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Sample records for additional risk loci

  1. Meta-analysis identifies 29 additional ulcerative colitis risk loci, increasing the number of confirmed associations to 47

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Carl A.; Boucher, Gabrielle; Lees, Charlie W.; Franke, Andre; D’Amato, Mauro; Taylor, Kent D.; Lee, James C.; Goyette, Philippe; Imielinski, Marcin; Latiano, Anna; Lagacé, Caroline; Scott, Regan; Amininejad, Leila; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Baidoo, Leonard; Baldassano, Robert N.; Barclay, Murray; Bayless, Theodore M.; Brand, Stephan; Büning, Carsten; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Denson, Lee A.; De Vos, Martine; Dubinsky, Marla; Edwards, Cathryn; Ellinghaus, David; Fehrmann, Rudolf S.N.; Floyd, James A.B.; Florin, Tim; Franchimont, Denis; Franke, Lude; Georges, Michel; Glas, Jürgen; Glazer, Nicole L.; Guthery, Stephen L.; Haritunians, Talin; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Jobin, Gilles; Laukens, Debby; Lawrance, Ian; Lémann, Marc; Levine, Arie; Libioulle, Cecile; Louis, Edouard; McGovern, Dermot P.; Milla, Monica; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morley, Katherine I.; Mowat, Craig; Ng, Aylwin; Newman, William; Ophoff, Roel A; Papi, Laura; Palmieri, Orazio; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Panés, Julián; Phillips, Anne; Prescott, Natalie J.; Proctor, Deborah D.; Roberts, Rebecca; Russell, Richard; Rutgeerts, Paul; Sanderson, Jeremy; Sans, Miquel; Schumm, Philip; Seibold, Frank; Sharma, Yashoda; Simms, Lisa; Seielstad, Mark; Steinhart, A. Hillary; Targan, Stephan R.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Vatn, Morten; Verspaget, Hein; Walters, Thomas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wilson, David C.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Zhao, Zhen Z.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Andersen, Vibeke; Torkvist, Leif; Gazouli, Maria; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Karlsen, Tom H.; Kupcinskas, Limas; Sventoraityte, Jurgita; Mansfield, John C.; Kugathasan, Subra; Silverberg, Mark S.; Halfvarson, Jonas; Rotter, Jerome I.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Griffiths, Anne M.; Gearry, Richard; Ahmad, Tariq; Brant, Steven R.; Chamaillard, Mathias; Satsangi, Jack; Cho, Judy H.; Schreiber, Stefan; Daly, Mark J.; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Parkes, Miles; Annese, Vito; Hakonarson, Hakon; Radford-Smith, Graham; Duerr, Richard H.; Vermeire, Séverine; Weersma, Rinse K.; Rioux, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene studies in ulcerative colitis (UC) have identified 18 susceptibility loci. We conducted a meta-analysis of 6 UC GWAS, comprising 6,687 cases and 19,718 controls, and followed-up the top association signals in 9,628 cases and 12,917 controls. We identified 29 additional risk loci (P<5×10-8), increasing the number of UC associated loci to 47. After annotating associated regions using GRAIL, eQTL data and correlations with non-synonymous SNPs, we identified many candidate genes providing potentially important insights into disease pathogenesis, including IL1R2, IL8RA/B, IL7R, IL12B, DAP, PRDM1, JAK2, IRF5, GNA12 and LSP1. The total number of confirmed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) risk loci is now 99, including a minimum of 28 shared association signals between Crohn’s disease (CD) and UC. PMID:21297633

  2. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Tobias L; Deutsch, Aaron J; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W J; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P; Nöthen, Markus M; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E; Tsoi, Lam C; van Heel, David A; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T; Gregersen, Peter K; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer substantial risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen-binding repertoires between a heterozygote's two expressed HLA variants might result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested the non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (ncases = 5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D; ncases = 5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (ncases = 3,089), idiopathic achalasia (ncases = 727) and celiac disease (ncases = 11,115). In four of the five diseases, we observed highly significant, non-additive dominance effects (rheumatoid arthritis, P = 2.5 × 10(-12); T1D, P = 2.4 × 10(-10); psoriasis, P = 5.9 × 10(-6); celiac disease, P = 1.2 × 10(-87)). In three of these diseases, the non-additive dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (rheumatoid arthritis, P = 1.8 × 10(-3); T1D, P = 8.6 × 10(-27); celiac disease, P = 6.0 × 10(-100)). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (rheumatoid arthritis, 1.4%; T1D, 4.0%; celiac disease, 4.1%) beyond a simple additive model. PMID:26258845

  3. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer strong risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen binding repertoires between a heterozygote’s two expressed HLA variants may result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Ncases=5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D, Ncases=5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (Ncases=3,089), idiopathic achalasia (Ncases=727), and celiac disease (Ncases=11,115). In four out of five diseases, we observed highly significant non-additive dominance effects (RA: P=2.5×1012; T1D: P=2.4×10−10; psoriasis: P=5.9×10−6; celiac disease: P=1.2×10−87). In three of these diseases, the dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (RA: P=1.8×10−3; T1D: P=8.6×1027; celiac disease: P=6.0×10−100). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (RA: 1.4%, T1D: 4.0%, and celiac disease: 4.1%, beyond a simple additive model). PMID:26258845

  4. High-Density Genotyping of Immune Loci in Koreans and Europeans Identifies Eight New Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Loci

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Nath, Swapan K.; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Kremer, Joel M.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlestig, Lisbeth; Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothée; Liao, Katherine P.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Plenge, Robert M.; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    Objective A highly polygenic etiology and high degree of allele-sharing between ancestries have been well-elucidated in genetic studies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, the high-density genotyping array Immunochip for immune disease loci identified 14 new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci among individuals of European ancestry. Here, we aimed to identify new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci using Korean-specific Immunochip data. Methods We analyzed Korean rheumatoid arthritis case-control samples using the Immunochip and GWAS array to search for new risk alleles of rheumatoid arthritis with anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies. To increase power, we performed a meta-analysis of Korean data with previously published European Immunochip and GWAS data, for a total sample size of 9,299 Korean and 45,790 European case-control samples. Results We identified 8 new rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci (TNFSF4, LBH, EOMES, ETS1–FLI1, COG6, RAD51B, UBASH3A and SYNGR1) that passed a genome-wide significance threshold (p<5×10−8), with evidence for three independent risk alleles at 1q25/TNFSF4. The risk alleles from the 7 new loci except for the TNFSF4 locus (monomorphic in Koreans), together with risk alleles from previously established RA risk loci, exhibited a high correlation of effect sizes between ancestries. Further, we refined the number of SNPs that represent potentially causal variants through a trans-ethnic comparison of densely genotyped SNPs. Conclusion This study demonstrates the advantage of dense-mapping and trans-ancestral analysis for identification of potentially causal SNPs. In addition, our findings support the importance of T cells in the pathogenesis and the fact of frequent overlap of risk loci among diverse autoimmune diseases. PMID:24532676

  5. Genetic association studies in complex disease: disentangling additional predisposing loci from associated neutral loci using a constrained - permutation approach.

    PubMed

    Spijker, G T; Nolte, I M; Jansen, R C; Te Meerman, G J

    2005-01-01

    In the process of genetically mapping a complex disease, the question may arise whether a certain polymorphism is the only causal variant in a region. A number of methods can answer this question, but unfortunately these methods are optimal for bi-allelic loci only. We wanted to develop a method that is more suited for multi-allelic loci, such as microsatellite markers. We propose the Additional Disease Loci Test (ADLT): the alleles at an additional locus are permuted within the subsample of haplotypes that have identical alleles at the predisposing locus. The hypothesis being tested is, whether the predisposing locus is the sole factor predisposing to the trait that is in LD with the additional locus under study. We applied ADLT to simulated datasets and a published dataset on Type 1 Diabetes, genotyped for microsatellite markers in the HLA-region. The method showed the expected number of false-positive results in the absence of additional loci, but proved to be more powerful than existing methods in the presence of additional disease loci. ADLT was especially superior in datasets with less LD or with multiple predisposing alleles. We conclude that the ADLT can be useful in identifying additional disease loci.

  6. Initial Assessment of the Pathogenic Mechanisms of the recently identified Alzheimer Risk Loci

    PubMed Central

    Holton, Patrick; Ryten, Mina; Nalls, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Weale, Michael E.; Hernandez, Dena; Crehan, Helen; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Ramirez-Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Myers, Amanda J.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Dillman, Allissa; Cookson, Mark R.; Reiman, Eric M.; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Guerreiro, Rita

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent genome wide association studies have identified CLU, CR1, ABCA7 BIN1, PICALM and MS4A6A/MS4A6E in addition to the long established APOE, as loci for Alzheimer’s disease. We have systematically examined each of these loci to assess whether common coding variability contributes to the risk of disease. We have also assessed the regional expression of all the genes in the brain and whether there is evidence of an eQTL explaining the risk. In agreement with other studies we find that coding variability may explain the ABCA7 association, but common coding variability does not explain any of the other loci. We were not able to show that any of the loci had eQTLs within the power of this study. Furthermore the regional expression of each of the loci did not match the pattern of brain regional distribution in Alzheimer pathology. Although these results are mainly negative, they allow us to start defining more realistic alternative approaches to determine the role of all the genetic loci involved in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23360175

  7. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele Loci in the Qatari Population

    PubMed Central

    Abi Khalil, Charbel; Fakhro, Khalid A.; Robay, Amal; Ramstetter, Monica D.; Al-Azwani, Iman K.; Malek, Joel A.; Zirie, Mahmoud; Jayyousi, Amin; Badii, Ramin; Al-Nabet Al-Marri, Ajayeb; Chiuchiolo, Maria J.; Al-Shakaki, Alya; Chidiac, Omar; Gharbiah, Maey; Bener, Abdulbari; Stadler, Dora; Hackett, Neil R.; Mezey, Jason G.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is increasing in the Middle East. However, the genetic risk factors for T2D in the Middle Eastern populations are not known, as the majority of studies of genetic risk for T2D are in Europeans and Asians. Methods All subjects were ≥3 generation Qataris. Cases with T2D (n = 1,124) and controls (n = 590) were randomly recruited and assigned to the 3 known Qatari genetic subpopulations [Bedouin (Q1), Persian/South Asian (Q2) and African (Q3)]. Subjects underwent genotyping for 37 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 29 genes known to be associated with T2D in Europeans and/or Asian populations, and an additional 27 tag SNPs related to these susceptibility loci. Pre-study power analysis suggested that with the known incidence of T2D in adult Qataris (22%), the study population size would be sufficient to detect significant differences if the SNPs were risk factors among Qataris, assuming that the odds ratio (OR) for T2D SNPs in Qatari’s is greater than or equal to the SNP with highest known OR in other populations. Results Haplotype analysis demonstrated that Qatari haplotypes in the region of known T2D risk alleles in Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations were similar to European haplotypes. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment for multiple testing, only two SNPs (rs7903146 and rs4506565), both associated with transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), achieved statistical significance in the whole study population. When T2D subjects and control subjects were assigned to the known 3 Qatari subpopulations, and analyzed individually and with the Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations combined, one of these SNPs (rs4506565) was also significant in the admixed group. No other SNPs associated with T2D in all Qataris or individual genetic subpopulations. Conclusions With the caveats of the power analysis, the European/Asian T2D SNPs do not contribute significantly to the high prevalence of T2D in the Qatari population, suggesting

  8. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M; Do, Chuong B; Hernandez, Dena G; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M Arfan; Ioannidis, John P A; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Bis, Joshua C; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H; Clark, Lorraine N; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were then tested in an independent set of 5,353 cases and 5,551 controls. Of the 32 tested SNPs, 24 replicated, including 6 newly identified loci. Conditional analyses within loci showed that four loci, including GBA, GAK-DGKQ, SNCA and the HLA region, contain a secondary independent risk variant. In total, we identified and replicated 28 independent risk variants for Parkinson's disease across 24 loci. Although the effect of each individual locus was small, risk profile analysis showed substantial cumulative risk in a comparison of the highest and lowest quintiles of genetic risk (odds ratio (OR) = 3.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.55-4.30; P = 2 × 10(-16)). We also show six risk loci associated with proximal gene expression or DNA methylation.

  9. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nalls, Mike A; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M; Do, Chuong B; Hernandez, Dena G; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M Arfan; Ioannidis, John P A; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Bis, Joshua C; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H; Clark, Lorraine N; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were then tested in an independent set of 5,353 cases and 5,551 controls. Of the 32 tested SNPs, 24 replicated, including 6 newly identified loci. Conditional analyses within loci showed that four loci, including GBA, GAK-DGKQ, SNCA and the HLA region, contain a secondary independent risk variant. In total, we identified and replicated 28 independent risk variants for Parkinson's disease across 24 loci. Although the effect of each individual locus was small, risk profile analysis showed substantial cumulative risk in a comparison of the highest and lowest quintiles of genetic risk (odds ratio (OR) = 3.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.55-4.30; P = 2 × 10(-16)). We also show six risk loci associated with proximal gene expression or DNA methylation. PMID:25064009

  10. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H; Traglia, Michela; Gögele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Hälldin, Jonas; Häldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sweep, Fred C; Sala, Cinzia F; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gérard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Whitfield, John B

    2014-01-01

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find 11 genome-wide-significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease. PMID:25352340

  11. Novel loci affecting iron homeostasis and their effects in individuals at risk for hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Benyamin, Beben; Esko, Tonu; Ried, Janina S; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Vermeulen, Sita H; Traglia, Michela; Gögele, Martin; Anderson, Denise; Broer, Linda; Podmore, Clara; Luan, Jian'an; Kutalik, Zoltan; Sanna, Serena; van der Meer, Peter; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wang, Fudi; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Hälldin, Jonas; Häldin, Jonas; Winkelmann, Juliane; Meitinger, Thomas; Thiery, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Waldenberger, Melanie; Rendon, Augusto; Jolley, Jennifer; Sambrook, Jennifer; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Sweep, Fred C; Sala, Cinzia F; Schwienbacher, Christine; Pichler, Irene; Hui, Jennie; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Amin, Najaf; Steri, Maristella; Waeber, Gérard; Verweij, Niek; Powell, Joseph E; Nyholt, Dale R; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Hernandez, Dena; Bandinelli, Stefania; van der Harst, Pim; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; van Duijn, Cornelia; Beilby, John; Pramstaller, Peter P; Hicks, Andrew A; Ouwehand, Willem H; Oexle, Konrad; Gieger, Christian; Metspalu, Andres; Camaschella, Clara; Toniolo, Daniela; Swinkels, Dorine W; Whitfield, John B

    2014-10-29

    Variation in body iron is associated with or causes diseases, including anaemia and iron overload. Here, we analyse genetic association data on biochemical markers of iron status from 11 European-population studies, with replication in eight additional cohorts (total up to 48,972 subjects). We find 11 genome-wide-significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci, some including known iron-related genes (HFE, SLC40A1, TF, TFR2, TFRC, TMPRSS6) and others novel (ABO, ARNTL, FADS2, NAT2, TEX14). SNPs at ARNTL, TF, and TFR2 affect iron markers in HFE C282Y homozygotes at risk for hemochromatosis. There is substantial overlap between our iron loci and loci affecting erythrocyte and lipid phenotypes. These results will facilitate investigation of the roles of iron in disease.

  12. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; Lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-07-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis-associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis-associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression.

  13. Identification of multiple risk variants for ankylosing spondylitis through high-density genotyping of immune-related loci

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Adrian; Hadler, Johanna; Pointon, Jenny P; Robinson, Philip C; Karaderi, Tugce; Leo, Paul; Cremin, Katie; Pryce, Karena; Harris, Jessica; lee, Seunghun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Weisman, Michael; Ward, Michael; Zhou, Xiaodong; Garchon, Henri-Jean; Chiocchia, Gilles; Nossent, Johannes; Lie, Benedicte A; Førre, Øystein; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Laiho, Kari; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yu; Wu, Xin; Bradbury, Linda A; Elewaut, Dirk; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Stebbings, Simon; Appleton, Louise; Farrah, Claire; Lau, Jonathan; Kenna, Tony J; Haroon, Nigil; Ferreira, Manuel A; Yang, Jian; Mulero, Juan; Fernandez-Sueiro, Jose Luis; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Deloukas, Panos; Donnelly, Peter; Bowness, Paul; Gafney, Karl; Gaston, Hill; Gladman, Dafna D; Rahman, Proton; Maksymowych, Walter P; Xu, Huji; Crusius, J Bart A; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; Chou, Chung-Tei; Valle-Oñate, Raphael; Romero-Sánchez, Consuelo; Hansen, Inger Myrnes; Pimentel-Santos, Fernando M; Inman, Robert D; Videm, Vibeke; Martin, Javier; Breban, Maxime; Reveille, John D; Evans, David M; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Wordsworth, Bryan Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a common, highly heritable inflammatory arthritis affecting primarily the spine and pelvis. In addition to HLA-B*27 alleles, 12 loci have previously been identified that are associated with ankylosing spondylitis in populations of European ancestry, and 2 associated loci have been identified in Asians. In this study, we used the Illumina Immunochip microarray to perform a case-control association study involving 10,619 individuals with ankylosing spondylitis (cases) and 15,145 controls. We identified 13 new risk loci and 12 additional ankylosing spondylitis–associated haplotypes at 11 loci. Two ankylosing spondylitis–associated regions have now been identified encoding four aminopeptidases that are involved in peptide processing before major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I presentation. Protective variants at two of these loci are associated both with reduced aminopeptidase function and with MHC class I cell surface expression. PMID:23749187

  14. Protein Interaction Networks Link Schizophrenia Risk Loci to Synaptic Function

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Emanuel; Izmailov, Rauf; Liò, Pietro; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and highly heritable psychiatric disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population. Genome-wide association studies have identified 108 independent genetic loci with genome-wide significance but their functional importance has yet to be elucidated. Here, we develop a novel strategy based on network analysis of protein–protein interactions (PPI) to infer biological function associated with variants most strongly linked to illness risk. We show that the schizophrenia loci are strongly linked to synaptic transmission (P FWE < .001) and ion transmembrane transport (P FWE = .03), but not to ontological categories previously found to be shared across psychiatric illnesses. We demonstrate that brain expression of risk-linked genes within the identified processes is strongly modulated during birth and identify a set of synaptic genes consistently changed across multiple brain regions of adult schizophrenia patients. These results suggest synaptic function as a developmentally determined schizophrenia process supported by the illness’s most associated genetic variants and their PPI networks. The implicated genes may be valuable targets for mechanistic experiments and future drug development approaches. PMID:27056717

  15. Independent Replication and Meta-Analysis for Endometriosis Risk Loci.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Yadav; Fassbender, Amelie; Bowdler, Lisa; Fung, Jenny N; Peterse, Daniëlle; O, Dorien; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; D'Hooghe, Thomas M

    2015-10-01

    Endometriosis is a complex disease that affects 6-10% of women in their reproductive years and 20-50% of women with infertility. Genome-wide and candidate-gene association studies for endometriosis have identified 10 independent risk loci, and of these, nine (rs7521902, rs13394619, rs4141819, rs6542095, rs1519761, rs7739264, rs12700667, rs1537377, and rs10859871) are polymorphic in European populations. Here we investigate the replication of nine SNP loci in 998 laparoscopically and histologically confirmed endometriosis cases and 783 disease-free controls from Belgium. SNPs rs7521902, rs13394619, and rs6542095 show nominally significant (p < .05) associations with endometriosis, while the directions of effect for seven SNPs are consistent with the original reports. Association of rs6542095 at the IL1A locus with 'All' (p = .066) and 'Grade_B' (p = .01) endometriosis is noteworthy because this is the first successful replication in an independent population. Meta-analysis with the published results yields genome-wide significant evidence for rs7521902, rs13394619, rs6542095, rs12700667, rs7739264, and rs1537377. Notably, three coding variants in GREB1 (near rs13394619) and CDKN2B-AS1 (near rs1537377) also showed nominally significant associations with endometriosis. Overall, this study provides important replication in a uniquely characterized independent population, and indicates that the majority of the original genome-wide association findings are not due to chance alone.

  16. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Eli A.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Barton, Anne; Bowes, John; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Burtt, Noel P.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Coblyn, Jonathan; Coenen, Marieke JH; Costenbader, Karen H.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Cui, Jing; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; De Jager, Phillip L.; Ding, Bo; Emery, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Harrison, Pille; Hocking, Lynne J.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Ke, Xiayi; Lee, Annette T.; Liu, Xiangdong; Martin, Paul; Morgan, Ann W.; Padyukov, Leonid; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Radstake, Timothy RDJ; Reid, David M.; Seielstad, Mark; Seldin, Michael F.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Steer, Sophia; Tak, Paul P.; Thomson, Wendy; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van Riel, Piet LCM; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Wordsworth, Paul; Wijmenga, Cisca; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Toes, Rene E. M.; de Vries, Niek; Begovich, Ann B.; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    To identify novel genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody positive RA cases and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 RA cases and 8,806 controls. Of 34 SNPs selected for replication, 7 novel RA risk alleles were identified at genome-wide significance (P<5×10−8) in analysis of all 41,282 samples. The associated SNPs are near genes of known immune function, including IL6ST, SPRED2, RBPJ, CCR6, IRF5, and PXK. We also refined the risk alleles at two established RA risk loci (IL2RA and CCL21) and confirmed the association at AFF3. These new associations bring the total number of confirmed RA risk loci to 31 among individuals of European ancestry. An additional 11 SNPs replicated at P<0.05, many of which are validated autoimmune risk alleles, suggesting that most represent bona fide RA risk alleles. PMID:20453842

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with bladder cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Ye, Yuanqing; Siddiq, Afshan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Kooperberg, Charles; Cussenot, Olivier; Benhamou, Simone; Prescott, Jennifer; Porru, Stefano; Dinney, Colin P.; Malats, Núria; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark; Jacobs, Eric J.; Albanes, Demetrius; Wang, Zhaoming; Deng, Xiang; Chung, Charles C.; Tang, Wei; Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ljungberg, Börje; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Krogh, Vittorio; Dorronsoro, Miren; Travis, Ruth; Tjønneland, Anne; Brenan, Paul; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Riboli, Elio; Conti, David; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Stern, Mariana C.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Van Den Berg, David; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hohensee, Chancellor; Rodabough, Rebecca; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Roupret, Morgan; Comperat, Eva; Chen, Constance; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Lindstrom, Sara; Carta, Angela; Pavanello, Sofia; Arici, Cecilia; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Kamat, Ashish M.; Lerner, Seth P.; Barton Grossman, H.; Lin, Jie; Gu, Jian; Pu, Xia; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Wheeler, William; Kogevinas, Manolis; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Johnson, Alison; Schned, Alan; Armenti, Karla R.; Hosain, G.M.; Andriole, Gerald; Grubb, Robert; Black, Amanda; Ryan Diver, W.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Haiman, Chris A.; Landi, Maria T.; Caporaso, Neil; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Vineis, Paolo; Wu, Xifeng; Silverman, Debra T.; Chanock, Stephen; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 11 independent susceptibility loci associated with bladder cancer risk. To discover additional risk variants, we conducted a new GWAS of 2422 bladder cancer cases and 5751 controls, followed by a meta-analysis with two independently published bladder cancer GWAS, resulting in a combined analysis of 6911 cases and 11 814 controls of European descent. TaqMan genotyping of 13 promising single nucleotide polymorphisms with P < 1 × 10−5 was pursued in a follow-up set of 801 cases and 1307 controls. Two new loci achieved genome-wide statistical significance: rs10936599 on 3q26.2 (P = 4.53 × 10−9) and rs907611 on 11p15.5 (P = 4.11 × 10−8). Two notable loci were also identified that approached genome-wide statistical significance: rs6104690 on 20p12.2 (P = 7.13 × 10−7) and rs4510656 on 6p22.3 (P = 6.98 × 10−7); these require further studies for confirmation. In conclusion, our study has identified new susceptibility alleles for bladder cancer risk that require fine-mapping and laboratory investigation, which could further understanding into the biological underpinnings of bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:24163127

  18. A comprehensive examination of breast cancer risk loci in African American women.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ye; Stram, Daniel O; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Millikan, Robert C; Ambrosone, Christine B; John, Esther M; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Olshan, Andrew F; Hu, Jennifer J; Ziegler, Regina G; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V; Ingles, Sue A; Press, Michael F; Deming, Sandra L; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Palmer, Julie R; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng; Adebamowo, Clement A; Ogundiran, Temidayo; Chen, Gary K; Stram, Alex; Park, Karen; Rand, Kristin A; Chanock, Stephen J; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N; Conti, David V; Easton, Douglas; Henderson, Brian E; Haiman, Christopher A

    2014-10-15

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 73 breast cancer risk variants mainly in European populations. Given considerable differences in linkage disequilibrium structure between populations of European and African ancestry, the known risk variants may not be informative for risk in African ancestry populations. In a previous fine-mapping investigation of 19 breast cancer loci, we were able to identify SNPs in four regions that better captured risk associations in African American women. In this study of breast cancer in African American women (3016 cases, 2745 controls), we tested an additional 54 novel breast cancer risk variants. Thirty-eight variants (70%) were found to have an association with breast cancer in the same direction as previously reported, with eight (15%) replicating at P < 0.05. Through fine-mapping, in three regions (1q32, 3p24, 10q25), we identified variants that better captured associations with overall breast cancer or estrogen receptor positive disease. We also observed suggestive associations with variants (at P < 5 × 10(-6)) in three separate regions (6q25, 14q13, 22q12) that may represent novel risk variants. Directional consistency of association observed for ∼65-70% of currently known genetic variants for breast cancer in women of African ancestry implies a shared functional common variant at most loci. To validate and enhance the spectrum of alleles that define associations at the known breast cancer risk loci, as well as genome-wide, will require even larger collaborative efforts in women of African ancestry.

  19. A comprehensive examination of breast cancer risk loci in African American women

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ye; Stram, Daniel O.; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Millikan, Robert C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; John, Esther M.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Olshan, Andrew F.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V.; Ingles, Sue A.; Press, Michael F.; Deming, Sandra L.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Palmer, Julie R.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Huo, Dezheng; Adebamowo, Clement A.; Ogundiran, Temidayo; Chen, Gary K.; Stram, Alex; Park, Karen; Rand, Kristin A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Conti, David V.; Easton, Douglas; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified 73 breast cancer risk variants mainly in European populations. Given considerable differences in linkage disequilibrium structure between populations of European and African ancestry, the known risk variants may not be informative for risk in African ancestry populations. In a previous fine-mapping investigation of 19 breast cancer loci, we were able to identify SNPs in four regions that better captured risk associations in African American women. In this study of breast cancer in African American women (3016 cases, 2745 controls), we tested an additional 54 novel breast cancer risk variants. Thirty-eight variants (70%) were found to have an association with breast cancer in the same direction as previously reported, with eight (15%) replicating at P < 0.05. Through fine-mapping, in three regions (1q32, 3p24, 10q25), we identified variants that better captured associations with overall breast cancer or estrogen receptor positive disease. We also observed suggestive associations with variants (at P < 5 × 10−6) in three separate regions (6q25, 14q13, 22q12) that may represent novel risk variants. Directional consistency of association observed for ∼65–70% of currently known genetic variants for breast cancer in women of African ancestry implies a shared functional common variant at most loci. To validate and enhance the spectrum of alleles that define associations at the known breast cancer risk loci, as well as genome-wide, will require even larger collaborative efforts in women of African ancestry. PMID:24852375

  20. Insights into Autism Spectrum Disorder Genomic Architecture and Biology from 71 Risk Loci

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Stephan J.; He, Xin; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Cicek, A. Ercument; Murtha, Michael T.; Bal, Vanessa H.; Bishop, Somer L.; Dong, Shan; Goldberg, Arthur P.; Jinlu, Cai; Keaney, John F.; Klei, Lambertus; Mandell, Jeffrey D.; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Poultney, Christopher S.; Robinson, Elise B.; Smith, Louw; Solli-Nowlan, Tor; Su, Mack Y.; Teran, Nicole A.; Walker, Michael F.; Werling, Donna M.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Cantor, Rita M.; Fombonne, Eric; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Donna M.; Morrow, Eric M.; Talkowski, Michael E.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Yu, Timothy W.; Ledbetter, David H.; Martin, Christa Lese; Cook, Edwin H.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Daly, Mark J.; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn; State, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Analysis of de novo CNVs (dnCNVs) from the full Simons Simplex Collection (SSC) (N = 2,591 families) replicates prior findings of strong association with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and confirms six risk loci (1q21.1, 3q29, 7q11.23, 16p11.2, 15q11.2-13, and 22q11.2). The addition of published CNV data from the Autism Genome Project (AGP) and exome sequencing data from the SSC and the Autism Sequencing Consortium (ASC) shows that genes within small de novo deletions, but not within large dnCNVs, significantly overlap the high-effect risk genes identified by sequencing. Alternatively, large dnCNVs are found likely to contain multiple modest-effect risk genes. Overall, we find strong evidence that de novo mutations are associated with ASD apart from the risk for intellectual disability. Extending the transmission and de novo association test (TADA) to include small de novo deletions reveals 71 ASD risk loci, including 6 CNV regions (noted above) and 65 risk genes (FDR ≤ 0.1). PMID:26402605

  1. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Eli A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A S; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I; Ardlie, Kristin G; Barton, Anne; Bowes, John; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Burtt, Noel P; Catanese, Joseph J; Coblyn, Jonathan; Coenen, Marieke J H; Costenbader, Karen H; Criswell, Lindsey A; Crusius, J Bart A; Cui, Jing; de Bakker, Paul I W; De Jager, Philip L; Ding, Bo; Emery, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Harrison, Pille; Hocking, Lynne J; Huizinga, Tom W J; Kastner, Daniel L; Ke, Xiayi; Lee, Annette T; Liu, Xiangdong; Martin, Paul; Morgan, Ann W; Padyukov, Leonid; Posthumus, Marcel D; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Reid, David M; Seielstad, Mark; Seldin, Michael F; Shadick, Nancy A; Steer, Sophia; Tak, Paul P; Thomson, Wendy; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; van der Schoot, C Ellen; van Riel, Piet L C M; Weinblatt, Michael E; Wilson, Anthony G; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Wordsworth, B Paul; Wijmenga, Cisca; Karlson, Elizabeth W; Toes, Rene E M; de Vries, Niek; Begovich, Ann B; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Gregersen, Peter K; Klareskog, Lars; Plenge, Robert M

    2010-06-01

    To identify new genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis, we conducted a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody-positive individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 rheumatoid arthritis cases and 8,806 controls. Of 34 SNPs selected for replication, 7 new rheumatoid arthritis risk alleles were identified at genome-wide significance (P < 5 x 10(-8)) in an analysis of all 41,282 samples. The associated SNPs are near genes of known immune function, including IL6ST, SPRED2, RBPJ, CCR6, IRF5 and PXK. We also refined associations at two established rheumatoid arthritis risk loci (IL2RA and CCL21) and confirmed the association at AFF3. These new associations bring the total number of confirmed rheumatoid arthritis risk loci to 31 among individuals of European ancestry. An additional 11 SNPs replicated at P < 0.05, many of which are validated autoimmune risk alleles, suggesting that most represent genuine rheumatoid arthritis risk alleles. PMID:20453842

  2. Protein-Protein Interaction Analysis Highlights Additional Loci of Interest for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ragnedda, Giammario; Disanto, Giulio; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ebers, George C.; Sotgiu, Stefano; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in determining the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). The strongest genetic association in MS is located within the major histocompatibility complex class II region (MHC), but more than 50 MS loci of modest effect located outside the MHC have now been identified. However, the relative candidate genes that underlie these associations and their functions are largely unknown. We conducted a protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis of gene products coded in loci recently reported to be MS associated at the genome-wide significance level and in loci suggestive of MS association. Our aim was to identify which suggestive regions are more likely to be truly associated, which genes are mostly implicated in the PPI network and their expression profile. From three recent independent association studies, SNPs were considered and divided into significant and suggestive depending on the strength of the statistical association. Using the Disease Association Protein-Protein Link Evaluator tool we found that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected by chance when considering both significant regions alone (p<0.0002) and significant plus suggestive (p<0.007). The number of genes involved in the network was 43. Of these, 23 were located within suggestive regions and many of them directly interacted with proteins coded within significant regions. These included genes such as SYK, IL-6, CSF2RB, FCLR3, EIF4EBP2 and CHST12. Using the gene portal BioGPS, we tested the expression of these genes in 24 different tissues and found the highest values among immune-related cells as compared to non-immune tissues (p<0.001). A gene ontology analysis confirmed the immune-related functions of these genes. In conclusion, loci currently suggestive of MS association interact with and have similar expression profiles and function as those significantly associated, highlighting the fact that more common variants remain to be

  3. Further Replication Studies of the EVE Consortium Meta-Analysis Identifies Two Asthma Risk Loci in European Americans

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Rachel A.; Himes, Blanca E.; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Yang, James J.; Gauderman, W. James; Rebordosa, Cristina; Xie, Jianming; Torgerson, Dara G.; Levin, Albert M.; Baurley, James; Graves, Penelope E.; Mathias, Rasika A.; Romieu, Isabelle; Roth, Lindsey A.; Conti, David; Avila, Lydia; Eng, Celeste; Vora, Hita; LeNoir, Michael A.; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Liu, Jinghua; Celedon, Juan C.; Farber, Harold J.; Kumar, Rajesh; Avila, Pedro C.; Meade, Kelley; Serebrisky, Denise; Thyne, Shannon; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Borrell, Luisa N.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Meyers, Deborah A.; London, Stephanie J.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Martinez, Fernando D.; Gilliland, Frank D.; Williams, L. Keoki; Burchard, Esteban G.; Weiss, Scott T.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Ober, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies of asthma have implicated many genetic risk factors, with well-replicated associations at approximately 10 loci that account for only a small proportion of the genetic risk. Objectives We aimed to identify additional asthma risk loci by performing an extensive replication study of the results from the EVE Consortium meta-analysis. Methods We selected 3186 SNPs for replication based on the p-values from the EVE Consortium meta-analysis. These SNPs were genotyped in ethnically diverse replication samples from nine different studies, totaling to 7202 cases, 6426 controls, and 507 case-parent trios. Association analyses were conducted within each participating study and the resulting test statistics were combined in a meta-analysis. Results Two novel associations were replicated in European Americans: rs1061477 in the KLK3 gene on chromosome 19 (combined OR = 1.18; 95% CI 1.10 – 1.25) and rs9570077 (combined OR =1.20 95% CI 1.12–1.29) on chromosome 13q21. We could not replicate any additional associations in the African American or Latino individuals. Conclusions This extended replication study identified two additional asthma risk loci in populations of European descent. The absence of additional loci for African Americans and Latino individuals highlights the difficulty in replicating associations in admixed populations. PMID:23040885

  4. YjjQ Represses Transcription of flhDC and Additional Loci in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, Helene; Gürlebeck, Doreen; Groß, Jana; Dreck, Katrin; Pannen, Derk; Ewers, Christa; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The presumptive transcriptional regulator YjjQ has been identified as being virulence associated in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). In this work, we characterize YjjQ as transcriptional repressor of the flhDC operon, encoding the master regulator of flagellar synthesis, and of additional loci. The latter include gfc (capsule 4 synthesis), ompC (outer membrane porin C), yfiRNB (regulated c-di-GMP synthesis), and loci of poorly defined function (ybhL and ymiA-yciX). We identify the YjjQ DNA-binding sites at the flhDC and gfc promoters and characterize a DNA-binding sequence motif present at all promoters found to be repressed by YjjQ. At the flhDC promoter, the YjjQ DNA-binding site overlaps the RcsA-RcsB DNA-binding site. RcsA-RcsB likewise represses the flhDC promoter, but the repression by YjjQ and that by RcsA-RcsB are independent of each other. These data suggest that YjjQ is an additional regulator involved in the complex control of flhDC at the level of transcription initiation. Furthermore, we show that YjjQ represses motility of the E. coli K-12 laboratory strain and of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains CFT073 and 536. Regulation of flhDC, yfiRNB, and additional loci by YjjQ may be features relevant for pathogenicity. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli is a commensal and pathogenic bacterium causing intra- and extraintestinal infections in humans and farm animals. The pathogenicity of E. coli strains is determined by their particular genome content, which includes essential and associated virulence factors that control the cellular physiology in the host environment. However, the gene pools of commensal and pathogenic E. coli are not clearly differentiated, and the function of virulence-associated loci needs to be characterized. In this study, we characterize the function of yjjQ, encoding a transcription regulator that was identified as being virulence associated in avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). We characterize YjjQ as transcriptional

  5. Association analysis identifies new risk loci for congenital heart disease in Chinese populations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhao, Bijun; Liu, Juanjuan; Da, Min; Wen, Yang; Hu, Yuanli; Ni, Bixian; Zhang, Kai; Yang, Shiwei; Xu, Jing; Dai, Juncheng; Wang, Xiaowei; Xia, Yankai; Ma, Hongxia; Jin, Guangfu; Yu, Shiqiang; Liu, Jiayin; Keavney, Bernard D; Goodship, Judith A; Cordell, Heather J; Wang, Xinru; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Zhou, Zuomin; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Luo, Lingfei; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-08-18

    Our previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified two susceptibility loci for congenital heart disease (CHD) in Han Chinese. Here we identify additional loci by testing promising associations in an extended 3-stage validation consisting of 6,053 CHD cases and 7,410 controls. We find GW significant (P<5.0 × 10(-8)) evidence of 4 additional CHD susceptibility loci at 4q31.22 (rs1400558, upstream of EDNRA, Pall=1.63 × 10(-9)), 9p24.2 (rs7863990, close to SMARCA2, Pall=3.71 × 10(-14)), 12q24.13 (rs2433752, upstream of TBX3 and TBX5, Pall=1.04 × 10(-10)) and 20q12 (rs490514, in PTPRT, Pall=1.20 × 10(-13)). Moreover, the data from previous European GWAS supports that rs490514 is associated with the risk of CHD (P=3.40 × 10(-3)). These results enhance our understanding of CHD susceptibility.

  6. Unmasking risk loci: DNA methylation illuminates the biology of cancer predisposition: analyzing DNA methylation of transcriptional enhancers reveals missed regulatory links between cancer risk loci and genes.

    PubMed

    Aran, Dvir; Hellman, Asaf

    2014-02-01

    Paradoxically, DNA sequence polymorphisms in cancer risk loci rarely correlate with the expression of cancer genes. Therefore, the molecular mechanism underlying an individual's susceptibility to cancer has remained largely unknown. However, recent evaluations of the correlations between DNA methylation and gene expression levels across healthy and cancerous genomes have revealed enrichment of disease-related DNA methylation variations within disease-associated risk loci. Moreover, it appears that transcriptional enhancers embedded in cancer risk loci often contain DNA methylation sites that closely define the expression of prominent cancer genes, despite the lack of significant correlations between gene expression levels and the surrounding disease-associated polymorphic sequences. We suggest that DNA methylation variations may obscure the effect of co-residing risk sequence alleles. Analysis of enhancer methylation data may help to reveal the regulatory circuits underlying predisposition to cancers and other common diseases.

  7. Large-scale genotyping identifies 41 new loci associated with breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Hall, Per; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ghoussaini, Maya; Dennis, Joe; Milne, Roger L; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel; van der Luijt, Rob B; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckman, Lars; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lichtner, Peter; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C; Canisius, Sander; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Haiman, Christopher A; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert; Brown, Judith; Luccarini, Craig; Schoof, Nils; Humphreys, Keith; Li, Jingmei; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; Vachon, Celine; Stevens, Kristen N; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Paridaens, Robert; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Broeks, Annegien; Van’t Veer, Laura J; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Jager, Agnes; Bui, Quang M; Stone, Jennifer; Dite, Gillian S; Apicella, Carmel; Tsimiklis, Helen; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Jones, Michael; Figueroa, Jonine; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bonanni, Bernardo; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Dörk, Thilo; Kristensen, Vessela N; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Edge, Stephen; Fostira, Florentia; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Phuah, Sze Yee; Cornes, Belinda K; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Ding, Shian-Ling; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Simard, Jacques; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Benitez, Javier; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Common variants at 27 loci have been identified as associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, and these account for ~9% of the familial risk of the disease. We report here a meta-analysis of 9 genome-wide association studies, including 10,052 breast cancer cases and 12,575 controls of European ancestry, from which we selected 29,807 SNPs for further genotyping. These SNPs were genotyped in 45,290 cases and 41,880 controls of European ancestry from 41 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). The SNPs were genotyped as part of a collaborative genotyping experiment involving four consortia (Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study, COGS) and used a custom Illumina iSelect genotyping array, iCOGS, comprising more than 200,000 SNPs. We identified SNPs at 41 new breast cancer susceptibility loci at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). Further analyses suggest that more than 1,000 additional loci are involved in breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:23535729

  8. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new risk loci for gout arthritis in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Li, Changgui; Li, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shiguo; Wang, Can; Han, Lin; Cui, Lingling; Zhou, Jingguo; Zou, Hejian; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Jianhua; Cheng, Xiaoyu; Zhou, Zhaowei; Ding, Chengcheng; Wang, Meng; Chen, Tong; Cui, Ying; He, Hongmei; Zhang, Keke; Yin, Congcong; Wang, Yunlong; Xing, Shichao; Li, Baojie; Ji, Jue; Jia, Zhaotong; Ma, Lidan; Niu, Jiapeng; Xin, Ying; Liu, Tian; Chu, Nan; Yu, Qing; Ren, Wei; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Aiqing; Sun, Yuping; Wang, Haili; Lu, Jie; Li, Yuanyuan; Qing, Yufeng; Chen, Gang; Wang, Yangang; Zhou, Li; Niu, Haitao; Liang, Jun; Dong, Qian; Li, Xinde; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Shi, Yongyong

    2015-05-13

    Gout is one of the most common types of inflammatory arthritis, caused by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in and around the joints. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many genetic loci associated with raised serum urate concentrations. However, hyperuricemia alone is not sufficient for the development of gout arthritis. Here we conduct a multistage GWAS in Han Chinese using 4,275 male gout patients and 6,272 normal male controls (1,255 cases and 1,848 controls were genome-wide genotyped), with an additional 1,644 hyperuricemic controls. We discover three new risk loci, 17q23.2 (rs11653176, P=1.36 × 10(-13), BCAS3), 9p24.2 (rs12236871, P=1.48 × 10(-10), RFX3) and 11p15.5 (rs179785, P=1.28 × 10(-8), KCNQ1), which contain inflammatory candidate genes. Our results suggest that these loci are most likely related to the progression from hyperuricemia to inflammatory gout, which will provide new insights into the pathogenesis of gout arthritis.

