

    1994-01-01

    Uncovers issues in indexing that need scientific research, including the cognitive processes of indexers and users; vocabulary control; how best to supplement human indexers' intellectual effort with computer capabilities; structure and layout of indexes on the printed page and on the computer screen; and evaluation of indexes. (Contains 21…

  8. Session: Discussion of Research Needs

    SciTech Connect

    anon.

    2004-09-01

    This final session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was lead by a facilitator who asked participants for their overall reaction to the research that had been presented during the workshop. Questions addressed by workshop participants included: how do you develop trust and confidence in the research, what are some of the specific gaps in our understanding of wind energy's impact on birds and bats; how do we prioritize and proceed with closing the data/research gaps; how do we connect the dots and bring various research and mapping efforts together; given gaps in the data, what are the critical questions we need to answer to make project decisions now; and, how do we track/influence the policies that will shape wind energy development. Conclusions reached regarding these questions are included in summary form.

  9. Approaches to Dispute Resolution in Additional Support Needs in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Sheila; Weedon, Elisabet

    2009-01-01

    The Education (Additional Support for Learning) (Scotland) Act 2004 aimed, among other things, to increase parents' rights in relation to the education of their children. In addition to the creation of the Additional Supports Needs Tribunals for Scotland, parents were given new rights to challenge local authority decisions through mediation and…

  10. Additional Support Needs Reforms and Social Justice in Scotland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Sheila; Stead, Joan; Weedon, Elisabet; Wright, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    New additional support-needs legislation in Scotland sought to recognise the way in which poverty, as well as individual impairment, contribute to the creation of children's difficulties in learning. As well as identifying a wider range of needs, the legislation sought to provide parents, irrespective of social background, with more powerful means…

  11. 20 CFR 416.263 - No additional application needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false No additional application needed. 416.263 Section 416.263 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Eligibility Special Provisions for People Who Work Despite A...

  12. 20 CFR 416.263 - No additional application needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false No additional application needed. 416.263 Section 416.263 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Eligibility Special Provisions for People Who Work Despite A...

  13. Mapping Transitions in Interpersonal Learning for Students with Additional Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles-Janess, Bernadette; Griffin, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the development of an interpersonal measure for students with additional learning needs. A questionnaire and learning continuum were constructed using a methodology devised by Griffin (2007a) for creating criterion-referenced frameworks. Teachers reported on 1619 students, ranging in age from 3 to 18 years. Analysis of the…

  14. Food irradiation: Key research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Morehouse, K.M. )

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of foods with ionizing radiation reduces microbial infection and insect infestations, inhibits sprouting, and delays maturation, thereby extending the shelf life of foods. The treatment of different types of foods with ionizing radiation for specific purposes is accepted in several countries, although it is prohibited in others. The US Food and Drug Administration has established regulations to allow the treatment of several different foods with ionizing radiation and has received petitions for the approval of radiation treatment of additional foods. When carried out according to established good manufacturing practices, food irradiation yields safe, wholesome foods. The irradiated product may be often chemically or microbiologically [open quotes]safer[close quotes] than the nonirradiated product. This paper presents several areas of scientific research in which more information would facilitate the expansion of this technology and points out major areas of concern. The question of the public acceptance of foods that have been treated with ionizing radiation is discussed only briefly in order to make the presentation complete.

  15. Overview of Materials Qualification Needs for Metal Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Mohsen; Salem, Ayman; Beuth, Jack; Harrysson, Ola; Lewandowski, John J.

    2016-03-01

    This overview highlights some of the key aspects regarding materials qualification needs across the additive manufacturing (AM) spectrum. AM technology has experienced considerable publicity and growth in the past few years with many successful insertions for non-mission-critical applications. However, to meet the full potential that AM has to offer, especially for flight-critical components (e.g., rotating parts, fracture-critical parts, etc.), qualification and certification efforts are necessary. While development of qualification standards will address some of these needs, this overview outlines some of the other key areas that will need to be considered in the qualification path, including various process-, microstructure-, and fracture-modeling activities in addition to integrating these with lifing activities targeting specific components. Ongoing work in the Advanced Manufacturing and Mechanical Reliability Center at Case Western Reserve University is focusing on fracture and fatigue testing to rapidly assess critical mechanical properties of some titanium alloys before and after post-processing, in addition to conducting nondestructive testing/evaluation using micro-computerized tomography at General Electric. Process mapping studies are being conducted at Carnegie Mellon University while large area microstructure characterization and informatics (EBSD and BSE) analyses are being conducted at Materials Resources LLC to enable future integration of these efforts via an Integrated Computational Materials Engineering approach to AM. Possible future pathways for materials qualification are provided.

  16. Matching software practitioner needs to researcher activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.; Menzies, T.; Connelly, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present an approach to matching software practitioners' needs to software researchers' activities. It uses an accepted taxonomical software classfication scheme as intermediary, in terms of which practitioners express needs, and researchers express activities.

  17. Relating practitioner needs to research activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, M. S.; Menzies, T.; Connelly, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    We present an approach to matching needs (practioner requirements) to solutions (researcher activities). A taxonomical classification scheme acts as intermediary between needs and activities. Expert practitioners exprss their needs in terms of this taxonomy. Researchers express their activities in the same terms. A decision support tool is used to assist in the combination and study of their expressions of needs and activities.

  18. Research Needs and Future Directions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The food safety challenges facing the growers, processors and consumers of fresh and fresh cut produce are complex and multi-faceted. Established and ongoing research has given new insights into the ways in which produce can be contaminated at any step in the supply chain. The goal of future researc...

  19. Benchmark Study of Industrial Needs for Additive Manufacturing in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindqvist, Markku; Piili, Heidi; Salminen, Antti

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a modern way to produce parts for industrial use. Even though the technical knowledge and research of AM processes are strong in Finland, there are only few industrial applications. Aim of this study is to collect practical knowledge of companies who are interested in industrial use of AM, especially in South-Eastern Finland. Goal of this study is also to investigate demands and requirements of applications for industrial use of AM in this area of Finland. It was concluded, that two of the reasons prohibiting wider industrial use of AM in Finland, are wrong expectations against this technology as well as lack of basic knowledge of possibilities of the technology. Especially, it was noticed that strong 3D-hype is even causing misunderstandings. Nevertheless, the high-level industrial know-how in the area, built around Finnish lumber industry is a strong foundation for the additive manufacturing technology.

  20. Laser ultrasonics: Current research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.W. . Center for Nondestructive Evaluation)

    1990-09-26

    Laser-ultrasonics refers to a range of technologies involving the use of laser electrooptical systems both to generate and to detect ultrasonic signals in and on materials and structures. Such systems have been developed to permit classical ultrasonic measurements for materials characterization and defect identification and measurement. From the point of view of one concerned with practical applications of ultrasonic inspection and measurement methods, laser-ultrasonic systems offer the flexibility which, in principle, should permit remote ultrasonic measurements to be performed on objects at elevated temperatures or in hostile environments. Laser-ultrasonic systems can be designed and constructed with extremely wide and flat detection bandwidth so that ultrasonic vibrational displacements can be recorded with high fidelity. In addition, there is no mechanical loading of the surface to damp, absorb, or otherwise distort the propagating acoustic energy. This feature has been used to great advantage in performing ultrasonic measurements in thin plates and films. In spite of the great advantages offered by laser-ultrasonics, there are severe limitations which restrict its application. In fact, based upon the performance of current state-of-the-art laser-ultrasonic systems, it is almost always more advantageous to use conventional ultrasonic transduction methods, if possible for a given application, than it is to apply laser-ultrasonics. In short, the main reason leading to this conclusion is the poor system detection sensitivity of laser-ultrasonic systems compared with piezoelectric transducer systems. The ramifications of this limited sensitivity are many.

  1. The Need for Research In Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Larry W.

    A clear and present need exists for research in schools leading to defensible, reliable objective data for decision-making, as opposed to research on schools, which is generally limited to experimental methodology leading to "general truths." Reasons for an increasing need for in-school research are: (1) an increasingly sophisticated public demand…

  2. A Right to Be Heard: Learning from Learners with Additional Needs in Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhillips, Therese; Shevlin, Michael; Long, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the consultation experiences of pupils who have additional needs in literacy. An opportunistic sample of eight schools--four in Northern Ireland and four in the Republic of Ireland--were chosen by the researchers; selected pupils were receiving additional literacy support. Focus group discussions and arts-based creative…

  3. Research needs of the new accelerator technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1982-08-01

    A review is given of some of the new accelerator technologies with a special eye to the requirements which they generate for research and development. Some remarks are made concerning the organizational needs of accelerator research.

  4. Reading Research: Notable Findings and Urgent Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nila Banton

    This paper discusses some of the findings and needs of reading research. The areas of research study mentioned include word boundaries, letter names, preschool reading, teacher questioning, critical reading and Negro dialects. Researchers cited include Dolores Durkin, Frank Guszak, Jay Samuels, Guy Bond, A. Sterl Artley, Edward Fry, and Robert…

  5. Basic Research Needs for Countering Terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, W.; Michalske, T.; Trewhella, J.; Makowski, L.; Swanson, B.; Colson, S.; Hazen, T.; Roberto, F.; Franz, D.; Resnick, G.; Jacobson, S.; Valdez, J.; Gourley, P.; Tadros, M.; Sigman, M.; Sailor, M.; Ramsey, M.; Smith, B.; Shea, K.; Hrbek, J.; Rodacy, P.; Tevault, D.; Edelstein, N.; Beitz, J.; Burns, C.; Choppin, G.; Clark, S.; Dietz, M.; Rogers, R.; Traina, S.; Baldwin, D.; Thurnauer, M.; Hall, G.; Newman, L.; Miller, D.; Kung, H.; Parkin, D.; Shuh, D.; Shaw, H.; Terminello, L.; Meisel, D.; Blake, D.; Buchanan, M.; Roberto, J.; Colson, S.; Carling, R.; Samara, G.; Sasaki, D.; Pianetta, P.; Faison, B.; Thomassen, D.; Fryberger, T.; Kiernan, G.; Kreisler, M.; Morgan, L.; Hicks, J.; Dehmer, J.; Kerr, L.; Smith, B.; Mays, J.; Clark, S.

    2002-03-01

    To identify connections between technology needs for countering terrorism and underlying science issues and to recommend investment strategies to increase the impact of basic research on efforts to counter terrorism.

  6. TMDL MODEL EVALUATION AND RESEARCH NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review examines the modeling research needs to support environmental decision-making for the 303(d) requirements for development of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) and related programs such as 319 Nonpoint Source Program activities, watershed management, stormwater permits...

  7. Medical Research Misconduct Need Regulatory Reforms

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    The medical research misconduct has become a global problem. Except from countries like the USA, China, and Germany the exact figures of misconduct are not available. The research misconduct include fabricating the data, falsifying data, and plagiarism. The irresponsible research practices are publishing research data more than once, conflicts of interest is not declared, selective reporting of data and including an author who has not contributed at all and many more. About 2% of scientists have been found to admit the fabricating the data and 33% researchers were involved in irresponsible research practices. There is no formal regulatory programs available to monitor the research projects. Few developed countries like the USA, Germany, and China tried to develop programs which can monitor the medical research misconduct. There is a need to develop a regulatory system at national and institutional level to regulate the research activity to ensure that good ethical and scientific standards are practiced by medical researchers. PMID:25364140

  8. Profiling Transitions in Emotional Development for Students with Additional Learning Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Eileen; Griffin, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research described in this article was to build a protocol for describing students' development of emotional knowledge and understanding, and to tailor this to the requirements of assessing the progress of students with additional needs. The paper reports the establishment of such a developmental profile, using procedures for…

  9. Telerobotics: Research needs for evolving space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, L.

    1987-01-01

    It is argued that triplicate planning for telerobotics applicable to space stations is needed. It is important to carry out research to accomplish tasks: (1) with man alone (such as extra-vehicular activities), (2) with autonomous robots, and (3) with telerobotics. The research necessary to carry out these approaches is compared and contrasted in order to clarify present problems.

  10. Needed Research in Business Education. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Martha H.; Wilhelm, William J.

    Areas of business education that need to be researched were identified through a two-round study. First, 2 groups of more than 40 Delta Pi Epsilon members generated ideas for research topics at regional and national conferences. The resulting list of topics was edited and rated by a Delphi panel consisting of 15 educators from postsecondary and…

  11. Research Needs for Rural Public Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, Frederick D.

    The report proposes a conceptual framework for researching key issues relating to rural public facility policy affecting such services as fire protection, water systems, roads, wastewater treatment, hospitals, and others, and identifies important research needs in this area. Major components of the framework are sources of financing (private and…

  12. Who needs an RVAD in addition to an LVAD?

    PubMed

    Kaczorowski, David J; Woo, Y Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Mechanical circulatory support using left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) has become an accepted mode of therapy for both bridging patients with end-stage heart failure to transplant and as a destination therapy. Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is common after LVAD insertion and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing LVAD placement. Several studies have identified clinical, laboratory, hemodynamic, and echocardiographic parameters that may serve as risk factors for RV dysfunction after LVAD placement. Furthermore, scoring systems have been established to help quantitatively predict the potential need for RV support after LVAD placement. PMID:22062210

  13. Research training needs in Peruvian national TB/HIV programs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few published reports of research training needs assessments and research training programs. In an effort to expand this nascent field of study and to bridge the gap between research and practice, we sought to systematically assess the research training needs of health care professionals working at Peruvian governmental institutions leading HIV and tuberculosis (TB) control and among senior stakeholders in the field. Methods Six institutional workshops were conducted with the participation of 161 mid-level health professionals from agencies involved in national HIV and TB control. At each workshop informants completed a structured questionnaire and participated in small and large group discussions. Additional data and institutional commitment was obtained through in-depth interviews from 32 senior managers and researchers from the Ministry of Health, academia and NGOs. Results Participants exhibited an overwhelming receptivity for additional research training, observing a gap between current levels of research training and their perceived importance. Specialized skills in obtaining funding, developing research protocols, particularly in operational, behavioral and prevention research were considered in greatest need. Beyond research training, participants identified broader social, economic and political factors as influential in infectious disease control. Conclusions The needs assessment suggests that future training should focus on operational research techniques, rather than on clinical skill building or program implementation only. Strengthening health systems not only requires additional research training, but also adequate financial resources to implement research findings. PMID:20875140

  14. The need for additional training for nutritional management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carney, Trish; Stein, Susan E; Quinlan, Jennifer J

    The purpose of this study was to investigate nurses' and nursing students'knowledge and perceived role in assisting patients with the nutritional management of diabetes. Three focus groups were conducted and the results were used to modify a previously developed survey regarding the nutritional management of diabetes. The survey was administered via an online survey tool and completed by 231 nurses and students. Over 70% of respondents agreed that nurses have an important role in reinforcing patient nutritional education. Results indicated,however, that knowledge gaps in the nutritional management of diabetes exist among nurses, including not knowing the carbohydrate content of 120ml of orange juice, a common treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%), not knowing where to locate carbohydrate content on a food label (60%), and not identifying the correct treatment for hypoglycaemia (47.5%). These results indicate that there may be a need to improve the nutritional education of nurses with respect to diabetes management.

  15. Research needs in family planning program promotion.

    PubMed

    Cernada, G P

    1984-09-01

    Areas of family planning promotion which need to be further researched are identified. The effectiveness of diverse information, education, and communication approaches needs to be evaluated, feasible ways to increase contraceptive continuation rates must be identified, the relative merits of providing fieldworkers with salaries or incentives should be assessed, different styles of interactions between providers and clients should be identified and evaluated and research directed toward improving training programs, field supervision, and supply logistics should be undertaken. A number of more detailed research suggestions with special reference to Taiwan and other Asian and Pacific countries are also provided. Little is known, for example, about provider and user interaction patterns in Asia, and the impact of these patterns on contraceptive acceptance and continuance. These patterns could be analyzed using diverse research techniques ranging from observation to experimental manipulation. Despite the fact that approximately 50% of all acceptors discontinue use within 2 years, researchers tend to focus on identifying acceptor characteristics while ignoring the discontinuation process. Researcher should 1) identify the best time for providing postacceptance followup services, 2) identify training strategies which provide fieldworkers with the highest level of confidence in specific contraceptive methods, 3) experiment with the use of newspaper columns and telephone advisory services to provide users with information about side effects, 4) assess the merits of involving both partners in the contraceptive counseling process, 5) develop and evaluate postacceptance educational materials, and 6) assess the impact of various supply systems on contraceptive continuance. Another neglected area of research is the public's attitude toward different contraceptive knowledge sources. For example, receptivity to family planning messages may vary depending on wether the message is

  16. Additive manufacturing metrology: State of the art and needs assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, L.; Taheri, H.; Bond, L. J.; Barnard, D.; Gray, J.

    2016-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a technology that first emerged in 1987 with stereolithography (SL) of plastic materials from 3D Systems. It saw light use for rapid prototyping and very low volume production for a number of years. However, in the past few years AM of metallic materials has become a practical fabrication technology, use is rapidly increasing and is projected to continue with double digit growth in coming years. The promise and flexibility shown by AM has spurred efforts to begin standardization of this type of process. This paper provides an assessment of the state of the art for in-situ process monitoring of AM processes with an emphasis on the production of metallic components. It is seen that with the implementation of proper process control there is potential to create reliable and reproducible materials and geometries previously unachievable using metal removal based means of production. A reliable methodology for detection and control of microstructure and defects would be of great value in terms of enabling broader AM utilization.

  17. Research needs for a commercial passenger tiltrotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unger, George; Alexander, Harold

    1991-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently completed a series of contracts and studies that examined the technology needs for a tiltrotor aircraft in commercial service as well as military missions. The commercial needs arise out of market-driven requirements that include vertiport location and design, passenger comfort levels and competitive costs. The military needs are derived from time-sensitive missions and combat effectiveness. In response to these results, NASA has decided to address the commercial needs first, recognizing that there will be eventual payoff to military missions as well. Research goals were explored in acoustics, flight dynamics, human factors and displays, dynamics and loads, propulsion, safety, and configuration design. The paper describes the development of these goals from the market requirements and the implications for possible research activities. The aircraft issues that were addressed include number of blades, advanced blade planforms, steep approach requirements and pilot-cockpit interface for civil operations.

  18. Assessment of Research Needs for Coal Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, S.S.

    1983-08-01

    The Coal Combustion and Applications Working Group (CCAWG), at the request of J.W. Mares (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy) and A.W. Trivelpiece (Director, Office of Energy Research), has reviewed and evaluated the U.S. programs on coal combustion and utilization. The important topical areas of coal gasification and coal liquefaction have been deliberately excluded because R and D needs for these technologies were reviewed previously by the DOE Fossil Energy Research Working Group. The CCAWG studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of research areas that affect prospects for augmented coal utilization. In this report, we summarize the findings and research recommendations of CCAWG.

  19. Data literacy training needs of biomedical researchers

    PubMed Central

    Federer, Lisa M.; Lu, Ya-Ling; Joubert, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The research investigated topic priorities for data literacy training for biomedical researchers and staff. Methods An electronic survey was used to assess researchers' level of knowledge related to data literacy skills and the relevance of these skills to their work. Results Most respondents did not have any formal training in data literacy. Respondents considered most tasks highly relevant to their work but rated their expertise in tasks lower. Conclusion Among this group, researchers have diverse data literacy training needs. Librarians' expertise makes them well suited to provide such training. PMID:26807053

  20. Artisanal Fisheries Research: A Need for Globalization?

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Vandick S.; Fabré, Nidia N.

    2016-01-01

    Given limited funds for research and widespread degradation of ecosystems, environmental scientists should geographically target their studies where they will be most effective. However, in academic areas such as conservation and natural resource management there is often a mismatch between the geographic foci of research effort/funding and research needs. The former frequently being focused in the developed world while the latter is greater in the biodiverse countries of the Global South. Here, we adopt a bibliometric approach to test this hypothesis using research on artisanal fisheries. Such fisheries occur throughout the world, but are especially prominent in developing countries where they are important for supporting local livelihoods, food security and poverty alleviation. Moreover, most artisanal fisheries in the Global South are unregulated and unmonitored and are in urgent need of science-based management to ensure future sustainability. Our results indicate that, as predicted, global research networks and centres of knowledge production are predominantly located in developed countries, indicating a global mismatch between research needs and capacity. PMID:26942936

  1. Artisanal Fisheries Research: A Need for Globalization?

    PubMed

    Oliveira Júnior, José Gilmar C; Silva, Luana P S; Malhado, Ana C M; Batista, Vandick S; Fabré, Nidia N; Ladle, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Given limited funds for research and widespread degradation of ecosystems, environmental scientists should geographically target their studies where they will be most effective. However, in academic areas such as conservation and natural resource management there is often a mismatch between the geographic foci of research effort/funding and research needs. The former frequently being focused in the developed world while the latter is greater in the biodiverse countries of the Global South. Here, we adopt a bibliometric approach to test this hypothesis using research on artisanal fisheries. Such fisheries occur throughout the world, but are especially prominent in developing countries where they are important for supporting local livelihoods, food security and poverty alleviation. Moreover, most artisanal fisheries in the Global South are unregulated and unmonitored and are in urgent need of science-based management to ensure future sustainability. Our results indicate that, as predicted, global research networks and centres of knowledge production are predominantly located in developed countries, indicating a global mismatch between research needs and capacity.

  2. Implementing Vision Research in Special Needs Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsen, Gunvor Birkeland; Aanstad, Monica L.; Leirvik, Eva Iren B.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents experiences from vision research implemented in education and argues for the need for teachers with visual competence and insight into suitable methods for stimulation and learning. A new type of continuing professional development (CPD) focuses on the role of vision in children's learning and development, the consequences of…

  3. Heavy duty transport research needs assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-09-01

    As a result of the desire to decrease the dependence of the U.S. on foreign petroleum as a transportation fuel, this report assesses the research needs to further develop heavy duty engines. The topics covered include diesel engines, alternative fuels, electric vehicle technology, gas turbine engines, and Stirling cycle alternative engines.

  4. Workshop on indoor air quality research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

  5. Roseoloviruses: unmet needs and research priorities: perspective.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Mary T; Krug, Laurie T; Pellett, Philip E

    2014-12-01

    The human roseoloviruses, human herpesviruses 6A (HHV-6A), HHV-6B, and HHV-7, are highly prevalent viruses that typically cause fever/rash illnesses such as roseola during early life primary infections. They also cause significant neurologic disease and complications following stem cell and solid organ transplantation, and have suggestive but less certain etiologic associations with other neurologic diseases and immunologic disorders. The US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently sponsored a workshop (Roseoloviruses: Clinical Impact, Interventions, and Research Needs) to discuss disease associations, novel biology, and the many unmet research needs related to Roseoloviruses. This perspective is a distillation of the workshop's presentations and discussions, with a focus on the more general research priorities that emerged. PMID:25462450

  6. Manganese: brain transport and emerging research needs.

    PubMed

    Aschner, M

    2000-06-01

    potential susceptibility of selected populations (e.g., iron-deficient) to Mn exposure, and addresses future research needs for Mn.

  7. [Research on patient safety: needs and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Aibar-Remón, C; Aranaz-Andrés, J M; García-Montero, J I; Mareca-Doñate, R

    2008-12-01

    A safe health care system requires applying procedures and practices that have demonstrated effectiveness in reducing errors, faults and adverse events in health care, but it also needs to update its knowledge on the factors that contribute to improve patient safety. Adverse events and patient safety are two sides of the same coin, clinical risk. We must ensure that the priority of health managers and providers is aimed at patient safety more than adverse events. They are some fundamental areas of research in patient safety: to estimate the magnitude and features of the clinical risk, to understand the factors contributing to the appearance of adverse events, to evaluate the impact of adverse events on health care system and to identify effective, feasible and sustainable solutions to achieve a safe health care. Key points of patient safety research projects are: aims of research, priority, data and information quality, available resources and methodology. The study of the patient safety and adverse events needs two complementary perspectives: a collective one, based on epidemiological methods and aimed at quantifying the risks in healthcare, and an individual one, based on qualitative methods, to analyze causes and factors contributing to adverse events. Several things are required to improve the patient safety research: better data and information systems, greater collaboration in training between developed and transitional countries, and wider dissemination of experiences and results of the projects. Key points of patient safety research projects are: aims of research, priority, data and information quality, available resources and methodology. The study of the patient safety and adverse events needs two complementary perspectives: a collective, based on epidemiological method and guided to quantifying the risks of healthcare, and another individual, based on qualitative methods, to analyze causes and contributing factors of adverse events. To improve the

  8. Additional Support Needs Policy in Scotland: Challenging or Reinforcing Social Inequality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Sheila; Weedon, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on Scottish policy on additional support needs and its material outcomes. The central question addressed is the extent to which the Scottish additional support needs system undermines or reinforces existing social and economic inequalities. Administrative data highlight the inflation of the additional support needs category,…

  9. The ecological research needs of business.

    PubMed

    Armsworth, Paul R; Armsworth, Anastasia N; Compton, Natalie; Cottle, Phil; Davies, Ian; Emmett, Bridget A; Fandrich, Vanessa; Foote, Matthew; Gaston, Kevin J; Gardiner, Phil; Hess, Tim; Hopkins, John; Horsley, Nick; Leaver, Natasha; Maynard, Trevor; Shannon, Delia

    2010-04-01

    .Business participants were forward-looking regarding ecological questions and research. For example, representatives from mining and quarrying companies emphasized the need to move beyond biodiversity to consider how ecosystems function, while those from the insurance sector stressed the importance of ecology researchers entering into new types of interdisciplinary collaboration.Synthesis and applications. Businesses from a variety of sectors demonstrated a clear interest in managing their impacts on, and exploiting opportunities created by, ecosystem services and biodiversity. To achieve this, businesses are asking diverse ecological research questions, but publications in leading applied ecology journals and research council funding reveal limited evidence of direct engagement with businesses. This represents a missed opportunity for ecological research findings to see more widespread application. PMID:20383265

  10. The ecological research needs of business

    PubMed Central

    Armsworth, Paul R; Armsworth, Anastasia N; Compton, Natalie; Cottle, Phil; Davies, Ian; Emmett, Bridget A; Fandrich, Vanessa; Foote, Matthew; Gaston, Kevin J; Gardiner, Phil; Hess, Tim; Hopkins, John; Horsley, Nick; Leaver, Natasha; Maynard, Trevor; Shannon, Delia

    2010-01-01

    . Business participants were forward-looking regarding ecological questions and research. For example, representatives from mining and quarrying companies emphasized the need to move beyond biodiversity to consider how ecosystems function, while those from the insurance sector stressed the importance of ecology researchers entering into new types of interdisciplinary collaboration. Synthesis and applications. Businesses from a variety of sectors demonstrated a clear interest in managing their impacts on, and exploiting opportunities created by, ecosystem services and biodiversity. To achieve this, businesses are asking diverse ecological research questions, but publications in leading applied ecology journals and research council funding reveal limited evidence of direct engagement with businesses. This represents a missed opportunity for ecological research findings to see more widespread application. PMID:20383265

  11. The ecological research needs of business.

    PubMed

    Armsworth, Paul R; Armsworth, Anastasia N; Compton, Natalie; Cottle, Phil; Davies, Ian; Emmett, Bridget A; Fandrich, Vanessa; Foote, Matthew; Gaston, Kevin J; Gardiner, Phil; Hess, Tim; Hopkins, John; Horsley, Nick; Leaver, Natasha; Maynard, Trevor; Shannon, Delia

    2010-04-01

    .Business participants were forward-looking regarding ecological questions and research. For example, representatives from mining and quarrying companies emphasized the need to move beyond biodiversity to consider how ecosystems function, while those from the insurance sector stressed the importance of ecology researchers entering into new types of interdisciplinary collaboration.Synthesis and applications. Businesses from a variety of sectors demonstrated a clear interest in managing their impacts on, and exploiting opportunities created by, ecosystem services and biodiversity. To achieve this, businesses are asking diverse ecological research questions, but publications in leading applied ecology journals and research council funding reveal limited evidence of direct engagement with businesses. This represents a missed opportunity for ecological research findings to see more widespread application.

  12. Training needs of clinical research associates.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Samyuktha; Bhatt, Arun

    2010-10-01

    skills were not rated as critical to the role. This kind of a survey gives a good direction when training curriculum has to be designed for specific roles in clinical research. However, there is a need to expand the sample size to fine-tune the knowledge and skills areas. PMID:21350728

  13. Shaping Literacy Achievement: Research We Have, Research We Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressley, Michael, Ed.; Billman, Alison K., Ed.; Perry, Kristen H., Ed.; Reffitt, Kelly E., Ed.; Reynolds, Julia Moorhead, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    In the era of No Child Left Behind, what literacy research is still needed? How should it be conducted? And what role does research play in determining the kinds of literacy experiences that actually take place in classrooms? This forward-thinking book brings together leading authorities to address these vital and hotly debated questions.…

  14. Fossil energy biotechnology: A research needs assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-11-01

    The Office of Program Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy commissioned this study to evaluate and prioritize research needs in fossil energy biotechnology. The objectives were to identify research initiatives in biotechnology that offer timely and strategic options for the more efficient and effective uses of the Nation's fossil resource base, particularly the early identification of new and novel applications of biotechnology for the use or conversion of domestic fossil fuels. Fossil energy biotechnology consists of a number of diverse and distinct technologies, all related by the common denominator -- biocatalysis. The expert panel organized 14 technical subjects into three interrelated biotechnology programs: (1) upgrading the fuel value of fossil fuels; (2) bioconversion of fossil feedstocks and refined products to added value chemicals; and (3) the development of environmental management strategies to minimize and mitigate the release of toxic and hazardous petrochemical wastes.

  15. Wind turbine aerodynamics research needs assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, F. S.; Porter, B. K.

    1986-01-01

    A prioritized list is developed for wind turbine aerodynamic research needs and opportunities which could be used by the Department of Energy program management team in detailing the DOE Five-Year Wind Turbine Research Plan. The focus of the Assessment was the basic science of aerodynamics as applied to wind turbines, including all relevant phenomena, such as turbulence, dynamic stall, three-dimensional effects, viscosity, wake geometry, and others which influence aerodynamic understanding and design. The study was restricted to wind turbines that provide electrical energy compatible with the utility grid, and included both horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) and vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT). Also, no economic constraints were imposed on the design concepts or recommendations since the focus of the investigation was purely scientific.

  16. Researching Skills: They Need Them When They Need Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Barbara J.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests a method for teaching research and other media center skills by integrating them in the reading and language arts curriculum with the media specialist and classroom teacher team-planning relevant activities. Advantages and disadvantages of this approach are summarized. (MES)

  17. Development of a Science Research Program for Special Needs Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danch, J. M.

    2005-12-01

    Originally designed for students in the top 20 percent of the class who had a strong interest in science, the Science Research Program in Woodbridge Township was expanded to include special needs students and others who had not previously demonstrated success and/or interest in science. New techniques to prepare, engage, and motivate special needs students in performing original research were developed and field-tested. A cooperative learning system where experienced research students acted as project mentors for the new special needs population was utilized. The program was extended to additional instructors by a teacher-training workshop for both science and special education teachers wishing to incorporate student-facilitated original research into their classrooms.

  18. Intelligence is as intelligence does: can additional support needs replace disability?

    PubMed

    Arnold, Samuel R C; Riches, Vivienne C; Stancliffe, Roger J

    2011-12-01

    Abstract In many developed cultures there is an assumption that IQ is intelligence. However, emerging theories of multiple intelligences, of emotional intelligence, as well as the application of IQ testing to other cultural groups, and to people with disability, raises many questions as to what IQ actually measures. Despite recent research that shows IQ testing produces a floor effect when applied to people with lower IQ, as well as research that shows the Flynn effect also applies to people with lower IQ, in practice IQ scores below a certain cut-off are still being used to determine and classify a person's intellectual disability. However, a new paradigm is emerging, almost returning to the original intent of Binet, where measurement is made of the supports the person needs. In this paper, we argue that if one extends the notions of this supports paradigm that diagnosis of intellectual or physical disability could potentially be replaced by diagnosis of additional intellectual support needs, or additional physical support needs.

  19. Intelligence is as intelligence does: can additional support needs replace disability?

    PubMed

    Arnold, Samuel R C; Riches, Vivienne C; Stancliffe, Roger J

    2011-12-01

    Abstract In many developed cultures there is an assumption that IQ is intelligence. However, emerging theories of multiple intelligences, of emotional intelligence, as well as the application of IQ testing to other cultural groups, and to people with disability, raises many questions as to what IQ actually measures. Despite recent research that shows IQ testing produces a floor effect when applied to people with lower IQ, as well as research that shows the Flynn effect also applies to people with lower IQ, in practice IQ scores below a certain cut-off are still being used to determine and classify a person's intellectual disability. However, a new paradigm is emerging, almost returning to the original intent of Binet, where measurement is made of the supports the person needs. In this paper, we argue that if one extends the notions of this supports paradigm that diagnosis of intellectual or physical disability could potentially be replaced by diagnosis of additional intellectual support needs, or additional physical support needs. PMID:21992715

  20. Regulation of animal biotechnology: research needs.

    PubMed

    Rexroad, C E; Green, R D; Wall, R J

    2007-09-01

    Livestock that result from biotechnology have been a part of agricultural science for over 30 years but have not entered the market place as food or fiber. Two biotechnologies are at the forefront as challenges to the world's systems for regulating the market place: animal clones and transgenic animals. Both technologies have come before the Food and Drug Administration in the United States and it appears that action is imminent for clones. The FDA has asserted principles for evaluation of clones and asserts that "... remaining hazard(s) from cloning are likely to be subtle in nature." The science-based principles recognize that in some areas related to developmental biology and gene expression in clones, additional scientific information would be useful. The role of science then is to use the genomic tools that we have available to answer questions about epigenetic regulation of development and reprogramming of genes to the state found in germ cells. Transgenics pose additional challenges to regulators. If the transgenics are produced using cloning from modified cells then the additional scientific information needed will be related to the effects of insertion and expression of the transgenes. Other approaches such as retrovirally vectored transgenesis will elicit additional questions. These questions will be challenging because the science will have to be related to the expression and function of each gene or class of genes. For the promises of animal biotechnology to be fulfilled, scientists will have to resolve many questions for regulators and the public but tools to answer those questions are rapidly becoming available.

  1. Why infectious disease research needs community ecology.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pieter T J; de Roode, Jacobus C; Fenton, Andy

    2015-09-01

    Infectious diseases often emerge from interactions among multiple species and across nested levels of biological organization. Threats as diverse as Ebola virus, human malaria, and bat white-nose syndrome illustrate the need for a mechanistic understanding of the ecological interactions underlying emerging infections. We describe how recent advances in community ecology can be adopted to address contemporary challenges in disease research. These analytical tools can identify the factors governing complex assemblages of multiple hosts, parasites, and vectors, and reveal how processes link across scales from individual hosts to regions. They can also determine the drivers of heterogeneities among individuals, species, and regions to aid targeting of control strategies. We provide examples where these principles have enhanced disease management and illustrate how they can be further extended. PMID:26339035

  2. Why infectious disease research needs community ecology

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Pieter T. J.; de Roode, Jacobus C.; Fenton, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases often emerge from interactions among multiple species and across nested levels of biological organization. Threats as diverse as Ebola virus, human malaria, and bat white-nose syndrome illustrate the need for a mechanistic understanding of the ecological interactions underlying emerging infections. We describe how recent advances in community ecology can be adopted to address contemporary challenges in disease research. These analytical tools can identify the factors governing complex assemblages of multiple hosts, parasites, and vectors, and reveal how processes link across scales from individual hosts to regions. They can also determine the drivers of heterogeneities among individuals, species, and regions to aid targeting of control strategies. We provide examples where these principles have enhanced disease management and illustrate how they can be further extended. PMID:26339035

  3. Research needs for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Key issues and questions addressed by the workshop related to optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivering BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted.

  4. RESEARCH NEEDS FOR EFFECTIVE WATERSHED PLANNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Watershed research has historically focused on physical and biological processes, stressor-response, and effects research, providing valuable understanding of the effects of human activity and natural disturbances on watershed ecosystems. Continued research to support watershed ...

  5. Asphalt and asphalt additives. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Contents: use of asphalt emulsions for in-place recycling: oregon experience; gap-graded cold asphalt concrete: benefits of polymer-modified asphalt cement and fibers; cold in-place recycling for rehabilitation and widening of low-volume flexible pavements in indiana; in situ cold recycling of bituminous pavements with polymer-modified high float emulsions; evaluation of new generation of antistripping additives; correlation between performance-related characteristics of asphalt cement and its physicochemical parameters using corbett's fractions and hpgc; reaction rates and hardening susceptibilities as determined from pressure oxygen vessel aging of asphalts; evaluation of aging characteristics of asphalts by using tfot and rtfot at different temperature levels; summary of asphalt additive performance at selected sites; relating asphalt absorption to properties of asphalt cement and aggregate; study of the effectiveness of styrene-butadiene rubber latex in hot mix asphalt mixes; stability of straight and polymer-modified asphalts.

  6. Water Conveyance Infrastructure Research Needs: An EPA/ORD Perspective

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a Powerpoint presentation that identifies pipe/pipeline related research needs that have been identified in several Agency Research programs including Safe & Sustainable Water Research, Aging Water Infrastucture Research, & Distribution Systems Research and Information Co...

  7. Research needs in aircraft noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raney, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Progress needed in understanding the mechanisms of aircraft noise generation and propagation is outlined using the focus provided by the need to predict accurately the noise produced and received at the ground by an aircraft operating in the vicinity of an airport. The components of internal engine noise generation, jet exhaust, airframe noise and shielding and configuration effects, and the roles of atmospheric propagation and ground noise attenuation are presented and related to the prediction problem. The role of NASA in providing the focus and direction for needed advances is discussed, and possible contributions of the academic community in helping to fulfill the needs for accurate aircraft noise prediction methods are suggested.

  8. Rural Studies: Leadership Development Research Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.

    Rural school and human service administrators' professional development needs can be categorized as technical, interpersonal, and intrapersonal in nature. Vermont surveys have indicated that the technical skills most needed are in the areas of public relations, career education, teacher effectiveness training, community involvement, administrative…

  9. RESEARCH NEEDS IN VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COURTNEY, E. WAYNE

    THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO IDENTIFY A STARTING POINT FOR RESEARCH EFFORTS IN THE STATE'S VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION SYSTEM. THE DIRECTORS OF THE 64 SCHOOLS OFFERING VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL PROGRAMS IN THE STATE RANKED, ACCORDING TO RESEARCH IMPORTANCE, THE COMPONENTS IN 14 CATEGORIES RELATING TO THE BROAD AREAS OF OCCUPATIONAL…

  10. Understanding Consumer Needs through Market Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overton, Cynthia; Volkman, Cheryl; Silver-Pacuilla, Heidi; Gray, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how existing market research in the assistive technology (AT) field can be leveraged to create new solutions and to help those solutions reach wider markets. To do so, we discuss market research projects, focusing on seminal activities that have occurred in the assistive and learning technology field;…

  11. Risk Management: Research Needs and Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Terry J.

    1998-01-01

    Summarizes risk-management research in categories of practical relevance to outdoor recreation stakeholders and the research community: conceptualization of risk; risk/benefit studies; risk monitoring; risk management in organizations and programs (identification, evaluation, control, planning, evaluation); legal issues; and risk communication.…

  12. Qualitative Research Articles: Guidelines, Suggestions and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crescentini, Alberto; Mainardi, Giuditta

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to give ideas and suggestions to avoid some typical problems of qualitative articles. The aim is not to debate quality in qualitative research but to indicate some practical solutions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper discusses the design of qualitative research and the structure of a qualitative article…

  13. 15 CFR 270.204 - Provision of additional resources and services needed by a Team.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... services needed by a Team. 270.204 Section 270.204 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to... CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION SAFETY TEAMS Investigations § 270.204 Provision of additional resources and services needed by a Team. The Director will determine the appropriate resources that a...

  14. DOD Health Care. Additional Efforts Needed To Verify Physicians' Qualifications. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    The Department of Defense's (DOD) efforts to assure that its physicians are qualified to perform their assigned duties are discussed. Five sections include: introduction; additional actions needed to help assure that military physicians have proper qualifications; hospital credentialing and privileging systems needed to comply with DOD…

  15. Teachers' Perceptions of Students' Additional Support Needs: In the Eye of the Beholder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruggink, Marjon; Goei, Sui L.; Koot, Hans M.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, teachers are regarded as key players in the process of identifying and catering to students' additional support needs within mainstream primary classrooms. However, teachers' professional judgements regarding students with special needs have been found to be contextually influenced (e.g. by school context, student population, level of…

  16. Future Research Needs for Long-Term Monitoring Program Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, B. S.; Dougherty, D. E.; Williams, G.; Davis, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    An ASCE Task Committee is preparing a manual of practice on long-term monitoring (LTM) program design for groundwater (including vadose) systems. The committee has identified several areas for future research and technology transfer that will improve LTM design. LTM is an on-going activity aimed at assessing remediation performance, containment integrity, and/or continued non-contamination of the subsurface and groundwater. LTM has different goals and needs than site characterization, so data collection, analysis, and modeling approaches must evolve to meet these new needs. Many new sensors and field measurement methods for LTM are under development, and research is needed to develop methods to integrate these data sources with more traditional samples drawn from wells to maximize the information extracted from the data. These new methods need to be able to provide information to assess performance of waste management activities and to understand long-term behavior by optimizing the collection and analysis of multiple data types. The effects of different sampling and measurement methods on monitoring results and their implications for the design of LTM programs also require study. Additional research needs include development of methods to assess flow control strategies, to identify monitoring redundancy in fractured media, and to better incorporate uncertainty into the LTM design process. Well-tested, documented, and open datasets are needed to validate and compare the performance of methods. Technology transfer activities must address the need for evolution of regulatory guidance to encompass the types of data analysis that are needed to assess remediation or containment performance, to identify appropriate LTM plans, and to incorporate novel data collection methods that may support better decision quality through the use of more extensive measurements with lower individual precisions than traditional measurements or may measure an indicator parameter rather than

  17. Spacecraft software training needs assessment research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, Shirley; Golas, Katharine

    1990-01-01

    The problems were identified, along with their causes and potential solutions, that the management analysts were encountering in performing their jobs. It was concluded that sophisticated training applications would provide the most effective solution to a substantial portion of the analysts' problems. The remainder could be alleviated through the introduction of tools that could help make retrieval of the needed information from the vast and complex information resources feasible.

  18. Onchocerciasis control: biological research is still needed.

    PubMed

    Boussinesq, M

    2008-09-01

    Achievements obtained by the onchocerciasis control programmes should not lead to a relaxation in the biological research on Onchocerco volvulus. Issues such as the Loa loa-related post-ivermectin serious adverse events, the uncertainties as to whether onchocerciasis can be eliminated by ivermectin treatments, and the possible emergence of ivermectin-resistant O. volvulus populations should be addressed proactively. Doxycycline, moxidectin and emodepside appear to be promising as alternative drugs against onchocerciasis but support to researches in immunology and genomics should also be increased to develop new control tools, including both vaccines and macrofilaricidal drugs. PMID:18814732

  19. NEEDED RESEARCH ON DIFFUSION WITHIN EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JAIN, NEMI C.; ROGERS, EVERETT M.

    IN SPITE OF THE VOLUME OF RESEARCH ATTENTION DEVOTED TO THE DIFFUSION OF INNOVATIONS, RELATIVELY LITTLE EMPHASIS HAS BEEN PLACED UPON DIFFUSION WITHIN ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES. METHODOLOGICALLY, RELATIONAL ANALYSIS IN WHICH THE UNIT OF ANALYSIS IS A TWO-PERSON INTERACTING PAIR, A MULTIPLE PERSON COMMUNICATION CHAIN, OR CLIQUES OR SUBSYSTEMS IS…

  20. Why We Need Qualitative Research in Suicidology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjelmeland, Heidi; Knizek, Birthe Loa

    2010-01-01

    Using the differentiation between "explanations" and "understanding" from philosophy of science as the point of departure, a critical look at the current mainstream suicidological research was launched. An almost exclusive use of quantitative methodology focusing on "explanations" is demonstrated. This bias in scope and methodology has to a large…

  1. Financing Academic Research Facilities: A National Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Julie T.

    1990-01-01

    This article examines possible changes to provide increased federal funding for university-based research facilities. The difficulties of converting between depreciation and use allowances are discussed, as is the possibility of using current market value versus acquisition cost as a basis for costing calculations and splitting the indirect cost…

  2. Medical Amnesty Policies: Research is Needed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oster-Aaland, Laura; Eighmy, Myron A.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the issues surrounding medical amnesty policies in higher education beginning with the background of such policies, a summary of the current debate regarding the policies, and a discussion of research related to helping behaviors among college students. Due to the negative consequences of alcohol misuse, many student affairs…

  3. Spacecraft software training needs assessment research, appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliff, Shirley; Golas, Katharine

    1990-01-01

    The appendices to the previously reported study are presented: statistical data from task rating worksheets; SSD references; survey forms; fourth generation language, a powerful, long-term solution to maintenance cost; task list; methodology; SwRI's instructional systems development model; relevant research; and references.

  4. Research needs in ocean color data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluney, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The success of the effort to extract several subsurface oceanographic parameters from remotely sensed ocean color data will depend to a great extent upon the existence of adequate theoretical models relating the desired oceanographic parameters to the upwelling radiances to be observed. In order to guide the development of these models, and to check their accuracies, a considerable amount of experimental work must be performed. The theoretical and experimental work needed to develop techniques for the quantitative analysis of satellite ocean color data is described.