  9. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H; Karlan, Beth Y; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S; Southey, Melissa C; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Arun, Banu K; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gille, Johannes J P; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Blok, Marinus J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A M; Wijnen, Juul T; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Side, Lucy E; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Blank, Stephanie V; Cohn, David E; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L; Loud, Jennifer T; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Buys, Saundra S; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B; Sokolenko, Anna P; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Lu, Karen H; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4)). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  11. Genetic markers of pigmentation are novel risk loci for uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Robert; Vogelsang, Matjaz; Ucisik-Akkaya, Esma; Rai, Karan; Pilarski, Robert; Martinez, Carlos N; Rendleman, Justin; Kazlow, Esther; Nagdimov, Khagay; Osman, Iman; Klein, Robert J; Davidorf, Frederick H; Cebulla, Colleen M; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H; Kirchhoff, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    While the role of genetic risk factors in the etiology of uveal melanoma (UM) has been strongly suggested, the genetic susceptibility to UM is currently vastly unexplored. Due to shared epidemiological risk factors between cutaneous melanoma (CM) and UM, in this study we have selected 28 SNPs identified as risk variants in previous genome-wide association studies on CM or CM-related host phenotypes (such as pigmentation and eye color) and tested them for association with UM risk. By logistic regression analysis of 272 UM cases and 1782 controls using an additive model, we identified five variants significantly associated with UM risk, all passing adjustment for multiple testing. The three most significantly associated variants rs12913832 (OR = 0.529, 95% CI 0.415-0.673; p = 8.47E-08), rs1129038 (OR = 0.533, 95% CI 0.419-0.678; p = 1.19E-07) and rs916977 (OR = 0.465, 95% CI 0.339-0.637; p = 3.04E-07) are correlated (r(2) > 0.5) and map at 15q12 in the region of HERC2/OCA2, which determines eye-color in the human population. Our data provides first evidence that the genetic factors associated with pigmentation traits are risk loci of UM susceptibility. PMID:27499155

  12. Genetic markers of pigmentation are novel risk loci for uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Robert; Vogelsang, Matjaz; Ucisik-Akkaya, Esma; Rai, Karan; Pilarski, Robert; Martinez, Carlos N.; Rendleman, Justin; Kazlow, Esther; Nagdimov, Khagay; Osman, Iman; Klein, Robert J.; Davidorf , Frederick H.; Cebulla, Colleen M.; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed H.; Kirchhoff , Tomas

    2016-01-01

    While the role of genetic risk factors in the etiology of uveal melanoma (UM) has been strongly suggested, the genetic susceptibility to UM is currently vastly unexplored. Due to shared epidemiological risk factors between cutaneous melanoma (CM) and UM, in this study we have selected 28 SNPs identified as risk variants in previous genome-wide association studies on CM or CM-related host phenotypes (such as pigmentation and eye color) and tested them for association with UM risk. By logistic regression analysis of 272 UM cases and 1782 controls using an additive model, we identified five variants significantly associated with UM risk, all passing adjustment for multiple testing. The three most significantly associated variants rs12913832 (OR = 0.529, 95% CI 0.415–0.673; p = 8.47E-08), rs1129038 (OR = 0.533, 95% CI 0.419–0.678; p = 1.19E-07) and rs916977 (OR = 0.465, 95% CI 0.339–0.637; p = 3.04E-07) are correlated (r2 > 0.5) and map at 15q12 in the region of HERC2/OCA2, which determines eye-color in the human population. Our data provides first evidence that the genetic factors associated with pigmentation traits are risk loci of UM susceptibility. PMID:27499155

  13. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingchang; Day, Felix R; Gustafsson, Stefan; Buchkovich, Martin L; Na, Jianbo; Bataille, Veronique; Cousminer, Diana L; Dastani, Zari; Drong, Alexander W; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M; Falchi, Mario; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Hedman, Åsa K; Haring, Robin; Hysi, Pirro G; Iles, Mark M; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lagou, Vasiliki; Li, Rui; Li, Xin; Locke, Adam; Lu, Chen; Mägi, Reedik; Perry, John R B; Pers, Tune H; Qi, Qibin; Sanna, Marianna; Schmidt, Ellen M; Scott, William R; Shungin, Dmitry; Teumer, Alexander; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Walker, Ryan W; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zhang, Mingfeng; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Zhihong; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Bakker, Stephan J L; Bellis, Claire; Bonnefond, Amélie; Borodulin, Katja; Buchman, Aron S; Cederholm, Tommy; Choh, Audrey C; Choi, Hyung Jin; Curran, Joanne E; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; De Jager, Philip L; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; Enneman, Anke W; Eury, Elodie; Evans, Daniel S; Forsen, Tom; Friedrich, Nele; Fumeron, Frédéric; Garcia, Melissa E; Gärtner, Simone; Han, Bok-Ghee; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Ittermann, Till; Kent, Jack W; Kolcic, Ivana; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lahti, Jari; Mateo Leach, Irene; Lee, Christine G; Lee, Jong-Young; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loh, Marie; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Michaëlsson, Karl; Nalls, Mike A; Nielson, Carrie M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Polašek, Ozren; Ripatti, Samuli; Sarzynski, Mark A; Shin, Chan Soo; Narančić, Nina Smolej; Spira, Dominik; Srikanth, Priya; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Sung, Yun Ju; Swart, Karin M A; Taittonen, Leena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tikkanen, Emmi; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Schoor, Natasja M; Verweij, Niek; Wright, Alan F; Yu, Lei; Zmuda, Joseph M; Eklund, Niina; Forrester, Terrence; Grarup, Niels; Jackson, Anne U; Kristiansson, Kati; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lichtner, Peter; Luan, Jian'an; Mahajan, Anubha; Männistö, Satu; Palmer, Cameron D; Ried, Janina S; Scott, Robert A; Stancáková, Alena; Wagner, Peter J; Demirkan, Ayse; Döring, Angela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kiel, Douglas P; Kühnel, Brigitte; Mangino, Massimo; Mcknight, Barbara; Menni, Cristina; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Oostra, Ben A; Shuldiner, Alan R; Song, Kijoung; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; White, Charles C; Boehnke, Michael; Boettcher, Yvonne; Cooper, Richard S; Forouhi, Nita G; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Hingorani, Aroon; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; Linneberg, Allan; Luke, Amy; Mckenzie, Colin A; Palotie, Aarno; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Strauch, Konstantin; Tayo, Bamidele O; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bennett, David A; Bertram, Lars; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Bouchard, Claude; Campbell, Harry; Cho, Nam H; Cummings, Steven R; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Demuth, Ilja; Eckardt, Rahel; Eriksson, Johan G; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hastie, Nicholas; Heliövaara, Markku; Hofman, Albert; Jordan, Joanne M; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Knekt, Paul B; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lind, Lars; Liu, Yongmei; Orwoll, Eric S; Osmond, Clive; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Towne, Bradford; Tranah, Gregory J; Tremblay, Angelo; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Harst, Pim; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma S; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F; Yengo, Loïc; Bishop, D Timothy; Borecki, Ingrid B; Chambers, John C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Dehghan, Abbas; Deloukas, Panos; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fox, Caroline; Furey, Terrence S; Franke, Lude; Han, Jiali; Hunter, David J; Karjalainen, Juha; Karpe, Fredrik; Kaplan, Robert C; Kooner, Jaspal S; McCarthy, Mark I; Murabito, Joanne M; Morris, Andrew P; Bishop, Julia A N; North, Kari E; Ohlsson, Claes; Ong, Ken K; Prokopenko, Inga; Richards, J Brent; Schadt, Eric E; Spector, Tim D; Widén, Elisabeth; Willer, Cristen J; Yang, Jian; Ingelsson, Erik; Mohlke, Karen L; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Pospisilik, John Andrew; Zillikens, M Carola; Lindgren, Cecilia; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas Oskari; Loos, Ruth J F

    2016-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)), of which eight were previously associated with increased overall adiposity (BMI, BF%) and four (in or near COBLL1/GRB14, IGF2BP1, PLA2G6, CRTC1) were novel associations with BF%. Seven loci showed a larger effect on BF% than on BMI, suggestive of a primary association with adiposity, while five loci showed larger effects on BMI than on BF%, suggesting association with both fat and lean mass. In particular, the loci more strongly associated with BF% showed distinct cross-phenotype association signatures with a range of cardiometabolic traits revealing new insights in the link between adiposity and disease risk. PMID:26833246

  14. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingchang; Day, Felix R; Gustafsson, Stefan; Buchkovich, Martin L; Na, Jianbo; Bataille, Veronique; Cousminer, Diana L; Dastani, Zari; Drong, Alexander W; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M; Falchi, Mario; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Hedman, Åsa K; Haring, Robin; Hysi, Pirro G; Iles, Mark M; Justice, Anne E; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lagou, Vasiliki; Li, Rui; Li, Xin; Locke, Adam; Lu, Chen; Mägi, Reedik; Perry, John R B; Pers, Tune H; Qi, Qibin; Sanna, Marianna; Schmidt, Ellen M; Scott, William R; Shungin, Dmitry; Teumer, Alexander; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Walker, Ryan W; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zhang, Mingfeng; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Zhihong; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Bakker, Stephan J L; Bellis, Claire; Bonnefond, Amélie; Borodulin, Katja; Buchman, Aron S; Cederholm, Tommy; Choh, Audrey C; Choi, Hyung Jin; Curran, Joanne E; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; De Jager, Philip L; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; Enneman, Anke W; Eury, Elodie; Evans, Daniel S; Forsen, Tom; Friedrich, Nele; Fumeron, Frédéric; Garcia, Melissa E; Gärtner, Simone; Han, Bok-Ghee; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Ittermann, Till; Kent, Jack W; Kolcic, Ivana; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lahti, Jari; Mateo Leach, Irene; Lee, Christine G; Lee, Jong-Young; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loh, Marie; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Michaëlsson, Karl; Nalls, Mike A; Nielson, Carrie M; Oozageer, Laticia; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Polašek, Ozren; Ripatti, Samuli; Sarzynski, Mark A; Shin, Chan Soo; Narančić, Nina Smolej; Spira, Dominik; Srikanth, Priya; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Sung, Yun Ju; Swart, Karin M A; Taittonen, Leena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tikkanen, Emmi; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Schoor, Natasja M; Verweij, Niek; Wright, Alan F; Yu, Lei; Zmuda, Joseph M; Eklund, Niina; Forrester, Terrence; Grarup, Niels; Jackson, Anne U; Kristiansson, Kati; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lichtner, Peter; Luan, Jian'an; Mahajan, Anubha; Männistö, Satu; Palmer, Cameron D; Ried, Janina S; Scott, Robert A; Stancáková, Alena; Wagner, Peter J; Demirkan, Ayse; Döring, Angela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kiel, Douglas P; Kühnel, Brigitte; Mangino, Massimo; Mcknight, Barbara; Menni, Cristina; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Oostra, Ben A; Shuldiner, Alan R; Song, Kijoung; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; White, Charles C; Boehnke, Michael; Boettcher, Yvonne; Cooper, Richard S; Forouhi, Nita G; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Hingorani, Aroon; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; Linneberg, Allan; Luke, Amy; Mckenzie, Colin A; Palotie, Aarno; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Strauch, Konstantin; Tayo, Bamidele O; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bennett, David A; Bertram, Lars; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Bouchard, Claude; Campbell, Harry; Cho, Nam H; Cummings, Steven R; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Demuth, Ilja; Eckardt, Rahel; Eriksson, Johan G; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hastie, Nicholas; Heliövaara, Markku; Hofman, Albert; Jordan, Joanne M; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Knekt, Paul B; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lind, Lars; Liu, Yongmei; Orwoll, Eric S; Osmond, Clive; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Raitakari, Olli T; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D C; Rice, Treva K; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Towne, Bradford; Tranah, Gregory J; Tremblay, Angelo; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Harst, Pim; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma S; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F; Yengo, Loïc; Bishop, D Timothy; Borecki, Ingrid B; Chambers, John C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Dehghan, Abbas; Deloukas, Panos; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fox, Caroline; Furey, Terrence S; Franke, Lude; Han, Jiali; Hunter, David J; Karjalainen, Juha; Karpe, Fredrik; Kaplan, Robert C; Kooner, Jaspal S; McCarthy, Mark I; Murabito, Joanne M; Morris, Andrew P; Bishop, Julia A N; North, Kari E; Ohlsson, Claes; Ong, Ken K; Prokopenko, Inga; Richards, J Brent; Schadt, Eric E; Spector, Tim D; Widén, Elisabeth; Willer, Cristen J; Yang, Jian; Ingelsson, Erik; Mohlke, Karen L; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Pospisilik, John Andrew; Zillikens, M Carola; Lindgren, Cecilia; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas Oskari; Loos, Ruth J F

    2016-02-01

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10(-8)), of which eight were previously associated with increased overall adiposity (BMI, BF%) and four (in or near COBLL1/GRB14, IGF2BP1, PLA2G6, CRTC1) were novel associations with BF%. Seven loci showed a larger effect on BF% than on BMI, suggestive of a primary association with adiposity, while five loci showed larger effects on BMI than on BF%, suggesting association with both fat and lean mass. In particular, the loci more strongly associated with BF% showed distinct cross-phenotype association signatures with a range of cardiometabolic traits revealing new insights in the link between adiposity and disease risk.

  15. New loci for body fat percentage reveal link between adiposity and cardiometabolic disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingchang; Day, Felix R.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Na, Jianbo; Bataille, Veronique; Cousminer, Diana L.; Dastani, Zari; Drong, Alexander W.; Esko, Tõnu; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Hedman, Åsa K.; Haring, Robin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Iles, Mark M.; Justice, Anne E.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lagou, Vasiliki; Li, Rui; Li, Xin; Locke, Adam; Lu, Chen; Mägi, Reedik; Perry, John R. B.; Pers, Tune H.; Qi, Qibin; Sanna, Marianna; Schmidt, Ellen M.; Scott, William R.; Shungin, Dmitry; Teumer, Alexander; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Walker, Ryan W.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Zhang, Mingfeng; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Zhihong; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bellis, Claire; Bonnefond, Amélie; Borodulin, Katja; Buchman, Aron S.; Cederholm, Tommy; Choh, Audrey C.; Choi, Hyung Jin; Curran, Joanne E.; de Groot, Lisette C. P. G. M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A. M.; Enneman, Anke W.; Eury, Elodie; Evans, Daniel S.; Forsen, Tom; Friedrich, Nele; Fumeron, Frédéric; Garcia, Melissa E.; Gärtner, Simone; Han, Bok-Ghee; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hillege, Hans; Ittermann, Till; Kent, Jack W.; Kolcic, Ivana; Laatikainen, Tiina; Lahti, Jari; Leach, Irene Mateo; Lee, Christine G.; Lee, Jong-Young; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loh, Marie; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Michaëlsson, Karl; Nalls, Mike A.; Nielson, Carrie M.; Oozageer, Laticia; Pascoe, Laura; Paternoster, Lavinia; Polašek, Ozren; Ripatti, Samuli; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Shin, Chan Soo; Narančić, Nina Smolej; Spira, Dominik; Srikanth, Priya; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Sung, Yun Ju; Swart, Karin M. A.; Taittonen, Leena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tikkanen, Emmi; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Verweij, Niek; Wright, Alan F.; Yu, Lei; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Eklund, Niina; Forrester, Terrence; Grarup, Niels; Jackson, Anne U.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lichtner, Peter; Luan, Jian'an; Mahajan, Anubha; Männistö, Satu; Palmer, Cameron D.; Ried, Janina S.; Scott, Robert A.; Stancáková, Alena; Wagner, Peter J.; Demirkan, Ayse; Döring, Angela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kühnel, Brigitte; Mangino, Massimo; Mcknight, Barbara; Menni, Cristina; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Oostra, Ben A.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Song, Kijoung; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; White, Charles C.; Boehnke, Michael; Boettcher, Yvonne; Cooper, Richard S.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Hingorani, Aroon; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Laakso, Markku; Langenberg, Claudia; Linneberg, Allan; Luke, Amy; Mckenzie, Colin A.; Palotie, Aarno; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Strauch, Konstantin; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bennett, David A.; Bertram, Lars; Blangero, John; Blüher, Matthias; Bouchard, Claude; Campbell, Harry; Cho, Nam H.; Cummings, Steven R.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Demuth, Ilja; Eckardt, Rahel; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H.; Froguel, Philippe; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hastie, Nicholas; Heliövaara, Markku; Hofman, Albert; Jordan, Joanne M.; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Knekt, Paul B.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lind, Lars; Liu, Yongmei; Orwoll, Eric S.; Osmond, Clive; Perola, Markus; Pérusse, Louis; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rao, D. C.; Rice, Treva K.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Towne, Bradford; Tranah, Gregory J.; Tremblay, Angelo; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Harst, Pim; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma S.; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Mark; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wild, Sarah; Wilson, James F.; Yengo, Loïc; Bishop, D. Timothy; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Chambers, John C.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Dehghan, Abbas; Deloukas, Panos; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Fox, Caroline; Furey, Terrence S.; Franke, Lude; Han, Jiali; Hunter, David J.; Karjalainen, Juha; Karpe, Fredrik; Kaplan, Robert C.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Bishop, Julia A. N.; North, Kari E.; Ohlsson, Claes; Ong, Ken K.; Prokopenko, Inga; Richards, J. Brent; Schadt, Eric E.; Spector, Tim D.; Widén, Elisabeth; Willer, Cristen J.; Yang, Jian; Ingelsson, Erik; Mohlke, Karen L.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Pospisilik, John Andrew; Zillikens, M. Carola; Lindgren, Cecilia; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas Oskari; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2016-01-01

    To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of adiposity and its links to cardiometabolic disease risk, we conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of body fat percentage (BF%) in up to 100,716 individuals. Twelve loci reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8), of which eight were previously associated with increased overall adiposity (BMI, BF%) and four (in or near COBLL1/GRB14, IGF2BP1, PLA2G6, CRTC1) were novel associations with BF%. Seven loci showed a larger effect on BF% than on BMI, suggestive of a primary association with adiposity, while five loci showed larger effects on BMI than on BF%, suggesting association with both fat and lean mass. In particular, the loci more strongly associated with BF% showed distinct cross-phenotype association signatures with a range of cardiometabolic traits revealing new insights in the link between adiposity and disease risk. PMID:26833246

  16. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  17. SMAD7 loci contribute to risk of hepatocellular carcinoma and clinicopathologic development among Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chenying; Song, Jingjing; Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Minjiang; Fan, Xiaoxi; Cheng, Xingyao; Lan, Xilin; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified three loci at 18q21 (rs4939827, rs7240004, and rs7229639), which maps to SMAD7 loci, were associated with risk of diseases of the digestive system. However, their associations with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk remain unknown. A case-control study was conducted to assess genetic associations with HCC risk and clinicopathologic development among Chinese Han population. Three SNPs were genotyped among 1,000 HCC cases and 1,000 controls using Sequenom Mass-ARRAY technology. We observed statistically significant associations for the three SMAD7 loci and HCC risk. Each copy of minor allele was associated with a 1.24–1.36 fold increased risk of HCC. We also found that significant differences were observed between rs4939827 and clinical TNM stage and vascular invasion, as well as rs7240004 and vascular invasion. We also established a genetic risk score (GRS) by summing the risk alleles. The GRS was significantly associated with increased risk of HCC and vascular invasion. Our data revealed the SMAD7 loci is associated with HCC susceptibility and its clinicopathologic development. PMID:26989026

  18. Alzheimer’s Disease Risk Polymorphisms Regulate Gene Expression in the ZCWPW1 and the CELF1 Loci

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Celeste M.; Ezerskiy, Lubov A.; Bertelsen, Sarah; Goate, Alison M.

    2016-01-01

    Late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) is a genetically complex and clinically heterogeneous disease. Recent large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than twenty loci that modify risk for AD. Despite the identification of these loci, little progress has been made in identifying the functional variants that explain the association with AD risk. Thus, we sought to determine whether the novel LOAD GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) alter expression of LOAD GWAS genes and whether expression of these genes is altered in AD brains. The majority of LOAD GWAS SNPs occur in gene dense regions under large linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks, making it unclear which gene(s) are modified by the SNP. Thus, we tested for brain expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) between LOAD GWAS SNPs and SNPs in high LD with the LOAD GWAS SNPs in all of the genes within the GWAS loci. We found a significant eQTL between rs1476679 and PILRB and GATS, which occurs within the ZCWPW1 locus. PILRB and GATS expression levels, within the ZCWPW1 locus, were also associated with AD status. Rs7120548 was associated with MTCH2 expression, which occurs within the CELF1 locus. Additionally, expression of several genes within the CELF1 locus, including MTCH2, were highly correlated with one another and were associated with AD status. We further demonstrate that PILRB, as well as other genes within the GWAS loci, are most highly expressed in microglia. These findings together with the function of PILRB as a DAP12 receptor supports the critical role of microglia and neuroinflammation in AD risk. PMID:26919393

  19. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J.; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F.; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tainle; de Bakker, Paul IW; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Charles; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin NA; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John RB; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbæk, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple new genomic loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)1-11. Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to discover loci at which common alleles have modest effects, we performed meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans encompassing 10,128 individuals of European-descent and ~2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed). Replication testing was performed in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. At least six new loci with robust evidence for association were detected, including the JAZF1 (p=5.0×10−14), CDC123/CAMK1D (p=1.2×10−10), TSPAN8/LGR5 (p=1.1×10−9), THADA (p=1.1×10−9), ADAMTS9 (p=1.2×10−8), and NOTCH2 (p=4.1×10−8) gene regions. The large number of loci with relatively small effects indicates the value of large discovery and follow-up samples in identifying additional clues about the inherited basis of T2D. PMID:18372903

  20. Risk Analysis of Prostate Cancer in PRACTICAL, a Multinational Consortium, Using 25 Known Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Loci

    PubMed Central

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Benlloch, Sara; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita; Stephenson, Robert; Cox, Angela; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; FitzGerald, Liesel; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Guy, Michelle; Dadaev, Tokhir; Little, Sarah J.; Govindasami, Koveela; Sawyer, Emma; Wilkinson, Rosemary; Herkommer, Kathleen; Hopper, John L.; Lophatonanon, Aritaya; Rinckleb, Antje E.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic variants associated with prostate cancer (PrCa) risk which explain a substantial proportion of familial relative risk. These variants can be used to stratify individuals by their risk of PrCa. Methods We genotyped 25 PrCa susceptibility loci in 40,414 individuals and derived a polygenic risk score (PRS). We estimated empirical Odds Ratios for PrCa associated with different risk strata defined by PRS and derived age-specific absolute risks of developing PrCa by PRS stratum and family history. Results The PrCa risk for men in the top 1% of the PRS distribution was 30.6 (95% CI 16.4-57.3) fold compared with men in the bottom 1%, and 4.2 (95% CI 3.2-5.5) fold compared with the median risk. The absolute risk of PrCa by age 85 was 65.8% for a man with family history in the top 1% of the PRS distribution, compared with 3.7% for a man in the bottom 1%. The PRS was only weakly correlated with serum PSA level (correlation=0.09). Conclusions Risk profiling can identify men at substantially increased or reduced risk of PrCa. The effect size, measured by OR per unit PRS, was higher in men at younger ages and in men with family history of PrCa. Incorporating additional newly identified loci into a PRS should improve the predictive value of risk profiles. Impact We demonstrate that the risk profiling based on SNPs can identify men at substantially increased or reduced risk that could have useful implications for targeted prevention and screening programs. PMID:25837820

  1. Multiple Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping Methods to Validate Additive Quantitative Trait Loci in Korean Native Cattle (Hanwoo).

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency of genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) depends on power of detection for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and precision for QTL mapping. In this study, three different strategies for GWAS were applied to detect QTL for carcass quality traits in the Korean cattle, Hanwoo; a linkage disequilibrium single locus regression method (LDRM), a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis (LDLA) and a BayesCπ approach. The phenotypes of 486 steers were collected for weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), carcass weight (CWT), backfat thickness (BFT), longissimus dorsi muscle area, and marbling score (Marb). Also the genotype data for the steers and their sires were scored with the Illumina bovine 50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips. For the two former GWAS methods, threshold values were set at false discovery rate <0.01 on a chromosome-wide level, while a cut-off threshold value was set in the latter model, such that the top five windows, each of which comprised 10 adjacent SNPs, were chosen with significant variation for the phenotype. Four major additive QTL from these three methods had high concordance found in 64.1 to 64.9Mb for Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 7 for WWT, 24.3 to 25.4Mb for BTA14 for CWT, 0.5 to 1.5Mb for BTA6 for BFT and 26.3 to 33.4Mb for BTA29 for BFT. Several candidate genes (i.e. glutamate receptor, ionotropic, ampa 1 [GRIA1], family with sequence similarity 110, member B [FAM110B], and thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box [TOX]) may be identified close to these QTL. Our result suggests that the use of different linkage disequilibrium mapping approaches can provide more reliable chromosome regions to further pinpoint DNA makers or causative genes in these regions.

  2. Multiple Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping Methods to Validate Additive Quantitative Trait Loci in Korean Native Cattle (Hanwoo).

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency of genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) depends on power of detection for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and precision for QTL mapping. In this study, three different strategies for GWAS were applied to detect QTL for carcass quality traits in the Korean cattle, Hanwoo; a linkage disequilibrium single locus regression method (LDRM), a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis (LDLA) and a BayesCπ approach. The phenotypes of 486 steers were collected for weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), carcass weight (CWT), backfat thickness (BFT), longissimus dorsi muscle area, and marbling score (Marb). Also the genotype data for the steers and their sires were scored with the Illumina bovine 50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips. For the two former GWAS methods, threshold values were set at false discovery rate <0.01 on a chromosome-wide level, while a cut-off threshold value was set in the latter model, such that the top five windows, each of which comprised 10 adjacent SNPs, were chosen with significant variation for the phenotype. Four major additive QTL from these three methods had high concordance found in 64.1 to 64.9Mb for Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 7 for WWT, 24.3 to 25.4Mb for BTA14 for CWT, 0.5 to 1.5Mb for BTA6 for BFT and 26.3 to 33.4Mb for BTA29 for BFT. Several candidate genes (i.e. glutamate receptor, ionotropic, ampa 1 [GRIA1], family with sequence similarity 110, member B [FAM110B], and thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box [TOX]) may be identified close to these QTL. Our result suggests that the use of different linkage disequilibrium mapping approaches can provide more reliable chromosome regions to further pinpoint DNA makers or causative genes in these regions. PMID:26104396

  3. Fine-mapping at three loci known to affect fetal hemoglobin levels explains additional genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, Geneviève; Palmer, Cameron D; Sankaran, Vijay G; Orkin, Stuart H; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Lettre, Guillaume

    2010-12-01

    We used resequencing and genotyping in African Americans with sickle cell anemia (SCA) to characterize associations with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels at the BCL11A, HBS1L-MYB and β-globin loci. Fine-mapping of HbF association signals at these loci confirmed seven SNPs with independent effects and increased the explained heritable variation in HbF levels from 38.6% to 49.5%. We also identified rare missense variants that causally implicate MYB in HbF production.

  4. MANBA, CXCR5, SOX8, RPS6KB1 and ZBTB46 are genetic risk loci for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lill, Christina M.; Schjeide, Brit-Maren M.; Graetz, Christiane; Ban, Maria; Alcina, Antonio; Ortiz, Miguel A.; Pérez, Jennifer; Damotte, Vincent; Booth, David; Lopez de Lapuente, Aitzkoa; Broer, Linda; Schilling, Marcel; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafa; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Compston, Alastair; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Dörner, Thomas; Epplen, Joerg T.; Fernández, Óscar; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Guillot-Noël, Léna; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hoffjan, Sabine; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Kemppinen, Anu; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Li, Shu-Chen; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lohse, Peter; Lubetzki, Catherine; Luessi, Felix; Malhotra, Sunny; Mescheriakova, Julia; Montalban, Xavier; Papeix, Caroline; Paredes, Lidia F.; Rieckmann, Peter; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Winkelmann, Alexander; Zettl, Uwe K.; Hintzen, Rogier; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Stewart, Graeme; Fontaine, Bertrand; Comabella, Manuel; Urcelay, Elena; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Sawcer, Stephen; Bertram, Lars; Zipp, Frauke

    2013-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study reported five loci for which there was strong, but sub-genome-wide significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of these potential risk loci in a large and independent data set of ∼20 000 subjects. We tested five single nucleotide polymorphisms rs228614 (MANBA), rs630923 (CXCR5), rs2744148 (SOX8), rs180515 (RPS6KB1), and rs6062314 (ZBTB46) for association with multiple sclerosis risk in a total of 8499 cases with multiple sclerosis, 8765 unrelated control subjects and 958 trios of European descent. In addition, we assessed the overall evidence for association by combining these newly generated data with the results from the original genome-wide association study by meta-analysis. All five tested single nucleotide polymorphisms showed consistent and statistically significant evidence for association with multiple sclerosis in our validation data sets (rs228614: odds ratio = 0.91, P = 2.4 × 10−6; rs630923: odds ratio = 0.89, P = 1.2 × 10−4; rs2744148: odds ratio = 1.14, P = 1.8 × 10−6; rs180515: odds ratio = 1.12, P = 5.2 × 10−7; rs6062314: odds ratio = 0.90, P = 4.3 × 10−3). Combining our data with results from the previous genome-wide association study by meta-analysis, the evidence for association was strengthened further, surpassing the threshold for genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) in each case. Our study provides compelling evidence that these five loci are genuine multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci. These results may eventually lead to a better understanding of the underlying disease pathophysiology. PMID:23739915

  5. Novel Associations for Hypothyroidism Include Known Autoimmune Risk Loci

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Nicholas; Tung, Joyce Y.; Kiefer, Amy K.; Hinds, David A.; Francke, Uta; Mountain, Joanna L.; Do, Chuong B.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is the most common thyroid disorder, affecting about 5% of the general population. Here we present the current largest genome-wide association study of hypothyroidism, in 3,736 cases and 35,546 controls. Hypothyroidism was assessed via web-based questionnaires. We identify five genome-wide significant associations, three of which are well known to be involved in a large spectrum of autoimmune diseases: rs6679677 near PTPN22, rs3184504 in SH2B3, and rs2517532 in the HLA class I region (-values , , and , respectively). We also report associations with rs4915077 near VAV3 (-value ) and rs925489 near FOXE1 (-value ). VAV3 is involved in immune function, and FOXE1 and PTPN22 have previously been associated with hypothyroidism. Although the HLA class I region and SH2B3 have previously been linked with a number of autoimmune diseases, this is the first report of their association with thyroid disease. The VAV3 association is also novel. We also show suggestive evidence of association for hypothyroidism with a SNP in the HLA class II region (independent of the other HLA association) as well as SNPs in CAPZB, PDE8B, and CTLA4. CAPZB and PDE8B have been linked to TSH levels and CTLA4 to a variety of autoimmune diseases. These results suggest heterogeneity in the genetic etiology of hypothyroidism, implicating genes involved in both autoimmune disorders and thyroid function. Using a genetic risk profile score based on the top association from each of the five genome-wide significant regions in our study, the relative risk between the highest and lowest deciles of genetic risk is 2.0. PMID:22493691

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Lindström, Sara; Thompson, Deborah J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Li, Jingmei; Gierach, Gretchen L.; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Douglas, Julie A.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fernandez-Navarro, Pablo; Verghase, Jajini; Smith, Paula; Brown, Judith; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Heit, John A.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Norman, Aaron; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; deAndrade, Mariza; Vierkant, Robert A.; Czene, Kamila; Fasching, Peter A.; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Shah, Kaanan P.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A.; Beck, Andrew H.; Knoblauch, Nicholas W.; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Pollan, Marina; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hopper, John L.; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Boyd, Norman F.; Vachon, Celine M.; Tamimi, Rulla M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density reflects the amount of stromal and epithelial tissues in relation to adipose tissue in the breast and is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Here we report the results from meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of three mammographic density phenotypes: dense area, non-dense area and percent density in up to 7,916 women in stage 1 and an additional 10,379 women in stage 2. We identify genome-wide significant (P<5×10−8) loci for dense area (AREG, ESR1, ZNF365, LSP1/TNNT3, IGF1, TMEM184B, SGSM3/MKL1), non-dense area (8p11.23) and percent density (PRDM6, 8p11.23, TMEM184B). Four of these regions are known breast cancer susceptibility loci, and four additional regions were found to be associated with breast cancer (P<0.05) in a large meta-analysis. These results provide further evidence of a shared genetic basis between mammographic density and breast cancer and illustrate the power of studying intermediate quantitative phenotypes to identify putative disease susceptibility loci. PMID:25342443

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with both mammographic density and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Sara; Thompson, Deborah J; Paterson, Andrew D; Li, Jingmei; Gierach, Gretchen L; Scott, Christopher; Stone, Jennifer; Douglas, Julie A; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Fernandez-Navarro, Pablo; Verghase, Jajini; Smith, Paula; Brown, Judith; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F; Heit, John A; Pankratz, V Shane; Norman, Aaron; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; deAndrade, Mariza; Vierkant, Robert A; Czene, Kamila; Fasching, Peter A; Baglietto, Laura; Southey, Melissa C; Giles, Graham G; Shah, Kaanan P; Chan, Heang-Ping; Helvie, Mark A; Beck, Andrew H; Knoblauch, Nicholas W; Hazra, Aditi; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Pollan, Marina; Figueroa, Jonine D; Couch, Fergus J; Hopper, John L; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Boyd, Norman F; Vachon, Celine M; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2014-01-01

    Mammographic density reflects the amount of stromal and epithelial tissues in relation to adipose tissue in the breast and is a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Here we report the results from meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of three mammographic density phenotypes: dense area, non-dense area and percent density in up to 7,916 women in stage 1 and an additional 10,379 women in stage 2. We identify genome-wide significant (P<5 × 10(-8)) loci for dense area (AREG, ESR1, ZNF365, LSP1/TNNT3, IGF1, TMEM184B and SGSM3/MKL1), non-dense area (8p11.23) and percent density (PRDM6, 8p11.23 and TMEM184B). Four of these regions are known breast cancer susceptibility loci, and four additional regions were found to be associated with breast cancer (P<0.05) in a large meta-analysis. These results provide further evidence of a shared genetic basis between mammographic density and breast cancer and illustrate the power of studying intermediate quantitative phenotypes to identify putative disease-susceptibility loci. PMID:25342443

  8. Risk loci for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a genome-wide association study and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Michael H.; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Zhou, Xiaobo; Mattheisen, Manuel; Castaldi, Peter J.; Hersh, Craig P.; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Sylvia, Jody S.; Ziniti, John; Laird, Nan M.; Lange, Christoph; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Casaburi, Richard; Barr, R. Graham; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Make, Barry J.; Hokanson, John E.; Lutz, Sharon; Murray, Tanda; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Beaty, Terri H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The genetic risk factors for susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still largely unknown. Additional genetic variants are likely to be identified by genome-wide association studies in larger cohorts or specific subgroups. Methods Genome-wide association analysis in COPDGene (non-Hispanic whites and African-Americans) was combined with existing data from the ECLIPSE, NETT/NAS, and GenKOLS (Norway) studies. Analyses were performed both using all moderate-to-severe cases and the subset of severe cases. Top loci not previously described as genome-wide significant were genotyped in the ICGN study, and results combined in a joint meta-analysis. Findings Analysis of a total of 6,633 moderate-to-severe cases and 5,704 controls confirmed association at three known loci: CHRNA3/CHRNA5/IREB2, FAM13A, and HHIP (10−12 < P < 10−14), and also showed significant evidence of association at a novel locus near RIN3 (overall P, including ICGN = 5•4×10−9). In the severe COPD analysis (n=3,497), the effects at two of three previously described loci were significantly stronger; we also identified two additional loci previously reported to affect gene expression of MMP12 and TGFB2 (overall P = 2•6x10−9 and 8•3×10−9). RIN3 and TGFB2 expression levels were reduced in a set of Lung Tissue Research Consortium COPD lung tissue samples compared with controls. Interpretation In a genome-wide study of COPD, we confirmed associations at three known loci and found additional genome-wide significant associations with moderate-to-severe COPD near RIN3 and with severe COPD near MMP12 and TGFB2. Genetic variants, apart from alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, increase the risk of COPD. Our analysis of severe COPD suggests additional genetic variants may be identified by focusing on this subgroup. Funding National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; the COPD Foundation through contributions from AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Novartis, and Sepracor

  9. A large-scale replication study identifies TNIP1, PRDM1, JAZF1, UHRF1BP1 and IL10 as risk loci for systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Gateva, Vesela; Sandling, Johanna K; Hom, Geoff; Taylor, Kimberly E; Chung, Sharon A; Sun, Xin; Ortmann, Ward; Kosoy, Roman; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Nordmark, Gunnel; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Padyukov, Leonid; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Jönsen, Andreas; Bengtsson, Anders A; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Baechler, Emily C; Brown, Elizabeth E; Alarcón, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; McGwin, Gerald; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Kimberly, Robert P; Manzi, Susan; Petri, Michelle A; Lee, Annette; Gregersen, Peter K; Seldin, Michael F; Rönnblom, Lars; Criswell, Lindsey A; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Behrens, Timothy W; Graham, Robert R

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have recently identified at least 15 susceptibility loci for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To confirm additional risk loci, we selected SNPs from 2,466 regions that showed nominal evidence of association to SLE (P < 0.05) in a genome-wide study and genotyped them in an independent sample of 1,963 cases and 4,329 controls. This replication effort identified five new SLE susceptibility loci (P < 5 × 10−8): TNIP1 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.27), PRDM1 (OR = 1.20), JAZF1 (OR = 1.20), UHRF1BP1 (OR = 1.17) and IL10 (OR = 1.19). We identified 21 additional candidate loci with P ≤ 1 × 10−5. A candidate screen of alleles previously associated with other autoimmune diseases suggested five loci (P < 1 × 10−3) that may contribute to SLE: IFIH1, CFB, CLEC16A, IL12B and SH2B3. These results expand the number of confirmed and candidate SLE susceptibility loci and implicate several key immunologic pathways in SLE pathogenesis. PMID:19838195

  10. A Multistage Genetic Association Study Identifies Breast Cancer Risk Loci at 10q25 and 16q24

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Kathryn S.; Breyer, Joan P.; McReynolds, Kate M.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Plummer, W. Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Parl, Fritz F.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Page, David L.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Dupont, William D.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Heritable risk for breast cancer includes an increasing number of common, low effect risk variants. We conducted a multistage genetic association study in a series of independent epidemiologic breast cancer study populations to identify novel breast cancer risk variants. Methods We tested 1,162 SNPs of greatest nominal significance from stage I of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility breast cancer study (CGEMS; 1,145 cases, 1,142 controls) for evidence of replicated association with breast cancer in the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 599 cases, 1,161 controls), the Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls), and BioVU Breast Cancer Study (BioVU; 1,172 cases, 1,172 controls). Results Among these SNPs, a series of validated breast cancer risk variants yielded expected associations in the study populations. In addition, we observed two previously unreported loci that were significantly associated with breast cancer risk in the CGEMS, NBC, and CBCS study populations and had a consistent, although not statistically significant, risk effect in the BioVU study population. These were rs1626678 at 10q25.3 near ENO4 and KIAA1598 (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR 1.13 [1.07–1.20], P = 5.6 × 10−5), and rs8046508 at 16q23.1 in the eighth intron of WWOX (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR = 1.20 [1.10–1.31], P = 3.5 × 10−5). Conclusions Our data supports the association of two novel loci, at 10q25.3 and 16q23.1, with risk of breast cancer. Impact The expanding compendium of known breast cancer genetic risk variants holds increasing power for clinical risk prediction models of breast cancer, improving upon the Gail model. PMID:22806168

  11. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns: from diabetes risk loci to disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward; Grallert, Harald; Glunk, Viktoria; Berulava, Tea; Lee, Heekyoung; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Fadista, Joao; Ehlers, Kerstin; Wahl, Simone; Hoffmann, Christoph; Qian, Kun; Rönn, Tina; Riess, Helene; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Bretschneider, Nancy; Schroeder, Timm; Skurk, Thomas; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Spieler, Derek; Klingenspor, Martin; Seifert, Martin; Kern, Michael J; Mejhert, Niklas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Hansson, Ola; Hauck, Stefanie M; Blüher, Matthias; Arner, Peter; Groop, Leif; Illig, Thomas; Suhre, Karsten; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Mellgren, Gunnar; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut

    2014-01-16

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2 diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms.

  12. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns: from diabetes risk loci to disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward; Grallert, Harald; Glunk, Viktoria; Berulava, Tea; Lee, Heekyoung; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Fadista, Joao; Ehlers, Kerstin; Wahl, Simone; Hoffmann, Christoph; Qian, Kun; Rönn, Tina; Riess, Helene; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Bretschneider, Nancy; Schroeder, Timm; Skurk, Thomas; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Spieler, Derek; Klingenspor, Martin; Seifert, Martin; Kern, Michael J; Mejhert, Niklas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Hansson, Ola; Hauck, Stefanie M; Blüher, Matthias; Arner, Peter; Groop, Leif; Illig, Thomas; Suhre, Karsten; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Mellgren, Gunnar; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut

    2014-01-16

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2 diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms. PMID:24439387

  13. Sequencing chromosomal abnormalities reveals neurodevelopmental loci that confer risk across diagnostic boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Talkowski, Michael E.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Blumenthal, Ian; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Chiang, Colby; Heilbut, Adrian; Ernst, Carl; Hanscom, Carrie; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lindgren, Amelia; Pereira, Shahrin; Ruderfer, Douglas; Kirby, Andrew; Ripke, Stephan; Harris, David; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Ha, Kyungsoo; Kim, Hyung-Goo; Solomon, Benjamin D.; Gropman, Andrea L.; Lucente, Diane; Sims, Katherine; Ohsumi, Toshiro K.; Borowsky, Mark L.; Loranger, Stephanie; Quade, Bradley; Lage, Kasper; Miles, Judith; Wu, Bai-Lin; Shen, Yiping; Neale, Benjamin; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Daly, Mark J.; Morton, Cynthia C.; Gusella, James F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Balanced chromosomal abnormalities (BCAs) represent a reservoir of single gene disruptions in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD). We sequenced BCAs in autism and related NDDs, revealing disruption of 33 loci in four general categories: 1) genes associated with abnormal neurodevelopment (e.g., AUTS2, FOXP1, CDKL5), 2) single gene contributors to microdeletion syndromes (MBD5, SATB2, EHMT1, SNURF-SNRPN), 3) novel risk loci (e.g., CHD8, KIRREL3, ZNF507), and 4) genes associated with later onset psychiatric disorders (e.g., TCF4, ZNF804A, PDE10A, GRIN2B, ANK3). We also discovered profoundly increased burden of copy number variants among 19,556 neurodevelopmental cases compared to 13,991 controls (p = 2.07×10−47) and enrichment of polygenic risk alleles from autism and schizophrenia genome-wide association studies (p = 0.0018 and 0.0009, respectively). Our findings suggest a polygenic risk model of autism incorporating loci of strong effect and indicate that some neurodevelopmental genes are sensitive to perturbation by multiple mutational mechanisms, leading to variable phenotypic outcomes that manifest at different life stages. PMID:22521361

  14. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2.

    PubMed

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J; Hogervorst, Frans B; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Van Asperen, Christi J; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Easton, Douglas F; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-05-15

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88-0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10(-25)). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ∼14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08-1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10(-09)) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06-1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10(-11)). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10(-05)). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis. PMID:25652398

  15. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2.

    PubMed

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J; Hogervorst, Frans B; Fasching, Peter A; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Van Asperen, Christi J; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Easton, Douglas F; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-05-15

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88-0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10(-25)). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ∼14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08-1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10(-09)) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06-1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10(-11)). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06-1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10(-05)). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis.

  16. Characterization of candidate genes in inflammatory bowel disease-associated risk loci.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, Joanna M; Goel, Gautam; Kong, Lingjia; Huang, Hailiang; Haritunians, Talin; Sartor, R Balfour; Daly, Mark J; Newberry, Rodney D; McGovern, Dermot P; Yajnik, Vijay; Lira, Sergio A; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-01-01

    GWAS have linked SNPs to risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but a systematic characterization of disease-associated genes has been lacking. Prior studies utilized microarrays that did not capture many genes encoded within risk loci or defined expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) using peripheral blood, which is not the target tissue in IBD. To address these gaps, we sought to characterize the expression of IBD-associated risk genes in disease-relevant tissues and in the setting of active IBD. Terminal ileal (TI) and colonic mucosal tissues were obtained from patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis and from healthy controls. We developed a NanoString code set to profile 678 genes within IBD risk loci. A subset of patients and controls were genotyped for IBD-associated risk SNPs. Analyses included differential expression and variance analysis, weighted gene coexpression network analysis, and eQTL analysis. We identified 116 genes that discriminate between healthy TI and colon samples and uncovered patterns in variance of gene expression that highlight heterogeneity of disease. We identified 107 coexpressed gene pairs for which transcriptional regulation is either conserved or reversed in an inflammation-independent or -dependent manner. We demonstrate that on average approximately 60% of disease-associated genes are differentially expressed in inflamed tissue. Last, we identified eQTLs with either genotype-only effects on expression or an interaction effect between genotype and inflammation. Our data reinforce tissue specificity of expression in disease-associated candidate genes, highlight genes and gene pairs that are regulated in disease-relevant tissue and inflammation, and provide a foundation to advance the understanding of IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27668286

  17. Characterization of candidate genes in inflammatory bowel disease–associated risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Peloquin, Joanna M.; Sartor, R. Balfour; Newberry, Rodney D.; McGovern, Dermot P.; Yajnik, Vijay; Lira, Sergio A.

    2016-01-01

    GWAS have linked SNPs to risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but a systematic characterization of disease-associated genes has been lacking. Prior studies utilized microarrays that did not capture many genes encoded within risk loci or defined expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) using peripheral blood, which is not the target tissue in IBD. To address these gaps, we sought to characterize the expression of IBD-associated risk genes in disease-relevant tissues and in the setting of active IBD. Terminal ileal (TI) and colonic mucosal tissues were obtained from patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis and from healthy controls. We developed a NanoString code set to profile 678 genes within IBD risk loci. A subset of patients and controls were genotyped for IBD-associated risk SNPs. Analyses included differential expression and variance analysis, weighted gene coexpression network analysis, and eQTL analysis. We identified 116 genes that discriminate between healthy TI and colon samples and uncovered patterns in variance of gene expression that highlight heterogeneity of disease. We identified 107 coexpressed gene pairs for which transcriptional regulation is either conserved or reversed in an inflammation-independent or -dependent manner. We demonstrate that on average approximately 60% of disease-associated genes are differentially expressed in inflamed tissue. Last, we identified eQTLs with either genotype-only effects on expression or an interaction effect between genotype and inflammation. Our data reinforce tissue specificity of expression in disease-associated candidate genes, highlight genes and gene pairs that are regulated in disease-relevant tissue and inflammation, and provide a foundation to advance the understanding of IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27668286

  18. Cardiometabolic risk loci share downstream cis- and trans-gene regulation across tissues and diseases.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Oscar; Ermel, Raili; Cohain, Ariella; Akers, Nicholas K; Di Narzo, Antonio; Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi-Asl, Hassan; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Fullard, John F; Sukhavasi, Katyayani; Köks, Sulev; Gan, Li-Ming; Giannarelli, Chiara; Kovacic, Jason C; Betsholtz, Christer; Losic, Bojan; Michoel, Tom; Hao, Ke; Roussos, Panos; Skogsberg, Josefin; Ruusalepp, Arno; Schadt, Eric E; Björkegren, Johan L M

    2016-08-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of cardiometabolic disease (CMD) risk loci. However, they contribute little to genetic variance, and most downstream gene-regulatory mechanisms are unknown. We genotyped and RNA-sequenced vascular and metabolic tissues from 600 coronary artery disease patients in the Stockholm-Tartu Atherosclerosis Reverse Networks Engineering Task study (STARNET). Gene expression traits associated with CMD risk single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) identified by GWAS were more extensively found in STARNET than in tissue- and disease-unspecific gene-tissue expression studies, indicating sharing of downstream cis-/trans-gene regulation across tissues and CMDs. In contrast, the regulatory effects of other GWAS risk SNPs were tissue-specific; abdominal fat emerged as an important gene-regulatory site for blood lipids, such as for the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease risk gene PCSK9 STARNET provides insights into gene-regulatory mechanisms for CMD risk loci, facilitating their translation into opportunities for diagnosis, therapy, and prevention. PMID:27540175

  19. Cardiometabolic risk loci share downstream cis- and trans-gene regulation across tissues and diseases.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Oscar; Ermel, Raili; Cohain, Ariella; Akers, Nicholas K; Di Narzo, Antonio; Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi-Asl, Hassan; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Fullard, John F; Sukhavasi, Katyayani; Köks, Sulev; Gan, Li-Ming; Giannarelli, Chiara; Kovacic, Jason C; Betsholtz, Christer; Losic, Bojan; Michoel, Tom; Hao, Ke; Roussos, Panos; Skogsberg, Josefin; Ruusalepp, Arno; Schadt, Eric E; Björkegren, Johan L M

    2016-08-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of cardiometabolic disease (CMD) risk loci. However, they contribute little to genetic variance, and most downstream gene-regulatory mechanisms are unknown. We genotyped and RNA-sequenced vascular and metabolic tissues from 600 coronary artery disease patients in the Stockholm-Tartu Atherosclerosis Reverse Networks Engineering Task study (STARNET). Gene expression traits associated with CMD risk single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) identified by GWAS were more extensively found in STARNET than in tissue- and disease-unspecific gene-tissue expression studies, indicating sharing of downstream cis-/trans-gene regulation across tissues and CMDs. In contrast, the regulatory effects of other GWAS risk SNPs were tissue-specific; abdominal fat emerged as an important gene-regulatory site for blood lipids, such as for the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and coronary artery disease risk gene PCSK9 STARNET provides insights into gene-regulatory mechanisms for CMD risk loci, facilitating their translation into opportunities for diagnosis, therapy, and prevention.