  5. Health effects of coal technologies: research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    In this 1977 Environmental Message, President Carter directed the establishment of a joint program to identify the health and environmental problems associated with advanced energy technologies and to review the adequacy of present research programs. In response to the President's directive, representatives of three agencies formed the Federal Interagency Committee on the Health and Environmental Effects of Energy Technologies. This report was prepared by the Health Effects Working Group on Coal Technologies for the Committee. In this report, the major health-related problems associated with conventional coal mining, storage, transportation, and combustion, and with chemical coal cleaning, in situ gasification, fluidized bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamic combustion, cocombustion of coal-oil mixtures, and cocombustion of coal with municipal solid waste are identified. The report also contains recommended research required to address the identified problems.

  6. Heat engine regenerators: Research status and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    The rapidly oscillating, variable density flows of regenerative heat engines provide a class of poorly understood unsteady flow and heat transfer problems. These problems are not currently amenable to direct experimental resolution. Experiences in engine development and test programs and efforts to develop analysis tools point to the regenerator as a key area of insufficient understanding. Focusing on flow and heat transfer in regenerators, this report discusses similarity parameters for the flows and reviews the experimental data currently available for Stirling analysis. Then a number of experimental results are presented from recent fundamental fluid mechanical and thermal investigations that shed additional light on the functioning of heat engine regenerators. Suggestions are made for approaches for further measurement and analysis efforts.

  7. The National Extreme Events Data and Research Center (NEED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulledge, J.; Kaiser, D. P.; Wilbanks, T. J.; Boden, T.; Devarakonda, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is establishing the National Extreme Events Data and Research Center (NEED), with the goal of transforming how the United States studies and prepares for extreme weather events in the context of a changing climate. NEED will encourage the myriad, distributed extreme events research communities to move toward the adoption of common practices and will develop a new database compiling global historical data on weather- and climate-related extreme events (e.g., heat waves, droughts, hurricanes, etc.) and related information about impacts, costs, recovery, and available research. Currently, extreme event information is not easy to access and is largely incompatible and inconsistent across web sites. NEED's database development will take into account differences in time frames, spatial scales, treatments of uncertainty, and other parameters and variables, and leverage informatics tools developed at ORNL (i.e., the Metadata Editor [1] and Mercury [2]) to generate standardized, robust documentation for each database along with a web-searchable catalog. In addition, NEED will facilitate convergence on commonly accepted definitions and standards for extreme events data and will enable integrated analyses of coupled threats, such as hurricanes/sea-level rise/flooding and droughts/wildfires. Our goal and vision is that NEED will become the premiere integrated resource for the general study of extreme events. References: [1] Devarakonda, Ranjeet, et al. "OME: Tool for generating and managing metadata to handle BigData." Big Data (Big Data), 2014 IEEE International Conference on. IEEE, 2014. [2] Devarakonda, Ranjeet, et al. "Mercury: reusable metadata management, data discovery and access system." Earth Science Informatics 3.1-2 (2010): 87-94.

  8. Research on Youth Violence: Progress by Replacement, Not Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the need to concentrate more educational research into efficacy studies on the effectiveness of specific preventive and treatment interventions targeted at disruptive behavior disorders. Other research needs are highlighted such as underlying mechanisms by which aggressive behavior develops, involvement in gangs, positive…

  9. Biological effectiveness of neutrons: Research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Casarett, G.W.; Braby, L.A.; Broerse, J.J.; Elkind, M.M.; Goodhead, D.T.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1994-02-01

    The goal of this report was to provide a conceptual plan for a research program that would provide a basis for determining more precisely the biological effectiveness of neutron radiation with emphasis on endpoints relevant to the protection of human health. This report presents the findings of the experts for seven particular categories of scientific information on neutron biological effectiveness. Chapter 2 examines the radiobiological mechanisms underlying the assumptions used to estimate human risk from neutrons and other radiations. Chapter 3 discusses the qualitative and quantitative models used to organize and evaluate experimental observations and to provide extrapolations where direct observations cannot be made. Chapter 4 discusses the physical principles governing the interaction of radiation with biological systems and the importance of accurate dosimetry in evaluating radiation risk and reducing the uncertainty in the biological data. Chapter 5 deals with the chemical and molecular changes underlying cellular responses and the LET dependence of these changes. Chapter 6, in turn, discusses those cellular and genetic changes which lead to mutation or neoplastic transformation. Chapters 7 and 8 examine deterministic and stochastic effects, respectively, and the data required for the prediction of such effects at different organizational levels and for the extrapolation from experimental results in animals to risks for man. Gaps and uncertainties in this data are examined relative to data required for establishing radiation protection standards for neutrons and procedures for the effective and safe use of neutron and other high-LET radiation therapy.

  10. Reflections on the Need for Continued Research on Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brett; McCardle, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    A focused scientific research effort on writing research and its relationship to language development and reading is needed to address the writing and broader literacy needs of today's and tomorrow's learners and workers. In the United States, as well as in many other nations, research on writing has been neglected in relation to the emphasis on…

  11. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  12. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  13. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  14. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  15. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  16. Additional Learning Needs Policy in the Devolved Polities of the UK: A Systems Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Using a systems approach, this paper explores the impact of devolution on additional learning needs (ALN) policy in compulsory phase education. Focus is placed on ALN/SEN Codes of Practice, the schools curriculum, teacher training, and the work of education inspectorates and tribunals. Analysis reveals that the move to quasi-federalism in the UK…

  17. The Capacity Profile: A Method to Classify Additional Care Needs in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meester-Delver, Anke; Beelen, Anita; Hennekam, Raoul; Nollet, Frans; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the interrater reliability and stability over time of the Capacity Profile (CAP). The CAP is a standardized method for classifying additional care needs indicated by current impairments in five domains of body functions: physical health, neuromusculoskeletal and movement-related, sensory, mental, and voice…

  18. 43 CFR 1823.13 - Is additional documentation needed when a third party requests a refund?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Is additional documentation needed when a third party requests a refund? 1823.13 Section 1823.13 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) APPLICATION PROCEDURES Payments and...

  19. EDUCATIONAL PLANNING--AN INVENTORY OF MAJOR RESEARCH NEEDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COOMBS, PHILIP H.; AND OTHERS

    URGENT CONTEMPORARY EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH NEEDS AS SEEN FROM THE VANTAGE POINT OF BOTH PRODUCERS AND CONSUMERS OF RESEARCH ARE IDENTIFIED IN THIS REPORT. THE DOCUMENT, WHICH COVERS 25 POSSIBLE AREAS OF RESEARCH, SUGGESTS THOSE RESEARCH TOPICS WHICH, IN THE OPINION OF SELECTED CONSULTANTS, ARE CONSIDERED TO BE PARTICULARLY USEFUL AND IMPORTANT AS…

  20. Sequential Research Needs in Evolving Disciplines of Social Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Malcolm S.

    The author suggests that the emerging fields of social practice (such as recreation, social work, and adult education) must all go through a sequential pattern of research needs, first superficially, and then in ever deeper cycles. The six phases of these research needs are: definition of the field (survey and descriptive studies, census studies,…

  1. Research needs of cotton ginning industry - survey results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A survey was sent out to members of the cotton ginning associations across the United States. The survey asked five questions: 1) In what state is your gin located? 2) In your estimation, what are the top 3 research needs of the ginning industry? 3) What are the top 3 research needs of your gin? 4...

  2. Information Needs and Information-Gathering Behavior of Research Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siess, Judith A.

    Research into both the information needs of engineers engaged in research and development, and the means chosen by engineers to fulfill their information needs are summarized in this condensation of a Master's thesis. Parallel questionnaires were administered in 1981 to 78 engineers at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering…

  3. Developing Social Skills of Students with Additional Needs within the Context of the Australian Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Michael; Cooper, Greta; Kettler, Ryan J.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research on social skills assessment and intervention indicates the importance of social skills in improving academic achievement. Additionally, a strong evidence base promotes the inclusion of social-emotional learning into the whole school curriculum. In recognition of this evidence, the new Australian Curriculum, under Personal and…

  4. Membrane separation systems---A research and development needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W. ); Cussler, E.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science); Eykamp, W. ); Koros, W.J. ); Riley, R.L. ); Strathmann, H. (Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Grenzflaech

    1990-04-01

    Industrial separation processes consume a significant portion of the energy used in the United States. A 1986 survey by the Office of Industrial Programs estimated that about 4.2 quads of energy are expended annually on distillation, drying and evaporation operations. This survey also concluded that over 0.8 quads of energy could be saved in the chemical, petroleum and food industries alone if these industries adopted membrane separation systems more widely. Membrane separation systems offer significant advantages over existing separation processes. In addition to consuming less energy than conventional processes, membrane systems are compact and modular, enabling easy retrofit to existing industrial processes. The present study was commissioned by the Department of Energy, Office of Program Analysis, to identify and prioritize membrane research needs in light of DOE's mission. Each report will be individually cataloged.

  5. HIV/AIDS research in correctional settings: perspectives on training needs from researchers and IRB members.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Karli K; Johnson, Mark E; Ironside, Erica F; Brems, Christiane; Eldridge, Gloria D

    2014-12-01

    Being disproportionately represented by individuals living with HIV/AIDS, correctional facilities are an important venue for potentially invaluable HIV/AIDS epidemiological and intervention research. However, unique ethical, regulatory, and environmental challenges exist in these settings that have limited the amount and scope of research. We surveyed 760 HIV/AIDS researchers, and IRB chairs, members, and prisoner representatives to identify areas in which additional training might ameliorate these challenges. Most commonly identified training needs related to federal regulations, ethics (confidentiality, protection for participants/researchers, coercion, privacy, informed consent, and general ethics), and issues specific to the environment (culture of the correctional setting; general knowledge of correctional systems; and correctional environments, policies, and procedures). Bolstering availability of training on the challenges of conducting HIV/AIDS research in correctional settings is a crucial step toward increasing research that will yield significant benefits to incarcerated individuals and society as a whole.

  6. HIV/AIDS Research in Correctional Settings: Perspectives on Training Needs from Researchers and IRB Members

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Karli K.; Johnson, Mark E.; Ironside, Erica F.; Brems, Christiane; Eldridge, Gloria D.

    2015-01-01

    Being disproportionately represented by individuals living with HIV/AIDS, correctional facilities are an important venue for potentially invaluable HIV/AIDS epidemiological and intervention research. However, unique ethical, regulatory, and environmental challenges exist in these settings that have limited the amount and scope of research. We surveyed 760 HIV/AIDS researchers, and IRB chairs, members, and prisoner representatives to identify areas in which additional training might ameliorate these challenges. Most commonly identified training needs related to federal regulations, ethics (confidentiality, protection for participants/researchers, coercion, privacy, informed consent, and general ethics), and issues specific to the environment (culture of the correctional setting; general knowledge of correctional systems; and correctional environments, policies, and procedures). Bolstering availability of training on the challenges of conducting HIV/AIDS research in correctional settings is a crucial step toward increasing research that will yield significant benefits to incarcerated individuals and society as a whole. PMID:25490736

  7. Needs for Rural Research in the Northern Finland Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muilu, Toivo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the needs and demands which rural research faces at the interface between research and development. The case study area is northern Finland, which constitutes the most remote and sparsely populated areas of the European Union. This paper is based on the tradition of rural research since the 1980s in connection…

  8. Data Curation: A Study of Researcher Practices and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLure, Merinda; Level, Allison V.; Cranston, Catherine L.; Oehlerts, Beth; Culbertson, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Colorado State University librarians conducted five focus groups with thirty-one faculty, research scientists, and research associates. The groups explored: (1) The nature of data sets that these researchers create or maintain; (2) How participants manage their data; (3) Needs for support that the participants identify in relation to sharing,…

  9. Research Needs for Technology Education: A U.S. Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Gene; Ritz, John

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of identifying research needs for technology education by generating a rank-ordered list of research topics that the profession's members might wish to explore individually or in collaboration with colleagues and students. The researchers' goal was to provide a concise list of topics that could be used by…

  10. Research needs for risk-informed, performance-based regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Cloninger, T.H.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation was made by an executive in the utility which operates the South Texas Project reactors, and summarizes their perspective on probabilistic safety analysis, risk-based operation, and risk-based regulation. They view it as a tool to help them better apply their resources to maintain the level of safety necessary to protect the public health and safety. South Texas served as one of the pilot plants for the application of risk-based regulation to the maintenance rule. The author feels that the process presents opportunities as well as challenges. Among the opportunities is the involvement of more people in the process, and the sense of investment they take in the decisions, in addition to the insight they can offer. In the area of challenges there is the need for better understanding of how to apply what already is known on problems, rather than essentially reinventing the wheel to address problems. Research is needed to better understand when some events are not truly of a significant safety concern. The demarcation between deterministic decisions and the appropriate application of risk-based decisions must be better defined, for the sake of the operator as well as the public observing plant operation.

  11. Games for health for children—Current status and needed research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Videogames for health (G4H) offer exciting, innovative, potentially highly effective methods for increasing knowledge, delivering persuasive messages, changing behaviors, and influencing health outcomes. Although early outcome results are promising, additional research is needed to determine the gam...

  12. Research needs for risk-informed, performance-based regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Thadani, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes the activities of the Office of Research of the NRC, both from a historical aspect as well as it applies to the application of risk-based decision making. The office has been actively involved in problems related to understanding risks related to core accidents, to understanding the problem of aging of reactor components and materials from years of service, and toward the understanding and analysis of severe accidents. In addition new policy statements regarding the role of risk assessment in regulatory applications has given focus for the need of further work. The NRC has used risk assessment in regulatory questions in the past but in a fairly ad hoc sort of manner. The new policies will clearly require a better defined application of risk assessment, and help for people evaluating applications in judging the applicability of such applications when a component of them is based on risk-based decision making. To address this, standard review plans are being prepared to serve as guides for such questions. In addition, with regulatory decisions being allowed to be based upon risk-based decisions, it is necessary to have an adequate data base prepared, and made publically available, to support such a position.

  13. Aggregated Interdisciplinary Databases and the Needs of Undergraduate Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fister, Barbara; Gilbert, Julie; Fry, Amy Ray

    2008-01-01

    After seeing growing frustration among inexperienced undergraduate researchers searching a popular aggregated interdisciplinary database, the authors questioned whether the leading interdisciplinary databases are serving undergraduates' needs. As a preliminary exploration of this question, the authors queried vendors, analyzed their marketing…

  14. Technology transfer needs and experiences: The NASA Research Center perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer needs and experiences - the NASA Research Center perspective are provided. Topics covered include: functions of NASA, incentives and benefits, technology transfer mechanisms, economics of technology commercialization, examples, and conclusions.

  15. 75 FR 25208 - Announcement of Body Armor Research Needs Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... the examination of such issues as material longevity, new materials, and improved testing... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Announcement of Body Armor Research Needs Meeting...

  16. Determining the research needs of the surface coal mining industry

    SciTech Connect

    Zell, L.M.

    1982-12-01

    This paper reveals avenues open to the coal industry to help gain technology and research information needed to meet the requirements of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. It discusses projects of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Coal Mining and the Mining and Reclamation Council of America (MARC) to help meet the environmental needs as well as the coal industry needs.

  17. Selected Research, Development and Organizational Needs of the Hearing Impaired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Charles W., Ed.

    Identified are research, development, and organizational needs regarding sensory aids for the hearing impaired. Discussion of the present status of sensory aids focuses on acoustic and nonacoustic aids and points out that practical long-term utility has been extremely limited. Described are organizational and planning needs such as demographic…

  18. Health Information Technology Needs Help from Primary Care Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.; Green, Lee A.; Phillips, Robert L.; Beasley, John W.; DeVoe, Jennifer E.; Klinkman, Michael S.; Hughes, John; Puro, Jon; Fox, Chester H.; Burdick, Tim

    2015-01-01

    While health information technology (HIT) efforts are beginning to yield measurable clinical benefits, more is needed to meet the needs of patients and clinicians. Primary care researchers are uniquely positioned to inform the evidence-based design and use of technology. Research strategies to ensure success include engaging patient and clinician stakeholders, working with existing practice-based research networks, and using established methods from other fields such as human factors engineering and implementation science. Policies are needed to help support primary care researchers in evaluating and implementing HIT into everyday practice, including expanded research funding, strengthened partnerships with vendors, open access to information systems, and support for the Primary Care Extension Program. Through these efforts, the goal of improved outcomes through HIT can be achieved. PMID:25957361

  19. Medicinal herbs in the United States: research needs.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, H B; Lucier, G W; Fisher, K D

    1999-01-01

    Virtually all cultures have, throughout history, used a variety of plants or materials derived from plants for the prevention and treatment of disease. Evidence of the beneficial therapeutic effects of these medicinal herbs is seen in their continued use. Additionally, the development of modern chemistry permitted the isolation of chemicals from medicinal herbs that have served as drugs or starting materials for the synthesis of many important drugs used today. Many more modern drugs have been synthesized as a result of knowledge gained from studies of mechanisms of actions of chemicals first isolated from medicinal herbs. Thus, medicinal herbs have played a major role in the development of modern medicine and continue to be widely used in their original form. Whereas it is generally agreed that most medicinal herbs are safe under the conditions used, some are toxic and should be avoided even though they are readily available, and others have significant adverse side effects when misused. Also, little has been done to investigate potential adverse effects that may be associated with extended or high-dose use of medicinal herbs. Thus, concern has been expressed that the lack of quality control used in the preparation of medicinal herbs, plus their unregulated sale and uninformed use, pose potential adverse health effects for consumers. There is also concern regarding potential herb/herb or herb/drug interactions and possible untoward health effects of medicinal herbs in sensitive subpopulations such as the young and the elderly and certain genetically predisposed individuals. In this paper, we discuss these concerns at some length and make recommendations for additional research and education discussed in the recent International Workshop to Evaluate Research Needs on the Use and Safety of Medicinal Herbs. PMID:10504141

  20. The perceptions of teachers and principals toward providing additional compensation to teachers in high-need subject areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longing, Jeffrey Lucian

    The purpose of this study was to determine possible differences in the perceptions of teachers teaching in high-need areas (i.e., math, science, special education, etc.) and teachers not teaching in high-need areas, (i.e., business education, physical education, etc.) as defined by the states of Arkansas and Louisiana, regarding higher compensation for high-need teachers. In addition, possible perception differences among principals and teachers were determined. The independent variables consisted of gender, position held, years of certified experience, and certification areas. The dependent variable was the perceptions of the participants on providing higher compensation for high-need teachers in order to attract and retain them. The data for all variables were collected using the Teacher Compensation Survey. The sample for this study was limited to teachers, grades 9 through 12, and principals of public high schools in south Arkansas and north Louisiana. Forty-four school districts in south Arkansas (Arkansas Department of Education, 2008a) and north Louisiana (Louisiana Department of Education, 2008a) met the criteria for this study. Twenty-two superintendents gave permission for their districts to participate in the research. A sample of 849 teachers and 38 principals were identified in these districts. Surveys were returned from 350 teachers, creating a 41% response rate. When the 31 principals that returned surveys were added to the total population, the response rate increased to 43% with 381 of the 887 surveyed responding. However, 42 of the teachers and two of the principals skipped some of the questions on the survey and were not included in the study. The researcher used a One-Way ANOVA and independent t-tests to determine the presence of statistical differences at the .05 level. The data showed that most math and science teachers agreed that high-need teachers should be compensated at a higher rate than teachers not teaching in high-need areas. The data

  1. Basic Research Needs for Carbon Capture: Beyond 2020

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, Paul; Buchanan, Michelle

    2010-03-04

    mimic those encountered in actual separation processes. Such tools are needed to examine interfaces and thin films at the atomic and molecular levels, achieving an atomic/molecular-scale understanding of gas–host structures, kinetics, and dynamics, and understanding and control of nanoscale synthesis in multiple dimensions. A second major crosscutting theme was the development of new computational tools for theory, modeling, and simulation of separation processes. Computational techniques can be used to elucidate mechanisms responsible for observed separations, predict new desired features for advanced separations materials, and guide future experiments, thus complementing synthesis and characterization efforts. These two crosscut areas underscored the fact that the challenge for future carbon capture technologies will be met only with multidisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers. In addition, it was noted that success in this fundamental research area must be closely coupled with successful applied research to ensure the continuing assessment and maturation of new technologies as they undergo scale-up and deployment. Carbon capture is a very rich scientific problem, replete with opportunity for basic researchers to advance the frontiers of science as they engage on one of the most important technical challenges of our times. This workshop report outlines an ambitious agenda for addressing the very difficult problem of carbon capture by creating foundational new basic science. This new science will in turn pave the way for many additional advances across a broad range of scientific disciplines and technology sectors.

  2. SRRC Cotton Research: Changing with the Public's Need

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After the July 2002 SRRC Cotton Program review, a panel of industrial and university advisors recommended that we could respond better to industry needs and increase the impact of our research by reducing the number of active projects. As part of the response, the cotton research units at SRRC have ...

  3. Information Seeking Research Needs Extension towards Tasks and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Järvelin, Kalervo; Ingwersen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the research into information seeking and its directions at a general level. We approach this topic by analysis and argumentation based on past research in the domain. We begin by presenting a general model of information seeking and retrieval which is used to derive nine broad dimensions that are needed to analyze information…

  4. Research Needs of a Family Life Educator and Marriage Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Robert O.

    1976-01-01

    The author, a family life educator, reviews the research literature on marriage and family indicating the neglected areas and stressing the need for cause and effect studies. He proposes a number of research approaches to achieve the latter. Speech presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Family Relations, Salt Lake City, Utah,…

  5. Information Needs Research in Russia and Lithuania, 1965-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maceviciute, Elena

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The invisibility of research on information needs from the East and Central Europe in the West suggested an exploration of the published research output from Lithuania and Russia from 1965 to 2003. Method: The data were collected from the abstracting journal Informatika-59. The publications were retrieved from Lithuanian and Russian…

  6. Research Needs for Technology Education: An International Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.; Martin, Gene

    2013-01-01

    These authors report the findings of a study that sought to determine the most relevant research issues needed to be studied by the technology education profession. It used an international panel of experts to develop a list of important research issues for the school subject of technology education and for the preparation of teachers to better…

  7. Focusing Biodiversity Research on the Needs of Decision Makers

    PubMed

    SMYTHE; BERNABO; CARTER; JUTRO

    1996-11-01

    / The project on Biodiversity Uncertainties and Research Needs (BURN) ensures the advancement of usable knowledge on biodiversity by obtaining input from decision makers on their priority information needs about biodiversity and then using this input to engage leading scientists in designing policy-relevant research. Decision makers articulated concerns related to four issues: significance of biodiversity; status and trends of biodiversity; management for biodiversity; and the linkage of social, cultural, economic, legal, and biological objectives. Leading natural and social scientists then identified the research required to address the decision makers' needs and determined the probability of success. The diverse group of experts reached consensus on several fundamental issues, helping to clarify the role of biodiversity in land and resource management. The BURN participants identified several features that should be incorporated into policy-relevant research plans and management strategies for biodiversity. Research and assessment efforts should be: multidisciplinary and integrative, participatory with stakeholder involvement, hierarchical (multiple scales), and problem- and region-specific. The activities should be focused regionally within a global perspective. Meta-analysis of existing data is needed on all fronts to assess the state of the science. More specifically, the scientists recommended six priority research areas that should be pursued to address the information needs articulated by decision makers: (1) characterization of biodiversity, (2) environmental valuation, (3) management for sustainability-for humans and the environment (adaptive management), (4) information management strategies, (5) governance and stewardship issues, and (6) communication and outreach. Broad recommendations were developed for each research area to provide direction for research planning and resource management strategies. The results will directly benefit those groups that

  8. Additive manufacturing in biomedical sciences and the need for definitions and norms.

    PubMed

    Chhaya, Mohit P; Poh, Patrina S P; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; van Griensven, Martijn; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2015-01-01

    The application of additive biomanufacturing represents one of the most rapidly advancing areas of biomedical science, in which engineers, scientists, and clinicians are contributing to the future of health care. The combined efforts of a large number of groups around the globe have developed a strong research thrust that has resulted in a large number of publications. Reviewing this body of literature, there is an increasing trend of research groups inventing their own definitions and terminology. This has made it difficult to find and compare the results. Therefore, to move the field constructively forward, it is a conditio sine qua non to clarify various terminologies and standards. Based on this background, this article advocates tightening the terminology and has the objective of penning out definitions that will ultimately allow the development of official industry standard terms, such as American Society for Testing and Materials and or International Organization for Standardization for technologies developed for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

  9. Climate Change Research - What Do We Need Really?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Chandra Prasad, P.

    2015-01-01

    This research note focuses on the current climate change research scenario and discusses primarily what is required in the present global climate change conditions. Most of the climate change research and models predict adverse future conditions that have to be faced by humanity, with less emphasis on mitigation measures. Moreover, research ends as reports on the shelves of scientists and researchers and as publications in journals. At this juncture the major focus should be on research that helps in reducing the impact rather than on analysing future scenarios of climate change using different models. The article raises several questions and suggestions regards climate change research and lays emphasis on what we really need from climate change researchers.

  10. Translational research education and training needs in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle R; Inouye, Jillian; Seto, Todd B; Braun, Kathryn L

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this needs assessment was to identify the translational research education and training needs of researchers and administrators working in Hawai'i's communities and to use the finding to develop an education and training plan. The assessment was led by a community advisory board with members from community health centers, social agencies, hospitals, and academia on O'ahu. The survey, developed with input of the community advisory board, was sent to 94 administrators and researchers involved or affiliated with research being conducted in Hawai'i. Forty-one respondents (43%) completed the survey. Respondents wanted education and training in research processes, specific research-related skills, and facilitating interactions between community and academic researchers. Sixty-one percent were interested in training related to community-engaged research and yearly seminars on "collaborative mentoring." Popular topics of interest were related to data monitoring, networking with different cultural groups, statistics, and human subjects review. A majority of respondents wanted to attend workshops, seminars, and presentations rather than take a class. Approximately 50% of the respondents wanted to gain information through on-line training. Findings guided the development of a translational research education and training plan for the University of Hawai'i National Institute of Health (NIH) Research Centers in Minority Institutions Multidisciplinary and Translational Research Infrastructure Expansion (RMATRIX) grant.

  11. Translational Research Education and Training Needs in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Jillian; Seto, Todd B; Braun, Kathryn L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this needs assessment was to identify the translational research education and training needs of researchers and administrators working in Hawai‘i's communities and to use the finding to develop an education and training plan. The assessment was led by a community advisory board with members from community health centers, social agencies, hospitals, and academia on O‘ahu. The survey, developed with input of the community advisory board, was sent to 94 administrators and researchers involved or affiliated with research being conducted in Hawai‘i. Forty-one respondents (43%) completed the survey. Respondents wanted education and training in research processes, specific research-related skills, and facilitating interactions between community and academic researchers. Sixty-one percent were interested in training related to community-engaged research and yearly seminars on “collaborative mentoring.” Popular topics of interest were related to data monitoring, networking with different cultural groups, statistics, and human subjects review. A majority of respondents wanted to attend workshops, seminars, and presentations rather than take a class. Approximately 50% of the respondents wanted to gain information through on-line training. Findings guided the development of a translational research education and training plan for the University of Hawai‘i National Institute of Health (NIH) Research Centers in Minority Institutions Multidisciplinary and Translational Research Infrastructure Expansion (RMATRIX) grant. PMID:26019985

  12. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention. PMID:26068647

  13. The Facial Aesthetic index: An additional tool for assessing treatment need

    PubMed Central

    Sundareswaran, Shobha; Ramakrishnan, Ranjith

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Facial Aesthetics, a major consideration in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, may not be judged correctly and completely by simply analyzing dental occlusion or osseous structures. Despite this importance, there is no index to guarantee availability of treatment or prioritize patients based on their soft tissue treatment needs. Individuals having well-aligned teeth but unaesthetic convex profiles do not get included for treatment as per current malocclusion indices. The aim of this investigation is to develop an aesthetic index based on facial profiles which could be used as an additional tool with malocclusion indices. Materials and Methods: A chart showing typical facial profile changes due to underlying malocclusions was generated by soft tissue manipulations of standardized profile photographs of a well-balanced male and female face. A panel of 62 orthodontists judged the profile photographs of 100 patients with different soft tissue patterns for assessing profile variations and treatment need. The index was later tested in a cross-section of school population. Statistical analysis was done using “irr” package of R environment version 2.15.1. Results: The index exhibited very good reliability in determining profile variations (Fleiss kappa 0.866, P < 0.001), excellent reproducibility (kappa 0.9078), high sensitivity, and specificity (95.7%). Testing in population yielded excellent agreement among orthodontists (kappa 0.9286). Conclusions: A new Facial Aesthetic index, based on patient's soft tissue profile requirements is proposed, which can complement existing indices to ensure treatment to those in need. PMID:27127752

  14. Research needs for risk-informed, performance-based regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station has used PRA-derived risk insights for about 10 years now. The plant originally started applying PRA modeling to an auxiliary feedwater system during the initial licensing phases of the plant, and as a result of that, they were able to work with the NRC and apply some graded quality requirements to that particular system. There was a third redundant auxiliary feedwater pump, and they now can treat that system as partially safety related and partially non-safety related. So it was an advance for Palo Verde at that time to be able to make decisions with a PRA and they began learning how to use those techniques. After completing the IPE it became natural for the plant to make a transition into other areas at the plant to look for areas where the insights gained from PRA could be applied into their decision-making processes. Those that the plant embarked upon initially were areas where they could gain operational risk assessment insights. The author goes on to discuss experiences gained in using these techniques to better assess the safety of operations within the plant. In addition he offers comments on areas which need further development and research to make them more applicable to a plant by plant basis.

  15. Focusing biodiversity research on the needs of decision makers

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, K.D.; Bernabo, J.C.; Carter, T.B.; Jutro, P.R.

    1996-11-01

    The project on Biodiversity Uncertainties and Research Needs (BURN) ensures the advancement of usable knowledge on biodiversity by obtaining input from decision makers on their priority information needs about biodiversity and then using this input to engage leading scientists in designing policy-relevant research. Decision makers had concerns about four issues: significance of biodiversity; status and trends of biodiversity; management for biodiversity; the linkage of social, cultural, economic, legal, and biological objectives. Leading scientists identified research required to address these needs and determined the probability of success. The diverse group of experts reached consensus on several fundamental issues, helping to clarify the role of biodiversity in land and resource management. Several features that should be incorporated into policy-relevant research plans and management strategies for biodiversity were identified: multidisciplinary and integrative, participatory with stakeholder involvement, hierarchical, and problem- and region-specific. Activities should be focused regionally within a global perspective. More specifically, the scientists recommended six priority research areas that should be pursued to address the information needs articulated by decision makers: (1) characterization of biodiversity, (2) environmental valuation, (3) management for sustainability-for humans and the environment (adaptive management), (4) information management strategies, (5) governance and stewardship issues, and (6) communication and outreach. Broad recommendations wee developed for each research area to provide direction for research planning and resource management strategies. The results will directly benefit those groups that require biodiversity research to address their needs-whether to develop policy, manage natural resources, or make other decisions affecting biodiversity. 11 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. Industry-identified combustion research needs: Special study

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, J.G.; Soelberg, N.R.; Kessinger, G.F.

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses the development and demonstration of innovative combustion technologies that improve energy conservation and environmental practices in the US industrial sector. The report includes recommendations by industry on R&D needed to resolve current combustion-related problems. Both fundamental and applied R&D needs are presented. The report assesses combustion needs and suggests research ideas for seven major industries, which consume about 78% of all energy used by industry. Included are the glass, pulp and paper, refinery, steel, metal casting, chemicals, and aluminum industries. Information has been collected from manufacturers, industrial operators, trade organizations, and various funding organizations and has been supplemented with expertise at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to develop a list of suggested research and development needed for each of the seven industries.

  17. The need for unity in the biomedical research community.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, M

    1991-10-01

    The author provides a perspective on how basic scientists view contemporary issues of biomedical research funding by discussing five topics of concern to the biomedical research community and the need for that community to form a new consensus as the basis for new approaches to legislative efforts in Congress and communication with the public. The topics are (1) the reasons scientific societies became active in legislative efforts in Congress, (2) the reasons there was initial friction between these societies and other institutions in the biomedical research community, (3) the history of the founding of a biomedical research community, (3) the history of the founding of a biomedical research caucus in the House of Representatives, (4) the effects of the Institute of Medicine's recent report on funding health sciences research, and (5) the weakness of the present institutional coalition. The author proposes specific steps to develop a more unified approach to achieve a common biomedical research agenda.

  18. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  19. Preparing Jewish Educators: The Research We Have, the Research We Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman-Nemser, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the research we have and the research we need in both general and Jewish teacher education. First, I discuss three recent efforts to synthesize and assess existing research in teacher education and to identify needed research. Next I review a handful of recent studies in Jewish teacher education which illustrate various…

  20. Translational research-the need of a new bioethics approach.

    PubMed

    Hostiuc, Sorin; Moldoveanu, Alin; Dascălu, Maria-Iuliana; Unnthorsson, Runar; Jóhannesson, Ómar I; Marcus, Ioan

    2016-01-15

    Translational research tries to apply findings from basic science to enhance human health and well-being. Many phases of the translational research may include non-medical tasks (information technology, engineering, nanotechnology, biochemistry, animal research, economy, sociology, psychology, politics, and so on). Using common bioethics principles to these areas might sometimes be not feasible, or even impossible. However, the whole process must respect some fundamental, moral principles. The purpose of this paper is to argument the need for a different approach to the morality in translational bioethics, and to suggest some directions that might be followed when constructing such a bioethics. We will show that a new approach is needed and present a few ethical issues that are specific to the translational research.

  1. Migration of radionuclides in geologic media: Fundamental research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, D.T. ); Zachara, J.M.; Wildung, R.E. ); Wobber, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    An assessment of the fundamental research needs in understanding and predicting the migration of radionuclides in the subsurface is provided. Emphasis is on the following three technical areas: (1) aqueous speciation of radionuclides, (2) the interaction of radionuclides with substrates, and (3) intermediate-scale interaction studies. This research relates to important issues associated with environmental restoration and remediation of DOE sites contaminated with mixed radionuclide-organic wastes. 64 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Mining nonterrestrial resources: Information needs and research topics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daemen, Jaak J. K.

    1992-01-01

    An outline of topics we need to understand better in order to apply mining technology to a nonterrestrial environment is presented. The proposed list is not intended to be complete. It aims to identify representative topics that suggest productive research. Such research will reduce the uncertainties associated with extrapolating from conventional earthbound practice to nonterrestrial applications. One objective is to propose projects that should put future discussions of nonterrestrial mining on a firmer, less speculative basis.

  3. Laser-based additive manufacturing: where it has been, where it needs to go

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.

    2014-03-01

    It is no secret that the laser was the driver for additive manufacturing (AM) of 3D objects since such objects were first demonstrated in the mid-1980s. A myriad of techniques utilizing the directed energy of lasers were invented. Lasers are used to selectively sinter or fuse incremental layers in powder-beds, melt streaming powder following a programmed path, and polymerize photopolymers in a liquid vat layer-by-layer. The laser is an energy source of choice for repair of damaged components, for manufacture of new or replacement parts, and for rapid prototyping of concept designs. Lasers enable microstructure gradients and heterogeneous structures designed to exhibit unique properties and behavior. Laserbased additive manufacturing has been successful in producing relatively simple near net-shape metallic parts saving material and cost, but requiring finish-machining and in repair and refurbishment of worn components. It has been routinely used to produce polymer parts. These capabilities have been widely recognized as evidenced by the explosion in interest in AM technology, nationally. These successes are, however, tempered by challenges facing practitioners such as process and part qualification and verification, which are needed to bring AM as a true manufacturing technology. The ONR manufacturing science program, in collaboration with other agencies, invested in basic R&D in AM since its beginnings. It continues to invest, currently focusing on developing cyber-enabled manufacturing systems for AM. It is believed that such computation, communication and control approaches will help in validating AM and moving it to the factory floor along side CNC machines.

  4. Need for Practice-Based Research in School Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Place, A. Will; Edmister, Julie; Zigler, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article's first objective is to establish the need for elevating the quantity and quality of practice-based research in school administration. The requirement is addressed in relation to (a) persisting social demands for school reform, (b) heightened demands for evidence-based practice in all professions, and (c) persistent…

  5. Response to ERIS 2014 States' Research Needs Survey

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is ORD’s response to the states’ needs and priorities, as identified in the 2014 survey. ORD identified existing methods, models, tools and databases on these topics, as well as near-term research and development efforts, that could assist states in thei...

  6. Research Needs Related to Naphthalene Assessment (2005, Workshop)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has announced the release of the final report from the 2005 peer consultation workshop which sought expert opinion on research needs related to the mode of action of the inhalation carcinogenicity of naphthalene. This report is a summary of the main points of presentations an...

  7. Technical Services Research Needs for the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veaner, Allen B.

    1983-01-01

    Research needs in area of library technical services are identified, focusing on costs, the catalog, bibliographic data, new cataloging code, subject access in online catalogs, acquisitions, serials control system, universal technical processing terminals, data storage devices, robots and artificial intelligence, bibliographic instruction, and…

  8. What Further Research Is Needed on Restorative Justice in Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Nancy; Guckenburg, Sarah; Persson, Hannah; Fronius, Trevor; Petrosino, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Restorative justice is a non-punitive approach to resolving conflict that focuses on restoring relationships. This report summarizes recommendations about future research and evaluation needs that would advance the understanding of restorative justice in K-12 schools in the United States. The recommendations were generated from interviews with…

  9. Prospects for Technical Communication: Research for Futures Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, J. C.

    The need for technical communication to enable the transition from a "postindustrial" future to an alternative future is incalculable; however, research is required to improve current technical communication models and methods. The current rhetoric of technical communication derives from an inadequate command-generated technical communication…

  10. Research Highlights. Strengths and Needs of Divided Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringer-Seibold, Traci; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a qualitative research study of children from divided families and analyzes findings in terms of family contexts, children's resiliency, and needs. Suggests strategies for professionals including recognition of developmental capacity within family circumstances, interactive systems, communication patterns and areas of stress. Includes…

  11. Research and dissemination needs for ergonomics in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Estill, Cheryl Fairfield; Baron, Sherry; Steege, Andrea L

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health convened a conference of researchers interested in the ergonomics of agricultural workers. Participants included 20 representatives from universities, state governments, private agricultural and insurance companies, migrant worker organizations, agricultural industry organizations, and the Agricultural Extension Service. The attendees divided into three groups and brainstormed about research ideas and dissemination methods related to ergonomics for farm workers. The groups separately reported that interventions, cost-benefit analyses, and cultural belief systems were the main topics that needed to be researched to reduce physical risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders. The participants also presented ideas for disseminating information to farm owners and workers. PMID:12500960

  12. Developing the Understanding and Practice of Inclusion in Higher Education for International Students with Disabilities/Additional Needs: A Whole Schooling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supple, Briony; Abgenyega, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present research on inclusion in higher education using a whole schooling philosophy. We seek insight into the perspectives of international students with disabilities/additional needs, three of whom from this particular research group are from non-English speaking backgrounds and attending the same university in Melbourne,…

  13. Diesel emissions: is more health research still needed?

    PubMed

    Mauderly, J L

    2001-07-01

    It can legitimately be asked whether we need any more research on the health effects of diesel emissions. However, despite a research effort spanning at least 5 decades and the generation of a huge literature, there are still key uncertainties about the health impacts of present and future diesel emissions. This article briefly characterizes current knowledge and information gaps, and then proposes some key issues requiring further research. These issues include the adjuvant effect, the bioactivity of inhaled emissions at realistic doses, the toxicity of aged diesel exhaust particles, the importance of ultrafine particulate emissions, the need to improve our ability to predict the impacts of changes in emissions, and the placement of diesel health risks in context regarding other exposures.

  14. The Essential Need for Research Misconduct Allegation Audits.

    PubMed

    Loikith, Lisa; Bauchwitz, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 90 % of allegations of biomedical research misconduct in the United States are dismissed by responsible institutions without any faculty assessment or auditable record. Recently, members of the U.S. Congress have complained that the penalties for those against whom findings of research misconduct are made are too light and that too few grant funds associated with research misconduct have been recovered for use by other researchers and taxpayers. Here we discuss the laws that empower federal agencies that can oversee investigations of biomedical research misconduct: the Office of Research Integrity (ORI) and the Office of the Inspector General (OIG), both located within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Research misconduct investigations pertaining to U.S. physical sciences funded through the National Science Foundation (NSF) are overseen by the NSF's OIG. While OIGs may provide some improvement over the ORI in the handling of research misconduct, we have found that a much more serious flaw exists which undermines an ability to conduct performance audits of the effectiveness by which allegations of research misconduct are handled in the United States. Specifically, sufficient data do not need to be retained by U.S. research institutions funded by HHS or NSF to allow effective audit of why allegations of research misconduct are dismissed before being seen by faculty inquiry or investigative committees. U.S. federal Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards (GAGAS/Yellow Book), if applied to the research misconduct oversight process, would allow a determination of whether the handling of allegations of biomedical research misconduct actually functions adequately, and if not, how it might be improved. In particular, we propose that independent, external peer review under GAGAS audit standards should be instituted without delay in assessing the performance of ORI, or any other similarly tasked federal agency, in handling allegations of

  15. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  16. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  17. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  18. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  19. 49 CFR 40.303 - What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional treatment, aftercare, or support...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What happens if the SAP believes the employee... the Return-to-Duty Process § 40.303 What happens if the SAP believes the employee needs additional...? (a) As a SAP, if you believe that ongoing services (in addition to follow-up tests) are needed...

  20. Meeting the research infrastructure needs of micropolitan and rural communities.

    PubMed

    Strasburger, Janette F

    2009-05-01

    In the 1800s, this country chose to establish land-grant colleges to see that the working class could attain higher education, and that the research needs of the agricultural and manufacturing segments of this country could be met. It seems contrary to our origins to see so little support at present for research infrastructure going to the very communities that need such research to sustain their populations, grow their economies, to attract physicians, to provide adequate health care, and to educate, retain, and employ their youth. Cities are viewed as sources for high-paying jobs, yet many of these same jobs could be translated to rural and micropolitan areas, provided that the resources are established to support it. One of the fastest growing economic periods in this country's history was during World War II, when even the smallest and most remote towns contributed substantially to the innovations, manufacture, and production of goods benefiting our nation as a whole. Rural areas have always lagged somewhat behind metropolitan areas in acquisition of new technology. Rural electricity and rural phone access are examples from the past. Testing our universities' abilities to grow distributive research networks beyond their campuses will create a competitive edge regionally, against global workplace, educational, and research competition, and will lay the groundwork for efficiency in research and for new innovation. PMID:19552350

  1. EDITORIAL: The need and challenge for Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2006-11-01

    Why another journal? This is the inevitable question that every effort to launch a new journal must, and should, address. A common statistic in the business world is that nine out of ten new restaurants fail. In the academic world something similar, but less definitive, can happen: a potentially interesting, but practically flawed, effort can be launched, never truly build an intellectual community, but then continue as a sub-critical, little-known journal for far too long. The challenge any new publication, academic or professional, faces is thus extreme. A new journal must find a way to usefully compete, and bring new value, in the face of multiple existing outlets for significant results, tremendous barriers to establishing a 'track record' or 'name recognition' against existing publications, and a print and a cyberspace increasingly desperate in the search for 'content', scientific or otherwise. In the case of Environmental Research Letters (ERL), however, these questions answered themselves and, as a result, I cannot imagine a more critically needed new publication. Indeed, the goal of ERL is to be more than simply one more good new journal. It is to be a place—both physical and online—that those engaged in environmental issues—from researchers within the physical and natural sciences, to those concerned with applied systems studies, modeling and simulation techniques, practical engagement in environmental activism, and developing, conducting or critiquing policy, legal, or business efforts—will all want to go to read, and to engage with colleagues. The environmental field has witnessed an incredible intellectual and professional proliferation. The areas of ecological resilience, global change science, policy, law and economics, industrial ecology, green buildings, environmental genomics, environmental archaeology, and the sociology of environmental movements have become increasingly regarded and, to varying degrees, recognized themselves as major

  2. Assessment of industrial attitudes toward generic research needs in tribology

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, L.B.; Zlotnick, M.; Levinson, T.M.

    1985-09-01

    Based on extended discussions during visits with 27 companies representing 13 different parts of the tribology industry (such as bearings, lubricants, coatings, powerplants), it is apparent that only a tiny fraction of the large sums publicly reported as R and D expenditures by industry are used to fund generic tribology research. For example, of the greater than $2 B expenditures reported for R and D in the lubricants sector for 1982, the estimated total for generic tribology research was $12 M. This was the largest expenditure in any sector of the tribology industry and one-third of the total of $36 M. In the automotive industry out of a reported expenditure of $4 B, the estimated generic tribology research was $3 M. In some segments of the tribology industry, for example coatings and filters, there were no expenditures on generic research. There was little tendency to improve the state of the art of the tribology industry through long-term investment in generic R and D in ways that would foster innovation and productivity of energy conservation technology. Expenditures were oriented to development of specific commercial and military products, or to basic research focused on unspecified far term results, although useful spin-off of military developments into commercial fields sometimes occurs. There was a broad consensus in the companies visited that existing research results were not always made easily accessible to potential users in industry. The implication was that industry might benefit more if a larger fraction of the funds were devoted to putting the research results into a form design and development engineers could more readily apply. The need for a more effective presentation of research results was expressed with greater urgency at the smaller companies, but there seemed to be a broad consensus on the need for improvement. Recommendations are given.

  3. Assessment of basic research needs for greenhouse gas control technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.M.; Chandler, W.; Edmonds, J.; Houghton, J.; Levine, M.; Bates, L.; Chum, H.; Dooley, J.; Grether, D.; Logan, J.; Wiltsee, G.; Wright, L.

    1998-09-01

    This paper is an outgrowth of an effort undertaken by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research to assess the fundamental research needs to support a national program in carbon management. Five topics were identified as areas where carbon management strategies and technologies might be developed: (1) capture of carbon dioxide, decarbonization strategies, and carbon dioxide disposal and utilization; (2) hydrogen development and fuel cells; (3) enhancement of the natural carbon cycle; (4) biomass production and utilization; and (5) improvement of the efficiency of energy production, conversion, and utilization. Within each of these general areas, experts came together to identify targets of opportunity for fundamental research likely to lead to the development of mid- to long-term solutions for stabilizing or decreasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Basic research to support the options outlined above are far reaching-from understanding natural global processes such as the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles to development of new materials and concepts for chemical separation. Examples of fundamental research needs are described in this paper.

  4. Summary report of a workshop on phytoremediation research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Soil contamination is a national and global problem. A major challenge is the remediation of large sites contaminated with radionuclides and toxic metals, often present in relatively small amounts but above regulatory action levels. Despite the function of phytoremediation processes in nature for millenia, the technology of phytoremediation is, for the most part, still a concept. There are many different pollutants, plant uptake mechanisms, soil matrices, and plant species that need to be investigated, without overlooking the microbial participation in this technology. Developing actual practical applications will require a significant and coordinated research and development effort, due to the complexity of both biological systems and the soil contamination problems. Research and development in this area must involve scientists and engineers in Federal and state agencies, foreign organizations and industry. The representation at the workshop of researchers from many disciplines, organizations and countries, augurs well for a cooperative and interdisciplinary research effort and the rapid application of this technology. The urgent needs for effective, low-cost technologies to clean-up contaminated soils, both in the US and around the world, suggests phytoremediation as a high national and international research priority. The availability of scientists trained in the interdisciplinary topics relating to phytoremediation will be a major factor in expediting development of this technology.

  5. Harnessing the placebo effect: the need for translational research

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Miller, Franklin G.

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory research recently has greatly enhanced the understanding of placebo and nocebo effects by identifying specific neuromodulators and brain areas associated with them. However, little progress has been made in translating this knowledge into improved patient care. Here, we discuss the limitations in our knowledge about placebo (and nocebo) effects and the need for translational research with the aim of guiding physicians in maximizing placebo effects and minimizing nocebo effects in their routine clinical practice. We suggest some strategies for how, when and why interventions to promote beneficial placebo responses might be administered in the clinical setting. PMID:21576150

  6. Basic research needs and opportunities on interfaces in solar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Czanderna, A. W.; Gottschall, R. J.

    1981-04-01

    The workshop on research needs and recommended research programs on interfaces in solar energy conversion devices was held June 30-July 3, 1980. The papers deal mainly with solid-solid, solid-liquid, and solid-gas interfaces, sometimes involving multilayer solid-solid interfaces. They deal mainly with instrumental techniques of studying these interfaces so they can be optimized, so they can be fabricated with quality control and so changes with time can be forecast. The latter is required because a long lifetime (20 yrs is suggested) is necessary for economic reasons. Fifteen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  7. Food reward system: current perspectives and future research needs.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Alonso, Miguel; Woods, Stephen C; Pelchat, Marcia; Grigson, Patricia Sue; Stice, Eric; Farooqi, Sadaf; Khoo, Chor San; Mattes, Richard D; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews current research and cross-disciplinary perspectives on the neuroscience of food reward in animals and humans, examines the scientific hypothesis of food addiction, discusses methodological and terminology challenges, and identifies knowledge gaps and future research needs. Topics addressed herein include the role of reward and hedonic aspects in the regulation of food intake, neuroanatomy and neurobiology of the reward system in animals and humans, responsivity of the brain reward system to palatable foods and drugs, translation of craving versus addiction, and cognitive control of food reward. The content is based on a workshop held in 2013 by the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute. PMID:26011903

  8. Food reward system: current perspectives and future research needs.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Alonso, Miguel; Woods, Stephen C; Pelchat, Marcia; Grigson, Patricia Sue; Stice, Eric; Farooqi, Sadaf; Khoo, Chor San; Mattes, Richard D; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews current research and cross-disciplinary perspectives on the neuroscience of food reward in animals and humans, examines the scientific hypothesis of food addiction, discusses methodological and terminology challenges, and identifies knowledge gaps and future research needs. Topics addressed herein include the role of reward and hedonic aspects in the regulation of food intake, neuroanatomy and neurobiology of the reward system in animals and humans, responsivity of the brain reward system to palatable foods and drugs, translation of craving versus addiction, and cognitive control of food reward. The content is based on a workshop held in 2013 by the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute.

  9. Structural dynamics technology research in NASA: Perspective on future needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The perspective of a NASA ad hoc study group on future research needs in structural dynamics within the aerospace industry is presented. The common aspects of the design process across the industry are identified and the role of structural dynamics is established through a discussion of various design considerations having their basis in structural dynamics. The specific structural dynamics issues involved are identified and assessed as to their current technological status and trends. Projections of future requirements based on this assessment are made and areas of research to meet them are identified.

  10. Food reward system: current perspectives and future research needs

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Stephen C.; Pelchat, Marcia; Grigson, Patricia Sue; Stice, Eric; Farooqi, Sadaf; Khoo, Chor San; Mattes, Richard D.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews current research and cross-disciplinary perspectives on the neuroscience of food reward in animals and humans, examines the scientific hypothesis of food addiction, discusses methodological and terminology challenges, and identifies knowledge gaps and future research needs. Topics addressed herein include the role of reward and hedonic aspects in the regulation of food intake, neuroanatomy and neurobiology of the reward system in animals and humans, responsivity of the brain reward system to palatable foods and drugs, translation of craving versus addiction, and cognitive control of food reward. The content is based on a workshop held in 2013 by the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute. PMID:26011903

  11. Research Needs: Glass Solar Reflectance and Vinyl Siding

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Robert; Curcija, Charlie; Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian; Selkowitz, Stephen

    2011-07-07

    The subject of glass solar reflectance and its contribution to permanent vinyl siding distortion has not been extensively studied, and some phenomena are not yet well understood. This white paper presents what is known regarding the issue and identifies where more research is needed. Three primary topics are discussed: environmental factors that control the transfer of heat to and from the siding surface; vinyl siding properties that may affect heat build-up and permanent distortion; and factors that determine the properties of reflected solar radiation from glass surfaces, including insulating window glass. Further research is needed to fully characterize the conditions associated with siding distortion, the scope of the problem, physical properties of vinyl siding, insulating window glass reflection characteristics, and possible mitigation or prevention strategies.

  12. We Don't Need a "Geoengineering" Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.

    2011-12-01

    Most approaches commonly labeled as 'geoengineering' can be divided into two categories: approaches that attempt to reduce the change in atmospheric composition caused by anthropogenic emissions (commonly labeled CDR, for Carbon Dioxide Removal), and approaches that attempt to reduce the change in climate caused by changes in atmospheric composition (commonly labeled SRM, for Sunlight Reflection Methods or Solar Radiation Management). CDR is relatively uncontroversial (apart from ocean fertilization), and the primary issues are typically cost, effectiveness, local environmental consequences, and verification. In contrast, SRM has provoked much controversy, because large-scale SRM deployments necessarily would affect everyone on this planet. Several proposals have been tabled for SRM-specific or geoengineering-specific research and governance structures, treating SRM or geoengineering research as a thing apart. We should instead view CDR and SRM research as part of a broader continuum of activities aimed at understanding Earth system dynamics and reducing risks associated with climate change. The scope of existing research efforts should be broadened so that CDR and SRM approaches are, at this stage in development, treated as an extension of what we are already doing. What is 'geoengineering research'? A primary need at this time is for expansion of scope of and funding for existing climate-related research efforts. For examples: Scientists studying the role of aerosols in clouds or stratospheric processes can expand the domain of concern to consider effects of intentionally introduced aerosols (and not just natural aerosols and aerosols we introduce as a byproduct of civilization's normal functioning). Scientists studying effects of land-surface change on global and regional climates can expand the domain of concern beyond inadvertent effects to consider effects of land-surface changes undertaken with the intent to affect these climates. Research programs aimed at

  13. The Electric Power Research Institute. Coordinated Energy Research to Meet a National Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Laura H.

    1975-01-01

    In an institute responsible for coordinating research and development for the electric energy industry, a data base and technical library are being developed to provide for information and research needs. Includes a selected basic annotated list of reference publications. (LS)

  14. Improving depression care: barriers, solutions, and research needs.

    PubMed

    Von Korff, M; Katon, W; Unützer, J; Wells, K; Wagner, E H

    2001-06-01

    Potential solutions for barriers to improved organization of care of depressive illness were identified. These included (1) aligning efforts to improve depression care with broader strategies for improving care of other chronic conditions; (2) increasing the availability of depression case management services in primary care; (3) developing registries and reminder systems to ensure active follow-up of depressed patients; (4) achieving agreement on how depression outcomes should be measured to provide outcomes-based performance standards; (5) providing greater support from mental health specialists for management of depressed patients by primary care providers; (6) campaigns to reduce the stigma associated with treatment of depressive illness; (7) increased dissemination of interventions that activate and empower patients managing a depressive illness; (8) redefining the lack of time of primary care providers for high-quality depression care as issues in organization of care and provider training; and (9) development of incentives (organizational or financial) for high-quality depression care. Research needs were identified according to what has been learned to date. Identified research needs included: studies of approaches to organization of case management, research in new populations (e.g., new diagnostic groups, rural populations, the disadvantaged, the elderly, and those with chronic medical illnesses), research on stepped care and relapse prevention strategies, evaluation of the societal benefits of improved depression care, and multisite trials and meta-analytic approaches that can provide adequate statistical power to assess societal benefits of improved care.

  15. Health effects of fossil-fuel combustion products: needed research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    An examination is made of the research needed to expand and clarify the understanding of the products of fossil-fuel combustion, chiefly that taking place in stationary sources of power. One of the specific objectives that guided the study on which this report is based was to identify the pollutants potentially hazardous to man that are released into the environment in the course of the combustion of fossil fuels. The hazards of principal concern are those which could cause deleterious, long-term somatic and genetic effects. Another objective was to specify the nature of the research needed to determine the health effects of these pollutants on the general population. Special attention was paid to the interaction of pollutants; the meteorologic and climatic factors that affect the transport, diffusion, and transformation of pollutants; the effects of concentrations of aerosol, particulate, and thermal loads on biologic systems; and the susceptibility of some portions of the population to the effects of pollutants on the skin and cardiovascular, pulmonary, and urinary systems. Other objectives were to evaluate the methods of the proposed research, including analytic and interpretation techniques, to identify fields in which the available scientific information is inadequate for regulatory decision-making and to recommend a research program to meet those deficiencies, and to provide a logical framework within which the necessary information can be developed (the proposed program is presented in terms of subject, methods, and priorities).

  16. A carbon monoxide passive sampler: Research and development needs

    SciTech Connect

    Traynor, G.W.; Apte, M.G.; Diamond, R.C.; Woods, A.L.

    1991-11-01

    In rare instances, carbon monoxide (CO) levels in houses can reach dangerously high concentrations, causing adverse health effects ranging from mild headaches to, under extreme conditions, death. Hundreds of fatal accidental carbon monoxide poisonings occur each year primarily due to the indoor operation of motor vehicles, the indoor use of charcoal for cooking, the operation of malfunctioning vented and unvented combustion appliances, and the misuse combustion appliances. Because there is a lack of simple, inexpensive, and accurate field sampling instrumentation, it is difficult for gas utilities and researchers to conduct field research studies designed to quantify the concentrations of CO in residences. Determining the concentration of CO in residences is the first step towards identifying the high risk appliances and high-CO environments which pose health risks. Thus, there exists an urgent need to develop and field-validate a CO-quantifying technique suitable for affordable field research. A CO passive sampler, if developed, could fulfill these requirements. Existing CO monitoring techniques are discussed as well as three potential CO-detection methods for use in a CO passive sampler. Laboratory and field research needed for the development and validation of an effective and cost-efficient CO passive sampler are also discussed.

  17. Conservation Research Is Not Happening Where It Is Most Needed

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kerrie A.; Auerbach, Nancy A.; Sam, Katerina; Magini, Ariana G.; Moss, Alexander St. L.; Langhans, Simone D.; Budiharta, Sugeng; Terzano, Dilva; Meijaard, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Target 19, set by the Convention on Biological Diversity, seeks to improve the knowledge, science base, and technologies relating to biodiversity. We will fail to achieve this target unless prolific biases in the field of conservation science are addressed. We reveal that comparatively less research is undertaken in the world’s most biodiverse countries, the science conducted in these countries is often not led by researchers based in-country, and these scientists are also underrepresented in important international fora. Mitigating these biases requires wide-ranging solutions: reforming open access publishing policies, enhancing science communication strategies, changing author attribution practices, improving representation in international processes, and strengthening infrastructure and human capacity for research in countries where it is most needed. PMID:27023288

  18. Conservation Research Is Not Happening Where It Is Most Needed.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kerrie A; Auerbach, Nancy A; Sam, Katerina; Magini, Ariana G; Moss, Alexander St L; Langhans, Simone D; Budiharta, Sugeng; Terzano, Dilva; Meijaard, Erik

    2016-03-01

    Target 19, set by the Convention on Biological Diversity, seeks to improve the knowledge, science base, and technologies relating to biodiversity. We will fail to achieve this target unless prolific biases in the field of conservation science are addressed. We reveal that comparatively less research is undertaken in the world's most biodiverse countries, the science conducted in these countries is often not led by researchers based in-country, and these scientists are also underrepresented in important international fora. Mitigating these biases requires wide-ranging solutions: reforming open access publishing policies, enhancing science communication strategies, changing author attribution practices, improving representation in international processes, and strengthening infrastructure and human capacity for research in countries where it is most needed. PMID:27023288

  19. Assessment of Research Needs for Advanced Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, S.S.

    1985-11-01

    The DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Working Group (AFCWG) was formed and asked to perform a scientific evaluation of the current status of fuel cells, with emphasis on identification of long-range research that may have a significant impact on the practical utilization of fuel cells in a variety of applications. The AFCWG held six meetings at locations throughout the country where fuel cell research and development are in progress, for presentations by experts on the status of fuel cell research and development efforts, as well as for inputs on research needs. Subsequent discussions by the AFCWG have resulted in the identification of priority research areas that should be explored over the long term in order to advance the design and performance of fuel cells of all types. Surveys describing the salient features of individual fuel cell types are presented in Chapters 2 to 6 and include elaborations of long-term research needs relating to the expeditious introduction of improved fuel cells. The Introduction and the Summary (Chapter 1) were prepared by AFCWG. They were repeatedly revised in response to comments and criticism. The present version represents the closest approach to a consensus that we were able to reach, which should not be interpreted to mean that each member of AFCWG endorses every statement and every unexpressed deletion. The Introduction and Summary always represent a majority view and, occasionally, a unanimous judgment. Chapters 2 to 6 provide background information and carry the names of identified authors. The identified authors of Chapters 2 to 6, rather than AFCWG as a whole, bear full responsibility for the scientific and technical contents of these chapters.

  20. Biowaste biorefinery in Europe: opportunities and research & development needs.

    PubMed

    Fava, Fabio; Totaro, Grazia; Diels, Ludo; Reis, Maria; Duarte, Jose; Carioca, Osvaldo Beserra; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M; Ferreira, Bruno Sommer

    2015-01-25

    This review aims to explore the needs and opportunities of research & development in the field of biowaste biorefinery in Europe. Modern industry in recent years is giving its close attention on organic waste as a new precious bioresource. Specific biowaste valorisation pathways are focusing on food processing waste, being food sector the first manufacture in Europe. Anyway they need to be further tested and validated and then transferred at the larger scale. In particular, they also need to become integrated, combining biomass pretreatments and recovery of biogenic chemicals with bioconversion processes in order to obtain a large class of chemicals. This will help to (a) use the whole biowaste, by avoiding producing residues and providing to the approach the required environmental sustainability, and (b) producing different biobased products that enter different markets, to get the possible economical sustainability of the whole biorefinery. However, the costs of the developed integrated processes might be high, mostly for the fact that the industry dealing with such issues is still underdeveloped and therefore dominated by high processing costs. Such costs can be significantly reduced by intensifying research & development on process integration and intensification. The low or no cost of starting material along with the environmental benefits coming from the concomitant biowaste disposal would offset the high capital costs for initiating such a biorefinery. As long as the oil prices tend to increase (and they will) this strategy will become even more attractive.

  1. Biowaste biorefinery in Europe: opportunities and research & development needs.

    PubMed

    Fava, Fabio; Totaro, Grazia; Diels, Ludo; Reis, Maria; Duarte, Jose; Carioca, Osvaldo Beserra; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M; Ferreira, Bruno Sommer

    2015-01-25

    This review aims to explore the needs and opportunities of research & development in the field of biowaste biorefinery in Europe. Modern industry in recent years is giving its close attention on organic waste as a new precious bioresource. Specific biowaste valorisation pathways are focusing on food processing waste, being food sector the first manufacture in Europe. Anyway they need to be further tested and validated and then transferred at the larger scale. In particular, they also need to become integrated, combining biomass pretreatments and recovery of biogenic chemicals with bioconversion processes in order to obtain a large class of chemicals. This will help to (a) use the whole biowaste, by avoiding producing residues and providing to the approach the required environmental sustainability, and (b) producing different biobased products that enter different markets, to get the possible economical sustainability of the whole biorefinery. However, the costs of the developed integrated processes might be high, mostly for the fact that the industry dealing with such issues is still underdeveloped and therefore dominated by high processing costs. Such costs can be significantly reduced by intensifying research & development on process integration and intensification. The low or no cost of starting material along with the environmental benefits coming from the concomitant biowaste disposal would offset the high capital costs for initiating such a biorefinery. As long as the oil prices tend to increase (and they will) this strategy will become even more attractive. PMID:24284045

  2. Research Needs in Electrostatics for Lunar and Mars Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos I.

    2005-01-01

    The new space exploratory vision announced by President Bush on January 14, 2004, initiated new activities at the National Science and Space Administration (NASA) for human space missions to further explore our solar system. NASA is undertaking Lunar exploration to support sustained human and robotic exploration of Mars and beyond. A series of robotic missions to the Moon by 2008 to prepare for human exploration as early as 2015 but no later than 2020 are anticipated. In a similar way, missions to the Moon and Mars are being planned in Europe, Japan and Russia. These space missions will require international participation to solve problems in a number of important technological areas where research is needed, including biomedical risk mitigation as well as life support and habitability on the surface of Mars. Mitigation of dust hazards is one of the most important problems to be resolved for both Lunar and Mars missions. Both Lunar and Martian regolith are unique materials and completely different from the terrestrial soils that we are exposed to on earth. The total absence of water and an atmosphere on the moon and the formation of soil and fine dust by micrometeorite impacts over billions of years resulted in a layer of soil with unique properties. The soil is primarily basaltic in composition with a high glass concentration. The depth of the soil layer varies from a few meters in the mare areas (dark areas on the Lunar near side) to tens of meters in the highland areas (the lighter mountainous areas) and the particle size distribution of this dust layer varies widely with a major mass fraction less than 10 micrometer in diameter. The hard soil from the moon which has been extensively studied by several researchers showed clearly unique properties of Lunar soil. Apollo astronauts became aware of the potentially serious threat to crew health and mission hardware that can be caused by the lunar dust. As reported by McKay and Carrier the mass fraction of the lunar

  3. Assessing the Need for a Research Ethics Remediation Program

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, James M; Anderson, Emily E; Chibnall, John

    2013-01-01

    With supplement funding to the Washington University CTSA, the Restoring Professionalism and Integrity in Research (RePAIR) program was developed at Saint Louis University to meet the remediation needs of institutions nationwide regarding investigators who violate research regulations. With the aim of determining the frequency and kinds of wrongdoing at leading research institutions in the United States, as well as institutional responses and levels of interest in a formal remediation program, an online questionnaire was distributed by email to a research integrity officer (RIO) and institutional review board (IRB) chair at all medical schools and comprehensive doctoral institutions in the United States (N = 194). One hundred sixty-one individuals responded (44%) representing 66% of institutions. For those institutions that had both RIOs and IRB chairs responding, 96% had investigated at least one case over the past 2 years; the modal individual response was 3–5 cases, with a range from 0 to more than 16 cases. The most common forms of wrongdoing were violations of procedure, informed consent, research integrity (fabrication, falsification, plagiarism), privacy, and conflict of interest policies. Most RIOs and IRB chairs expressed interest in the RePAIR program, despite concerns about costs and faculty resistance. PMID:23751027

  4. Fertility-related research needs among women at the margins.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Sheree R; Baral, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Fertility-related research encompasses fertility intentions, preconception care, research amongst pregnant women, and post-partum outcomes of mothers and children. However, some women remain under-represented within this domain of study. Women frequently missing within fertility-related research include those who are already the most vulnerable to health disparities, including female sex workers, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender women, women living with HIV, and women who use drugs. Yet characterization of the needs of these women is important, given their unique fertility-related concerns, including risks and barriers to care emanating from social stigmas and discrimination. This synthesis provides an overview of fertility-related evidence, highlighting where there are clear research gaps among marginalized women and the potential implications of these data shortfalls. Overall, research among marginalized women to date has addressed pregnancy prevention and in some cases fertility intentions, but the majority of studies have focused on post-conception pregnancy safety and the well-being of the child. However, among female sex workers specifically, data on pregnancy safety and the well-being of the child are largely unavailable. Within each marginalized group, preconception care and effectiveness of conception methods are consistently understudied. Ultimately, the absence of epidemiologic, clinical and programmatic evidence limits the availability and quality of reproductive health services for all women and prevents social action to address these gaps. PMID:26278831

  5. Assessing the need for a research ethics remediation program.

    PubMed

    DuBois, James M; Anderson, Emily E; Chibnall, John

    2013-06-01

    With supplement funding to the Washington University CTSA, the Restoring Professionalism and Integrity in Research (RePAIR) program was developed at Saint Louis University to meet the remediation needs of institutions nationwide regarding investigators who violate research regulations. With the aim of determining the frequency and kinds of wrongdoing at leading research institutions in the United States, as well as institutional responses and levels of interest in a formal remediation program, an online questionnaire was distributed by email to a research integrity officer (RIO) and institutional review board (IRB) chair at all medical schools and comprehensive doctoral institutions in the United States (N = 194). One hundred sixty-one individuals responded (44%) representing 66% of institutions. For those institutions that had both RIOs and IRB chairs responding, 96% had investigated at least one case over the past 2 years; the modal individual response was 3-5 cases, with a range from 0 to more than 16 cases. The most common forms of wrongdoing were violations of procedure, informed consent, research integrity (fabrication, falsification, plagiarism), privacy, and conflict of interest policies. Most RIOs and IRB chairs expressed interest in the RePAIR program, despite concerns about costs and faculty resistance. PMID:23751027

  6. Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cells: A Market Need Provides Research Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Terry L; Brown, Gilbert M; Bogomolny, David

    2010-01-01

    It has been said that necessity is the mother of invention. Another way this can be stated is that market demands create research opportunities. Because of the increasing demand for oil (especially for fueling vehicles utilizing internal combustion engines) and the fact that oil is a depleting (not renewable) energy source, a market need for a renewable source of energy has created significant opportunities for research. This paper addresses the research opportunities associated with producing a market competitive (i.e., high performance, low cost and durable) hydrogen proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Of the many research opportunities, the primary ones to be addressed directly are: Alternative membrane materials, Alternative catalysts, Impurity effects, and Water transport. A status of Department of Energy-sponsored research in these areas will be summarized and the impact of each on the ability to develop a market-competitive hydrogen PEM fuel cell powered vehicle will be discussed. Also, activities of the International Partnership for the Hydrogen Economy in areas such as advanced membranes for fuel cells and materials for storage will be summarized.

  7. Anaerobic digestion of microalgal biomass: Challenges, opportunities and research needs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Cristina; Sialve, Bruno; Molinuevo-Salces, Beatriz

    2015-12-01

    Integration of anaerobic digestion (AD) with microalgae processes has become a key topic to support economic and environmental development of this resource. Compared with other substrates, microalgae can be produced close to the plant without the need for arable lands and be fully integrated within a biorefinery. As a limiting step, anaerobic hydrolysis appears to be one of the most challenging steps to reach a positive economic balance and to completely exploit the potential of microalgae for biogas and fertilizers production. This review covers recent investigations dealing with microalgae AD and highlights research opportunities and needs to support the development of this resource. Novel approaches to increase hydrolysis rate, the importance of the reactor design and the noteworthiness of the microbial anaerobic community are addressed. Finally, the integration of AD with microalgae processes and the potential of the carboxylate platform for chemicals and biofuels production are reviewed. PMID:26454349

  8. Research and development needs for ITER engineering design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, C.

    1991-08-01

    In the series of documents that summarize the results of the Conceptual Design Activities (CDA) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), this document describes the research and development (R and D) plans for 1991 - 1995. Part A describes the physics R and D, and Part B the technology R and D. The physics R and D needs are presented in terms of task descriptions of an ITER-related R and D program for 1991/1992 and beyond, while diagnostics R and D needs, although covered in Appendix A, are described in Part B. In Chapter 2 of Part A, 'ITER-related Physics R and D Needs for 91/92 and Beyond', the following tasks are described as most crucial: (1) demonstration that (a) operation with a cold divertor plasma is possible, (b) the peak heat flux onto the divertor plate can be kept below about 10 MW per square meter, and (c) helium exhaust conditions allow a fractional burnup of about three percent or more; (2) a characterization of disruptions that allows to specify their consequences for the plasma-facing-components, and that provides evidence that the number of disruptions expected allows acceptable plasma-facing-component lifetimes; (3) demonstration that steady-state operation in an enhanced-confinement regime and satisfactory plasma purity is possible, and provision of energy confinement scaling allowing the prediction of ITER performance; and (4) ensurance that the presence of a fast ion population does not jeopardize plasma performance in ITER. Part B, 'ITER Technology Research and Development Needs', describes planning R and D for magnets, containment structure, assembly and maintenance, current drive and heating, plasma facing components, blanket, fuel cycle, structural materials, and diagnostics. A table of key milestones for technology R and D is included, as well as cost estimates.

  9. Space facilities: Meeting future needs for research, development, and operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The National Facilities Study (NFS) represents an interagency effort to develop a comprehensive and integrated long-term plan for world-class aeronautical and space facilities that meet current and projected needs for commercial and government aerospace research and development and space operations. At the request of NASA and the DOD, the National Research Council's Committee on Space Facilities has reviewed the space related findings of the NFS. The inventory of more than 2800 facilities will be an important resource, especially if it continues to be updated and maintained as the NFS report recommends. The data in the inventory provide the basis for a much better understanding of the resources available in the national facilities infrastructure, as well as extensive information on which to base rational decisions about current and future facilities needs. The working groups have used the inventory data and other information to make a set of recommendations that include estimates of cast savings and steps for implementation. While it is natural that the NFS focused on cost reduction and consolidations, such a study is most useful to future planning if it gives equal weight to guiding the direction of future facilities needed to satisfy legitimate national aspirations. Even in the context of cost reduction through facilities closures and consolidations, the study is timid about recognizing and proposing program changes and realignments of roles and missions to capture what could be significant savings and increased effectiveness. The recommendations of the Committee on Space Facilities are driven by the clear need to be more realistic and precise both in recognizing current incentives and disincentives in the aerospace industry and in forecasting future conditions for U.S. space activities.

  10. Research and Development Needs for Building-Integrated Solar Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-01-01

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) has identified Building Integrated Solar Technologies (BIST) as a potentially valuable piece of the comprehensive pathway to help achieve its goal of reducing energy consumption in residential and commercial buildings by 50% by the year 2030. This report helps to identify the key research and development (R&D) needs that will be required for BIST to make a substantial contribution toward that goal. BIST include technologies for space heating and cooling, water heating, hybrid photovoltaic-thermal systems (PV/T), active solar lighting, and building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV).

  11. Refuge management analyses: research needs for Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roelle, J.E.; Auble, G.T.; Hamilton, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge, located in southeastern Indiana, was established by the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission in 1966. Land use planning for the Refuge formally began in 1971, and development of facilities designed in that planning effort is now nearing completion. As these facilities become operational, Refuge personnel will be manipulating water (both spatially and temporally) and other habitat components to achieve the joint Refuge goals of natural resource conservation and public use. This situation offers a unique opportunity to institute research and management studies designed to evaluate and enhance the effectiveness of the management regime in providing for the needs of migratory waterfowl and other wildlife resources.

  12. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies.

    PubMed

    Beard, T Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J; McIntyre, Peter B; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin; Cowx, Ian G

    2011-08-23

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social-ecological system dynamics.

  13. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: Research needs and implementation strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, T.D.; Arlinghaus, R.; Cooke, S.J.; McIntyre, P.B.; De Silva, S.; Bartley, D.; Cowx, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social-ecological system dynamics. ?? 2010 The Royal Society.

  14. Fossil energy biotechnology: A research needs assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Office of Program Analysis of the US Department of Energy commissioned this study to evaluate and prioritize research needs in fossil energy biotechnology. The objectives were to identify research initiatives in biotechnology that offer timely and strategic options for the more efficient and effective uses of the Nation`s fossil resource base, particularly the early identification of new and novel applications of biotechnology for the use or conversion of domestic fossil fuels. Fossil energy biotechnology consists of a number of diverse and distinct technologies, all related by the common denominator -- biocatalysis. The expert panel organized 14 technical subjects into three interrelated biotechnology programs: (1) upgrading the fuel value of fossil fuels; (2) bioconversion of fossil feedstocks and refined products to added value chemicals; and, (3) the development of environmental management strategies to minimize and mitigate the release of toxic and hazardous petrochemical wastes.

  15. Mercury biogeochemistry: Paradigm shifts, outstanding issues and research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonke, Jeroen E.; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Dommergue, Aurélien

    2013-05-01

    Half a century of mercury research has provided scientists and policy makers with a detailed understanding of mercury toxicology, biogeochemical cycling and past and future impacts on human exposure. The complexity of the global biogeochemical mercury cycle has led to repeated and ongoing paradigm shifts in numerous mercury-related disciplines and outstanding questions remain. In this review, we highlight some of the paradigm shifts and questions on mercury toxicity, the risks and benefits of seafood consumption, the source of mercury in seafood, and the Arctic mercury cycle. We see a continued need for research on mercury toxicology and epidemiology, for marine mercury dynamics and ecology, and for a closer collaboration between observational mercury science and mercury modeling in general. As anthropogenic mercury emissions are closely tied to the energy cycle (in particular coal combustion), mercury exposure to humans and wildlife are likely to persist unless drastic emission reductions are put in place.

  16. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beard, T. Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.; McIntyre, Peter B.; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin M.; Cowx, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social–ecological system dynamics.

  17. Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Beard, T. Douglas; Arlinghaus, Robert; Cooke, Steven J.; McIntyre, Peter B.; De Silva, Sena; Bartley, Devin; Cowx, Ian G.

    2011-01-01

    Inland fisheries are a vital component in the livelihoods and food security of people throughout the world, as well as contributing huge recreational and economic benefits. These valuable assets are jeopardized by lack of research-based understanding of the impacts of fisheries on inland ecosystems, and similarly the impact of human activities associated with inland waters on fisheries and aquatic biodiversity. To explore this topic, an international workshop was organized in order to examine strategies to incorporate fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters. To achieve this goal, a new research agenda is needed that focuses on: quantifying the ecosystem services provided by fresh waters; quantifying the economic, social and nutritional benefits of inland fisheries; improving assessments designed to evaluate fisheries exploitation potential; and examining feedbacks between fisheries, ecosystem productivity and aquatic biodiversity. Accomplishing these objectives will require merging natural and social science approaches to address coupled social–ecological system dynamics. PMID:21325307

  18. [Effects of menthol as an additive in tobacco products and the need for regulation].

    PubMed

    Kahnert, S; Nair, U; Mons, U; Pötschke-Langer, M

    2012-03-01

    Menthol is the most widely used and the most prominent tobacco additive in tobacco products advertised and marketed by the tobacco industry. Besides its characteristic flavor, it possesses a variety of pharmacological properties facilitating tobacco smoke inhalation and potentiating dependence. These properties of menthol not only favor tobacco initiation and consumption but can also prevent smoking cessation. This article summarizes the effect of menthol as an additive in tobacco products and its effect on tobacco consumption that causes a number of chronic diseases and premature death and, therefore, counteracts tobacco control measures. Currently, there is no legislative regulation in Germany that considers the health hazard, addiction-enhancing and attractiveness-increasing properties of additives permitted in tobacco products. Effective regulation or even a ban could contribute to a reduction of tobacco consumption and, hence, save many people from a long-lasting tobacco dependence. PMID:22373857

  19. Clinical and outcome research in oncology. The need for integration.

    PubMed

    Apolone, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    Cancer is one of the main healthcare problems in Europe. Although significant progress has recently been made, long-term survival is still disappointing for most common solid tumours. The explosion of information has strengthened the need to create and sustain coordinated interaction between technology, biology, clinical research, clinical practice and health policy. A simple process based on automatic and passive translation from bench to clinical research and eventually to the bed side is usually assumed but cannot be taken for granted. A critical role might be played by Outcome Research (OR), defined as the discipline that describes, interprets, and predicts the impact of various influences, especially interventions, on final endpoints (from survival to satisfaction with care) that matter to decision makers (from patients to society at large), with special emphasis on the use of patient-reported outcomes (PRO). Recently, under pressure from several parts of society, the FDA, recognizing the need for faster drug approval, has modified existing regulations and created new rules to allow anti-cancer drugs to be approved more quickly and, in certain but quite common circumstances, single arm trials and surrogate endpoints to be used as measures of clinical benefit. In this context, the faster approval process may lead to drugs being marketed without there being a complete picture of how effective or safe they are. The FDA move to speed up drug approval, together with the use of not fully validated surrogate endpoints, give OR the unique opportunity to help understand the value of drugs that have received accelerated approval. Despite this opportunity, OR has yet to demonstrate its role in this specific setting and provide proof of the validity, reliability and added value of its primary endpoint measures when evaluated in a broader context. The implementation of lines of OR in the development and evaluation of anti-cancer drugs hinges upon the availability of

  20. International research needs for improving sleep and health of workers.

    PubMed

    Kogi, Kazutaka

    2005-01-01

    Research needs in identifying preventive measures dealing with working time arrangements and associated sleep problems are reviewed. These needs are based on the recognition of a range of risk factors for health involving disturbed circadian rhythms leading to various levels of sleep deficits. The review takes account of recent joint change approaches that address both working time arrangements and various relevant intervening factors. As examples of such approaches, voluntary industry-based guidelines for improving shift work are examined. Also reviewed is evidence indicating the effects of improved working time arrangements and sleep hygiene on the tolerance of workers working irregular shifts. Trends in action-oriented risk assessment are further discussed as the effects on health and sleep of these workers may be modified by complex aspects related to working situations, family and social conditions, personal characteristics and social support. Generally relevant are not only the relationships between sleep-affecting factors and health, but also advances in taking the various support measures. The effective use of participatory steps is found important in dealing with working time arrangements and associated health and sleep problems together. It is thus considered important to study (a) the efficacy of joint change approaches addressing complex sleep and health factors, (b) effective procedures for action-oriented health risk assessment in various work life situations, and (c) the relevance of innovative participatory steps to improving health and tolerance of workers. Future research topics mentioned by the participants of the international symposium on night and shift work held in Santos in 2003 are presented, and international efforts to promote research into these aspects in field conditions are discussed. Interactive research involving local people appears crucial.

  1. Evaluation of NIPER thermal EOR research, state-of-the-art and research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K.; Mahmood, S.M.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1993-06-01

    The Thermal Oil Production Research Group at NIPER has conducted research on behalf of the US Department of Energy on thermal methods of oil production (steam and for 1 year, in situ combustion) since 1983. Research projects performed by this group have attempted to adapt to the needs and direction of the DOE`s oil research program and that of industry. This report summarizes the research that has been conducted, analyses the contributions of the research, describes how the technology was transferred to potential users, analyzes current trends in thermal research and thermal oil production, and makes suggestions for future research where NIPER could contribute to advances in thermal oil production.

  2. Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2008-03-21

    Fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and biomass burning are the dominant contributors to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and global warming. Many approaches to mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions are being pursued, and among the most promising are terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. Recent advances in ecology and microbial biology offer promising new possibilities for enhancing terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. A workshop was held October 29, 2007, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration (BECS). The workshop participants (approximately 30 scientists from California, Illinois, Oregon, Montana, and New Mexico) developed a prioritized list of research needed to make progress in the development of biological enhancements to improve terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. The workshop participants also identified a number of areas of supporting science that are critical to making progress in the fundamental research areas. The purpose of this position paper is to summarize and elaborate upon the findings of the workshop. The paper considers terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration separately. First, we present a summary in outline form of the research roadmaps for terrestrial and geologic BECS. This outline is elaborated upon in the narrative sections that follow. The narrative sections start with the focused research priorities in each area followed by critical supporting science for biological enhancements as prioritized during the workshop. Finally, Table 1 summarizes the potential significance or 'materiality' of advances in these areas for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Declining scaup populations: issues, hypotheses, and research needs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, J.E.; Afton, A.D.; Anderson, M.G.; Clark, R.G.; Custer, Christine M.; Lawrence, J.S.; Pollard, J.B.; Ringelman, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    The population estimate for greater (Aythya marila) and lesser (Aythya affinis) scaup (combined) has declined dramatically since the early 1980s to record lows in 1998. The 1998 estimate of 3.47 million scaup is far below the goal of 6.3 million set in the North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP), causing concern among biologists and hunters. We summarize issuesof concern, hypotheses for factors contributing to the population decline, and research and management needs recommended by participants of the Scaup Workshop, held in September 1999. We believe that contaminants, lower female survival, and reduced recruitment due to changes in food resources or breedingground habitats are primary factors contributing to the decline. These factors are not mutually exclusive but likely interact across seasons. Workshop participants identified seven action items. We need to further delineate where declines in breeding populations have occurred, with a primary focus on the western Canadian boreal forest, where declines appear to be most pronounced. Productivity in various areas and habitats throughout the breeding range needs to be assessed by conducting retrospective analyses of existing data and by intensive field studies at broad and local scales. Annual and seasonal survival rates need to be determined in order to assess the role of harvest or natural mortality. Effects of contaminants on reproduction, female body condition, and behavior must be investigated. Use, distribution, and role of food resources relative to body condition and reproduction need to be examined to better understand seasonal dynamics of nutrient reserves and the role in reproductive success. Affiliations among breeding, migration, and wintering areas must be assessed in order to understand differential exposure to harvest or contaminants, and differential reproductive success and recruitment. Biologists and agencies need to gather and improve information needed to manage greater and lesser

  4. Speech Perception Results for Children Using Cochlear Implants Who Have Additional Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettman, Shani J.; Fiket, Hayley; Dowell, Richard C.; Charlton, Margaret; Williams, Sarah S.; Tomov, Alexandra M.; Barker, Elizabeth J.

    2004-01-01

    Speech perception outcomes in young children with cochlear implants are affected by a number of variables including the age of implantation, duration of implantation, mode of communication, and the presence of a developmental delay or additional disability. The aim of this study is to examine the association between degree of developmental delay…

  5. Reduced Need of Lubricity Additives in Soybean Oil Blends Under Boundary Lubrication Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Converging prices of vegetable oils and petroleum, along with increased focus on renewable resources, gave more momentum to vegetable oil lubricants. Boundary lubrication properties of four Extreme Pressure (EP) additive blends in conventional Soy Bean Oil (SBO) and Paraffinic Mineral Oil (PMO) of ...

  6. Reservoir Sedimentation and Upstream Sediment Sources: Perspectives and Future Research Needs on Streambank and Gully Erosion.

    PubMed

    Fox, G A; Sheshukov, A; Cruse, R; Kolar, R L; Guertault, L; Gesch, K R; Dutnell, R C

    2016-05-01

    The future reliance on water supply and flood control reservoirs across the globe will continue to expand, especially under a variable climate. As the inventory of new potential dam sites is shrinking, construction of additional reservoirs is less likely compared to simultaneous flow and sediment management in existing reservoirs. One aspect of this sediment management is related to the control of upstream sediment sources. However, key research questions remain regarding upstream sediment loading rates. Highlighted in this article are research needs relative to measuring and predicting sediment transport rates and loading due to streambank and gully erosion within a watershed. For example, additional instream sediment transport and reservoir sedimentation rate measurements are needed across a range of watershed conditions, reservoir sizes, and geographical locations. More research is needed to understand the intricate linkage between upland practices and instream response. A need still exists to clarify the benefit of restoration or stabilization of a small reach within a channel system or maturing gully on total watershed sediment load. We need to better understand the intricate interactions between hydrological and erosion processes to improve prediction, location, and timing of streambank erosion and failure and gully formation. Also, improved process-based measurement and prediction techniques are needed that balance data requirements regarding cohesive soil erodibility and stability as compared to simpler topographic indices for gullies or stream classification systems. Such techniques will allow the research community to address the benefit of various conservation and/or stabilization practices at targeted locations within watersheds.

  7. Reservoir Sedimentation and Upstream Sediment Sources: Perspectives and Future Research Needs on Streambank and Gully Erosion.

    PubMed

    Fox, G A; Sheshukov, A; Cruse, R; Kolar, R L; Guertault, L; Gesch, K R; Dutnell, R C

    2016-05-01

    The future reliance on water supply and flood control reservoirs across the globe will continue to expand, especially under a variable climate. As the inventory of new potential dam sites is shrinking, construction of additional reservoirs is less likely compared to simultaneous flow and sediment management in existing reservoirs. One aspect of this sediment management is related to the control of upstream sediment sources. However, key research questions remain regarding upstream sediment loading rates. Highlighted in this article are research needs relative to measuring and predicting sediment transport rates and loading due to streambank and gully erosion within a watershed. For example, additional instream sediment transport and reservoir sedimentation rate measurements are needed across a range of watershed conditions, reservoir sizes, and geographical locations. More research is needed to understand the intricate linkage between upland practices and instream response. A need still exists to clarify the benefit of restoration or stabilization of a small reach within a channel system or maturing gully on total watershed sediment load. We need to better understand the intricate interactions between hydrological and erosion processes to improve prediction, location, and timing of streambank erosion and failure and gully formation. Also, improved process-based measurement and prediction techniques are needed that balance data requirements regarding cohesive soil erodibility and stability as compared to simpler topographic indices for gullies or stream classification systems. Such techniques will allow the research community to address the benefit of various conservation and/or stabilization practices at targeted locations within watersheds. PMID:26885658

  8. Reservoir Sedimentation and Upstream Sediment Sources: Perspectives and Future Research Needs on Streambank and Gully Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, G. A.; Sheshukov, A.; Cruse, R.; Kolar, R. L.; Guertault, L.; Gesch, K. R.; Dutnell, R. C.

    2016-05-01

    The future reliance on water supply and flood control reservoirs across the globe will continue to expand, especially under a variable climate. As the inventory of new potential dam sites is shrinking, construction of additional reservoirs is less likely compared to simultaneous flow and sediment management in existing reservoirs. One aspect of this sediment management is related to the control of upstream sediment sources. However, key research questions remain regarding upstream sediment loading rates. Highlighted in this article are research needs relative to measuring and predicting sediment transport rates and loading due to streambank and gully erosion within a watershed. For example, additional instream sediment transport and reservoir sedimentation rate measurements are needed across a range of watershed conditions, reservoir sizes, and geographical locations. More research is needed to understand the intricate linkage between upland practices and instream response. A need still exists to clarify the benefit of restoration or stabilization of a small reach within a channel system or maturing gully on total watershed sediment load. We need to better understand the intricate interactions between hydrological and erosion processes to improve prediction, location, and timing of streambank erosion and failure and gully formation. Also, improved process-based measurement and prediction techniques are needed that balance data requirements regarding cohesive soil erodibility and stability as compared to simpler topographic indices for gullies or stream classification systems. Such techniques will allow the research community to address the benefit of various conservation and/or stabilization practices at targeted locations within watersheds.

  9. Governance of Large Scale Research Infrastructures: Tailoring Infrastructures to Fit the Research Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, E.; Pedersen, H.; Clémenceau, A.; Evans, R.