  20. Fine-mapping identifies two additional breast cancer susceptibility loci at 9q31.2

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nick; Dudbridge, Frank; Dryden, Nicola; Maguire, Sarah; Novo, Daniela; Perrakis, Eleni; Johnson, Nichola; Ghoussaini, Maya; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Stone, Jennifer; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Haeberle, Lothar; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Gibson, Lorna; Aitken, Zoe; Warren, Helen; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Chistof; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Sanchez, Marie; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, Maria Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Hamann, Ute; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Lambrechts, Diether; Moisse, Matthieu; Floris, Guiseppe; Beuselinck, Benoit; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Pensotti, Valeria; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Slettedahl, Seth; Vachon, Celine; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Nord, Silje; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robertus A. E. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Klevebring, Daniel; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Kriege, Mieke; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidema; Iwata, Hiroji; Ishiguro, Junko; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Kang, Peter; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Lim, Wei Yen; Lee, Soo Chin; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Shen, Chen-Yang; Blot, William; Cai, Qiuyin; Signorello, Lisa B.; Luccarini, Craig; Bayes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Maranian, Mel; Healey, Catherine S.; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M. Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Hunter, David J.; Lindstrom, Sara; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas F.; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified a novel susceptibility variant, rs865686, for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer at 9q31.2. Here, we report a fine-mapping analysis of the 9q31.2 susceptibility locus using 43 160 cases and 42 600 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 52 studies and a further 5795 cases and 6624 controls of Asian ancestry from nine studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs676256 was most strongly associated with risk in Europeans (odds ratios [OR] = 0.90 [0.88–0.92]; P-value = 1.58 × 10−25). This SNP is one of a cluster of highly correlated variants, including rs865686, that spans ∼14.5 kb. We identified two additional independent association signals demarcated by SNPs rs10816625 (OR = 1.12 [1.08–1.17]; P-value = 7.89 × 10−09) and rs13294895 (OR = 1.09 [1.06–1.12]; P-value = 2.97 × 10−11). SNP rs10816625, but not rs13294895, was also associated with risk of breast cancer in Asian individuals (OR = 1.12 [1.06–1.18]; P-value = 2.77 × 10−05). Functional genomic annotation using data derived from breast cancer cell-line models indicates that these SNPs localise to putative enhancer elements that bind known drivers of hormone-dependent breast cancer, including ER-α, FOXA1 and GATA-3. In vitro analyses indicate that rs10816625 and rs13294895 have allele-specific effects on enhancer activity and suggest chromatin interactions with the KLF4 gene locus. These results demonstrate the power of dense genotyping in large studies to identify independent susceptibility variants. Analysis of associations using subjects with different ancestry, combined with bioinformatic and genomic characterisation, can provide strong evidence for the likely causative alleles and their functional basis. PMID:25652398

  1. Extended Analysis of a Genome-Wide Association Study in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Detects Multiple Novel Risk Loci

    PubMed Central

    Folseraas, Trine; Melum, Espen; Rausch, Philipp; Juran, Brian D.; Ellinghaus, Eva; Shiryaev, Alexey; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Ellinghaus, David; Schramm, Christoph; Weismüller, Tobias J.; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Clausen, Ole Petter; Weersma, Rinse K.; Janse, Marcel; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Björnsson, Einar; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Cleynen, Isabelle; Rosenstiel, Philip; Holm, Kristian; Teufel, Andreas; Rust, Christian; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Bergquist, Annika; Ryu, Euijung; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Runz, Heiko; Sterneck, Martina; Vermeire, Severine; Beuers, Ulrich; Wijmenga, Cisca; Schrumpf, Erik; Manns, Michael P.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Schreiber, Stefan; Baines, John F.; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims A limited number of genetic risk factors have been reported in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). To discover further genetic susceptibility factors for PSC, we followed up on a second tier of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods We analyzed 45 SNPs in 1221 PSC cases and 3508 controls. The association results from the replication analysis and the original GWAS (715 PSC cases and 2962 controls) were combined in a meta-analysis comprising 1936 PSC cases and 6470 controls. We performed an analysis of bile microbial community composition in 39 PSC patients by 16S rRNA sequencing. Results Seventeen SNPs representing 12 distinct genetic loci achieved nominal significance (Preplication<0.05) in the replication. The most robust novel association was detected at chromosome 1p36 (rs3748816; Pcombined=2.1×10−8) where the MMEL1 and TNFRSF14 genes represent potential disease genes. Eight additional novel loci showed suggestive evidence of association (Prepl<0.05). FUT2 at chromosome 19q13 (rs602662; Pcomb=1.9×10−6, rs281377; Pcomb = 2.1×10−6 and rs601338; Pcomb=2.7×10−6) is notable due to its implication in altered susceptibility to infectious agents. We found that FUT2 secretor status and genotype defined by rs601338 significantly influences biliary microbial community composition in PSC patients. Conclusions We identify multiple new PSC risk loci by extended analysis of a PSC GWAS. FUT2 genotype needs to be taken into account when assessing the influence from microbiota on biliary pathology in PSC. PMID:22521342

  2. Identification of 15 genetic loci associated with risk of major depression in individuals of European descent.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Craig L; Nagle, Michael W; Tian, Chao; Chen, Xing; Paciga, Sara A; Wendland, Jens R; Tung, Joyce Y; Hinds, David A; Perlis, Roy H; Winslow, Ashley R

    2016-09-01

    Despite strong evidence supporting the heritability of major depressive disorder (MDD), previous genome-wide studies were unable to identify risk loci among individuals of European descent. We used self-report data from 75,607 individuals reporting clinical diagnosis of depression and 231,747 individuals reporting no history of depression through 23andMe and carried out meta-analysis of these results with published MDD genome-wide association study results. We identified five independent variants from four regions associated with self-report of clinical diagnosis or treatment for depression. Loci with a P value <1.0 × 10(-5) in the meta-analysis were further analyzed in a replication data set (45,773 cases and 106,354 controls) from 23andMe. A total of 17 independent SNPs from 15 regions reached genome-wide significance after joint analysis over all three data sets. Some of these loci were also implicated in genome-wide association studies of related psychiatric traits. These studies provide evidence for large-scale consumer genomic data as a powerful and efficient complement to data collected from traditional means of ascertainment for neuropsychiatric disease genomics.

  3. Identification of 15 genetic loci associated with risk of major depression in individuals of European descent.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Craig L; Nagle, Michael W; Tian, Chao; Chen, Xing; Paciga, Sara A; Wendland, Jens R; Tung, Joyce Y; Hinds, David A; Perlis, Roy H; Winslow, Ashley R

    2016-09-01

    Despite strong evidence supporting the heritability of major depressive disorder (MDD), previous genome-wide studies were unable to identify risk loci among individuals of European descent. We used self-report data from 75,607 individuals reporting clinical diagnosis of depression and 231,747 individuals reporting no history of depression through 23andMe and carried out meta-analysis of these results with published MDD genome-wide association study results. We identified five independent variants from four regions associated with self-report of clinical diagnosis or treatment for depression. Loci with a P value <1.0 × 10(-5) in the meta-analysis were further analyzed in a replication data set (45,773 cases and 106,354 controls) from 23andMe. A total of 17 independent SNPs from 15 regions reached genome-wide significance after joint analysis over all three data sets. Some of these loci were also implicated in genome-wide association studies of related psychiatric traits. These studies provide evidence for large-scale consumer genomic data as a powerful and efficient complement to data collected from traditional means of ascertainment for neuropsychiatric disease genomics. PMID:27479909

  4. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Karol; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Evangelou, Evangelos; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Duncan, Emma L; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Oei, Ling; Albagha, Omar M E; Amin, Najaf; Kemp, John P; Koller, Daniel L; Li, Guo; Liu, Ching-Ti; Minster, Ryan L; Moayyeri, Alireza; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Willner, Dana; Xiao, Su-Mei; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Alonso, Nerea; Eriksson, Joel; Kammerer, Candace M; Kaptoge, Stephen K; Leo, Paul J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wilson, Scott G; Wilson, James F; Aalto, Ville; Alen, Markku; Aragaki, Aaron K; Aspelund, Thor; Center, Jacqueline R; Dailiana, Zoe; Duggan, David J; Garcia, Melissa; Garcia-Giralt, Natàlia; Giroux, Sylvie; Hallmans, Göran; Hocking, Lynne J; Husted, Lise Bjerre; Jameson, Karen A; Khusainova, Rita; Kim, Ghi Su; Kooperberg, Charles; Koromila, Theodora; Kruk, Marcin; Laaksonen, Marika; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Lee, Seung Hun; Leung, Ping C; Lewis, Joshua R; Masi, Laura; Mencej-Bedrac, Simona; Nguyen, Tuan V; Nogues, Xavier; Patel, Millan S; Prezelj, Janez; Rose, Lynda M; Scollen, Serena; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Smith, Albert V; Svensson, Olle; Trompet, Stella; Trummer, Olivia; van Schoor, Natasja M; Woo, Jean; Zhu, Kun; Balcells, Susana; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Buckley, Brendan M; Cheng, Sulin; Christiansen, Claus; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George; Ford, Ian; Frost, Morten; Goltzman, David; González-Macías, Jesús; Kähönen, Mika; Karlsson, Magnus; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Koh, Jung-Min; Kollia, Panagoula; Langdahl, Bente Lomholt; Leslie, William D; Lips, Paul; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorenc, Roman S; Marc, Janja; Mellström, Dan; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Olmos, José M; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; Reid, David M; Riancho, José A; Ridker, Paul M; Rousseau, François; Slagboom, P Eline; Tang, Nelson LS; Urreizti, Roser; Van Hul, Wim; Viikari, Jorma; Zarrabeitia, María T; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Grundberg, Elin; Herrera, Lizbeth; Ingvarsson, Thorvaldur; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kwan, Tony; Li, Rui; Luben, Robert; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Palsson, Stefan Th; Reppe, Sjur; Rotter, Jerome I; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Verlaan, Dominique; Williams, Frances MK; Wood, Andrew R; Zhou, Yanhua; Gautvik, Kaare M; Pastinen, Tomi; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Cauley, Jane A; Chasman, Daniel I; Clark, Graeme R; Cummings, Steven R; Danoy, Patrick; Dennison, Elaine M; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jones, Graeme; Jukema, J Wouter; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liu, Yongmei; Lorentzon, Mattias; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitchell, Braxton D; Nandakumar, Kannabiran; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Oostra, Ben A; Peacock, Munro; Pols, Huibert A P; Prince, Richard L; Raitakari, Olli; Reid, Ian R; Robbins, John; Sambrook, Philip N; Sham, Pak Chung; Shuldiner, Alan R; Tylavsky, Frances A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wareham, Nick J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Econs, Michael J; Evans, David M; Harris, Tamara B; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Psaty, Bruce M; Reeve, Jonathan; Spector, Timothy D; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Zillikens, M Carola; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ohlsson, Claes; Karasik, David; Richards, J Brent; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Uitterlinden, André G; Ralston, Stuart H; Ioannidis, John P A; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is the most important predictor of fracture risk. We performed the largest meta-analysis to date on lumbar spine and femoral neck BMD, including 17 genome-wide association studies and 32,961 individuals of European and East Asian ancestry. We tested the top-associated BMD markers for replication in 50,933 independent subjects and for risk of low-trauma fracture in 31,016 cases and 102,444 controls. We identified 56 loci (32 novel)associated with BMD atgenome-wide significant level (P<5×10−8). Several of these factors cluster within the RANK-RANKL-OPG, mesenchymal-stem-cell differentiation, endochondral ossification and the Wnt signalling pathways. However, we also discovered loci containing genes not known to play a role in bone biology. Fourteen BMD loci were also associated with fracture risk (P<5×10−4, Bonferroni corrected), of which six reached P<5×10−8 including: 18p11.21 (C18orf19), 7q21.3 (SLC25A13), 11q13.2 (LRP5), 4q22.1 (MEPE), 2p16.2 (SPTBN1) and 10q21.1 (DKK1). These findings shed light on the genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying BMD variation and fracture susceptibility. PMID:22504420

  5. Lack of Association between Genetic Risk Loci for Restless Legs Syndrome and Multimorbidity

    PubMed Central

    Szentkirályi, András; Völzke, Henry; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Winkelmann, Julianne; Berger, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Multimorbidity is a risk factor for incident restless legs syndrome (RLS). In this relationship, the potential role of known genetic risk loci for RLS has not been studied. Our aim was to evaluate whether carriers of specific RLS risk alleles have higher comorbidity burden than noncarriers. Methods: The Dortmund Health Study (DHS) and the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP) are two independent cohort studies in Germany based on agestratified, random samples drawn from the respective population registers. DHS included 1,312 subjects and SHIP included 4,308 subjects. RLS status was assessed according to the RLS standard minimal criteria. A comorbidity index was calculated by summing the scores of the following conditions: diabetes, hypertension, myocardial infarction, obesity, stroke, cancer, renal disease, anemia, depression, thyroid disease, and migraine. Thirteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) previously associated with elevated risk of RLS were genotyped. Analyses were carried out on the pooled sample of the two studies. Results: The mean age was 50.4 ± 15.9 y, and the proportion of women was 51.4%. The mean number of comorbid conditions was 1.5 ± 1.3. In multivariable regression, the mean number of comorbidities was not significantly different between carriers of any of the RLS risk alleles and noncarriers either in the total pooled sample or in those having RLS symptoms. Conclusions: Based on these results it is unlikely that known genetic risk factors for RLS would lead to increased multimorbidity. Citation: Szentkirályi A, Völzke H, Hoffmann W, Winkelmann J, Berger K. Lack of association between genetic risk loci for restless legs syndrome and multimorbidity. SLEEP 2016;39(1):111–115. PMID:26350469

  6. Genetic Loci Influencing C-reactive Protein Levels and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Paul; Chambers, John C.; Zhang, Weihua; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Peden, John F.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Braund, Peter; Engert, James C.; Bennett, Derrick; Coin, Lachlan; Ashby, Deborah; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Brown, Ian J.; Mt-Isa, Shahrul; McCarthy, Mark I.; Peltonen, Leena; Freimer, Nelson B.; Farrall, Martin; Ruokonen, Aimo; Hamsten, Anders; Lim, Noha; Froguel, Philippe; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Scott, James; Hall, Alistair S.; Schunkert, Heribert; Anand, Sonia S.; Collins, Rory; Samani, Nilesh J.; Watkins, Hugh; Kooner, Jaspal S.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are independently associated with risk of coronary heart disease, but whether CRP is causally associated with coronary heart disease or merely a marker of underlying atherosclerosis is uncertain. Objective: To investigate association of genetic loci with CRP levels and risk of coronary heart disease. Design, setting and participants: We first carried out a genome-wide association (n=17,967) and replication study (n=14,747) to identify genetic loci associated with plasma CRP concentrations. Data collection took place between 1989 and 2008 and genotyping between 2003 and 2008. We carried out a Mendelian randomisation study of the most closely associated SNP in the CRP locus and published data on other CRP variants involving a total of 28,112 cases and 100,823 controls, to investigate the association of CRP variants with coronary heart disease. We compared our finding with that predicted from meta-analysis of observational studies of CRP levels and risk of coronary heart disease. For the other loci associated with CRP levels, we selected the most closely associated SNP for testing against coronary heart disease among 14,365 cases and 32,069 controls. Main outcome measure: Risk of coronary heart disease. Results: Polymorphisms in five genetic loci were strongly associated with CRP levels (% difference per minor allele): SNP rs6700896 in LEPR (−14.7% [95% Confidence Interval {CI}], −17.5 – −11.9, P=1.6×10−21), rs4537545 in IL6R (−10.8% [95% CI, −13.8 – −7.7], P=5.1×10−11), rs7553007 in CRP locus (−20.7% [95% CI, −23.5 – −17.9], P=3.3×10−38), rs1183910 in HNF1A (−13.6% [95% CI, −16.4 – −10.6], P=1.2×10−17) and rs4420638 in APOE-CI-CII (−21.8% [95% CI, −25.4 – −18.1], P=2.1×10−25). Association of SNP rs7553007 in the CRP locus with coronary heart disease gave odds ratio (OR) 0.98 (95% CI, 0.94 – 1.01) per 20% lower CRP. Our Mendelian randomisation study of variants

  7. Genetic Sharing with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Diabetes Reveals Novel Bone Mineral Density Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Wesley K.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Zuber, Verena; LeBlanc, Marissa; Bettella, Francesco; Mills, Ian G.; Desikan, Rahul S.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Gautvik, Kaare M.; Dale, Anders M.; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. We used a novel genetic pleiotropy-informed conditional False Discovery Rate (FDR) method to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMD by leveraging cardiovascular disease (CVD) associated disorders and metabolic traits. By conditioning on SNPs associated with the CVD-related phenotypes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and waist hip ratio, we identified 65 novel independent BMD loci (26 with femoral neck BMD and 47 with lumbar spine BMD) at conditional FDR < 0.01. Many of the loci were confirmed in genetic expression studies. Genes validated at the mRNA levels were characteristic for the osteoblast/osteocyte lineage, Wnt signaling pathway and bone metabolism. The results provide new insight into genetic mechanisms of variability in BMD, and a better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of clinical comorbidity. PMID:26695485

  8. Fine-mapping of breast cancer susceptibility loci characterizes genetic risk in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fang; Chen, Gary K.; Millikan, Robert C.; John, Esther M.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Deming, Sandra L.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Nyante, Sarah; Palmer, Julie R.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Ingles, Sue A.; Press, Michael F.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Le Marchand, Loïc; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Stram, Daniel O.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 19 common genetic variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Testing of the index signals found through GWAS and fine-mapping of each locus in diverse populations will be necessary for characterizing the role of these risk regions in contributing to inherited susceptibility. In this large study of breast cancer in African-American women (3016 cases and 2745 controls), we tested the 19 known risk variants identified by GWAS and replicated associations (P < 0.05) with only 4 variants. Through fine-mapping, we identified markers in four regions that better capture the association with breast cancer risk in African Americans as defined by the index signal (2q35, 5q11, 10q26 and 19p13). We also identified statistically significant associations with markers in four separate regions (8q24, 10q22, 11q13 and 16q12) that are independent of the index signals and may represent putative novel risk variants. In aggregate, the more informative markers found in the study enhance the association of these risk regions with breast cancer in African Americans [per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, P = 2.8 × 10−24 versus OR = 1.04, P = 6.1 × 10−5]. In this detailed analysis of the known breast cancer risk loci, we have validated and improved upon markers of risk that better characterize their association with breast cancer in women of African ancestry. PMID:21852243

  9. Characterizing genetic risk at known prostate cancer susceptibility loci in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Haiman, Christopher A; Chen, Gary K; Blot, William J; Strom, Sara S; Berndt, Sonja I; Kittles, Rick A; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Isaacs, William B; Ingles, Sue A; Stanford, Janet L; Diver, W Ryan; Witte, John S; Chanock, Stephen J; Kolb, Suzanne; Signorello, Lisa B; Yamamura, Yuko; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Thun, Michael J; Murphy, Adam; Casey, Graham; Sheng, Xin; Wan, Peggy; Pooler, Loreall C; Monroe, Kristine R; Waters, Kevin M; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N; Stram, Daniel O; Henderson, Brian E

    2011-05-01

    GWAS of prostate cancer have been remarkably successful in revealing common genetic variants and novel biological pathways that are linked with its etiology. A more complete understanding of inherited susceptibility to prostate cancer in the general population will come from continuing such discovery efforts and from testing known risk alleles in diverse racial and ethnic groups. In this large study of prostate cancer in African American men (3,425 prostate cancer cases and 3,290 controls), we tested 49 risk variants located in 28 genomic regions identified through GWAS in men of European and Asian descent, and we replicated associations (at p≤0.05) with roughly half of these markers. Through fine-mapping, we identified nearby markers in many regions that better define associations in African Americans. At 8q24, we found 9 variants (p≤6×10(-4)) that best capture risk of prostate cancer in African Americans, many of which are more common in men of African than European descent. The markers found to be associated with risk at each locus improved risk modeling in African Americans (per allele OR = 1.17) over the alleles reported in the original GWAS (OR = 1.08). In summary, in this detailed analysis of the prostate cancer risk loci reported from GWAS, we have validated and improved upon markers of risk in some regions that better define the association with prostate cancer in African Americans. Our findings with variants at 8q24 also reinforce the importance of this region as a major risk locus for prostate cancer in men of African ancestry.

  10. Multiple novel prostate cancer susceptibility signals identified by fine-mapping of known risk loci among Europeans.

    PubMed

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Dadaev, Tokhir; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiuyan; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward J; Stephens, Sarah; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Whitmore, Ian; Benlloch Garcia, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David E; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Mcdonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A; Freedman, Mathew; Conti, David V; Easton, Douglas; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous common prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. We have fine-mapped 64 GWAS regions known at the conclusion of the iCOGS study using large-scale genotyping and imputation in 25 723 PrCa cases and 26 274 controls of European ancestry. We detected evidence for multiple independent signals at 16 regions, 12 of which contained additional newly identified significant associations. A single signal comprising a spectrum of correlated variation was observed at 39 regions; 35 of which are now described by a novel more significantly associated lead SNP, while the originally reported variant remained as the lead SNP only in 4 regions. We also confirmed two association signals in Europeans that had been previously reported only in East-Asian GWAS. Based on statistical evidence and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure, we have curated and narrowed down the list of the most likely candidate causal variants for each region. Functional annotation using data from ENCODE filtered for PrCa cell lines and eQTL analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for overlap with bio-features within this set. By incorporating the novel risk variants identified here alongside the refined data for existing association signals, we estimate that these loci now explain ∼38.9% of the familial relative risk of PrCa, an 8.9% improvement over the previously reported GWAS tag SNPs. This suggests that a significant fraction of the heritability of PrCa may have been hidden during the discovery phase of GWAS, in particular due to the presence of multiple independent signals within the same region. PMID:26025378

  11. Multiple novel prostate cancer susceptibility signals identified by fine-mapping of known risk loci among Europeans.

    PubMed

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Dadaev, Tokhir; Hazelett, Dennis J; Li, Qiuyan; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward J; Stephens, Sarah; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Whitmore, Ian; Benlloch Garcia, Sara; Giles, Graham G; Southey, Melissa C; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David E; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Mcdonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A; Freedman, Mathew; Conti, David V; Easton, Douglas; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous common prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. We have fine-mapped 64 GWAS regions known at the conclusion of the iCOGS study using large-scale genotyping and imputation in 25 723 PrCa cases and 26 274 controls of European ancestry. We detected evidence for multiple independent signals at 16 regions, 12 of which contained additional newly identified significant associations. A single signal comprising a spectrum of correlated variation was observed at 39 regions; 35 of which are now described by a novel more significantly associated lead SNP, while the originally reported variant remained as the lead SNP only in 4 regions. We also confirmed two association signals in Europeans that had been previously reported only in East-Asian GWAS. Based on statistical evidence and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure, we have curated and narrowed down the list of the most likely candidate causal variants for each region. Functional annotation using data from ENCODE filtered for PrCa cell lines and eQTL analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for overlap with bio-features within this set. By incorporating the novel risk variants identified here alongside the refined data for existing association signals, we estimate that these loci now explain ∼38.9% of the familial relative risk of PrCa, an 8.9% improvement over the previously reported GWAS tag SNPs. This suggests that a significant fraction of the heritability of PrCa may have been hidden during the discovery phase of GWAS, in particular due to the presence of multiple independent signals within the same region.

  12. Multiple novel prostate cancer susceptibility signals identified by fine-mapping of known risk loci among Europeans

    PubMed Central

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Dadaev, Tokhir; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Li, Qiuyan; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Saunders, Edward J.; Stephens, Sarah; Cieza-Borrella, Clara; Whitmore, Ian; Benlloch Garcia, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Southey, Melissa C.; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Gronberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schleutker, Johanna; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Key, Tim J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Mcdonnell, Shannon K.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Kibel, Adam S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluzniak, Wojciech; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Arndt, Volker; Park, Jong Y.; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A.; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Muir, Kenneth; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A.; Freedman, Mathew; Conti, David V.; Easton, Douglas; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous common prostate cancer (PrCa) susceptibility loci. We have fine-mapped 64 GWAS regions known at the conclusion of the iCOGS study using large-scale genotyping and imputation in 25 723 PrCa cases and 26 274 controls of European ancestry. We detected evidence for multiple independent signals at 16 regions, 12 of which contained additional newly identified significant associations. A single signal comprising a spectrum of correlated variation was observed at 39 regions; 35 of which are now described by a novel more significantly associated lead SNP, while the originally reported variant remained as the lead SNP only in 4 regions. We also confirmed two association signals in Europeans that had been previously reported only in East-Asian GWAS. Based on statistical evidence and linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure, we have curated and narrowed down the list of the most likely candidate causal variants for each region. Functional annotation using data from ENCODE filtered for PrCa cell lines and eQTL analysis demonstrated significant enrichment for overlap with bio-features within this set. By incorporating the novel risk variants identified here alongside the refined data for existing association signals, we estimate that these loci now explain ∼38.9% of the familial relative risk of PrCa, an 8.9% improvement over the previously reported GWAS tag SNPs. This suggests that a significant fraction of the heritability of PrCa may have been hidden during the discovery phase of GWAS, in particular due to the presence of multiple independent signals within the same region. PMID:26025378

  13. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  14. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  15. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  16. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  17. 46 CFR 308.104 - Additional war risk insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional war risk insurance. 308.104 Section 308.104 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance § 308.104 Additional war risk insurance. Owners or charterers...

  18. Multi-ancestry genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A John; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe M R; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla M T; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, W H Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Nöthen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common, complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified ten new risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with new secondary signals at four of these loci). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in the regulation of innate host defenses and T cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. PMID:26482879

  19. Association analyses identify 38 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and highlight shared genetic risk across populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jimmy Z; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Huang, Hailiang; Ng, Siew C; Alberts, Rudi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ripke, Stephan; Lee, James C; Jostins, Luke; Shah, Tejas; Abedian, Shifteh; Cheon, Jae Hee; Cho, Judy; Daryani, Naser E; Franke, Lude; Fuyuno, Yuta; Hart, Ailsa; Juyal, Ramesh C; Juyal, Garima; Kim, Won Ho; Morris, Andrew P; Poustchi, Hossein; Newman, William G; Midha, Vandana; Orchard, Timothy R; Vahedi, Homayon; Sood, Ajit; Sung, Joseph J Y; Malekzadeh, Reza; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yamazaki, Keiko; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Franke, Andre; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Parkes, Miles; B K, Thelma; Daly, Mark J; Kubo, Michiaki; Anderson, Carl A; Weersma, Rinse K

    2015-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here we report the first trans-ancestry association study of IBD, with genome-wide or Immunochip genotype data from an extended cohort of 86,640 European individuals and Immunochip data from 9,846 individuals of East Asian, Indian or Iranian descent. We implicate 38 loci in IBD risk for the first time. For the majority of the IBD risk loci, the direction and magnitude of effect are consistent in European and non-European cohorts. Nevertheless, we observe genetic heterogeneity between divergent populations at several established risk loci driven by differences in allele frequency (NOD2) or effect size (TNFSF15 and ATG16L1) or a combination of these factors (IL23R and IRGM). Our results provide biological insights into the pathogenesis of IBD and demonstrate the usefulness of trans-ancestry association studies for mapping loci associated with complex diseases and understanding genetic architecture across diverse populations. PMID:26192919

  20. Cell-type-specific enrichment of risk-associated regulatory elements at ovarian cancer susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Simon G.; Shen, Howard C.; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Lawrenson, Kate; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline; Tyrer, Jonathan; Rhie, Suhn K.; Levanon, Keren; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny; Ramus, Susan J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Antoniou, Antonis; Freedman, Matthew; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Noushmehr, Houtan; Gayther, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory landscape of the human genome is a central question in complex trait genetics. Most single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with cancer risk lie in non-protein-coding regions, implicating regulatory DNA elements as functional targets of susceptibility variants. Here, we describe genome-wide annotation of regions of open chromatin and histone modification in fallopian tube and ovarian surface epithelial cells (FTSECs, OSECs), the debated cellular origins of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOCs) and in endometriosis epithelial cells (EECs), the likely precursor of clear cell ovarian carcinomas (CCOCs). The regulatory architecture of these cell types was compared with normal human mammary epithelial cells and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. We observed similar positional patterns of global enhancer signatures across the three different ovarian cancer precursor cell types, and evidence of tissue-specific regulatory signatures compared to non-gynecological cell types. We found significant enrichment for risk-associated SNPs intersecting regulatory biofeatures at 17 known HGSOC susceptibility loci in FTSECs (P = 3.8 × 10−30), OSECs (P = 2.4 × 10−23) and HMECs (P = 6.7 × 10−15) but not for EECs (P = 0.45) or LNCaP cells (P = 0.88). Hierarchical clustering of risk SNPs conditioned on the six different cell types indicates FTSECs and OSECs are highly related (96% of samples using multi-scale bootstrapping) suggesting both cell types may be precursors of HGSOC. These data represent the first description of regulatory catalogues of normal precursor cells for different ovarian cancer subtypes, and provide unique insights into the tissue specific regulatory variation with respect to the likely functional targets of germline genetic susceptibility variants for ovarian cancer. PMID:25804953

  1. Investigating the viability of genetic screening/testing for RA susceptibility using combinations of five confirmed risk loci

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Annie; Lunt, Mark; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Thomson, Wendy; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Gibbons, Laura; Plant, Darren; Wilson, Anthony G.; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann W.; Emery, Paul; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne J.; Reid, David M.; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Worthington, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Five loci—the shared epitope (SE) of HLA-DRB1, the PTPN22 gene, a locus on 6q23, the STAT4 gene and a locus mapping to the TRAF1/C5 genetic region—have now been unequivocally confirmed as conferring susceptibility to RA. The largest single effect is conferred by SE. We hypothesized that combinations of susceptibility alleles may increase risk over and above that of any individual locus alone. Methods. We analysed data from 4238 RA cases and 1811 controls, for which genotypes were available at all five loci. Results. Statistical analysis identified eight high-risk combinations conferring an odds ratio >6 compared with carriage of no susceptibility variants and, interestingly, 10% population controls carried a combination conferring high risk. All high-risk combinations included SE, and all but one contained PTPN22. Statistical modelling showed that a model containing only these two loci could achieve comparable sensitivity and specificity to a model including all five. Furthermore, replacing SE (which requires full subtyping at the HLA-DRB1 gene) with DRB1*1/4/10 carriage resulted in little further loss of information (correlation coefficient between models = 0.93). Conclusions. This represents the first exploration of the viability of population screening for RA and identifies several high-risk genetic combinations. However, given the population incidence of RA, genetic screening based on these loci alone is neither sufficiently sensitive nor specific at the current time. PMID:19741008

  2. Validating GWAS-Identified Risk Loci for Alzheimer's Disease in Han Chinese Populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Zhen; Bi, Rui; Hu, Qiu-Xiang; Xiang, Qun; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Zhang, Wen; Ma, Xiaohong; Guo, Wanjun; Deng, Wei; Zhao, Liansheng; Ni, Peiyan; Li, Mingli; Fang, Yiru; Li, Tao; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified many novel susceptible genes/loci for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, most of these studies were conducted in European and populations of European origin, and limited studies have been performed in Han Chinese. In this study, we genotyped 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight GWAS-reported AD risk genes in 1509 individuals comprising two independent Han Chinese case-control cohorts. Four SNPs (rs11234495, rs592297, rs676733, and rs3851179) in the PICALM gene were significantly associated with late-onset (LO)-AD in populations from Southwest China, whereas SNPs rs744373 (BIN1), rs9331942 (CLU), and rs670139 (MS4A4E) were linked to LO-AD in populations from East China. In the combined Han Chinese population, positive associations were observed between PICALM, CLU, MS4A4E genes, and LO-AD. The association between rs3851179 (PICALM), rs744373 (BIN1), and AD was further confirmed by meta-analysis of Asian populations. Our study verified the association between PICALM, BIN1, CLU, and MS4A4E variants and AD susceptibility in Han Chinese populations. We also discerned some regional differences concerning AD susceptibility SNPs.

  3. Five endometrial cancer risk loci identified through genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Timothy H T; Thompson, Deborah J; O'Mara, Tracy A; Painter, Jodie N; Glubb, Dylan M; Flach, Susanne; Lewis, Annabelle; French, Juliet D; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Church, David; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Webb, Penelope M; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Henders, Anjali K; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Shah, Mitul; Dennis, Joe; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo; Amant, Frederic; Schrauwen, Stefanie; Zhao, Hui; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Dowdy, Sean C; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Njølstad, Tormund S; Salvesen, Helga B; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Ashton, Katie; Otton, Geoffrey; Proietto, Tony; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Tham, Emma; Li, Mulin Jun; Yip, Shun H; Wang, Junwen; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Dunlop, Malcolm; Houlston, Richard; Palles, Claire; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Cunningham, Julie M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Edwards, Stacey L; Easton, Douglas F; Tomlinson, Ian; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of three endometrial cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and two follow-up phases totaling 7,737 endometrial cancer cases and 37,144 controls of European ancestry. Genome-wide imputation and meta-analysis identified five new risk loci of genome-wide significance at likely regulatory regions on chromosomes 13q22.1 (rs11841589, near KLF5), 6q22.31 (rs13328298, in LOC643623 and near HEY2 and NCOA7), 8q24.21 (rs4733613, telomeric to MYC), 15q15.1 (rs937213, in EIF2AK4, near BMF) and 14q32.33 (rs2498796, in AKT1, near SIVA1). We also found a second independent 8q24.21 signal (rs17232730). Functional studies of the 13q22.1 locus showed that rs9600103 (pairwise r(2) = 0.98 with rs11841589) is located in a region of active chromatin that interacts with the KLF5 promoter region. The rs9600103[T] allele that is protective in endometrial cancer suppressed gene expression in vitro, suggesting that regulation of the expression of KLF5, a gene linked to uterine development, is implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings provide enhanced insight into the genetic and biological basis of endometrial cancer. PMID:27135401

  4. Genome-wide association study of intracranial aneurysm identifies three new risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Yasuno, Katsuhito; Bilguvar, Kaya; Bijlenga, Philippe; Low, Siew Kee; Krischek, Boris; Auburger, Georg; Simon, Matthias; Krex, Dietmar; Arlier, Zulfikar; Nayak, Nikhil; Ruigrok, Ynte M; Niemela, Mika; Tajima, Atsushi; von und zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Doczi, Tamas; Wirjatijasa, Florentina; Hata, Akira; Blasco, Jordi; Oszvald, Agi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Zilani, Gulam; Schoch, Beate; Singh, Pankaj; Stüer, Carsten; Risselada, Roelof; Beck, Jürgen; Sola, Teresa; Ricciardi, Filomena; Aromaa, Arpo; Illig, Thomas; Schreiber, Stefan; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van den Berg, Leonard H; Perret, Claire; Proust, Carole; Roder, Constantin; Ozturk, Ali K; Gaál, Emília; Berg, Daniela; Geisen, Christof; Friedrich, Christoph M; Summers, Paul; Frangi, Alejandro F; State, Matthew W; Wichmann, HErich; Breteler, Monique M B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Mane, Shrikant; Peltonen, Leena; Elio, Vivas; Sturkenboom, Miriam CJM; Lawford, Patricia; Byrne, James; Macho, Juan; Sandalcioglu, Erol I; Meyer, Bernhard; Raabe, Andreas; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Rüfenacht, Daniel; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Hernesniemi, Juha; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Inoue, Ituro; Palotie, Aarno; Cambien, François; Nakamura, Yusuke; Lifton, Richard P; Günel, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Saccular intracranial aneurysms (IAs) are balloon-like dilations of the intracranial arterial wall; their hemorrhage commonly results in severe neurologic impairment and death. We report a second genome-wide association study with discovery and replication cohorts from Europe and Japan comprising 5,891 cases and 14,181 controls with ∼832,000 genotyped and imputed SNPs across discovery cohorts. We identified three new loci showing strong evidence for association with IA in the combined data set, including intervals near RBBP8 on 18q11.2 (OR=1.22, P=1.1×10-12), STARD13/KL on 13q13.1 (OR=1.20, P=2.5×10-9) and a gene-rich region on 10q24.32 (OR=1.29, P=1.2×10-9). We also confirmed prior associations near SOX17 (8q11.23-q12.1; OR=1.28, P=1.3×10-12) and CDKN2A/B (9p21.3; OR=1.31, P=1.5×10-22). It is noteworthy that several putative risk genes play a role in cell-cycle progression, potentially affecting proliferation and senescence of progenitor cell populations that are responsible for vascular formation and repair. PMID:20364137

  5. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course.

    PubMed

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Hayes, Richard B; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M; Crout, Richard J; Marazita, Mary L; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D; Fox, Caroline S; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C; Czerwinski, Stefan A; Demerath, Ellen W; Dyer, Thomas D; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Zillikens, M Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E; Cupples, L Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I

    2013-09-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10⁻⁸) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10⁻²³), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10⁻¹⁷), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10⁻¹⁷), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10⁻¹¹), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10⁻⁹), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10⁻⁸) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10⁻⁸) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10⁻⁵ after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18-90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of BMI in adolescents and young adults reveals additional insight into the effects of genetic loci over the life course

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Mariaelisa; Ngwa, Julius S.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Homuth, Georg; Schipf, Sabine; Teumer, Alexander; Völzke, Henry; Wallaschofski, Henri; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Edward, Lakatta; Francesco, Cucca; Sanna, Serena; Scheet, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sidore, Carlo; Xiao, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhaoming; Chanock, Stephen J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hu, Frank; Van Dam, Rob M.; Crout, Richard J.; Marazita, Mary L.; Shaffer, John R; Atwood, Larry D.; Fox, Caroline S.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; White, Charles; Choh, Audrey C.; Czerwinski, Stefan A.; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Towne, Bradford; Amin, Najaf; Oostra, Ben A.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Esko, Tõnu; Nelis, Mari; Nikopensius, Tit; Metspalu, Andres; Strachan, David P.; Monda, Keri; Qi, Lu; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Berndt, Sonja I.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic loci for body mass index (BMI) in adolescence and young adulthood, a period of high risk for weight gain, are understudied, yet may yield important insight into the etiology of obesity and early intervention. To identify novel genetic loci and examine the influence of known loci on BMI during this critical time period in late adolescence and early adulthood, we performed a two-stage meta-analysis using 14 genome-wide association studies in populations of European ancestry with data on BMI between ages 16 and 25 in up to 29 880 individuals. We identified seven independent loci (P < 5.0 × 10−8) near FTO (P = 3.72 × 10−23), TMEM18 (P = 3.24 × 10−17), MC4R (P = 4.41 × 10−17), TNNI3K (P = 4.32 × 10−11), SEC16B (P = 6.24 × 10−9), GNPDA2 (P = 1.11 × 10−8) and POMC (P = 4.94 × 10−8) as well as a potential secondary signal at the POMC locus (rs2118404, P = 2.4 × 10−5 after conditioning on the established single-nucleotide polymorphism at this locus) in adolescents and young adults. To evaluate the impact of the established genetic loci on BMI at these young ages, we examined differences between the effect sizes of 32 published BMI loci in European adult populations (aged 18–90) and those observed in our adolescent and young adult meta-analysis. Four loci (near PRKD1, TNNI3K, SEC16B and CADM2) had larger effects and one locus (near SH2B1) had a smaller effect on BMI during adolescence and young adulthood compared with older adults (P < 0.05). These results suggest that genetic loci for BMI can vary in their effects across the life course, underlying the importance of evaluating BMI at different ages. PMID:23669352

  7. Multi-ethnic genome-wide association study of 21,000 cases and 95,000 controls identifies new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Waage, Johannes; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Hotze, Melanie; Strachan, David P; Curtin, John A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Tian, Chao; Takahashi, Atsushi; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Thyssen, Jacob P; den Dekker, Herman T; Ferreira, Manuel A; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Sleiman, Patrick MA; Xiao, Feng Li; Gonzalez, Juan R; Marenholz, Ingo; Kalb, Birgit; Yanes, Maria Pino; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Venturini, Cristina; Pennell, Craig E; Barton, Sheila J; Levin, Albert M; Curjuric, Ivan; Bustamante, Mariona; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Lockett, Gabrielle A; Bacelis, Jonas; Bunyavanich, Supinda; Myers, Rachel A; Matanovic, Anja; Kumar, Ashish; Tung, Joyce Y; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Kubo, Michiaki; McArdle, Wendy L; Henderson, A J; Kemp, John P; Zheng, Jie; Smith, George Davey; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Schmidt, Carsten O; Mangold, Elisabeth; Cichon, Sven; Keil, Thomas; Rodríguez, Elke; Peters, Annette; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Novak, Natalija; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Horikoshi, Momoko; Pekkanen, Juha; Sebert, Sylvain; Husemoen, Lise L; Grarup, Niels; de Jongste, Johan C; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; Pasmans, Suzanne GMA; Elbert, Niels J; Uitterlinden, André G; Marks, Guy B; Thompson, Philip J; Matheson, Melanie C; Robertson, Colin F; Ried, Janina S; Li, Jin; Zuo, Xian Bo; Zheng, Xiao Dong; Yin, Xian Yong; Sun, Liang Dan; McAleer, Maeve A; O'Regan, Grainne M; Fahy, Caoimhe MR; Campbell, Linda E; Macek, Milan; Kurek, Michael; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Postma, Dirkje S; Feenstra, Bjarke; Geller, Frank; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hysi, Pirro; Bataille, Veronique; Spector, Tim; Tiesler, Carla MT; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pahukasahasram, Badri; Yang, James J; Imboden, Medea; Huntsman, Scott; Vilor-Tejedor, Natàlia; Relton, Caroline L; Myhre, Ronny; Nystad, Wenche; Custovic, Adnan; Weiss, Scott T; Meyers, Deborah A; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Ober, Carole; Raby, Benjamin A; Simpson, Angela; Jacobsson, Bo; Holloway, John W; Bisgaard, Hans; Sunyer, Jordi; Hensch, Nicole M Probst; Williams, L Keoki; Godfrey, Keith M; Wang, Carol A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Melbye, Mads; Koppelman, Gerard H; Jarvis, Deborah; McLean, WH Irwin; Irvine, Alan D; Zhang, Xue Jun; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gieger, Christian; Burchard, Esteban G; Martin, Nicholas G; Duijts, Liesbeth; Linneberg, Allan; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Noethen, Markus M; Lau, Susanne; Hübner, Norbert; Lee, Young-Ae; Tamari, Mayumi; Hinds, David A; Glass, Daniel; Brown, Sara J; Heinrich, Joachim; Evans, David M; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 21 loci associated with atopic dermatitis risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify further susceptibility loci for this common complex skin disease, we performed a meta-analysis of >15 million genetic variants in 21,399 cases and 95,464 controls from populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry, followed by replication in 32,059 cases and 228,628 controls from 18 studies. We identified 10 novel risk loci, bringing the total number of known atopic dermatitis risk loci to 31 (with novel secondary signals at 4 of these). Notably, the new loci include candidate genes with roles in regulation of innate host defenses and T-cell function, underscoring the important contribution of (auto-)immune mechanisms to atopic dermatitis pathogenesis. PMID:26482879

  8. Supportive evidence for FOXP1, BARX1, and FOXF1 as genetic risk loci for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jessica; May, Andrea; Gerges, Christian; Anders, Mario; Veits, Lothar; Weise, Katharina; Czamara, Darina; Lyros, Orestis; Manner, Hendrik; Terheggen, Grischa; Venerito, Marino; Noder, Tania; Mayershofer, Rupert; Hofer, Jan-Hinnerk; Karch, Hans-Werner; Ahlbrand, Constantin J; Arras, Michael; Hofer, Sebastian; Mangold, Elisabeth; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Heinrichs, Sophie K M; Hess, Timo; Kiesslich, Ralf; Izbicki, Jakob R; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Bollschweiler, Elfriede; Malfertheiner, Peter; Lang, Hauke; Moehler, Markus; Lorenz, Dietmar; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Ott, Katja; Schmidt, Thomas; Whiteman, David C; Vaughan, Thomas L; Nöthen, Markus M; Hackelsberger, Andreas; Schumacher, Brigitte; Pech, Oliver; Vashist, Yogesh; Vieth, Michael; Weismüller, Josef; Neuhaus, Horst; Rösch, Thomas; Ell, Christian; Gockel, Ines; Schumacher, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    The Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON) recently performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and Barrett's esophagus. They identified genome-wide significant association for variants at three genes, namely CRTC1, FOXP1, and BARX1. Furthermore, they replicated an association at the FOXF1 gene that has been previously found in a GWAS on Barrett's esophagus. We aimed at further replicating the association at these and other loci that showed suggestive association with P < 10(-4) in the BEACON sample. In total, we tested 88 SNPs in an independent sample consisting of 1065 EAC cases and 1019 controls of German descent. We could replicate the association at FOXP1, BARX1, and FOXF1 with nominal significance and thereby confirm that genetic variants at these genes confer EAC risk. In addition, we found association of variants near the genes XRCC2 and GATA6 that were strongly (P < 10(-5) ) although not genome-wide significantly associated with the BEACON GWAS. Therefore, both variants and corresponding genes represent promising candidates for future EAC association studies on independent samples.

  9. Supportive evidence for FOXP1, BARX1, and FOXF1 as genetic risk loci for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jessica; May, Andrea; Gerges, Christian; Anders, Mario; Veits, Lothar; Weise, Katharina; Czamara, Darina; Lyros, Orestis; Manner, Hendrik; Terheggen, Grischa; Venerito, Marino; Noder, Tania; Mayershofer, Rupert; Hofer, Jan-Hinnerk; Karch, Hans-Werner; Ahlbrand, Constantin J; Arras, Michael; Hofer, Sebastian; Mangold, Elisabeth; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Heinrichs, Sophie K M; Hess, Timo; Kiesslich, Ralf; Izbicki, Jakob R; Hölscher, Arnulf H; Bollschweiler, Elfriede; Malfertheiner, Peter; Lang, Hauke; Moehler, Markus; Lorenz, Dietmar; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Ott, Katja; Schmidt, Thomas; Whiteman, David C; Vaughan, Thomas L; Nöthen, Markus M; Hackelsberger, Andreas; Schumacher, Brigitte; Pech, Oliver; Vashist, Yogesh; Vieth, Michael; Weismüller, Josef; Neuhaus, Horst; Rösch, Thomas; Ell, Christian; Gockel, Ines; Schumacher, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The Barrett’s and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON) recently performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and Barrett’s esophagus. They identified genome-wide significant association for variants at three genes, namely CRTC1, FOXP1, and BARX1. Furthermore, they replicated an association at the FOXF1 gene that has been previously found in a GWAS on Barrett’s esophagus. We aimed at further replicating the association at these and other loci that showed suggestive association with P <  10−4 in the BEACON sample. In total, we tested 88 SNPs in an independent sample consisting of 1065 EAC cases and 1019 controls of German descent. We could replicate the association at FOXP1, BARX1, and FOXF1 with nominal significance and thereby confirm that genetic variants at these genes confer EAC risk. In addition, we found association of variants near the genes XRCC2 and GATA6 that were strongly (P < 10−5) although not genome-wide significantly associated with the BEACON GWAS. Therefore, both variants and corresponding genes represent promising candidates for future EAC association studies on independent samples. PMID:26383589

  10. Genome-wide meta-analysis of maize heterosis reveals the potential role of additive gene expression at pericentromeric loci

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    QTL, and also suggests a model for the potential role of additive expression in the formation and conservation of heterosis for GY via dominant, multigenic quantitative trait loci. Our findings contribute to a deeper understanding of the multifactorial phenomenon of heterosis, and thus to the breeding of new high yielding varieties. PMID:24693880

  11. Identification of novel genetic risk loci in Maltese dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis and evidence of a shared genetic risk across toy dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Barber, Renee M; Schatzberg, Scott J; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Porter, Brian F; Vernau, Karen M; Keesler, Rebekah I; Matiasek, Kaspar; Flegel, Thomas; Miller, Andrew D; Southard, Teresa; Mariani, Christopher L; Johnson, Gayle C; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) affects toy and small breed dogs causing progressive, often fatal, inflammation and necrosis in the brain. Genetic risk loci for NME previously were identified in pug dogs, particularly associated with the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex on chromosome 12, but have not been investigated in other susceptible breeds. We sought to evaluate Maltese and Chihuahua dogs, in addition to pug dogs, to identify novel or shared genetic risk factors for NME development. Genome-wide association testing of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Maltese dogs with NME identified 2 regions of genome-wide significance on chromosomes 4 (chr4:74522353T>A, p = 8.1×10-7) and 15 (chr15:53338796A>G, p = 1.5×10-7). Haplotype analysis and fine-mapping suggests that ILR7 and FBXW7, respectively, both important for regulation of immune system function, could be the underlying associated genes. Further evaluation of these regions and the previously identified DLA II locus across all three breeds, revealed an enrichment of nominal significant SNPs associated with chromosome 15 in pug dogs and DLA II in Maltese and Chihuahua dogs. Meta-analysis confirmed effect sizes the same direction in all three breeds for both the chromosome 15 and DLA II loci (p = 8.6×10-11 and p = 2.5×10-7, respectively). This suggests a shared genetic background exists between all breeds and confers susceptibility to NME, but effect sizes might be different among breeds. In conclusion, we identified the first genetic risk factors for NME development in the Maltese, chromosome 4 and chromosome 15, and provide evidence for a shared genetic risk between breeds associated with chromosome 15 and DLA II. Last, DLA II and IL7R both have been implicated in human inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, suggesting that similar pharmacotherapeutic targets across species should be investigated.