    2012-04-01

    The legal and governance structures of a pan-European large scale research infrastructure (RI) are critical. They shape the very operation of the undertaking - decision making processes, allocation of tasks and resources, and the relationships amongst the various interested parties - and its eventual success is crucially dependent on choosing these structures wisely. The experience of several examples is used to illustrate how legal and governance schemes for pan-European Research Infrastructures can be used as vehicles to tailor the infrastructure according to its scientific objectives. Indeed, the chosen model can: 1) foster multi-disciplinary research by having representatives of different communities deciding on joint programs; 2) better coordinate scattered communities, both geographically and thematically, increasing their cooperation; 3) implement an innovative Research organization; 4) leverage additional funding; 5) develop a strong identity and elevate international visibility for the communities served; 6) clarify responsibilities, accountability and authority. The ESFRI roadmap has extended the "classical" concept of single-sited RIs (as exemplified in the field of physics by facilities such as CERN) to that of distributed and virtual infrastructures but these raise new issues, especially regarding data exchange and management. As this concept of infrastructure at a European level is relatively new to the major part of the science community, it is especially important that governance models are thoroughly discussed and carefully adapted to fit the specific needs of each of these new distributed facilities. Alongside the legal frameworks which have previously been used for existing infrastructures, the European Commission has established a new legal vehicle, the European Research Infrastructure Consortium or "ERIC", to meet the requirements of the pan-European facilities. It will be shown that this flexible model can be used in a "customized" way to meet

  10. Intelligence Is as Intelligence Does: Can Additional Support Needs Replace Disability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Samuel R. C.; Riches, Vivienne C.; Stancliffe, Roger J.

    2011-01-01

    In many developed cultures there is an assumption that IQ is intelligence. However, emerging theories of multiple intelligences, of emotional intelligence, as well as the application of IQ testing to other cultural groups, and to people with disability, raises many questions as to what IQ actually measures. Despite recent research that shows IQ…

  11. Cervical Cancer Screening: Defining the Need for Research

    PubMed Central

    Simoes, E.; Brucker, S.; Beckmann, M. W.; Ortmann, O.; Albring, C.; Wallwiener, D.

    2013-01-01

    With the development of a National Cancer Plan published in 2012, Germany has followed the recommendations of the WHO and the EU. The first area of action listed in Germanyʼs National Cancer Plan is improving the early detection of cancer. Both citizens and medical specialists are encouraged to take responsibility themselves and contribute to the efforts being made to meet the challenge of cancer. Screening for cervical cancer has long been an integral part of the German Directive for the Early Detection of Cancer and now – following the recommendations given in the European Guideline – an organised screening approach shall be developed to maximise the benefits and minimise the risks through a partial reorganisation of existing structures. Before this can be rolled out nationwide, it will be necessary to check the feasibility and suitability of new contents and organisational structures. The Federal Joint Committee which is largely responsible for the process according to the draft law on the implementation of the National Cancer Plan has emphasised the importance of evidence-based medicine and of collaboration between the autonomous governing bodies within the healthcare system to obtain viable results. For medical specialists, the follow-on question is which areas will need more research in future. New process steps need to be developed and verified to see whether they offer evidence which will support defined approaches or whether such evidence needs to be newly compiled, e.g. by testing invitation procedures for screening in trial schemes. The experience gained during the implementation of the existing directive on early detection of cancer should be integrated into the new process. Research initiated by specialists could encourage the development of a new version of the Directive for the Early Detection of Cancer suitable for the Germanyʼs healthcare system. PMID:26633900

  12. Long-Term Monitoring Research Needs: A DOE Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, B.; Davis, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management is responsible for dealing with the nation's legacy of Cold War radioactive and hazardous waste and contamination. Major efforts are underway to deal with this legacy; these are expected to last up to decades and cost up to billions of dollars at some sites. At all sites, however, active remediation must eventually cease; if hazards then remain, the site must enter into a long-term stewardship mode. In this talk we discuss aspects of long-term monitoring pertinent to DOE sites, focusing on challenges to be faced, specific goals or targets to be met, and research needs to be addressed in order to enable DOE to meet its long-term stewardship obligations. DOE LTM research needs fall into three major categories: doing what we can do now much more efficiently; doing things we cannot do now; and proving the validity of our monitoring programs. Given the enormity of the DOE obligations, it will be highly desirable to develop much more efficient monitoring paradigms. Doing so will demand developing autonomous, remote monitoring networks of in situ sensors capable of replacing (or at least supplementing to a large extent) conventional groundwater and soil gas sampling and analysis programs. The challenges involved range from basic science (e.g., inventing in situ sensors for TCE that do not demand routine maintenance) to engineering (attaining superior reliability in data reporting in remote networks) to ergonomics (developing decent ways of selecting and presenting the "right" information from the monitoring network) to regulatory affairs (presenting convincing evidence that the more efficient systems actually provide superior monitoring). We explore these challenges in some detail, focusing on the "long" in long-term monitoring as it applies to DOE sites. Monitoring system performance validation and, ultimately, regulator and stakeholder acceptance of site closure and long-term stewardship plans depend

  13. The need for translational research on antidotes for pesticide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Nick A; Eddleston, Michael; Dawson, Andrew H

    2006-01-01

    Summary Pesticide poisoning kills hundreds of thousands of people in the Asia Pacific region each year. The majority are from deliberate self-poisoning with organophosphorus pesticides (OP), aluminium phosphide and paraquat. The current response from a public health, medical and research perspective is inadequate. There are few proven or effective treatments; in addition, very little clinical research has been done to transfer antidotes shown to work in animal studies into clinical practice. The human toxicity of pesticides is poorly studied and better information might inform a more sustained and appropriate regulatory response. Further understanding may also lead to improvement in diagnosis and treatment. The few effective treatments are not being recommended or delivered in an optimal and timely fashion to poisoned patients. A regional approach to facilitate appropriate pricing, packaging and delivery of antidotes is required. PMID:16405459

  14. The need for research training in orthopaedic residency education.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert W

    2006-08-01

    Orthopaedic surgery residents should be exposed during their clinical training to the processes of creativity and innovation that are the basis of research. The definition of a research experience for surgery residents should be broad and include not only traditional bench research in a basic science environment but also translational and clinical research to move innovation from bench to bedside and validate its value in a scientific manner. Additionally, there are enormous opportunities for surgeons to study healthcare delivery and policy and to develop new approaches to educating colleagues, other medical personnel, and patients. The question that must be addressed is how can the knowledge and human resources residing in orthopaedic surgery best be used to meet the challenges future residents will face as healthcare undergoes profound changes? How these issues are managed in a rapidly changing environment is the critical issue and the challenge faced by surgical training programs wishing to remain viable and provide trainees with the opportunity to adapt and be successful in the future. What is state of the art today will not be tomorrow and unless trainees are encouraged and taught to be creative and innovative they risk becoming surgical dinosaurs.

  15. Reorganizing Nigeria's Vaccine Supply Chain Reduces Need For Additional Storage Facilities, But More Storage Is Required.

    PubMed

    Shittu, Ekundayo; Harnly, Melissa; Whitaker, Shanta; Miller, Roger

    2016-02-01

    One of the major problems facing Nigeria's vaccine supply chain is the lack of adequate vaccine storage facilities. Despite the introduction of solar-powered refrigerators and the use of new tools to monitor supply levels, this problem persists. Using data on vaccine supply for 2011-14 from Nigeria's National Primary Health Care Development Agency, we created a simulation model to explore the effects of variance in supply and demand on storage capacity requirements. We focused on the segment of the supply chain that moves vaccines inside Nigeria. Our findings suggest that 55 percent more vaccine storage capacity is needed than is currently available. We found that reorganizing the supply chain as proposed by the National Primary Health Care Development Agency could reduce that need to 30 percent more storage. Storage requirements varied by region of the country and vaccine type. The Nigerian government may want to consider the differences in storage requirements by region and vaccine type in its proposed reorganization efforts.

  16. Reorganizing Nigeria's Vaccine Supply Chain Reduces Need For Additional Storage Facilities, But More Storage Is Required.

    PubMed

    Shittu, Ekundayo; Harnly, Melissa; Whitaker, Shanta; Miller, Roger

    2016-02-01

    One of the major problems facing Nigeria's vaccine supply chain is the lack of adequate vaccine storage facilities. Despite the introduction of solar-powered refrigerators and the use of new tools to monitor supply levels, this problem persists. Using data on vaccine supply for 2011-14 from Nigeria's National Primary Health Care Development Agency, we created a simulation model to explore the effects of variance in supply and demand on storage capacity requirements. We focused on the segment of the supply chain that moves vaccines inside Nigeria. Our findings suggest that 55 percent more vaccine storage capacity is needed than is currently available. We found that reorganizing the supply chain as proposed by the National Primary Health Care Development Agency could reduce that need to 30 percent more storage. Storage requirements varied by region of the country and vaccine type. The Nigerian government may want to consider the differences in storage requirements by region and vaccine type in its proposed reorganization efforts. PMID:26858383

  17. HTGR Dust Safety Issues and Needs for Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Paul W. Humrickhouse

    2011-06-01

    This report presents a summary of high temperature gas-cooled reactor dust safety issues. It draws upon a literature review and the proceedings of the Very High Temperature Reactor Dust Assessment Meeting held in Rockville, MD in March 2011 to identify and prioritize the phenomena and issues that characterize the effect of carbonaceous dust on high temperature reactor safety. It reflects the work and input of approximately 40 participants from the U.S. Department of Energy and its National Labs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, industry, academia, and international nuclear research organizations on the topics of dust generation and characterization, transport, fission product interactions, and chemical reactions. The meeting was organized by the Idaho National Laboratory under the auspices of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project, with support from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Information gleaned from the report and related meetings will be used to enhance the fuel, graphite, and methods technical program plans that guide research and development under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. Based on meeting discussions and presentations, major research and development needs include: generating adsorption isotherms for fission products that display an affinity for dust, investigating the formation and properties of carbonaceous crust on the inside of high temperature reactor coolant pipes, and confirming the predominant source of dust as abrasion between fuel spheres and the fuel handling system.

  18. Operational research needs toward malaria elimination in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shen-Bo; Ju, Chuan; Chen, Jun-Hu; Zheng, Bin; Huang, Fang; Xiao, Ning; Zhou, Xia; Ernest, Tambo; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Owing to the implementation of a national malaria elimination programme from 2010 to 2020, we performed a systematic review to assess research challenges in the People's Republic of China (P.R. China) and define research priorities in the next few years. A systematic search was conducted for articles published from January 2000 to December 2012 in international journals from PubMed and Chinese journals from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). In total, 2532 articles from CNKI and 308 articles from PubMed published between 2010 and 2012 related to malaria after unrelated references and review or comment were further excluded, and a set of research gaps have been identified that could hinder progress toward malaria elimination in P.R. China. For example, there is a lack of sensitive and specific tests for the diagnosis of malaria cases with low parasitemia, and there is a need for surveillance tools that can evaluate the epidemic status for guiding the elimination strategy. Hence, we argue that malaria elimination will be accelerated in P.R. China through the development of new tests, such as detection of parasite or drug resistance, monitoring glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, active malaria screening methods, and understanding the effects of the environment and climate variation on vector distribution. PMID:25476883

  19. Electroactive Biofilms: Current Status and Future Research Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Reguera, Gemma; Ringeisen, Bradley; Wang, Zhiwu; Feng, Yujie; Kim, Byung Hong

    2011-01-01

    Electroactive biofilms generated by electrochemically active microorganisms have many potential applications in bioenergy and chemicals production. This review assesses the effects of microbiological and process parameters on enrichment of such biofilms as well as critically evaluates the current knowledge of the mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer in BES systems. First we discuss the role of biofilm forming microorganisms vs. planktonic microorganisms. Physical, chemical and electrochemical parameters which dictate the enrichment and subsequent performance of the biofilms are discussed. Potential dependent biological parameters including biofilm growth rate, specific electron transfer rate and others and their relationship to BES system performance is assessed. A review of the mechanisms of electron transfer in BES systems is included followed by a discussion of biofilm and its exopolymeric components and their electrical conductivity. A discussion of the electroactive biofilms in biocathodes is also included. Finally, we identify the research needs for further development of the electroactive biofilms to enable commercial applications.

  20. Space environmental effects on polymer composites: Research needs and opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Bor Z.; Bianchi, J.; Liu, Y. M.; Chang, C. P.

    1993-01-01

    The long-term performance of polymer-based composites in the space environment is discussed. Both thermoset and thermoplastic matrix composites are included in this discussion. Previous efforts on the space environmental effects on composites are briefly reviewed. Focus of this review is placed on the effects of hygrothermal stresses, atomic oxygen, ultraviolet (UV), and space debris/micrometeoroid impacts along with the potential synergism. Potential approaches to estimating the residual strength of polymer composites after exposure to atomic oxygen erosion or space debris/micrometeoroid impact are evaluated. New ground-based data are then utilized to illustrate the effects of atomic oxygen and thermal cycling on the failure behavior of polymer composites. Finally, research needs, challenges, and opportunities in the field of space environmental effects on composite materials are highlighted.

  1. Assessment of industry needs for oil shale research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Hackworth, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    Thirty-one industry people were contacted to provide input on oil shale in three subject areas. The first area of discussion dealt with industry's view of the shape of the future oil shale industry; the technology, the costs, the participants, the resources used, etc. It assessed the types and scale of the technologies that will form the industry, and how the US resource will be used. The second subject examined oil shale R D needs and priorities and potential new areas of research. The third area of discussion sought industry comments on what they felt should be the role of the DOE (and in a larger sense the US government) in fostering activities that will lead to a future commercial US oil shale shale industry.

  2. Biodiesel Exhaust: The Need for Health Effects Research

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Kimberly J.; Madden, Michael C.; Ghio, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    Background Biodiesel is a diesel fuel alternative that has shown potential of becoming a commercially accepted part of the United States’ energy infrastructure. In November 2004, the signing of the Jobs Creation Bill HR 4520 marked an important turning point for the future production of biodiesel in the United States because it offers a federal excise tax credit. By the end of 2005, industry production was 75 million gallons, a 300% increase in 1 year. Current industry capacity, however, stands at just over 300 million gallons/year, and current expansion and new plant construction could double the industry’s capacity within a few years. Biodiesel exhaust emission has been extensively characterized under field and laboratory conditions, but there have been limited cytotoxicity and mutagenicity studies on the effects of biodiesel exhaust in biologic systems. Objectives We reviewed pertinent medical literature and addressed recommendations on testing specific research needs in the field of biodiesel toxicity. Discussion Employment of biodiesel fuel is favorably viewed, and there are suggestions that its exhaust emissions are less likely to present any risk to human health relative to petroleum diesel emissions. Conclusion The speculative nature of a reduction in health effects based on chemical composition of biodiesel exhaust needs to be followed up with investigations in biologic systems. PMID:17450214

  3. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D.; Barron, E. J.; Fine, R. A.; Bellingham, J. G.; Boss, E.; Boyle, E. A.; Edwards, M.; Johnson, K. S.; Kelley, D. S.; Kite-Powell, H.; Ramberg, S. E.; Rudnick, D. L.; Schofield, O.; Tamburri, M.; Wiebe, P. H.; Wright, D. J.; Committee on an Ocean Infrastructure StrategyU. S. Ocean Research in 2030

    2011-12-01

    At the request of the Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, an expert committee was convened by the National Research Council to identify major research questions anticipated to be at the forefront of ocean science in 2030, define categories of infrastructure that should be included in planning, provide advice on criteria and processes that could be used to set priorities, and recommend ways to maximize the value of investments in ocean infrastructure. The committee identified 32 future ocean research questions in four themes: enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant now and are likely to take decades to solve. U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations and autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. A coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments will be needed and should be based upon known priorities and reviewed every 5-10 years. After assessing trends in ocean infrastructure and technology development, the committee recommended implementing a comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan in order to retain access to the sea; continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. They also recommended that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit. Particular consideration should be given to

  4. EDITORIAL: The need and challenge for Environmental Research Letters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2006-11-01

    Why another journal? This is the inevitable question that every effort to launch a new journal must, and should, address. A common statistic in the business world is that nine out of ten new restaurants fail. In the academic world something similar, but less definitive, can happen: a potentially interesting, but practically flawed, effort can be launched, never truly build an intellectual community, but then continue as a sub-critical, little-known journal for far too long. The challenge any new publication, academic or professional, faces is thus extreme. A new journal must find a way to usefully compete, and bring new value, in the face of multiple existing outlets for significant results, tremendous barriers to establishing a 'track record' or 'name recognition' against existing publications, and a print and a cyberspace increasingly desperate in the search for 'content', scientific or otherwise. In the case of Environmental Research Letters (ERL), however, these questions answered themselves and, as a result, I cannot imagine a more critically needed new publication. Indeed, the goal of ERL is to be more than simply one more good new journal. It is to be a place—both physical and online—that those engaged in environmental issues—from researchers within the physical and natural sciences, to those concerned with applied systems studies, modeling and simulation techniques, practical engagement in environmental activism, and developing, conducting or critiquing policy, legal, or business efforts—will all want to go to read, and to engage with colleagues. The environmental field has witnessed an incredible intellectual and professional proliferation. The areas of ecological resilience, global change science, policy, law and economics, industrial ecology, green buildings, environmental genomics, environmental archaeology, and the sociology of environmental movements have become increasingly regarded and, to varying degrees, recognized themselves as major

  5. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    SciTech Connect

    National Research Council

    2011-04-22

    The United States has jurisdiction over 3.4 million square miles of ocean expanse greater than the land area of all fifty states combined. This vast marine area offers researchers opportunities to investigate the ocean's role in an integrated Earth system, but also presents challenges to society, including damaging tsunamis and hurricanes, industrial accidents, and outbreaks of waterborne diseases. The 2010 Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill and 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami are vivid reminders that a broad range of infrastructure is needed to advance our still-incomplete understanding of the ocean. The National Research Council (NRC)'s Ocean Studies Board was asked by the National Science and Technology Council's Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, comprised of 25 U.S. government agencies, to examine infrastructure needs for ocean research in the year 2030. This request reflects concern, among a myriad of marine issues, over the present state of aging and obsolete infrastructure, insufficient capacity, growing technological gaps, and declining national leadership in marine technological development; issues brought to the nation's attention in 2004 by the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. A 15-member committee of experts identified four themes that encompass 32 future ocean research questions enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions in the report (e.g., sea level rise, sustainable fisheries, the global water cycle) reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant today, and are likely to take decades of effort to solve. As such, U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations or autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Consequently, a

  6. Research needs and opportunities in radiation chemistry workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara, Paul F

    1998-04-19

    There is a growing urgency for forefront basic research on ionizing radiation-induced chemical reactions, due to the relevance of these reactions in such areas of critical national need as environmental waste management, environmental remediation, nuclear energy production, and medical diagnosis and radiation therapy. Fortunately, the emergence of new theoretical and experimental tools for the study of radiation-induced chemical and physical processes, i.e. Radiation Chemistry, makes future progress quite promising. Nevertheless, a recent decline in he number of young investigators in radiation chemistry, as well as a natural obsolescence of large research facilities in radiation chemistry are serious obstacles to further progress. Understanding radiation-induced processes is of vital significance in such diverse fields as waste remediation in environmental cleanup, radiation processing of polymers and food, medical diagnosis and therapy, catalysis of chemical reactions, environmentally benign synthesis, and nuclear energy production. Radiation chemistry provides for these fields fundamental quantitative data, such as reaction rate coefficients, diffusion coefficients, radiation chemical yields, etc. As well as providing useful quantitative information of technological and medical importance, radiation chemistry is also a valuable tool for solving fundamental problems in chemistry and in material sciences. Exploiting the many facets of radiation chemistry requires a thorough and comprehensive understanding of the underlying chemical and physical processes. An understanding of the structure and dynamics of “tracks” produced by ionizing radiation is a central issue in the field. There is a continuing need to study the ultrafast processes that link the chemistry and physics of radiation-induced phenomena. This is especially true for practically important, but less well understood, nonstandard environments such as interfacial systems, supercritical media, and

  7. Photovoltaic manufacturing: Present status, future prospects, and research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Wolden, C.A.; Fthenakis, V.; Kurtin, J.; Baxter, J.; Repins, I.; Shasheen, S.; Torvik, J.; Rocket, A.; Aydil, E.

    2011-03-29

    In May 2010 the United States National Science Foundation sponsored a two-day workshop to review the state-of-the-art and research challenges in photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing. This article summarizes the major conclusions and outcomes from this workshop, which was focused on identifying the science that needs to be done to help accelerate PV manufacturing. A significant portion of the article focuses on assessing the current status of and future opportunities in the major PV manufacturing technologies. These are solar cells based on crystalline silicon (c-Si), thin films of cadmium telluride (CdTe), thin films of copper indium gallium diselenide, and thin films of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon. Current trends indicate that the cost per watt of c-Si and CdTe solar cells are being reduced to levels beyond the constraints commonly associated with these technologies. With a focus on TW/yr production capacity, the issue of material availability is discussed along with the emerging technologies of dye-sensitized solar cells and organic photovoltaics that are potentially less constrained by elemental abundance. Lastly, recommendations are made for research investment, with an emphasis on those areas that are expected to have cross-cutting impact.

  8. The ecology of cormorants: some research needs and recommendations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Nettleship, David N.; Duffy, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Concerns about Double-crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) have arisen because of their rapid population increase across North America and their economic impact on several aquaculture and commercial fish industries. In spite of the concern for cormorants, little published research is available that addresses either basic population biology questions or management issues. Based on a literature review, I recommend that research be conducted in four areas. First, a large-scale banding and marking program should be initiated so that population models can be used to estimate age- and sex-specific survival and fecundity (as has been done for the Shag [P. aristotelis] in Europe). By marking individual birds, survival and movement rates can be estimated between nesting colonies, which will provide information about potential source versus sink colonies. Second, studies of movements during migration and winter are required. Presently, no data are available on habitat use during migration or on the length-of-stay by individual birds. This has important implications to how cormorants interact with other fish and wildlife species over a broad range. Studies of movements during winter with radio-marked birds should indicate whether the 'problem birds' at aquaculture sites are merely a few specialists. Third, limiting factors, such as contaminants and disease, should receive further investigation, especially in light of recent concerns over the outbreak of Newcastle disease. The relationship between contaminant levels and developmental abnormalities in young cormorants in certain areas of the Great Lakes in Canada and the United States remains equivocal. Fourth, further studies are needed to document the economic impacts of cormorants on Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and other cultured fishes and to determine ways to reduce predation by fish-eating birds. Mesocosm experiments should be conducted to evaluate how different fish extraction rates affect final

  9. Converging Research Needs Across Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Articles: Making Research Relevant to Global Tobacco Control Practice and Policy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Much of the research used to support the ratification of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) was conducted in high-income countries or in highly controlled environments. Therefore, for the global tobacco control community to make informed decisions that will continue to effectively inform policy implementation, it is critical that the tobacco control community, policy makers, and funders have updated information on the state of the science as it pertains to provisions of the FCTC. Following the National Cancer Institute’s process model used in identifying the research needs of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s relatively new tobacco law, a core team of scientists from the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco identified and commissioned internationally recognized scientific experts on the topics covered within the FCTC. These experts analyzed the relevant sections of the FCTC and identified critical gaps in research that is needed to inform policy and practice requirements of the FCTC. This paper summarizes the process and the common themes from the experts’ recommendations about the research and related infrastructural needs. Research priorities in common across Articles include improving surveillance, fostering research communication/collaboration across organizations and across countries, and tracking tobacco industry activities. In addition, expanding research relevant to low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), was also identified as a priority, including identification of what existing research findings are transferable, what new country-specific data are needed, and the infrastructure needed to implement and disseminate research so as to inform policy in LMIC. PMID:22990225

  10. 76 FR 44593 - Identifying the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research's Science and Research Needs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER), and will guide strategic planning of internal research... delineates major areas of scientific need that can contribute to the development of a strategic science and..., Acting Deputy Commissioner for Policy, Planning and Budget. BILLING CODE 4160-01-P...

  11. Information Management in Cancer Registries: Evaluating the Needs for Cancer Data Collection and Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Zachary, Iris; Boren, Suzanne A; Simoes, Eduardo; Jackson-Thompson, Jeannette; Davis, J Wade; Hicks, Lanis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer registry data collection involves, at a minimum, collecting data on demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatment. A common, identified, and standardized set of data elements is needed to share data quickly and efficiently with consumers of this data. This project highlights the fact that, there is a need to develop common data elements; Surveys were developed for central cancer registries (CCRs) and cancer researchers (CRs) at NCI-designated Cancer Centers, in order to understand data needs. Survey questions were developed based on the project focus, an evaluation of the research registries and database responses, and systematic review of the literature. Questions covered the following topics: 1) Research, 2) Data collection, 3) Database/ repository, 4) Use of data, 5) Additional data items, 6) Data requests, 7) New data fields, and 8) Cancer registry data set. A review of the surveys indicates that all cancer registries' data are used for public health surveillance, and 96% of the registries indicate the data are also used for research. Data are available online in interactive tables from over 50% of CRs and 87% of CCRs. Some other survey responses indicate that CCR treatment data are not complete for example treatment data, however cancer researchers are interested in treatment variables from CCRs. Cancer registries have many data available for review, but need to examine what data are needed and used by different entities. Cancer Registries can further enhance usage through collaborations and partnerships to connect common interests in the data by making registries visible and accessible. PMID:26392844

  12. The Need for More Research on Language Barriers in Health Care: A Proposed Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Elizabeth; Chen, Alice HM; Karliner, Leah S; Agger-Gupta, Niels; Mutha, Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Many U.S. residents who speak little English may face language barriers when seeking health care. This article describes what is currently known about language barriers in health care and outlines a research agenda based on mismatches between the current state of knowledge of language barriers and what health care stakeholders need to know. Three broad areas needing more research are discussed: the ways in which language barriers affect health and health care, the efficacy of linguistic access service interventions, and the costs of language barriers and efforts to overcome them. In each of these areas, we outline specific research questions and recommendations. PMID:16529570

  13. Regulatory ozone modeling: status, directions, and research needs.

    PubMed Central

    Georgopoulos, P G

    1995-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have established selected comprehensive, three-dimensional, Photochemical Air Quality Simulation Models (PAQSMs) as the required regulatory tools for analyzing the urban and regional problem of high ambient ozone levels across the United States. These models are currently applied to study and establish strategies for meeting the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone in nonattainment areas; State Implementation Plans (SIPs) resulting from these efforts must be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in November 1994. The following presentation provides an overview and discussion of the regulatory ozone modeling process and its implications. First, the PAQSM-based ozone attainment demonstration process is summarized in the framework of the 1994 SIPs. Then, following a brief overview of the representation of physical and chemical processes in PAQSMs, the essential attributes of standard modeling systems currently in regulatory use are presented in a nonmathematical, self-contained format, intended to provide a basic understanding of both model capabilities and limitations. The types of air quality, emission, and meteorological data needed for applying and evaluating PAQSMs are discussed, as well as the sources, availability, and limitations of existing databases. The issue of evaluating a model's performance in order to accept it as a tool for policy making is discussed, and various methodologies for implementing this objective are summarized. Selected interim results from diagnostic analyses, which are performed as a component of the regulatory ozone modeling process for the Philadelphia-New Jersey region, are also presented to provide some specific examples related to the general issues discussed in this work. Finally, research needs related to a) the evaluation and refinement of regulatory ozone modeling, b) the characterization of uncertainty in photochemical modeling, and c

  14. 40 CFR 155.46 - Deciding that a registration review is complete and additional review is not needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deciding that a registration review is complete and additional review is not needed. 155.46 Section 155.46 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS REGISTRATION STANDARDS AND REGISTRATION REVIEW Registration Review Procedures §...

  15. We need to take a fresh look at medical research

    PubMed Central

    Simnett, John David

    1982-01-01

    Every human being has a vast store of knowledge about health and sickness and the ability to draw conclusions on the basis of this knowledge. Yet science research continues to be based largely on `objective studies' conducted by academics and to look down on `subjective' studies. The belief that `pure' objective science is highest and subjective information is lowest, inculcated by the way science is taught in schools, deters doctors from communicating information based on personal experience lest it be decried - as it certainly will be - as scientifically worthless. Alternative medicine with its open, flexible approach to the whole person, has something to teach conventional medicine. And doctors must pay more attention to what their patients can tell them. There is no rational justification for accepting the factual information that people give (in a case history) while disregarding what they have to say about their condition. Old-style science is particularly inept in helping doctors deal with psychosomatic problems. What is needed is a new `science of the subjective' which would be truly appropriate to the subject of study, the whole human being. There is a commentary on this paper by Sir Douglas Black, President of the Royal College of Physicians. PMID:7108911

  16. Asthma in the Elderly: Current Understanding and Future Research Needs

    PubMed Central

    Hanania, Nicola A.; King, Monroe J.; Braman, Sidney S.; Saltoun, Carol; Wise, Robert A.; Enright, Paul; Falsey, Ann A; Mathur, Sameer K.; Ramsdell, Joe W.; Rogers, Linda; Stempel, David A.; Lima, John J.; Fish, James E.; Wilson, Sandra R.; Boyd, Cynthia; Patel, Kushang V.; Irvin, Charles G.; Yawn, Barbara P.; Halm, Ethan A; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Sands, Mark F.; Ershler, William B.; Ledford, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma in the elderly (AIE) is under diagnosed and under treated and there is a paucity of knowledge. The National Institute on Aging convened this workshop to identify what is known, what gaps in knowledge remain and suggest research directions needed to improve the understanding and care of AIE. Asthma presenting at an advanced age often has similar clinical and physiologic consequences as seen with younger individuals but co-morbid illnesses and the psychosocial effects of aging may affect the diagnosis, clinical presentation and care of asthma in this population. At least two phenotypes exist among elderly asthma; those with long-standing asthma have more severe airflow limitation and less complete reversibility than those with late-onset asthma. Many challenges exist in the recognition and treatment of asthma in the elderly. Furthermore, the pathophysiological mechanisms of AIE are likely to be different from those seen in young asthmatics and these differences may influence the clinical course and outcomes of asthma in this population. PMID:21872730

  17. Life Cycle Impact Assessment Research Developments and Needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) developments are explained along with key publications which record discussions which comprised ISO 14042 and SETAC document development, UNEP SETAC Life Cycle Initiative research, and research from public and private research institutions. It ...

  18. Review of current research and long-term research needs in air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    Current research and long-term research needs of air pollution are reviewed and assessed in the following areas: pollution definition and characterization; atmospheric chemistry; measurement and monitoring of ambient air and sources; effects of human health and welfare, vegetation, animals, aquatic life, materials and structures; air pollution meteorology and modeling; engineering control; and regulatory control. The work spans NSF program categories including atmospheric sciences, chemical and process engineering, chemistry, biotic systems, materials research, mechanical engineering, physics, physiology, research instrumentation, and economic sciences. An attempt is made to analyze these research areas to determine how the research could be made more useful and effective by merging and crossing disciplinary lines with interdisciplinary approaches. An appendix provides a detailed listing of air pollution research projects in progress during 1985.

  19. Review of current research and long-term research needs in air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    Current research and long-term research needs of air pollution are reviewed and assessed in the following areas: pollution definition and characterization; atmospheric chemistry; measurement and monitoring of ambient air and sources; effects of human health and welfare, vegetation, animals, aquatic life, materials and structures; air pollution meteorology and modeling; engineering control; and regulatory control. The work spans NSF program categories including atmospheric sciences, chemical and process engineering, chemistry, biotic systems, materials research, mechanical engineering, physics, physiology, research instrumentation, and economic sciences. An attempt is made to analyze these research areas to determine how the research could be made more useful and effective by merging and crossing disciplinary lines with inderdisciplinary approaches. An appendix provides a detailed listing of air pollution research projects in progress during 1985.

  20. TESOL, Teacher Identity, and the Need for "Small Story" Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasquez, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    Narrative research in TESOL still remains very much in its infancy. And the predominant mode of narrative research in TESOL--following the trend in educational research, as well as in other social sciences--has clearly been that of narrative inquiry, with its concomitant privileging of autobiographical "big stories", or researcher-elicited…

  1. Resource competition in plant invasions: emerging patterns and research needs.

    PubMed

    Gioria, Margherita; Osborne, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Invasions by alien plants provide a unique opportunity to examine competitive interactions among plants. While resource competition has long been regarded as a major mechanism responsible for successful invasions, given a well-known capacity for many invaders to become dominant and reduce plant diversity in the invaded communities, few studies have measured resource competition directly or have assessed its importance relative to that of other mechanisms, at different stages of an invasion process. Here, we review evidence comparing the competitive ability of invasive species vs. that of co-occurring native plants, along a range of environmental gradients, showing that many invasive species have a superior competitive ability over native species, although invasive congeners are not necessarily competitively superior over native congeners, nor are alien dominants are better competitors than native dominants. We discuss how the outcomes of competition depend on a number of factors, such as the heterogeneous distribution of resources, the stage of the invasion process, as well as phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation, which may result in increased or decreased competitive ability in both invasive and native species. Competitive advantages of invasive species over natives are often transient and only important at the early stages of an invasion process. It remains unclear how important resource competition is relative to other mechanisms (competition avoidance via phenological differences, niche differentiation in space associated with phylogenetic distance, recruitment and dispersal limitation, indirect competition, and allelopathy). Finally, we identify the conceptual and methodological issues characterizing competition studies in plant invasions, and we discuss future research needs, including examination of resource competition dynamics and the impact of global environmental change on competitive interactions between invasive and native species.

  2. Resource competition in plant invasions: emerging patterns and research needs

    PubMed Central

    Gioria, Margherita; Osborne, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Invasions by alien plants provide a unique opportunity to examine competitive interactions among plants. While resource competition has long been regarded as a major mechanism responsible for successful invasions, given a well-known capacity for many invaders to become dominant and reduce plant diversity in the invaded communities, few studies have measured resource competition directly or have assessed its importance relative to that of other mechanisms, at different stages of an invasion process. Here, we review evidence comparing the competitive ability of invasive species vs. that of co-occurring native plants, along a range of environmental gradients, showing that many invasive species have a superior competitive ability over native species, although invasive congeners are not necessarily competitively superior over native congeners, nor are alien dominants are better competitors than native dominants. We discuss how the outcomes of competition depend on a number of factors, such as the heterogeneous distribution of resources, the stage of the invasion process, as well as phenotypic plasticity and evolutionary adaptation, which may result in increased or decreased competitive ability in both invasive and native species. Competitive advantages of invasive species over natives are often transient and only important at the early stages of an invasion process. It remains unclear how important resource competition is relative to other mechanisms (competition avoidance via phenological differences, niche differentiation in space associated with phylogenetic distance, recruitment and dispersal limitation, indirect competition, and allelopathy). Finally, we identify the conceptual and methodological issues characterizing competition studies in plant invasions, and we discuss future research needs, including examination of resource competition dynamics and the impact of global environmental change on competitive interactions between invasive and native species. PMID

  3. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  4. CCMC/Space Weather Research Center: Overview and Future Space Weather Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Maddox, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Space Weather Research Center (SWRC), part of the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC), was established in 2010 to address emerging space weather needs of NASA robotic missions. By leveraging CCMC's modeling capabilities and through collaborations with different NASA centers, government agencies, educational institutions and multiple entities worldwide, SWRC provides research-based space weather forecasting, monitoring and anomaly support to NASA users. SWRC analyst team has also helped to identify limitations of current models and thus accelerate R2O-O2R process. In addition, the establishment of SWRC has added a new dimension to CCMC's education program. In this presentation, an overview of SWRC activities will be given. Future research and modeling needs will be discussed from the perspective of a space weather analyst.

  5. Measuring Basic Needs Satisfaction: Evaluating Previous Research and Conducting New Psychometric Evaluations of the Basic Needs Satisfaction in General Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Mary M.; Finney, Sara J.

    2010-01-01

    Self-Determination Theory specifies the existence of three basic psychological needs: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. The current set of studies (a) provides a narrative review of past research on the Basic Needs Satisfaction in General Scale, (b) examines its dimensionality which has been assumed but not empirically studied, and (c)…

  6. High speed commercial transport fuels considerations and research needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. M.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    NASA is currently evaluating the potential of incorporating High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft in the commercial fleet in the beginning of the 21st century. NASA sponsored HSCT enabling studies currently underway with airframers and engine manufacturers, are addressing a broad range of technical, environmental, economic, and related issues. Supersonic cruise speeds for these aircraft were originally focused in the Mach 2 to 5 range. At these flight speeds, both jet fuels and liquid methane were considered potential fuel candidates. For the year 2000 to 2010, cruise Mach numbers of 2 to 3+ are projected for aircraft fuel with thermally stable liquid jet fuels. For 2015 and beyond, liquid methane fueled aircraft cruising at Mach numbers of 4+ may be viable candidates. Operation at supersonic speeds will be much more severe than those encountered at subsonic flight. One of the most critical problems is the potential deterioration of the fuel due to the high temperature environment. HSCT fuels will not only be required to provide the energy necessary for flight, but will also be subject to aerodynamic heating and, will be required to serve as the primary heat sink for cooling the engine and airframe. To define fuel problems for high speed flight, a fuels workshop was conducted at NASA Lewis Research Center. The purpose of the workshop was to gather experts on aviation fuels, airframe fuel systems, airport infrastructure, and combustion systems to discuss high speed fuel alternatives, fuel supply scenarios, increased thermal stability approaches and measurements, safety considerations, and to provide directional guidance for future R and D efforts. Subsequent follow-up studies defined airport infrastructure impacts of high speed fuel candidates. The results of these activities are summarized. In addition, an initial case study using modified in-house refinery simulation model Gordian code (1) is briefly discussed. This code can be used to simulate different

  7. Internet cognitive testing of large samples needed in genetic research.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Claire M A; Harlaar, Nicole; Kovas, Yulia; Davis, Oliver S P; Oliver, Bonamy R; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E; Frances, Jane; Busfield, Patricia; McMillan, Andrew; Dale, Philip S; Plomin, Robert

    2007-08-01

    Quantitative and molecular genetic research requires large samples to provide adequate statistical power, but it is expensive to test large samples in person, especially when the participants are widely distributed geographically. Increasing access to inexpensive and fast Internet connections makes it possible to test large samples efficiently and economically online. Reliability and validity of Internet testing for cognitive ability have not been previously reported; these issues are especially pertinent for testing children. We developed Internet versions of reading, language, mathematics and general cognitive ability tests and investigated their reliability and validity for 10- and 12-year-old children. We tested online more than 2500 pairs of 10-year-old twins and compared their scores to similar internet-based measures administered online to a subsample of the children when they were 12 years old (> 759 pairs). Within 3 months of the online testing at 12 years, we administered standard paper and pencil versions of the reading and mathematics tests in person to 30 children (15 pairs of twins). Scores on Internet-based measures at 10 and 12 years correlated .63 on average across the two years, suggesting substantial stability and high reliability. Correlations of about .80 between Internet measures and in-person testing suggest excellent validity. In addition, the comparison of the internet-based measures to ratings from teachers based on criteria from the UK National Curriculum suggests good concurrent validity for these tests. We conclude that Internet testing can be reliable and valid for collecting cognitive test data on large samples even for children as young as 10 years.

  8. Research Training Needs of Scientist-Practitioners: Implications for Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christina Hamme; Hall, Sean B.; Buser, Juleen K.

    2016-01-01

    Counselors (N = 911) reported the research skills needed for practice and subsequent research training needs. Findings indicate that counselors have a high need for research skills at work, but training needs differ significantly by counselor type. Recommendations include increasing emphasis on single-case design, survey design, and widely…

  9. Why do we need to standardize no-tillage research?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    No-tillage / conservation agricultural systems research has now been performed for more than half a century in many countries around the world, but few efforts have been made to standardize research methodology. This has led to a situation where no-tillage research results have often not been direct...

  10. Using Brain-Based Research to Help Students with Special Needs. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2002-01-01

    How do students with special needs learn best based on brain research? There was a great deal of strictly scientific information about different types of brain damage and how that can affect learning. Given this, it was surprising that there was very little information on ways in which to assist students with learning disabilities utilizing the…

  11. Do we need a special ethics for research?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Sven Ove

    2011-03-01

    Research is subject to more stringent ethical requirements than most other human activities, and a procedure that is otherwise allowed may be forbidden in research. Hence, risk-taking is more restricted in scientific research than in most non-research contexts, and privacy is better protected in scientific questionnaires than in marketing surveys. Potential arguments for this difference are scrutinized. The case in its favour appears to be weak. A stronger case can be made in favour of a difference in the opposite direction: If perilous or otherwise problematic activities have to be performed it is usually better to perform them in a research context where they are properly evaluated so that guidance is obtained for the future. However, retreating from current ethical demands on research is not a desirable direction to go. Instead, research ethics can serve to inspire the introduction of more stringent ethical principles in other social sectors.

  12. New Zealand needs a Practice Based Research Network.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Sharon

    2016-03-01

    Practice Based Research Networks (PBRNs) are groups of general practices collaborating to produce research. Contemporary New Zealand health information technology systems are ideal for electronic data extraction for PBRN research. Stakeholders have a valuable, but typically underutilised, part to play in research. Development of an e-participation platform will facilitate stakeholder engagement. New Zealand is in a unique position to create an innovative, low cost, stakeholder-engaged PBRN. This type of PBRN would offer unparalleled research opportunities, and would strengthen New Zealand's general practice research capacity. The more research information we have based on our New Zealand population, the more appropriate care we can provide. Establishing a stakeholder-engaged PBRN in New Zealand will promote and support transformational change within our health system. PMID:27477369

  13. New Zealand needs a Practice Based Research Network.

    PubMed

    Leitch, Sharon

    2016-03-01

    Practice Based Research Networks (PBRNs) are groups of general practices collaborating to produce research. Contemporary New Zealand health information technology systems are ideal for electronic data extraction for PBRN research. Stakeholders have a valuable, but typically underutilised, part to play in research. Development of an e-participation platform will facilitate stakeholder engagement. New Zealand is in a unique position to create an innovative, low cost, stakeholder-engaged PBRN. This type of PBRN would offer unparalleled research opportunities, and would strengthen New Zealand's general practice research capacity. The more research information we have based on our New Zealand population, the more appropriate care we can provide. Establishing a stakeholder-engaged PBRN in New Zealand will promote and support transformational change within our health system.

  14. Plants with genetically modified events combined by conventional breeding: an assessment of the need for additional regulatory data.

    PubMed

    Pilacinski, W; Crawford, A; Downey, R; Harvey, B; Huber, S; Hunst, P; Lahman, L K; MacIntosh, S; Pohl, M; Rickard, C; Tagliani, L; Weber, N

    2011-01-01

    Crop varieties with multiple GM events combined by conventional breeding have become important in global agriculture. The regulatory requirements in different countries for such products vary considerably, placing an additional burden on regulatory agencies in countries where the submission of additional data is required and delaying the introduction of innovative products to meet agricultural needs. The process of conventional plant breeding has predictably provided safe food and feed products both historically and in the modern era of plant breeding. Thus, previously approved GM events that have been combined by conventional plant breeding and contain GM traits that are not likely to interact in a manner affecting safety should be considered to be as safe as their conventional counterparts. Such combined GM event crop varieties should require little, if any, additional regulatory data to meet regulatory requirements.

  15. Needs, opportunities, and options for large scale systems research

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.L.

    1984-10-01

    The Office of Energy Research was recently asked to perform a study of Large Scale Systems in order to facilitate the development of a true large systems theory. It was decided to ask experts in the fields of electrical engineering, chemical engineering and manufacturing/operations research for their ideas concerning large scale systems research. The author was asked to distribute a questionnaire among these experts to find out their opinions concerning recent accomplishments and future research directions in large scale systems research. He was also requested to convene a conference which included three experts in each area as panel members to discuss the general area of large scale systems research. The conference was held on March 26--27, 1984 in Pittsburgh with nine panel members, and 15 other attendees. The present report is a summary of the ideas presented and the recommendations proposed by the attendees.

  16. Problems in turbidite research: A need for COMFAN

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; Mutti, E.; Bouma, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    Comparison of modern submarine fans and ancient turbidite sequences is still in its infancy, mainly because of the incompatibility of study approaches. Research on modern fan systems mainly deals with morphologic aspects and surficial sediments, while observations on ancient turbidite formations are mostly directed to vertical sequences. The lack of a common data set also results from different scales of observation. To review the current status of modern and ancient turbidite research, an international group of specialists formed COMFAN (Committee on Fans) and met in September 1982 at the Gulf Research and Development Company research facilities in Pennsylvania. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  17. [Platforms are needed for innovative basic research in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-qiang

    2012-07-01

    Basic research poses the cornerstone of technical innovation in all lines including medical sciences. Currently, there are shortages of professional scientists as well as technical supporting teams and facilities in the field of basic research of ophthalmology and visual science in China. Evaluation system and personnel policies are not supportive for innovative but high-risk-of-failure research projects. Discussion of reasons and possible solutions are given here to address these problems, aiming at promoting buildup of platforms hosting novel and important basic research in eye science in this country.

  18. Graduate Student Needs in Relation to Library Research Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Shawna; Jacobs, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, graduate study includes a research component, requiring library skills to locate relevant literature. Upon matriculation into graduate programs, many students are underprepared in library research skills, making library instruction a priority for the success of graduate students. This qualitative study, utilizing emergent design,…

  19. Why We Need a Structured Abstract in Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosteller, Frederick; Nave, Bill; Miech, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Approximately 1,100 education journals collectively publish more than 20,000 education research articles each year. Under current practice, no systematic way exists to move the research findings from these studies into the hands of the millions of education practitioners and policymakers in the United States who might use them.…

  20. Educational Needs Research and Mobilising Strategies in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerbecker, Carl L.; Hake, Barry

    Research knowledge and reflections about efforts to mobilize participation have been developed in the Netherlands. Research into educational motivations has suggested nine independent motivations among adult learners that can be grouped into three general categories: intrinsic, extrinsic, and conditional educational motivations. An attempt has…

  1. Studies of U.S. Universities' Research Equipment Needs Inconclusive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    According to the General Accounting Office (GAO), scientific leaders estimated in 1982 that between $1 and $4 billion was necessary to update university research equipment. Because of this large cost variance, GAO was requested to assess how well past studies have defined the nationwide deficiency in university research equipment and to suggest…

  2. Physical Environments of Assisted Living: Research Needs and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Lois J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to review research measures and findings related to physical environments of assisted living (AL) according to multiple conceptual perspectives--ecological, cultural, and Maslovian hierarchy. Design and Methods: A literature and research review was undertaken with two foci: performance measures for physical environments,…

  3. Clear principles are needed for integrity in gambling research.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Charles; Adams, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Commercial gambling is expanding rapidly across the globe. However, the field of gambling research has not kept pace with this expansion, and continues to focus on prevalence studies and individuated treatment regimes, with little attention to the political, economic or technological underpinnings of commercial gambling. The implications of this lack of sophistication in the research agenda are that society is ill-equipped to understand the nature and underlying causes of gambling harms, and how these might best be avoided, minimized or ameliorated. Around the world, various levels of government benefit from gambling revenue, with consequences for the independent regulation of gambling. Further, there is considerable industry influence on the research agenda, often involving similar techniques to those employed previously by the tobacco and alcohol industries to engage researchers. This influence is compounded by a failure of many gambling researchers and journals to adopt traditional academic safeguards, such as the disclosure of conflicts of interest, and by many arguing for a 'partnership model' with industry to advance the research agenda. This paper identifies five basic principles to restore reasonable standards of integrity in gambling studies: (1) research should not be funded by the proceeds of gambling; (2) research priorities should not be influenced by the beneficiaries of gambling; (3) conferences and other research fora should not be influenced by industry; (4) funding sources should be disclosed in journals and at conferences; and (5) meaningful access to gambling products and environments must be part of licensing. We also propose a range of actions to promote greater transparency and independence in the gambling research field. PMID:26058407

  4. Translating Research Into E/PO That Addresses Real Needs in K-12 Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Wil E.; Belbruno, E. A.; Roelofsen Moody, T.

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenges in NASA ROSES E/PO is translating cutting edge research into products for which there is a demonstrated need. Rather than working from the premise that the "research is so cool’ that K-12 students or the public should learn about it, it is key to consult with the target audience to identify what their needs really are. The partnership between NJACE, Innovative Orbital Design, Inc., and Princeton offered a unique opportunity to translate intriguing but theoretical and mathematical research related to low energy orbits into a valuable education product. NJACE worked with educators to identify several needs with an intellectual link to this research: 1) Understanding of Gravity and Newton's Laws, 2) Understanding of Energy and Energy Transformations, 3) Integration of the sciences with math and technology, and 4) Knowledge of NASA's past accomplishments (such as the moon landings). Based on these identified needs, two science units were developed for students in grades 5-12 that integrate astronomy, physics, and the life sciences with math and technology. In addition an engaging public lecture was developed that tells a personal story of the quest for more economic space travel. In the past year, the workshops have been presented on three occasions, reaching over 75 teachers and demand exceeded available space with numerous teachers on waiting lists. The lecture has been presented numerous times at planetariums, museums, amateur astronomy and other clubs. We hope that our partnership will serve as a useful example of how to translate cutting edge research into valuable education products with an identified need. We will provide handouts with links to a website where the products and training can be downloaded in hope that others will help disseminate our product.

  5. Literacy Instruction, Technology, and Students with Learning Disabilities: Research We Have, Research We Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Michael J.; Deshler, Donald D.

    2010-01-01

    Technology, whether assistive (AT) or instructional (IT), has played an uneven role in the field of learning disabilities since its inception more than a half century ago. In addition, technology is in a constant state of flux; hence, researchers have been challenged to conduct appropriate experimental testing of interventions before they are…

  6. Personnel Needs and Training for Biomedical and Behavioral Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Human Resources.

    The fourth in a series of annual reports assessing the role of and need for federal training programs in the biomedical and behavioral sciences is presented. Highlights of this 1978 report include: (1) the results of surveys of the chairpersons of 1,324 basic biomedical science departments and 474 behavioral science departments in Ph.D.-granting…

  7. RESEARCH NEEDS FOR SCALING UP INDOOR SINK EFFECT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The events of 11 September 2001 underscored the need to study the vulnerability of buildings to weapons of mass destruction, including chemical, biological, physical, and radiological agents. Should these agents be released inside a building, they would interact with interior sur...

  8. Library Research Skills: A Needs Assessment for Graduate Student Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffmann, Kristin; Antwi-Nsiah, Fred; Feng, Vivian; Stanley, Meagan

    2008-01-01

    Information literacy instruction programs for graduate students can be challenging to develop. One solution is to develop non-course-based, non-mandatory library instruction programs, in order to meet the information literacy needs of as many graduate students as possible. This was the approach taken by the Taylor Library at the University of…

  9. Frontiers in Chemical Engineering. Research Needs and Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources.

    Chemical engineers play a key role in industries such as petroleum, food, artificial fibers, petrochemicals, plastics and many others. They are needed to tailor manufacturing technology to the requirements of products and to integrate product and process design. This report discusses how chemical engineers are continuing to address technological…

  10. Current and Needed Research on Alternative Certification Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ham, Edward

    2010-01-01

    With alternative certification programs gaining popularity in teacher education, the need to evaluate these programs has become much more necessary. Without strict guidelines to classify alternative certification programs, it is difficult to make generalizations about these programs because of different requirements for completion and…

  11. The Need to Emphasize Epistemology in Teaching and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Calvin

    2009-01-01

    The views on epistemology by philosophers of science are developed through an historical lens. Enabling students to develop a scientific mindset is complicated by student's views on the Nature of Science. Students need to appreciate the history of science and to contrast different frameworks. In order to do this, students have to be able to follow…

  12. A RESEARCH STUDY OF AGRICULTURAL TRAINING NEEDS IN VENTURA COUNTY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RODRIGUES, DONALD F.

    QUESTIONNAIRE RETURNS FROM 103 EMPLOYERS IN AGRICULTURE AND RELATED INDUSTRIES WERE COMBINED WITH 50 INTERVIEWS WITHIN THE SAME GROUP TO PROVIDE INFORMATION ABOUT AGRICULTURAL TRAINING NEEDS IN VENTURA COUNTY. MOST FIRMS EMPLOYED FEWER THAN 15 WORKERS ON A PERMANENT BASIS, SUPPLEMENTED BY LARGE MEMBERS OF SEASONAL WORKERS, ESPECIALLY IN THE…

  13. Is There a Need for a European Institutional Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathies, Charles; Valimaa, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Recent changes in European higher education have accompanied a strong desire and need by national ministries to have comparable data across institutions and a growing recognition from campus leaders that effective planning and decision-making requires reliable institutional data and analyses. This has induced changes and restructuring of duties…

  14. School Age Populations Research Needs - NCS Dietary Assessment Literature Review

    Cancer.gov

    Drawing conclusions about the validity of available dietary assessment instruments in school age children is hampered by the differences in instruments, research design, reference methods, and populations in the validation literature.

  15. INTEGRATED URBAN ECOSYSTEM RESEARCH: THEMES, NEEDS, AND APPLICATIONS. (R825792)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  16. GRACEnet: addressing policy needs through coordinated cross-location research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jawson, Michael D.; Walthall, Charles W.; Shafer, Steven R.; Liebig, Mark; Franzluebbers, Alan J.; Follett, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    GRACEnet (Greenhouse gas Reduction through Agricultural Carbon Enhancement network) was conceived to build upon ongoing USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) research to improve soil productivity, while addressing the challenges and opportunities of interest in C sequestration from a climate change perspective. The vision for GRACEnet was and remains: Knowledge and information used to implement scientifically based agricultural management practices from the field to national policy scales on C sequestration, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and environmental benefits. The national focus of GRACEnet uses a standardized approach by ARS laboratories and university and land manager (e.g. farmer and rancher) cooperators to assess C sequestration and GHG emission from different crop and grassland systems. Since 2002, GRACEnet has significantly expanded GHG mitigation science and delivered usable information to agricultural research and policy organizations. Recent developments suggest GRACEnet will have international impact by contributing leadership and technical guidance for the Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases.

  17. Adolescent Populations Research Needs - NCS Dietary Assessment Literature Review

    Cancer.gov

    As with school age children, it is difficult to make conclusions about the validity of available dietary assessment instruments for adolescents because of the differences in instruments, research designs, reference methods, and populations in the validation literature.

  18. Space medicine research: Needs for the 21st century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Space medicine research in the 21st century will continue to focus on the four major areas including: (1) expansion of the current incomplete knowledge base of clinical and subclinical physiological changes due to microgravity; (2) development of countermeasures to extend the capabilities of the human performance envelope in extended duration flights; (3) development of novel methods for delivering all aspects of a comprehensive health care system in extreme remote conditions: and (4) further research and application of systems for biological materials processing. New space transportation vehicles will place unique physiologic and human factors demands on the human system, while providing better access to platforms for materials processing. Success in meeting the demands in each of the noted research areas will require an extensive, interactive team approach. Personnel from the medical research,operational, developmental, and basic science communities will be essential to success.

  19. A need for more psychophysiological research in australia.

    PubMed

    Tebēcis, A K

    1976-05-01

    Western communities are becoming increasingly more interested in altered states of consciousness such as hypnosis, meditation and other states associated with certain "brain wave" patterns. In the United States of America especially, psychophysiological research is beginning to lead to an understanding of some of the basic mechanisms underlying certain mental phenomena and their therapeutic uses. In Australia, on the other hand, experimental investigations in this area are negligible. It is important to begin intensive psychophysiological research now.

  20. Why our patients (and we) need basic science research.

    PubMed

    Schor, Nina F

    2013-05-28

    In times of fiscal austerity, the tendency is to seek instant, inexpensive gratification. In the case of biomedical research, this means the shortest path to practical clinical implementation. But fueling the translational pipeline with discovery depends critically on allowing the biomedical research community to follow their science where it takes them. Fiscal constraints carry with them the risk of squelching creativity and forfeiting the power of serendipity to provide the substrate for the translational engine in the future. PMID:23713087

  1. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-08

    strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

  2. Assessment of research needs for wind turbine rotor materials technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araj, Kamal J.; Fisher, Theresa A.; Kronenburg, Jan C.

    Wind-driven power systems represent a renewable technology that is still in the early stages of its development and maturation. It is a renewable power technology that, during the course of its rapid evolution over the last decade, has accumulated significant, large-scale, utility-connected experience. The focus is on the need for improved knowledge of materials properties and advanced, economical, high volume manufacturing processes. The first chapter: (1) traces the evolution of wind power systems in the United States; (2) identifies the principle components of a power-generating wind turbine; and (3) presents a simplified description of the relationship between the power in the wind and the power flow through the turbine drive train, and describes the characteristics of the wind environment that impact both the short and long term structural integrity of wind turbines. The remaining chapters of this report explore and further define the need for improved materials properties, manufacturing processes, and control systems.

  3. Need for multidisciplinary research towards a second green revolution.

    PubMed

    Wollenweber, Bernd; Porter, John R; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Despite recent achievements in conventional plant breeding and genomics, the rate of increase of crop yields is declining and thus there is a need for a second green revolution. Advances within single disciplines, alone, cannot solve the challenges of increasing yield. As scientific disciplines have become increasingly diversified, a more complete understanding of the mechanisms by which genetic and environmental variation modify grain yield and composition is needed, so that specific quantitative and quality targets can be identified. To achieve this aim, the expertise of plant genomics, physiology and agronomy, as well as recently developed plant modelling techniques, must be combined. There has been recent progress in these individual disciplines, but multidisciplinary approaches must be implemented to tackle drought stress and salinity as major constraints to achieving sufficient grain yield in the future. PMID:15860432

  4. Sociotechnical approaches to workplace safety: Research needs and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Michelle M.; Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Waterson, Patrick E.; Ian Noy, Y.; Dainoff, Marvin J.; Leveson, Nancy G.; Carayon, Pascale; Courtney, Theodore K.

    2015-01-01

    The sociotechnical systems perspective offers intriguing and potentially valuable insights into problems associated with workplace safety. While formal sociotechnical systems thinking originated in the 1950s, its application to the analysis and design of sustainable, safe working environments has not been fully developed. To that end, a Hopkinton Conference was organised to review and summarise the state of knowledge in the area and to identify research priorities. A group of 26 international experts produced collaborative articles for this special issue of Ergonomics, and each focused on examining a key conceptual, methodological and/or theoretical issue associated with sociotechnical systems and safety. In this concluding paper, we describe the major conference themes and recommendations. These are organised into six topic areas: (1) Concepts, definitions and frameworks, (2) defining research methodologies, (3) modelling and simulation, (4) communications and decision-making, (5) sociotechnical attributes of safe and unsafe systems and (6) potential future research directions for sociotechnical systems research. Practitioner Summary: Sociotechnical complexity, a characteristic of many contemporary work environments, presents potential safety risks that traditional approaches to workplace safety may not adequately address. In this paper, we summarise the investigations of a group of international researchers into questions associated with the application of sociotechnical systems thinking to improve worker safety. PMID:25728246

  5. Discrimination and racial disparities in health: evidence and needed research

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Selina A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review and critique of empirical research on perceived discrimination and health. The patterns of racial disparities in health suggest that there are multiple ways by which racism can affect health. Perceived discrimination is one such pathway and the paper reviews the published research on discrimination and health that appeared in PubMed between 2005 and 2007. This recent research continues to document an inverse association between discrimination and health. This pattern is now evident in a wider range of contexts and for a broader array of outcomes. Advancing our understanding of the relationship between perceived discrimination and health will require more attention to situating discrimination within the context of other health-relevant aspects of racism, measuring it comprehensively and accurately, assessing its stressful dimensions, and identifying the mechanisms that link discrimination to health. PMID:19030981

  6. Discrimination and racial disparities in health: evidence and needed research.

    PubMed

    Williams, David R; Mohammed, Selina A

    2009-02-01

    This paper provides a review and critique of empirical research on perceived discrimination and health. The patterns of racial disparities in health suggest that there are multiple ways by which racism can affect health. Perceived discrimination is one such pathway and the paper reviews the published research on discrimination and health that appeared in PubMed between 2005 and 2007. This recent research continues to document an inverse association between discrimination and health. This pattern is now evident in a wider range of contexts and for a broader array of outcomes. Advancing our understanding of the relationship between perceived discrimination and health will require more attention to situating discrimination within the context of other health-relevant aspects of racism, measuring it comprehensively and accurately, assessing its stressful dimensions, and identifying the mechanisms that link discrimination to health.

  7. Stakeholder assessment of comparative effectiveness research needs for Medicaid populations.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael A; Allen-Coleman, Cora; Farrell, Stephen F; Schneeweiss, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    Patients, providers and policy-makers rely heavily on comparative effectiveness research (CER) when making complex, real-world medical decisions. In particular, Medicaid providers and policy-makers face unique challenges in decision-making because their program cares for traditionally underserved populations, especially children, pregnant women and people with mental illness. Because these patient populations have generally been underrepresented in research discussions, CER questions for these groups may be understudied. To address this problem, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality commissioned our team to work with Medicaid Medical Directors and other stakeholders to identify relevant CER questions. Through an iterative process of topic identification and refinement, we developed relevant, feasible and actionable questions based on issues affecting Medicaid programs nationwide. We describe challenges and limitations and provide recommendations for future stakeholder engagement. PMID:26388438

  8. AIDS research receives a much-needed stimulus.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in research on acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have brought human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines and antiviral drugs closer to realization. A group of sex workers in Gambia have been found to be immune to HIV. In the US, it has been discovered that a fierce battle is conducted by the body's immune system during the asymptomatic stage of the disease, and scientists are searching for drugs that delay the onset of AIDS. According to Professor Robin Weiss of the Institute for Cancer Research, AIDS research is progressing at a more rapid rate than other areas of study, such as cancer and multiple sclerosis. The public and media frustration with the continuing astronomical spread of HIV should be directed at solving a social problem, rather than a scientific one.

  9. Adolescent Pregnancy: The Unmet Need for Psychological Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Christiane B.; Freese, Margaret P.

    Adolescents contribute nearly 20% of all births in the United States; half of these are unplanned or unwanted. Negative health and socioeconomic consequences are associated with adolescent childbearing, and teenagers account for nearly one-third of all reported therapeutic abortions. Failure to use other than traditional research methods to study…

  10. Electrorheological (ER) fluids: A research needs assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, I.M.; Collins, E.A.

    1993-05-01

    This report consists of seven sections: (1) Executive Summary, (2) Introduction, (3) Overview, (4) Recommendations, (5) Panelist Reports, (6) Overseas Research and Development, and (7) Extended Bibliography. The Appendix contains the reports of site visits and contacts and other supplementary documents.

  11. The need for epidemiological research in road trauma.

    PubMed

    Wigglesworth, E C

    1979-04-01

    This paper discusses the application of epidemiological methods to the public health problem of road trauma. The complex nature of the system is stressed, and some consequent difficulties in the formulation of appropriate hypotheses are outlined. Examples are given. To solve these problems, the paper proposes the formation of multidisciplinary full-time epidemiological research teams.

  12. Empowering Design-Based Implementation Research: The Need for Infrastructure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabelli, Nora; Dede, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses frameworks and conceptual lenses that help orient design-based implementation research (DBIR) work to the types of infrastructure required for success, while contributing to theories about the processes of educational improvement. Such infrastructures can be conceived as a framework: a set of interconnected elements that…

  13. Martians in the Playground: Researching Special Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirrie, Anne; Head, George

    2007-01-01

    This article offers a critique of what has become known as "inclusive education" under the New Labour administration. The initial impetus for the article was a research project designed to ascertain the impact of the "presumption of mainstreaming" contained in Section 15 of the "Standards in Scotland's Schools etc. Act 2000." This stipulates that…

  14. IDENTIFYING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH CHARACTERISTICS NEEDED IN RESEARCH WORK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah Univ., Salt Lake City.

    A STUDY WAS CONDUCTED OF NINE NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SUMMER SCIENCE PROGRAMS FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS DURING THE SUMMER OF 1961. THE TYPES OF SUMMER PROGRAMS STUDIED WERE THE ACADEMIC TYPE AND THE RESEARCH-PARTICIPATION TYPE. IN THE ACADEMIC-TYPE PROGRAMS, THE STUDENTS RECEIVED AN ADVANCED TREATMENT OF SUBJECT MATTER AND LABORATORY EXERCISES,…

  15. Examining Teachers' Conception of and Needs on Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Marie Paz E.; Abulon, Edna Luz R.; Soriano, Portia R.; David, Adonis P.; Hermosisima, Ma. Victoria C.; Gerundio, Maribel G.

    2016-01-01

    Action research is viewed as a path towards better student achievement. This track may be attained through the reflective nature instilled in the teacher that sparks initiatives to promote better classroom practices in the aspects of pedagogy, assessment, and parental involvement. This descriptive survey explores Filipino teachers' conceptions of…

  16. Does Every Research Library Need a Digital Humanities Center?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Jennifer; Erway, Ricky

    2014-01-01

    The digital humanities (DH) are attracting considerable attention and funding at the same time that this nascent field is striving for an identity. Some research libraries are making significant investments by creating digital humanities centers. However, questions about whether such investments are warranted persist across the cultural heritage…

  17. Immigrant Families over the Life Course: Research Directions and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Rebecca L.; Glick, Jennifer E.; Bures, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Family researchers and policy makers are giving increasing attention to the consequences of immigration for families. Immigration affects the lives of family members who migrate as well as those who remain behind and has important consequences for family formation, kinship ties, living arrangements, and children's outcomes. We present a selective…

  18. FINDING THE BALANCE - QUALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS VS. RESEARCH NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigators often misapply quality assurance (QA) procedures and may consider QA as a hindrance to developing test plans for
    sampling and analysis. If used properly, however, QA is the driving force for collecting the right kind and proper amount of data.
    Researchers must...

  19. FINDING THE BALANCE - QUALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS VS. RESEARCH NEEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigators often misapply quality assurance (QA) procedures and may consider QA as a hindrance to developing test plans for sampling and analysis. If used properly, however, QA is the driving force for collecting the right kind and proper amount of data. Researchers must use Q...

  20. Technology Innovation and Future Research Needs in Net Shape Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong-Yol

    2005-08-05

    The rapid change in customer needs and industrial environment has demanded innovations in the manufacturing sector. Metal forming industries have been confronted with new challenges of innovations in products, processes, machines, materials and production systems. From the viewpoints of competitiveness of products, new paradigms are required for innovation in manufacturing, especially in net shape manufacturing. Product innovations are increasingly put under emphasis beyond manufacturing innovations based on the holistic concurrent engineering approach. The presentation covers not only the innovation methodologies, but also the innovation directions in net shape manufacturing.

  1. The Need to Emphasize Epistemology in Teaching and Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalman, Calvin

    2009-04-01

    The views on epistemology by philosophers of science are developed through an historical lens. Enabling students to develop a scientific mindset is complicated by student’s views on the Nature of Science. Students need to appreciate the history of science and to contrast different frameworks. In order to do this, students have to be able to follow presentations in class and read their textbooks. Although individual words are understandable, the sentences appear to take the form of an unknown language. The solution utilized in this paper is to get students to approach their reading of their textbooks in the manner of the hermeneutical circle through an activity called Reflective Writing.

  2. Review of Pacific Northwest Laboratory research on aquatic effects of hydroelectric generation and assessment of research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Fickeisen, D.H.; Becker, C.D.; Neitzel, D.A.

    1981-05-01

    This report is an overview of Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) research on how hydroelectric generation affects aquatic biota and environments. The major accomplishments of this research are described, and additional work needed to permit optimal use of available data is identified. The research goals are to: (1) identify impacts of hydroelectric generation, (2) provide guidance in allocating scarce water resources, and (3) develop techniques to avoid or reduce the impacts on aquatic communities or to compensate for unavoidable impacts. Through laboratory and field experiments, an understanding is being developed of the generic impacts of hydrogeneration. Because PNL is located near the Columbia River, which is extensively developed for hydroelectric generation, it is used as a natural laboratory for studying a large-scale operating system. Although the impacts studied result from a particular system of dams and operating procedures and occur within a specific ecosystem, the results of these studies have application at hydroelectric generating facilities throughout the United States.

  3. AudioGuides at a National Research Laboratory Supporting Visitors With Special Needs: Initial Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, R.; Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Carbone, L.; Lewis, H.; Abshire, W.; Mann, L.

    2003-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesa Laboratory offers the public an opportunity to visit an internationally recognized research laboratory housed in an architectural landmark located in a dramatic geological setting. The Mesa Lab's exhibits are viewed by over 80,000 people each year. Exhibits provide information about NCAR's scientific mission, current research efforts, technology, and the societal benefits of weather and climate research. Nearly 13,000 of NCAR's visitors are served with staff-led guided tours, including 3,000 students in school groups. Frequently, these tours are tailored to address the interests, ages, nationality, and special needs of the visitors. In June 2003, an audioguide was unveiled in English and Spanish versions for both adults and children. Based on preliminary summer usage figures, the audioguides may reach an additional 7,000 visitors in the coming year, many of whom may have special needs. With this in mind, the University Corporation of Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Office of Education and Outreach (EO) contracted local experts as advisors on the needs of people with low-vision, hearing loss, and Spanish language accessibility as the audioguide was developed. The script was written with the help of scientists and an internationally recognized audioguide production firm. Since the installation of the audioguide in July, visitors of all ages appear to be enthusiastic about this service and better focused on their learning experiences while viewing the exhibits. Interviews are helping EO to learn more about how the audioguide is helpful or may be revised to more effectively serve visitors in general as well as visitors with special needs. The audioguide was made possible by grants from the National Science Foundation Geoscience Education Program and the Friends of UCAR Fund.

  4. Research for food and health in Europe: themes, needs and proposals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diet, in addition to tobacco, alcohol and physical exercise, is a major factor contributing to chronic diseases in Europe. There is a pressing need for multidisciplinary research to promote healthier food choices and better diets. Food and Health Research in Europe (FAHRE) is a collaborative project commissioned by the European Union. Among its tasks is the description of national research systems for food and health and, in work reported here, the identification of strengths and gaps in the European research base. Methods A typology of nine research themes was developed, spanning food, society, health and research structures. Experts were selected through the FAHRE partners, with balance for individual characteristics, and reported using a standardised template. Results Countries usually commission research on food, and on health, separately: few countries have combined research strategies or programmes. Food and health are also strongly independent fields within the European Commission's research programmes. Research programmes have supported food and bio-technology, food safety, epidemiological research, and nutritional surveillance; but there has been less research into personal behaviour and very little on environmental influences on food choices - in the retail and marketing industries, policy, and regulation. The research is mainly sited within universities and research institutes: there is relatively little published research contribution from industry. Discussion National food policies, based on epidemiological evidence and endorsed by the World Health Organisation, recommend major changes in food intake to meet the challenge of chronic diseases. Biomedical and biotechnology research, in areas such as 'nutrio-genomics', 'individualised' diets, 'functional' foods and 'nutri-pharmaceuticals' appear likely to yield less health benefit, and less return on public investment, than research on population-level interventions to influence dietary

  5. Project management of life-science research projects: project characteristics, challenges and training needs.

    PubMed

    Beukers, Margot W

    2011-02-01

    Thirty-four project managers of life-science research projects were interviewed to investigate the characteristics of their projects, the challenges they faced and their training requirements. A set of ten discriminating parameters were identified based on four project categories: contract research, development, discovery and call-based projects--projects set up to address research questions defined in a call for proposals. The major challenges these project managers are faced with relate to project members, leadership without authority and a lack of commitment from the respective organization. Two-thirds of the project managers indicated that they would be interested in receiving additional training, mostly on people-oriented, soft skills. The training programs that are currently on offer, however, do not meet their needs.

  6. Project management of life-science research projects: project characteristics, challenges and training needs.

    PubMed

    Beukers, Margot W

    2011-02-01

    Thirty-four project managers of life-science research projects were interviewed to investigate the characteristics of their projects, the challenges they faced and their training requirements. A set of ten discriminating parameters were identified based on four project categories: contract research, development, discovery and call-based projects--projects set up to address research questions defined in a call for proposals. The major challenges these project managers are faced with relate to project members, leadership without authority and a lack of commitment from the respective organization. Two-thirds of the project managers indicated that they would be interested in receiving additional training, mostly on people-oriented, soft skills. The training programs that are currently on offer, however, do not meet their needs. PMID:21134487

  7. Personnel Needs and Training for Biomedical and Behavioral Research. The 1985 Report of the Committee on National Needs for Biomedical and Behavioral Research Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Medicine (NAS), Washington, DC.

    Designed to provide assistance in the assessment of the need for biomedical and behavioral research personnel, this report presents research findings related to specific medical careers. The review includes an examination of the system under which biomedical and behavioral scientists are trained for research careers and the United States…

  8. Needed: Global Collaboration for Comparative Research on Cities and Health

    PubMed Central

    Gusmano, Michael K.; Rodwin, Victor G.

    2016-01-01

    Over half of the world’s population lives in cities and United Nations (UN) demographers project an increase of 2.5 billion more urban dwellers by 2050. Yet there is too little systematic comparative research on the practice of urban health policy and management (HPAM), particularly in the megacities of middle-income and developing nations. We make a case for creating a global database on cities, population health and healthcare systems. The expenses involved in data collection would be difficult to justify without some review of previous work, some agreement on indicators worth measuring, conceptual and methodological considerations to guide the construction of the global database, and a set of research questions and hypotheses to test. We, therefore, address these issues in a manner that we hope will stimulate further discussion and collaboration.

  9. Needed: Global Collaboration for Comparative Research on Cities and Health

    PubMed Central

    Gusmano, Michael K.; Rodwin, Victor G.

    2016-01-01

    Over half of the world’s population lives in cities and United Nations (UN) demographers project an increase of 2.5 billion more urban dwellers by 2050. Yet there is too little systematic comparative research on the practice of urban health policy and management (HPAM), particularly in the megacities of middle-income and developing nations. We make a case for creating a global database on cities, population health and healthcare systems. The expenses involved in data collection would be difficult to justify without some review of previous work, some agreement on indicators worth measuring, conceptual and methodological considerations to guide the construction of the global database, and a set of research questions and hypotheses to test. We, therefore, address these issues in a manner that we hope will stimulate further discussion and collaboration. PMID:27694667

  10. Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes: Research Needs and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Ershow, Abby G; Peterson, Charles M; Riley, William T; Rizzo, Albert “Skip”; Wansink, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The rising rates, high prevalence, and adverse consequences of obesity and diabetes call for new approaches to the complex behaviors needed to prevent and manage these conditions. Virtual reality (VR) technologies, which provide controllable, multisensory, interactive three-dimensional (3D) stimulus environments, are a potentially valuable means of engaging patients in interventions that foster more healthful eating and physical activity patterns. Furthermore, the capacity of VR technologies to motivate, record, and measure human performance represents a novel and useful modality for conducting research. This article summarizes background information and discussions for a joint July 2010 National Institutes of Health – Department of Defense workshop entitled Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes. The workshop explored the research potential of VR technologies as tools for behavioral and neuroscience studies in diabetes and obesity, and the practical potential of VR in fostering more effective utilization of diabetes- and obesity-related nutrition and lifestyle information. Virtual reality technologies were considered especially relevant for fostering desirable health-related behaviors through motivational reinforcement, personalized teaching approaches, and social networking. Virtual reality might also be a means of extending the availability and capacity of health care providers. Progress in the field will be enhanced by further developing available platforms and taking advantage of VR’s capabilities as a research tool for well-designed hypothesis-testing behavioral science. Multidisciplinary collaborations are needed between the technology industry and academia, and among researchers in biomedical, behavioral, pedagogical, and computer science disciplines. Research priorities and funding opportunities for use of VR to improve prevention and management of obesity and diabetes can be found at agency websites (National

  11. Virtual reality technologies for research and education in obesity and diabetes: research needs and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Ershow, Abby G; Peterson, Charles M; Riley, William T; Rizzo, Albert Skip; Wansink, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The rising rates, high prevalence, and adverse consequences of obesity and diabetes call for new approaches to the complex behaviors needed to prevent and manage these conditions. Virtual reality (VR) technologies, which provide controllable, multisensory, interactive three-dimensional (3D) stimulus environments, are a potentially valuable means of engaging patients in interventions that foster more healthful eating and physical activity patterns. Furthermore, the capacity of VR technologies to motivate, record, and measure human performance represents a novel and useful modality for conducting research. This article summarizes background information and discussions for a joint July 2010 National Institutes of Health - Department of Defense workshop entitled Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes. The workshop explored the research potential of VR technologies as tools for behavioral and neuroscience studies in diabetes and obesity, and the practical potential of VR in fostering more effective utilization of diabetes- and obesity-related nutrition and lifestyle information. Virtual reality technologies were considered especially relevant for fostering desirable health-related behaviors through motivational reinforcement, personalized teaching approaches, and social networking. Virtual reality might also be a means of extending the availability and capacity of health care providers. Progress in the field will be enhanced by further developing available platforms and taking advantage of VR's capabilities as a research tool for well-designed hypothesis-testing behavioral science. Multidisciplinary collaborations are needed between the technology industry and academia, and among researchers in biomedical, behavioral, pedagogical, and computer science disciplines. Research priorities and funding opportunities for use of VR to improve prevention and management of obesity and diabetes can be found at agency websites (National

  12. Virtual reality technologies for research and education in obesity and diabetes: research needs and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Ershow, Abby G; Peterson, Charles M; Riley, William T; Rizzo, Albert Skip; Wansink, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The rising rates, high prevalence, and adverse consequences of obesity and diabetes call for new approaches to the complex behaviors needed to prevent and manage these conditions. Virtual reality (VR) technologies, which provide controllable, multisensory, interactive three-dimensional (3D) stimulus environments, are a potentially valuable means of engaging patients in interventions that foster more healthful eating and physical activity patterns. Furthermore, the capacity of VR technologies to motivate, record, and measure human performance represents a novel and useful modality for conducting research. This article summarizes background information and discussions for a joint July 2010 National Institutes of Health - Department of Defense workshop entitled Virtual Reality Technologies for Research and Education in Obesity and Diabetes. The workshop explored the research potential of VR technologies as tools for behavioral and neuroscience studies in diabetes and obesity, and the practical potential of VR in fostering more effective utilization of diabetes- and obesity-related nutrition and lifestyle information. Virtual reality technologies were considered especially relevant for fostering desirable health-related behaviors through motivational reinforcement, personalized teaching approaches, and social networking. Virtual reality might also be a means of extending the availability and capacity of health care providers. Progress in the field will be enhanced by further developing available platforms and taking advantage of VR's capabilities as a research tool for well-designed hypothesis-testing behavioral science. Multidisciplinary collaborations are needed between the technology industry and academia, and among researchers in biomedical, behavioral, pedagogical, and computer science disciplines. Research priorities and funding opportunities for use of VR to improve prevention and management of obesity and diabetes can be found at agency websites (National

  13. Children with cochlear implants and complex needs: a review of outcome research and psychological practice.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Lindsey C

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the number of children receiving cochlear implants who have significant disabilities in addition to their deafness has increased substantially. However, in comparison with the extensive literature on speech, language, and communication outcomes following pediatric implantation in children without complex needs, the available literature for this special group of children is relatively sparse. This article reviews the available research on outcomes, grouping studies according to the nature of the additional disabilities and specific etiologies of deafness. The methodological problems relating to outcome research in this field are outlined, followed by some tentative conclusions drawn from the literature base while bearing these problems in mind. The remainder of the article focuses on the challenges for clinical practice, from a psychological perspective, of implanting deaf children with complex needs. Two groups of children are considered, those whose additional disabilities have been identified prior to implantation and those whose difficulties become apparent at some point afterward, sometimes many years later. A case example describing the psychological assessment of a deaf-blind child being considered for implantation is presented. PMID:17493953

  14. Basic research needed for stimulating the development of behavioral technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mace, F. Charles

    1994-01-01

    The costs of disconnection between the basic and applied sectors of behavior analysis are reviewed, and some solutions to these problems are proposed. Central to these solutions are collaborations between basic and applied behavioral scientists in programmatic research that addresses the behavioral basis and solution of human behavior problems. This kind of collaboration parallels the deliberate interactions between basic and applied researchers that have proven to be so profitable in other scientific fields, such as medicine. Basic research questions of particular relevance to the development of behavioral technologies are posed in the following areas: response allocation, resistance to change, countercontrol, formation and differentiation/discrimination of stimulus and response classes, analysis of low-rate behavior, and rule-governed behavior. Three interrelated strategies to build connections between the basic and applied analysis of behavior are identified: (a) the development of nonhuman animal models of human behavior problems using operations that parallel plausible human circumstances, (b) replication of the modeled relations with human subjects in the operant laboratory, and (c) tests of the generality of the model with actual human problems in natural settings. PMID:16812734

  15. Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

  16. Our Natural Resources: Basic Research Needs in Forestry and Renewable Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Task Force on Basic Research in Forestry and Renewable Natural Resources.

    This report examines basic research needs in forestry and renewable natural resources and determines benefits to be gained from greater investments in basic research. It was prepared by a group of 17 research scientists, each an accomplished investigator in one or more fields. Each contributor reflected on research needs within his own discipline…

  17. Strengthen forensic entomology in court--the need for data exploration and the validation of a generalised additive mixed model.

    PubMed

    Baqué, Michèle; Amendt, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Developmental data of juvenile blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are typically used to calculate the age of immature stages found on or around a corpse and thus to estimate a minimum post-mortem interval (PMI(min)). However, many of those data sets don't take into account that immature blow flies grow in a non-linear fashion. Linear models do not supply a sufficient reliability on age estimates and may even lead to an erroneous determination of the PMI(min). According to the Daubert standard and the need for improvements in forensic science, new statistic tools like smoothing methods and mixed models allow the modelling of non-linear relationships and expand the field of statistical analyses. The present study introduces into the background and application of these statistical techniques by analysing a model which describes the development of the forensically important blow fly Calliphora vicina at different temperatures. The comparison of three statistical methods (linear regression, generalised additive modelling and generalised additive mixed modelling) clearly demonstrates that only the latter provided regression parameters that reflect the data adequately. We focus explicitly on both the exploration of the data--to assure their quality and to show the importance of checking it carefully prior to conducting the statistical tests--and the validation of the resulting models. Hence, we present a common method for evaluating and testing forensic entomological data sets by using for the first time generalised additive mixed models.

  18. Aircraft noise effects on sleep: mechanisms, mitigation and research needs.

    PubMed

    Basner, Mathias; Griefahn, Barbara; Berg, Martin van den

    2010-01-01

    There is an ample number of laboratory and field studies which provide sufficient evidence that aircraft noise disturbs sleep and, depending on traffic volume and noise levels, may impair behavior and well-being during the day. Although clinical sleep disorders have been shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, only little is known about the long-term effects of aircraft noise disturbed sleep on health. National and international laws and guidelines try to limit aircraft noise exposure facilitating active and passive noise control to prevent relevant sleep disturbances and its consequences. Adopting the harmonized indicator of the European Union Directive 2002/49/EC, the WHO Night Noise Guideline for Europe (NNG) defines four Lnight , outside ranges associated with different risk levels of sleep disturbance and other health effects ( < 30, 30-40, 40-55, and> 55 dBA). Although traffic patterns differing in number and noise levels of events that lead to varying degrees of sleep disturbance may result in the same Lnight , simulations of nights with up to 200 aircraft noise events per night nicely corroborate expert opinion guidelines formulated in WHO's NNG. In the future, large scale field studies on the effects of nocturnal (aircraft) noise on sleep are needed. They should involve representative samples of the population including vulnerable groups like children and chronically ill subjects. Optimally, these studies are prospective in nature and examine the long-term consequences of noise-induced sleep disturbances. Furthermore, epidemiological case-control studies on the association of nocturnal (aircraft) noise exposure and cardiovascular disease are needed. Despite the existing gaps in knowledge on long-term health effects, sufficient data are available for defining limit values, guidelines and protection concepts, which should be updated with the availability of new data.

  19. Assessment of pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.K.; Fassbender, L.L. ); Sen, R.K. and Associates, Washington, DC )

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the first phase of a study undertaken to define a role for the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Division of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in developing waste minimization technologies for the industrial sector. The report describes the results of an industrial waste characterization based mainly on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) 1989 Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) database. IN addition, it contains the results of interviews with personnel from trade associations, environmental advocacy groups, federal agencies, and industrial firms regarding pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization. Recommendations for future AIC waste minimization activities are provided.

  20. Assessment of pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.K.; Fassbender, L.L.; Sen, R.K.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the first phase of a study undertaken to define a role for the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Division of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) in developing waste minimization technologies for the industrial sector. The report describes the results of an industrial waste characterization based mainly on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 1989 Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) database. IN addition, it contains the results of interviews with personnel from trade associations, environmental advocacy groups, federal agencies, and industrial firms regarding pre-competitive research and development needs for industrial waste minimization. Recommendations for future AIC waste minimization activities are provided.

  1. Games for Health for Children-Current Status and Needed Research.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Tom; Blumberg, Fran; Buday, Richard; DeSmet, Ann; Fiellin, Lynn E; Green, C Shawn; Kato, Pamela M; Lu, Amy Shirong; Maloney, Ann E; Mellecker, Robin; Morrill, Brooke A; Peng, Wei; Shegog, Ross; Simons, Monique; Staiano, Amanda E; Thompson, Debbe; Young, Kimberly

    2016-02-01

    Videogames for health (G4H) offer exciting, innovative, potentially highly effective methods for increasing knowledge, delivering persuasive messages, changing behaviors, and influencing health outcomes. Although early outcome results are promising, additional research is needed to determine the game design and behavior change procedures that best promote G4H effectiveness and to identify and minimize possible adverse effects. Guidelines for ideal use of different types of G4H by children and adolescents should be elucidated to enhance effectiveness and minimize adverse effects. G4H stakeholders include organizational implementers, policy makers, players and their families, researchers, designers, retailers, and publishers. All stakeholders should be involved in G4H development and have a voice in setting goals to capitalize on their insights to enhance effectiveness and use of the game. In the future, multiple targeted G4H should be available to meet a population's diverse health needs in developmentally appropriate ways. Substantial, consistent, and sophisticated research with appropriate levels of funding is needed to realize the benefits of G4H. PMID:26262772

  2. Research needs for lion conservation in West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Hans; De Iongh, Hans H; Princée, Frank P; Ngantou, Daniel

    2003-08-01

    The lion has historically probably been widespread at low densities in West and Central Africa, nowadays they are largely restricted to small isolated populations inside protected areas. The total number is probably between 1200 and 2700, the best possible guesstimate would be 1700. Mankind is the main cause for the suspected decline of lion populations, both inside and outside protected areas. Very little research has been done on West and Central African lions a few examples are summarized here. The international community is slowly becoming aware of threats to lions in the region and some initiatives for lion conservation have started.

  3. Airborne Instrumentation Needs for Climate and Atmospheric Research

    SciTech Connect

    McFarquhar, Greg; Schmid, Beat; Korolev, Alexei; Ogren, John A.; Russell, P. B.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Turner, David D.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2011-10-06

    Observational data are of fundamental importance for advances in climate and atmospheric research. Advances in atmospheric science are being made not only through the use of ground-based and space-based observations, but also through the use of in-situ and remote sensing observations acquired on instrumented aircraft. In order for us to enhance our knowledge of atmospheric processes, it is imperative that efforts be made to improve our understanding of the operating characteristics of current instrumentation and of the caveats and uncertainties in data acquired by current probes, as well as to develop improved observing methodologies for acquisition of airborne data.

  4. Membrane separation systems---A research and development needs assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, R.W. ); Cussler, E.L. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science); Eykamp, W. ); Koros, W.J. ); Riley, R.L. ); Strathmann, H. (Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Grenzflaech

    1990-03-01

    Membrane based separation technology, a relative newcomer on the separations scene, has demonstrated the potential of saving enormous amounts of energy in the processing industries if substituted for conventional separation systems. Over 1 quad annually, out of 2.6, can possibly be saved in liquid-to-gas separations, alone, if membrane separation systems gain wider acceptance, according to a recent DOE/OIP (DOE/NBM-80027730 (1986)) study. In recent years great strides have been made in the field and offer even greater energy savings in the future when substituted for other conventional separation techniques such as distillation, evaporation, filtration, sedimentation, and absorption. An assessment was conducted by a group of six internationally known membrane separations experts who examined the worldwide status of research in the seven major membrane areas. This encompassed four mature technology areas: reverse osmosis, micorfiltration, ultrafiltration, and electrodialysis; two developing areas: gas separation and and pervaporation; and one emerging technology: facilitated transport. Particular attention was paid to identifying the innovative processes currently emerging, and even further improvements which could gain wider acceptance for the more mature membrane technology. The topics that were pointed out as having the greatest research emphasis are pervaporation for organic-organic separations; gas separation; micorfiltration; an oxidant-resistant reverse osmosis membrane; and a fouling-resistant ultrafiltration membrane. 35 refs., 6 figs., 22 tabs.

  5. Respiratory protection against bioaerosols: literature review and research needs.

    PubMed

    Rengasamy, Appavoo; Zhuang, Ziqing; Berryann, Roland

    2004-10-01

    Research on respiratory protection against biologic agents is important to address major concerns such as occupational safety and terrorist attack. This review describes the literature on respiratory protection against bioaerosols and identifies research gaps. Respiratory protection is a complex field involving a number of factors, such as the efficiency of respirator filter material; face-piece fitting; and maintenance, storage, and reuse of respirators. Several studies used nonpathogenic microorganisms having physical characteristics similar to that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to analyze microbial penetration through respirators. Some studies showed that high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and N95 filters provided a higher level of protection than dust/mist (DM) and dust/mist/fume (DMF) filters. Flow rate and relative humidity appear to alter the level of penetration of microorganisms through respirator filters. The relationship between microbial penetration through respirator filters and the aerodynamic diameter, length, or other physical characteristics of microorganisms remains controversial. Whether reaerosolization of bioaerosol particles should be a concern is unclear, given the fact that one study has demonstrated significant reaerosolization of 1- to 5-microm particles loaded onto respirator filters. Respirator maintenance, storage, and decontamination are important factors to be considered when reusing respirators. The respiratory protection against biologic warfare agents such as anthrax in military and civilian situations is described. PMID:15454893

  6. Trends in catalysis research to meet future refining needs

    SciTech Connect

    Absi-Halabi, M.; Stanislaus, A.; Qabazard, H.

    1997-02-01

    The main emphasis of petroleum refining during the `70s and early `80s was to maximize conversion of heavy oils to gasoline and middle distillate products. While this objective is still important, the current focus that began in the late `80s is to develop cleaner products. This is a result of strict environmental constraints to reduce emissions from both the products and refineries. Developing catalysts with improved activity, selectivity and stability for use in processes producing such environmentally acceptable fuels is the most economical and effective route for refiners. Novel technologies such as biocatalysis and catalytic membranes are examples of current successful laboratory-scale attempts to resolve anticipated future industry problems. Since catalysts play a key role in refining processes, it is important to examine the challenges facing catalysis research to meet future refining developments. The paper discusses the factors influencing refining, advancements in refining technology and catalysis, short-term future trends in refining catalysts research, and long-term trends in refining catalysts. 56 refs.