  12. Meta-analysis of gene–environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W.; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E.; Williams, Katie M.; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F.; Joshi, Peter K.; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M.; Simpson, Claire L.; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P.; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S.; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M. Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E. H.; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W.; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N.; Foster, Paul J.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L.; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A.; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N.; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G.; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J.; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O.; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L.; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K.H.; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L.; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-01-01

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10−5), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia. PMID:27020472

  13. Meta-analysis of gene-environment-wide association scans accounting for education level identifies additional loci for refractive error.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiao; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Wojciechowski, Robert; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Hysi, Pirro G; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; Vitart, Veronique; Khawaja, Anthony P; Yamashiro, Kenji; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lu, Yi; Haller, Toomas; Xie, Jing; Delcourt, Cécile; Pirastu, Mario; Wedenoja, Juho; Gharahkhani, Puya; Venturini, Cristina; Miyake, Masahiro; Hewitt, Alex W; Guo, Xiaobo; Mazur, Johanna; Huffman, Jenifer E; Williams, Katie M; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Simpson, Claire L; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Igo, Robert P; Mirshahi, Alireza; Cougnard-Gregoire, Audrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Blettner, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Seppala, Ilkka; Zeller, Tanja; Meitinger, Thomas; Ried, Janina S; Gieger, Christian; Portas, Laura; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Vingerling, Johannes R; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Xu; Tai-Hui Boh, Eileen; Ikram, M Kamran; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Gupta, Preeti; Tan, Vincent; Zhou, Lei; Ho, Candice E H; Lim, Wan'e; Beuerman, Roger W; Siantar, Rosalynn; Tai, E-Shyong; Vithana, Eranga; Mihailov, Evelin; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Hayward, Caroline; Luben, Robert N; Foster, Paul J; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Hoi-Suen; Mitchell, Paul; Metspalu, Andres; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L; He, Mingguang; Pärssinen, Olavi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Jin Wang, Jie; Williams, Cathy; Jonas, Jost B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Mackey, David A; Oexle, Konrad; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Paterson, Andrew D; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Baird, Paul N; Stambolian, Dwight; Wilson, Joan E Bailey; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Hammond, Christopher J; Klaver, Caroline C W; Saw, Seang-Mei; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Kemp, John P; Timpson, Nicholas J; Smith, George Davey; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Fogarty, Rhys D; Iyengar, Sudha K; Chew, Emily; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Martin, Nicholas G; MacGregor, Stuart; Xu, Liang; Schache, Maria; Nangia, Vinay; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; Wright, Alan F; Fondran, Jeremy R; Lass, Jonathan H; Feng, Sheng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick J; Rantanen, Taina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Tam, Pancy O; Jhanji, Vishal; Young, Alvin L; Döring, Angela; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary-Frances; Li, Xiaohui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K H; Biino, Ginevra; Vaccargiu, Simona; Fossarello, Maurizio; Fleck, Brian; Yazar, Seyhan; Tideman, Jan Willem L; Tedja, Milly; Deangelis, Margaret M; Morrison, Margaux; Farrer, Lindsay; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Meguro, Akira; Mäkelä, Kari Matti

    2016-03-29

    Myopia is the most common human eye disorder and it results from complex genetic and environmental causes. The rapidly increasing prevalence of myopia poses a major public health challenge. Here, the CREAM consortium performs a joint meta-analysis to test single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) main effects and SNP × education interaction effects on refractive error in 40,036 adults from 25 studies of European ancestry and 10,315 adults from 9 studies of Asian ancestry. In European ancestry individuals, we identify six novel loci (FAM150B-ACP1, LINC00340, FBN1, DIS3L-MAP2K1, ARID2-SNAT1 and SLC14A2) associated with refractive error. In Asian populations, three genome-wide significant loci AREG, GABRR1 and PDE10A also exhibit strong interactions with education (P<8.5 × 10(-5)), whereas the interactions are less evident in Europeans. The discovery of these loci represents an important advance in understanding how gene and environment interactions contribute to the heterogeneity of myopia.

  14. Chemical Mixture Risk Assessment Additivity-Based Approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powerpoint presentation includes additivity-based chemical mixture risk assessment methods. Basic concepts, theory and example calculations are included. Several slides discuss the use of "common adverse outcomes" in analyzing phthalate mixtures.

  15. Identification of risk loci with shared effects on five major psychiatric disorders: a genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Findings from family and twin studies suggest that genetic contributions to psychiatric disorders do not in all cases map to present diagnostic categories. We aimed to identify specific variants underlying genetic effects shared between the five disorders in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium: autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia. Methods We analysed genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data for the five disorders in 33 332 cases and 27 888 controls of European ancestory. To characterise allelic effects on each disorder, we applied a multinomial logistic regression procedure with model selection to identify the best-fitting model of relations between genotype and phenotype. We examined cross-disorder effects of genome-wide significant loci previously identified for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and used polygenic risk-score analysis to examine such effects from a broader set of common variants. We undertook pathway analyses to establish the biological associations underlying genetic overlap for the five disorders. We used enrichment analysis of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data to assess whether SNPs with cross-disorder association were enriched for regulatory SNPs in post-mortem brain-tissue samples. Findings SNPs at four loci surpassed the cutoff for genome-wide significance (p<5×10−8) in the primary analysis: regions on chromosomes 3p21 and 10q24, and SNPs within two L-type voltage-gated calcium channel subunits, CACNA1C and CACNB2. Model selection analysis supported effects of these loci for several disorders. Loci previously associated with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia had variable diagnostic specificity. Polygenic risk scores showed cross-disorder associations, notably between adult-onset disorders. Pathway analysis supported a role for calcium channel signalling genes for all five disorders. Finally, SNPs

  16. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cordell, Heather J.; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F.; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Greene, Casey S.; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D.; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C.; Floyd, James A. B.; Morley, Katherine I.; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Schlicht, Erik M; Lammert, Craig; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Chan, Landon L; de Andrade, Mariza; Balschun, Tobias; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Zhang, Jinyi; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Qu, Jia; Odin, Joseph A; Luketic, Velimir A; Bacon, Bruce R; Bodenheimer Jr, Henry C; Liakina, Valentina; Vincent, Catherine; Levy, Cynthia; Gregersen, Peter K; Almasio, Piero L; Alvaro, Domenico; Andreone, Pietro; Andriulli, Angelo; Barlassina, Cristina; Battezzati, Pier Maria; Benedetti, Antonio; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Bianchi, Ilaria; Bragazzi, Maria Consiglia; Brunetto, Maurizia; Bruno, Savino; Casella, Giovanni; Coco, Barbara; Colli, Agostino; Colombo, Massimo; Colombo, Silvia; Cursaro, Carmela; Crocè, Lory Saveria; Crosignani, Andrea; Donato, Maria Francesca; Elia, Gianfranco; Fabris, Luca; Ferrari, Carlo; Floreani, Annarosa; Foglieni, Barbara; Fontana, Rosanna; Galli, Andrea; Lazzari, Roberta; Macaluso, Fabio; Malinverno, Federica; Marra, Fabio; Marzioni, Marco; Mattalia, Alberto; Montanari, Renzo; Morini, Lorenzo; Morisco, Filomena; Hani S, Mousa; Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Niro, Grazia A; Palmieri, Vincenzo O; Picciotto, Antonio; Podda, Mauro; Portincasa, Piero; Ronca, Vincenzo; Rosina, Floriano; Rossi, Sonia; Sogno, Ilaria; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Spreafico, Marta; Strazzabosco, Mario; Tarallo, Sonia; Tarocchi, Mirko; Tiribelli, Claudio; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Vinci, Maria; Zuin, Massimo; Ch'ng, Chin Lye; Rahman, Mesbah; Yapp, Tom; Sturgess, Richard; Healey, Christopher; Czajkowski, Marek; Gunasekera, Anton; Gyawali, Pranab; Premchand, Purushothaman; Kapur, Kapil; Marley, Richard; Foster, Graham; Watson, Alan; Dias, Aruna; Subhani, Javaid; Harvey, Rory; McCorry, Roger; Ramanaden, David; Gasem, Jaber; Evans, Richard; Mathialahan, Thiriloganathan; Shorrock, Christopher; Lipscomb, George; Southern, Paul; Tibble, Jeremy; Gorard, David; Palegwala, Altaf; Jones, Susan; Carbone, Marco; Dawwas, Mohamed; Alexander, Graeme; Dolwani, Sunil; Prince, Martin; Foxton, Matthew; Elphick, David; Mitchison, Harriet; Gooding, Ian; Karmo, Mazn; Saksena, Sushma; Mendall, Mike; Patel, Minesh; Ede, Roland; Austin, Andrew; Sayer, Joanna; Hankey, Lorraine; Hovell, Christopher; Fisher, Neil; Carter, Martyn; Koss, Konrad; Piotrowicz, Andrzej; Grimley, Charles; Neal, David; Lim, Guan; Levi, Sass; Ala, Aftab; Broad, Andrea; Saeed, Athar; Wood, Gordon; Brown, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Mark; Gordon, Harriet; Ramage, John; Ridpath, Jo; Ngatchu, Theodore; Grover, Bob; Shaukat, Syed; Shidrawi, Ray; Abouda, George; Ali, Faiz; Rees, Ian; Salam, Imroz; Narain, Mark; Brown, Ashley; Taylor-Robinson, Simon; Williams, Simon; Grellier, Leonie; Banim, Paul; Das, Debashis; Chilton, Andrew; Heneghan, Michael; Curtis, Howard; Gess, Markus; Drake, Ian; Aldersley, Mark; Davies, Mervyn; Jones, Rebecca; McNair, Alastair; Srirajaskanthan, Raj; Pitcher, Maxton; Sen, Sambit; Bird, George; Barnardo, Adrian; Kitchen, Paul; Yoong, Kevin; Chirag, Oza; Sivaramakrishnan, Nurani; MacFaul, George; Jones, David; Shah, Amir; Evans, Chris; Saha, Subrata; Pollock, Katharine; Bramley, Peter; Mukhopadhya, Ashis; Fraser, Andrew; Mills, Peter; Shallcross, Christopher; Campbell, Stewart; Bathgate, Andrew; Shepherd, Alan; Dillon, John; Rushbrook, Simon; Przemioslo, Robert; Macdonald, Christopher; Metcalf, Jane; Shmueli, Udi; Davis, Andrew; Naqvi, Asifabbas; Lee, Tom; Ryder, Stephen D; Collier, Jane; Klass, Howard; Ninkovic, Mary; Cramp, Matthew; Sharer, Nicholas; Aspinall, Richard; Goggin, Patrick; Ghosh, Deb; Douds, Andrew; Hoeroldt, Barbara; Booth, Jonathan; Williams, Earl; Hussaini, Hyder; Stableforth, William; Ayres, Reuben; Thorburn, Douglas; Marshall, Eileen; Burroughs, Andrew; Mann, Steven; Lombard, Martin; Richardson, Paul; Patanwala, Imran; Maltby, Julia; Brookes, Matthew; Mathew, Ray; Vyas, Samir; Singhal, Saket; Gleeson, Dermot; Misra, Sharat; Butterworth, Jeff; George, Keith; Harding, Tim; Douglass, Andrew; Panter, Simon; Shearman, Jeremy; Bray, Gary; Butcher, Graham; Forton, Daniel; Mclindon, John; Cowan, Matthew; Whatley, Gregory; Mandal, Aditya; Gupta, Hemant; Sanghi, Pradeep; Jain, Sanjiv; Pereira, Steve; Prasad, Geeta; Watts, Gill; Wright, Mark; Neuberger, James; Gordon, Fiona; Unitt, Esther; Grant, Allister; Delahooke, Toby; Higham, Andrew; Brind, Alison; Cox, Mark; Ramakrishnan, Subramaniam; King, Alistair; Collins, Carole; Whalley, Simon; Li, Andy; Fraser, Jocelyn; Bell, Andrew; Wong, Voi Shim; Singhal, Amit; Gee, Ian; Ang, Yeng; Ransford, Rupert; Gotto, James; Millson, Charles; Bowles, Jane; Thomas, Caradog; Harrison, Melanie; Galaska, Roman; Kendall, Jennie; Whiteman, Jessica; Lawlor, Caroline; Gray, Catherine; Elliott, Keith; Mulvaney-Jones, Caroline; Hobson, Lucie; Van Duyvenvoorde, Greta; Loftus, Alison; Seward, Katie; Penn, Ruth; Maiden, Jane; Damant, Rose; Hails, Janeane; Cloudsdale, Rebecca; Silvestre, Valeria; Glenn, Sue; Dungca, Eleanor; Wheatley, Natalie; Doyle, Helen; Kent, Melanie; Hamilton, Caroline; Braim, Delyth; Wooldridge, Helen; Abrahams, Rachel; Paton, Alison; Lancaster, Nicola; Gibbins, Andrew; Hogben, Karen; Desousa, Phillipa; Muscariu, Florin; Musselwhite, Janine; McKay, Alexandra; Tan, LaiTing; Foale, Carole; Brighton, Jacqueline; Flahive, Kerry; Nambela, Estelle; Townshend, Paula; Ford, Chris; Holder, Sophie; Palmer, Caroline; Featherstone, James; Nasseri, Mariam; Sadeghian, Joy; Williams, Bronwen; Thomas, Carol; Rolls, Sally-Ann; Hynes, Abigail; Duggan, Claire; Jones, Sarah; Crossey, Mary; Stansfield, Glynis; MacNicol, Carolyn; Wilkins, Joy; Wilhelmsen, Elva; Raymode, Parizade; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Durant, Emma; Bishop, Rebecca; Ncube, Noma; Tripoli, Sherill; Casey, Rebecca; Cowley, Caroline; Miller, Richard; Houghton, Kathryn; Ducker, Samantha; Wright, Fiona; Bird, Bridget; Baxter, Gwen; Keggans, Janie; Hughes, Maggie; Grieve, Emma; Young, Karin; Williams, D; Ocker, Kate; Hines, Frances; Martin, Kirsty; Innes, Caron; Valliani, Talal; Fairlamb, Helen; Thornthwaite, Sarah; Eastick, Anne; Tanqueray, Elizabeth; Morrison, Jennifer; Holbrook, Becky; Browning, Julie; Walker, Kirsten; Congreave, Susan; Verheyden, Juliette; Slininger, Susan; Stafford, Lizzie; O'Donnell, Denise; Ainsworth, Mark; Lord, Susan; Kent, Linda; March, Linda; Dickson, Christine; Simpson, Diane; Longhurst, Beverley; Hayes, Maria; Shpuza, Ervin; White, Nikki; Besley, Sarah; Pearson, Sallyanne; Wright, Alice; Jones, Linda; Gunter, Emma; Dewhurst, Hannah; Fouracres, Anna; Farrington, Liz; Graves, Lyn; Marriott, Suzie; Leoni, Marina; Tyrer, David; Martin, Kate; Dali-kemmery, Lola; Lambourne, Victoria; Green, Marie; Sirdefield, Dawn; Amor, Kelly; Colley, Julie; Shinder, Bal; Jones, Jayne; Mills, Marisa; Carnahan, Mandy; Taylor, Natalie; Boulton, Kerenza; Tregonning, Julie; Brown, Carly; Clifford, Gayle; Archer, Emily; Hamilton, Maria; Curtis, Janette; Shewan, Tracey; Walsh, Sue; Warner, Karen; Netherton, Kimberley; Mupudzi, Mcdonald; Gunson, Bridget; Gitahi, Jane; Gocher, Denise; Batham, Sally; Pateman, Hilary; Desmennu, Senayon; Conder, Jill; Clement, Darren; Gallagher, Susan; Orpe, Jacky; Chan, PuiChing; Currie, Lynn; O'Donohoe, Lynn; Oblak, Metod; Morgan, Lisa; Quinn, Marie; Amey, Isobel; Baird, Yolanda; Cotterill, Donna; Cumlat, Lourdes; Winter, Louise; Greer, Sandra; Spurdle, Katie; Allison, Joanna; Dyer, Simon; Sweeting, Helen; Kordula, Jean; Gershwin, M. Eric; Anderson, Carl A.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F.; Sandford, Richard N.; Amos, Christopher I.; Siminovitch, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10−8) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine–cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist. PMID:26394269

  17. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Heather J; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Greene, Casey S; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C; Floyd, James A B; Morley, Katherine I; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Gershwin, M Eric; Anderson, Carl A; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F; Sandford, Richard N; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10(-8)) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine-cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist. PMID:26394269

  18. International genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new primary biliary cirrhosis risk loci and targetable pathogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Cordell, Heather J; Han, Younghun; Mells, George F; Li, Yafang; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Greene, Casey S; Xie, Gang; Juran, Brian D; Zhu, Dakai; Qian, David C; Floyd, James A B; Morley, Katherine I; Prati, Daniele; Lleo, Ana; Cusi, Daniele; Gershwin, M Eric; Anderson, Carl A; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Invernizzi, Pietro; Seldin, Michael F; Sandford, Richard N; Amos, Christopher I; Siminovitch, Katherine A

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a classical autoimmune liver disease for which effective immunomodulatory therapy is lacking. Here we perform meta-analyses of discovery data sets from genome-wide association studies of European subjects (n=2,764 cases and 10,475 controls) followed by validation genotyping in an independent cohort (n=3,716 cases and 4,261 controls). We discover and validate six previously unknown risk loci for PBC (Pcombined<5 × 10(-8)) and used pathway analysis to identify JAK-STAT/IL12/IL27 signalling and cytokine-cytokine pathways, for which relevant therapies exist.

  19. Novel Association Strategy with Copy Number Variation for Identifying New Risk Loci of Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xianfeng; Li, Xinlei; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhao, Guoping; Xu, Haiming; Zhu, Jun; Qin, Xueying; Chen, Suchao; Hu, Landian; Kong, Xiangyin

    2010-01-01

    Background Copy number variations (CNV) are important causal genetic variations for human disease; however, the lack of a statistical model has impeded the systematic testing of CNVs associated with disease in large-scale cohort. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we developed a novel integrated strategy to test CNV-association in genome-wide case-control studies. We converted the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) signal to copy number states using a well-trained hidden Markov model. We mapped the susceptible CNV-loci through SNP site-specific testing to cope with the physiological complexity of CNVs. We also ensured the credibility of the associated CNVs through further window-based CNV-pattern clustering. Genome-wide data with seven diseases were used to test our strategy and, in total, we identified 36 new susceptible loci that are associated with CNVs for the seven diseases: 5 with bipolar disorder, 4 with coronary artery disease, 1 with Crohn's disease, 7 with hypertension, 9 with rheumatoid arthritis, 7 with type 1 diabetes and 3 with type 2 diabetes. Fifteen of these identified loci were validated through genotype-association and physiological function from previous studies, which provide further confidence for our results. Notably, the genes associated with bipolar disorder converged in the phosphoinositide/calcium signaling, a well-known affected pathway in bipolar disorder, which further supports that CNVs have impact on bipolar disorder. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrated the effectiveness and robustness of our CNV-association analysis and provided an alternative avenue for discovering new associated loci of human diseases. PMID:20808825

  20. Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, Panos; Kanoni, Stavroula; Willenborg, Christina; Farrall, Martin; Assimes, Themistocles L; Thompson, John R; Ingelsson, Erik; Saleheen, Danish; Erdmann, Jeanette; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Stirrups, Kathleen; König, Inke R; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Johansson, Asa; Hall, Alistair S; Lee, Jong-Young; Willer, Cristen J; Chambers, John C; Esko, Tõnu; Folkersen, Lasse; Goel, Anuj; Grundberg, Elin; Havulinna, Aki S; Ho, Weang K; Hopewell, Jemma C; Eriksson, Niclas; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lundmark, Per; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Rafelt, Suzanne; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tikkanen, Emmi; Van Zuydam, Natalie; Voight, Benjamin F; Waite, Lindsay L; Zhang, Weihua; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Altshuler, David; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barroso, Inês; Braund, Peter S; Burgdorf, Christof; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cox, David; Dimitriou, Maria; Do, Ron; Doney, Alex S F; El Mokhtari, NourEddine; Eriksson, Per; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gigante, Bruna; Groop, Leif; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hager, Jörg; Hallmans, Göran; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hunt, Sarah E; Kang, Hyun M; Illig, Thomas; Kessler, Thorsten; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lundmark, Anders; McCarthy, Mark I; Meisinger, Christa; Melander, Olle; Mihailov, Evelin; Maouche, Seraya; Morris, Andrew D; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nikus, Kjell; Peden, John F; Rayner, N William; Rasheed, Asif; Rosinger, Silke; Rubin, Diana; Rumpf, Moritz P; Schäfer, Arne; Sivananthan, Mohan; Song, Ci; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Wagner, Peter J; Wells, George A; Wild, Philipp S; Yang, Tsun-Po; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Basart, Hanneke; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brambilla, Paolo; Cambien, Francois; Cupples, Adrienne L; de Faire, Ulf; Dehghan, Abbas; Diemert, Patrick; Epstein, Stephen E; Evans, Alun; Ferrario, Marco M; Ferrières, Jean; Gauguier, Dominique; Go, Alan S; Goodall, Alison H; Gudnason, Villi; Hazen, Stanley L; Holm, Hilma; Iribarren, Carlos; Jang, Yangsoo; Kähönen, Mika; Kee, Frank; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Klopp, Norman; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laakso, Markku; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lee, Ji-Young; Lind, Lars; Ouwehand, Willem H; Parish, Sarah; Park, Jeong E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peters, Annette; Quertermous, Thomas; Rader, Daniel J; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric; Shah, Svati H; Sinisalo, Juha; Stark, Klaus; Stefansson, Kari; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas; Zimmermann, Martina E; Nieminen, Markku S; Hengstenberg, Christian; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Pastinen, Tomi; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Hovingh, G Kees; Dedoussis, George; Franks, Paul W; Lehtimäki, Terho; Metspalu, Andres; Zalloua, Pierre A; Siegbahn, Agneta; Schreiber, Stefan; Ripatti, Samuli; Blankenberg, Stefan S; Perola, Markus; Clarke, Robert; Boehm, Bernhard O; O'Donnell, Christopher; Reilly, Muredach P; März, Winfried; Collins, Rory; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hamsten, Anders; Kooner, Jaspal S; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Danesh, John; Palmer, Colin N A; Roberts, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r(2) < 0.2) strongly associated with CAD at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Together, these variants explain approximately 10.6% of CAD heritability. Of the 46 genome-wide significant lead SNPs, 12 show a significant association with a lipid trait, and 5 show a significant association with blood pressure, but none is significantly associated with diabetes. Network analysis with 233 candidate genes (loci at 10% FDR) generated 5 interaction networks comprising 85% of these putative genes involved in CAD. The four most significant pathways mapping to these networks are linked to lipid metabolism and inflammation, underscoring the causal role of these activities in the genetic etiology of CAD. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CAD and identifies key biological pathways.

  1. Identification of cell types, tissues and pathways affected by risk loci in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Zhao, Pan; Shen, Changbing; Shen, Songke; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zuo, Xianbo; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Yin, Xianyong

    2016-04-01

    Many common variants have been found associated with the risk of psoriasis, but the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown, mostly owing to the difficulty in dissecting the mechanism of each variant using representative cell type and tissue in biological experiments. We applied an integrative method SNPsea which has been developed by investigators in Broad, to identify the most relevant cell types, tissues, and pathways to psoriasis by assessing the condition specificity affected by psoriasis genome-wide association studies-implicated genes. We employed this software on 89 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with genome-wide significance in Han Chinese and Caucasian populations. We found significant evidence for peripheral blood CD56 + NK cells (P = 1.30 × 10(-7)), Langerhans cells (P = 4.96 × 10(-6)) and CD14+ monocytes (P < 4.80 × 10(-5)) in psoriasis. We suggested that the DNase I hypersensitivity sites in CD14+ cells were active in psoriasis (P = 2.20 × 10(-16)). In addition, we discovered that biotic stimulus response, cytokine production and NF-κB pathways were significantly activated in psoriasis (P < 1.00 × 10(-5)). In conclusion, we found several innate immune cells and immune pathways in psoriasis that will help guide biological experiments for psoriasis risk variants in future.

  2. Identification of cell types, tissues and pathways affected by risk loci in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Zhao, Pan; Shen, Changbing; Shen, Songke; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zuo, Xianbo; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Yin, Xianyong

    2016-04-01

    Many common variants have been found associated with the risk of psoriasis, but the underlying mechanism is still largely unknown, mostly owing to the difficulty in dissecting the mechanism of each variant using representative cell type and tissue in biological experiments. We applied an integrative method SNPsea which has been developed by investigators in Broad, to identify the most relevant cell types, tissues, and pathways to psoriasis by assessing the condition specificity affected by psoriasis genome-wide association studies-implicated genes. We employed this software on 89 single-nucleotide polymorphisms with genome-wide significance in Han Chinese and Caucasian populations. We found significant evidence for peripheral blood CD56 + NK cells (P = 1.30 × 10(-7)), Langerhans cells (P = 4.96 × 10(-6)) and CD14+ monocytes (P < 4.80 × 10(-5)) in psoriasis. We suggested that the DNase I hypersensitivity sites in CD14+ cells were active in psoriasis (P = 2.20 × 10(-16)). In addition, we discovered that biotic stimulus response, cytokine production and NF-κB pathways were significantly activated in psoriasis (P < 1.00 × 10(-5)). In conclusion, we found several innate immune cells and immune pathways in psoriasis that will help guide biological experiments for psoriasis risk variants in future. PMID:26563434

  3. GWAS in an Amerindian ancestry population reveals novel systemic lupus erythematosus risk loci and the role of European admixture

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Molineros, Julio; Howard, Timothy D.; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Elena; Ainsworth, Hannah C.; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Comeau, Mary E.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Adler, Adam; Acevedo-Vázquez, Eduardo; Cucho, Jorge Mariano; García-De la Torre, Ignacio; Cardiel, Mario H.; Miranda, Pedro; Catoggio, Luis; Maradiaga-Ceceña, Marco; Gaffney, Patrick; Vyse, Timothy; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Tsao, Betty P.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; James, Judith A.; Kimberly, Robert; Kaufman, Ken; Harley, John B.; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge; Moctezuma, José F.; García, Mercedes A.; Berbotto, Guillermo; Babini, Alejandra; Scherbarth, Hugo; Toloza, Sergio; Baca, Vicente; Nath, Swapan K.; Salinas, Carlos Aguilar; Orozco, Lorena; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Jacob, Chaim O.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component. Our aim was to perform the first genome-wide association study on individuals from the Americas enriched for Native American heritage. MATERIALS and METHODS We analyzed 3,710 individuals from four countries of Latin America and the Unites States diagnosed with SLE and healthy controls. Samples were genotyped with the HumanOmni1 BeadChip. Data of out-of-study controls was obtained for the HumanOmni2.5. Statistical analyses were performed using SNPTEST and SNPGWA. Data was adjusted for genomic control and FDR. Imputation was done using IMPUTE2, and HiBAG for classical HLA alleles. RESULTS The IRF5-TNPO3 region showed the strongest association and largest odds ratio (OR) (rs10488631, Pgcadj = 2.61×10−29, OR = 2.12, 95% CI: 1.88–2.39) followed by the HLA class II on the DQA2-DQB1 loci (rs9275572, Pgcadj = 1.11 × 10−16, OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.46–1.80; rs9271366, Pgcadj=6.46 × 10−12, OR = 2.06, 95% CI: 1.71–2.50). Other known SLE loci associated were ITGAM, STAT4, TNIP1, NCF2 and IRAK1. We identified a novel locus on 10q24.33 (rs4917385, Pgcadj =1.4×10−8) with a eQTL effect (Peqtl=8.0 × 10−37 at USMG5/miR1307), and describe novel loci. We corroborate SLE-risk loci previously identified in European and Asians. Local ancestry estimation showed that HLA allele risk contribution is of European ancestral origin. Imputation of HLA alleles suggested that autochthonous Native American haplotypes provide protection. CONCLUSIONS Our results show the insight gained by studying admixed populations to delineate the genetic architecture that underlies autoimmune and complex diseases. PMID:26606652

  4. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative–specific breast cancer risk loci

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather s; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van’t; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; Van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20–30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry1. The etiology2 and clinical behavior3 of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition4. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10−12 and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10−8), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10−8) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10−8), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:23535733

  5. Evolutionary and Functional Analysis of Celiac Risk Loci Reveals SH2B3 as a Protective Factor against Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhernakova, Alexandra; Elbers, Clara C.; Ferwerda, Bart; Romanos, Jihane; Trynka, Gosia; Dubois, Patrick C.; de Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Franke, Lude; Oosting, Marije; Barisani, Donatella; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Joosten, Leo A.B.; Saavalainen, Paivi; van Heel, David A.; Catassi, Carlo; Netea, Mihai G.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an intolerance to dietary proteins of wheat, barley, and rye. CD may have substantial morbidity, yet it is quite common with a prevalence of 1%–2% in Western populations. It is not clear why the CD phenotype is so prevalent despite its negative effects on human health, especially because appropriate treatment in the form of a gluten-free diet has only been available since the 1950s, when dietary gluten was discovered to be the triggering factor. The high prevalence of CD might suggest that genes underlying this disease may have been favored by the process of natural selection. We assessed signatures of selection for ten confirmed CD-associated loci in several genome-wide data sets, comprising 8154 controls from four European populations and 195 individuals from a North African population, by studying haplotype lengths via the integrated haplotype score (iHS) method. Consistent signs of positive selection for CD-associated derived alleles were observed in three loci: IL12A, IL18RAP, and SH2B3. For the SH2B3 risk allele, we also show a difference in allele frequency distribution (Fst) between HapMap phase II populations. Functional investigation of the effect of the SH2B3 genotype in response to lipopolysaccharide and muramyl dipeptide revealed that carriers of the SH2B3 rs3184504∗A risk allele showed stronger activation of the NOD2 recognition pathway. This suggests that SH2B3 plays a role in protection against bacteria infection, and it provides a possible explanation for the selective sweep on SH2B3, which occurred sometime between 1200 and 1700 years ago. PMID:20560212

  6. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and risk of CA...

  7. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Wren, Jonathan D; Harley, John B; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,478 SLE cases and 12,656 controls from six East Asian cohorts to identify new SLE susceptibility loci and better localize known loci. We identified ten new loci and confirmed 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the new loci, the most significant locus was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta = 3.75 × 10(-117), odds ratio (OR) = 2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We identified the most likely functional variants at each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene expression data. Ten candidate variants are known to alter gene expression in cis or in trans. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B cell and T cell biology. The new loci, together with previously known loci, increase the explained heritability of SLE to 24%. The new loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics.

  8. GWAS of human bitter taste perception identifies new loci and reveals additional complexity of bitter taste genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Mirko; Kutalik, Zoltán; Souza Destito, Maria C.; Souza, Milena M.; Cirillo, Cintia A.; Zamboni, Amabilene; Martin, Nathalie; Morya, Edgard; Sameshima, Koichi; Beckmann, Jacques S.; le Coutre, Johannes; Bergmann, Sven; Genick, Ulrich K.

    2014-01-01

    Human perception of bitterness displays pronounced interindividual variation. This phenotypic variation is mirrored by equally pronounced genetic variation in the family of bitter taste receptor genes. To better understand the effects of common genetic variations on human bitter taste perception, we conducted a genome-wide association study on a discovery panel of 504 subjects and a validation panel of 104 subjects from the general population of São Paulo in Brazil. Correction for general taste-sensitivity allowed us to identify a SNP in the cluster of bitter taste receptors on chr12 (10.88– 11.24 Mb, build 36.1) significantly associated (best SNP: rs2708377, P = 5.31 × 10−13, r2 = 8.9%, β = −0.12, s.e. = 0.016) with the perceived bitterness of caffeine. This association overlaps with—but is statistically distinct from—the previously identified SNP rs10772420 influencing the perception of quinine bitterness that falls in the same bitter taste cluster. We replicated this association to quinine perception (P = 4.97 × 10−37, r2 = 23.2%, β = 0.25, s.e. = 0.020) and additionally found the effect of this genetic locus to be concentration specific with a strong impact on the perception of low, but no impact on the perception of high concentrations of quinine. Our study, thus, furthers our understanding of the complex genetic architecture of bitter taste perception. PMID:23966204

  9. GWAS of human bitter taste perception identifies new loci and reveals additional complexity of bitter taste genetics.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Mirko; Kutalik, Zoltán; Souza Destito, Maria C; Souza, Milena M; Cirillo, Cintia A; Zamboni, Amabilene; Martin, Nathalie; Morya, Edgard; Sameshima, Koichi; Beckmann, Jacques S; le Coutre, Johannes; Bergmann, Sven; Genick, Ulrich K

    2014-01-01

    Human perception of bitterness displays pronounced interindividual variation. This phenotypic variation is mirrored by equally pronounced genetic variation in the family of bitter taste receptor genes. To better understand the effects of common genetic variations on human bitter taste perception, we conducted a genome-wide association study on a discovery panel of 504 subjects and a validation panel of 104 subjects from the general population of São Paulo in Brazil. Correction for general taste-sensitivity allowed us to identify a SNP in the cluster of bitter taste receptors on chr12 (10.88- 11.24 Mb, build 36.1) significantly associated (best SNP: rs2708377, P = 5.31 × 10(-13), r(2) = 8.9%, β = -0.12, s.e. = 0.016) with the perceived bitterness of caffeine. This association overlaps with-but is statistically distinct from-the previously identified SNP rs10772420 influencing the perception of quinine bitterness that falls in the same bitter taste cluster. We replicated this association to quinine perception (P = 4.97 × 10(-37), r(2) = 23.2%, β = 0.25, s.e. = 0.020) and additionally found the effect of this genetic locus to be concentration specific with a strong impact on the perception of low, but no impact on the perception of high concentrations of quinine. Our study, thus, furthers our understanding of the complex genetic architecture of bitter taste perception.

  10. Risk analysis of sulfites used as food additives in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian Bo; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Hua Li; Zhang, Ji Yue; Luo, Peng Jie; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Zhu Tian

    2014-02-01

    This study was to analyze the risk of sulfites in food consumed by the Chinese people and assess the health protection capability of maximum-permitted level (MPL) of sulfites in GB 2760-2011. Sulfites as food additives are overused or abused in many food categories. When the MPL in GB 2760-2011 was used as sulfites content in food, the intake of sulfites in most surveyed populations was lower than the acceptable daily intake (ADI). Excess intake of sulfites was found in all the surveyed groups when a high percentile of sulfites in food was in taken. Moreover, children aged 1-6 years are at a high risk to intake excess sulfites. The primary cause for the excess intake of sulfites in Chinese people is the overuse and abuse of sulfites by the food industry. The current MPL of sulfites in GB 2760-2011 protects the health of most populations.

  11. An investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L.; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A.; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M.; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R.; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S.; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M.; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J. Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Yesilyurt, Betul T.; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G.; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Perez, José Ignacio Arias; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Spurdle, Amanda; Investigators, kConFab; Group, AOCS; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E.; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G.; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L.; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E.; Easton, Doug F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint) <1.1×10−3. None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women ≥170cm (OR=1.22, p=0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women <160cm (OR=0.83, p=0.039, pint=1.9×10−4). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR=0.85, p=2.0×10−4), and absent in women who had had just one (OR=0.96, p=0.19, pint = 6.1×10−4). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR=0.93, p=2.8×10−5), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR=1.07, p=0.14, pint = 3.4×10−4). In conclusion, recently identified breast cancer susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies. PMID:25227710

  12. Investigation of gene-environment interactions between 47 newly identified breast cancer susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Anja; Milne, Roger L; Truong, Thérèse; Knight, Julia A; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Munday, Hannah R; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Brand, Judith S; Olson, Janet; Vachon, Celine M; Hallberg, Emily; Castelao, J Esteban; Carracedo, Angel; Torres, Maria; Li, Jingmei; Humphreys, Keith; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Yesilyurt, Betul T; Floris, Giuseppe; Leunen, Karin; Engelhardt, Ellen G; Broeks, Annegien; Rutgers, Emiel J; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Cross, Simon; Reed, Malcolm; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Arias Perez, José Ignacio; Provenzano, Elena; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Spurdle, Amanda; Häberle, Lothar; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; McLean, Catriona; Baglietto, Laura; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sherman, Mark E; Brüning, Thomas; Hamann, Ute; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk; Ashworth, Alan; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Mannermaa, Arto; Swerdlow, Anthony; Giles, Graham G; Brenner, Hermann; Fasching, Peter A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hopper, John; Benítez, Javier; Cox, Angela; Andrulis, Irene L; Lambrechts, Diether; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Couch, Fergus; Czene, Kamila; Bojesen, Stig E; Easton, Doug F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Guénel, Pascal; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2015-03-15

    A large genotyping project within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) recently identified 41 associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and overall breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated whether the effects of these 41 SNPs, as well as six SNPs associated with estrogen receptor (ER) negative BC risk are modified by 13 environmental risk factors for BC. Data from 22 studies participating in BCAC were pooled, comprising up to 26,633 cases and 30,119 controls. Interactions between SNPs and environmental factors were evaluated using an empirical Bayes-type shrinkage estimator. Six SNPs showed interactions with associated p-values (pint ) <1.1 × 10(-3) . None of the observed interactions was significant after accounting for multiple testing. The Bayesian False Discovery Probability was used to rank the findings, which indicated three interactions as being noteworthy at 1% prior probability of interaction. SNP rs6828523 was associated with increased ER-negative BC risk in women ≥170 cm (OR = 1.22, p = 0.017), but inversely associated with ER-negative BC risk in women <160 cm (OR = 0.83, p = 0.039, pint = 1.9 × 10(-4) ). The inverse association between rs4808801 and overall BC risk was stronger for women who had had four or more pregnancies (OR = 0.85, p = 2.0 × 10(-4) ), and absent in women who had had just one (OR = 0.96, p = 0.19, pint = 6.1 × 10(-4) ). SNP rs11242675 was inversely associated with overall BC risk in never/former smokers (OR = 0.93, p = 2.8 × 10(-5) ), but no association was observed in current smokers (OR = 1.07, p = 0.14, pint = 3.4 × 10(-4) ). In conclusion, recently identified BC susceptibility loci are not strongly modified by established risk factors and the observed potential interactions require confirmation in independent studies.

  13. Multiple sclerosis risk loci and disease severity in 7,125 individuals from 10 studies

    PubMed Central

    George, Michaela F.; Briggs, Farren B.S.; Shao, Xiaorong; Gianfrancesco, Milena A.; Kockum, Ingrid; Harbo, Hanne F.; Celius, Elisabeth G.; Bos, Steffan D.; Hedström, Anna; Shen, Ling; Bernstein, Allan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; De Jager, Philip L.; Oturai, Annette B.; Søndergaard, Helle B.; Sellebjerg, Finn; Sorensen, Per S.; Gomez, Refujia; Caillier, Stacy J.; Cree, Bruce A.C.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Hauser, Stephen L.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Leone, Maurizio A.; Boneschi, Filippo Martinelli; Sorosina, Melissa; van der Mei, Ingrid; Taylor, Bruce V.; Zhou, Yuan; Schaefer, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the association between 52 risk variants identified through genome-wide association studies and disease severity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Ten unique MS case data sets were analyzed. The Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (MSSS) was calculated using the Expanded Disability Status Scale at study entry and disease duration. MSSS was considered as a continuous variable and as 2 dichotomous variables (median and extreme ends; MSSS of ≤5 vs >5 and MSSS of <2.5 vs ≥7.5, respectively). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were examined individually and as both combined weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) and unweighted genetic risk score (GRS) for association with disease severity. Random-effects meta-analyses were conducted and adjusted for cohort, sex, age at onset, and HLA-DRB1*15:01. Results: A total of 7,125 MS cases were analyzed. The wGRS and GRS were not strongly associated with disease severity after accounting for cohort, sex, age at onset, and HLA-DRB1*15:01. After restricting analyses to cases with disease duration ≥10 years, associations were null (p value ≥0.05). No SNP was associated with disease severity after adjusting for multiple testing. Conclusions: The largest meta-analysis of established MS genetic risk variants and disease severity, to date, was performed. Results suggest that the investigated MS genetic risk variants are not associated with MSSS, even after controlling for potential confounders. Further research in large cohorts is needed to identify genetic determinants of disease severity using sensitive clinical and MRI measures, which are critical to understanding disease mechanisms and guiding development of effective treatments. PMID:27540591

  14. Major histocompatibility complex harbors widespread genotypic variability of non-additive risk of rheumatoid arthritis including epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Hua; Bowes, John; Plant, Darren; Viatte, Sebastien; Yarwood, Annie; Massey, Jonathan; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variability based genome-wide association studies (vGWASs) can identify potentially interacting loci without prior knowledge of the interacting factors. We report a two-stage approach to make vGWAS applicable to diseases: firstly using a mixed model approach to partition dichotomous phenotypes into additive risk and non-additive environmental residuals on the liability scale and secondly using the Levene’s (Brown-Forsythe) test to assess equality of the residual variances across genotype groups per marker. We found widespread significant (P < 2.5e-05) vGWAS signals within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) across all three study cohorts of rheumatoid arthritis. We further identified 10 epistatic interactions between the vGWAS signals independent of the MHC additive effects, each with a weak effect but jointly explained 1.9% of phenotypic variance. PTPN22 was also identified in the discovery cohort but replicated in only one independent cohort. Combining the three cohorts boosted power of vGWAS and additionally identified TYK2 and ANKRD55. Both PTPN22 and TYK2 had evidence of interactions reported elsewhere. We conclude that vGWAS can help discover interacting loci for complex diseases but require large samples to find additional signals. PMID:27109064

  15. Associations of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) risk with autoimmune conditions according to putative NHL loci.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sophia S; Vajdic, Claire M; Linet, Martha S; Slager, Susan L; Voutsinas, Jenna; Nieters, Alexandra; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cozen, Wendy; Alarcón, Graciela S; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Brown, Elizabeth E; Bracci, Paige M; Lightfoot, Tracy; Turner, Jennifer; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Spinelli, John J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Morton, Lindsay M; Birmann, Brenda M; Flowers, Christopher R; Paltiel, Ora; Becker, Nikolaus; Holly, Elizabeth A; Kane, Eleanor; Weisenburger, Dennis; Maynadie, Marc; Cocco, Pierluigi; Foretova, Lenka; Staines, Anthony; Davis, Scott; Severson, Richard; Cerhan, James R; Breen, Elizabeth C; Lan, Qing; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Smith, Martyn T; Roman, Eve; Boffetta, Paolo; Kricker, Anne; Zhang, Yawei; Skibola, Christine; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Benavente, Yolanda; Hartge, Patricia; Smedby, Karin E

    2015-03-15

    Autoimmune conditions and immune system-related genetic variations are associated with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In a pooled analysis of 8,692 NHL cases and 9,260 controls from 14 studies (1988-2007) within the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium, we evaluated the interaction between immune system genetic variants and autoimmune conditions in NHL risk. We evaluated the immunity-related single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1800629 (tumor necrosis factor gene (TNF) G308A), rs1800890 (interleukin-10 gene (IL10) T3575A), rs6457327 (human leukocyte antigen gene (HLA) class I), rs10484561 (HLA class II), and rs2647012 (HLA class II)) and categorized autoimmune conditions as primarily mediated by B-cell or T-cell responses. We constructed unconditional logistic regression models to measure associations between autoimmune conditions and NHL with stratification by genotype. Autoimmune conditions mediated by B-cell responses were associated with increased NHL risk, specifically diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (odds ratio (OR) = 3.11, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.25, 4.30) and marginal zone lymphoma (OR = 5.80, 95% CI: 3.82, 8.80); those mediated by T-cell responses were associated with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.35, 3.38). In the presence of the rs1800629 AG/AA genotype, B-cell-mediated autoimmune conditions increased NHL risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.07, 5.16; P-interaction = 0.03) in comparison with the GG genotype (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.31, 2.53). This interaction was consistent across major B-cell NHL subtypes, including marginal zone lymphoma (P-interaction = 0.02) and follicular lymphoma (P-interaction = 0.04).