  7. An imperative need for global change research in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuhui; Fu, Yuling; Zhou, Lingyan; Li, Bo; Luo, Yiqi

    2013-09-01

    Tropical forests play a crucial role in regulating regional and global climate dynamics, and model projections suggest that rapid climate change may result in forest dieback or savannization. However, these predictions are largely based on results from leaf-level studies. How tropical forests respond and feedback to climate change is largely unknown at the ecosystem level. Several complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the effects of climate change on tropical forests, but the results are conflicting, largely due to confounding effects of multiple factors. Although altered precipitation and nitrogen deposition experiments have been conducted in tropical forests, large-scale warming and elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) manipulations are completely lacking, leaving many hypotheses and model predictions untested. Ecosystem-scale experiments to manipulate temperature and CO2 concentration individually or in combination are thus urgently needed to examine their main and interactive effects on tropical forests. Such experiments will provide indispensable data and help gain essential knowledge on biogeochemical, hydrological and biophysical responses and feedbacks of tropical forests to climate change. These datasets can also inform regional and global models for predicting future states of tropical forests and climate systems. The success of such large-scale experiments in natural tropical forests will require an international framework to coordinate collaboration so as to meet the challenges in cost, technological infrastructure and scientific endeavor.

  8. An imperative need for global change research in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuhui; Fu, Yuling; Zhou, Lingyan; Li, Bo; Luo, Yiqi

    2013-09-01

    Tropical forests play a crucial role in regulating regional and global climate dynamics, and model projections suggest that rapid climate change may result in forest dieback or savannization. However, these predictions are largely based on results from leaf-level studies. How tropical forests respond and feedback to climate change is largely unknown at the ecosystem level. Several complementary approaches have been used to evaluate the effects of climate change on tropical forests, but the results are conflicting, largely due to confounding effects of multiple factors. Although altered precipitation and nitrogen deposition experiments have been conducted in tropical forests, large-scale warming and elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) manipulations are completely lacking, leaving many hypotheses and model predictions untested. Ecosystem-scale experiments to manipulate temperature and CO2 concentration individually or in combination are thus urgently needed to examine their main and interactive effects on tropical forests. Such experiments will provide indispensable data and help gain essential knowledge on biogeochemical, hydrological and biophysical responses and feedbacks of tropical forests to climate change. These datasets can also inform regional and global models for predicting future states of tropical forests and climate systems. The success of such large-scale experiments in natural tropical forests will require an international framework to coordinate collaboration so as to meet the challenges in cost, technological infrastructure and scientific endeavor. PMID:24128847

  9. Prioritized List of Research Needs to support MRWFD Case Study Flowsheet Advancement

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Jack Douglas; Soelberg, Nicholas Ray

    2015-06-17

    In FY-13, a case study evaluation was performed of full recycle technologies for both the processing of light-water reactor (LWR) used nuclear fuels as well as fast reactor (FR) fuel in the full recycle option. This effort focused on the identification of the case study processes and the initial preparation of material balance flowsheets for the identified technologies. In identifying the case study flowsheets, it was decided that two cases would be developed: one which identifies the flowsheet as currently developed and another near-term target flowsheet which identifies the flowsheet as envisioned within two years, pending the results of ongoing research. The case study focus is on homogeneous aqueous recycle of the U/TRU resulting from the processing of LWR fuel as feed for metal fuel fabrication. The metal fuel is utilized in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and the used fast reactor fuel is processed using electrochemical separations. The recovered U/TRU from electrochemical separations is recycled to fuel fabrication and the fast reactor. Waste streams from the aqueous and electrochemical processing are treated and prepared for disposition. Off-gas from the separations and waste processing are also treated. As part of the FY-13 effort, preliminary process unknowns and research needs to advance the near-term target flowsheets were identified. In FY-14, these research needs were updated, expanded and prioritized. This report again updates the prioritized list of research needs based upon results to date in FY-15. The research needs are listed for each of the main portions of the flowsheet: 1) Aqueous headend, 2) Headend tritium pretreatment off-gas, 3) Aqueous U/Pu/Np recovery, 4) Aqueous TRU product solidification, 5) Aqueous actinide/lanthanide separation, 6) Aqueous off-gas treatment, 7) Aqueous HLW management, 8) Treatment of aqueous process wastes, 9) E-chem actinide separations, 10) E-chem off-gas, 11) E-chem HLW management. The identified research needs

  10. Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas; Wright, Art; Lambert, John; Hayes, Steven; Natesan, Ken; Ott, Larry J.; Garner, Frank; Walters, Leon; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2011-09-01

    An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

  11. Global atmospheric change and research needs in environmental health sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, B.D. ); Reed, D.J. )

    1991-12-01

    On November 6-7, 1989, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) held a conference on Global Atmospheric Change and Human Health. As a result, and in the months since this conference, many important areas of research have been identified with regard to the impacts of climatic changes on human health. To develop comprehensive research programs that address important human health issues related to global warming, it is necessary to begin by recognizing that some of the health effects will be direct such as those due to temperature changes, and others will be indirect consequences of environmental alterations resulting in crop loss, changing disease vectors, population migration, etc. It should also be recognized that the conditions leading to global warming have importance to human health and the environment other than through increasing concentrations of CO[sub 2] in the atmosphere, rising surface temperatures, and rising sea levels. Much of the increase in CO[sub 2] in the atmosphere is due to the increased combustion of fossil fuels for transportation and electric power production. Over the next 30 years, the demand for electrical power is expected to grow at a rate of 2 to 4% per year in the United States alone, and even faster growth is likely for developing countries. Much of this energy will be derived from the combustion of fossil fuels, including coal, which result in pollutant emissions to the air such as metals, radioactivity, SO[sub x], NO[sub x], and particles. Therefore, with increasing concentrations of CO[sub 2] there will not only be the effects of global warming on health, but also increasing concentrations of many serious air pollutants in urban areas, including the precursors of acid rain and acid deposition over large regional areas.

  12. Respiratory sensitization and allergy: Current research approaches and needs

    SciTech Connect

    Boverhof, Darrell R. Billington, Richard; Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar; Hotchkiss, John A.; Krieger, Shannon M.; Poole, Alan; Wiescinski, Connie M.; Woolhiser, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    There are currently no accepted regulatory models for assessing the potential of a substance to cause respiratory sensitization and allergy. In contrast, a number of models exist for the assessment of contact sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Research indicates that respiratory sensitizers may be identified through contact sensitization assays such as the local lymph node assay, although only a small subset of the compounds that yield positive results in these assays are actually respiratory sensitizers. Due to the increasing health concerns associated with occupational asthma and the impending directives on the regulation of respiratory sensitizers and allergens, an approach which can identify these compounds and distinguish them from contact sensitizers is required. This report discusses some of the important contrasts between respiratory allergy and ACD, and highlights several prominent in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches that are being applied or could be further developed to identify compounds capable of causing respiratory allergy. Although a number of animal models have been used for researching respiratory sensitization and allergy, protocols and endpoints for these approaches are often inconsistent, costly and difficult to reproduce, thereby limiting meaningful comparisons of data between laboratories and development of a consensus approach. A number of emerging in vitro and in silico models show promise for use in the characterization of contact sensitization potential and should be further explored for their ability to identify and differentiate contact and respiratory sensitizers. Ultimately, the development of a consistent, accurate and cost-effective model will likely incorporate a number of these approaches and will require effective communication, collaboration and consensus among all stakeholders.

  13. Using Software to Elicit User Needs for Clinical Research Visit Scheduling

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Chunhua; Boland, Mary Regina; So, Yat; Rusanov, Alexander; Lopez, Carlos; Steinman, Richard; Busacca, Linda; Bakken, Suzanne; Bigger, J Thomas

    2014-01-01

    User needs understanding is critical for developing useful and usable clinical research decision support. Existing methods largely depend on self-reporting and often fail to elicit implicit or fine-grained user needs. We hypothesized that functional software would address this problem by presenting to users existing technology while simultaneously encouraging users to optimize workflow. Using clinical research visit scheduling as an example, we used a piece of software under development that was called IMPACT to reveal user needs iteratively. The identified user needs explained why most clinical research coordinators still rely on paper to schedule clinical research visits. The common user needs themes such as information completeness for software to be useful may generalize to other clinical decision support. This paper contributes valuable firsthand knowledge about user needs for decision support for clinical research visit scheduling among clinical research coordinators and a generalizable methodology for collecting and analyzing software usage data to inform user needs elicitation. PMID:25954586

  14. Chemerin: A Comprehensive Review Elucidating the Need for Cardiovascular Research

    PubMed Central

    Ferland, David J.; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2016-01-01

    When chemerin was discovered in 1997, it was relegated to being a protein associated with the normal skin function contrasting the setting of psoriasis. However, with the discovery of multiple receptors for the chemerin protein and a vast collection of associations with various pathologies, chemerin has global influence capable of regulating chemotactic, adipokine, autocrine/paracrine, adipogenic, angiogenic, and reproductive functions. These individual abilities of chemerin are important for understanding its basic pharmacology and physiology, but application of these principles to human pathology relies on the ability of scientists and physicians to view this protein from a much wider, all-encompassing angle. A global participant in the action of chemerin is the cardiovascular system (CVS). Although the CVS may not have as many direct interactions (e.g. smooth muscle in endothelium) with chemerin as it does indirect (e.g. chemerin activation in the lumen by proteases), our basic understanding of the CVS and its relation to chemerin is necessary to form a proper grasp of its individual actions and make the applications to pathology. This review provides a fundamental, yet comprehensive review of chemerin that inherently identifies the CVS as a necessary link between chemerin and its associated pathologies, but also calls for basic cardiovascular research as the solution to this chasm between knowledge and application. PMID:26211950

  15. The need for novel informatics tools for integrating and planning research in molecular and cellular cognition

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2015-01-01

    The sheer volume and complexity of publications in the biological sciences are straining traditional approaches to research planning. Nowhere is this problem more serious than in molecular and cellular cognition, since in this neuroscience field, researchers routinely use approaches and information from a variety of areas in neuroscience and other biology fields. Additionally, the multilevel integration process characteristic of this field involves the establishment of experimental connections between molecular, electrophysiological, behavioral, and even cognitive data. This multidisciplinary integration process requires strategies and approaches that originate in several different fields, which greatly increases the complexity and demands of this process. Although causal assertions, where phenomenon A is thought to contribute or relate to B, are at the center of this integration process and key to research in biology, there are currently no tools to help scientists keep track of the increasingly more complex network of causal connections they use when making research decisions. Here, we propose the development of semiautomated graphical and interactive tools to help neuroscientists and other biologists, including those working in molecular and cellular cognition, to track, map, and weight causal evidence in research papers. There is a great need for a concerted effort by biologists, computer scientists, and funding institutions to develop maps of causal information that would aid in integration of research findings and in experiment planning. PMID:26286658

  16. The XXth century dengue pandemic: need for surveillance and research.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S B

    1992-01-01

    By the last decade of the XXth century Aedes aegypti and the 4 dengue viruses had spread to nearly all countries of the tropical world. Some 2 billion persons live in dengue-endemic areas with tens of millions infected annually. Dengue pandemics were also documented in the XVIIIth and XIXth centuries; they were contained by organized anti-Aedes aegypti campaigns and urban improvements. The XXth century dengue pandemic has brought with it the simultaneous circulation of multiple serotypes and in its aftermath, endemic dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). Nearly 3 million children have been hospitalized with this syndrome in the past 3 decades, mainly in South-East Asia. Recent outbreaks of DHF/DSS in the Pacific Islands, China, India, Sri Lanka, Cuba and Venezuela are indicators of the high intensity and rapid spread of dengue transmission. The magnitude of the XXth century dengue pandemic requires urgent improvements in early warning surveillance by WHO Member States and the development of the capacity to study underlying mechanisms of the disease. A key research question is why does DHF/DSS not occur with all second dengue infections? Two answers have been suggested: (1) a human resistance gene. Data from the 1981 DHF/DSS epidemic in Cuba have demonstrated the existence in blacks of a resistance gene. The effect of such a gene in reducing disease susceptibility of American and African blacks requires more study. (2) The existence of dengue "biotypes". Some, but not all biotypes may cause DHF/DSS during a second dengue infection.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Research Review: DSM-V conduct disorder: research needs for an evidence base

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise; Jaffee, Sara R.; Kim-Cohen, Julia; Koenen, Karestan C.; Odgers, Candice L.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Viding, Essi

    2009-01-01

    This article charts a strategic research course toward an empirical foundation for the diagnosis of conduct disorder in the forthcoming DSM-V. Since the DSM-IV appeared in 1994, an impressive amount of new information about conduct disorder has emerged. As a result of this new knowledge, reasonable rationales have been put forward for adding to the conduct disorder diagnostic protocol: a childhood-limited subtype, family psychiatric history, callous-unemotional traits, female-specific criteria, preschool-specific criteria, early substance use, and biomarkers from genetics, neuroimaging, and physiology research. This article reviews the evidence for these and other potential changes to the conduct disorder diagnosis. We report that although there is a great deal of exciting research into each of the topics, very little of it provides the precise sort of evidence base required to justify any alteration to the DSM-V. We outline specific research questions and study designs needed to build the lacking evidence base for or against proposed changes to DSM-V conduct disorder. PMID:18181878

  18. Research review: DSM-V conduct disorder: research needs for an evidence base.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Terrie E; Arseneault, Louise; Jaffee, Sara R; Kim-Cohen, Julia; Koenen, Karestan C; Odgers, Candice L; Slutske, Wendy S; Viding, Essi

    2008-01-01

    This article charts a strategic research course toward an empirical foundation for the diagnosis of conduct disorder in the forthcoming DSM-V. Since the DSM-IV appeared in 1994, an impressive amount of new information about conduct disorder has emerged. As a result of this new knowledge, reasonable rationales have been put forward for adding to the conduct disorder diagnostic protocol: a childhood-limited subtype, family psychiatric history, callous-unemotional traits, female-specific criteria, preschool-specific criteria, early substance use, and biomarkers from genetics, neuroimaging, and physiology research. This article reviews the evidence for these and other potential changes to the conduct disorder diagnosis. We report that although there is a great deal of exciting research into each of the topics, very little of it provides the precise sort of evidence base required to justify any alteration to the DSM-V. We outline specific research questions and study designs needed to build the lacking evidence base for or against proposed changes to DSM-V conduct disorder.

  19. Research protocol of the NeedYD-study (Needs in Young onset Dementia): a prospective cohort study on the needs and course of early onset dementia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Early onset dementia has serious consequences for patients and their family members. Although there has been growing attention for this patient group, health care services are still mainly targeted at the elderly. Specific knowledge of the needs of early onset dementia patients and their families is limited but necessary for the development of adequate health care services and specific guidelines. This research project is mainly targeted at delineating the course of early onset dementia, the functional characteristics and needs of early onset dementia patients and their caregivers, the risk factors for institutionalization and the interaction with the caring environment. Methods/Design The NeedYD-study (Needs in Young Onset Dementia) is a longitudinal observational study investigating early onset dementia patients and their caregivers (n = 217). Assessments are performed every six months over two years and consist of interviews and questionnaires with patients and caregivers. The main outcomes are (1) the needs of patients and caregivers, as measured by the Camberwell Assessment of Needs for the Elderly (CANE) and (2) neuropsychiatric symptoms, as measured by the NeuroPsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Qualitative analyses will be performed in order to obtain more in-depth information on the experiences of EOD patients and their family members. The results of this study will be compared with comparable data on late onset dementia from a historical cohort. Discussion The study protocol of the NeedYD-study is presented here. To our knowledge, this study is the first prospective cohort study in this research area. Although some limitations exist, these do not outweigh the strong points of this study design. PMID:20226041

  20. Research Information Needs of Public Policy Oriented Researchers at a Regional University: Issues Emerging from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Faye

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the results of a pilot study of the research information needs, behaviour and source preferences of academic researchers at a regional university engaged in a public policy research project. In-depth interviews with three public policy oriented academic researchers undertaking interdisciplinary research projects at Charles…

  1. A Needs Assessment Informs Development of a Participatory Research Faculty Development Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salsberg, Jon; Seller, Robbyn; Shea, Laura; Macaulay, Ann C.

    2012-01-01

    University-based researchers are finding they need a new set of skills to collaborate meaningfully with non-academic research partners, and to compete for funding opportunities that require community and end-user partnerships. This article describes a needs assessment conducted to develop a participatory research faculty development workshop at…

  2. 48 CFR 12.202 - Market research and description of agency need.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Market research and... Commercial Items 12.202 Market research and description of agency need. (a) Market research (see 10.001) is... physical characteristics. Describing the agency's needs in these terms allows offerors to propose...

  3. Needs for public health intervention and needs for new research on vinyl halides and their polymers: a public policy perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Hattis, D

    1981-01-01

    Consideration of needs for public health interventions and new research requires comparative assessments of the health benefits that are likely to result from alternative uses of limited regulatory and technical resources. This paper briefly examines regulatory and research priorities in the light of recent information on the carcinogenic hazards of vinyl chloride and alkyl and vinyl halides related to vinyl chloride, the respiratory-system hazards of poly (vinyl chloride), and the reproductive hazards of vinyl chloride. Specific suggestions are made for relatively promising types of efforts in these areas. PMID:7333240

  4. 43 CFR 2430.3 - Additional criteria for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. 2430.3 Section 2430.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations... for classification of lands needed for urban or suburban purposes. (a) To be needed for urban or... determined to be needed for urban or suburban purposes may be classified for sale pursuant to the Public...

  5. Assessing the research and education needs of the organic dairy industry in the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A B D; Brito, A F; Townson, L L; Townson, D H

    2013-01-01

    Demographic and management data about organic dairies have been reported previously, but the current study is the first needs assessment of research and educational priorities of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States based directly upon their input. Our objectives were to (1) develop an initial understanding of the emerging research and educational needs of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States via focus group interviews, and (2) prioritize the needs identified by the focus groups with a broader population of organic dairy farmers via survey methods. Focus group interviews determined the questions used for the survey questionnaire distributed to 1,200 members of the Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance. The members were asked about demographic information, but more importantly, challenges concerning business management and marketing, organic certification, and animal nutrition, health, and reproduction. The results (183 respondents, 15% response rate) were parsed by region (New England farms compared with New York and Pennsylvania farms), herd size (i.e., 12 to 37, 38 to 59, and >60 cows), and years of organic certification (<4 yr vs. ≥ 4 yr); however, no differences between regions were observed for demographic data. The average farm consisted of 309 acres and 57 milking cows, on which most of the forage was homegrown but grains were purchased (73% of farms). Among the greatest challenges identified by the farmers were obtaining a steady, fair price for milk (85% respondents); determining dry matter intake for animals on pasture (76%); and controlling nuisance flies (89%). Needs for additional research included organic treatments for mastitis (92% respondents), growing forages for organic production (84%), and developing value-added products (84%). Farms with <4 yr of organic certification were concerned with level of knowledge and experience of local certifiers, whereas organic producers with ≥ 4 yr of organic

  6. Assessing the research and education needs of the organic dairy industry in the northeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A B D; Brito, A F; Townson, L L; Townson, D H

    2013-01-01

    Demographic and management data about organic dairies have been reported previously, but the current study is the first needs assessment of research and educational priorities of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States based directly upon their input. Our objectives were to (1) develop an initial understanding of the emerging research and educational needs of organic dairy farmers in the northeastern United States via focus group interviews, and (2) prioritize the needs identified by the focus groups with a broader population of organic dairy farmers via survey methods. Focus group interviews determined the questions used for the survey questionnaire distributed to 1,200 members of the Northeast Organic Dairy Producers Alliance. The members were asked about demographic information, but more importantly, challenges concerning business management and marketing, organic certification, and animal nutrition, health, and reproduction. The results (183 respondents, 15% response rate) were parsed by region (New England farms compared with New York and Pennsylvania farms), herd size (i.e., 12 to 37, 38 to 59, and >60 cows), and years of organic certification (<4 yr vs. ≥ 4 yr); however, no differences between regions were observed for demographic data. The average farm consisted of 309 acres and 57 milking cows, on which most of the forage was homegrown but grains were purchased (73% of farms). Among the greatest challenges identified by the farmers were obtaining a steady, fair price for milk (85% respondents); determining dry matter intake for animals on pasture (76%); and controlling nuisance flies (89%). Needs for additional research included organic treatments for mastitis (92% respondents), growing forages for organic production (84%), and developing value-added products (84%). Farms with <4 yr of organic certification were concerned with level of knowledge and experience of local certifiers, whereas organic producers with ≥ 4 yr of organic

  7. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  8. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  9. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  10. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  11. 48 CFR 1852.235-74 - Additional Reports of Work-Research and Development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Research and Development. 1852.235-74 Section 1852.235-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL... Provisions and Clauses 1852.235-74 Additional Reports of Work—Research and Development. As prescribed in 1835.070(e), insert a clause substantially the same as the following: Additional Reports of...

  12. Dreams Do Come True: The Creation and Growth of a Recreational Dance Program for Children and Young Adults with Additional Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinders, Nicole; Fletcher, Paula; Bryden, Pam

    2015-01-01

    There are many benefits to dance, both for typically developing individuals and for individuals with additional needs. The purpose of this narrative case study was to analyse a dance program for children and young adults with additional needs from the perspective of the program creator and primary dance instructor. Data collection occurred at two…

  13. National uses and needs for separated stable isotopes in physics, chemistry, and geoscience research

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    Present uses of separated stable isotopes in the fields of physics, chemistry, and the geosciences have been surveyed to identify current supply problems and to determine future needs. Demand for separated isotopes remains strong, with 220 different nuclides having been used in the past three years. The largest needs, in terms of both quantity and variety of isotopes, are found in nuclear physics research. Current problems include a lack of availability of many nuclides, unsatisfactory enrichment of rare species, and prohibitively high costs for certain important isotopes. It is expected that demands for separated isotopes will remain roughly at present levels, although there will be a shift toward more requests for highly enriched rare isotopes. Significantly greater use will be made of neutron-rich nuclides below A = 100 for producing exotic ion beams at various accelerators. Use of transition metal nuclei for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will expand. In addition, calibration standards will be required for the newer techniques of radiological dating, such as the Sm/Nd and Lu/Hf methods, but in relatively small quantities. Most members of the research community would be willing to pay considerably more than they do now to maintain adequate supplies of stable isotopes.

  14. Using Adult Learning Principles as a Framework for Learning ICT Skills Needed for Research Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyitayo, Oduronke Temitope

    2013-01-01

    Students in higher institutions need to carry out research projects. The focus of this paper explores a model to help students learn ICT skills needed for research projects. Generally students go through the "long and hard route" to learn and use ICT resources because they do not know how to do it. The paper explores the Adult Learning…

  15. Academic Research Equipment and Equipment Needs in the Physical Sciences: 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This monograph is one in a series of analytical reports presenting findings from the National Science Foundation's 1989-90 National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs. It describes recent national trends in academic research equipment and equipment needs in the physical sciences. It also documents equipment trends in…

  16. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sangeeta; Hutchison, James; Group, Canadian Critical Care Trials

    2016-01-01

    Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians' professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees.

  17. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sangeeta; Menon, Kusum; Piquette, Dominique; Gottesman, Ronald; Hutchison, James; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Group, Canadian Critical Care Trials

    2016-01-01

    Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians' professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees. PMID:27610029

  18. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sangeeta; Hutchison, James; Group, Canadian Critical Care Trials

    2016-01-01

    Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians' professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees. PMID:27610029

  19. Recovery of uranium from seawater-status of technology and needed future research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kelmers, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of recent publications concerning uranium recovery from seawater shows that considerable experimental work in this area is currently under way in Japan, less in European countries. Repeated screening programs have identified hydrous titanium oxide as the most promising candidate adsorbent; however, many of its properties, such as distribution coefficient, selectivity, loading, and possibly stability, appear to fall far short of those required for a practical recovery system. In addition, various evaluations of the energy efficiency of pumped or tidal power schemes for contacting the sorbent and seawater are in serious disagreement. Needed future research and development tasks have been identified. A fundamental development program to achieve significantly improved adsorbent properties would be required to permit economical recovery of uranium from seawater. Unresolved engineering aspects of such recovery systems are also identified and discussed. 63 references.

  20. The communication of pharmacogenetic research results: participants weigh in on their informational needs in a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Parvaz; Joly, Yann; Avard, Denise; Chitayat, David C; Smith, M Anne; D Ross, Colin J; Carleton, Bruce C; Hayden, Michael R; Koren, Gideon

    2011-01-01

    In this brief investigation, the informational needs of research participants [n = 62; mothers who had breastfed, taken codeine, and participated in a pharmacogenetic study] were probed during a counselling session in which they received their CYP2D6 pharmacogenetic research results and overall study results. In addition to the standard information, developed by a multidisciplinary team and provided to the participants, 38% of individuals had further questions related to potential adverse effects in babies, future codeine or medication use, heredity, and consequences for policies and programmes. The diversity and complexity of the questions raised support the need to communicate the results in the context of personalized genetic counselling information sessions. PMID:21467605

  1. Current Treatment of Dyslipidemia: A New Paradigm for Statin Drug Use and the Need for Additional Therapies.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard; Rumana, Umme

    2015-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in most countries, with the high prevalence currently driven by dual epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Statin drugs, the most effective, evidence-based agents to prevent and treat this disease, have a central role in management and are advised in all published guidelines. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol and assessment guidelines ('new ACC/AHA guidelines') emphasized global cardiovascular (CV) risk reduction as opposed to targeting low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, stressed the use of statins in two dose intensities, utilized a new risk calculator using pooled cohort equations, and lowered the risk cutoff for initiation of statin therapy. Although there were major strengths of the new ACC/AHA guidelines, substantial controversy followed their release, particulars of which are discussed in this review. They were generally regarded as improvements in an ongoing transition using evidenced-based data for maximum patient benefit. Several guidelines, other than the ACC/AHA guidelines, currently provide practitioners with choices, some depending on practice locations. Cholesterol control with statin drugs is used in all paradigms. However, some patients respond inadequately, approximately 15% are intolerant, and other factors prevent attaining cholesterol goals in as many as 40% of patients. Even after treatment, substantial residual risk for ongoing major events remains. Another readily available modality that can rival statin drugs in effectiveness is vast improvement in diet and lifestyle within the general population; however, despite great effort, existing programs to implement such changes have failed. Hence, despite unrivaled success, there is great need for additional drugs to prevent and treat CHD, whether as monotherapy or in combination with statin drugs. New American guidelines do not discuss or recommend any nonstatin drugs for

  2. Materials Issues in Advanced Nuclear Systems: Executive Summary of DOE Basic Research Needs Workshop, "Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems"

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, James B; Diaz de la Rubia, Tomas

    2007-01-01

    This article is reproduced from excerpts from the Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, U.S. Department of Energy, October 2006, www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/files/ANES_rpt.pdf.

  3. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

    2006-10-01

    The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X

  4. Thinking Big Picture: Meeting the Needs of Researchers in Northern Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamtora, Jayshree

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increase in research activity at Charles Darwin University in recent years, the Library created the position of Research Services Coordinator to meet researcher needs. Eighteen months after the new staff member was in place, an online survey was carried out to gauge the success of the new services and resources provided, and thereby…

  5. Paradigms and poverty in global energy policy: research needs for achieving universal energy access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Bazilian, Morgan; Toman, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This research letter discusses elements of a long-term interdisciplinary research effort needed to help ensure the maximum social, economic, and environmental benefits of achieving secure universal access to modern energy services. Exclusion of these services affects the lives and livelihoods of billions of people. The research community has an important, but not yet well-defined, role to play.

  6. 48 CFR 12.202 - Market research and description of agency need.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market research and... Commercial Items 12.202 Market research and description of agency need. (a) Market research (see 10.001) is an essential element of building an effective strategy for the acquisition of commercial items...

  7. Research, Television and the Child: The Need for Risk-Takers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Gordon L.

    This paper discusses the need for innovative research paradigms in assessing the impact of television on children. Past research has shown that television, as part of a child's environment, can influence the social behavior of young children in positive and negative ways. It is suggested that researchers now study ways in which children's…

  8. The Elements of Library Research: What Every Student Needs to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Mary W.

    2008-01-01

    To do solid academic research, college students need to look beyond the computer search engine. This short, practical book introduces students to the important components of the information-seeking process. "The Elements of Library Research" provides a foundation for success in any research assignment, from a freshman paper to a senior thesis.…

  9. Research needs in allergy: an EAACI position paper, in collaboration with EFA.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Agache, Ioana; Bavbek, Sevim; Bilo, Beatrice M; Braido, Fulvio; Cardona, Victoria; Custovic, Adnan; Demonchy, Jan; Demoly, Pascal; Eigenmann, Philippe; Gayraud, Jacques; Grattan, Clive; Heffler, Enrico; Hellings, Peter W; Jutel, Marek; Knol, Edward; Lötvall, Jan; Muraro, Antonella; Poulsen, Lars K; Roberts, Graham; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Skevaki, Chrysanthi; Triggiani, Massimo; Vanree, Ronald; Werfel, Thomas; Flood, Breda; Palkonen, Susanna; Savli, Roberta; Allegri, Pia; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Annunziato, Francesco; Antolin-Amerigo, Dario; Apfelbacher, Christian; Blanca, Miguel; Bogacka, Ewa; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Bonini, Matteo; Boyman, Onur; Brockow, Knut; Burney, Peter; Buters, Jeroen; Butiene, Indre; Calderon, Moises; Cardell, Lars Olaf; Caubet, Jean-Christoph; Celenk, Sevcan; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Cingi, Cemal; Couto, Mariana; Dejong, Nicolette; Del Giacco, Stefano; Douladiris, Nikolaos; Fassio, Filippo; Fauquert, Jean-Luc; Fernandez, Javier; Rivas, Montserrat Fernandez; Ferrer, Marta; Flohr, Carsten; Gardner, James; Genuneit, Jon; Gevaert, Philippe; Groblewska, Anna; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Hovhannisyan, Lilit; Hox, Valérie; Jahnsen, Frode L; Kalayci, Omer; Kalpaklioglu, Ayse Füsun; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Konstantinou, George; Kurowski, Marcin; Lau, Susanne; Lauener, Roger; Lauerma, Antti; Logan, Kirsty; Magnan, Antoine; Makowska, Joanna; Makrinioti, Heidi; Mangina, Paraskevi; Manole, Felicia; Mari, Adriano; Mazon, Angel; Mills, Clare; Mingomataj, Ervinç; Niggemann, Bodo; Nilsson, Gunnar; Ollert, Markus; O'Mahony, Liam; O'Neil, Serena; Pala, Gianni; Papi, Alberto; Passalacqua, Gianni; Perkin, Michael; Pfaar, Oliver; Pitsios, Constantinos; Quirce, Santiago; Raap, Ulrike; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Rhyner, Claudio; Robson-Ansley, Paula; Alves, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Roje, Zeljka; Rondon, Carmen; Rudzeviciene, Odilija; Ruëff, Franziska; Rukhadze, Maia; Rumi, Gabriele; Sackesen, Cansin; Santos, Alexandra F; Santucci, Annalisa; Scharf, Christian; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten; Schnyder, Benno; Schwarze, Jürgen; Senna, Gianenrico; Sergejeva, Svetlana; Seys, Sven; Siracusa, Andrea; Skypala, Isabel; Sokolowska, Milena; Spertini, Francois; Spiewak, Radoslaw; Sprikkelman, Aline; Sturm, Gunter; Swoboda, Ines; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Toskala, Elina; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Venter, Carina; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber; Whitacker, Paul; Worm, Margitta; Xepapadaki, Paraskevi; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2012-01-01

    treatment-responsive groups. Research efforts to unveil the basic pathophysiologic pathways and mechanisms, thus leading to the comprehension and resolution of the pathophysiologic complexity of allergies will allow for the design of novel patient-oriented diagnostic and treatment protocols. Several allergic diseases require well-controlled epidemiological description and surveillance, using disease registries, pharmacoeconomic evaluation, as well as large biobanks. Additionally, there is a need for extensive studies to bring promising new biotechnological innovations, such as biological agents, vaccines of modified allergen molecules and engineered components for allergy diagnosis, closer to clinical practice. Finally, particular attention should be paid to the difficult-to-manage, precarious and costly severe disease forms and/or exacerbations. Nonetheless, currently arising treatments, mainly in the fields of immunotherapy and biologicals, hold great promise for targeted and causal management of allergic conditions. Active involvement of all stakeholders, including Patient Organizations and policy makers are necessary to achieve the aims emphasized herein. PMID:23121771

  10. Research needs in allergy: an EAACI position paper, in collaboration with EFA

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    and treatment-responsive groups. Research efforts to unveil the basic pathophysiologic pathways and mechanisms, thus leading to the comprehension and resolution of the pathophysiologic complexity of allergies will allow for the design of novel patient-oriented diagnostic and treatment protocols. Several allergic diseases require well-controlled epidemiological description and surveillance, using disease registries, pharmacoeconomic evaluation, as well as large biobanks. Additionally, there is a need for extensive studies to bring promising new biotechnological innovations, such as biological agents, vaccines of modified allergen molecules and engineered components for allergy diagnosis, closer to clinical practice. Finally, particular attention should be paid to the difficult-to-manage, precarious and costly severe disease forms and/or exacerbations. Nonetheless, currently arising treatments, mainly in the fields of immunotherapy and biologicals, hold great promise for targeted and causal management of allergic conditions. Active involvement of all stakeholders, including Patient Organizations and policy makers are necessary to achieve the aims emphasized herein. PMID:23121771

  11. Research Donor Program Needs Your Help to Advance Cancer and AIDS Research | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    NCI at Frederick employees have a unique opportunity to contribute directly to cancer and AIDS research by donating blood, saliva, and other samples through the Research Donor Program (RDP). Donors are compensated for their time, which is typically between 10 and 30 minutes. The RDP, which is administered by Occupational Health Services (OHS), Leidos Biomedical Research, provides samples from healthy donors for use in in vitro research conducted at NCI at Frederick and Fort Detrick. Samples are provided anonymously to researchers.

  12. Work stress and cancer researchers: an exploration of the challenges, experiences and training needs of UK cancer researchers.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, F; Hicks, B; Yarker, J

    2014-07-01

    Work stress is a significant issue for many UK healthcare professionals, in particular those working in the field of oncology. However, there have been very few attempts to explore the challenges, experiences or training needs of researchers working in cancer research. In doing so, we will be better positioned to support and develop these researchers. Eighteen UK oncology researchers from a variety of backgrounds took part in a semi-structured interview. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis identified two overarching themes: logistical research issues (workload, accessing/recruiting participants, finances) and sensitive research issues (emotional demands, professional boundaries, sensitivity around recruitment). One cross-cutting theme, supportive strategies (support and training, coping mechanisms), was seen to influence both logistical and sensitive research issues. While further research is needed to fully understand the causes and impact of work stress on cancer researchers, three specific issues were highlighted: emotional demands are relevant to quantitative and mixed methods researchers as well as those engaged in qualitative research; the researchers' background (experience; clinical/non-clinical) was influential and an exploration of effective coping strategies is required; and there is a clear need for adequate support systems and training to be available, particularly for early career researchers.

  13. Basic research needs and priorities in solar energy. Volume II. Technology crosscuts for DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, J S; Roessner, D

    1980-01-01

    Priorities for basic research important to the future developments of solar energy are idenified, described, and recommended. SERI surveyed more than 120 leading scientists who were engaged in or knowledgeable of solar-related research. The result is an amalgam of national scientific opinion representing the views of key researchers in relevant disciplines and of SERI staff members. The scientific disciplines included in the report are: chemistry, biology, materials sciences, engineering and mathematics, and the social and behavioral sciences. Each discipline is subdivided into two to five topical areas-and, within each topical area, research needs are described and ranked according to the priorities suggested in the survey. Three categories of priority were established: crucial, important, and needed. A narrative accompanying the description of research needs in each topical area discusses the importance of research in the area for solar energy development and presents the bases for the priority rankings recommended.

  14. Marine research in Greece and the additional Greek marine research centres: Progress and present situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonidis, S.

    1995-03-01

    Greece, as is known, has a coastline of 17 000 km, and over 2000 small and large islands. As expected, the quest of humankind for new sources of matter and energy has been focussed on the sea, with fishery being its primary interest. A number of philosophers and scientists have been involved in the study of this vast ecosystem since ancient times (Aristotle). The political, social and geographical upheavals witnessed in the Greek area, have, however resulted in bringing all these activities to a halt. The first contemporary research work commenced at the end of the 18th century/beginning of the 19th — with marine flora and fauna as its starting point. The first investigations had, of course, been limited to random collections of marine material done in the frame of international exploratory expeditions. Studies became more systematic by the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, with priority being given to the animal kingdom (fish, molluscs, etc.). Investigation of the marine phytobenthos (macrophyceae, phytoplankton) was to follow. The past 40 years research has been more extensive, not limited only to biogeographical evaluations, but also having expanded to physiological and ecological levels. The relevant institutes of Greek universities have all the while watched and contributed to this effort. Today, this kind of research is being supported by the N.M.R.C., the Center of Marine Research, University of Crete, and two research boats which sail the Greek seas. In the ever-changing world, the study of marine flora and fauna has certainly made great progress; however, there are still two big problems to be faced. The first deals with increasing pollution of the seas, the second, with the difficulties in finding and affording adequate financial resources that would enable a more detailed and complete execution of this research work.

  15. Results from a workshop on research needs for modeling aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, M. K.

    1990-08-01

    A workshop an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system modeling was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the workshop was to develop a list of high priority research activities that would facilitate the commercial success of ATES. During the workshop, participants reviewed currently available modeling tools for ATES systems and produced a list of significant issues related to modeling ATES systems. Participants assigned a priority to each issue on the list by voting and developed a list of research needs for each of four high-priority research areas; the need for a feasibility study model, the need for engineering design models, the need for aquifer characterization, and the need for an economic model. The workshop participants concluded that ATES commercialization can be accelerated by aggressive development of ATES modeling tools and made specific recommendations for that development.

  16. Results from a workshop on research needs for modeling aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, M K

    1990-08-01

    A workshop an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system modeling was conducted in Seattle, Washington, on November 30 and December 1, 1989 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the workshop was to develop a list of high-priority research activities that would facilitate the commercial success of ATES. During the workshop, participants reviewed currently available modeling tools for ATES systems and produced a list of significant issues related to modeling ATES systems. Participants assigned a priority to each issue on the list by voting and developed a list of research needs for each of four high-priority research areas; the need for a feasibility study model, the need for engineering design models, the need for aquifer characterization, and the need for an economic model. The workshop participants concluded that ATES commercialization can be accelerated by aggressive development of ATES modeling tools and made specific recommendations for that development. 2 tabs.

  17. Basic Research Needs for Clean and Efficient Combustion of 21st Century Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McIlroy, A.; McRae, G.; Sick, V.; Siebers, D. L.; Westbrook, C. K.; Smith, P. J.; Taatjes, C.; Trouve, A.; Wagner, A. F.; Rohlfing, E.; Manley, D.; Tully, F.; Hilderbrandt, R.; Green, W.; Marceau, D.; O'Neal, J.; Lyday, M.; Cebulski, F.; Garcia, T. R.; Strong, D.

    2006-11-01

    To identify basic research needs and opportunities underlying utilization of evolving transportation fuels, with a focus on new or emerging science challenges that have the potential for significant long-term impact on fuel efficiency and emissions.

  18. Towards sustainable environmental quality: A call to prioritize global research needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying, prioritizing, and advancing research priorities are important goals for those engaged in scientific enterprise. Anticipating the greatest scientific needs and challenges presents opportunities to be more agile in response, more efficient in purpose, and more intentio...

  19. Research needs to maximize economic producibility of the domestic oil resource

    SciTech Connect

    Tham, M.K.; Burchfield, T.; Chung, Ting-Horng; Lorenz, P.; Bryant, R.; Sarathi, P.; Chang, Ming Ming; Jackson, S.; Tomutsa, L. ); Dauben, D.L. )

    1991-10-01

    NIPER was contracted by the US Department of Energy Bartlesville (Okla.) Project Office (DOE/BPO) to identify research needs to increase production of the domestic oil resource, and K A Energy Consultants, Inc. was subcontracted to review EOR field projects. This report summarizes the findings of that investigation. Professional society and trade journals, DOE reports, dissertations, and patent literature were reviewed to determine the state-of-the-art of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and drilling technologies and the constraints to wider application of these technologies. The impacts of EOR on the environment and the constraints to the application of EOR due to environmental regulations were also reviewed. A review of well documented EOR field projects showed that in addition to the technical constraints, management factors also contributed to the lower-than-predicted oil recovery in some of the projects reviewed. DOE-sponsored projects were reviewed, and the achievements by these projects and the constraints which these projects were designed to overcome were also identified. Methods of technology transfer utilized by the DOE were reviewed, and several recommendations for future technology transfer were made. Finally, several research areas were identified and recommended to maximize economic producibility of the domestic oil resource. 14 figs., 41 tabs.

  20. Dating of 'young' groundwaters using environmental tracers: advantages, applications, and research needs.

    PubMed

    Newman, Brent D; Osenbrück, Karsten; Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner; Solomon, D Kip; Cook, Peter; Rózański, Kazimierz; Kipfer, Rolf

    2010-09-01

    Many problems related to groundwater supply and quality, as well as groundwater-dependent ecosystems require some understanding of the timescales of flow and transport. For example, increased concern about the vulnerabilities of 'young' groundwaters (less than ~1000 years) to overexploitation, contamination, and land use/climate change effects are driving the need to understand flow and transport processes that occur over decadal, annual, or shorter timescales. Over the last few decades, a powerful suite of environmental tracers has emerged that can be used to interrogate a wide variety of young groundwater systems and provide information about groundwater ages/residence times appropriate to the timescales over which these systems respond. These tracer methods have distinct advantages over traditional approaches providing information about groundwater systems that would likely not be obtainable otherwise. The objective of this paper is to discuss how environmental tracers are used to characterise young groundwater systems so that more researchers, water managers, and policy-makers are aware of the value of environmental tracer approaches and can apply them in appropriate ways. We also discuss areas where additional research is required to improve ease of use and extend quantitative interpretations of tracer results.

  1. The Value and Need for Research on the History of the Educational Research and Measurements Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhart, Max D.

    The theory and practice of education have been profoundly influenced since 1900 by the educational research and the educational testing movements. These movements deserve greatly increased historical research. Many current innovations in education have been tried in the past and found wanting. Study of the pioneer educational researches reveals…

  2. Identifying Community Needs and Resources in a Native Community: A Research Partnership in the Pacific Northwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Lisa Rey; Donovan, Dennis M.; Sigo, Robin L. W.

    2010-01-01

    Indigenous communities have engaged in needs and resources assessments for thousands of years. By blending CBPR/TPR approaches with community-driven assets and needs assessments, academic and community based researchers can work together to better understand and identify community strengths as well as issues of concern in Native communities. This…

  3. MANPOWER INVENTORY AND TRAINING NEEDS ANALYSIS. LOUISIANA DEPARTMENT OF HIGHWAYS MAINTENANCE RESEARCH PROJECT, REPORT NUMBER 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen (Roy) and Associates, Washington, DC.

    AS PART OF A LONG-RANGE (1965-69) RESEARCH PROJECT IN LOUISIANA, A STUDY (1) IDENTIFIED TRAINING NEEDS OF PERSONS SUPERVISING THE MAINTENANCE AND OPERATION OF HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES, FERRIES, AND EQUIPMENT, (2) ESTIMATED TRAINING NEEDS OF POTENTIAL SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL, (3) DETERMINED CHARACTERISTICS OF BOTH GROUPS, AND (4) MADE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR A…

  4. The Myth of Meeting Needs Revisited: The Case of Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawy, Robert; Armstrong, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Our primary objective in this paper is revisit a debate that was articulated 25 years ago in this journal in which it was argued that the idea of meeting needs in adult and continuing education is a myth. We extend the original analysis of need and apply it to the case of educational research. We look at the policy context, which has, in the…

  5. Local Authorities' Experiences of Improving Parental Confidence in the Special Educational Needs Process. LGA Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Richard; Macleod, Shona; Jeffes, Jennifer; Atkinson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    How can we help parents to understand the special educational needs (SEN) process? What sort of information and support do they need? This report details the results of research with SEN officers (or their equivalent) in 26 local authorities, covering: (1) the referral process; (2) early identification and intervention; (3) local authority and…

  6. Behavioral science in video games for children's diet and physical activity change: Key research needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innovative intervention programs are needed to overcome the limitations in previous programs that promoted change in diabetes risk behaviors in children. Serious video games show promise of changing dietary and physical activity behaviors, but research is needed on the optimal design of behavior-cha...

  7. Determining Data Information Literacy Needs: A Study of Students and Research Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jacob; Fosmire, Michael; Miller, C. C.; Nelson, Megan Sapp

    2011-01-01

    Researchers increasingly need to integrate the disposition, management, and curation of their data into their current workflows. However, it is not yet clear to what extent faculty and students are sufficiently prepared to take on these responsibilities. This paper articulates the need for a data information literacy program (DIL) to prepare…

  8. Evaluating mastery of biostatistics for medical researchers: need for a new assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Enders, Felicity

    2011-12-01

    Research training has enabled academic clinicians to contribute significantly to the body of medical research literature. Biostatistics represents a critical methodological skill for such researchers, as statistical methods are increasingly a necessary part of medical research. However, there is no validated knowledge and skills assessment for graduate level biostatistics for academic medical researchers. In this paper, I review graduate level statistical competencies and existing instruments intended to assess physicians' ability to read the medical literature and for undergraduate statistics for their alignment with core competencies necessary for successful use of statistics. This analysis shows a need for a new instrument to assess biostatistical competencies for medical researchers.