  16. Associations of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) Risk With Autoimmune Conditions According to Putative NHL Loci

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sophia S.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Linet, Martha S.; Slager, Susan L.; Voutsinas, Jenna; Nieters, Alexandra; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cozen, Wendy; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Bracci, Paige M.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Turner, Jennifer; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Spinelli, John J.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Morton, Lindsay M.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Paltiel, Ora; Becker, Nikolaus; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Kane, Eleanor; Weisenburger, Dennis; Maynadie, Marc; Cocco, Pierluigi; Foretova, Lenka; Staines, Anthony; Davis, Scott; Severson, Richard; Cerhan, James R.; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Lan, Qing; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Smith, Martyn T.; Roman, Eve; Boffetta, Paolo; Kricker, Anne; Zhang, Yawei; Skibola, Christine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Benavente, Yolanda; Hartge, Patricia; Smedby, Karin E.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune conditions and immune system–related genetic variations are associated with risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In a pooled analysis of 8,692 NHL cases and 9,260 controls from 14 studies (1988–2007) within the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium, we evaluated the interaction between immune system genetic variants and autoimmune conditions in NHL risk. We evaluated the immunity-related single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1800629 (tumor necrosis factor gene (TNF) G308A), rs1800890 (interleukin-10 gene (IL10) T3575A), rs6457327 (human leukocyte antigen gene (HLA) class I), rs10484561 (HLA class II), and rs2647012 (HLA class II)) and categorized autoimmune conditions as primarily mediated by B-cell or T-cell responses. We constructed unconditional logistic regression models to measure associations between autoimmune conditions and NHL with stratification by genotype. Autoimmune conditions mediated by B-cell responses were associated with increased NHL risk, specifically diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (odds ratio (OR) = 3.11, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.25, 4.30) and marginal zone lymphoma (OR = 5.80, 95% CI: 3.82, 8.80); those mediated by T-cell responses were associated with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.35, 3.38). In the presence of the rs1800629 AG/AA genotype, B-cell-mediated autoimmune conditions increased NHL risk (OR = 3.27, 95% CI: 2.07, 5.16; P-interaction = 0.03) in comparison with the GG genotype (OR = 1.82, 95% CI: 1.31, 2.53). This interaction was consistent across major B-cell NHL subtypes, including marginal zone lymphoma (P-interaction = 0.02) and follicular lymphoma (P-interaction = 0.04). PMID:25713336

  17. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Looger, Loren L.; Zhou, Xu-jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Harley, John B.; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,492 SLE cases and 12,675 controls from six East-Asian cohorts, to identify novel and better localize known SLE susceptibility loci. We identified 10 novel loci as well as 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the novel loci, the most significant was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta=3.75×10−117, OR=2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We localized the most likely functional variants for each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene regulation data. Ten putative variants are known to alter cis- or trans-gene expression. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B- and T-cell biology. Together with previously known loci, the explained heritability of SLE increases to 24%. Novel loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci, and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics. PMID:26808113

  18. Fine-scale mapping of the 4q24 locus identifies two independent loci associated with breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Zeng, Chenjie; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Milne, Roger L.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Cai, Qiuyin; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha P.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Stig E.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Brinton, Louise; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Hui; Canisius, Sander; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Devilee, Peter; Droit, Arnaud; Dörk, Thilo; Fasching, Peter A.; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gaborieau, Valerie; García-Closas, Montserrat; Giles, Graham G.; Grip, Mervi; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hartman, Mikael; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L.; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Khan, Sofia; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Lambrechts, Diether; Marchand, Loic Le; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; McLean, Catriona A.; Meindl, Alfons; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Olson, Janet E.; Orr, Nick; Peterlongo, Paolo; Putti, Thomas Choudary; Rudolph, Anja; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shi, Jiajun; Shrubsole, Martha J; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Teo, Soo Hwang; Thienpont, Bernard; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Tomlinson, Ian P.M.; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-chen; van den Ouweland, Ans; Wen, Wanqing; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna; Yip, Cheng Har; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zheng, Ying; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Simard, Jacques; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background A recent association study identified a common variant (rs9790517) at 4q24 to be associated with breast cancer risk. Independent association signals and potential functional variants in this locus have not been explored. Methods We conducted a fine-mapping analysis in 55,540 breast cancer cases and 51,168 controls from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Results Conditional analyses identified two independent association signals among women of European ancestry, represented by rs9790517 (conditional p = 2.51 × 10−4; OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.02–1.07) and rs77928427 (p = 1.86 × 10−4; OR = 1.04; 95% CI 1.02–1.07). Functional annotation using data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project revealed two putative functional variants, rs62331150 and rs73838678 in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with rs9790517 (r2 ≥ 0.90) residing in the active promoter or enhancer, respectively, of the nearest gene, TET2. Both variants are located in DNase I hypersensitivity and transcription factor binding sites. Using data from both The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC), we showed that rs62331150 was associated with level of expression of TET2 in breast normal and tumor tissue. Conclusion Our study identified two independent association signals at 4q24 in relation to breast cancer risk and suggested that observed association in this locus may be mediated through the regulation of TET2. Impact Fine-mapping study with large sample size warranted for identification of independent loci for breast cancer risk. PMID:26354892

  19. Protein quantitative trait loci analysis identifies genetic variation in the innate immune regulator TOLLIP in post lung transplant primary graft dysfunction risk

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Edward; Suzuki, Yoshikazu; Diamond, Joshua M.; Ellis, John; Tiwari, Jaya; Beduhn, Ben; Nellen, James R.; Shah, Rupal; Meyer, Nuala J.; Lederer, David J.; Kawut, Steven M.; Palmer, Scott M.; Snyder, Laurie D.; Hartwig, Matthew G.; Lama, Vibha N.; Bhorade, Sangeeta; Crespo, Maria; Demissie, Ejigayehu; Wille, Keith; Orens, Jonathan; Shah, Pali D.; Weinacker, Ann; Weill, David; Wilkes, David; Roe, David; Ware, Lorraine B.; Wang, Fan; Feng, Rui; Christie, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary We previously identified plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) level as a quantitative lung injury biomarker in PGD. We hypothesized plasma levels of PAI-1 used as a quantitative trait could facilitate discovery of genetic loci important in PGD pathogenesis. A 2-stage cohort study was performed. In stage 1, we tested associations of loci with PAI-1 plasma level using linear modeling. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina CVD Bead Chip v2. Loci meeting a p<5×10−4 cutoff were carried forward and tested in Stage 2 for association with PGD. 297 enrollees were evaluated in Stage 1. 6 loci, associated with PAI-1, were carried forward to Stage 2 and evaluated in 728 patients. rs3168046 (Toll interacting protein, TOLLIP) was significantly associated with PGD (p=0.006). The increased risk of PGD for carrying at least one copy of this variant was 11.7% [95% CI: 4.9%, 18.5%]. The false positive rate for individuals with this genotype who did not have PGD was 6.1%. Variants in the TOLLIP gene are associated with higher circulating PAI-1 plasma levels and validate for association with clinical PGD. A protein quantitative trait analysis for PGD risk prioritizes genetic variations in TOLLIP, and supports a role for toll-like receptors in PGD pathogenesis. PMID:26663441

  20. Quantitative trait loci modifying cardiac atrial septal morphology and risk of patent foramen ovale in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Edwin P; Hyun, Changbaig; Thomson, Peter C; Lai, Donna; Castro, M Leticia; Biben, Christine; Buckley, Michael F; Martin, Ian C A; Moran, Chris; Harvey, Richard P

    2006-03-17

    Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common congenital heart disease (CHD) occurring in 5 to 7 per 10,000 live births. Mutations in 5 human genes (NKX2.5, TBX5, GATA4, MYHC, ACTC) are known to cause dominant ASD, but these account for a minority of cases. Human and mouse data suggest that ASD exists in an anatomical continuum with milder septal variants patent foramen ovale (PFO) and atrial septal aneurysm, strongly associated with ischemic stroke and migraine. We have previously shown in inbred mice that the incidence of PFO strongly correlates with length of the interatrial septum primum, defining a quantitative trait underlying PFO risk. To better understand genetic causation of atrial septal abnormalities, we mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) influencing septal morphology using mouse strains (QSi5 and 129T2/SvEms) maximally informative for PFO incidence and 3 quantitative septal anatomical traits including septum primum length. [QSi5x129T2/SvEms]F2 intercross animals (n=1437) were phenotyped and a whole genome scan performed at an average 17-cM interval. Statistical methodology scoring PFO as a binary phenotype was developed as a confirmatory mapping technique. We mapped 7 significant and 6 suggestive QTL modifying quantitative phenotypes, with 4 supported by binary analysis. Quantitative traits, although strongly associated with PFO (P<0.001), correlated poorly with each other and in all but 1 case QTL for different traits were nonoverlapping. Thus, multiple anatomical processes under separate genetic control contribute to risk of PFO. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of modeling the genetic basis of common CHD using animal genetic and genomic technologies.

  1. HLA-DQA1 and PLCG2 Are Candidate Risk Loci for Childhood-Onset Steroid-Sensitive Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gbadegesin, Rasheed A.; Webb, Nicholas J.A.; Greenbaum, Larry A.; Abeyagunawardena, Asiri; Thalgahagoda, Shenal; Kale, Arundhati; Gipson, Debbie; Srivastava, Tarak; Lin, Jen-Jar; Chand, Deepa; Hunley, Tracy E.; Brophy, Patrick D.; Bagga, Arvind; Sinha, Aditi; Rheault, Michelle N.; Ghali, Joanna; Nicholls, Kathy; Abraham, Elizabeth; Janjua, Halima S.; Omoloja, Abiodun; Barletta, Gina-Marie; Cai, Yi; Milford, David D.; O'Brien, Catherine; Awan, Atif; Belostotsky, Vladimir; Smoyer, William E.; Homstad, Alison; Hall, Gentzon; Wu, Guanghong; Nagaraj, Shashi; Wigfall, Delbert; Foreman, John; Winn, Michelle P.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) accounts for >80% of cases of nephrotic syndrome in childhood. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of SSNS remain obscure. Hypothesizing that coding variation may underlie SSNS risk, we conducted an exome array association study of SSNS. We enrolled a discovery set of 363 persons (214 South Asian children with SSNS and 149 controls) and genotyped them using the Illumina HumanExome Beadchip. Four common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 (rs1129740, rs9273349, rs1071630, and rs1140343) were significantly associated with SSNS at or near the Bonferroni-adjusted P value for the number of single variants that were tested (odds ratio, 2.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.56 to 2.86; P=1.68×10−6 (Fisher exact test). Two of these SNPs—the missense variants C34Y (rs1129740) and F41S (rs1071630) in HLA-DQA1—were replicated in an independent cohort of children of white European ancestry with SSNS (100 cases and ≤589 controls; P=1.42×10−17). In the rare variant gene set–based analysis, the best signal was found in PLCG2 (P=7.825×10−5). In conclusion, this exome array study identified HLA-DQA1 and PLCG2 missense coding variants as candidate loci for SSNS. The finding of a MHC class II locus underlying SSNS risk suggests a major role for immune response in the pathogenesis of SSNS. PMID:25349203

  2. Additional risk of end-of-the-pipe geoengineering technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohle, Martin

    2014-05-01

    qualitatively from the known successes. They do not tackle the initial cause, namely the carbon-dioxide inputs that are too high. This is their additional specific risk. 'The acceptability of geoengineering will be determined as much by social, legal and political issues as by scientific and technical factors', conclude Adam Corner and Nick Pidgeon (2010) when reviewing social and ethical implications of geoengineering the climate. It is to debate in that context that most geoengineering technologies are 'end of the pipe technologies', what involves an additional specific risk. Should these technologies be part of the toolbox to tackle anthropogenic climate change? Adam Corner and Nick Pidgeon 2010, Geoengineering the climate: The social and ethical implications, Environment Vol. 52.

  3. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  4. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  5. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  6. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  7. 46 CFR 308.204 - Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance... OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance § 308.204 Additional war risk protection and indemnity insurance. Owners or charterers may obtain, on an excess basis, additional war...

  8. Fine-mapping of genome-wide association study-identified risk loci for colorectal cancer in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hansong; Haiman, Christopher A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Fortini, Barbara K.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Blot, William J.; Keku, Temitope O.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Pande, Mala; Amos, Christopher I.; West, Dee W.; Casey, Graham; Sandler, Robert S.; Haile, Robert; Stram, Daniel O.; Le Marchand, Loïc

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of colorectal cancer (CRC) in Europeans and Asians have identified 21 risk susceptibility regions [29 index single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)]. Characterizing these risk regions in diverse racial groups with different linkage disequilibrium (LD) structure can help localize causal variants. We examined associations between CRC and all 29 index SNPs in 6597 African Americans (1894 cases and 4703 controls). Nine SNPs in eight regions (5q31.1, 6q26-q27, 8q23.3, 8q24.21, 11q13.4, 15q13.3, 18q21.1 and 20p12.3) formally replicated in our data with one-sided P-values <0.05 and the same risk directions as reported previously. We performed fine-mapping of the 21 risk regions (including 250 kb on both sides of the index SNPs) using genotyped and imputed markers at the density of the 1000 Genomes Project to search for additional or more predictive risk markers. Among the SNPs correlated with the index variants, two markers, rs12759486 (or rs7547751, a putative functional variant in perfect LD with it) in 1q41 and rs7252505 in 19q13.1, were more strongly and statistically significantly associated with CRC (P < 0.0006). The average per allele risk was improved using the replicated index variants and the two new markers (odds ratio = 1.14, P = 6.5 × 10−16) in African Americans, compared with using all index SNPs (odds ratio = 1.07, P = 3.4 × 10−10). The contribution of the two new risk SNPs to CRC heritability was estimated to be 1.5% in African Americans. This study highlights the importance of fine-mapping in diverse populations. PMID:23851122

  9. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetics is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structura...

  10. A Genetic Risk Score Comprising Known Venous Thromboembolism Loci is Associated with Chronic Venous Disease in a Multi-Ethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wassel, Christina L; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Callas, Peter W.; Denenberg, Julie O.; Durda, Peter; Reiner, Alexander P.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Allison, Matthew A.; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Criqui, Michael H.; Cushman, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic venous disease is common and shares some risk factors with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Several genetic loci have been discovered and well-replicated for VTE in European descent populations. We examined associations of a genetic risk score (GRS), comprising known VTE loci, with chronic venous disease. Methods The San Diego Population Study (SDPS) is a multi-ethnic cohort that evaluated 2404 men and women aged 29–91 from 1994 – 1998 for chronic venous disease. The current study includes 1447 participants genotyped for 33 variants in 22 established VTE risk loci. Using these variants, unweighted and weighted GRS were constructed. Logistic regression was used to examine associations with venous disease. Results In non-Hispanic Whites, African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asians, each standard deviation increment higher of the unweighted 33-SNP GRS was associated with a 1.45-fold (95% CI (1.26, 1.67)), 1.74-fold (1.18, 2.55), a 1.80-fold (1.30, 2.51), and 1.88-fold (1.30, 2.73) greater odds, respectively, for moderate plus severe disease. The difference in c-statistics was significant between a known venous risk factor model and a model adding the 33-SNP GRS for Whites (p=0.008), African-Americans (0.03), and Hispanics (p=0.04), with marginal significance in Asians (p=0.06). Conclusions GRS comprising variants primarily from VTE findings in European descent populations were associated with chronic venous disease across all race/ethnic groups, and contributed significantly to prediction, indicating some level of generalizability to other race/ethnic groups. Future work should focus on more in depth examination of racial/ethnic group genetic architecture in relation to chronic venous disease. PMID:26442836

  11. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  12. Search for new loci and low-frequency variants influencing glioma risk by exome-array analysis.

    PubMed

    Kinnersley, Ben; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Labussière, Marianne; Wang, Yufei; Galan, Pilar; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Fleming, Sarah J; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Nöthen, Markus M; Simon, Matthias; Sanson, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-05-01

    To identify protein-altering variants (PAVs) for glioma, we analysed Illumina HumanExome BeadChip exome-array data on 1882 glioma cases and 8079 controls from three independent European populations. In addition to single-variant tests we incorporated information on the predicted functional consequences of PAVs and analysed sets of genes with a higher likelihood of having a role in glioma on the basis of the profile of somatic mutations documented by large-scale sequencing initiatives. Globally there was a strong relationship between effect size and PAVs predicted to be damaging (P=2.29 × 10(-49)); however, these variants which are most likely to impact on risk, are rare (MAF<5%). Although no single variant showed an association which was statistically significant at the genome-wide threshold a number represented promising associations - BRCA2:c.9976A>T, p.(Lys3326Ter), which has been shown to influence breast and lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR)=2.3, P=4.00 × 10(-4) for glioblastoma (GBM)) and IDH2:c.782G>A, p.(Arg261His) (OR=3.21, P=7.67 × 10(-3), for non-GBM). Additionally, gene burden tests revealed a statistically significant association for HARS2 and risk of GBM (P=2.20 × 10(-6)). Genome scans of low-frequency PAVs represent a complementary strategy to identify disease-causing variants compared with scans based on tagSNPs. Strategies to lessen the multiple testing burden by restricting analysis to PAVs with higher priors affords an opportunity to maximise study power.

  13. Search for new loci and low-frequency variants influencing glioma risk by exome-array analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kinnersley, Ben; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Labussière, Marianne; Wang, Yufei; Galan, Pilar; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Fleming, Sarah J; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Nöthen, Markus M; Simon, Matthias; Sanson, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    To identify protein-altering variants (PAVs) for glioma, we analysed Illumina HumanExome BeadChip exome-array data on 1882 glioma cases and 8079 controls from three independent European populations. In addition to single-variant tests we incorporated information on the predicted functional consequences of PAVs and analysed sets of genes with a higher likelihood of having a role in glioma on the basis of the profile of somatic mutations documented by large-scale sequencing initiatives. Globally there was a strong relationship between effect size and PAVs predicted to be damaging (P=2.29 × 10−49); however, these variants which are most likely to impact on risk, are rare (MAF<5%). Although no single variant showed an association which was statistically significant at the genome-wide threshold a number represented promising associations – BRCA2:c.9976A>T, p.(Lys3326Ter), which has been shown to influence breast and lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR)=2.3, P=4.00 × 10−4 for glioblastoma (GBM)) and IDH2:c.782G>A, p.(Arg261His) (OR=3.21, P=7.67 × 10−3, for non-GBM). Additionally, gene burden tests revealed a statistically significant association for HARS2 and risk of GBM (P=2.20 × 10−6). Genome scans of low-frequency PAVs represent a complementary strategy to identify disease-causing variants compared with scans based on tagSNPs. Strategies to lessen the multiple testing burden by restricting analysis to PAVs with higher priors affords an opportunity to maximise study power. PMID:26264438

  14. Genetic loci on chromosome 5 are associated with circulating levels of interleukin-5 and eosinophil count in a European population with high risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Olga; Silveira, Angela; Valdes-Marquez, Elsa; Björkbacka, Harry; Almgren, Peter; Gertow, Karl; Gådin, Jesper R; Bäcklund, Alexandra; Sennblad, Bengt; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Humphries, Steve E; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Nilsson, Jan; Melander, Olle; Hopewell, Jemma C; Clarke, Robert; Björck, Hanna M; Hamsten, Anders; Öhrvik, John; Strawbridge, Rona J

    2016-05-01

    IL-5 is a Th2 cytokine which activates eosinophils and is suggested to have an atheroprotective role. Genetic variants in the IL5 locus have been associated with increased risk of CAD and ischemic stroke. In this study we aimed to identify genetic variants associated with IL-5 concentrations and apply a Mendelian randomisation approach to assess IL-5 levels for causal effect on intima-media thickness in a European population at high risk of coronary artery disease. We analysed SNPs within robustly associated candidate loci for immune, inflammatory, metabolic and cardiovascular traits. We identified 2 genetic loci for IL-5 levels (chromosome 5, rs56183820, BETA=0.11, P=6.73E(-5) and chromosome 14, rs4902762, BETA=0.12, P=5.76E(-6)) and one for eosinophil count (rs72797327, BETA=-0.10, P=1.41E(-6)). Both chromosome 5 loci were in the vicinity of the IL5 gene, however the association with IL-5 levels failed to replicate in a meta-analysis of 2 independent cohorts (rs56183820, BETA=0.04, P=0.2763, I(2)=24, I(2)-P=0.2516). No significant associations were observed between SNPs associated with IL-5 levels or eosinophil count and IMT measures. Expression quantitative trait analyses indicate effects of the IL-5 and eosinophil-associated SNPs on RAD50 mRNA expression levels (rs12652920 (r2=0.93 with rs56183820) BETA=-0.10, P=8.64E(-6) and rs11739623 (r2=0.96 with rs72797327) BETA=-0.23, P=1.74E(-29), respectively). Our data do not support a role for IL-5 levels and eosinophil count in intima-media thickness, however SNPs associated with IL-5 and eosinophils might influence stability of the atherosclerotic plaque via modulation of RAD50 levels. PMID:26821299

  15. Genetic loci on chromosome 5 are associated with circulating levels of interleukin-5 and eosinophil count in a European population with high risk for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Olga; Silveira, Angela; Valdes-Marquez, Elsa; Björkbacka, Harry; Almgren, Peter; Gertow, Karl; Gådin, Jesper R; Bäcklund, Alexandra; Sennblad, Bengt; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Humphries, Steve E; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Nilsson, Jan; Melander, Olle; Hopewell, Jemma C; Clarke, Robert; Björck, Hanna M; Hamsten, Anders; Öhrvik, John; Strawbridge, Rona J

    2016-05-01

    IL-5 is a Th2 cytokine which activates eosinophils and is suggested to have an atheroprotective role. Genetic variants in the IL5 locus have been associated with increased risk of CAD and ischemic stroke. In this study we aimed to identify genetic variants associated with IL-5 concentrations and apply a Mendelian randomisation approach to assess IL-5 levels for causal effect on intima-media thickness in a European population at high risk of coronary artery disease. We analysed SNPs within robustly associated candidate loci for immune, inflammatory, metabolic and cardiovascular traits. We identified 2 genetic loci for IL-5 levels (chromosome 5, rs56183820, BETA=0.11, P=6.73E(-5) and chromosome 14, rs4902762, BETA=0.12, P=5.76E(-6)) and one for eosinophil count (rs72797327, BETA=-0.10, P=1.41E(-6)). Both chromosome 5 loci were in the vicinity of the IL5 gene, however the association with IL-5 levels failed to replicate in a meta-analysis of 2 independent cohorts (rs56183820, BETA=0.04, P=0.2763, I(2)=24, I(2)-P=0.2516). No significant associations were observed between SNPs associated with IL-5 levels or eosinophil count and IMT measures. Expression quantitative trait analyses indicate effects of the IL-5 and eosinophil-associated SNPs on RAD50 mRNA expression levels (rs12652920 (r2=0.93 with rs56183820) BETA=-0.10, P=8.64E(-6) and rs11739623 (r2=0.96 with rs72797327) BETA=-0.23, P=1.74E(-29), respectively). Our data do not support a role for IL-5 levels and eosinophil count in intima-media thickness, however SNPs associated with IL-5 and eosinophils might influence stability of the atherosclerotic plaque via modulation of RAD50 levels.

  16. Additional safety risk to exceptionally approved drugs in Europe?

    PubMed Central

    Arnardottir, Arna H; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M; Straus, Sabine M J; Eichler, Hans-Georg; de Graeff, Pieter A; Mol, Peter G M

    2011-01-01

    AIMS Regulatory requirements for new drugs have increased. Special approval procedures with priority assessment are possible for drugs with clear ‘unmet medical need’. We question whether these Exceptional Circumstances (EC) or Conditional Approval (CA) procedures have led to a higher probability of serious safety issues. METHODS A retrospective cohort study was performed of new drugs approved in Europe between 1999 and 2009. The determinant was EC/CA vs. standard procedure approval. Outcome variables were frequency and timing of a first Direct Healthcare Professional Communication (DHPC). An association between approval procedure and the time from market approval to DHPC was assessed using Kaplan-Meyer survival analysis and Cox-regression to correct for covariates. RESULTS In total 289 new drugs were approved. Forty-six (16.4%) were approved under EC or CA, of which seven received a DHPC (15%). This was similar to the standard approval drugs (243), of which 33 received one or more DHPC (14%, P = 0.77). The probability of acquiring a DHPC for standard approval drugs vs. EC/CA drugs during 11-year follow-up is 22% (95% CI 14%, 29%) and 26% (95% CI 8%, 44%), respectively (log-rank P = 0.726). This difference remained not significant in the Cox-regression model: hazard ratio 0.94 (95% CI 0.40, 2.20). Only drug type was identified as a confounding covariate. CONCLUSION The EC/CA procedure is not associated with a higher probability of DHPCs despite limited clinical development data. These data do not support the view that early drug approval increases the risk of serious safety issues emerging after market approval. PMID:21501215

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study of Nicotine Dependence in American Populations: Identification of Novel Risk Loci in Both African-Americans and European-Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R.; Sherva, Richard; Almasy, Laura; Herman, Aryeh I.; Koesterer, Ryan; Zhao, Hongyu; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We report a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of nicotine dependence defined on the basis of scores on the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence in European-American (EA) and African-American (AA) populations. METHODS Our sample, from the one used in our previous GWAS, included only subjects who had smoked >100 cigarettes lifetime (2114 EA and 2602 AA subjects) and an additional 927 AA and 2003 EA subjects from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment project [via the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGAP)]. GWAS analysis considered Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence score as an ordinal trait, separately in each population and sample and by combining the results in meta-analysis. We also conducted analyses that were adjusted for other substance use disorder criteria in a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) subset. RESULTS In EAs, one chromosome 7 intergenic region was genome-wide significant (GWS): rs13225753, p = 3.48 × 10−8 (adjusted). In AAs, GWS associations were observed at numerous SNPs mapped to a region on chromosome 14 of >305,000 base pairs (minimal p = 4.74 × 10−10). Two chromosome 8 regions were associated: p = 4.45 × 10−8 at DLC1 SNP rs289519 (unadjusted) and p = 1.10 × 10−9 at rs6996964 (adjusted for other substances), located between CSGALNACT1 and INTS10. No GWS associations were observed at the chromosome 15 nicotinic receptor gene cluster (CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4) previously associated with nicotine dependence and smoking quantity traits. TSNAX-DISC1 SNP rs821722 (p = 1.46 × 10−7) was the most significant result with substantial contributions from both populations; we previously identified DISC1 associations with opioid dependence. Pathway analysis identified association with nitric oxide synthase and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathways in EAs. CONCLUSIONS The key risk loci identified, which require replication, offer novel insights into nicotine dependence biology. PMID

  18. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A.; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V.; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chung, Wendy K.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C.; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gayther, Simon A.; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E.; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Knight, Julia A.; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W. M.; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L.; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M.; Muranen, Taru A.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K.; Peeters, Petra H.; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B.; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Robert A. E. M.; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Monteiro, Alvaro A. N.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  19. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-04-27

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction.

  20. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27117709

  1. Genome-wide association study and meta-analysis find that over 40 loci affect risk of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Jeffrey C; Clayton, David G; Concannon, Patrick; Akolkar, Beena; Cooper, Jason D; Erlich, Henry A; Julier, Cécile; Morahan, Grant; Nerup, Jørn; Nierras, Concepcion; Plagnol, Vincent; Pociot, Flemming; Schuilenburg, Helen; Smyth, Deborah J; Stevens, Helen; Todd, John A; Walker, Neil M; Rich, Stephen S

    2009-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a common autoimmune disorder that arises from the action of multiple genetic and environmental risk factors. We report the findings of a genome-wide association study of T1D, combined in a meta-analysis with two previously published studies. The total sample set included 7,514 cases and 9,045 reference samples. Forty-one distinct genomic locations provided evidence for association with T1D in the meta-analysis (P < 10(-6)). After excluding previously reported associations, we further tested 27 regions in an independent set of 4,267 cases, 4,463 controls and 2,319 affected sib-pair (ASP) families. Of these, 18 regions were replicated (P < 0.01; overall P < 5 × 10(-8)) and 4 additional regions provided nominal evidence of replication (P < 0.05). The many new candidate genes suggested by these results include IL10, IL19, IL20, GLIS3, CD69 and IL27. PMID:19430480

  2. Prostate cancer susceptibility loci: finding the genes.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Elanie A; Johannesson, Bo

    2008-01-01

    Studies to date suggest that PC is a genetically very heterogeneous disease. High-risk families, in which multiple men are affected likely, reflect the contributions of a number of genes, some that are rare and highly penetrant, while others are more common and weakly penetrant. In this review, we have discussed only the first type of loci, and found that the identification of such genomic regions is a formidable problem. Replication between seemingly similar data sets is weak, likely reflecting the older age of onset associated with the disease, the inability to collect affected individuals from more than two generations in a family, and the variation seen in disease presentation, in addition to the underlying locus heterogeneity. Indeed, the definition of PC is ever changing, as diagnostic criteria and tools for pinpointing early lesions improve. Are we making progress? Clearly the answer is yes. The ability to divide large data sets into homogenous subset of families likely to share common genetic under-pinnings has improved power to identify loci and reproducibility between loci is now more common. Indeed, several groups report linkage to loci on chromosomes 1, 17, 19, and 22. Key to our continued success is our ever increasing ability to understand the disease. Identifying the subset of men who are likely to get clinically significant disease is the goal of genetic studies like these, and identifying the underlying loci is the key for developing diagnostics. The willingness of the community to work together has been an important factor in the successes the community has enjoyed to date, and will likely be as important as we move forward to untangle the genetics of this complex and common disorder.

  3. Genetic loci on chromosome 5 are associated with circulating levels of interleukin-5 and eosinophil count in a European population with high risk for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Olga; Silveira, Angela; Valdes-Marquez, Elsa; Björkbacka, Harry; Almgren, Peter; Gertow, Karl; Gådin, Jesper R.; Bäcklund, Alexandra; Sennblad, Bengt; Baldassarre, Damiano; Veglia, Fabrizio; Humphries, Steve E.; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Nilsson, Jan; Melander, Olle; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Clarke, Robert; Björck, Hanna M.; Hamsten, Anders; Öhrvik, John; Strawbridge, Rona J.

    2016-01-01

    IL-5 is a Th2 cytokine which activates eosinophils and is suggested to have an atheroprotective role. Genetic variants in the IL5 locus have been associated with increased risk of CAD and ischemic stroke. In this study we aimed to identify genetic variants associated with IL-5 concentrations and apply a Mendelian randomisation approach to assess IL-5 levels for causal effect on intima-media thickness in a European population at high risk of coronary artery disease. We analysed SNPs within robustly associated candidate loci for immune, inflammatory, metabolic and cardiovascular traits. We identified 2 genetic loci for IL-5 levels (chromosome 5, rs56183820, BETA = 0.11, P = 6.73E−5 and chromosome 14, rs4902762, BETA = 0.12, P = 5.76E−6) and one for eosinophil count (rs72797327, BETA = −0.10, P = 1.41E−6). Both chromosome 5 loci were in the vicinity of the IL5 gene, however the association with IL-5 levels failed to replicate in a meta-analysis of 2 independent cohorts (rs56183820, BETA = 0.04, P = 0.2763, I2 = 24, I2 − P = 0.2516). No significant associations were observed between SNPs associated with IL-5 levels or eosinophil count and IMT measures. Expression quantitative trait analyses indicate effects of the IL-5 and eosinophil-associated SNPs on RAD50 mRNA expression levels (rs12652920 (r2 = 0.93 with rs56183820) BETA = −0.10, P = 8.64E−6 and rs11739623 (r2 = 0.96 with rs72797327) BETA = −0.23, P = 1.74E−29, respectively). Our data do not support a role for IL-5 levels and eosinophil count in intima-media thickness, however SNPs associated with IL-5 and eosinophils might influence stability of the atherosclerotic plaque via modulation of RAD50 levels. PMID:26821299

  4. Replication of five GWAS-identified loci and breast cancer risk among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women living in the Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Byers, Tim; Herrick, Jennifer S.; Wolff, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci as being associated with breast cancer in mostly European populations. We focus on TNRC9 rs3803662, FGFR2 rs1219648 and rs2981582, MAP3K1 rs889312, and 2q35 rs13387042, to replicate in the 4-Corner’s Breast Cancer Study of Hispanic (N = 565 cases and 714 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women (N = 1177 cases and 1330 controls). We evaluate associations by ethnicity, menopausal status, and tumor ER/PR status after adjusting for genetic admixture. TNRC9 AA genotype was associated with significant increased risk among NHW women (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.14, 2.08; P trend 0.003). Both polymorphisms of FGFR2 were associated with statistically significant increased risk for NHW and Hispanic women; MAP3K1 was not associated with risk among either ethnic group. The polymorphism on 2q35 was associated with a statistically significant increased risk among Hispanic women (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.08, 2.15 for the AA genotype; P trend = 0.004). Associations were significantly different among pre/peri-menopausal women for TNRC9 (P heterogeneity 0.008) and for 2q35 (P heterogeneity 0.08) for NHW and Hispanic women. Both FGFR2 polymorphisms reduced risk of ER−/PR− tumors in the presence of the minor allele among NHW women. Among Hispanic women, polymorphisms of the FGFR2 gene were associated with almost a twofold increase risk of an ER+/PR+ tumor, while non-significantly inversely associated with ER−/PR− tumors. Our data replicated some of the previously reported GWAS findings. Differences in associations were detected for NHW and Hispanic women by menopausal status and by ER/PR status of tumors. PMID:21475998

  5. Public risk perception of food additives and food scares. The case in Suzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linhai; Zhong, Yingqi; Shan, Lijie; Qin, Wei

    2013-11-01

    This study examined the factors affecting public risk perception of food additive safety and possible resulting food scares using a survey conducted in Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. The model was proposed based on literature relating to the role of risk perception and information perception of public purchase intention under food scares. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used for data analysis. The results showed that attitude towards behavior, subjective norm and information perception exerted moderate to high effect on food scares, and the effects were also mediated by risk perceptions of additive safety. Significant covariance was observed between attitudes toward behavior, subjective norm and information perception. Establishing an effective mechanism of food safety risk communication, releasing information of government supervision on food safety in a timely manner, curbing misleading media reports on public food safety risk, and enhancing public knowledge of the food additives are key to the development and implementation of food safety risk management policies by the Chinese government. PMID:23831014

  6. Public risk perception of food additives and food scares. The case in Suzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Linhai; Zhong, Yingqi; Shan, Lijie; Qin, Wei

    2013-11-01

    This study examined the factors affecting public risk perception of food additive safety and possible resulting food scares using a survey conducted in Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. The model was proposed based on literature relating to the role of risk perception and information perception of public purchase intention under food scares. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used for data analysis. The results showed that attitude towards behavior, subjective norm and information perception exerted moderate to high effect on food scares, and the effects were also mediated by risk perceptions of additive safety. Significant covariance was observed between attitudes toward behavior, subjective norm and information perception. Establishing an effective mechanism of food safety risk communication, releasing information of government supervision on food safety in a timely manner, curbing misleading media reports on public food safety risk, and enhancing public knowledge of the food additives are key to the development and implementation of food safety risk management policies by the Chinese government.

  7. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Keaton, Jacob M.; Hellwege, Jacklyn N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Pankow, James S.; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G.; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rich, Stephen S.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10−6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  8. Genome-Wide Interaction with Insulin Secretion Loci Reveals Novel Loci for Type 2 Diabetes in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Keaton, Jacob M; Hellwege, Jacklyn N; Ng, Maggie C Y; Palmer, Nicholette D; Pankow, James S; Fornage, Myriam; Wilson, James G; Correa, Adolfo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rotter, Jerome I; Chen, Yii-Der I; Taylor, Kent D; Rich, Stephen S; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Freedman, Barry I; Bowden, Donald W

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is the result of metabolic defects in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, yet most T2D loci identified to date influence insulin secretion. We hypothesized that T2D loci, particularly those affecting insulin sensitivity, can be identified through interaction with insulin secretion loci. To test this hypothesis, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg), a dynamic measure of first-phase insulin secretion, were identified in African Americans from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS; n = 492 subjects). These SNPs were tested for interaction, individually and jointly as a genetic risk score (GRS), using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from five cohorts (ARIC, CARDIA, JHS, MESA, WFSM; n = 2,725 cases, 4,167 controls) with T2D as the outcome. In single variant analyses, suggestively significant (Pinteraction<5×10-6) interactions were observed at several loci including LYPLAL1 (rs10746381), CHN2 (rs7796525), and EXOC1 (rs4289500). Notable AIRg GRS interactions were observed with SAMD4A (rs11627203) and UTRN (rs17074194). These data support the hypothesis that additional genetic factors contributing to T2D risk can be identified by interactions with insulin secretion loci. PMID:27448167

  9. Multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Guy, Michelle; Morrison, Jonathan; Severi, Gianluca; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Jhavar, Sameer; Saunders, Ed; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Muir, Kenneth R; English, Dallas R; Dearnaley, David P; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have identified multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer risk. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SNP associations across 8q24 by genotyping tag SNPs in 5,504 prostate cancer cases and 5,834 controls. We confirmed associations at three previously reported loci and identified additional loci in two other linkage disequilibrium blocks (rs1006908: per-allele OR = 0.87, P = 7.9 x 10(-8); rs620861: OR = 0.90, P = 4.8 x 10(-8)). Eight SNPs in five linkage disequilibrium blocks were independently associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. PMID:19767752

  10. Multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Guy, Michelle; Morrison, Jonathan; Severi, Gianluca; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Jhavar, Sameer; Saunders, Ed; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Muir, Kenneth R; English, Dallas R; Dearnaley, David P; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Neal, David E; Eeles, Rosalind A; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have identified multiple loci on 8q24 associated with prostate cancer risk. We performed a comprehensive analysis of SNP associations across 8q24 by genotyping tag SNPs in 5,504 prostate cancer cases and 5,834 controls. We confirmed associations at three previously reported loci and identified additional loci in two other linkage disequilibrium blocks (rs1006908: per-allele OR = 0.87, P = 7.9 x 10(-8); rs620861: OR = 0.90, P = 4.8 x 10(-8)). Eight SNPs in five linkage disequilibrium blocks were independently associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

  11. Towards internationally acceptable standards for food additives and contaminants based on the use of risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Huggett, A; Petersen, B J; Walker, R; Fisher, C E; Notermans, S H; Rombouts, F M; Abbott, P; Debackere, M; Hathaway, S C; Hecker, E F; Knaap, A G; Kuznesof, P M; Meyland, I; Moy, G; Narbonne, J F; Paakkanen, J; Smith, M R; Tennant, D; Wagstaffe, P; Wargo, J; Würtzen, G

    1998-06-01

    Internationally acceptable norms need to incorporate sound science and consistent risk management principles in an open and transparent manner, as set out in the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the SPS Agreement). The process of risk analysis provides a procedure to reach these goals. The interaction between risk assessors and risk managers is considered vital to this procedure. This paper reports the outcome of a meeting of risk assessors and risk managers on specific aspects of risk analysis and its application to international standard setting for food additives and contaminants. Case studies on aflatoxins and aspartame were used to identify the key steps of the interaction process which ensure scientific justification for risk management decisions. A series of recommendations were proposed in order to enhance the scientific transparency in these critical phases of the standard setting procedure.

  12. Expression Quantitative Trait Loci for CARD8 Contributes to Risk of Two Infection-Related Cancers—Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Dong; Han, Jing; Jiang, Jie; Song, Ci; Liu, Yao; Liu, Jibin; Liu, Li; Zhu, Liguo; Chen, Jianguo; Zhai, Xiangjun; Xie, Shuanghua; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Dai, Min; Li, Ni

    2015-01-01

    Caspase recruitment domain family, member 8 (CARD8) can coordinate innate and adaptive immune responses and sensitize cells to apoptosis, which may participate in tumorigenesis of virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cervical cancer. By bioinformatics analyses, we identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a new identified long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for CARD8. In this study, we therefore hypothesized that CARD8 eQTLs SNPs within lncRNA may influence the risk of HCC and cervical cancer. We performed two independent case-control studies of 1,300 cases with HBV-positive HCC and 1,344 normal controls, together with 1,486 cervical cancer patients and 1,536 control subjects to test the association between eQTLs SNP (rs7248320) for CARD8 and the risk of HCC and cervical cancer. The variant genotype of rs7248320 was significantly associated with increased risk of HCC and cervical cancer [GG vs. AA/GA: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03–1.61, P = 0.028 for HCC; adjusted OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.09–1.66, P = 0.006 for cervical cancer]. Moreover, the effect of rs7248320 on cervical cancer risk was more prominent in premenopausal women. Further interactive analysis detected a significantly multiplicative interaction between rs7248320 and menopausal status on cervical cancer risk (P = 0.018). These findings suggest that CARD8 eQTLs SNP may serve as a susceptibility marker for virus-related HCC and cervical cancer. PMID:26147888

  13. Meta-analysis of loci associated with age at natural menopause in African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Christina T.L.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Chen, Gary K.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Arnold, Alice M.; Dreyfus, Jill; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa E.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Li, Guo; Lohman, Kurt K.; Musani, Solomon K.; Nalls, Michael A.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Smith, Jennifer; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Brzyski, Robert G.; Cappola, Anne; Carlson, Christopher S.; Couper, David; Deming, Sandra L.; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Heiss, Gerardo; John, Esther M.; Lu, Xiaoning; Le Marchand, Loic; Marciante, Kristin; Mcknight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert; Nock, Nora L.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Press, Michael F.; Vaiyda, Dhananjay; Woods, Nancy F.; Taylor, Herman A.; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Evans, Michele K.; Harris, Tamara B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Kooperberg, Charles; Liu, Yongmei; Mosley, Thomas H.; Psaty, Bruce; Wellons, Melissa; Windham, Beverly G.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Demerath, Ellen W.; Haiman, Christopher; Murabito, Joanne M.; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Age at menopause marks the end of a woman's reproductive life and its timing associates with risks for cancer, cardiovascular and bone disorders. GWAS and candidate gene studies conducted in women of European ancestry have identified 27 loci associated with age at menopause. The relevance of these loci to women of African ancestry has not been previously studied. We therefore sought to uncover additional menopause loci and investigate the relevance of European menopause loci by performing a GWAS meta-analysis in 6510 women with African ancestry derived from 11 studies across the USA. We did not identify any additional loci significantly associated with age at menopause in African Americans. We replicated the associations between six loci and age at menopause (P-value < 0.05): AMHR2, RHBLD2, PRIM1, HK3/UMC1, BRSK1/TMEM150B and MCM8. In addition, associations of 14 loci are directionally consistent with previous reports. We provide evidence that genetic variants influencing reproductive traits identified in European populations are also important in women of African ancestry residing in USA. PMID:24493794

  14. Meta-analysis of loci associated with age at natural menopause in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Chen, Christina T L; Liu, Ching-Ti; Chen, Gary K; Andrews, Jeanette S; Arnold, Alice M; Dreyfus, Jill; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa E; Kerr, Kathleen F; Li, Guo; Lohman, Kurt K; Musani, Solomon K; Nalls, Michael A; Raffel, Leslie J; Smith, Jennifer; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Brzyski, Robert G; Cappola, Anne; Carlson, Christopher S; Couper, David; Deming, Sandra L; Goodarzi, Mark O; Heiss, Gerardo; John, Esther M; Lu, Xiaoning; Le Marchand, Loic; Marciante, Kristin; Mcknight, Barbara; Millikan, Robert; Nock, Nora L; Olshan, Andrew F; Press, Michael F; Vaiyda, Dhananjay; Woods, Nancy F; Taylor, Herman A; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Evans, Michele K; Harris, Tamara B; Henderson, Brian E; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kooperberg, Charles; Liu, Yongmei; Mosley, Thomas H; Psaty, Bruce; Wellons, Melissa; Windham, Beverly G; Zonderman, Alan B; Cupples, L Adrienne; Demerath, Ellen W; Haiman, Christopher; Murabito, Joanne M; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-06-15

    Age at menopause marks the end of a woman's reproductive life and its timing associates with risks for cancer, cardiovascular and bone disorders. GWAS and candidate gene studies conducted in women of European ancestry have identified 27 loci associated with age at menopause. The relevance of these loci to women of African ancestry has not been previously studied. We therefore sought to uncover additional menopause loci and investigate the relevance of European menopause loci by performing a GWAS meta-analysis in 6510 women with African ancestry derived from 11 studies across the USA. We did not identify any additional loci significantly associated with age at menopause in African Americans. We replicated the associations between six loci and age at menopause (P-value < 0.05): AMHR2, RHBLD2, PRIM1, HK3/UMC1, BRSK1/TMEM150B and MCM8. In addition, associations of 14 loci are directionally consistent with previous reports. We provide evidence that genetic variants influencing reproductive traits identified in European populations are also important in women of African ancestry residing in USA.

  15. Extracting additional risk managers information from a risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes in deli meats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, F; van Asselt, E D; Garcia-Gimeno, R M; Zurera, G; Zwietering, M H

    2007-05-01

    The risk assessment study of Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat foods conducted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is an example of an extensive quantitative microbiological risk assessment that could be used by risk analysts and other scientists to obtain information and by managers and stakeholders to make decisions on food safety management. The present study was conducted to investigate how detailed sensitivity analysis can be used by assessors to extract more information on risk factors and how results can be communicated to managers and stakeholders in an understandable way. The extended sensitivity analysis revealed that the extremes at the right side of the dose distribution (at consumption, 9 to 11.5 log CFU per serving) were responsible for most of the cases of listeriosis simulated. For concentration at retail, values below the detection limit of 0.04 CFU/g and the often used limit for L. monocytogenes of 100 CFU/g (also at retail) were associated with a high number of annual cases of listeriosis (about 29 and 82%, respectively). This association can be explained by growth of L. monocytogenes at both average and extreme values of temperature and time, indicating that a wide distribution can lead to high risk levels. Another finding is the importance of the maximal population density (i.e., the maximum concentration of L. monocytogenes assumed at a certain temperature) for accurately estimating the risk of infection by opportunistic pathogens such as L. monocytogenes. According to the obtained results, mainly concentrations corresponding to the highest maximal population densities caused risk in the simulation. However, sensitivity analysis applied to the uncertainty parameters revealed that prevalence at retail was the most important source of uncertainty in the model.

  16. Common Variants at 9q22.33, 14q13.3, and ATM Loci, and Risk of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in the French Polynesian Population

    PubMed Central

    Maillard, Stéphane; Damiola, Francesca; Clero, Enora; Pertesi, Maroulio; Robinot, Nivonirina; Rachédi, Frédérique; Boissin, Jean-Louis; Sebbag, Joseph; Shan, Larrys; Bost-Bezeaud, Frédérique; Petitdidier, Patrick; Doyon, Françoise; Xhaard, Constance; Rubino, Carole; Blanché, Hélène; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Lesueur, Fabienne; de Vathaire, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Background French Polynesia has one of the highest incidence rates of thyroid cancer worldwide. Relationships with the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests and other environmental, biological, or behavioral factors have already been reported, but genetic susceptibility has yet to be investigated. We assessed the contribution of polymorphisms at the 9q22.33 and 14q13.3 loci identified by GWAS, and within the DNA repair gene ATM, to the risk of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) in 177 cases and 275 matched controls from the native population. Principal Findings For the GWAS SNP rs965513 near FOXE1, an association was found between genotypes G/A and A/A, and risk of DTC. A multiplicative effect of allele A was even noted. An excess risk was also observed in individuals carrying two long alleles of the poly-alanine tract expansion in FOXE1, while no association was observed with rs1867277 falling in the promoter region of the gene. In contrast, the GWAS SNP rs944289 (NKX2-1) did not show any significant association. Although the missense substitution D1853N (rs1801516) in ATM was rare in the population, carriers of the minor allele (A) also showed an excess risk. The relationships between these five polymorphisms and the risk of DTC were not contingent on the body surface area, body mass index, ethnicity or dietary iodine intake. However, an interaction was evidenced between the thyroid radiation dose and rs944289. Significance A clear link could not be established between the high incidence in French Polynesia and the studied polymorphisms, involved in susceptibility to DTC in other populations. Important variation in allele frequencies was observed in the Polynesian population as compared to the European populations. For FOXE1 rs965513, the direction of association and the effect size was similar to that observed in other populations, whereas for ATM rs1801516, the minor allele was associated to an increased risk in the Polynesian population and with a decreased risk

  17. Are major behavioral and sociodemographic risk factors for mortality additive or multiplicative in their effects?

    PubMed

    Mehta, Neil; Preston, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    All individuals are subject to multiple risk factors for mortality. In this paper, we consider the nature of interactions between certain major sociodemographic and behavioral risk factors associated with all-cause mortality in the United States. We develop the formal logic pertaining to two forms of interaction between risk factors, additive and multiplicative relations. We then consider the general circumstances in which additive or multiplicative relations might be expected. We argue that expectations about interactions among socio-demographic variables, and their relation to behavioral variables, have been stated in terms of additivity. However, the statistical models typically used to estimate the relation between risk factors and mortality assume that risk factors act multiplicatively. We examine empirically the nature of interactions among five major risk factors associated with all-cause mortality: smoking, obesity, race, sex, and educational attainment. Data were drawn from the cross-sectional NHANES III (1988-1994) and NHANES 1999-2010 surveys, linked to death records through December 31, 2011. Our analytic sample comprised 35,604 respondents and 5369 deaths. We find that obesity is additive with each of the remaining four variables. We speculate that its additivity is a reflection of the fact that obese status is generally achieved later in life. For all pairings of socio-demographic variables, risks are multiplicative. For survival chances, it is much more dangerous to be poorly educated if you are black or if you are male. And it is much riskier to be a male if you are black. These traits, established at birth or during childhood, literally result in deadly combinations. We conclude that the identification of interactions among risk factors can cast valuable light on the nature of the process being studied. It also has public health implications by identifying especially vulnerable groups and by properly identifying the proportion of deaths

  18. "The Dose Makes the Poison": Informing Consumers About the Scientific Risk Assessment of Food Additives.

    PubMed

    Bearth, Angela; Cousin, Marie-Eve; Siegrist, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intensive risk assessment is required before the approval of food additives. During this process, based on the toxicological principle of "the dose makes the poison,ˮ maximum usage doses are assessed. However, most consumers are not aware of these efforts to ensure the safety of food additives and are therefore sceptical, even though food additives bring certain benefits to consumers. This study investigated the effect of a short video, which explains the scientific risk assessment and regulation of food additives, on consumers' perceptions and acceptance of food additives. The primary goal of this study was to inform consumers and enable them to construct their own risk-benefit assessment and make informed decisions about food additives. The secondary goal was to investigate whether people have different perceptions of food additives of artificial (i.e., aspartame) or natural origin (i.e., steviolglycoside). To attain these research goals, an online experiment was conducted on 185 Swiss consumers. Participants were randomly assigned to either the experimental group, which was shown a video about the scientific risk assessment of food additives, or the control group, which was shown a video about a topic irrelevant to the study. After watching the video, the respondents knew significantly more, expressed more positive thoughts and feelings, had less risk perception, and more acceptance than prior to watching the video. Thus, it appears that informing consumers about complex food safety topics, such as the scientific risk assessment of food additives, is possible, and using a carefully developed information video is a successful strategy for informing consumers. PMID:25951078

  19. "The Dose Makes the Poison": Informing Consumers About the Scientific Risk Assessment of Food Additives.

    PubMed

    Bearth, Angela; Cousin, Marie-Eve; Siegrist, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Intensive risk assessment is required before the approval of food additives. During this process, based on the toxicological principle of "the dose makes the poison,ˮ maximum usage doses are assessed. However, most consumers are not aware of these efforts to ensure the safety of food additives and are therefore sceptical, even though food additives bring certain benefits to consumers. This study investigated the effect of a short video, which explains the scientific risk assessment and regulation of food additives, on consumers' perceptions and acceptance of food additives. The primary goal of this study was to inform consumers and enable them to construct their own risk-benefit assessment and make informed decisions about food additives. The secondary goal was to investigate whether people have different perceptions of food additives of artificial (i.e., aspartame) or natural origin (i.e., steviolglycoside). To attain these research goals, an online experiment was conducted on 185 Swiss consumers. Participants were randomly assigned to either the experimental group, which was shown a video about the scientific risk assessment of food additives, or the control group, which was shown a video about a topic irrelevant to the study. After watching the video, the respondents knew significantly more, expressed more positive thoughts and feelings, had less risk perception, and more acceptance than prior to watching the video. Thus, it appears that informing consumers about complex food safety topics, such as the scientific risk assessment of food additives, is possible, and using a carefully developed information video is a successful strategy for informing consumers.

  20. Fine-mapping identifies multiple prostate cancer risk loci at 5p15, one of which associates with TERT expression

    PubMed Central

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Saunders, Edward J.; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Dadaev, Tokhir; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Ross-Adams, Helen; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Benlloch, Sara; Halim, Silvia; Russel, Roslin; Dunning, Alison M.; Luccarini, Craig; Dennis, Joe; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Muir, Ken; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen; Berndt, Sonja I.; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Campa, Daniele; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Pharoah, Paul; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Schaid, Dan; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Kibel, Adam S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y.; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith A.; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Morgan, Angela; Dicks, Ed; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Bojesen, Stig E.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier, Daniel C.; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2013-01-01

    Associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 5p15 and multiple cancer types have been reported. We have previously shown evidence for a strong association between prostate cancer (PrCa) risk and rs2242652 at 5p15, intronic in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene that encodes TERT. To comprehensively evaluate the association between genetic variation across this region and PrCa, we performed a fine-mapping analysis by genotyping 134 SNPs using a custom Illumina iSelect array or Sequenom MassArray iPlex, followed by imputation of 1094 SNPs in 22 301 PrCa cases and 22 320 controls in The PRACTICAL consortium. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis identified four signals in the promoter or intronic regions of TERT that independently associated with PrCa risk. Gene expression analysis of normal prostate tissue showed evidence that SNPs within one of these regions also associated with TERT expression, providing a potential mechanism for predisposition to disease. PMID:23535824

  1. Inverse relationship between a genetic risk score of 31 BMI loci and weight change before and after reaching middle age

    PubMed Central

    Rukh, G; Ahmad, S; Ericson, U; Hindy, G; Stocks, T; Renström, F; Almgren, P; Nilsson, P M; Melander, O; Franks, P W; Orho-Melander, M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: Genome-wide-association studies have identified numerous body mass index (BMI)-associated variants, but it is unclear how these relate to weight gain in adults at different ages. Methods: We examined the association of a genetic risk score (GRS), consisting of 31 BMI-associated variants, with an annual weight change (AWC) and a substantial weight gain (SWG) of 10% by comparing self-reported weight at 20 years (y) with baseline weight (mean: 58 y; s.d.: 8 y) in 21407 participants from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS), and comparing baseline weight to weight at follow-up (mean: 73 y; s.d.: 6 y) among 2673 participants. Association between GRS and AWG and SWG was replicated in 4327 GLACIER (Gene x Lifestyle interactions And Complex traits Involved in Elevated disease Risk) participants (mean: 45 y; s.d.: 7 y) with 10 y follow-up. Cohort-specific results were pooled by fixed-effect meta-analyses. Results: In MDCS, the GRS was associated with increased AWC (β: 0.003; s.e: 0.01; P: 7 × 10−8) and increased odds for SWG (odds ratio (OR) 1.01 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00, 1.02); P: 0.013) per risk-allele from age 20y, but unexpectedly with decreased AWC (β: −0.006; s.e: 0.002; P: 0.009) and decreased odds for SWG OR 0.96 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.98); P: 0.001) between baseline and follow-up. Effect estimates from age 20 y to baseline differed significantly from those from baseline to follow-up (P: 0.0002 for AWC and P: 0.0001 for SWG). Similar to MDCS, the GRS was associated with decreased odds for SWG OR 0.98 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.00); P: 0.029) from baseline to follow-up in GLACIER. In meta-analyses (n=7000), the GRS was associated with decreased AWC (β: −0.005; s.e.m. 0.002; P: 0.002) and decreased odds for SWG OR 0.97 (95% CI: 0.96, 0.99); P: 0.001) per risk-allele. Conclusions: Our results provide convincing evidence for a paradoxical inversed relationship between a high number of BMI-associated risk-alleles and less

  2. Targeted resequencing of regulatory regions at schizophrenia risk loci: Role of rare functional variants at chromatin repressive states.

    PubMed

    González-Peñas, Javier; Amigo, Jorge; Santomé, Luis; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Páramo, Mario; Carracedo, Ángel; Arrojo, Manuel; Costas, Javier

    2016-07-01

    There is mounting evidence that regulatory variation plays an important role in genetic risk for schizophrenia. Here, we specifically search for regulatory variants at risk by sequencing promoter regions of twenty-three genes implied in schizophrenia by copy number variant or genome-wide association studies. After strict quality control, a total of 55,206bp per sample were analyzed in 526 schizophrenia cases and 516 controls from Galicia, NW Spain, using the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System. Variants were filtered based on frequency from public databases, chromatin states from the RoadMap Epigenomics Consortium at tissues relevant for schizophrenia, such as fetal brain, mid-frontal lobe, and angular gyrus, and prediction of functionality from RegulomeDB. The proportion of rare variants at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues was higher in cases than in controls. The proportion of rare variants with predicted regulatory role was significantly higher in cases than in controls (P=0.0028, OR=1.93, 95% C.I.=1.23-3.04). Combination of information from both sources led to the identification of an excess of carriers of rare variants with predicted regulatory role located at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues in cases versus controls (P=0.0016, OR=19.34, 95% C.I.=2.45-2495.26). The variants are located at two genes affected by the 17q12 copy number variant, LHX1 and HNF1B. These data strongly suggest that a specific epigenetic mechanism, chromatin remodeling by histone modification during early development, may be impaired in a subset of schizophrenia patients, in agreement with previous data. PMID:27066855

  3. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) polymorphism among ethnic groups in Singapore with report of additional alleles at loci 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, S P; Saha, N; Wee, K P

    1989-04-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST; E.C.2.5.1.18) were phenotyped by starch gel electrophoresis in post-mortem liver samples from 683 unrelated subjects of both sexes. 305 were Chinese, 185 Indians, 147 Malays and 46 from other racial groups of South-East Asia. GST1 and GST2 were found to be polymorphic in these populations. Additional alleles (GST1*3 and GST2*O) were observed at low frequency in all the ethnic groups. The frequency of GST1*1 was lower and that of GST1*2 was higher in Indians and Malays as compared to Chinese. GST1*0 and GST1*3 frequencies were similar in all these ethnic groups. The gene frequencies of the alleles of the GST2 locus varied significantly in the population studied. GST2*0 frequency was significantly higher in Indians than in Chinese and Malays, while the lowest frequency of GST2*1 was found in the Indians. GST2*2 frequency was higher in the Malays than in Chinese and Indians. GST1 and GST2 phenotype distributions were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all the ethnic groups studied. Sex made no significant difference in the phenotype distribution.

  4. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention. PMID:26068647

  5. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-01-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  6. Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

    2012-09-01

    Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

  7. DNA methylation of loci within ABCG1 and PHOSPHO1 in blood DNA is associated with future type 2 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Tasnim; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Almgren, Peter; Perfilyev, Alexander; Jansson, Per-Anders; de Mello, Vanessa D; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Vaag, Allan; Groop, Leif; Nilsson, Emma; Ling, Charlotte

    2016-07-01

    Identification of subjects with a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) is fundamental for prevention of the disease. Consequently, it is essential to search for new biomarkers that can improve the prediction of T2D. The aim of this study was to examine whether 5 DNA methylation loci in blood DNA (ABCG1, PHOSPHO1, SOCS3, SREBF1, and TXNIP), recently reported to be associated with T2D, might predict future T2D in subjects from the Botnia prospective study. We also tested if these CpG sites exhibit altered DNA methylation in human pancreatic islets, liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle from diabetic vs. non-diabetic subjects. DNA methylation at the ABCG1 locus cg06500161 in blood DNA was associated with an increased risk for future T2D (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02-1.16, P-value = 0.007, Q-value = 0.018), while DNA methylation at the PHOSPHO1 locus cg02650017 in blood DNA was associated with a decreased risk for future T2D (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.75-0.95, P-value = 0.006, Q-value = 0.018) after adjustment for age, gender, fasting glucose, and family relation. Furthermore, the level of DNA methylation at the ABCG1 locus cg06500161 in blood DNA correlated positively with BMI, HbA1c, fasting insulin, and triglyceride levels, and was increased in adipose tissue and blood from the diabetic twin among monozygotic twin pairs discordant for T2D. DNA methylation at the PHOSPHO1 locus cg02650017 in blood correlated positively with HDL levels, and was decreased in skeletal muscle from diabetic vs. non-diabetic monozygotic twins. DNA methylation of cg18181703 (SOCS3), cg11024682 (SREBF1), and cg19693031 (TXNIP) was not associated with future T2D risk in subjects from the Botnia prospective study. PMID:27148772

  8. High-density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert M; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Using the Immunochip custom SNP array, which was designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed 11,475 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. We combined these data in a meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n = 2,363) and controls (n = 17,872). We identified 14 new susceptibility loci, 9 of which were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and five of which were specifically associated with disease that was positive for anticitrullinated peptide antibodies, bringing the number of confirmed rheumatoid arthritis risk loci in individuals of European ancestry to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at 6 loci and identified association to low-frequency variants at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analyses generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations.

  9. High-density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert M; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Using the Immunochip custom SNP array, which was designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed 11,475 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. We combined these data in a meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n = 2,363) and controls (n = 17,872). We identified 14 new susceptibility loci, 9 of which were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and five of which were specifically associated with disease that was positive for anticitrullinated peptide antibodies, bringing the number of confirmed rheumatoid arthritis risk loci in individuals of European ancestry to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at 6 loci and identified association to low-frequency variants at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analyses generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  10. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    PubMed Central

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O’Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Åsa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate–increasing and heart rate–decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  11. Large-scale association analyses identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Schunkert, Heribert; König, Inke R.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Holm, Hilma; Preuss, Michael; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Barbalic, Maja; Gieger, Christian; Absher, Devin; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Allayee, Hooman; Altshuler, David; Anand, Sonia S.; Andersen, Karl; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Ardissino, Diego; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Timothy A.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Berger, Klaus; Bis, Joshua C.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnett, Mary Susan; Buysschaert, Ian; Carlquist, Cardiogenics, John F.; Chen, Li; Cichon, Sven; Codd, Veryan; Davies, Robert W.; Dedoussis, George; Dehghan, Abbas; Demissie, Serkalem; Devaney, Joseph M.; Do, Ron; Doering, Angela; Eifert, Sandra; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Ellis, Stephen G.; Elosua, Roberto; Engert, James C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faire, Ulf de; Fischer, Marcus; Folsom, Aaron R.; Freyer, Jennifer; Gigante, Bruna; Girelli, Domenico; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Halperin, Eran; Hammond, Naomi; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hofman, Albert; Horne, Benjamin D.; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jones, Gregory T.; Jukema, J.Wouter; Kaiser, Michael A.; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kong, Augustine; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lambrechts, Diether; Leander, Karin; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Mingyao; Lieb, Wolfgang; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Lotery, Andrew J.; Mannucci, Pier M.; Maouche, Seraya; Martinelli, Nicola; McKeown, Pascal P.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Mooser, Vincent; Morgan, Thomas; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Muhlestein, Joseph B.; Münzel, Thomas; Musunuru, Kiran; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Patel, Riyaz S.; Patterson, Chris C.; Peters, Annette; Peyvandi, Flora; Qu, Liming; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Rice, Catherine; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rubin, Diana; Salomaa, Veikko; Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Sandhu, Manj S.; Schadt, Eric; Schäfer, Arne; Schillert, Arne; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Sivananthan, Mohan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Smith, Albert; Smith, Tamara B.; Snoep, Jaapjan D.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spertus, John A.; Stark, Klaus; Stirrups, Kathy; Stoll, Monika; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Rij, Andre M.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wareham, Nick J.; Wells, George A.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Willenborg, Christina; Witteman, Jaqueline C. M.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Ye, Shu; Zeller, Tanja; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison H.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Quertermous, Thomas; März, Winfried; Hengstenberg, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Hall, Alistair S.; Deloukas, Panos; Thompson, John R.; Stefansson, Kari; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 cases and 64,762 controls of European descent, followed by genotyping of top association signals in 60,738 additional individuals. This genomic analysis identified 13 novel loci harboring one or more SNPs that were associated with CAD at P<5×10−8 and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 novel loci displayed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6 to 17 percent increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the novel loci displayed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors, while the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the novel CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits. PMID:21378990

  12. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    PubMed Central

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; van Heel, David A; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Núñez, Concepcion; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M; Ivarsson, Anneli; Boezen, H Marieke; Liu, Edwin; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible variants to common HLA testing. Design We developed an average weighted genetic risk score with 10, 26 and 57 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2675 cases and 2815 controls and assessed the improvement in risk prediction provided by the non-HLA SNP. Moreover, we assessed the transferability of the genetic risk model with 26 non-HLA variants to a nested case–control population (n=1709) and a prospective cohort (n=1245) and then tested how well this model predicted CD outcome for 985 independent individuals. Results Adding 57 non-HLA variants to HLA testing showed a statistically significant improvement compared to scores from models based on HLA only, HLA plus 10 SNP and HLA plus 26 SNP. With 57 non-HLA variants, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve reached 0.854 compared to 0.823 for HLA only, and 11.1% of individuals were reclassified to a more accurate risk group. We show that the risk model with HLA plus 26 SNP is useful in independent populations. Conclusions Predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improved the identification of potential CD patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for CD. PMID:23704318

  13. Possible effects of protracted exposure on the additivity of risks from space radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. B.

    1996-01-01

    Conventional radiation risk assessments are presently based on the additivity assumption. This assumption states that risks from individual components of a complex radiation field involving many different types of radiation can be added to yield the total risk of the complex radiation field. If the assumption is not correct, the summations and integrations performed to obtain the presently quoted risk estimates are not appropriate. This problem is particularly important in the area of space radiation risk evaluation because of the many different types of high- and low-LET radiation present in the galactic cosmic ray environment. For both low- and high-LET radiations at low enough dose rates, the present convention is that the addivity assumption holds. Mathematically, the total risk, Rtot is assumed to be Rtot = summation (i) Ri where the summation runs over the different types of radiation present. If the total dose (or fluence) from each component is such that the interaction between biological lesions caused by separate single track traversals is negligible within a given cell, it is presently considered to be reasonable to accept the additivity assumption. However, when the exposure is protracted over many cell doubling times (as will be the case for extended missions to the moon or Mars), the possibility exists that radiation effects that depend on multiple cellular events over a long time period, such as is probably the case in radiation-induced carcinogenesis, may not be additive in the above sense and the exposure interval may have to be included in the evaluation procedure. It is shown, however, that "inverse" dose-rate effects are not expected from intermediate LET radiations arising from the galactic cosmic ray environment due to the "sensitive-window-in-the-cell-cycle" hypothesis.

  14. Overlap of disease susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, Anne; Eyre, Steve; Ke, Xiayi; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Packham, Jon; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been extremely successful in the search for susceptibility risk factors for complex genetic autoimmune diseases. As more studies are published, evidence is emerging of considerable overlap of loci between these diseases. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), another complex genetic autoimmune disease, the strategy of using information from autoimmune disease GWAS or candidate gene studies to help in the search for novel JIA susceptibility loci has been successful, with confirmed association with two genes, PTPN22 and IL2RA. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that shares similar clinical and pathological features with JIA and, therefore, recently identified confirmed RA susceptibility loci are also excellent JIA candidate loci. Objective To determine the overlap of disease susceptibility loci for RA and JIA. Methods Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at nine RA-associated loci were genotyped in Caucasian patients with JIA (n=1054) and controls (n=3531) and tested for association with JIA. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between cases and controls using the genetic analysis software, PLINK. Results Two JIA susceptibility loci were identified, one of which was a novel JIA association (STAT4) and the second confirmed previously published associations of the TRAF1/C5 locus with JIA. Weak evidence of association of JIA with three additional loci (Chr6q23, KIF5A and PRKCQ) was also obtained, which warrants further investigation. Conclusion All these loci are good candidates in view of the known pathogenesis of JIA, as genes within these regions (TRAF1, STAT4, TNFAIP3, PRKCQ) are known to be involved in T-cell receptor signalling or activation pathways. PMID:19674979

  15. Immunochip analysis identifies multiple susceptibility loci for systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mayes, Maureen D; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K; Arnett, Frank C; Reveille, John D; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K; Lee, Annette T; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H W; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Schuerwegh, Annemie J; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M; Hummers, Laura K; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E; Furst, Daniel E; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M; Molitor, Jerry A; Silver, Richard M; Steen, Virginia D; Simms, Robert W; Lafyatis, Robert A; Fessler, Barri J; Frech, Tracy M; Alkassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R D J; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci.

  16. Immunochip Analysis Identifies Multiple Susceptibility Loci for Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, Maureen D.; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Gorlova, Olga; Martin, José Ezequiel; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Wei V.; Assassi, Shervin; Ying, Jun; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Reveille, John D.; Guerra, Sandra; Teruel, María; Carmona, Francisco David; Gregersen, Peter K.; Lee, Annette T.; López-Isac, Elena; Ochoa, Eguzkine; Carreira, Patricia; Simeón, Carmen Pilar; Castellví, Iván; González-Gay, Miguel Ángel; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos, Raquel; Callejas, José Luis; Navarrete, Nuria; García Portales, Rosa; Camps, María Teresa; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; González-Escribano, María F.; Sánchez-Román, Julio; García-Hernández, Francisco José; Castillo, María Jesús; Aguirre, María Ángeles; Gómez-Gracia, Inmaculada; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Vicente, Esther; Andreu, José Luis; Fernández de Castro, Mónica; García de la Peña, Paloma; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Martínez, Lina; Fonollosa, Vicente; Espinosa, Gerard; Tolosa, Carlos; Pros, Anna; Rodríguez Carballeira, Mónica; Narváez, Francisco Javier; Rubio Rivas, Manel; Ortiz Santamaría, Vera; Díaz, Bernardino; Trapiella, Luis; Freire, María del Carmen; Sousa, Adrián; Egurbide, María Victoria; Fanlo Mateo, Patricia; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Díaz, Federico; Hernández, Vanesa; Beltrán, Emma; Román-Ivorra, José Andrés; Grau, Elena; Alegre Sancho, Juan José; Blanco García, Francisco J.; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernández Sueiro, Luis; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Padyukov, Leonid; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Brown, Matthew; Beretta, Lorenzo; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Witte, Torsten; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Kreuter, Alexander; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; Hesselstrand, Roger; Nordin, Annika; Airó, Paolo; Lunardi, Claudio; Shiels, Paul; van Laar, Jacob M.; Herrick, Ariane; Worthington, Jane; Denton, Christopher; Wigley, Fredrick M.; Hummers, Laura K.; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Baron, Murray; Hudson, Marie; Pope, Janet E.; Furst, Daniel E.; Khanna, Dinesh; Phillips, Kristin; Schiopu, Elena; Segal, Barbara M.; Molitor, Jerry A.; Silver, Richard M.; Steen, Virginia D.; Simms, Robert W.; Lafyatis, Robert A.; Fessler, Barri J.; Frech, Tracy M.; AlKassab, Firas; Docherty, Peter; Kaminska, Elzbieta; Khalidi, Nader; Jones, Henry Niall; Markland, Janet; Robinson, David; Broen, Jasper; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Fonseca, Carmen; Koeleman, Bobby P.; Martin, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci. PMID:24387989

  17. Assessing the additive risks of PSII herbicide exposure to the Great Barrier Reef.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephen E; Schaffelke, Britta; Shaw, Melanie; Bainbridge, Zoë T; Rohde, Ken W; Kennedy, Karen; Davis, Aaron M; Masters, Bronwyn L; Devlin, Michelle J; Mueller, Jochen F; Brodie, Jon E

    2012-01-01

    Herbicide residues have been measured in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon at concentrations which have the potential to harm marine plant communities. Monitoring on the Great Barrier Reef lagoon following wet season discharge show that 80% of the time when herbicides are detected, more than one are present. These herbicides have been shown to act in an additive manner with regards to photosystem-II inhibition. In this study, the area of the Great Barrier Reef considered to be at risk from herbicides is compared when exposures are considered for each herbicide individually and also for herbicide mixtures. Two normalisation indices for herbicide mixtures were calculated based on current guidelines and PSII inhibition thresholds. The results show that the area of risk for most regions is greatly increased under the proposed additive PSII inhibition threshold and that the resilience of this important ecosystem could be reduced by exposure to these herbicides.

  18. Risk assessment of combined photogenotoxic effects of sunlight and food additives.

    PubMed

    Salih, Fadhil M

    2006-06-01

    The presence of flavored colorants (peach and raspberry), flavors (caramel, citric acid and vanilla) and food preservatives (sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate, sodium benzoate, benzoic acid, potassium sorbate and sodium chloride) in Escherichia coli suspension during exposure to sunlight did not change the extent of cell survival. No effect on viability and mutation induction (kanamycin resistant) was also seen when cells were kept in contact with any of the additives for 80 min in the dark. However, when the relevant additive was present in cell suspension during sunlight exposure the number of induced mutations was increased to varying extents over that seen with sunlight alone. Raspberry and peach increased the number of mutations in a dose dependent manner, while vanilla produced mutations in an additive fashion. Nitrite, nitrate, benzoate, sorbate and benzoic acid increased mutation somewhat additively over that of sunlight. Sodium chloride and citric acid were not effective. The impact of this investigation reflects the significance of combination of sunlight and chemical food additives as potential risk, which requires special attention and necessitates further investigations to evaluate the risk.

  19. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C; Sampson, Joshua N; Hoskins, Jason W; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S; Abnet, Christian C; Adjei, Andrew A; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Berg, Christine D; Berndt, Sonja I; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Chu, Lisa W; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A; Colt, Joanne S; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B; Cortessis, Victoria K; Crawford, E David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W Ryan; Duell, Eric J; Elena, Joanne W; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fridley, Brooke L; Fuchs, Charles S; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gaziano, J Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S; Giffen, Carol A; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Harris, Curtis C; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J; Inskip, Peter D; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Meltzer, Paul S; Mensah, James E; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S; Mondul, Alison M; Moore, Lee E; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Stram, Daniel O; Strom, Sara S; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Toro, Jorge R; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2014-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.

  20. C9orf72 and UNC13A are shared risk loci for ALS and FTD: a genome-wide meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Diekstra, Frank P.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; van Swieten, John C.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Ludolph, Albert C.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Hardiman, Orla; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; van Es, Michael A.; Pasterkamp, R. Jeroen; Koppers, Max; Andersen, Peter M.; Estrada, Karol; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Damme, Philip; Melki, Judith; Meininger, Vincent; Shatunov, Aleksey; Shaw, Christopher E.; Leigh, P. Nigel; Shaw, Pamela J.; Morrison, Karen E.; Fogh, Isabella; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J.; Czell, David; Weber, Markus; Heutink, Peter; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Silani, Vincenzo; Robberecht, Wim; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Substantial clinical, pathological and genetic overlap exists between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). TDP-43 inclusions have been found in both ALS and FTD cases (FTD-TDP). Recently, a repeat expansion in C9orf72 was identified as the causal variant in a proportion of ALS and FTD cases. We sought to identify additional evidence for a common genetic basis for the spectrum of ALS-FTD. Methods We used published GWAS data of 4,377 ALS patients and 13,017 controls and 435 pathology-proven FTD-TDP cases and 1,414 controls for genotype imputation. Data were analyzed in a joint meta-analysis, by replicating topmost associated hits of one disease in the other, and by using a conservative rank products analysis, allocating equal weight to ALS and FTD-TDP sample sizes. Results Meta-analysis identified 19 genome-wide significant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at C9orf72 on chromosome 9p21.2 (lowest p=2.6×10−12) and one SNP in UNC13A on chromosome 19p13.11 (p=1.0×10−11) as shared susceptibility loci for ALS and FTD-TDP. Conditioning on the 9p21.2 genotype increased statistical significance at UNC13A. A third signal, on chromosome 8q24.13 at the SPG8 locus coding for strumpellin, (p=3.91×10−7) was replicated in an independent cohort of 4,056 ALS patients and 3,958 controls (p=0.026; combined analysis p=1.01×10−7). Interpretation We identified common genetic variants at C9orf72, but in addition in UNC13A that are shared between ALS and FTD. UNC13A provides a novel link between ALS and FTD-TDP, and identifies changes in neurotransmitter release and synaptic function as a converging mechanism in the pathogenesis of ALS and FTD-TDP. PMID:24931836

  1. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I; Conti, David V; Schumacher, Fredrick; Han, Ying; Benlloch, Sara; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wang, Zhaoming; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Lindstrom, Sara; Jugurnauth-Little, Sara; Dadaev, Tokhir; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Stram, Daniel O; Rand, Kristin; Wan, Peggy; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C; Park, Karen; Xia, Lucy; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Goh, Chee; Ahmed, Mahbubl; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna; Visakorpi, Tapio; Leinonen, Katri A; Xu, Jianfeng; Aly, Markus; Donovan, Jenny; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Tim J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Klarskov, Peter; Røder, Martin Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Thibodeau, Stephen N; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Holt, Sarah; Knudsen, Beatrice; Coll, Antonio Hurtado; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Maier, Christiane; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Rinckleb, Antje E; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Park, Jong; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Isaacs, William B; Partin, Alan W; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Chen, Constance; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Penney, Kathryn L; Mucci, Lorelei; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Kibel, Adam S; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Seminara, Daniella; Riboli, Elio; Hamdy, Freddie C; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Muir, Kenneth; Gronberg, Henrik; Neal, David E; Southey, Melissa; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Wiklund, Fredrik; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Henderson, Brian E; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Haiman, Christopher A

    2014-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of > 10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three new susceptibility loci were identified at association P < 5 × 10(-8); 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 were identified in multi-ancestry analyses and 1 was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk for this disease in European-ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the usefulness of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease.

  2. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I.; Conti, David V.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Han, Ying; Benlloch, Sara; Hazelett, Dennis J.; Wang, Zhaoming; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Lindstrom, Sara; Jugurnauth-Little, Sara; Dadaev, Tokhir; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Stram, Daniel O.; Rand, Kristin; Wan, Peggy; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C.; Park, Karen; Xia, Lucy; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Hoover, Robert N.; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C.; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Goh, Chee; Ahmed, Mahbubl; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Auvinen, Anssi; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna; Visakorpi, Tapio; Leinonen, Katri A.; Xu, Jianfeng; Aly, Markus; Donovan, Jenny; Travis, Ruth C.; Key, Tim J.; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Klarskov, Peter; Røder, Martin Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L.; Kolb, Suzanne; Holt, Sarah; Knudsen, Beatrice; Coll, Antonio Hurtado; Gapstur, Susan M.; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Maier, Christiane; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Rinckleb, Antje E.; Strom, Sara S.; Pettaway, Curtis; Yeboah, Edward D.; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Park, Jong; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Isaacs, William B.; Partin, Alan W.; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Chen, Constance; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Penney, Kathryn L.; Mucci, Lorelei; John, Esther M.; Ingles, Sue A.; Kittles, Rick A.; Murphy, Adam B.; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej M.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Kibel, Adam S.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W.; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S. Lilly; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Witte, John S.; Casey, Graham; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Seminara, Daniella; Riboli, Elio; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L.; Hunter, David J.; Muir, Kenneth; Gronberg, Henrik; Neal, David E.; Southey, Melissa; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Cook, Michael B.; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Wiklund, Fredrik; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of >10 million SNPs in 43,303prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three novel susceptibility loci were revealed at P<5×10-8; 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 from multiethnic analyses and one was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with the known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk of the disease in European ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the utility of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease. PMID:25217961

  3. A meta-analysis of 87,040 individuals identifies 23 new susceptibility loci for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Olama, Ali Amin; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Berndt, Sonja I; Conti, David V; Schumacher, Fredrick; Han, Ying; Benlloch, Sara; Hazelett, Dennis J; Wang, Zhaoming; Saunders, Ed; Leongamornlert, Daniel; Lindstrom, Sara; Jugurnauth-Little, Sara; Dadaev, Tokhir; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Stram, Daniel O; Rand, Kristin; Wan, Peggy; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C; Park, Karen; Xia, Lucy; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Hoover, Robert N; Machiela, Mitchell J; Yeager, Merideth; Burdette, Laurie; Chung, Charles C; Hutchinson, Amy; Yu, Kai; Goh, Chee; Ahmed, Mahbubl; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi; Wahlfors, Tiina; Schleutker, Johanna; Visakorpi, Tapio; Leinonen, Katri A; Xu, Jianfeng; Aly, Markus; Donovan, Jenny; Travis, Ruth C; Key, Tim J; Siddiq, Afshan; Canzian, Federico; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Klarskov, Peter; Røder, Martin Andreas; Iversen, Peter; Thibodeau, Stephen N; McDonnell, Shannon K; Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L; Kolb, Suzanne; Holt, Sarah; Knudsen, Beatrice; Coll, Antonio Hurtado; Gapstur, Susan M; Diver, W Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L; Maier, Christiane; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Rinckleb, Antje E; Strom, Sara S; Pettaway, Curtis; Yeboah, Edward D; Tettey, Yao; Biritwum, Richard B; Adjei, Andrew A; Tay, Evelyn; Truelove, Ann; Niwa, Shelley; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Park, Jong; Sellers, Thomas; Lin, Hui-Yi; Isaacs, William B; Partin, Alan W; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Stegmaier, Christa; Chen, Constance; Giovannucci, Edward L; Ma, Jing; Stampfer, Meir; Penney, Kathryn L; Mucci, Lorelei; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue A; Kittles, Rick A; Murphy, Adam B; Pandha, Hardev; Michael, Agnieszka; Kierzek, Andrzej M; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Zheng, Wei; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Nemesure, Barbara; Carpten, John; Leske, Cristina; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Hennis, Anselm; Kibel, Adam S; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Hsing, Ann W; Chu, Lisa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Klein, Eric A; Zheng, S Lilly; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith; Spurdle, Amanda; Teixeira, Manuel R; Paulo, Paula; Maia, Sofia; Slavov, Chavdar; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio; Witte, John S; Casey, Graham; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Seminara, Daniella; Riboli, Elio; Hamdy, Freddie C; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Li, Qiyuan; Freedman, Matthew L; Hunter, David J; Muir, Kenneth; Gronberg, Henrik; Neal, David E; Southey, Melissa; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Cook, Michael B; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Wiklund, Fredrik; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Henderson, Brian E; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; Haiman, Christopher A

    2014-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 76 variants associated with prostate cancer risk predominantly in populations of European ancestry. To identify additional susceptibility loci for this common cancer, we conducted a meta-analysis of > 10 million SNPs in 43,303 prostate cancer cases and 43,737 controls from studies in populations of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. Twenty-three new susceptibility loci were identified at association P < 5 × 10(-8); 15 variants were identified among men of European ancestry, 7 were identified in multi-ancestry analyses and 1 was associated with early-onset prostate cancer. These 23 variants, in combination with known prostate cancer risk variants, explain 33% of the familial risk for this disease in European-ancestry populations. These findings provide new regions for investigation into the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and demonstrate the usefulness of combining ancestrally diverse populations to discover risk loci for disease. PMID:25217961

  4. Joint Association of Genome-Wide Association Study–Identified Susceptibility Loci and Dietary Patterns in Risk of Renal Cell Carcinoma Among Non-Hispanic Whites

    PubMed Central

    Melkonian, Stephanie C.; Daniel, Carrie R.; Hildebrandt, Michelle A. T.; Tannir, Nizar M.; Ye, Yuanqing; Chow, Wong-Ho; Wood, Christopher G.; Wu, Xifeng

    2014-01-01

    Dietary factors may affect risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In an ongoing case-control study of RCC initiated in Houston, Texas, in 2002, we identified 3 empirically derived dietary patterns: “fruits and vegetables,” “American/Western,” and “Tex-Mex.” Among 659 RCC cases and 699 controls, we evaluated associations of these dietary patterns with RCC risk and whether the associations varied by obesity status, smoking status, physical activity level, history of hypertension, and genetic variants previously identified via genome-wide association studies. Among persons in the highest categories of adherence versus the lowest, the “fruits and vegetables” dietary pattern was associated with an approximately 50% lower RCC risk (Ptrend < 0.001), while “American/Western” dietary pattern scores were positively associated with a 2-fold higher risk (Ptrend < 0.001). We observed synergistic interaction between the American/Western pattern and hypertension status: The odds ratio (highest tertile vs. lowest) among persons with hypertension was 2.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.43, 3.45), as compared with 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.16, 2.70) among persons without hypertension (additive Pinteraction = 0.01). A variant (rs718314) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 2 gene (ITPR2) was found to interact with the American/Western dietary pattern in relation to RCC risk (additive Pinteraction = 0.03). ITPR2 has been shown to affect nutrient metabolism and central obesity. Dietary patterns, genetic variants, and host characteristics may individually and jointly influence susceptibility to RCC. PMID:25053674

  5. Joint association of genome-wide association study-identified susceptibility loci and dietary patterns in risk of renal cell carcinoma among non-Hispanic whites.

    PubMed

    Melkonian, Stephanie C; Daniel, Carrie R; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Tannir, Nizar M; Ye, Yuanqing; Chow, Wong-Ho; Wood, Christopher G; Wu, Xifeng

    2014-09-01

    Dietary factors may affect risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In an ongoing case-control study of RCC initiated in Houston, Texas, in 2002, we identified 3 empirically derived dietary patterns: "fruits and vegetables," "American/Western," and "Tex-Mex." Among 659 RCC cases and 699 controls, we evaluated associations of these dietary patterns with RCC risk and whether the associations varied by obesity status, smoking status, physical activity level, history of hypertension, and genetic variants previously identified via genome-wide association studies. Among persons in the highest categories of adherence versus the lowest, the "fruits and vegetables" dietary pattern was associated with an approximately 50% lower RCC risk (Ptrend < 0.001), while "American/Western" dietary pattern scores were positively associated with a 2-fold higher risk (Ptrend < 0.001). We observed synergistic interaction between the American/Western pattern and hypertension status: The odds ratio (highest tertile vs. lowest) among persons with hypertension was 2.23 (95% confidence interval: 1.43, 3.45), as compared with 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.16, 2.70) among persons without hypertension (additive Pinteraction = 0.01). A variant (rs718314) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 2 gene (ITPR2) was found to interact with the American/Western dietary pattern in relation to RCC risk (additive Pinteraction = 0.03). ITPR2 has been shown to affect nutrient metabolism and central obesity. Dietary patterns, genetic variants, and host characteristics may individually and jointly influence susceptibility to RCC. PMID:25053674

  6. SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C loci and risk of Parkinson's diseases in Iranian population: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Safaralizadeh, Tannaz; Jamshidi, Javad; Esmaili Shandiz, Ehsan; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Fazeli, Atena; Emamalizadeh, Babak; Manafi, Navid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Tafakhori, Abbas; Darvish, Hossein

    2016-10-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. Prevalence of PD increases steadily with age. A recent meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies has identified six new loci to be linked with PD. Here we investigated the association of four of these new loci, SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C with PD in an Iranian population. Through a case-control study a total of 1800 subjects comprising 600 PD patients and 1200 unrelated healthy controls were recruited. Rs10797576, rs329648, rs11158026 and rs2414739 related to SIPA1L2, MIR4697, GCH1 and VPS13C loci respectively, were genotyped in all subjects. The difference of genotype and allele frequencies between case and control groups were investigated using chi-square test and logistic regression models with R software. Genotype and allele frequencies were significantly different in PD patients and control group for rs329648, rs11158026 and rs2414739 (p-value=0.018, 0.025, and 0.009 respectively for allele frequency differences). There was no difference in genotype nor allele frequencies between the two groups for rs10797576. We replicated the association of three new loci which are proposed for PD. More studies in other populations and also functional analysis are required to clear the role of these variants in PD. PMID:27653855

  7. Estimation of radiation risk in presence of classical additive and Berkson multiplicative errors in exposure doses.

    PubMed

    Masiuk, S V; Shklyar, S V; Kukush, A G; Carroll, R J; Kovgan, L N; Likhtarov, I A

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of measurement errors in exposure doses in a regression model with binary response is studied. Recently, it has been recognized that uncertainty in exposure dose is characterized by errors of two types: classical additive errors and Berkson multiplicative errors. The combination of classical additive and Berkson multiplicative errors has not been considered in the literature previously. In a simulation study based on data from radio-epidemiological research of thyroid cancer in Ukraine caused by the Chornobyl accident, it is shown that ignoring measurement errors in doses leads to overestimation of background prevalence and underestimation of excess relative risk. In the work, several methods to reduce these biases are proposed. They are new regression calibration, an additive version of efficient SIMEX, and novel corrected score methods.

  8. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index.

    PubMed

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire; van der Valk, Ralf J P; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Pitkänen, Niina; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville; Franks, Steve; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Cousminer, Diana L; Marsh, Julie A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Curtin, John A; Vioque, Jesus; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Myhre, Ronny; Price, Thomas S; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Yengo, Loïc; Grarup, Niels; Ntalla, Ioanna; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; Bisgaard, Hans; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Bonnefond, Amelie; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Johan; Flexeder, Claudia; Franke, Lude; Geller, Frank; Geserick, Mandy; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Haworth, Claire M A; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Holm, Jens-Christian; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Kähönen, Mika; Kiess, Wieland; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A; Lewin, Alexandra M; Liang, Liming; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Ma, Baoshan; Magnus, Per; McCormack, Shana E; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D; Middeldorp, Christel M; Murray, Clare S; Pahkala, Katja; Pers, Tune H; Pfäffle, Roland; Postma, Dirkje S; Power, Christine; Simpson, Angela; Sengpiel, Verena; Tiesler, Carla M T; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G; van Meurs, Joyce B; Vinding, Rebecca; Waage, Johannes; Wardle, Jane; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zemel, Babette S; Dedoussis, George V; Pedersen, Oluf; Froguel, Philippe; Sunyer, Jordi; Plomin, Robert; Jacobsson, Bo; Hansen, Torben; Gonzalez, Juan R; Custovic, Adnan; Raitakari, Olli T; Pennell, Craig E; Widén, Elisabeth; Boomsma, Dorret I; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sebert, Sylvain; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hyppönen, Elina; McCarthy, Mark I; Lindi, Virpi; Harri, Niinikoski; Körner, Antje; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Heinrich, Joachim; Melbye, Mads; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ring, Susan M; Smith, George Davey; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Grant, Struan F A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2016-01-15

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We included 35 668 children from 20 studies in the discovery phase and 11 873 children from 13 studies in the replication phase. In total, 15 loci reached genome-wide significance (P-value < 5 × 10(-8)) in the joint discovery and replication analysis, of which 12 are previously identified loci in or close to ADCY3, GNPDA2, TMEM18, SEC16B, FAIM2, FTO, TFAP2B, TNNI3K, MC4R, GPR61, LMX1B and OLFM4 associated with adult body mass index or childhood obesity. We identified three novel loci: rs13253111 near ELP3, rs8092503 near RAB27B and rs13387838 near ADAM23. Per additional risk allele, body mass index increased 0.04 Standard Deviation Score (SDS) [Standard Error (SE) 0.007], 0.05 SDS (SE 0.008) and 0.14 SDS (SE 0.025), for rs13253111, rs8092503 and rs13387838, respectively. A genetic risk score combining all 15 SNPs showed that each additional average risk allele was associated with a 0.073 SDS (SE 0.011, P-value = 3.12 × 10(-10)) increase in childhood body mass index in a population of 1955 children. This risk score explained 2% of the variance in childhood body mass index. This study highlights the shared genetic background between childhood and adult body mass index and adds three novel loci. These loci likely represent age-related differences in strength of the associations with body mass index.

  9. Risk assessment of additives through soft drinks and nectars consumption on Portuguese population: a 2010 survey.

    PubMed

    Diogo, Janina S G; Silva, Liliana S O; Pena, Angelina; Lino, Celeste M

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated whether the Portuguese population is at risk of exceeding ADI levels for acesulfame-K, saccharin, aspartame, caffeine, benzoic and sorbic acid through an assessment of dietary intake of additives and specific consumption of four types of beverages, traditional soft drinks and soft drinks based on mineral waters, energetic drinks, and nectars. The highest mean levels of additives were found for caffeine in energetic drinks, 293.5mg/L, for saccharin in traditional soft drinks, 18.4 mg/L, for acesulfame-K and aspartame in nectars, with 88.2 and 97.8 mg/L, respectively, for benzoic acid in traditional soft drinks, 125.7 mg/L, and for sorbic acid in soft drinks based on mineral water, 166.5 mg/L. Traditional soft drinks presented the highest acceptable daily intake percentages (ADIs%) for acesulfame-K, aspartame, benzoic and sorbic acid and similar value for saccharin (0.5%) when compared with soft drinks based on mineral water, 0.7%, 0.08%, 7.3%, and 1.92% versus 0.2%, 0.053%, 0.6%, and 0.28%, respectively. However for saccharin the highest percentage of ADI was obtained for nectars, 0.9%, in comparison with both types of soft drinks, 0.5%. Therefore, it is concluded that the Portuguese population is not at risk of exceeding the established ADIs for the studied additives.