  9. Needs Assessment for Research Use of High-Throughput Sequencing at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Albert; Legowski, Elizabeth; Chakka, Anish; Chandran, Uma R; Barmada, M Michael; LaFramboise, William A; Berg, Jeremy; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) methods are driving profound changes in biomedical research, with a growing impact on patient care. Many academic medical centers are evaluating potential models to prepare for the rapid increase in NGS information needs. This study sought to investigate (1) how and where sequencing data is generated and analyzed, (2) research objectives and goals for NGS, (3) workforce capacity and unmet needs, (4) storage capacity and unmet needs, (5) available and anticipated funding resources, and (6) future challenges. As a precursor to informed decision making at our institution, we undertook a systematic needs assessment of investigators using survey methods. We recruited 331 investigators from over 60 departments and divisions at the University of Pittsburgh Schools of Health Sciences and had 140 respondents, or a 42% response rate. Results suggest that both sequencing and analysis bottlenecks currently exist. Significant educational needs were identified, including both investigator-focused needs, such as selection of NGS methods suitable for specific research objectives, and program-focused needs, such as support for training an analytic workforce. The absence of centralized infrastructure was identified as an important institutional gap. Key principles for organizations managing this change were formulated based on the survey responses. This needs assessment provides an in-depth case study which may be useful to other academic medical centers as they identify and plan for future needs.

  10. Needs Assessment for Research Use of High-Throughput Sequencing at a Large Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Geskin, Albert; Legowski, Elizabeth; Chakka, Anish; Chandran, Uma R; Barmada, M. Michael; LaFramboise, William A.; Berg, Jeremy; Jacobson, Rebecca S.

    2015-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) methods are driving profound changes in biomedical research, with a growing impact on patient care. Many academic medical centers are evaluating potential models to prepare for the rapid increase in NGS information needs. This study sought to investigate (1) how and where sequencing data is generated and analyzed, (2) research objectives and goals for NGS, (3) workforce capacity and unmet needs, (4) storage capacity and unmet needs, (5) available and anticipated funding resources, and (6) future challenges. As a precursor to informed decision making at our institution, we undertook a systematic needs assessment of investigators using survey methods. We recruited 331 investigators from over 60 departments and divisions at the University of Pittsburgh Schools of Health Sciences and had 140 respondents, or a 42% response rate. Results suggest that both sequencing and analysis bottlenecks currently exist. Significant educational needs were identified, including both investigator-focused needs, such as selection of NGS methods suitable for specific research objectives, and program-focused needs, such as support for training an analytic workforce. The absence of centralized infrastructure was identified as an important institutional gap. Key principles for organizations managing this change were formulated based on the survey responses. This needs assessment provides an in-depth case study which may be useful to other academic medical centers as they identify and plan for future needs. PMID:26115441

  11. Reflections on Doctoral Supervision: Drawing from the Experiences of Students with Additional Learning Needs in Two Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Bethan

    2015-01-01

    Supervision is an essential part of doctoral study, consisting of relationship and process aspects, underpinned by a range of values. To date there has been limited research specifically about disabled doctoral students' experiences of supervision. This paper draws on qualitative, narrative interviews about doctoral supervision with disabled…

  12. 48 CFR 312.202(d) - Market research and description of agency need.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market research and description of agency need. 312.202(d) Section 312.202(d) Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND... for the Acquisition of Commercial Items 312.202(d) Market research and description of agency...

  13. Sharing the Focus: Engaging with Support Workers to Include People with Communication Needs in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Deborah; Fisher, Karen R.; Robinson, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Inclusive research is an increasing expectation to value and include people's voice in research and evaluations intended to benefit them. The active participation of people with communication support needs can be difficult due to the practical constraints of evaluations. One technique is to engage with workers who are familiar with the person, but…

  14. Academic Research Equipment and Equipment Needs in Selected Science and Engineering Fields: 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This monograph is one in a series of analytical reports presenting findings from the National Science Foundation's 1989-90 National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs. This report documents current status and recent trends in the amounts, costs, and kinds of academic research equipment in seven major…

  15. A Research Agenda for the Common Core State Standards: What Information Do Policymakers Need?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentner, Diane Stark; Ferguson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This report looks specifically at the information and data needs of policymakers related to the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the types of research that could provide this information. The ideas in this report were informed by a series of meetings and discussions about a possible research agenda for the Common Core, sponsored by the…

  16. The Revival of Research Circles: Meeting the Needs of Modern Aging and the Third Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostlund, Britt

    2008-01-01

    This article provides evidence that it is worthwhile to reconsider the traditional research circle method as a means of involving people in the third age in fulfilling their needs to participate in learning activities and make their voices heard. The findings are based on three cases of research circles consistently driven by the interests of the…

  17. What Research Administrators Need to Know about Researcher Development: Towards a New Conceptual Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Located within the recently emerged field of researcher development, this article represents an attempt to make a key theoretical contribution to its knowledge base through a conceptual analysis. It presents as propositional knowledge an original theoretical model of the componential structure of researcher development, as interpreted and defined…

  18. Bioenergy Research and Strategic Planning: The Need for both Proactive and Reactive research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Public policy typically refers to governmental actions such as laws, regulatory measures, and funding decisions for a specified issue. As scientists, we should strive to provide unbiased, research information on which strategic planning and long-term goals can be based. However, research can contrib...

  19. Meeting the Challenge of Adolescent Literacy: Research We Have, Research We Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Mark W., Ed.; Freidhoff, Joseph R., Ed.; Sherry, Michael B., Ed.; Tuckey, Steven Forbes, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    In this concise, thought-provoking book, prominent researchers analyze existing knowledge on adolescent literacy, examine the implications for classroom instruction, and offer specific goals for future research. The volume reviews cutting-edge approaches to understanding the unique features of teaching and learning in secondary schools. Particular…

  20. Recommendations concerning research and model evaluation needs to support breeder reactor environmental radiological assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C. W.; Dunning, Jr., D. E.; Etnier, E. L.; Kocher, D. C.; McDowell-Boyer, L. M.; Meyer, H. R.; Rohwer, P. S.

    1980-12-01

    Purpose of this report is to present recommendations concerning needs for model evaluations, environmental research, and biomedical research to support breeder reactor environmental radiological assessments. More data are needed to specify dry deposition velocities and to validate plume depletion models. More atmospheric dispersion data are required to characterize flow near buildings, in complex terrain, and for travel distances at 100 km or more. Field data are needed for terrestrial food chain transport models, especially those used to assess the impact of acute radionuclide releases. Efforts are needed to develop models for the estimation of dose from external exposure to photons from a finite, elevated plume resulting from an acute radionuclide release to the atmosphere. Estimates of doses to man from internally deposited radionuclides require scrutiny. Further study of tritium is needed to determine its dependence on dose and dose rate and to specify the relative toxicity of various physiochemical forms of tritium in the environment.

  1. Fire Research in the United States--The Challenge of Meeting Changing Management and Policy Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conard, S. G.

    2002-05-01

    Since the beginnings of government-sponsored fire research in the United States in the early 1900s, fire research has had close ties with fire management. However, as the social, economic, and environmental impacts of wildland fires and their management are increasingly recognized by the broader land management and environmental policy communities and by Congress, the roles, funding, and potential impacts of fire-related research are changing rapidly. Fire research is increasingly interdisciplinary and multiscalar. It is increasingly addressing a broader range of issues that require new competencies, new collaborations, new tools, and a strong vision of future needs. Fire is a dominant disturbance process in many terrestrial ecosystems, and its wise management is critical to society, to ecosystem health, and to resource sustainability. The challenges to fire research are great, the issues are complex. Developing research programs to meet these challenges is critical to ensuring protection of life and property, while meeting resource needs and maintaining a healthy environment.

  2. Critical uncertainties and research needs for the restoration and conservation of native lampreys in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mesa, Matthew G.; Copeland, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    We briefly reviewed the literature, queried selected researchers, and drew upon our own experience to describe some critical uncertainties and research needs for the conservation and restoration of native lampreys in North America. We parsed the uncertainties and research needs into five general categories: (1) population status; (2) systematics; (3) passage at dams, screens, and other structures; (4) species identification in the field; and (5) geneal biology and ecology. For each topic, we describe why the subject is important for lampreys, briefly smmarize our current state of knowledge, and discuss the key data or information gaps.

  3. [The need for research to support the emergence of alternative animal health systems].

    PubMed

    Domenech, J; Bonnet, P; Renard, J F

    2004-04-01

    Animal diseases remain one of the main problems for livestock production in terms of trade development, poverty reduction and public health. Animal health systems are complex because of the diversity of the parties involved and because of various changes in the delivery of veterinary services, such as the redefinition of the roles of the public and private sectors. It is, therefore, often difficult to assess the global performance of animal health systems and sub-systems in terms of their medical, economic and social effectiveness. In addition, the necessary reliability of the health information obtained leads to certification of the status of regions and countries with regard to epizootics, which requires a high degree of standardisation and conformity with international norms. An assessment therefore needs to be made of the advantages of alternative systems compared with conventional systems. An animal health system should be seen as a whole, and when assessing its overall performance several things must be taken into account, e.g. the markets for products and the sometimes contradictory interests of all the different parties involved. There are, therefore, many research needs and avenues to be pursued, including: the methods, data and tools required for assessing the effectiveness of systems, including a definition of what constitutes a reliable indicator; the factors that determine the health of a herd; having a clearer idea of what will affect herd health will make it possible to map risk indicators and animal health care needs; the design and management of realistic and harmonised animal health information systems whose indicators provide reliable measurements of health; the function, organisation and effectiveness of participative surveillance approaches; the definition and effectiveness of animal health contracts, such as health mandates between the State and private veterinarians; the function and role of livestock auxiliaries; the establishment of

  4. Exploring paradigms in postpartum depression research: the need for feminist pragmatism.

    PubMed

    Mollard, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) is an important area of women's health research internationally and across disciplines. There is no guiding paradigm, however, to ensure that PPD research results translate to women on a global level. This commentary builds on the work of Doucet, Letourneau, and Stoppard ( 2010 ) to determine a "best fit" paradigm with which to guide PPD research. Postpositivism, critical theory, constructivism, and pragmatism are combined with a feminist ideology and critiqued as potential guiding paradigms for PPD research. After thorough examination, I conclude the need for further use of a feminist pragmatist paradigm in PPD research.

  5. Identifying Community Needs and Resources in a Native Community: A Research Partnership in the Pacific Northwest

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Dennis M.; Sigo, Robin L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Indigenous communities have engaged in needs and resources assessments for thousands of years. By blending CBPR/TPR approaches with community-driven assets and needs assessments, academic and community based researchers can work together to better understand and identify community strengths as well as issues of concern in Native communities. This best practice approach can set research agendas that are relevant to Native communities and result in interventions and health promotion programs that are respectful of Tribal sovereignty and that incorporate unique traditions and strengths of Native communities. A successful research partnership to develop and implement a needs and resources assessment using CBPR/TPR approaches is presented using a case study that can be used as a model for other research partnerships. PMID:23123765

  6. White Sturgeon Research Needs: Workshop Results, Seattle, Washington, November 3-4, 1983.

    SciTech Connect

    Fickeisen, Duane H.; Neitzel, D.A.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the results of a workshop to develop a research program for Columbia River Basin white surgeon. Invited participants developed a list of white sturgeon research needs and rationale for ranking the relative importance of the research needs. The highest ranked research needs were: define physical habitat requirements (substrate, flow, water quality) for early life history stages; identify genetic stocks; assess population status (e.g., distribution, densities, age-structure, year-class strength, age-specific mortality, disease, parasitism); assess reproductive status (e.g., spawning success, recruitment, age/size-dependent fecundity); develop new sampling techniques and gear for collecting early life history stages; assess gametogenesis (timing of maturation, frequency of spawning), including effects of environmental factors on gonadal development; and define physical habitat requirements (substrate, flow, water quality) for spawning. 2 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Institutional Research, Fiscal Year 1978: OASES Community Needs Assessment. Research Monograph XIII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Oklahoma City Junior Coll., OK.

    A needs assessment survey of the community surrounding the Open Access Satellite Education Services Center was conducted by South Oklahoma City Junior College in March 1978 to determine levels of interest in educational activities. Of a sample of 288 people, whose names were taken from the local telephone directory, 52% refused to answer any…

  8. Women, Reproductive Rights, and HIV/AIDS: Issues on Which Research and Interventions are Still Needed

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    From 2002 to 2005, two literature reviews identified a number of reproductive-health issues that appeared to be relatively neglected in relation to HIV/AIDS: contraceptive information tailored to the needs of HIV-positive people; voluntary HIV counselling and testing during antenatal care, labour, and delivery; parenting options for HIV-positive people besides pregnancy through unprotected intercourse (i.e. assisted conception and legal adoption or foster care); unwanted pregnancy; and abortion-related care. An additional finding was that stigma and discrimination were frequently cited as barriers to enjoyment of reproductive rights by HIV-positive women. Subsequently, a pilot project was initiated in which non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in developing countries used benchmarks to ascertain whether these neglected issues were addressed in local programmes and interventions serving women affected by HIV and AIDS. The benchmarks also assessed whether policies and programmes paid attention to the human and reproductive rights of HIV-positive women. This paper describes the main findings from the two exercises in relation to contraception for women living with HIV or AIDS, abortion-related care, legal adoption by HIV-positive parents, and reproductive rights. It concludes with a number of recommendations on topics to be incorporated into the international research agenda, policies, and programmes in the field of HIV/AIDS. PMID:17591338

  9. Aeronautical Communications Research and Development Needs for Future Air Traffic Management Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Continuing growth in regional and global air travel has resulted in increasing traffic congestion in the air and on the ground. In spite of occasional temporary downturns due to economic recessions and catastrophic events, average growth rates of air travel have remained high since the 1960s. The resulting congestion, which constrains expansion of the air transportation industry, inflicts schedule delays and decreases overall system efficiency, creating a pressing need to develop more efficient methods of air traffic management (ATM). New ATM techniques, procedures, air space automation methods, and decision support tools are being researched and developed for deployment in time frames stretching from the next few years to the year 2020 and beyond. As these methods become more advanced and increase in complexity, the requirements for information generation, sharing and transfer among the relevant entities in the ATM system increase dramatically. However, current aeronautical communications systems will be inadequate to meet the future information transfer demands created by these advanced ATM systems. Therefore, the NASA Glenn Research Center is undertaking research programs to develop communication, methods and key technologies that can meet these future requirements. As part of this process, studies, workshops, testing and experimentation, and research and analysis have established a number of research and technology development needs. The purpose of this paper is to outline the critical research and technology needs that have been identified in these activities, and explain how these needs have been determined.

  10. Coated particle fuel for radioisotope power systems and heater units: status and future research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Tournier, Jean-Michel; Sholtis, Joseph A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    Coated particle fuel has been proposed recently for use in Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) and Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) for a variety of space missions requiring power levels from mWs to 10's or even hundreds of Watts. It can be made into different shapes and sizes of solid compacts, heating tapes, or paints. Using a conservative design approach, this fuel form could increase by 2.3-2.4 times the thermal power output of a LWRHU, while offering promise of enhanced safety. These performance figures are based on using single-size (500 μm) compacts of ZrC coated 238PuO2 kernels and assuming 10% and 5% He release, respectively, at 1723 K, following 10 years of storage. Using binary-size (300 and 1200 μm) fuel kernels in the compact increases the thermal power output by an additional 15%. 238PuO2 fuel kernels are intentionally sized (>=300 μm in diameter) to prevent any adverse radiological effects. They are non-respirable and non-inhalable and, if ingested, would simply be excreted with no radiological effects. The 238PuO2 fuel kernels are contained within a strong ZrC coating, which is designed to fully retain the fuel and the helium gas. Helium retention in large grain (>=300 μm) granular and polycrystalline fuel kernels is possible even at high temperatures (>1700 K). The former could be fabricated using binderless agglomeration or similar processes, while the latter could be fabricated using Sol-Gel or thermal plasma processes, with potentially less radioactive waste and fabrication contamination. In addition to summarizing the results of a recent effort investigating the performance of coated fuel particle compact (CPFC) and helium gas release, this paper identifies and discusses future research and testing needs. .

  11. A Review of Research on the Literacy of Students with Visual Impairments and Additional Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Amy T.; Pogrund, Rona L.

    2009-01-01

    Research on the development of literacy in children with visual impairments and additional disabilities is minimal even though these children make up approximately 65% of the population of children with visual impairments. This article reports on emerging themes that were explored after a review of the literature revealed nine literacy studies…

  12. Research needs in drinking water: a basis in regulations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jacangelo, Joseph G; Askenaizer, Daniel J; Schwab, Kellogg

    2006-01-01

    Regulations are one of the primary drivers for research on contaminants in drinking water in the United States. Since the original Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), enacted in 1974, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has developed a series of drinking water regulations. These regulations are focused on protecting public health. When evaluating available information on whether or not to regulate a constituent in drinking water, USEPA considers available information on health effects and occurrence of the constituent. The authors provide their view of the research needed for these contaminants. For inorganics, more data are needed on perchlorate. For organics, greater treatment and health effects information is warranted for N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products. Finally, more research is needed on analytical methods for noroviruses and other emerging pathogens. PMID:16493893

  13. Leadership for Researcher Development: What Research Leaders Need to Know and Understand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Research leadership, a much neglected area of educational leadership and management, is disadvantaged by having an underdeveloped and inadequate knowledge base. This article represents a contribution to this knowledge base through a conceptual analysis. It presents as propositional knowledge an original theoretical model of the componential…

  14. International Research Workshop on Integrating GIS and Environmental Modeling: Problems, Prospects, and Research Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Bradley; Meeson, Blanche W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 4th International Conference on Integrating GIS and Environmental Modeling (GIS/EM4) was convened in Banff, Canada, September 2-8, 2000 at The Banff Centre for Conferences. The meeting's purpose, like it's predecessors was to reformulate, each three to four years, the collaborative research agenda for integrating spatio-temporal analysis with environmental simulation modeling.

  15. Research Review: DSM-V Conduct Disorder--Research Needs for an Evidence Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise; Jaffee, Sara R.; Kim-Cohen, Julia; Koenen, Karestan C.; Odgers, Candice L.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Viding, Essi

    2008-01-01

    This article charts a strategic research course toward an empirical foundation for the diagnosis of conduct disorder in the forthcoming DSM-V. Since the DSM-IV appeared in 1994, an impressive amount of new information about conduct disorder has emerged. As a result of this new knowledge, reasonable rationales have been put forward for adding to…

  16. "You Need to Let Your Voice Be Heard": Research Participants' Views on Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, K. E.; Kidney, C. A.; Patka, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities have had regrettably few opportunities to voice their opinions on aspects of research with which they have had direct experience. Understanding and responding to these views can contribute to policies and practices that increasingly treat people as they desire to be treated.…

  17. The NIHR Public Health Research Programme: responding to local authority research needs in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Dorling, Hannah; Cook, Andrew; Ollerhead, Liz; Westmore, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The remit of the National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research (PHR) Programme is to evaluate public health interventions, providing new knowledge on the benefits, costs, acceptability and wider impacts of interventions, set outside of the National Health Service, intended to improve the health of the public and reduce inequalities. This paper illustrates how the PHR Programme is providing new knowledge for public health decision makers, based on the nine key areas for local authority public health action, described by the King's Fund. Many funded PHR projects are evaluating interventions, applied in a range of settings, across the identified key areas for local authority influence. For example, research has been funded on children and young people, and for some of the wider determinants of health, such as housing and travel. Other factors, such as spatial planning, or open and green spaces and leisure, are less represented in the PHR Programme. Further opportunities in research include interventions to improve the health of adolescents, adults in workplaces, and communities. Building evidence for public health interventions at local authority level is important to prioritise and implement effective changes to improve population health. PMID:26652743

  18. The Need for District Support for School Reform: What the Researchers Say. Research Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appelbaum, Deborah

    This article focuses on the school district's role in implementing Comprehensive School Reform (CSR). Research shows that effective district support for CSR varies from district to district. This is due, in part, to the fact that many prior models bypassed the district, operating under the belief that reform would be more effective if it targeted…

  19. The NIHR Public Health Research Programme: responding to local authority research needs in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Dorling, Hannah; Cook, Andrew; Ollerhead, Liz; Westmore, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The remit of the National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research (PHR) Programme is to evaluate public health interventions, providing new knowledge on the benefits, costs, acceptability and wider impacts of interventions, set outside of the National Health Service, intended to improve the health of the public and reduce inequalities. This paper illustrates how the PHR Programme is providing new knowledge for public health decision makers, based on the nine key areas for local authority public health action, described by the King's Fund. Many funded PHR projects are evaluating interventions, applied in a range of settings, across the identified key areas for local authority influence. For example, research has been funded on children and young people, and for some of the wider determinants of health, such as housing and travel. Other factors, such as spatial planning, or open and green spaces and leisure, are less represented in the PHR Programme. Further opportunities in research include interventions to improve the health of adolescents, adults in workplaces, and communities. Building evidence for public health interventions at local authority level is important to prioritise and implement effective changes to improve population health.

  20. Technology needs assessment of an atmospheric observation system for tropospheric research missions, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, D. R.; Bortner, M. H.; Grenda, R. N.; Frippel, G. G.; Halsey, H.; Neste, S. L.; Kritikos, H.; Keafer, L. S.; Deryder, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    The technology advancements needed to implement the atmospheric observation satellite systems for air quality research were identified. Tropospheric measurements are considered. The measurements and sensors are based on a model of knowledge objectives in atmospheric science. A set of potential missions and attendant spacecraft and sensors is postulated. The results show that the predominant technology needs will be in passive and active sensors for accurate and frequent global measurements of trace gas concentration profiles.

  1. Behavioral science in video games for children's diet and physical activity change: key research needs.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, Tom; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Debbe; Buday, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Innovative intervention programs are needed to overcome the limitations in previous programs that promoted change in diabetes risk behaviors in children. Serious video games show promise of changing dietary and physical activity behaviors, but research is needed on the optimal design of behavior-change procedures in video games, the mechanisms that account for changes obtained, and the groups in which these interventions work best. Such research will permit the optimal design of serious video games for diabetes and obesity prevention in the future.

  2. A syllabus for research ethics committees: training needs and resources in different European countries.

    PubMed

    Cairoli, Ester; Davies, Hugh T; Helm, Jürgen; Hook, Georg; Knupfer, Petra; Wells, Frank

    2012-03-01

    This paper reports a European Forum for Good Clinical Practice workshop held in 2011 to consider a research ethics committee training syllabus, subsequent training needs and resources. The syllabus that was developed was divided into four competencies: committee working; scientific method; ethical analysis and the regulatory framework. Appropriate training needs for each, with possible resources, were discussed. Lack of funding for training was reported as a major problem but affordable alternatives were debated. Strengths and weaknesses of this approach were discussed and the resultant proposal will be disseminated through the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice and the research ethics committees of member states.

  3. An overview of aerodynamic research and technology requirements as related to some military needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearman, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    Based on unclassified sources, a general review is presented of some military needs in light of the perceived U.S.S.R. doctrine, force balances, inventory growth, inventory items, and current actions. The Soviets appear to be attempting to increase their sphere of influence throught economic and political control as well as possible military control of land, sea, air, and space. To offset such possibilities, certain areas of deterrent needs that the Western World might pursue are suggested. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of research and technology related to aerospace systems as part of the deterrent needs.

  4. Cancer Control Research Training for Native Researchers: A Model for Development of Additional Native Researcher Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Thomas M.; Dunn, Esther; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Joe, Jennie

    2005-01-01

    Several social and biological scientists who have Native status are engaged in productive research careers, but the encouragement that has been offered to Native students to formulate career goals devoted to cancer etiology or cancer control in Native peoples has had limited success. Hence, the Native Researchers' Cancer Control Training Program…

  5. Children with Cochlear Implants and Complex Needs: A Review of Outcome Research and Psychological Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lindsay C.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the number of children receiving cochlear implants who have significant disabilities in addition to their deafness has increased substantially. However, in comparison with the extensive literature on speech, language, and communication outcomes following pediatric implantation in children without complex needs, the available…

  6. Exploratory investigation of the need for and feasibility of a Lower Atmosphere Research Satellite (LARS) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The need for and feasibility of a research satellite program for the intensive study of the lower atmosphere (the troposphere and lower stratosphere) is discussed. The priorities for scientific investigation of the lower atmosphere during the next decade are examined. The findings of the study are concerned with identification of those broad research issues of highest priority and, in particular, with those that are most appropriate for investigation from space platforms.

  7. Research needs to better understand Lake Ontario ecosystem function: A workshop summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, Thomas J.; Rudstam, Lars G.; Watkins, James M.; Johnson, Timothy B.; Weidel, Brian C.; Koops, Marten A.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Ontario investigators discussed and interpreted published and unpublished information during two workshops to assess our current understanding of Lake Ontario ecosystem function and to identify research needs to guide future research and monitoring activities. The purpose of this commentary is to summarize key investigative themes and hypotheses that emerged from the workshops. The outcomes of the workshop discussions are organized under four themes: spatial linkages and interactions, drivers of primary production, trophic transfer, and human interactions.

  8. A proposal to speed translation of healthcare research into practice: dramatic change is needed.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Rodger; Glasgow, Russell E

    2011-06-01

    Efficacy trials have generated interventions to improve health behaviors and biomarkers. However, these efforts have had limited impact on practice and policy. It is suggested that key methodologic and contextual issues have contributed to this state of affairs. Current research paradigms generally have not provided the answers needed for more probable and more rapid translation. A major shift is proposed to produce research with more rapid clinical, public health, and policy impact.

  9. Aviation human factors research in US universities: Potential contributions to national needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dismukes, R. Key

    1994-01-01

    Universities can and should make vital contributions to national needs in aviation human factors. However, to guide and utilize university research effectively we must understand what types of expertise and facilities universities can bring to bear on aviation problems. We should be aware of where relevant research is already underway and where untapped potential exists. How does the character of research in universities differ from and complement research in government and industry laboratories? What conditions would encourage universities to focus on national priorities and would promote high quality, relevant research? This paper attempts to address these issues. It is based on a survey conducted by the author, which included site visits to several universities, telephone interviews with faculty members at other universities, and a search of the aviation human factors research literature.

  10. Basic research needs and priorities in solar energy. Volume I. Executive summary. Technology crosscuts for DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Jayadev, T S; Roessner, D

    1980-01-01

    This report identifies, describes, and recommends priorities for basic research important to the future development of solar energy. In response to a request from the US Department of Energy, SERI surveyed more than 120 leading scientists who were engaged in or knowledgeable of solar-related research. SERI scientists relied heavily on the opinions of scientists polled, but weighted their own recommendations and opinions equally. The result is an amalgam of national scientific opinion representing the views of key researchers in relevant disciplines and of SERI staff members. The Scientific disciplines included in the report are: chemistry, biology, materials sciences, engineering and mathematics, and the social and behavioral sciences. Each discipline is subdivided into two to five topical areas and, wintin each topical area, research needs are described and ranked according to the priorities suggested in the survey. Three categories of priority were established: Crucial, important, and needed. A narrative accompanying the descripton of research needs in each topical area discusses the importance of research in the area for solar energy development and presents the bases for the priority rankings recommended.

  11. Research brief: the need for historically grounded HIV/AIDS prevention research among Native Americans.

    PubMed

    Lowe, John

    2007-01-01

    This is a brief report that summarizes the need for historically grounded HIV prevention research among Native Americans living in the United States. It illustrates the intersection of culture and history, showing that ethnic groups can respond to historical traumatic events for generations, often to the detriment of individual and collective health. PMID:17403492

  12. Needed Research in the Assessment and Monitoring of the Quality of Medical Care. NCHSR Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donabedian, Avedis

    In this paper the author assesses the state-of-the-art on quality assessment and monitoring of medical care and makes recommendations for needed research in this area. Following a brief introduction, the content is presented in two sections. The first, providing a frame of reference, covers definitions; quality assessment and program evaluation;…

  13. Research Needs in Fire Safety for the Human Exploration and Utilization of Space: Proceedings and Research Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop documented in this publication was to bring together personnel responsible for the design and operations of the International Space Station (ISS) and the fire protection research community to review the current knowledge in fire safety relative to spacecraft. From this review, research needs were identified that were then used to formulate a research plan with specific objectives. In this document, I have attempted to capture the very informative and lively discussions that occurred in the plenary sessions and the working groups. I hope that it will be useful to readers and serve as a significant step in assuring fire protection for the crews of current and future spacecraft.

  14. Basic Research Needs for Geosciences: Facilitating 21st Century Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, D. J.; Orr, F. M.; Benson, S. M.; Celia, M.; Felmy, A.; Nagy, K. L.; Fogg, G. E.; Snieder, R.; Davis, J.; Pruess, K.; Friedmann, J.; Peters, M.; Woodward, N. B.; Dobson, P.; Talamini, K.; Saarni, M.

    2007-06-01

    To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

  15. Stakeholder Perceptions of the Need for Research on Elements of Service Dog Partnerships in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Margaret K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the perceived need for research on elements of successful service dog partnerships in the workplace outlined by stakeholders in an exploratory study. Method: A structured mixed methods approach was used to gather ideas from people with service dogs, trainers, vocational rehabilitation counselors, and other health care…

  16. HIV and Aging: State of Knowledge and Areas of Critical Need for Research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    HIV risk behaviors, susceptibility to HIV acquisition, progression of disease after infection, and response to anti-retroviral therapy all vary by age. In those living with HIV, current effective treatment has increased the median life expectancy to > 70 years of age. Biologic, medical, individual social and societal issues change as one ages with HIV infection, but there has been only a small amount of research in this field. Therefore, the Office of AIDS Research of the National Institutes of Health commissioned a working group to develop an outline of the current state of knowledge and areas of critical need for research in HIV and Aging; the working groups’ findings and recommendations are summarized in this report. Key overarching themes identified by the group included: multi-morbidity, poly-pharmacy and the need to emphasize maintenance of function; the complexity of assessing HIV vs. treatment effects vs. aging vs. concurrent disease; the inter-related mechanisms of immune senescence, inflammation and hypercoagulability; the utility of multi-variable indices for predicting outcomes; a need to emphasize human studies to account for complexity; and a required focus on issues of community support, caregivers and systems infrastructure. Critical resources are needed to enact this research agenda and include expanded review panel expertise in aging, functional measures and multi-morbidity, as well as facilitated use and continued funding to allow long-term follow-up of cohorts aging with HIV. PMID:22688010

  17. Training: Who Needs It? Research Report 1995. Key Issues for Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Training Co., London (England).

    Aimed at all those involved in the supply of training and vocational education for the hospitality industry, this report summarizes findings of the research report, "Training Who Needs It?" It draws out and explores in more detail key issues relating to the provision of training, support, and related initiatives for the industry. Section 1…

  18. NATIONAL RESEARCH NEEDS CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS: RISK-BASED DECISION MAKING FOR ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Research Needs Conference Proceedings consist of a description of the background for the project and a series of white papers on the topics of integrated risk assessment/management for decentralized wastewater systems, design and performance of onsite soil adsorption systems,...

  19. Improving Access to Needed Health Care Improves Low-Income Children's Quality of Life: Research Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seid, Michael. Varni, James W.; Cummings, Leslie; Schonlau, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    This research brief describes an examination of the effect of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) on children's access to needed health services and on their quality of life. The analysis focused on a sample of California families who had recently enrolled in that state's SCHIP. The study found that, after enrollment, children…

  20. Urban Indian Voices: A Community-Based Participatory Research Health and Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Chad V.; Bartgis, Jami; Worley, Jody A.; Hellman, Chan M.; Burkhart, Russell

    2010-01-01

    This community-based participatory research (CBPR) project utilized a mixed-methods survey design to identify urban (Tulsa, OK) American Indian (AI) strengths and needs. Six hundred fifty AIs (550 adults and 100 youth) were surveyed regarding their attitudes and beliefs about their community. These results were used in conjunction with other…

  1. Serving the Needs of Challenged Students at a Private Shanghai School: An Action Research Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    This action research started in year 2009 at LIU Shanghai, a private school for children with autism spectrum disorder, to serve the needs of challenged students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify the strengths and challenges of the program, plus solicit recommendations from the parents and teachers for making improvements. The…

  2. Leisure Activity Participation and Handicapped Populations: An Assessment of Research Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoven, Peter J.; Goldstein, Judith E.

    Presented is a report of a conference on research needs in the area of leisure time activity for handicapped persons. Reviewed are the initial conference concept and its evaluation into five categories of concern (leisure concepts, attitudinal barriers, activity analysis, design/adaptation considerations, and education/counseling). Discussed are…

  3. Institutionalizing Student Outcomes Assessment: The Need for Better Research to Inform Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the organizational impediments and facilitators that influence the implementation of student learning outcomes assessment (SLOA). This review points to the importance of culture, leadership, and organizational policies to the implementation of SLOA. However, we need to approach research differently, both conceptually and…

  4. Assessment of research and development (R and D) needs in ammonia safety and environmental control

    SciTech Connect

    Brenchley, D.L.; Athey, G.F.; Bomelburg, H.J.

    1981-09-01

    This report characterizes the ammonia industry operations, reviews current knowledge of ammonia release and subsequent impacts, summarizes the status of release prevention and control methods and identify research and development needs for safety and environmental control. Appendices include: accidental spills and human exposure; adiabatic mixing of liquid nitrogen and air; fire and explosion hazards; and environmental impact rating tables. (PSB)

  5. Methodological Issues in Research: The Need for Improved Instrumentation and Model Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Harlingen, David L.

    This researcher investigated two problems: (1) the accuracy and validity of instruments which measure Piagetian levels of thought; and (2) the need for more detailed models of concrete and formal operational structures, both as they develop and consolidate, and in their most highly developed state. Several tasks such as the Piagetian correlations…

  6. Education and Training that Meets the Needs of Small Business: A Systematic Review of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawe, Susan; Nguyen, Nhi

    2007-01-01

    Small businesses account for the great majority of businesses and half the private sector employment in Australia, but only one third provide structured training for their employees. This study, a systematic review of existing research, set out to find clear evidence of intervention strategies that meet small business needs in relation to the…

  7. ASAS Centennial Paper: Future needs of research and extension in forage utilization.

    PubMed

    Rouquette, F M; Redmon, L A; Aiken, G E; Hill, G M; Sollenberger, L E; Andrae, J

    2009-01-01

    Forage-animal production agriculture is implementing infrastructure changes and management strategies to adjust to increased energy-related costs of fuel, feed grains, fertilizers, and seeds. The primary objectives of this position paper are to assess future research and extension scientific needs in forage utilization, financial support for the discipline, and changing status and number of scientists. A survey questionnaire returned from 25 land-grant universities in the eastern half of the United States rated the top 4 research needs as 1) pasture systems and efficiency of production; 2) interfacing with energy concerns; 3) forage cultivar evaluations and persistence; and 4) environment impacts. Plant-animal future research needs at 11 USDA-ARS regional locations are targeted at sustainable management and improved livestock performance, ecophysiology and ecology of grasslands, environment impacts, and improved technologies for nutritive value assessments. Extension scientists from 17 southern and northeastern states listed the top 3 needs as forage persistence, soil fertility and nutrient management, and pasture systems and efficiency of production. Grant funds currently provide more than 40% of land-grant university research and extension efforts in forage utilization, and scientists estimate that this support base will increase to 55 to 60% of the funding total by 2013. Reduced allocation of state and federal funding has contributed to a reduction in the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) scientists engaged in forage utilization research and extension activities. The current 25 state FTE conducting research number about 2.8 per state. This includes 10 states with >3, 11 states with <2, and 3 states with <1 FTE. Increased interest in cellulosic energy, climate change, and environmental impact may offer new opportunities for these FTE to participate in integrated cross-discipline research Extension programming, and technology transfer methods will change to

  8. Aviation human factors research in U.S. universities: Potential contributions to national needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key Dismukes, R.

    1994-01-01

    Univesity research can make vital contributions to national needs in aviation human factors (AHF). This article examines the types of expertise and facilities available in universities and explores how university capabilities complement the work of government laboratories. The AHF infrastructure is discussed and compared to other fields of applied research. Policy and funding issues are also examined. This study is based on a survey conducted by the author, which included site visits to several universities, telephone interviews with faculty members at other universities, and a search of the AHF research literature.

  9. National Research Needs Conference Proceedings: Risk-Based Decision Making for Onsite Wastewater Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    2001-03-01

    On May 19-20, 2000, the Research Needs Conference for ''Risk-Based Decision Making for Onsite Wastewater Treatment'' was convened in St. Louis, Missouri. The conference, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was the culmination of an eighteen-month-long effort by the National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) to assist onsite wastewater leadership in identifying critical research gaps in the field. The five ''White Papers'' included in this volume of Proceedings, along with the reviewer comments for four of these papers, provided the basis for extended discussion. Topics for the papers had been determined from research needs forums convened in three different areas of the country. Four major research areas were defined at the conclusion of the regional meetings: fate and transport of nutrients; fate and transport of pathogens; long-term performance of soil-absorption systems; and the economics of decentralized wastewater systems. National leaders were then identified to prepare white papers in each of these areas, and two reviewers were also selected to critique each of the papers at the research needs conference. Other experts were asked to prepare a white paper on risk assessment and risk management, and to incorporate specific onsite wastewater examples that had been cited in the regional meetings. The resulting papers and peer review comments summarize the existing literature. They also identify gaps relevant for rigorous risk-based decision-making.

  10. Research Needs for Fusion-Fission Hybrid Systems. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 30 - October 2, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-30

    Largely in anticipation of a possible nuclear renaissance, there has been an enthusiastic renewal of interest in the fusion-fission hybrid concept, driven primarily by some members of the fusion community. A fusion-fission hybrid consists of a neutron-producing fusion core surrounded by a fission blanket. Hybrids are of interest because of their potential to address the main long-term sustainability issues related to nuclear power: fuel supply, energy production, and waste management. As a result of this renewed interest, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with the participation of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), organized a three-day workshop in Gaithersburg, Maryland, from September 30 through October 2, 2009. Participants identified several goals. At the highest level, it was recognized that DOE does not currently support any R&D in the area of fusion-fission hybrids. The question to be addressed was whether or not hybrids offer sufficient promise to motivate DOE to initiate an R&D program in this area. At the next level, the workshop participants were asked to define the research needs and resources required to move the fusion-fission concept forward. The answer to the high-level question was given in two ways. On the one hand, when viewed as a standalone concept, the fusion-fission hybrid does indeed offer the promise of being able to address the sustainability issues associated with conventional nuclear power. On the other hand, when participants were asked whether these hybrid solutions are potentially more attractive than contemplated pure fission solutions (that is, fast burners and fast breeders), there was general consensus that this question could not be quantitatively answered based on the known technical information. Pure fission solutions are based largely on existing both fusion and nuclear technology, thereby prohibiting a fair side-by-side comparison

  11. Outpatient Management of Postbiopsy Pneumothorax with Small-Caliber Chest Tubes: Factors Affecting the Need for Prolonged Drainage and Additional Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay Hicks, Marshall E.; Wallace, Michael J.; Ahrar, Kamran; Madoff, David C.; Murthy, Ravi

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of outpatient management of postbiopsy pneumothoraces with small-caliber chest tubes and to assess the factors that influence the need for prolonged drainage or additional interventions.We evaluated the medical records of patients who were treated with small-caliber chest tubes attached to Heimlich valves for pneumothoraces resulting from image-guided transthoracic needle biopsy to determine the hospital admission rates, the number of days the catheters were left in place, and the need for further interventions. We also evaluated the patient, lesion, and biopsy technique characteristics to determine their influence on the need for prolonged catheter drainage or additional interventions. Of the 191 patients included in our study, 178 (93.2%) were treated as outpatients. Ten patients (5.2%) were admitted for chest tube-related problems, either for underwater suction (n = 8) or for pain control (n = 2). No further interventions were required in 146 patients (76.4%), with successful removal of the chest tubes the day after the biopsy procedure. Prolonged catheter drainage (mean, 4.3 days) was required in 44 patients (23%). Nineteen patients (9.9%) underwent additional interventions for management of pneumothorax. Presence of emphysema was noted more frequently in patients who required additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage than in those who did not (51.1% vs. 24.7%; p = 0.001).We conclude that use of the Heimlich valve allows safe and successful outpatient treatment of most patients requiring chest tube placement for postbiopsy pneumothorax. Additional interventions or prolonged chest tube drainage are needed more frequently in patients with emphysema in the needle path.

  12. Needs Assessment of the Healthcare Sector in the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Area. Research Report. Business Needs Assessment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Virginia Community Coll., Annandale. Office of Institutional Research.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the growing population of elderly citizens will result in an increased demand for healthcare services that will rise for a full 50 years. This study assesses the need for healthcare sector workers in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Information on the skills, education, and experience that…

  13. Structure, function and five basic needs of the global health research system

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Igor; Sridhar, Devi

    2016-01-01

    Background Two major initiatives that were set up to support and co–ordinate global health research efforts have been largely discontinued in recent years: the Global Forum for Health Research and World Health Organization's Department for Research Policy and Cooperation. These developments provide an interesting case study into the factors that contribute to the sustainability of initiatives to support and co–ordinate global health research in the 21st century. Methods We reviewed the history of attempts to govern, support or co–ordinate research in global health. Moreover, we studied the changes and shifts in funding flows attributed to global health research. This allowed us to map the structure of the global health research system, as it has evolved under the increased funding contributions of the past decade. Bearing in mind its structure, core functions and dynamic nature, we proposed a framework on how to effectively support the system to increase its efficiency. Results Based on our framework, which charted the structure and function of the global health research system and exposed places and roles for many stakeholders within the system, five basic needs emerged: (i) to co–ordinate funding among donors more effectively; (ii) to prioritize among many research ideas; (iii) to quickly recognize results of successful research; (iv) to ensure broad and rapid dissemination of results and their accessibility; and (v) to evaluate return on investments in health research. Conclusion The global health research system has evolved rapidly and spontaneously. It has not been optimally efficient, but it is possible to identify solutions that could improve this. There are already examples of effective responses for the need of prioritization of research questions (eg, the CHNRI method), quick recognition of important research (eg, systems used by editors of the leading journals) and rapid and broadly accessible publication of the new knowledge (eg, PLoS One

  14. Families of children with traumatic injuries identify needs for research and training.

    PubMed

    Lash, M; Russo, D C; Navalta, C P; Baryza, M J

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the survey responses of 67 families with children who were hospitalized after traumatic injuries. The survey was conducted during the pre-planning phase of a major research proposal on the rehabilitation of children who had been injured. The purpose of the survey was to involve families in the identification of needs and determination of priorities for research and training in childhood injuries. The first part of the survey focused on direct services that children and their families received through medical, psychosocial, educational and vocational interventions and providers. The second part concerned the immediate and long-term effects of a child's injury upon the family. Families were asked to indicate: (1) the direct care services they considered most important in their child's recovery; (2) areas needing more research and study; (3) training needed by professionals; and (4) information needed by families. Major findings were the importance to families of emergency room treatment and the quality of hospital care; concerns about communication between professionals and parents; the uncertainty of expectations for the future; and lack of information on community resources. Written comments emphasized the emotional impact of physical trauma upon families and the need for longitudinal research, with pediatric rehabilitation viewed as a broad spectrum of care starting with emergency room care and hospitalization and continuing through school and community programs. As a result of this survey several projects were initiated. They include: revision of head sheets distributed by emergency rooms, physician training in communication skills, preparation of families as service coordinators, and development of materials and programs specifically for families. PMID:24525578

  15. Caring for terminal patients in haematology: the urgent need of a new research agenda.

    PubMed

    Niscola, Pasquale; Tendas, Andrea; Giovannini, Marco; Scaramucci, Laura; Perrotti, Alessio; de Fabritiis, Paolo; Howell, Debra A

    2015-01-01

    Although major therapeutic advances have led to improved survival for many hematologic malignancies in recent years, survival remains poor for some disease subtypes and a substantial proportion of patients are ultimately destined to die from their disease and/or related complications. Despite this, there is evidence that patients are not always referred to palliative/home care services as often as those with other cancers, although this situation may be improving in some areas. More research is needed, however, to explore reasons for this and identify whether patients may consequently have unmet needs that impact on their quality of life at this time.

  16. Racism and Health II: A Needed Research Agenda for Effective Interventions.

    PubMed

    Williams, David R; Mohammed, Selina A

    2013-08-01

    This article reviews the empirical evidence that suggests that there is a solid foundation for more systematic research attention to the ways in which interventions that seek to reduce the multiple dimensions of racism can improve health and reduce disparities in health. First, research reveals that policies and procedures that seek to reduce institutional racism by improving neighborhood and educational quality and enhancing access to additional income, employment opportunities and other desirable resources can improve health. Second, research is reviewed that shows that there is the potential to improve health through interventions that can reduce cultural racism at the societal and individual level. Finally, research is presented that suggests that the adverse consequences of racism on health can be reduced through policies that maximize the health-enhancing capacities of medical care, address the social factors that initiate and sustain risk behaviors and empower individuals and communities to take control of their lives and health. Directions for future research are outlined.