  10. Additive Genetic Risk from Five Serotonin System Polymorphisms Interacts with Interpersonal Stress to Predict Depression

    PubMed Central

    Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Stroud, Catherine B.; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E.; Adam, Emma K.; Redei, Eva E.; Hammen, Constance; Craske, Michelle G.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral genetic research supports polygenic models of depression in which many genetic variations each contribute a small amount of risk, and prevailing diathesis-stress models suggest gene-environment interactions (GxE). Multilocus profile scores of additive risk offer an approach that is consistent with polygenic models of depression risk. In a first demonstration of this approach in a GxE predicting depression, we created an additive multilocus profile score from five serotonin system polymorphisms (one each in the genes HTR1A, HTR2A, HTR2C, and two in TPH2). Analyses focused on two forms of interpersonal stress as environmental risk factors. Using five years of longitudinal diagnostic and life stress interviews from 387 emerging young adults in the Youth Emotion Project, survival analyses show that this multilocus profile score interacts with major interpersonal stressful life events to predict major depressive episode onsets (HR = 1.815, p = .007). Simultaneously, there was a significant protective effect of the profile score without a recent event (HR = 0.83, p = .030). The GxE effect with interpersonal chronic stress was not significant (HR = 1.15, p = .165). Finally, effect sizes for genetic factors examined ignoring stress suggested such an approach could lead to overlooking or misinterpreting genetic effects. Both the GxE effect and the protective simple main effect were replicated in a sample of early adolescent girls (N = 105). We discuss potential benefits of the multilocus genetic profile score approach and caveats for future research. PMID:26595467

  11. Relative Importance and Additive Effects of Maternal and Infant Risk Factors on Childhood Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Salazar, Christian; James, Kristina; Escobar, Gabriel; Gebretsadik, Tebeb; Li, Sherian Xu; Carroll, Kecia N.; Walsh, Eileen; Mitchel, Edward; Das, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh; Yu, Chang; Dupont, William D.; Hartert, Tina V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Environmental exposures that occur in utero and during early life may contribute to the development of childhood asthma through alteration of the human microbiome. The objectives of this study were to estimate the cumulative effect and relative importance of environmental exposures on the risk of childhood asthma. Methods We conducted a population-based birth cohort study of mother-child dyads who were born between 1995 and 2003 and were continuously enrolled in the PRIMA (Prevention of RSV: Impact on Morbidity and Asthma) cohort. The individual and cumulative impact of maternal urinary tract infections (UTI) during pregnancy, maternal colonization with group B streptococcus (GBS), mode of delivery, infant antibiotic use, and older siblings at home, on the risk of childhood asthma were estimated using logistic regression. Dose-response effect on childhood asthma risk was assessed for continuous risk factors: number of maternal UTIs during pregnancy, courses of infant antibiotics, and number of older siblings at home. We further assessed and compared the relative importance of these exposures on the asthma risk. In a subgroup of children for whom maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy information was available, the effect of maternal antibiotic use on the risk of childhood asthma was estimated. Results Among 136,098 singleton birth infants, 13.29% developed asthma. In both univariate and adjusted analyses, maternal UTI during pregnancy (odds ratio [OR] 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18, 1.25; adjusted OR [AOR] 1.04, 95%CI 1.02, 1.07 for every additional UTI) and infant antibiotic use (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.20, 1.22; AOR 1.16, 95%CI 1.15, 1.17 for every additional course) were associated with an increased risk of childhood asthma, while having older siblings at home (OR 0.92, 95%CI 0.91, 0.93; AOR 0.85, 95%CI 0.84, 0.87 for each additional sibling) was associated with a decreased risk of childhood asthma, in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with vaginal

  12. THE COMBINED CARCINOGENIC RISK FOR EXPOSURE TO MIXTURES OF DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS MAY BE LESS THAN ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Combined Carcinogenic Risk for Exposure to Mixtures of Drinking Water Disinfection By-Products May be Less Than Additive

    Risk assessment methods for chemical mixtures in drinking water are not well defined. Current default risk assessments for chemical mixtures assume...

  13. Risk assessment of nitrate and oxytetracycline addition on coastal ecosystem functions.

    PubMed

    Feng-Jiao, Liu; Shun-Xing, Li; Feng-Ying, Zheng; Xu-Guang, Huang; Yue-Gang, Zuo; Teng-Xiu, Tu; Xue-Qing, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms dominate phytoplankton communities in the well-mixed coastal and upwelling regions. Coastal diatoms are often exposed to both aquaculture pollution and eutrophication. But how these exposures influence on coastal ecosystem functions are unknown. To examine these influences, a coastal centric diatom, Conticribra weissflogii was maintained at different concentrations of nitrate (N) and/or oxytetracycline (OTC). Algal density, cell growth cycle, protein, chlorophyll a, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malonaldehyde (MDA) were determined for the assessment of algal biomass, lifetime, nutritional value, photosynthesis and respiration, antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation, respectively. When N addition was combined with OTC pollution, the cell growth cycles were shortened by 56-73%; algal density, SOD activities, the concentrations of chlorophyll a, protein, and MDA varied between 73 and 121%, 19 and 397%, 52 and 693%, 19 and 875%, and 66 and 2733% of the values observed in N addition experiments, respectively. According to P-value analysis, the influence of OTC on algal density and SOD activity was not significant, but the effect on cell growth cycle, protein, chlorophyll a, and MDA were significant (P<0.05). The influence of N addition with simultaneous OTC pollution on the above six end points was significant. Algal biomass, lifetime, nutrition, antioxidant capacity, lipid peroxidation, photosynthesis, and respiration were all affected by the addition of OTC and N. Coastal ecosystem functions were severely affected by N and OTC additions, and the influence was increased in the order: Nrisk assessment of aquaculture pollution on coastal ecosystem functions.

  14. Quantifying Missing Heritability at Known GWAS Loci

    PubMed Central

    Gusev, Alexander; Bhatia, Gaurav; Zaitlen, Noah; Vilhjalmsson, Bjarni J.; Diogo, Dorothée; Stahl, Eli A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Worthington, Jane; Klareskog, Lars; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Price, Alkes L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has shown that much of the missing heritability of complex traits can be resolved by estimates of heritability explained by all genotyped SNPs. However, it is currently unknown how much heritability is missing due to poor tagging or additional causal variants at known GWAS loci. Here, we use variance components to quantify the heritability explained by all SNPs at known GWAS loci in nine diseases from WTCCC1 and WTCCC2. After accounting for expectation, we observed all SNPs at known GWAS loci to explain more heritability than GWAS-associated SNPs on average (). For some diseases, this increase was individually significant: for Multiple Sclerosis (MS) () and for Crohn's Disease (CD) (); all analyses of autoimmune diseases excluded the well-studied MHC region. Additionally, we found that GWAS loci from other related traits also explained significant heritability. The union of all autoimmune disease loci explained more MS heritability than known MS SNPs () and more CD heritability than known CD SNPs (), with an analogous increase for all autoimmune diseases analyzed. We also observed significant increases in an analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) samples typed on ImmunoChip, with more heritability from all SNPs at GWAS loci () and more heritability from all autoimmune disease loci () compared to known RA SNPs (including those identified in this cohort). Our methods adjust for LD between SNPs, which can bias standard estimates of heritability from SNPs even if all causal variants are typed. By comparing adjusted estimates, we hypothesize that the genome-wide distribution of causal variants is enriched for low-frequency alleles, but that causal variants at known GWAS loci are skewed towards common alleles. These findings have important ramifications for fine-mapping study design and our understanding of complex disease architecture. PMID:24385918

  15. Meta-analysis identifies six new susceptibility loci for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Ellinor, Patrick T; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Albert, Christine M; Glazer, Nicole L; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Smith, Albert V; Arking, Dan E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Lubitz, Steven A; Bis, Joshua C; Chung, Mina K; Dörr, Marcus; Ozaki, Kouichi; Roberts, Jason D; Smith, J Gustav; Pfeufer, Arne; Sinner, Moritz F; Lohman, Kurt; Ding, Jingzhong; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Jonathan D; Rienstra, Michiel; Rice, Kenneth M; Van Wagoner, David R; Magnani, Jared W; Wakili, Reza; Clauss, Sebastian; Rotter, Jerome I; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Launer, Lenore J; Davies, Robert W; Borkovich, Matthew; Harris, Tamara B; Lin, Honghuang; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Milan, David J; Hofman, Albert; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chen, Lin Y; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Voight, Benjamin F; Li, Guo; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kubo, Michiaki; Tedrow, Usha B; Rose, Lynda M; Ridker, Paul M; Conen, David; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Xu, Siyan; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Levy, Daniel; Nakamura, Yusuke; Parvez, Babar; Mahida, Saagar; Furie, Karen L; Rosand, Jonathan; Muhammad, Raafia; Psaty, Bruce M; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Wichmann, H-Erich; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Kao, W H Linda; Kathiresan, Sekar; Roden, Dan M; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; McKnight, Barbara; Sjögren, Marketa; Newman, Anne B; Liu, Yongmei; Gollob, Michael H; Melander, Olle; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ch Stricker, Bruno H; Felix, Stephan B; Alonso, Alvaro; Darbar, Dawood; Barnard, John; Chasman, Daniel I; Heckbert, Susan R; Benjamin, Emelia J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kääb, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a highly prevalent arrhythmia and a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and death1. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry, including 6,707 with and 52,426 without atrial fibrillation. Six new atrial fibrillation susceptibility loci were identified and replicated in an additional sample of individuals of European ancestry, including 5,381 subjects with and 1 0,030 subjects without atrial fibrillation (P < 5 × 10−8). Four of the loci identified in Europeans were further replicated in silico in a GWAS of Japanese individuals, including 843 individuals with and 3,350 individuals without atrial fibrillation. The identified loci implicate candidate genes that encode transcription factors related to cardiopulmonary development, cardiac-expressed ion channels and cell signaling molecules. PMID:22544366

  16. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C; Sampson, Joshua N; Hoskins, Jason W; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S; Abnet, Christian C; Adjei, Andrew A; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Berg, Christine D; Berndt, Sonja I; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Buring, Julie E; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Chu, Lisa W; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A; Colt, Joanne S; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B; Cortessis, Victoria K; Crawford, E David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W Ryan; Duell, Eric J; Elena, Joanne W; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Fridley, Brooke L; Fuchs, Charles S; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M; Gaziano, J Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S; Giffen, Carol A; Giles, Graham G; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Giovannucci, Edward L; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E; Harris, Curtis C; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J; Inskip, Peter D; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H; McWilliams, Robert R; Melin, Beatrice S; Meltzer, Paul S; Mensah, James E; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S; Mondul, Alison M; Moore, Lee E; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A; Rodabough, Rebecca J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schwartz, Ann G; Schwartz, Kendra L; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Stram, Daniel O; Strom, Sara S; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Toro, Jorge R; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2014-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  17. Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoming; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Mingfeng; Parikh, Hemang; Jia, Jinping; Chung, Charles C.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Hutchinson, Amy; Burdette, Laurie; Ibrahim, Abdisamad; Hautman, Christopher; Raj, Preethi S.; Abnet, Christian C.; Adjei, Andrew A.; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Allen, Naomi E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aldrich, Melinda; Amiano, Pilar; Amos, Christopher; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arici, Cecilia; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Berg, Christine D.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biritwum, Richard B.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Bolton, Kelly; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brennan, Paul; Brinton, Louise A.; Brotzman, Michelle; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cao, Guangwen; Caporaso, Neil E.; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Che, Xu; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Colditz, Graham A.; Colt, Joanne S.; Conti, David; Cook, Michael B.; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Crawford, E. David; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Deng, Xiang; Ding, Ti; Dinney, Colin P.; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Diver, W. Ryan; Duell, Eric J.; Elena, Joanne W.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Feychting, Maria; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Giffen, Carol A.; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Gorlick, Richard; Greene, Mark H.; Gross, Myron; Grossman, H. Barton; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Hartge, Patricia; Hattinger, Claudia; Hayes, Richard B.; He, Qincheng; Helman, Lee; Henderson, Brian E.; Henriksson, Roger; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hsing, Ann W.; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Hunter, David J.; Inskip, Peter D.; Ito, Hidemi; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jenab, Mazda; Ji, Bu-Tian; Johansen, Christoffer; Johansson, Mattias; Johnson, Alison; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kamat, Ashish M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Karagas, Margaret; Khanna, Chand; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, In-Sam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young-Chul; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Chang Hyun; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kratz, Christian P.; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kurucu, Nilgun; Lan, Qing; Lathrop, Mark; Lau, Ching C.; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Kyoung-Mu; Lee, Maxwell P.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lerner, Seth P.; Li, Donghui; Liao, Linda M.; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Dongxin; Lin, Jie; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lu, Daru; Ma, Jing; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marina, Neyssa; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGlynn, Katherine A.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Mensah, James E.; Miao, Xiaoping; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mondul, Alison M.; Moore, Lee E.; Muir, Kenneth; Niwa, Shelley; Olson, Sara H.; Orr, Nick; Panico, Salvatore; Park, Jae Yong; Patel, Alpa V.; Patino-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Pu, Xia; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Sanson, Marc; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Min; Shete, Sanjay; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesumaga, Luis; Sierri, Sabina; Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart; Silverman, Debra T.; Simon, Matthias; Southey, Melissa C.; Spector, Logan; Spitz, Margaret; Stampfer, Meir; Stattin, Par; Stern, Mariana C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Stram, Daniel O.; Strom, Sara S.; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Sook Whan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tan, Wen; Tanaka, Hideo; Tang, Wei; Tang, Ze-Zhang; Tardon, Adonina; Tay, Evelyn; Taylor, Philip R.; Tettey, Yao; Thomas, David M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjonneland, Anne; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Toro, Jorge R.; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Troisi, Rebecca; Truelove, Ann; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret A.; Tumino, Rosario; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Visvanathan, Kala; Vogel, Ulla; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chengfeng; Wang, Junwen; Wang, Sophia S.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolk, Alicja; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wrensch, Margaret; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yatabe, Yasushi; Ye, Yuanqing; Yeboah, Edward D.; Yin, Zhihua; Ying, Chen; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Kraft, Peter; Chanock, Stephen J.; Yeager, Meredith; Landi, Maria Terese; Shi, Jianxin; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10−39; Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10−36 and PConditional = 2.36 × 10−8; Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10−12 and PConditional = 5.19 × 10−6, Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10−6; and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10−15 and PConditional = 5.35 × 10−7) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10−18 and PConditional = 7.06 × 10−16). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci. PMID:25027329

  18. Characterization of a Family with Rare Deletions in CNTNAP5 and DOCK4 Suggests Novel Risk Loci for Autism and Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Bacchelli, Elena; de Jonge, Maretha V.; Mirza, Ghazala; Scerri, Thomas S.; Minopoli, Fiorella; Chiocchetti, Andreas; Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Hoffmann, Per; Paracchini, Silvia; Lowy, Ernesto; Harold, Denise H.; Chapman, Jade A.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Poustka, Fritz; Houben, Renske H.; Staal, Wouter G.; Ophoff, Roel A.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Williams, Julie; Nöthen, Markus M.; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Deloukas, Panos; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Bailey, Anthony J.; Maestrini, Elena; Monaco, Anthony P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are characterized by social, communication, and behavioral deficits and complex genetic etiology. A recent study of 517 ASD families implicated DOCK4 by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) association and a microdeletion in an affected sibling pair. Methods The DOCK4 microdeletion on 7q31.1 was further characterized in this family using QuantiSNP analysis of 1M SNP array data and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Extended family members were tested by polymerase chain reaction amplification of junction fragments. DOCK4 dosage was measured in additional samples using SNP arrays. Since QuantiSNP analysis identified a novel CNTNAP5 microdeletion in the same affected sibling pair, this gene was sequenced in 143 additional ASD families. Further polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis included 380 ASD cases and suitable control subjects. Results The maternally inherited microdeletion encompassed chr7:110,663,978-111,257,682 and led to a DOCK4-IMMP2L fusion transcript. It was also detected in five extended family members with no ASD. However, six of nine individuals with this microdeletion had poor reading ability, which prompted us to screen 606 other dyslexia cases. This led to the identification of a second DOCK4 microdeletion co-segregating with dyslexia. Assessment of genomic background in the original ASD family detected a paternal 2q14.3 microdeletion disrupting CNTNAP5 that was also transmitted to both affected siblings. Analysis of other ASD cohorts revealed four additional rare missense changes in CNTNAP5. No exonic deletions of DOCK4 or CNTNAP5 were seen in 2091 control subjects. Conclusions This study highlights two new risk factors for ASD and dyslexia and demonstrates the importance of performing a high-resolution assessment of genomic background, even after detection of a rare and likely damaging microdeletion using a targeted approach. PMID:20346443

  19. Identification of four new susceptibility loci for testicular germ cell tumour

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Holroyd, Amy; Lloyd, Amy; Broderick, Peter; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Douglas F; Dudakia, Darshna; Bishop, D. Timothy; Reid, Alison; Huddart, Robert A.; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik; Shipley, Janet; Houlston, Richard S.; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple risk loci for testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT), revealing a polygenic model of disease susceptibility strongly influenced by common variation. To identify additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with TGCT, we conducted a multistage GWAS with a combined data set of >25,000 individuals (6,059 cases and 19,094 controls). We identified new risk loci for TGCT at 3q23 (rs11705932, TFDP2, P=1.5 × 10−9), 11q14.1 (rs7107174, GAB2, P=9.7 × 10−11), 16p13.13 (rs4561483, GSPT1, P=1.6 × 10−8) and 16q24.2 (rs55637647, ZFPM1, P=3.4 × 10−9). We additionally present detailed functional analysis of these loci, identifying a statistically significant relationship between rs4561483 risk genotype and increased GSPT1 expression in TGCT patient samples. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of TGCT risk and further insight into the biological basis of disease development. PMID:26503584

  20. The addition of whole soy flour to cafeteria diet reduces metabolic risk markers in wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Soybean is termed a functional food because it contains bioactive compounds. However, its effects are not well known under unbalanced diet conditions. This work is aimed at evaluating the effect of adding whole soy flour to a cafeteria diet on intestinal histomorphometry, metabolic risk and toxicity markers in rats. Methods In this study, 30 male adult Wistar rats were used, distributed among three groups (n = 10): AIN-93 M diet, cafeteria diet (CAF) and cafeteria diet with soy flour (CAFS), for 56 days. The following parameters were measured: food intake; weight gain; serum concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), aspartate (AST) and alanine (ALT) aminotransferases and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS); humidity and lipid fecal content; weight and fat of the liver. The villous height, the crypt depth and the thickness of the duodenal and ileal circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the animals were also measured. Results There was a significant reduction in the food intake in the CAF group. The CAFS showed lower serum concentrations of triglycerides and serum TBARS and a lower percentage of hepatic fat, with a corresponding increase in thickness of the intestinal muscle layers. In the CAF group, an increase in the HbA1c, ALT, lipid excretion, liver TBARS and crypt depth, was observed associated with lower HDL-c and villous height. The addition of soy did not promote any change in these parameters. Conclusions The inclusion of whole soy flour in a high-fat diet may be helpful in reducing some markers of metabolic risk; however, more studies are required to clarify its effects on unbalanced diets. PMID:24119309

  1. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci.

    PubMed

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association study (GWAS). More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWAS. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Many susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in the development of vitiligo.

  2. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association study (GWAS). More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWAS. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Many susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in the development of vitiligo. PMID:26870082

  3. Goodness-of-fit tests for the additive risk model with (p > 2)-dimensional time-invariant covariates.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Song, M S; Lee, S

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents methods for checking the goodness-of-fit of the additive risk model with p(> 2)-dimensional time-invariant covariates. The procedures are an extension of Kim and Lee (1996) who developed a test to assess the additive risk assumption for two-sample censored data. We apply the proposed tests to survival data from South Wales nikel refinery workers. Simulation studies are carried out to investigate the performance of the proposed tests for practical sample sizes. PMID:9880997

  4. Dense fine-mapping study identifies new susceptibility loci for primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jimmy Z; Almarri, Mohamed A; Gaffney, Daniel J; Mells, George F; Jostins, Luke; Cordell, Heather J; Ducker, Samantha J; Day, Darren B; Heneghan, Michael A; Neuberger, James M; Donaldson, Peter T; Bathgate, Andrew J; Burroughs, Andrew; Davies, Mervyn H; Jones, David E; Alexander, Graeme J; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Sandford, Richard N; Anderson, Carl A

    2012-10-01

    We genotyped 2,861 cases of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) from the UK PBC Consortium and 8,514 UK population controls across 196,524 variants within 186 known autoimmune risk loci. We identified 3 loci newly associated with PBC (at P<5×10(-8)), increasing the number of known susceptibility loci to 25. The most associated variant at 19p12 is a low-frequency nonsynonymous SNP in TYK2, further implicating JAK-STAT and cytokine signaling in disease pathogenesis. An additional five loci contained nonsynonymous variants in high linkage disequilibrium (LD; r2>0.8) with the most associated variant at the locus. We found multiple independent common, low-frequency and rare variant association signals at five loci. Of the 26 independent non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) signals tagged on the Immunochip, 15 have SNPs in B-lymphoblastoid open chromatin regions in high LD (r2>0.8) with the most associated variant. This study shows how data from dense fine-mapping arrays coupled with functional genomic data can be used to identify candidate causal variants for functional follow-up.

  5. The apolipoprotein epsilon4 allele confers additional risk in children with familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Wiegman, Albert; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Rodenburg, Jessica; Defesche, Joep C; de Jongh, Saskia; Bakker, Henk D; Kastelein, John J P

    2003-06-01

    Children with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) exhibit substantial variance of LDL cholesterol. In previous studies, family members of children with FH were included, which may have influenced results. To avoid such bias, we studied phenotype in 450 unrelated children with FH and in 154 affected sib-pairs. In known families with classical FH, diagnosis was based on plasma LDL cholesterol above the age- and gender-specific 95th percentile. Girls had 0.47 +/- 0.15 mmol/L higher LDL cholesterol, compared with boys (p = 0.002). Also in girls, HDL cholesterol increased by 0.07 +/- 0.03 mmol/L per 5 y (pfor trend = 0.005); this age effect was not observed in boys. The distribution of apolipoprotein (apo) E genotypes was not significantly different between probands, their paired affected siblings, or a Dutch control population. Carriers with or without one epsilon4 allele had similar LDL and HDL cholesterol levels. Within the affected sib-pairs, the epsilon4 allele explained 72.4% of the variance of HDL cholesterol levels (-0.15 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval -0.24 to -0.05, p = 0.003). The effect of apoE4 on HDL cholesterol differed with an analysis based on probands or on affected sib-pairs. The affected sib-pair model used adjustment for shared environment, type of LDL receptor gene mutation, and a proportion of additional genetic factors and may, therefore, be more accurate in estimating effects of risk factors on complex traits. We conclude that the epsilon4 allele was associated with lower HDL cholesterol levels in an affected sib-pair analysis, which strongly suggests that apoE4 influences HDL cholesterol levels in FH children. Moreover, the strong association suggests that apoE4 carries an additional disadvantage for FH children. PMID:12646733

  6. Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies 14 new susceptibility loci for juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hinks, Anne; Cobb, Joanna; Marion, Miranda C.; Prahalad, Sampath; Sudman, Marc; Bowes, John; Martin, Paul; Comeau, Mary E.; Sajuthi, Satria; Andrews, Robert; Brown, Milton; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick; Deloukas, Panos; Edkins, Sarah; Eyre, Stephen; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Guthery, Stephen L.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Hunt, Sarah E.; James, Judith A.; Keddache, Mehdi; Moser, Kathy L.; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Onslow, Mitchell L.; Rosé, Carlos D.; Rich, Stephen S.; Steel, Kathryn J.A.; Wakeland, Edward K.; Wallace, Carol A.; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Woo, Patricia; Bohnsack, John F.; Haas, Johannes Peter; Glass, David N.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Thomson, Wendy; Thompson, Susan D.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the ImmunoChip single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in 2816 individuals, comprising the most common subtypes (oligoarticular and RF negative polyarticular) of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and 13056 controls strengthens the evidence for association to three known JIA-risk loci (HLA, PTPN22 and PTPN2) and has identified fourteen risk loci reaching genome-wide significance (p < 5 × 10-8) for the first time. Eleven additional novel regions showed suggestive evidence for association with JIA (p < 1 × 10-6). Dense-mapping of loci along with bioinformatic analysis has refined the association to one gene for eight regions, highlighting crucial pathways, including the IL-2 pathway, in JIA disease pathogenesis. The entire ImmunoChip loci, HLA region and the top 27 loci (p < 1 × 10-6) explain an estimated 18%, 13% and 6% risk of JIA, respectively. Analysis of the ImmunoChip dataset, the largest cohort of JIA cases investigated to date, provides new insight in understanding the genetic basis for this childhood autoimmune disease. PMID:23603761

  7. The risk of stillbirth and infant death by each additional week of expectant management stratified by maternal age

    PubMed Central

    Page, Jessica M.; Snowden, Jonathan M.; Cheng, Yvonne W.; Doss, Amy; Rosenstein, Melissa G.; Caughey, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of the study was to examine fetal/infant mortality by gestational age at term stratified by maternal age. STUDY DESIGN A retrospective cohort study was conducted using 2005 US national birth certificate data. For each week of term gestation, the risk of mortality associated with delivery was compared with composite mortality risk of expectant management. The expectant management measure included stillbirth and infant death. This expectant management risk was calculated to estimate the composite mortality risk with remaining pregnant an additional week by combining the risk of stillbirth during the additional week of pregnancy and infant death risk following delivery at the next week. Maternal age was stratified by 35 years or more compared with women younger than 35 years as well as subgroup analyses of younger than 20, 20–34, 35–39, or 40 years old or older. RESULTS The fetal/infant mortality risk of expectant management is greater than the risk of infant death at 39 weeks’ gestation in women 35 years old or older (15.2 vs 10.9 of 10,000, P < .05). In women younger than 35 years old, the risk of expectant management also exceeded that of infant death at 39 weeks (21.3 vs 18.8 of 10,000, P < .05). For women younger than 35 years old, the overall expectant management risk is influenced by higher infant death risk and does not rise significantly until 41 weeks compared with women 35 years old or older in which it increased at 40 weeks. CONCLUSION Risk varies by maternal age, and delivery at 39 weeks minimizes fetal/infant mortality for both groups, although the magnitude of the risk reduction is greater in older women. PMID:23707677

  8. Increased Risk of Additional Cancers Among Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James D.; Ma, Grace L.; Baumgartner, Joel M.; Madlensky, Lisa; Burgoyne, Adam M.; Tang, Chih-Min; Martinez, Maria Elena; Sicklick, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered non-hereditary or sporadic. However, single-institution studies suggest that GIST patients develop additional malignancies with increased frequencies. We hypothesized that we could gain greater insight into possible associations between GIST and other malignancies using a national cancer database inquiry. Methods Patients diagnosed with GIST (2001–2011) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database were included. Standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to quantify cancer risks incurred by GIST patients before and after GIST diagnoses, respectively, when compared with the general U.S. population. Results Of 6,112 GIST patients, 1,047 (17.1%) had additional cancers. There were significant increases in overall cancer rates: 44% (SPR=1.44) before diagnosis and 66% (SIR=1.66) after GIST diagnoses. Malignancies with significantly increased occurrence both before/after diagnoses included other sarcomas (SPR=5.24/SIR=4.02), neuroendocrine-carcinoid tumors (SPR=3.56/SIR=4.79), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (SPR=1.69/SIR=1.76), and colorectal adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.51/SIR=2.16). Esophageal adenocarcinoma (SPR=12.0), bladder adenocarcinoma (SPR=7.51), melanoma (SPR=1.46), and prostate adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.20) were significantly more common only before GIST. Ovarian carcinoma (SIR=8.72), small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIR=5.89), papillary thyroid cancer (SIR=5.16), renal cell carcinoma (SIR=4.46), hepatobiliary adenocarcinomas (SIR=3.10), gastric adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.70), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.03), uterine adenocarcinoma (SIR=1.96), non-small cell lung cancer (SIR=1.74), and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (SIR=1.65) were significantly more common only after GIST. Conclusion This is the first population-based study to characterize the associations and temporal relationships between GIST and other cancers, both by site and

  9. Polymorphic microsatellite loci for the sand pocket mouse Chaetodipus arenarius, an endemic from the Baja California Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munguia-Vega, A.; Rodriguez-Estrella, R.; Nachman, M.; Culver, M.

    2009-01-01

    Fifteen polymorphic microsatellite loci were isolated from an enriched genomic library of the sand pocket mouse Chaetodipus arenarius. The mean number of alleles per locus was 11.53 (range five to 19) and the average observed heterozygosity was 0.764 (range 0.121 to 1.0). The markers will be used for detecting the impact of human-induced habitat fragmentation on patterns of gene flow, genetic structure, and extinction risk. In addition, these markers will be useful across the genus because most of the loci cross-amplified and were polymorphic in three other species of Chaetodipus. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  10. GWAS identifies four novel eosinophilic esophagitis loci.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Patrick M A; Wang, Mei-Lun; Cianferoni, Antonella; Aceves, Seema; Gonsalves, Nirmala; Nadeau, Kari; Bredenoord, Albert J; Furuta, Glenn T; Spergel, Jonathan M; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-11-19

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic disorder characterized by infiltration of the oesophagus with eosinophils. We had previously reported association of the TSLP/WDR36 locus with EoE. Here we report genome-wide significant associations at four additional loci; c11orf30 and STAT6, which have been previously associated with both atopic and autoimmune diseases, and two EoE-specific loci, ANKRD27 that regulates the trafficking of melanogenic enzymes to epidermal melanocytes and CAPN14, that encodes a calpain whose expression is highly enriched in the oesophagus. The identification of five EoE loci, not only expands our aetiological understanding of the disease but may also represent new therapeutic targets to treat the most debilitating aspect of EoE, oesophageal inflammation and remodelling.

  11. [Risk hidden in the small print? : Some food additives may trigger pseudoallergic reactions].

    PubMed

    Zuberbier, Torsten; Hengstenberg, Claudine

    2016-06-01

    Some food additives may trigger pseudoallergenic reactions. However, the prevalence of such an overreaction is - despite the increasing number of food additives - rather low in the general population. The most common triggers of pseudoallergic reactions to food are naturally occurring ingredients. However, symptoms in patients with chronic urticaria should improve significantly on a pseudoallergen-free diet. In addition, some studies indicate that certain food additives may also have an impact on the symptoms of patients with neurodermatitis and asthma. PMID:27173908

  12. [Risk hidden in the small print? : Some food additives may trigger pseudoallergic reactions].

    PubMed

    Zuberbier, Torsten; Hengstenberg, Claudine

    2016-06-01

    Some food additives may trigger pseudoallergenic reactions. However, the prevalence of such an overreaction is - despite the increasing number of food additives - rather low in the general population. The most common triggers of pseudoallergic reactions to food are naturally occurring ingredients. However, symptoms in patients with chronic urticaria should improve significantly on a pseudoallergen-free diet. In addition, some studies indicate that certain food additives may also have an impact on the symptoms of patients with neurodermatitis and asthma.

  13. Newly discovered breast cancer susceptibility loci on 3p24 and 17q23.2

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shahana; Thomas, Gilles; Ghoussaini, Maya; Healey, Catherine S; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Platte, Radka; Morrison, Jonathan; Maranian, Melanie; Pooley, Karen A; Luben, Robert; Eccles, Diana; Evans, D Gareth; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Stratton, Michael R; Rahman, Nazneen; Jacobs, Kevin; Prentice, Ross; Anderson, Garnet L; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Curb, J David; Ziegler, Regina G; Berg, Christine D; Buys, Saundra S; McCarty, Catherine A; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Calle, Eugenia E; Thun, Michael J; Diver, W Ryan; Bojesen, Stig; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Hillemanns, Peter; Karstens, Johann H; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Zalutsky, Iosif V; Bermisheva, Marina; Fedorova, Sardana; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Devilee, Peter; van Asperen, Christi J; Tollenaar, R A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Peplonska, Beata; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Smith, Letitia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; van Hien, Richard R; Cornelissen, Sten; Milne, Roger L; Ribas, Gloria; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Schmutzler, Rita K; Burwinkel, Barbara; Bartram, Claus R; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Hamann, Ute; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kataja, Vesa; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R; Hankinson, Susan E; Cox, David G; Kraft, Peter; Vatten, Lars J; Hveem, Kristian; Kumle, Merethe; Sigurdson, Alice; Doody, Michele; Bhatti, Parveen; Alexander, Bruce H; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Oldenburg, Rogier A; Schutte, Mieke; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Yuqing; Cox, Angela; Elliott, Graeme; Brock, Ian; Reed, Malcolm W R; Shen, Chen-Yang; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; kConFab; Beesley, Jonathan; Goode, Ellen L; Couch, Fergus; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hoover, Robert N; Ponder, Bruce A J; Hunter, David J; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Chanock, Stephen J; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified seven breast cancer susceptibility loci, but these explain only a small fraction of the familial risk of the disease. Five of these loci were identified through a two-stage GWAS involving 390 familial cases and 364 controls in the first stage, and 3,990 cases and 3,916 controls in the second stage1. To identify additional loci, we tested over 800 promising associations from this GWAS in a further two stages involving 37,012 cases and 40,069 controls from 33 studies in the CGEMS collaboration and Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We found strong evidence for additional susceptibility loci on 3p (rs4973768: per-allele OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.08–1.13, P = 4.1 × 10−23) and 17q (rs6504950: per-allele OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.92–0.97, P = 1.4 × 10−8). Potential causative genes include SLC4A7 and NEK10 on 3p and COX11 on 17q. PMID:19330027

  14. New basal cell carcinoma susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, Simon N.; Helgason, Hannes; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zink, Florian; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Kehr, Birte; Gudmundsson, Julius; Sulem, Patrick; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Grasa, Matilde; Planelles, Dolores; Sanmartin, Onofre; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Nexø, Bjørn A.; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Jonasson, Jon G.; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Johannsdottir, Hrefna; Kristinsdottir, Anna M.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Kong, Augustine; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Vogel, Ulla; Kumar, Rajiv; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Olafsson, Jon H.; Stefansson, Kari

    2015-01-01

    In an ongoing screen for DNA sequence variants that confer risk of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 24,988,228 SNPs and small indels detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders and imputed into 4,572 BCC patients and 266,358 controls. Here we show the discovery of four new BCC susceptibility loci: 2p24 MYCN (rs57244888[C], OR=0.76, P=4.7 × 10−12), 2q33 CASP8-ALS2CR12 (rs13014235[C], OR=1.15, P=1.5 × 10−9), 8q21 ZFHX4 (rs28727938[G], OR=0.70, P=3.5 × 10−12) and 10p14 GATA3 (rs73635312[A], OR=0.74, P=2.4 × 10−16). Fine mapping reveals that two variants correlated with rs73635312[A] occur in conserved binding sites for the GATA3 transcription factor. In addition, expression microarrays and RNA-seq show that rs13014235[C] and a related SNP rs700635[C] are associated with expression of CASP8 splice variants in which sequences from intron 8 are retained. PMID:25855136

  15. Association of variations in HLA class II and other loci with susceptibility to EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Kouya; Okada, Yukinori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Momozawa, Yukihide; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kunitoh, Hideo; Matsumoto, Shingo; Takano, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Goto, Akiteru; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Ohe, Yuichiro; Watanabe, Yukio; Goto, Yasushi; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Furuta, Koh; Yoshida, Akihiko; Goto, Koichi; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Miyagi, Yohei; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Kazumi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Maeda, Daichi; Imai, Kazuhiro; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Saito, Akira; Shimada, Yoko; Sunami, Kuniko; Saito, Motonobu; Inazawa, Johji; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Matsuo, Keitaro; Daigo, Yataro; Kubo, Michiaki; Kohno, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma driven by somatic EGFR mutations is more prevalent in East Asians (30–50%) than in European/Americans (10–20%). Here we investigate genetic factors underlying the risk of this disease by conducting a genome-wide association study, followed by two validation studies, in 3,173 Japanese patients with EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma and 15,158 controls. Four loci, 5p15.33 (TERT), 6p21.3 (BTNL2), 3q28 (TP63) and 17q24.2 (BPTF), previously shown to be strongly associated with overall lung adenocarcinoma risk in East Asians, were re-discovered as loci associated with a higher susceptibility to EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, two additional loci, HLA class II at 6p21.32 (rs2179920; P =5.1 × 10−17, per-allele OR=1.36) and 6p21.1 (FOXP4) (rs2495239; P=3.9 × 10−9, per-allele OR=1.19) were newly identified as loci associated with EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. This study indicates that multiple genetic factors underlie the risk of lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations. PMID:27501781

  16. Association of variations in HLA class II and other loci with susceptibility to EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kouya; Okada, Yukinori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Momozawa, Yukihide; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kunitoh, Hideo; Matsumoto, Shingo; Takano, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Goto, Akiteru; Tsuta, Koji; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Ohe, Yuichiro; Watanabe, Yukio; Goto, Yasushi; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Furuta, Koh; Yoshida, Akihiko; Goto, Koichi; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Miyagi, Yohei; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Kazumi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Ohtaki, Yoichi; Maeda, Daichi; Imai, Kazuhiro; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Saito, Akira; Shimada, Yoko; Sunami, Kuniko; Saito, Motonobu; Inazawa, Johji; Nakamura, Yusuke; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Matsuo, Keitaro; Daigo, Yataro; Kubo, Michiaki; Kohno, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma driven by somatic EGFR mutations is more prevalent in East Asians (30-50%) than in European/Americans (10-20%). Here we investigate genetic factors underlying the risk of this disease by conducting a genome-wide association study, followed by two validation studies, in 3,173 Japanese patients with EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma and 15,158 controls. Four loci, 5p15.33 (TERT), 6p21.3 (BTNL2), 3q28 (TP63) and 17q24.2 (BPTF), previously shown to be strongly associated with overall lung adenocarcinoma risk in East Asians, were re-discovered as loci associated with a higher susceptibility to EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, two additional loci, HLA class II at 6p21.32 (rs2179920; P =5.1 × 10(-17), per-allele OR=1.36) and 6p21.1 (FOXP4) (rs2495239; P=3.9 × 10(-9), per-allele OR=1.19) were newly identified as loci associated with EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. This study indicates that multiple genetic factors underlie the risk of lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations. PMID:27501781

  17. Additive composite ABCG2, SLC2A9 and SLC22A12 scores of high-risk alleles with alcohol use modulate gout risk.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hung-Pin; Chung, Chia-Min; Min-Shan Ko, Albert; Lee, Su-Shin; Lai, Han-Ming; Lee, Chien-Hung; Huang, Chung-Ming; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the contribution of urate transporter genes and alcohol use to the risk of gout/tophi. Eight variants of ABCG2, SLC2A9, SLC22A12, SLC22A11 and SLC17A3 were genotyped in male individuals in a case-control study with 157 gout (33% tophi), 106 asymptomatic hyperuricaemia and 295 control subjects from Taiwan. The multilocus profiles of the genetic risk scores for urate gene variants were used to evaluate the risk of asymptomatic hyperuricaemia, gout and tophi. ABCG2 Q141K (T), SLC2A9 rs1014290 (A) and SLC22A12 rs475688 (C) under an additive model and alcohol use independently predicted the risk of gout (respective odds ratio for each factor=2.48, 2.03, 1.95 and 2.48). The additive composite Q141K, rs1014290 and rs475688 scores of high-risk alleles were associated with gout risk (P<0.0001). We observed the supramultiplicative interaction effect of genetic urate scores and alcohol use on gout and tophi risk (P for interaction=0.0452, 0.0033). The synergistic effect of genetic urate score 5-6 and alcohol use indicates that these combined factors correlate with gout and tophi occurrence.

  18. Bacterial-based additives for the production of artificial snow: what are the risks to human health?

    PubMed

    Lagriffoul, A; Boudenne, J L; Absi, R; Ballet, J J; Berjeaud, J M; Chevalier, S; Creppy, E E; Gilli, E; Gadonna, J P; Gadonna-Widehem, P; Morris, C E; Zini, S

    2010-03-01

    For around two decades, artificial snow has been used by numerous winter sports resorts to ensure good snow cover at low altitude areas or more generally, to lengthen the skiing season. Biological additives derived from certain bacteria are regularly used to make artificial snow. However, the use of these additives has raised doubts concerning the potential impact on human health and the environment. In this context, the French health authorities have requested the French Agency for Environmental and Occupational Health Safety (Afsset) to assess the health risks resulting from the use of such additives. The health risk assessment was based on a review of the scientific literature, supplemented by professional consultations and expertise. Biological or chemical hazards from additives derived from the ice nucleation active bacterium Pseudomonas syringae were characterised. Potential health hazards to humans were considered in terms of infectious, toxic and allergenic capacities with respect to human populations liable to be exposed and the means of possible exposure. Taking into account these data, a qualitative risk assessment was carried out, according to four exposure scenarios, involving the different populations exposed, and the conditions and routes of exposure. It was concluded that certain health risks can exist for specific categories of professional workers (mainly snowmakers during additive mixing and dilution tank cleaning steps, with risks estimated to be negligible to low if workers comply with safety precautions). P. syringae does not present any pathogenic capacity to humans and that the level of its endotoxins found in artificial snow do not represent a danger beyond that of exposure to P. syringae endotoxins naturally present in snow. However, the risk of possible allergy in some particularly sensitive individuals cannot be excluded. Another important conclusion of this study concerns use of poor microbiological water quality to make artificial snow.

  19. Bacterial-based additives for the production of artificial snow: what are the risks to human health?

    PubMed

    Lagriffoul, A; Boudenne, J L; Absi, R; Ballet, J J; Berjeaud, J M; Chevalier, S; Creppy, E E; Gilli, E; Gadonna, J P; Gadonna-Widehem, P; Morris, C E; Zini, S

    2010-03-01

    For around two decades, artificial snow has been used by numerous winter sports resorts to ensure good snow cover at low altitude areas or more generally, to lengthen the skiing season. Biological additives derived from certain bacteria are regularly used to make artificial snow. However, the use of these additives has raised doubts concerning the potential impact on human health and the environment. In this context, the French health authorities have requested the French Agency for Environmental and Occupational Health Safety (Afsset) to assess the health risks resulting from the use of such additives. The health risk assessment was based on a review of the scientific literature, supplemented by professional consultations and expertise. Biological or chemical hazards from additives derived from the ice nucleation active bacterium Pseudomonas syringae were characterised. Potential health hazards to humans were considered in terms of infectious, toxic and allergenic capacities with respect to human populations liable to be exposed and the means of possible exposure. Taking into account these data, a qualitative risk assessment was carried out, according to four exposure scenarios, involving the different populations exposed, and the conditions and routes of exposure. It was concluded that certain health risks can exist for specific categories of professional workers (mainly snowmakers during additive mixing and dilution tank cleaning steps, with risks estimated to be negligible to low if workers comply with safety precautions). P. syringae does not present any pathogenic capacity to humans and that the level of its endotoxins found in artificial snow do not represent a danger beyond that of exposure to P. syringae endotoxins naturally present in snow. However, the risk of possible allergy in some particularly sensitive individuals cannot be excluded. Another important conclusion of this study concerns use of poor microbiological water quality to make artificial snow

  20. How to interpret a small increase in AUC with an additional risk prediction marker: decision analysis comes through.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart G; Schuit, Ewoud; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Pencina, Michael J; Vickers, Andrew; Vickers, Andew; Moons, Karel G M; Mol, Ben W J; Lindeman, Karen S

    2014-09-28

    An important question in the evaluation of an additional risk prediction marker is how to interpret a small increase in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Many researchers believe that a change in AUC is a poor metric because it increases only slightly with the addition of a marker with a large odds ratio. Because it is not possible on purely statistical grounds to choose between the odds ratio and AUC, we invoke decision analysis, which incorporates costs and benefits. For example, a timely estimate of the risk of later non-elective operative delivery can help a woman in labor decide if she wants an early elective cesarean section to avoid greater complications from possible later non-elective operative delivery. A basic risk prediction model for later non-elective operative delivery involves only antepartum markers. Because adding intrapartum markers to this risk prediction model increases AUC by 0.02, we questioned whether this small improvement is worthwhile. A key decision-analytic quantity is the risk threshold, here the risk of later non-elective operative delivery at which a patient would be indifferent between an early elective cesarean section and usual care. For a range of risk thresholds, we found that an increase in the net benefit of risk prediction requires collecting intrapartum marker data on 68 to 124 women for every correct prediction of later non-elective operative delivery. Because data collection is non-invasive, this test tradeoff of 68 to 124 is clinically acceptable, indicating the value of adding intrapartum markers to the risk prediction model.

  1. How to interpret a small increase in AUC with an additional risk prediction marker: Decision analysis comes through

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stuart G.; Schuit, Ewoud; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Pencina, Michael J.; Vickers, Andew; Moons, Karel G. M.; Mol, Ben W.J.; Lindeman, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    An important question in the evaluation of an additional risk prediction marker is how to interpret a small increase in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Many researchers believe that a change in AUC is a poor metric because it increases only slightly with the addition of a marker with a large odds ratio. Because it is not possible on purely statistical grounds to choose between the odds ratio and AUC, we invoke decision analysis, which incorporates costs and benefits. For example a timely estimate of the risk of later non-elective operative delivery can help a woman in labor decide if she wants an early elective cesarean section to avoid greater complications from possible later non-elective operative delivery. A basic risk prediction model for later non-elective operative delivery involves only antepartum markers. Because adding intrapartum markers to this risk prediction model increases AUC by 0.02, we questioned whether this small improvement is worthwhile. A key decision-analytic quantity is the risk threshold, here the risk of later non-elective operative delivery at which a patient would be indifferent between an early elective cesarean section and usual care. For a range of risk thresholds, we found that an increase in the net benefit of risk prediction requires collecting intrapartum marker data on 68 to 124 women for every correct prediction of later non-elective operative delivery. Because data collection is non-invasive, this test tradeoff of 68 to 124 is clinically acceptable, indicating the value of adding intrapartum markers to the risk prediction model. PMID:24825728

  2. Six Novel Susceptibility Loci for Early-Onset Androgenetic Alopecia and Their Unexpected Association with Common Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Daniel; Medland, Sarah E.; Dimitriou, Maria; Waterworth, Dawn; Tung, Joyce Y.; Geller, Frank; Heilmann, Stefanie; Hillmer, Axel M.; Bataille, Veronique; Eigelshoven, Sibylle; Hanneken, Sandra; Moebus, Susanne; Herold, Christine; den Heijer, Martin; Montgomery, Grant W.; Deloukas, Panos; Eriksson, Nicholas; Heath, Andrew C.; Becker, Tim; Sulem, Patrick; Mangino, Massimo; Vollenweider, Peter; Spector, Tim D.; Dedoussis, George; Martin, Nicholas G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Mooser, Vincent; Stefansson, Kari; Hinds, David A.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Richards, J. Brent

    2012-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a highly heritable condition and the most common form of hair loss in humans. Susceptibility loci have been described on the X chromosome and chromosome 20, but these loci explain a minority of its heritable variance. We conducted a large-scale meta-analysis of seven genome-wide association studies for early-onset AGA in 12,806 individuals of European ancestry. While replicating the two AGA loci on the X chromosome and chromosome 20, six novel susceptibility loci reached genome-wide significance (p = 2.62×10−9–1.01×10−12). Unexpectedly, we identified a risk allele at 17q21.31 that was recently associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) at a genome-wide significant level. We then tested the association between early-onset AGA and the risk of PD in a cross-sectional analysis of 568 PD cases and 7,664 controls. Early-onset AGA cases had significantly increased odds of subsequent PD (OR = 1.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.06–1.55, p = 8.9×10−3). Further, the AGA susceptibility alleles at the 17q21.31 locus are on the H1 haplotype, which is under negative selection in Europeans and has been linked to decreased fertility. Combining the risk alleles of six novel and two established susceptibility loci, we created a genotype risk score and tested its association with AGA in an additional sample. Individuals in the highest risk quartile of a genotype score had an approximately six-fold increased risk of early-onset AGA [odds ratio (OR) = 5.78, p = 1.4×10−88]. Our results highlight unexpected associations between early-onset AGA, Parkinson's disease, and decreased fertility, providing important insights into the pathophysiology of these conditions. PMID:22693459

  3. Polymorphism FXII 46C>T and cardiovascular risk: additional data from Spanish and Tunisian patients

    PubMed Central

    Athanasiadis, Georgios; Esteban, Esther; Vidal, Magdanela Gayà; Torres, Robert Carreras; Bahri, Raoudha; Moral, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed an association between Coagulation Factor XII 46C>T polymorphism and variation in FXII plasma levels, as 46C>T seems to affect the translation efficiency. Case-control studies in Spanish samples indicated that genotype T/T is an independent risk factor for venous thrombosis, ischemic stroke and acute coronary artery disease. In this study, we tried to reaffirm the importance of 46C>T in two samples from Spain and Tunisia. Findings A Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) based on 101 family trios from Barcelona with one offspring affected by ischemic heart disease and a classical case-control study based on 76 patients with IHD and 118 healthy individuals from North and Centre-South Tunisia were conducted. Subjects were genotyped for 46C>T and data were analyzed accordingly, revealing no association in any of the two samples (TDT: P = 0.16, relative risk 1.17; case-control study: P = 0.59, odds ratio 1.36). Conclusion The results suggest that 46C>T is not a risk factor for ischemic heart disease in any of the two analyzed samples and therefore the polymorphism seems not to be a universal risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19646235

  4. USING DOSE ADDITION TO ESTIMATE CUMULATIVE RISKS FROM EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) of 1996 requires the EPA to consider the cumulative risk from exposure to multiple chemicals that have a common mechanism of toxicity. Three methods, hazard index (HI), point-of-departure index (PODI), and toxicity equivalence factor (TEF), ...