  17. Racism and Health II: A Needed Research Agenda for Effective Interventions.

    PubMed

    Williams, David R; Mohammed, Selina A

    2013-08-01

    This article reviews the empirical evidence that suggests that there is a solid foundation for more systematic research attention to the ways in which interventions that seek to reduce the multiple dimensions of racism can improve health and reduce disparities in health. First, research reveals that policies and procedures that seek to reduce institutional racism by improving neighborhood and educational quality and enhancing access to additional income, employment opportunities and other desirable resources can improve health. Second, research is reviewed that shows that there is the potential to improve health through interventions that can reduce cultural racism at the societal and individual level. Finally, research is presented that suggests that the adverse consequences of racism on health can be reduced through policies that maximize the health-enhancing capacities of medical care, address the social factors that initiate and sustain risk behaviors and empower individuals and communities to take control of their lives and health. Directions for future research are outlined. PMID:24347667

  18. Racism and Health II: A Needed Research Agenda for Effective Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.; Mohammed, Selina A.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the empirical evidence that suggests that there is a solid foundation for more systematic research attention to the ways in which interventions that seek to reduce the multiple dimensions of racism can improve health and reduce disparities in health. First, research reveals that policies and procedures that seek to reduce institutional racism by improving neighborhood and educational quality and enhancing access to additional income, employment opportunities and other desirable resources can improve health. Second, research is reviewed that shows that there is the potential to improve health through interventions that can reduce cultural racism at the societal and individual level. Finally, research is presented that suggests that the adverse consequences of racism on health can be reduced through policies that maximize the health-enhancing capacities of medical care, address the social factors that initiate and sustain risk behaviors and empower individuals and communities to take control of their lives and health. Directions for future research are outlined. PMID:24347667

  19. Understanding Health-Care Needs of Sexual and Gender Minority Veterans: How Targeted Research and Policy Can Improve Health.

    PubMed

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Kauth, Michael R; Sandfort, Theo; Matza, Alexis R; Sullivan, J Cherry; Shipherd, Jillian C

    2014-03-01

    Given the size of the patient population of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), it is likely the largest single provider of health care for sexual and gender minority (SGM) individuals in the United States, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons. However, current VHA demographic data-collection strategies limit the understanding of how many SGM veterans there are, thereby making a population-based understanding of the health needs of SGM veterans receiving care in VHA difficult. In this article, we summarize the emergent research findings about SGM veterans and the first initiatives that have been implemented by VHA to promote quality care. Though the research on SGM veterans is in its infancy, it suggests that SGM veterans share some of the health risks noted in veterans generally and also risks associated with SGM status. Some promising resiliency factors have also been identified. These findings have implications for both VHA and non-VHA systems in the treatment of SGM veterans. However, more research on the unique needs of SGM veterans is needed to fully understand their health risks and resiliencies in addition to health-care utilization patterns.

  20. OAST Space Theme Workshop. Volume 3: Working group summary. 9: Aerothermodynamics (M-3). A: Statement. B: Technology needs (form 1). C. Priority assessment (form 2). D. Additional assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Twelve aerothermodynamic space technology needs were identified to reduce the design uncertainties in aerodynamic heating and forces experienced by heavy lift launch vehicles, orbit transfer vehicles, and advanced single stage to orbit vehicles for the space transportation system, and for probes, planetary surface landers, and sample return vehicles for solar system exploration vehicles. Research and technology needs identified include: (1) increasing the fluid dynamics capability by at least two orders of magnitude by developing an advanced computer processor for the solution of fluid dynamic problems with improved software; (2) predicting multi-engine base flow fields for launch vehicles; and (3) developing methods to conserve energy in aerothermodynamic ground test facilities.

  1. Global Foot-and-Mouth Disease Research Update and Gap Analysis: 1 - Overview of Global Status and Research Needs.

    PubMed

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Robinson, L; Charleston, B; Rodriguez, L L; Gay, C G; Sumption, K J; Vosloo, W

    2016-06-01

    The Global Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) Research Alliance periodically reviews the state of FMD research to assess progress and to identify new priorities. In this supplement we provide an update of global FMD research, comprising (i) this overview paper, which includes background information with key findings, and papers covering (ii) epidemiology, wildlife and economics, (iii) vaccines, (iv) diagnostics, (v) biotherapeutics and disinfectants, (vi) immunology and (vii) pathogenesis and molecular biology. FMD research publications were reviewed (2011-2015) and activity updates were obtained from 33 FMD research institutes from around the world. Although a continual threat, FMD has been effectively controlled in much of the world using existing tools. However, control remains a challenge in most developing countries, where little has been done to understand the ongoing burden of FMD. More research is needed to support control in endemically infected countries, particularly robust field studies. Traditional FMD vaccines have several limitations including short duration and spectrum of protection, cold chain requirements, and the costs and biosecurity risks associated with vaccine production. Significant progress has been made in the development of novel vaccine candidates, particularly in the use of recombinant vaccines and virus-like particles as an alternative to traditional inactivated whole virus vaccines. Continued investment is needed to turn these developments into improved vaccines produced at scale. Increased knowledge of cellular and mucosal immunity would benefit vaccine development, as would further advances in our ability to enhance vaccine capsid stability. Developments in molecular biology and phylogenetics underlie many of the recent advances in FMD research, including improved vaccines and diagnostics, and improved understanding of FMD epidemiology. Tools for genetic analyses continue to become both more powerful and more affordable enabling them to

  2. How to produce personality neuroscience research with high statistical power and low additional cost.

    PubMed

    Mar, Raymond A; Spreng, R Nathan; Deyoung, Colin G

    2013-09-01

    Personality neuroscience involves examining relations between cognitive or behavioral variability and neural variables like brain structure and function. Such studies have uncovered a number of fascinating associations but require large samples, which are expensive to collect. Here, we propose a system that capitalizes on neuroimaging data commonly collected for separate purposes and combines it with new behavioral data to test novel hypotheses. Specifically, we suggest that groups of researchers compile a database of structural (i.e., anatomical) and resting-state functional scans produced for other task-based investigations and pair these data with contact information for the participants who contributed the data. This contact information can then be used to collect additional cognitive, behavioral, or individual-difference data that are then reassociated with the neuroimaging data for analysis. This would allow for novel hypotheses regarding brain-behavior relations to be tested on the basis of large sample sizes (with adequate statistical power) for low additional cost. This idea can be implemented at small scales at single institutions, among a group of collaborating researchers, or perhaps even within a single lab. It can also be implemented at a large scale across institutions, although doing so would entail a number of additional complications.

  3. Does addition of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in conservative care of knee arthritis successfully postpone the need for joint replacement?

    PubMed

    Ip, David

    2015-12-01

    The current study evaluates whether the addition of low-level laser therapy into standard conventional physical therapy in elderly with bilateral symptomatic tri-compartmental knee arthritis can successfully postpone the need for joint replacement surgery. A prospective randomized cohort study of 100 consecutive unselected elderly patients with bilateral symptomatic knee arthritis with each knee randomized to receive either treatment protocol A consisting of conventional physical therapy or protocol B which is the same as protocol A with added low-level laser therapy. The mean follow-up was 6 years. Treatment failure was defined as breakthrough pain which necessitated joint replacement surgery. After a follow-up of 6 years, patients clearly benefited from treatment with protocol B as only one knee needed joint replacement surgery, while nine patients treated with protocol A needed surgery (p < 0.05). We conclude low-level laser therapy should be incorporated into standard conservative treatment protocol for symptomatic knee arthritis.

  4. Changing requirements and resulting needs for IT-infrastructure for longitudinal research in the neurosciences.

    PubMed

    Buckow, Karoline; Quade, Matthias; Rienhoff, Otto; Nussbeck, Sara Y

    2016-01-01

    The observation of growing "difficulties" in IT-infrastructures in neuroscience research during the last years led to a search for reasons and an analysis on how this phenomenon is reflected in the scientific literature. With a retrospective analysis of nine examples of multicenter research projects in the neurosciences and a literature review the observation was systematically analyzed. Results show that the rise in complexity mainly stems from two reasons: (1) more and more need for information on quality and context of research data (metadata) and (2) long-term requirements to handle the consent and identity/pseudonyms of study participants and biomaterials in relation to legal requirements. The combination of these two aspects together with very long study times and data evaluation periods are components of the subjectively perceived "difficulties". A direct consequence of this result is that big multicenter trials are becoming part of integrated research data environments and are not standing alone for themselves anymore. This drives up the resource needs regarding the IT-infrastructure in neuroscience research. In contrast to these findings, literature on this development is scarce and the problem probably underestimated.

  5. Environmental and occupational health research and training needs in Colombia: A Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura A.; González, Beatriz Elena; Vera, Lina María; Patz, Jonathan; Bautista, Leonelo E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Environmental factors contribute with 16% of the burden of disease in Colombia. A main obstacle in implementing national and regional environmental and occupational health policies is the limited knowledge on the local ability to study and control the impact of harmful exposures on health. Objective To identify needs for research and training in environmental and occupational health in Colombia. Materials and methods We conducted a three-round hybrid Delphi study. A group of environmental and occupational health Colombian experts (n=16) from government agencies, universities, and research centers was recruited to participate in the study. Expert’s opinions on research and training needs were gathered through online questionnaires, followed by an in-person meeting. The percentage of agreement and the coefficient of variation were used to measure consensus. Results Air pollution and chemical products were considered the most important environmental and occupational exposures, due to their significant impact on chronic non-communicable diseases, such as respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Research on the effects of outdoor air pollution on cardiovascular and respiratory diseases was considered of the greatest importance. Priority training areas included environmental and occupational health risk assessment, exposure modeling, advanced statistical methods, urban planning, occupational safety and hygiene, and epidemiology and toxicology. Conclusions These findings provide a valuable input for the definition and implementation of national environmental and occupational health policies and for the development of a regional hub aimed at strengthening the capacity for research and training in Colombia. PMID:26535742

  6. Sex is not enough: the need for gender-based analysis in health research.

    PubMed

    Nowatzki, Nadine; Grant, Karen R

    2011-04-01

    To gain a more detailed understanding of health care utilization patterns, researchers have begun to disaggregate administrative data by a number of important variables, including sex. Our purpose in this article is to confirm the need for sex-disaggregated data in health research, but also to argue that the further step of gender-based analysis is necessary. We focus on a number of conceptual and methodological issues surrounding sex-disaggregated administrative data, and we conclude that sex disaggregation alone is insufficient. Gender-sensitive indicators must be developed and used in order to understand the context of health differences and develop appropriate policies and programs. PMID:21409661

  7. Information needs research in the era of the digital medical library.

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, E. C.; Lowe, H. J.

    1998-01-01

    The rapid adoption of Internet-accessible information resources by the clinical community, has resulted in an exponential growth in the variety and type of clinical information resources along with an increasing diversity of information technologies to deliver clinical information. To date, little formal work has been done to investigate the significance of new information technologies such as Internet-based digital libraries and multimedia record systems on clinical information need or information seeking behavior. In the work described in this paper, we highlight some results from our recent multimethod research design and investigation of the information-seeking behavior of Pittsburgh area medical oncologists to argue for the use of a multimethod research design as an essential component of any investigation of clinical information need and information-seeking behavior in the era of the digital medical library. PMID:9929301

  8. Information needs research in the era of the digital medical library.

    PubMed

    Lomax, E C; Lowe, H J

    1998-01-01

    The rapid adoption of Internet-accessible information resources by the clinical community, has resulted in an exponential growth in the variety and type of clinical information resources along with an increasing diversity of information technologies to deliver clinical information. To date, little formal work has been done to investigate the significance of new information technologies such as Internet-based digital libraries and multimedia record systems on clinical information need or information seeking behavior. In the work described in this paper, we highlight some results from our recent multimethod research design and investigation of the information-seeking behavior of Pittsburgh area medical oncologists to argue for the use of a multimethod research design as an essential component of any investigation of clinical information need and information-seeking behavior in the era of the digital medical library.

  9. Environmental analysis using integrated GIS and remotely sensed data - Some research needs and priorities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Frank W.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Ridd, Merrill K.; Lam, Nina S.-N.; Walsh, Stephen J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses some basic scientific issues and research needs in the joint processing of remotely sensed and GIS data for environmental analysis. Two general topics are treated in detail: (1) scale dependence of geographic data and the analysis of multiscale remotely sensed and GIS data, and (2) data transformations and information flow during data processing. The discussion of scale dependence focuses on the theory and applications of spatial autocorrelation, geostatistics, and fractals for characterizing and modeling spatial variation. Data transformations during processing are described within the larger framework of geographical analysis, encompassing sampling, cartography, remote sensing, and GIS. Development of better user interfaces between image processing, GIS, database management, and statistical software is needed to expedite research on these and other impediments to integrated analysis of remotely sensed and GIS data.

  10. Katrina and the Thai Tsunami - Water Quality and Public Health Aspects Mitigation and Research Needs

    PubMed Central

    Englande, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The South East Asian Tsunami in Thailand and Hurricane Katrina in the United States were natural disasters of different origin but of similar destruction and response. Both disasters exhibited synonymous health outcomes and similar structural damage from large surges of water, waves, and flooding. A systematic discussion and comparison of the disasters in Thailand and the Gulf Coast considers both calamities to be similar types of disaster in different coastal locations. Thus valuable comparisons can be made for improvements in response, preparedness and mitigation. Research needs are discussed and recommendations made regarding potential methologies. Recommendations are made to: (1) improve disaster response time in terms of needs assessments for public health and environmental data collection; (2) develop an access-oriented data sharing policy; and (3) prioritize natural geomorphic structures such as barrier islands, mangroves, and wetlands to help reduce the scale of future natural disasters. Based on the experiences gained opportunities to enhance disaster preparedness through research are presented. PMID:19151433

  11. Current status of fluidization engineering and areas for future research needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C. Y.

    1982-05-01

    The state-of-the-art of fluidization, particularly for design and scale-up of bed reactors, is reviewed. Particulate, bubbling, slugging, turbulent, and circulating fluidization are described and research needs in fluidization flow regimes are identified. Fluidized bed reactor models are examined and research needs are noted. Models are proposed for the heat transfer coefficients in fluidized beds and gas convective heat transfer, particle convective heat transfer, and radiative heat transfer are discussed. Three-phase fluidization and the phenomena and parameters important in the design of three-phase fluidized bed reactors are also analyzed including: bubble behavior, phase holds-ups, pressure drop, phase mixing, gas-liquid mass transfer, solid entrainment, and a flow regime map. The development of better instrumentation for studying conceptual and mechanistic pictures within fluidized beds is recommended.

  12. Environmental analysis using integrated GIS and remotely sensed data - Some research needs and priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.W.; Quattrochi, D.A.; Ridd, M.K.; Lam, N.S.-N.; Walsh, S.J. NASA, Stennis Space Center, Bay Saint Louis, MS Utah, University, Salt Lake City Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge North Carolina, University, Chapel Hill )

    1991-06-01

    This paper discusses some basic scientific issues and research needs in the joint processing of remotely sensed and GIS data for environmental analysis. Two general topics are treated in detail: (1) scale dependence of geographic data and the analysis of multiscale remotely sensed and GIS data, and (2) data transformations and information flow during data processing. The discussion of scale dependence focuses on the theory and applications of spatial autocorrelation, geostatistics, and fractals for characterizing and modeling spatial variation. Data transformations during processing are described within the larger framework of geographical analysis, encompassing sampling, cartography, remote sensing, and GIS. Development of better user interfaces between image processing, GIS, database management, and statistical software is needed to expedite research on these and other impediments to integrated analysis of remotely sensed and GIS data. 79 refs.

  13. Katrina and the Thai Tsunami - water quality and public health aspects mitigation and research needs.

    PubMed

    Englande, A J

    2008-12-01

    The South East Asian Tsunami in Thailand and Hurricane Katrina in the United States were natural disasters of different origin but of similar destruction and response. Both disasters exhibited synonymous health outcomes and similar structural damage from large surges of water, waves, and flooding. A systematic discussion and comparison of the disasters in Thailand and the Gulf Coast considers both calamities to be similar types of disaster in different coastal locations. Thus valuable comparisons can be made for improvements in response, preparedness and mitigation. Research needs are discussed and recommendations made regarding potential methologies. Recommendations are made to: (1) improve disaster response time in terms of needs assessments for public health and environmental data collection; (2) develop an access-oriented data sharing policy; and (3) prioritize natural geomorphic structures such as barrier islands, mangroves, and wetlands to help reduce the scale of future natural disasters. Based on the experiences gained opportunities to enhance disaster preparedness through research are presented.

  14. Research needs on food marketing to children. Report of the StanMark project.

    PubMed

    Lobstein, T

    2013-03-01

    A series of meetings on the topic of children's exposure to the marketing of food and beverages was held between researchers and government officials based in Europe and the Americas during 2010-2011. The meetings resulted in a number of outputs, including observations from policy-makers on the types of evidence they needed to strengthen policy-making. Their observations on the definitions of a child, the specification of foods using nutrient profiling schemes, the types of media carrying marketing messages, and the related policy implementation problems, are summarised in this Short Communication. The paper highlights the need for research which can directly support policy-making and which can evaluate its effectiveness.

  15. The future of 'pure' medical science: the need for a new specialist professional research system.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Bruce G; Andras, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Over recent decades, medical research has become mostly an 'applied' science which implicitly aims at steady progress by an accumulation of small improvements, each increment having a high probability of validity. Applied medical science is, therefore, a social system of communications for generating pre-publication peer-reviewed knowledge that is ready for implementation. However, the need for predictability makes modern medical science risk-averse and this is leading to a decline in major therapeutic breakthroughs where new treatments for new diseases are required. There is need for the evolution of a specialized professional research system of pure medial science, whose role would be to generate and critically evaluate radically novel and potentially important theories, techniques, therapies and technologies. Pure science ideas typically have a lower probability of being valid, but the possibility of much greater benefit if they turn out to be true. The domination of medical research by applied criteria means that even good ideas from pure medical science are typically ignored or summarily rejected as being too speculative. Of course, radical and potentially important ideas may currently be published, but at present there is no formal mechanism by which pure science publications may be received, critiqued, evaluated and extended to become suitable for 'application'. Pure medical science needs to evolve to constitute a typical specialized scientific system of formal communications among a professional community. The members of this putative profession would interact via close research groupings, journals, meetings, electronic and web communications--like any other science. Pure medical science units might arise as elite grouping linked to existing world-class applied medical research institutions. However, the pure medical science system would have its own separate aims, procedures for scientific evaluation, institutional organization, funding and support

  16. Quantitative Risk reduction estimation Tool For Control Systems, Suggested Approach and Research Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Miles McQueen; Wayne Boyer; Mark Flynn; Sam Alessi

    2006-03-01

    For the past year we have applied a variety of risk assessment technologies to evaluate the risk to critical infrastructure from cyber attacks on control systems. More recently, we identified the need for a stand alone control system risk reduction estimation tool to provide owners and operators of control systems with a more useable, reliable, and credible method for managing the risks from cyber attack. Risk is defined as the probability of a successful attack times the value of the resulting loss, typically measured in lives and dollars. Qualitative and ad hoc techniques for measuring risk do not provide sufficient support for cost benefit analyses associated with cyber security mitigation actions. To address the need for better quantitative risk reduction models we surveyed previous quantitative risk assessment research; evaluated currently available tools; developed new quantitative techniques [17] [18]; implemented a prototype analysis tool to demonstrate how such a tool might be used; used the prototype to test a variety of underlying risk calculational engines (e.g. attack tree, attack graph); and identified technical and research needs. We concluded that significant gaps still exist and difficult research problems remain for quantitatively assessing the risk to control system components and networks, but that a useable quantitative risk reduction estimation tool is not beyond reach.

  17. From computer-assisted intervention research to clinical impact: The need for a holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Ourselin, Sébastien; Emberton, Mark; Vercauteren, Tom

    2016-10-01

    The early days of the field of medical image computing (MIC) and computer-assisted intervention (CAI), when publishing a strong self-contained methodological algorithm was enough to produce impact, are over. As a community, we now have substantial responsibility to translate our scientific progresses into improved patient care. In the field of computer-assisted interventions, the emphasis is also shifting from the mere use of well-known established imaging modalities and position trackers to the design and combination of innovative sensing, elaborate computational models and fine-grained clinical workflow analysis to create devices with unprecedented capabilities. The barriers to translating such devices in the complex and understandably heavily regulated surgical and interventional environment can seem daunting. Whether we leave the translation task mostly to our industrial partners or welcome, as researchers, an important share of it is up to us. We argue that embracing the complexity of surgical and interventional sciences is mandatory to the evolution of the field. Being able to do so requires large-scale infrastructure and a critical mass of expertise that very few research centres have. In this paper, we emphasise the need for a holistic approach to computer-assisted interventions where clinical, scientific, engineering and regulatory expertise are combined as a means of moving towards clinical impact. To ensure that the breadth of infrastructure and expertise required for translational computer-assisted intervention research does not lead to a situation where the field advances only thanks to a handful of exceptionally large research centres, we also advocate that solutions need to be designed to lower the barriers to entry. Inspired by fields such as particle physics and astronomy, we claim that centralised very large innovation centres with state of the art technology and health technology assessment capabilities backed by core support staff and open

  18. Use of health information in air pollution health research: past successes and emerging needs.

    PubMed

    Thurston, George D; Bekkedal, Marni Y V; Roberts, Eric M; Ito, Kazuhiko; Pope, C Arden; Glenn, Barbara S; Ozkaynak, Halûk; Utell, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    In September 2006, the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) co-organized a symposium on "Air Pollution Exposure and Health." The main objective of this symposium was to identify opportunities for improving the use of exposure and health information in future studies of air pollution health effects. This paper deals with the health information needs of such studies. We begin with a selected review of different types of health data and how they were used in previous epidemiologic studies of health effects of ambient particulate matter (PM). We then examine the current and emerging information needs of the environmental health community, dealing with PM and other air pollutants of health concern. We conclude that the past use of routinely collected health data proved to be essential for activities to protect public health, including the identification and evaluation of health hazards by air pollution research, setting standards for criteria pollutants, surveillance of health outcomes to identify incidence trends, and the more recent CDC environmental public health tracking program. Unfortunately, access to vital statistics records that have informed such pivotal research has recently been curtailed sharply, threatening the continuation of the type of research necessary to support future standard setting and research on emerging exposure and health problems (e.g. asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, and others), as well as our ability to evaluate the efficacy of regulatory and other prevention activities. A comprehensive devoted effort, perhaps new legislation, will be needed to address the standardization, centralization, and sharing of data sets, as well as to harmonize the interpretation of confidentiality and privacy protections across jurisdictions. These actions, combined with assuring researchers and public health practitioners appropriate access to data for evaluation of environmental risks, will be essential for the

  19. Biomedical research leaders: report on needs, opportunities, difficulties, education and training, and evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S H; Merkle, S; Brown, D; Moskowitz, J; Hurley, D; Brown, D; Bailey, B J; McClain, M; Misenhimer, M; Buckalew, J; Burks, T

    2000-01-01

    The National Association of Physicians for the Environment (NAPE) has assumed a leadership role in protecting environmental health in recent years. The Committee of Biomedical Research Leaders was convened at the recent NAPE Leadership Conference: Biomedical Research and the Environment held on 1--2 November 1999, at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. This report summarizes the discussion of the committee and its recommendations. The charge to the committee was to raise and address issues that will promote and sustain environmental health, safety, and energy efficiency within the biomedical community. Leaders from every important research sector (industry laboratories, academic health centers and institutes, hospitals and care facilities, Federal laboratories, and community-based research facilities) were gathered in this committee to discuss issues relevant to promoting environmental health. The conference and this report focus on the themes of environmental stewardship, sustainable development and "best greening practices." Environmental stewardship, an emerging theme within and outside the biomedical community, symbolizes the effort to provide an integrated, synthesized, and concerted effort to protect the health of the environment in both the present and the future. The primary goal established by the committee is to promote environmentally responsible leadership in the biomedical research community. Key outcomes of the committee's discussion and deliberation were a) the need for a central organization to evaluate, promote, and oversee efforts in environmental stewardship; and b) immediate need to facilitate efficient information transfer relevant to protecting the global environment through a database/clearinghouse. Means to fulfill these needs are discussed in this report. PMID:11121363

  20. Does Funding for Arctic Research Align with Research Priorities and Policy Needs? Trends in the USA, Canada and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, M. S.; Ibarguchi, G.; Rajdev, V.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past twenty years, increasing awareness and understanding of changes in the Arctic system, the stated desires of Arctic Peoples to be engaged in the research process, and a growing international interest in the region's resources have informed various stakeholders to undertake many Arctic science planning activities. Some examples of science planning include priority-setting for research, knowledge translation, stakeholder engagement, improved coordination, and international collaboration. The International Study of Arctic Change recently initiated an analysis of the extent to which alignment exists among stated science priorities, recognized societal needs, and funding patterns of the major North American and European agencies. In this paper, we present a decade of data on international funding patterns and data on two decades of science planning. We discuss whether funding patterns reflect the priority research questions and identified needs for information that are articulated in a myriad of Arctic research planning documents. The alignment in many areas remains poor, bringing into question the purpose of large-scale science planning if it does not lead to funding of those priorities identified by Arctic stakeholder communities (scientists, Arctic Peoples, planners, policy makers, the private sector, and others).

  1. Supportive care needs of caregivers of individuals following stroke: a synopsis of research.

    PubMed

    MacIsaac, Laura; Harrison, Margaret B; Godfrey, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 75% of stroke survivors are discharged from hospital to the community with varying degrees of residual neurological deficits (Heart & Stroke Foundation of Ontario, 2003). As a part of a masters' thesis, a systematic review was conducted to synthesize the research related to the identification of family needs during the acute phase of stroke in order to facilitate successful transition into the role of caregiver. Relevant articles were identified using: CINAHL, MEDLINE, All EBM Reviews, Psych Info, Embase, and AARP Ageline (1978 to December 2007). A Supportive Care Needs Framework (SCNF) (Fitch, 1994; 2008) was used to collect and analyze data. The utility of this framework was evaluated in capturing the spectrum of needs of the family caregivers of patients with stroke. Ten qualitative studies and seven quantitative studies were identified and analyzed by the author. The studies were equivocal in their reports of needs not being identified and addressed during hospitalization. The SCNF provided a comprehensive means of organizing the broad spectrum of needs of this population reported in the literature. No new domains were uncovered in the review.

  2. New Zealand needs guidelines for the safe and responsible inclusion of pregnant women in medical research.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Angela J

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a crucial window of time that influences long-term population health. As a matter of justice, pregnant woman are entitled to high quality, evidenced-based care. As a matter of population health, we need to better understand foetal development, particularly the impact of lifestyle, stress, chronic conditions and clinical treatment during pregnancy. Pregnancy continues to be dominated by the precautionary principle, advocating for the routine exclusion of pregnant women from medical research, particularly intervention studies, on the grounds of foetal vulnerability. But this stance simply shifts the risk into the community. Due to a lack of evidence-based data, many pregnant women are refused medically important drugs, are subject to dangerous delays in getting drugs, or are prescribed drugs that are thought 'safe', despite evidence of possible teratogenicity. I argue that New Zealand needs to shift to a default position of inclusion of pregnant women in research; and to develop guidelines to facilitate their safe and responsible inclusion. The uniqueness of pregnancy gives rise to specific questions regarding research ethics. These questions warrant focused debate and the answers cannot simply be deduced from the general principles of research ethics we currently have in New Zealand. PMID:27362600

  3. Professional Development in Early Childhood Programs: Process Issues and Research Needs

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, Susan M.; Edwards, Carolyn Pope; Marvin, Christine A.; Knoche, Lisa L.

    2009-01-01

    In light of the current policy context, early childhood educators are being asked to have a complex understanding of child development and early education issues and provide rich, meaningful educational experiences for all children and families in their care. Accountability for outcomes is high, and resources for professional support are limited. As such, the early education field needs well-conducted empirical studies on which to base professional development practices. In this paper, we offer research directions associated with the processes underlying professional development, including areas in need of investigation that can inform the early childhood education field in terms of how professional development efforts exert their influence and produce meaningful change in practitioners’ skills, behaviors, and dispositions. The paper highlights representative research from the professional development literature on its various forms/approaches and offers an agenda for research on the professional development process. Broad issues associated with the conduct of research on professional development, including considerations of professional development processes, participant characteristics, relationships, and sustainability are discussed. PMID:19809599

  4. Professional Development in Early Childhood Programs: Process Issues and Research Needs.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Susan M; Edwards, Carolyn Pope; Marvin, Christine A; Knoche, Lisa L

    2009-05-01

    In light of the current policy context, early childhood educators are being asked to have a complex understanding of child development and early education issues and provide rich, meaningful educational experiences for all children and families in their care. Accountability for outcomes is high, and resources for professional support are limited. As such, the early education field needs well-conducted empirical studies on which to base professional development practices. In this paper, we offer research directions associated with the processes underlying professional development, including areas in need of investigation that can inform the early childhood education field in terms of how professional development efforts exert their influence and produce meaningful change in practitioners' skills, behaviors, and dispositions. The paper highlights representative research from the professional development literature on its various forms/approaches and offers an agenda for research on the professional development process. Broad issues associated with the conduct of research on professional development, including considerations of professional development processes, participant characteristics, relationships, and sustainability are discussed. PMID:19809599

  5. Research Needs for Carbon Management in Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negra, C.; Lovejoy, T.; Ojima, D. S.; Ashton, R.; Havemann, T.; Eaton, J.

    2009-12-01

    Improved management of terrestrial carbon in agriculture, forestry, and other land use sectors is a necessary part of climate change mitigation. It is likely that governments will agree in Copenhagen in December 2009 to incentives for improved management of some forms of terrestrial carbon, including maintaining existing terrestrial carbon (e.g., avoiding deforestation) and creating new terrestrial carbon (e.g., afforestation, soil management). To translate incentives into changes in land management and terrestrial carbon stocks, a robust technical and scientific information base is required. All terrestrial carbon pools (and other greenhouse gases from the terrestrial system) that interact with the atmosphere at timescales less than centuries, and all land uses, have documented mitigation potential, however, most activity has focused on above-ground forest biomass. Despite research advances in understanding emissions reduction and sequestration associated with different land management techniques, there has not yet been broad-scale implementation of land-based mitigation activity in croplands, peatlands, grasslands and other land uses. To maximize long-term global terrestrial carbon volumes, further development of relevant data, methodologies and technologies are needed to complement policy and financial incentives. The Terrestrial Carbon Group, in partnership with UN-REDD agencies, the World Bank and CGIAR institutions, is reviewing literature, convening leading experts and surveying key research institutions to develop a Roadmap for Terrestrial Carbon: Research Needs for Implementation of Carbon Management in Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses. This work will summarize the existing knowledge base for emissions reductions and sequestration through land management as well as the current availability of tools and methods for measurement and monitoring of terrestrial carbon. Preliminary findings indicate a number of areas for future work. Enhanced information

  6. Ecological issues related to N deposition to natural ecosystems: research needs.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mary Beth

    2003-06-01

    There has and continues to be concern about the effects of elevated nitrogen (N) deposition on natural ecosystems. In this paper, research on natural ecosystems, including wetlands, heathlands, grasslands, steppe, naturally regenerated forests and deserts, is evaluated to determine what is known about nitrogen cycling in these ecosystems, the effects of elevated nitrogen on them and to identify research gaps. Aquatic ecosystems are not included in this review, except as they are part of the larger ecosystem. Research needs fall into several categories: (1) improved understanding and quantification of the N cycle, particularly relatively unstudied processes such as dry deposition, N fixation and decomposition/mineralization; (2) carbon cycling as affected by increased N deposition; (3) effects on arid ecosystems and other "neglected" ecosystems; (4) effects on complex ecosystems and interactions with other pollutants; (5) indicators and assessment tools for natural ecosystems. PMID:12676207

  7. Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

    1989-03-01

    Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

  8. Indoor Air Pollution in Developing Countries: Research and Implementation Needs for Improvements in Global Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Elliott T.; Carter, Ellison M.; Matt Earnest, C.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to indoor air pollution (IAP) from the burning of solid fuels for cooking, heating, and lighting accounts for a significant portion of the global burden of death and disease, and disproportionately affects women and children in developing regions. Clean cookstove campaigns recently received more attention and investment, but their successes might hinge on greater integration of the public health community with a variety of other disciplines. To help guide public health research in alleviating this important global environmental health burden, we synthesized previous research on IAP in developing countries, summarized successes and challenges of previous cookstove implementation programs, and provided key research and implementation needs from structured discussions at a recent symposium. PMID:23409891

  9. Ecological issues related to N deposition to natural ecosystems: research needs.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mary Beth

    2003-06-01

    There has and continues to be concern about the effects of elevated nitrogen (N) deposition on natural ecosystems. In this paper, research on natural ecosystems, including wetlands, heathlands, grasslands, steppe, naturally regenerated forests and deserts, is evaluated to determine what is known about nitrogen cycling in these ecosystems, the effects of elevated nitrogen on them and to identify research gaps. Aquatic ecosystems are not included in this review, except as they are part of the larger ecosystem. Research needs fall into several categories: (1) improved understanding and quantification of the N cycle, particularly relatively unstudied processes such as dry deposition, N fixation and decomposition/mineralization; (2) carbon cycling as affected by increased N deposition; (3) effects on arid ecosystems and other "neglected" ecosystems; (4) effects on complex ecosystems and interactions with other pollutants; (5) indicators and assessment tools for natural ecosystems.

  10. Unheard Voices: The Need for HIV Research and Prevention Priorities for YMSM in the Global Context.

    PubMed

    Hall, Casey D; Murdock, Daniel; Nehl, Eric J; Wong, Frank Y

    2016-06-01

    This commentary considers the AIDS Education and Prevention special issue (volume 28, number 3) entitled "Behavioral HIV Prevention Interventions for Diverse Young Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM)." The research presented in this special issue highlights the importance of addressing sub-populations of young MSM in order to better understand the unique realities and risk-factors affecting HIV epidemics and intervention needs. Here, we focus on several broad topics raised in this special issue and comment on their implications for HIV research and practice targeting young MSM in low- and middle-income countries. We consider issues relevant to reaching hidden populations, tailoring interventions, and integrating new communications and bio-medical technologies in research and practice in low-resource settings. PMID:27244194

  11. Workshop Report from the NIH Taskforce on the Research Needs of Eosinophil-Associated Diseases (TREAD)

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Bruce S.; Book, Wendy; Busse, William W.; Butterfield, Joseph; Furuta, Glenn T.; Gleich, Gerald J.; Klion, Amy D.; Lee, James J.; Leiferman, Kristin M.; Minnicozzi, Michael; Moqbel, Redwan; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Wechsler, Michael E.; Weller, Peter F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Eosinophils are blood cells that are often found in high numbers in the tissues of allergic conditions and helminthic parasite infections. The pathophysiological roles that eosinophils may serve in other human ‘eosinophil-associated’ diseases remain obscure. Objective NIH Institutes and the Office of Disease Prevention assembled an international taskforce of clinical and basic scientists with the charge to propose and prioritize unmet research needs in eosinophil-associated diseases. Methods The taskforce used an organ system approach to dissect out the different and common themes of eosinophil cell involvement in these diseases. In early 2012, a draft document was circulated for review. The document was amended and the prioritizations were set at a NIH-organized workshop in June 2012. Results The taskforce identified significant research needs. These needs cross disease entities but some are disease-specific. There are substantial shortcomings to the various preclinical animal models, as well as significant gaps in our epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic knowledge. The taskforce recognized that recent efforts by patient advocacy groups have played instrumental roles in improving the identification and characterization of these disorders. However, communication amongst the eosinophil interested communities, e.g., governmental funding and regulatory agencies, and industry and clinician scientists need to be more comprehensive. Conclusions Significant efforts are required to address our knowledge gaps in order to improve the outcomes of eosinophil-associated diseases. NIH Institutes, other federal agencies, lay organizations and the pharmaceutical industry should consider the taskforce’s recommendations in their future research activities. PMID:22935587

  12. Consent in crisis: the need to reconceptualize consent to tissue banking research.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, W; Ankeny, R; Kerridge, I

    2006-02-01

    The issues surrounding consent to tissue banking research in Australia are complex and have created a forum of intense debate, thus providing a window of opportunity to critically appraise and challenge standard models of consent for research in general and for tissue banking research in particular. The usual practical difficulties associated with meeting the criteria for valid consent to research (including adequate information provision and voluntariness) are amplified in the case of tissue banking research. A number of models, based on widely accepted ethical principles, have been proposed to improve the process of obtaining consent to tissue banking research, all of which assume that the consent of individual tissue donors is needed to meet the criteria for valid consent. Feminist and communitarian theories use many of the same criteria for valid consent but interpret these criteria differently and de-emphasize the importance of individual autonomy as the central criterion for valid consent. An enriched model of consent incorporating feminist and communitarian ideas could satisfy the currently accepted criteria for valid consent while also furthering a broader range of community values.

  13. Teacher Research Experiences: What We Have Learned and What We Need to Know

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowcroft, G. A.; Knowlton, C. W.

    2006-12-01

    The immersion of teachers in scientific research is an effective model for science teacher professional development that builds the capacity of teachers to engage students in scientific inquiry. Most science teachers have had little opportunity to "practice" science. Yet national and state science education standards expect teachers to provide these kinds of experiences for their students. Through the renewal and enhancement that a teacher research experience (TRE) offers, teachers become more capable and motivated to challenge their classes through inquiry-based activities. Although TREs are believed to be successful, there is little published research on their impacts to teaching practice and student science competencies. Research shows that teacher expertise can account for approximately 40 percent of the variance in student learning in reading and mathematics achievement more than any other single factor including student background. Other studies show a similar correlation between teacher expertise and student achievement across the subject areas. There is a critical need for empirical research on the impacts of TREs on science education. Future research could guide funding agencies in setting priorities for the professional development of science teachers as it fine tunes the TRE model to achieve the maximum impact. This presentation will review some of the available literature on TREs and accepted best practices. It will also point to future directions that the TRE community can take to optimize these worthwhile opportunities for teachers.

  14. The need for a clinical trials research methodology training programme in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lui, W F; Karlberg, J

    1998-03-01

    Training courses in the concepts of clinical trials research methodology that include rules in good clinical practice have not yet been extensively implemented in Hong Kong. This study aims to define the current knowledge of rules in good clinical practice and identify any need for such training programmes. Between May and August 1996, 161 clinical research staff were asked non-randomly to fill in a questionnaire about their knowledge of research methodology and their interest in specific courses. The median number of correctly answered questions (maximum score, 20) was 5 and the mode was 4, which was the expected score if questions had been answered randomly. Only minor differences in score were detected between doctors, research staff, and industry employees. Many researchers were keen, however, to further their knowledge by attending future courses; on average, each person showed an interest in three of the eight proposed courses. The study shows that the knowledge of rules in good clinical practice among clinical research staff in Hong Kong is poor, but there is nevertheless a demand for training programmes.

  15. High Priority Future Research Needs for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kamal; Moorthy, Denish; Chan, Jeffrey A.; Concannon, Thomas W.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Chung, Mei; Balk, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify and prioritize future research needs (FRN) topics for diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Twenty-one panel members represented six stake-holder categories: patients and the public, providers; purchasers of health care, payers, policymakers, and principal investigators. Building on a recently completed comparative effectiveness review, stakeholders nominated and discussed potential FRN topics. Stakeholders then nominated their top priority FRN topics based on the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Effective Health Care Program Selection Criteria. From these nominations, the highest priority FRN topics were determined and were elaborated upon to include possible study designs to address the topics. Results: Thirty-seven topics were discussed and prioritized. The nine highest priority FRN topics included: cost-effectiveness of management strategies, defining age- and sex-specific criteria for OSA, evaluating routine preoperative screening for OSA, evaluating involvement of a sleep medicine specialist in diagnosis of OSA, evaluating clinical prediction rules, assessing the effect of treating sleep disordered breathing and long-term clinical outcomes, comparing treatments for patients who do not tolerate positive airway pressure, evaluating strategies to improve treatment compliance, and evaluating the association between sleep apnea severity and long-term clinical outcomes. Conclusions: While there are numerous specific research questions with low or insufficient strength of evidence for OSA management, OSA patients, their healthcare providers, and society at large would benefit from refocusing research efforts into the prioritized research questions and away from simple comparisons of short-term outcomes between specific interventions. Citation: Patel K; Moorthy D; Chan JA; Concannon TW. High priority future research needs for obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. J Clin Sleep Med 2013

  16. Fundamental Research Needs for Water and Wastewater Treatment Systems. Proceedings of a Conference (Arlington, Virginia, December 15, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherrard, J. H., Ed.

    Papers are presented identifying fundamental research needs in water and wastewater treatment by industrial users of technology, industrial users of research, a municipal water department, a consulting engineer, Congress, and the EPA. Areas of research needs addressed include: (1) microbial, viral, and organic contaminants; (2) biological…

  17. Maternity referral systems in developing countries: current knowledge and future research needs.

    PubMed

    Murray, Susan F; Pearson, Stephen C

    2006-05-01

    A functioning referral system is generally considered to be a necessary element of successful Safe Motherhood programmes. This paper draws on a scoping review of available literature to identify key requisites for successful maternity referral systems in developing countries, to highlight knowledge gaps, and to suggest items for a future research agenda. Key online social science, medical and health system bibliographic databases, and websites were searched in July 2004 for evidence relating to referral systems for maternity care. Documentary evidence on implementation is scarce, but it suggests that many healthcare systems in developing countries are failing to optimise women's rapid access to emergency obstetric care, and that the poor and marginalised are affected disproportionately. Likely requisites for successful maternity referral systems include: a referral strategy informed by the assessment of population needs and health system capabilities; an adequately resourced referral centre; active collaboration between referral levels and across sectors; formalised communication and transport arrangements; agreed setting-specific protocols for referrer and receiver; supervision and accountability for providers' performance; affordable service costs; the capacity to monitor effectiveness; and underpinning all of these, policy support. Theoretically informed social and organisational research is required on the referral care needs of the poor and marginalised, on the maternity workforce and organisation, and on the implications of the mixed economy of healthcare for referral networks. Clinical research is required to determine how maternity referral fits within newborn health priorities and where the needs are different. Finally, research is required to determine how and whether a more integrated approach to emergency care systems may benefit women and their communities.

  18. Research needs for strandplain/barrier island reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.S.; Young, M.A.

    1994-12-01

    This report identifies reservoir characterization and reservoir management research needs and IOR process and related research needs for the fourth geologic class, strandplain/barrier island reservoirs. The 330 Class 4 reservoirs in the DOE Tertiary OH Recovery Information System (TORIS) database contain about 30.8 billion barrels of oil or about 9% of the total original oil-in-place (OOIP) in all United States reservoirs. The current projection of Class 4 ultimate recovery with current operations is only 38% of the OOIP, leaving 19 billion barrels as the target for future IOR projects. Using the TORIS database and its predictive and economic models, the recovery potential which could result from future application of IOR technologies to Class 4 reservoirs was estimated to be between 1.0 and 4.3 billion barrels, depending on oil price and the level of technology advancement. The analysis indicated that this potential could be realized through (1) infill drilling alone and in combination with polymer flooding and profile modification, (2) chemical flooding (surfactant), and (3) thermal processes. Most of this future potential is in Texas, Oklahoma, California, and the Rocky Mountain region. Approximately two-thirds of the potentially recoverable resource is at risk of abandonment by the year 2000, which emphasizes the urgent need for the development and demonstration of cost-effective recovery technologies.

  19. Does India perform medical research in areas where it is most needed?

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, S

    1998-01-01

    This paper attempts to map medical research in India and answer an important policy question by literature analysis. I match the disease pattern on the basis of mortality and morbidity statistics with journals used by Indian medical researchers to publish their work as shown by the Science Citation Index (SCI). The former reflects the needs while the latter reflects the areas in which research is being done. The limited statistics available from both the Government of India and the World Health Organization point to diarrhoeal diseases, diseases of children, respiratory diseases, circulatory system diseases, infectious diseases, malaria and tuberculosis as the major medical problems faced by India. The journals used often by Indian medical researchers to publish their work, as seen from the SCI (1981-85), show that in terms of number of publications, they are mainly active in general medicine, pharmacology, tropical medicine, neurosciences, radiology, oncology and pathology. In terms of the share of the world's literature in different subfields, India is second only to USA in andrology, third in tropical medicine after the USA and the UK, tenth in hygiene and public health, and eleventh in general and internal medicine, and radiology and nuclear medicine. Overall, India's share in the medical journal literature is not only much less than that of many other countries, both advanced and middle level, but also much less than that of India's share of the literature in physics, chemistry, mathematics and engineering. Data on the observed citation impact of Indian research in different subfields of medicine show that the work done in India in general is not integrated well into international research. India could be much more purposive in her research priorities and probably should invest much more in medical research.

  20. Findings of the US Research Needs Workshop on the Topic of Fusion Power

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Raffray, A R; Kurtz, R J; Morley, N B; Reiersen, W T; Sharpe, P; Willms, S

    2009-09-16

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) conducted a Research Needs Workshop, referred to as ReNeW, in June 2009. The information developed at this workshop will help OFES develop a plan for US fusion research during the ITER era, roughly the next two decades. The workshop was organized in five Themes, one of which was Harnessing Fusion Power (or Fusion Power for short). The top level goal of the Fusion Power Theme was to identify the research needed to develop the knowledge to design and build, with high confidence, robust and reliable systems that can convert fusion products to useful forms of energy in a reactor environment, including a self-sufficient supply of tritium fuel. Each Theme was subsequently subdivided into Panels to address specific topics. The Fusion Power Panel topics were: fusion fuel cycle; power extraction; materials science; safety and environment; and reliability, availability, maintainability and inspectability (RAMI). Here we present the key findings of the Fusion Power Theme.