  5. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  6. [Food additives and genetically modified food--a risk for allergic patients?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1999-04-01

    Adverse reactions to food and food additives must be classified according to pathogenic criteria. It is necessary to strictly differentiate between an allergy, triggered by a substance-specific immunological mechanism, and an intolerance, in which no specific immune reaction can be established. In contrast to views expressed in the media, by laymen and patients, adverse reactions to additives are less frequent than is believed. Due to frequently "alternative" methods of examination, an allergy to food additives is often wrongly blamed as the cause of a wide variety of symptoms and illness. Diagnosing an allergy or intolerance to additives normally involves carrying out double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests with food additives. Allergic reactions to food additives occur particularly against additives which are organic in origin. In principle, it is possible that during the manufacture of genetically modified plants and food, proteins are transferred which potentially create allergies. However, legislation exists both in the USA (Federal Drug Administration, FDA) and in Switzerland (Ordinance on the approval process for GM food, GM food additives and GM accessory agents for processing) which require a careful analysis before a genetically modified product is launched, particularly where foreign genes are introduced. Products containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) as additives must be declared. In addition, the source of the foreign protein must be identified. The "Round-up ready" (RR) soya flour introduced in Switzerland is no different from natural soya flour in terms of its allergenic potential. Genetically modified food can be a blessing for allergic individuals if gene technology were to succeed in removing the allergen (e.g. such possibilities exist for rice). The same caution shown towards genetically modified food might also be advisable for foreign food in our diet. Luckily, the immune system of the digestive tract in healthy people

  7. [Food additives and genetically modified food--a risk for allergic patients?].

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, B

    1999-04-01

    Adverse reactions to food and food additives must be classified according to pathogenic criteria. It is necessary to strictly differentiate between an allergy, triggered by a substance-specific immunological mechanism, and an intolerance, in which no specific immune reaction can be established. In contrast to views expressed in the media, by laymen and patients, adverse reactions to additives are less frequent than is believed. Due to frequently "alternative" methods of examination, an allergy to food additives is often wrongly blamed as the cause of a wide variety of symptoms and illness. Diagnosing an allergy or intolerance to additives normally involves carrying out double-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests with food additives. Allergic reactions to food additives occur particularly against additives which are organic in origin. In principle, it is possible that during the manufacture of genetically modified plants and food, proteins are transferred which potentially create allergies. However, legislation exists both in the USA (Federal Drug Administration, FDA) and in Switzerland (Ordinance on the approval process for GM food, GM food additives and GM accessory agents for processing) which require a careful analysis before a genetically modified product is launched, particularly where foreign genes are introduced. Products containing genetically modified organisms (GMO) as additives must be declared. In addition, the source of the foreign protein must be identified. The "Round-up ready" (RR) soya flour introduced in Switzerland is no different from natural soya flour in terms of its allergenic potential. Genetically modified food can be a blessing for allergic individuals if gene technology were to succeed in removing the allergen (e.g. such possibilities exist for rice). The same caution shown towards genetically modified food might also be advisable for foreign food in our diet. Luckily, the immune system of the digestive tract in healthy people

  8. Potential Signals of Natural Selection in the Top Risk Loci for Coronary Artery Disease: 9p21 and 10q11

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Daniela; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Esteban, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a complex disease and the leading cause of death in the world. Populations of different ancestry do not always share the same risk markers. Natural selective processes may be the cause of some of the population differences detected for specific risk mutations. Objective In this study, 384 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in four genomic regions associated with CAD (1p13, 1q41, 9p21 and 10q11) are analysed in a set of 19 populations from Europe, Middle East and North Africa and also in Asian and African samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. The aim of this survey is to explore for the first time whether the genetic variability in these genomic regions is better explained by demography or by natural selection. Results The results indicate significant differences in the structure of genetic variation and in the LD patterns among populations that probably explain the population disparities found in markers of susceptibility to CAD. Conclusions The results are consistent with potential signature of positive selection in the 9p21 region and of balancing selection in the 9p21 and 10q11. Specifically, in Europe three CAD risk markers in the 9p21 region (rs9632884, rs1537371 and rs1333042) show consistent signals of positive selection. The results of this study are consistent with a potential selective role of CAD in the configuration of genetic diversity in current human populations. PMID:26252781

  9. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Camp, Nicola J.; Skibola, Christine F.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S.; Smedby, Karin E.; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S.; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R.; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Novak, Anne J.; Kay, Neil E.; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M.; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T.; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K.; Weiner, George J.; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K.; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G.; Achenbach, Sara J.; Vachon, Celine M.; Goldin, Lynn R.; Strom, Sara S.; Leis, Jose F.; Weinberg, J. Brice; Caporaso, Neil E.; Norman, Aaron D.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María- Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Travis, Ruth C.; Southey, Melissa C.; Milne, Roger L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Villano, Danylo J.; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E.; Snowden, John A.; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10−11), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10−8) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10−8), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10−11) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10−7) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10−8) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10−7). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  10. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Sonja I; Camp, Nicola J; Skibola, Christine F; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S; Smedby, Karin E; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P; Birmann, Brenda M; Vajdic, Claire M; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D; Novak, Anne J; Kay, Neil E; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K; Weiner, George J; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Jackson, Rebecca D; Tinker, Lesley F; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G; Achenbach, Sara J; Vachon, Celine M; Goldin, Lynn R; Strom, Sara S; Leis, Jose F; Weinberg, J Brice; Caporaso, Neil E; Norman, Aaron D; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Travis, Ruth C; Southey, Melissa C; Milne, Roger L; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R; Villano, Danylo J; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E; Snowden, John A; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and 7,667 controls with follow-up replication in 1,958 cases and 5,530 controls. Here we report three new loci at 3p24.1 (rs9880772, EOMES, P=2.55 × 10(-11)), 6p25.2 (rs73718779, SERPINB6, P=1.97 × 10(-8)) and 3q28 (rs9815073, LPP, P=3.62 × 10(-8)), as well as a new independent SNP at the known 2q13 locus (rs9308731, BCL2L11, P=1.00 × 10(-11)) in the combined analysis. We find suggestive evidence (P<5 × 10(-7)) for two additional new loci at 4q24 (rs10028805, BANK1, P=7.19 × 10(-8)) and 3p22.2 (rs1274963, CSRNP1, P=2.12 × 10(-7)). Pathway analyses of new and known CLL loci consistently show a strong role for apoptosis, providing further evidence for the importance of this biological pathway in CLL susceptibility. PMID:26956414

  11. Seven prostate cancer susceptibility loci identified by a multi-stage genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Campa, Daniele; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim; Gronberg, Henrik; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Thun, Michael J; Ingles, Sue; Chanock, Stephen; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Pharoah, Paul; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Dörk, Thilo; Andriole, Gerald; Dickinson, Joanne L; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith A; Chambers, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Gardiner, R A Frank; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Dan; John, Esther M; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Cooney, Kathleen A; Park, Jong Y; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Habuchi, Tomonori; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Kaneva, Radka; Muir, Ken; Benlloch, Sara; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Saunders, Edward J; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Mahmud, Nadiya; Guy, Michelle; O'Brien, Lynne T; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Hall, Amanda L; Sawyer, Emma J; Dadaev, Tokhir; Morrison, Jonathan; Dearnaley, David P; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Van As, Nicholas; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin S; Lophatonanon, Aritaya; Southey, Melissa C; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Røder, M Andreas; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Bojesen, Stig E; Travis, Ruth; Canzian, Federico; Kaaks, Rudolf; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Lindstrom, Sara; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan; Stern, Mariana C; Corral, Roman; Virtamo, Jarmo; Cox, Angela; Haiman, Christopher A; Le Marchand, Loic; Fitzgerald, Liesel; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika M; Karyadi, Danielle M; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Borre, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Serth, Jürgen; Yeager, Meredith; Berndt, Sonja I; Marthick, James R; Patterson, Briony; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Batra, Jyotsna; Lose, Felicity; McDonnell, Shannon K; Joshi, Amit D; Shahabi, Ahva; Rinckleb, Antje E; Ray, Ana; Sellers, Thomas A; Lin, Hui-Yi; Stephenson, Robert A; Farnham, James; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Narita, Shintaro; Cao, Guang-Wen; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A

    2011-08-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study for PrCa and previously reported the results of the first two stages, which identified 16 PrCa susceptibility loci. We report here the results of stage 3, in which we evaluated 1,536 SNPs in 4,574 individuals with prostate cancer (cases) and 4,164 controls. We followed up ten new association signals through genotyping in 51,311 samples in 30 studies from the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium. In addition to replicating previously reported loci, we identified seven new prostate cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 2p11, 3q23, 3q26, 5p12, 6p21, 12q13 and Xq12 (P = 4.0 × 10(-8) to P = 2.7 × 10(-24)). We also identified a SNP in TERT more strongly associated with PrCa than that previously reported. More than 40 PrCa susceptibility loci, explaining ∼25% of the familial risk in this disease, have now been identified.

  12. Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N.M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G.M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2011-01-01

    Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10−7 study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r2 = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10−7 at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies. PMID:22100073

  13. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2006-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by quality-control failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen expressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians.

  14. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2009-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by qualitycontrol failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen ex-pressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians.

  15. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2006-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by quality-control failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen expressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians. PMID:16910351

  16. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2009-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by qualitycontrol failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen ex-pressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians. PMID:19364084

  17. Genetic identification of multiple loci that control breast cancer susceptibility in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shepel, L A; Lan, H; Haag, J D; Brasic, G M; Gheen, M E; Simon, J S; Hoff, P; Newton, M A; Gould, M N

    1998-01-01

    We have used a rat model of induced mammary carcinomas in an effort to identify breast cancer susceptibility genes. Using genetic crosses between the carcinoma-resistant Copenhagen (COP) and carcinoma-sensitive Wistar-Furth rats, we have confirmed the identification of the Mcs1 locus that modulates tumor number. We have now also identified two additional loci, Mcs2 and Mcs3. These three loci map to chromosomes 2, 7, and 1, respectively, and interact additively to suppress mammary carcinoma development in the COP strain. They are responsible for a major portion of the tumor-resistant phenotype of the COP rat. No loss of heterozygosity was observed surrounding the three loci. A fourth COP locus, Mcs4, has also been identified on chromosome 8 and acts in contrast to increase the number of carcinomas. These results show that mammary carcinoma susceptibility in the COP rat is a polygenic trait. Interestingly, a polymorphism in the human genomic region homologous to the rat Mcs4 region is associated with an increased breast cancer risk in African-American women. The isolation of the Mcs genes may help elucidate novel mechanisms of carcinogenesis, provide information important for human breast cancer risk estimation, and also provide unique drug discovery targets for breast cancer prevention. PMID:9584103

  18. Changes in diet, cardiovascular risk factors and modelled cardiovascular risk following diagnosis of diabetes: 1-year results from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Savory, L A; Griffin, S J; Williams, K M; Prevost, A T; Kinmonth, A-L; Wareham, N J; Simmons, R K

    2014-01-01

    Aims To describe change in self-reported diet and plasma vitamin C, and to examine associations between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled 10-year cardiovascular disease risk in the year following diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Methods Eight hundred and sixty-seven individuals with screen-detected diabetes underwent assessment of self-reported diet, plasma vitamin C, cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and 1 year (n = 736) in the ADDITION-Cambridge trial. Multivariable linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk at 1 year, adjusting for change in physical activity and cardio-protective medication. Results Participants reported significant reductions in energy, fat and sodium intake, and increases in fruit, vegetable and fibre intake over 1 year. The reduction in energy was equivalent to an average-sized chocolate bar; the increase in fruit was equal to one plum per day. There was a small increase in plasma vitamin C levels. Increases in fruit intake and plasma vitamin C were associated with small reductions in anthropometric and metabolic risk factors. Increased vegetable intake was associated with an increase in BMI and waist circumference. Reductions in fat, energy and sodium intake were associated with reduction in HbA1c, waist circumference and total cholesterol/modelled cardiovascular disease risk, respectively. Conclusions Improvements in dietary behaviour in this screen-detected population were associated with small reductions in cardiovascular disease risk, independently of change in cardio-protective medication and physical activity. Dietary change may have a role to play in the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk following diagnosis of diabetes. PMID:24102972

  19. Meta-analysis identifies common and rare variants influencing blood pressure and overlapping with metabolic trait loci.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Smith, Jennifer A; Brody, Jennifer A; Franceschini, Nora; Bis, Joshua C; Rice, Kenneth; Morrison, Alanna C; Lu, Yingchang; Weiss, Stefan; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Martin, Lisa W; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Cook, James P; Auer, Paul L; Chu, Audrey Y; Giri, Ayush; Zhao, Wei; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Lin, Li-An; Stafford, Jeanette M; Amin, Najaf; Mei, Hao; Yao, Jie; Voorman, Arend; Larson, Martin G; Grove, Megan L; Smith, Albert V; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Chen, Han; Huan, Tianxiao; Kosova, Gulum; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Deloukas, Panos; Li, Man; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Gorski, Mathias; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J; Rossouw, Jacques E; Faul, Jessica D; Kardia, Sharon L R; Bouchard, Claude; Raffel, Leslie J; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Vasan, Ramachandran S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Taylor, Kent D; Liu, Kiang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri; Daw, E Warwick; Giulianini, Franco; Ganesh, Santhi; Salfati, Elias; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B; Rettig, Rainer; Völzke, Henry; Kim, Eric; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lee, I-Te; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Tsosie, Krystal S; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Liu, Yongmei; Correa, Adolfo; Weir, David R; Völker, Uwe; Ridker, Paul M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Reiner, Alexander P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Edwards, Todd L; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Loos, Ruth J F; Fornage, Myriam; Ehret, Georg B; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Chasman, Daniel I

    2016-10-01

    Meta-analyses of association results for blood pressure using exome-centric single-variant and gene-based tests identified 31 new loci in a discovery stage among 146,562 individuals, with follow-up and meta-analysis in 180,726 additional individuals (total n = 327,288). These blood pressure-associated loci are enriched for known variants for cardiometabolic traits. Associations were also observed for the aggregation of rare and low-frequency missense variants in three genes, NPR1, DBH, and PTPMT1. In addition, blood pressure associations at 39 previously reported loci were confirmed. The identified variants implicate biological pathways related to cardiometabolic traits, vascular function, and development. Several new variants are inferred to have roles in transcription or as hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. Genetic risk scores constructed from the identified variants were strongly associated with coronary disease and myocardial infarction. This large collection of blood pressure-associated loci suggests new therapeutic strategies for hypertension, emphasizing a link with cardiometabolic risk.

  20. Meta-analysis identifies common and rare variants influencing blood pressure and overlapping with metabolic trait loci.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunyu; Kraja, Aldi T; Smith, Jennifer A; Brody, Jennifer A; Franceschini, Nora; Bis, Joshua C; Rice, Kenneth; Morrison, Alanna C; Lu, Yingchang; Weiss, Stefan; Guo, Xiuqing; Palmas, Walter; Martin, Lisa W; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Surendran, Praveen; Drenos, Fotios; Cook, James P; Auer, Paul L; Chu, Audrey Y; Giri, Ayush; Zhao, Wei; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Lin, Li-An; Stafford, Jeanette M; Amin, Najaf; Mei, Hao; Yao, Jie; Voorman, Arend; Larson, Martin G; Grove, Megan L; Smith, Albert V; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Chen, Han; Huan, Tianxiao; Kosova, Gulum; Stitziel, Nathan O; Kathiresan, Sekar; Samani, Nilesh; Schunkert, Heribert; Deloukas, Panos; Li, Man; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Gorski, Mathias; Kooperberg, Charles; Papanicolaou, George J; Rossouw, Jacques E; Faul, Jessica D; Kardia, Sharon L R; Bouchard, Claude; Raffel, Leslie J; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Vasan, Ramachandran S; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Taylor, Kent D; Liu, Kiang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri; Daw, E Warwick; Giulianini, Franco; Ganesh, Santhi; Salfati, Elias; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B; Rettig, Rainer; Völzke, Henry; Kim, Eric; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lee, I-Te; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Tsosie, Krystal S; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Liu, Yongmei; Correa, Adolfo; Weir, David R; Völker, Uwe; Ridker, Paul M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Reiner, Alexander P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Edwards, Todd L; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Loos, Ruth J F; Fornage, Myriam; Ehret, Georg B; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Chasman, Daniel I

    2016-10-01

    Meta-analyses of association results for blood pressure using exome-centric single-variant and gene-based tests identified 31 new loci in a discovery stage among 146,562 individuals, with follow-up and meta-analysis in 180,726 additional individuals (total n = 327,288). These blood pressure-associated loci are enriched for known variants for cardiometabolic traits. Associations were also observed for the aggregation of rare and low-frequency missense variants in three genes, NPR1, DBH, and PTPMT1. In addition, blood pressure associations at 39 previously reported loci were confirmed. The identified variants implicate biological pathways related to cardiometabolic traits, vascular function, and development. Several new variants are inferred to have roles in transcription or as hubs in protein-protein interaction networks. Genetic risk scores constructed from the identified variants were strongly associated with coronary disease and myocardial infarction. This large collection of blood pressure-associated loci suggests new therapeutic strategies for hypertension, emphasizing a link with cardiometabolic risk. PMID:27618448

  1. Remote Symbolic Computation of Loci

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abanades, Miguel A.; Escribano, Jesus; Botana, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a web-based tool designed to compute certified equations and graphs of geometric loci specified using standard Dynamic Geometry Systems (DGS). Complementing the graphing abilities of the considered DGS, the equations of the loci produced by the application are remotely computed using symbolic algebraic techniques from the…

  2. Common variants at the 19p13.1 and ZNF365 loci are associated with ER subtypes of breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Ramus, Susan J.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianshu; Kirchhoff, Tomas; McGuffog, Lesley; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Kruse, Torben A.; Caligo, Maria A.; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Loman, Niklas; Soller, Maria; Ehrencrona, Hans; Karlsson, Per; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Domchek, Susan M.; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Górski, Bohdan; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Tejada, María Isabel; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Hogervorst, Frans B.L.; van Os, Theo A.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; Wijnen, Juul; Blok, Marinus J.; Kets, Marleen; Hooning, Maartje J.; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana M.; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Side, Lucy E.; Bove, Betsy; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Fassy-Colcombet, Marion; Castera, Laurent; Cornelis, François; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Pujol, Pascal; Coupier, Isabelle; Delnatte, Capucine; Akloul, Linda; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, MaryBeth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M.; Miron, Alexander; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; Goldgar, David E.; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Tea, Muy-Kheng M.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Arason, Aðalgeir; Vijai, Joseph; Shah, Sohela; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark E.; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly; Basil, Jack; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Boggess, John; Wakeley, Katie; Ewart-Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Agata, Simona; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Brunet, Joan; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul PD; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Walsh, Christine S.; Olah, Edith; Teo, Soo Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Dorfling, Cecelia M.; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Heinritz, Wolfram; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tischkowitz, Marc D.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Lindor, Noralane M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Viel, Alessandra; Giannini, Giuseppe; Varesco, Liliana; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Offit, Kenneth; Simard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified variants at 19p13.1 and ZNF365 (10q21.2) as risk factors for breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, respectively. We explored associations with ovarian cancer and with breast cancer by tumor histopathology for these variants in mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Methods Genotyping data for 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 mutation carriers from 40 studies were combined. Results We confirmed associations between rs8170 at 19p13.1 and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers (hazard ratio (HR)=1.17; 95%CI 1.07–1.27; p=7.42×10−4) and between rs16917302 at ZNF365 (HR=0.84; 95%CI 0.73–0.97; p=0.017) but not rs311499 at 20q13.3 (HR=1.11; 95%CI 0.94–1.31; p=0.22) and breast cancer risk for BRCA2 mutation carriers. Analyses based on tumor histopathology showed that 19p13 variants were predominantly associated with estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, whereas rs16917302 at ZNF365 was mainly associated with ER-positive breast cancer for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We also found for the first time that rs67397200 at 19p13.1 was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer for BRCA1 (HR=1.16; 95%CI 1.05–1.29; p=3.8×10−4) and BRCA2 mutation carriers (HR=1.30; 95%CI 1.10–1.52; p=1.8×10−3). Conclusions 19p13.1 and ZNF365 are susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer and ER subtypes of breast cancer among BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Impact These findings can lead to an improved understanding of tumor development and may prove useful for breast and ovarian cancer risk prediction for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. PMID:22351618

  3. Concentration addition-based approach for aquatic risk assessment of realistic pesticide mixtures in Portuguese river basins.

    PubMed

    Silva, Emília; Cerejeira, Maria José

    2015-05-01

    A two-tiered outline for the predictive environmental risk assessment of chemical mixtures with effect assessments based on concentration addition (CA) approaches as first tier and consideration of independent action (IA) as the second tier was applied based on realistic pesticide mixtures measured in surface waters from 2002 to 2008 within three important Portuguese river basins ('Mondego', 'Sado' and 'Tejo'). The CA-based risk quotients, based on acute data and an assessment factor of 100, exceeded 1 in more than 39 % of the 281 samples, indicating a potential risk for the aquatic environment, namely to algae. Seven herbicide compounds and three insecticides were the most toxic compounds in the pesticide mixtures and provided at least 50 % of the mixture's toxicity in almost 100 % of the samples with risk quotients based on the sum of toxic units (RQSTU) above 1. In eight samples, the maximum cumulative ratio (MCR) and the Junghan's ratio values indicated that a chemical-by-chemical approach underestimated the toxicity of the pesticide mixtures, and CA predicted higher mixture toxicity than that of IA. From a risk management perspective, the results pointed out that, by deriving appropriate programmes of measures to a limited number of pesticides with the highest contribution to the total mixture toxicity, relevant benefits also on mixture impact could be produced. PMID:25424034

  4. Characterization of microsatellite loci isolated in Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    John, J. St; Kysela, R.F.; Oyler-McCance, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Primers for 15 microsatellite loci were developed for Mountain Plover, a species whose distribution and abundance have been reduced drastically in the past 30 years. In a screen of 126 individuals collected from four breeding locales across the species' range, levels of polymorphism ranged from two to 13 alleles per locus. No two loci were found to be linked, although one locus revealed significant departures from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These microsatellite loci can be used in population genetic studies, ultimately aiding in management efforts for Mountain Plover. Additionally, these markers can potentially be used in studies investigating the mating system of Mountain Plover. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Insulin resistance: an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tushar P; Rawal, Komal; Bagchi, Ashim K; Akolkar, Gauri; Bernardes, Nathalia; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Gupta, Sarita; Singal, Pawan K

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary life style and high calorie dietary habits are prominent leading cause of metabolic syndrome in modern world. Obesity plays a central role in occurrence of various diseases like hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, which lead to insulin resistance and metabolic derangements like cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mediated by oxidative stress. The mortality rate due to CVDs is on the rise in developing countries. Insulin resistance (IR) leads to micro or macro angiopathy, peripheral arterial dysfunction, hampered blood flow, hypertension, as well as the cardiomyocyte and the endothelial cell dysfunctions, thus increasing risk factors for coronary artery blockage, stroke and heart failure suggesting that there is a strong association between IR and CVDs. The plausible linkages between these two pathophysiological conditions are altered levels of insulin signaling proteins such as IR-β, IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, Glut4 and PGC-1α that hamper insulin-mediated glucose uptake as well as other functions of insulin in the cardiomyocytes and the endothelial cells of the heart. Reduced AMPK, PFK-2 and elevated levels of NADP(H)-dependent oxidases produced by activated M1 macrophages of the adipose tissue and elevated levels of circulating angiotensin are also cause of CVD in diabetes mellitus condition. Insulin sensitizers, angiotensin blockers, superoxide scavengers are used as therapeutics in the amelioration of CVD. It evidently becomes important to unravel the mechanisms of the association between IR and CVDs in order to formulate novel efficient drugs to treat patients suffering from insulin resistance-mediated cardiovascular diseases. The possible associations between insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases are reviewed here. PMID:26542377

  6. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K.; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P.; Harju, John F.; Idos, Gregory E.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J.; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E.; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S.; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Aragaki, Aaron K.; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Curtis, Keith R.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gala, Manish; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C.; Laurie, Cecelia A.; Lemire, Mathieu; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W.; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T.; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Conti, David V.; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Fortini, Barbara K.; Gallinger, Steven J.; Gauderman, W. James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L.; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W.; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:26151821

  7. Common variants in 22 loci are associated with QRS duration and cardiac ventricular conduction

    PubMed Central

    Sotoodehnia, Nona; Isaacs, Aaron; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Dörr, Marcus; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Nolte, Ilja M.; van der Harst, Pim; Müller, Martina; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Alonso, Alvaro; Hicks, Andrew A.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Hayward, Caroline; Smith, Albert Vernon; Polasek, Ozren; Giovannone, Steven; Fu, Jingyuan; Magnani, Jared W.; Marciante, Kristin D.; Pfeufer, Arne; Gharib, Sina A.; Teumer, Alexander; Li, Man; Bis, Joshua C.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aspelund, Thor; Köttgen, Anna; Johnson, Toby; Rice, Kenneth; Sie, Mark P.S.; Wang, Amanda Ying; Klopp, Norman; Fuchsberger, Christian; Wild, Sarah H.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Estrada, Karol; Völker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Qu, Jiaxiang; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Sinner, Moritz F.; Kors, Jan A.; Petersmann, Astrid; Harris, Tamara B.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Perz, Siegfried; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vözke, Henry; Spector, Timothy D.; Liu, Fang-Yu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Rotter, Jerome I.; van Herpen, Gé; Levy, Daniel; Wichmann, H.-Erich; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Kao, W.H. Linda; Heckbert, Susan R.; Meitinger, Thomas; Hofman, Albert; Campbell, Harry; Folsom, Aaron R.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Schwienbacher, Christine; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Volpato, Claudia Beu; Caulfield, Mark J.; Connell, John M.; Launer, Lenore; Lu, Xiaowen; Franke, Lude; Fehrmann, Rudolf S.N.; te Meerman, Gerard; Groen, Harry J.M.; Weersma, Rinse K.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Ophoff, Roel A.; Navis, Gerjan; Rudan, Igor; Snieder, Harold; Wilson, James F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Siscovick, David S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fishman, Glenn I.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kääb, Stefan; Arking, Dan E.

    2010-01-01

    QRS interval on the electrocardiogram reflects ventricular depolarization and conduction time, and is a risk factor for mortality, sudden death, and heart failure. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis in 40,407 European-descent individuals from 14 studies, with further genotyping in 7170 additional Europeans, and identified 22 loci associated with QRS duration (P < 5 × 10−8). These loci map in or near genes in pathways with established roles in ventricular conduction such as sodium channels, transcription factors, and calcium-handling proteins, but also point to novel biologic processes, such as kinase inhibitors and genes related to tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that SCN10A, a gene at our most significant locus, is expressed in the mouse ventricular conduction system, and treatment with a selective SCN10A blocker prolongs QRS duration. These findings extend our current knowledge of ventricular depolarization and conduction. PMID:21076409

  8. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer identifies six new susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schmit, Stephanie L; Jiao, Shuo; Edlund, Christopher K; Wang, Hansong; Zhang, Ben; Hsu, Li; Huang, Shu-Chen; Fischer, Christopher P; Harju, John F; Idos, Gregory E; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Manion, Frank J; McDonnell, Kevin; McNeil, Caroline E; Melas, Marilena; Rennert, Hedy S; Shi, Wei; Thomas, Duncan C; Van Den Berg, David J; Hutter, Carolyn M; Aragaki, Aaron K; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J; Carlson, Christopher S; Chanock, Stephen J; Curtis, Keith R; Fuchs, Charles S; Gala, Manish; Giovannucc, Edward L; Giocannucci, Edward L; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Hayes, Richard B; Henderson, Brian; Hunter, David J; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Küry, Sébastien; Kury, Sebastian; LaCroix, Andrea; Laurie, Cathy C; Laurie, Cecelia A; Lemire, Mathieu; Lemire, Mathiew; Levine, David; Ma, Jing; Makar, Karen W; Qu, Conghui; Taverna, Darin; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Wu, Kana; Kono, Suminori; West, Dee W; Berndt, Sonja I; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Conti, David V; Duggan, David; Figueiredo, Jane C; Fortini, Barbara K; Gallinger, Steven J; Gauderman, W James; Giles, Graham; Green, Roger; Haile, Robert; Harrison, Tabitha A; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L; Hudson, Thomas J; Jacobs, Eric; Iwasaki, Motoki; Jee, Sun Ha; Jenkins, Mark; Jia, Wei-Hua; Joshi, Amit; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Matsuo, Keitaro; Moreno, Victor; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; Raskin, Leon; Rennert, Gad; Rosse, Stephanie; Severi, Gianluca; Schoen, Robert E; Seminara, Daniela; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Slattery, Martha L; Tsugane, Shoichiro; White, Emily; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zanke, Brent W; Zheng, Wei; Le Marchand, Loic; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Stephen B; Peters, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility to colorectal cancer is caused by rare pathogenic mutations and common genetic variants that contribute to familial risk. Here we report the results of a two-stage association study with 18,299 cases of colorectal cancer and 19,656 controls, with follow-up of the most statistically significant genetic loci in 4,725 cases and 9,969 controls from two Asian consortia. We describe six new susceptibility loci reaching a genome-wide threshold of P<5.0E-08. These findings provide additional insight into the underlying biological mechanisms of colorectal cancer and demonstrate the scientific value of large consortia-based genetic epidemiology studies.

  9. Poor Metabolizers at the Cytochrome P450 2C19 Loci Is at Increased Risk of Developing Cancer in Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zenggan; Yu, Yanmin

    2013-01-01

    Background CYP2C19 encodes a member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes, which play a central role in activating and detoxifying many carcinogens and endogenous compounds thought to be involved in the development of cancer. In the past decade, two common polymorphisms among CYP2C19 (CYP2C19*2 and CYP2C19*3) that are responsible for the poor metabolizers (PMs) phenotype in humans and cancer susceptibility have been investigated extensively; however, these studies have yielded contradictory results. Methods and Results To investigate this inconsistency, we conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 11,554 cases and 16,592 controls from 30 case-control studies. Overall, the odds ratio (OR) of cancer was 1.52 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23–1.88, P<10-4] for CYP2C19 PMs genotypes. However, this significant association vanished when the analyses were restricted to 5 larger studies (no. of cases ≥ 500 cases). In the subgroup analysis for different cancer types, PMs genotypes had an effect of increasing the risks of esophagus cancer, gastric cancer, lung cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma as well as head neck cancer. Significant results were found in Asian populations when stratified by ethnicity; whereas no significant associations were found among Caucasians. Stratified analyses according to source of controls, significant associations were found only in hospital base controls. Conclusions Our meta-analysis suggests that the CYP2C19 PMs genotypes most likely contributes to cancer susceptibility, particularly in the Asian populations. PMID:24015291

  10. Probiotics as Additives on Therapy in Allergic Airway Diseases: A Systematic Review of Benefits and Risks

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Naik, Sushree Samiksha; Singh, Meenu

    2013-01-01

    Background. We conducted a systematic review to find out the role of probiotics in treatment of allergic airway diseases.  Methods. A comprehensive search of the major electronic databases was done till March 2013. Trials comparing the effect of probiotics versus placebo were included. A predefined set of outcome measures were assessed. Continuous data were expressed as standardized mean difference with 95% CI. Dichotomous data were expressed as odds ratio with 95% CI. P value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results. A total of 12 studies were included. Probiotic intake was associated with a significantly improved quality of life score in patients with allergic rhinitis (SMD −1.9 (95% CI −3.62, −0.19); P = 0.03), though there was a high degree of heterogeneity. No improvement in quality of life score was noted in asthmatics. Probiotic intake also improved the following parameters: longer time free from episodes of asthma and rhinitis and decrease in the number of episodes of rhinitis per year. Adverse events were not significant. Conclusion. As the current evidence was generated from few trials with high degree of heterogeneity, routine use of probiotics as an additive on therapy in subjects with allergic airway diseases cannot be recommended. PMID:23956972

  11. Posttraumatic stress disorder, alone or additively with early life adversity, is associated with obesity and cardiometabolic risk

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Olivia M.; Ko, Byung-Joon; Joung, Kyoung Eun; Zaichenko, Lesya; Usher, Nicole; Tsoukas, Michael; Thakkar, Bindiya; Davis, Cynthia R.; Crowell, Judith A.; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims There is some evidence that posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and early life adversity may influence metabolic outcomes such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how these interact is not clear. Methods We analyzed data from a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study to determine how PTSD severity influences obesity, insulin sensitivity, and key measures and biomarkers of cardiovascular risk. We then looked at how PTSD and early life adversity may interact to impact these same outcomes. Results PTSD severity is associated with increasing risk of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, with higher symptoms correlating with higher values of BMI, leptin, fibrinogen, and blood pressure, and lower values of insulin sensitivity. PTSD and early life adversity have an additive effect on these metabolic outcomes. The longitudinal study confirmed findings from the cross sectional study and showed that fat mass, leptin, CRP, ICAM, and TNFRII were significantly increased with higher PTSD severity during a 2.5 year follow-up period. Conclusions Individuals with early life adversity and PTSD are at high risk and should be monitored carefully for obesity, insulin resistance, and cardiometabolic risk. PMID:25770759

  12. Characterization of 38 microsatellite loci in the European blackbird, Turdus merula (Turdidae, AVES).

    PubMed

    Simeoni, Michelle; Dawson, Deborah A; Gentle, Louise K; Coiffait, Lisette; Wolff, Kirsten; Evans, Karl L; Gaston, Kevin J; Hatchwell, Ben J

    2009-11-01

    We characterized 38 microsatellite loci in the European blackbird, Turdus merula. Thirty-seven loci were identified by testing 242 loci that had been originally isolated in other avian species. One additional locus was isolated from a European blackbird genomic library. All loci were characterized in 20-29 blackbirds from a population in the Czech Republic and displayed between two and 16 alleles, with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.04 to 1.00. Thirty-seven loci could be assigned a chromosome location in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genome based on sequence homology. PMID:21564948

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Li, Ni; Weinhold, Niels; Försti, Asta; Ali, Mina; van Duin, Mark; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Johnson, David C.; Chen, Bowang; Halvarsson, Britt-Marie; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Kuiper, Rowan; Stephens, Owen W.; Bertsch, Uta; Broderick, Peter; Campo, Chiara; Einsele, Hermann; Gregory, Walter A.; Gullberg, Urban; Henrion, Marc; Hillengass, Jens; Hoffmann, Per; Jackson, Graham H.; Johnsson, Ellinor; Jöud, Magnus; Kristinsson, Sigurður Y.; Lenhoff, Stig; Lenive, Oleg; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Migliorini, Gabriele; Nahi, Hareth; Nelander, Sven; Nickel, Jolanta; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Ross, Fiona M.; da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio; Swaminathan, Bhairavi; Thomsen, Hauke; Turesson, Ingemar; Vangsted, Annette; Vogel, Ulla; Waage, Anders; Walker, Brian A.; Wihlborg, Anna-Karin; Broyl, Annemiek; Davies, Faith E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Langer, Christian; Hansson, Markus; Kaiser, Martin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Stefansson, Kari; Morgan, Gareth J.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hemminki, Kari; Nilsson, Björn; Houlston, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy with a significant heritable basis. Genome-wide association studies have transformed our understanding of MM predisposition, but individual studies have had limited power to discover risk loci. Here we perform a meta-analysis of these GWAS, add a new GWAS and perform replication analyses resulting in 9,866 cases and 239,188 controls. We confirm all nine known risk loci and discover eight new loci at 6p22.3 (rs34229995, P=1.31 × 10−8), 6q21 (rs9372120, P=9.09 × 10−15), 7q36.1 (rs7781265, P=9.71 × 10−9), 8q24.21 (rs1948915, P=4.20 × 10−11), 9p21.3 (rs2811710, P=1.72 × 10−13), 10p12.1 (rs2790457, P=1.77 × 10−8), 16q23.1 (rs7193541, P=5.00 × 10−12) and 20q13.13 (rs6066835, P=1.36 × 10−13), which localize in or near to JARID2, ATG5, SMARCD3, CCAT1, CDKN2A, WAC, RFWD3 and PREX1. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of MM and insight into the biological basis of tumour development. PMID:27363682

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan S; Li, Ni; Weinhold, Niels; Försti, Asta; Ali, Mina; van Duin, Mark; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Johnson, David C; Chen, Bowang; Halvarsson, Britt-Marie; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Kuiper, Rowan; Stephens, Owen W; Bertsch, Uta; Broderick, Peter; Campo, Chiara; Einsele, Hermann; Gregory, Walter A; Gullberg, Urban; Henrion, Marc; Hillengass, Jens; Hoffmann, Per; Jackson, Graham H; Johnsson, Ellinor; Jöud, Magnus; Kristinsson, Sigurður Y; Lenhoff, Stig; Lenive, Oleg; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Migliorini, Gabriele; Nahi, Hareth; Nelander, Sven; Nickel, Jolanta; Nöthen, Markus M; Rafnar, Thorunn; Ross, Fiona M; da Silva Filho, Miguel Inacio; Swaminathan, Bhairavi; Thomsen, Hauke; Turesson, Ingemar; Vangsted, Annette; Vogel, Ulla; Waage, Anders; Walker, Brian A; Wihlborg, Anna-Karin; Broyl, Annemiek; Davies, Faith E; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Langer, Christian; Hansson, Markus; Kaiser, Martin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Stefansson, Kari; Morgan, Gareth J; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Hemminki, Kari; Nilsson, Björn; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-07-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy with a significant heritable basis. Genome-wide association studies have transformed our understanding of MM predisposition, but individual studies have had limited power to discover risk loci. Here we perform a meta-analysis of these GWAS, add a new GWAS and perform replication analyses resulting in 9,866 cases and 239,188 controls. We confirm all nine known risk loci and discover eight new loci at 6p22.3 (rs34229995, P=1.31 × 10(-8)), 6q21 (rs9372120, P=9.09 × 10(-15)), 7q36.1 (rs7781265, P=9.71 × 10(-9)), 8q24.21 (rs1948915, P=4.20 × 10(-11)), 9p21.3 (rs2811710, P=1.72 × 10(-13)), 10p12.1 (rs2790457, P=1.77 × 10(-8)), 16q23.1 (rs7193541, P=5.00 × 10(-12)) and 20q13.13 (rs6066835, P=1.36 × 10(-13)), which localize in or near to JARID2, ATG5, SMARCD3, CCAT1, CDKN2A, WAC, RFWD3 and PREX1. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of MM and insight into the biological basis of tumour development.

  15. Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies 14 new susceptibility loci for juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Anne; Cobb, Joanna; Marion, Miranda C; Prahalad, Sampath; Sudman, Marc; Bowes, John; Martin, Paul; Comeau, Mary E; Sajuthi, Satria; Andrews, Robert; Brown, Milton; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick; Deloukas, Panos; Edkins, Sarah; Eyre, Stephen; Gaffney, Patrick M; Guthery, Stephen L; Guthridge, Joel M; Hunt, Sarah E; James, Judith A; Keddache, Mehdi; Moser, Kathy L; Nigrovic, Peter A; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Onslow, Mitchell L; Rosé, Carlos D; Rich, Stephen S; Steel, Kathryn J A; Wakeland, Edward K; Wallace, Carol A; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Woo, Patricia; Bohnsack, John F; Haas, Johannes Peter; Glass, David N; Langefeld, Carl D; Thomson, Wendy; Thompson, Susan D

    2013-06-01

    We used the Immunochip array to analyze 2,816 individuals with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), comprising the most common subtypes (oligoarticular and rheumatoid factor-negative polyarticular JIA), and 13,056 controls. We confirmed association of 3 known JIA risk loci (the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, PTPN22 and PTPN2) and identified 14 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for the first time. Eleven additional new regions showed suggestive evidence of association with JIA (P < 1 × 10(-6)). Dense mapping of loci along with bioinformatics analysis refined the associations to one gene in each of eight regions, highlighting crucial pathways, including the interleukin (IL)-2 pathway, in JIA disease pathogenesis. The entire Immunochip content, the HLA region and the top 27 loci (P < 1 × 10(-6)) explain an estimated 18, 13 and 6% of the risk of JIA, respectively. In summary, this is the largest collection of JIA cases investigated so far and provides new insight into the genetic basis of this childhood autoimmune disease. PMID:23603761

  16. Addition of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors to sulphonylureas and risk of hypoglycaemia: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nicholas; Arnaud, Mickael; Robinson, Philip; Raschi, Emanuel; De Ponti, Fabrizio; Bégaud, Bernard; Pariente, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Objective To quantify the risk of hypoglycaemia associated with the concomitant use of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and sulphonylureas compared with placebo and sulphonylureas. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Medline, ISI Web of Science, SCOPUS, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and clinicaltrial.gov were searched without any language restriction. Study selection Placebo controlled randomised trials comprising at least 50 participants with type 2 diabetes treated with DPP-4 inhibitors and sulphonylureas. Review methods Risk of bias in each trial was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration tool. The risk ratio of hypoglycaemia with 95% confidence intervals was computed for each study and then pooled using fixed effect models (Mantel Haenszel method) or random effect models, when appropriate. Subgroup analyses were also performed (eg, dose of DPP-4 inhibitors). The number needed to harm (NNH) was estimated according to treatment duration. Results 10 studies were included, representing a total of 6546 participants (4020 received DPP-4 inhibitors plus sulphonylureas, 2526 placebo plus sulphonylureas). The risk ratio of hypoglycaemia was 1.52 (95% confidence interval 1.29 to 1.80). The NNH was 17 (95% confidence interval 11 to 30) for a treatment duration of six months or less, 15 (9 to 26) for 6.1 to 12 months, and 8 (5 to 15) for more than one year. In subgroup analysis, no difference was found between full and low doses of DPP-4 inhibitors: the risk ratio related to full dose DPP-4 inhibitors was 1.66 (1.34 to 2.06), whereas the increased risk ratio related to low dose DPP-4 inhibitors did not reach statistical significance (1.33, 0.92 to 1.94). Conclusions Addition of DPP-4 inhibitors to sulphonylurea to treat people with type 2 diabetes is associated with a 50% increased risk of hypoglycaemia and to one excess case of hypoglycaemia for every 17 patients in the first six months of treatment. This

  17. Risk assessment of nitrate and petroleum-derived hydrocarbon addition on Contricriba weissflogii biomass, lifetime, and nutritional value.

    PubMed

    Shun-Xing, Li; Feng-Jiao, Liu; Feng-Ying, Zheng; Xu-Guang, Huang; Yue-Gang, Zuo

    2014-03-15

    Coastal diatoms are often exposed to both petroleum-derived hydrocarbon pollution and eutrophication. How these exposures influence on algal biomass, lifetime, and nutritional value are unknown. To examine a more accurate risk assessment of the pollutants on the role of diatoms in coastal ecosystem functions, Conticribra weissflogii was maintained at different concentrations of nitrate (N) and/or water-soluble fractions of No.0 diesel oil (WSF). Algal density, cell growth cycle, protein, chlorophyll a, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malonaldehyde (MDA) were determined for the assessment of algal biomass, lifetime, nutritional value, photosynthesis and respiration, antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation, respectively.When N addition was combined with WSF pollution, the cell growth cycles were shortened by 27-44%; SOD activities were decreased by 1-64%; algal density, the concentrations of chlorophyll a, protein, and MDA were varied between 38 and 310%, 62 and 712%, 4 and 124%, and 19 and 233% of the values observed in N addition experiments, respectively. Coastal ecosystem functions were severely weakened by N and WSF additions, and the influence was increased in the order: Nrisk assessment of petroleum-derived hydrocarbon on coastal ecosystem functions.

  18. Additive Synergism between Asbestos and Smoking in Lung Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ngamwong, Yuwadee; Tangamornsuksan, Wimonchat; Lohitnavy, Ornrat; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Scholfield, C. Norman; Reisfeld, Brad; Lohitnavy, Manupat

    2015-01-01

    Smoking and asbestos exposure are important risks for lung cancer. Several epidemiological studies have linked asbestos exposure and smoking to lung cancer. To reconcile and unify these results, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to provide a quantitative estimate of the increased risk of lung cancer associated with asbestos exposure and cigarette smoking and to classify their interaction. Five electronic databases were searched from inception to May, 2015 for observational studies on lung cancer. All case-control (N = 10) and cohort (N = 7) studies were included in the analysis. We calculated pooled odds ratios (ORs), relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects model for the association of asbestos exposure and smoking with lung cancer. Lung cancer patients who were not exposed to asbestos and non-smoking (A-S-) were compared with; (i) asbestos-exposed and non-smoking (A+S-), (ii) non-exposure to asbestos and smoking (A-S+), and (iii) asbestos-exposed and smoking (A+S+). Our meta-analysis showed a significant difference in risk of developing lung cancer among asbestos exposed and/or smoking workers compared to controls (A-S-), odds ratios for the disease (95% CI) were (i) 1.70 (A+S-, 1.31–2.21), (ii) 5.65; (A-S+, 3.38–9.42), (iii) 8.70 (A+S+, 5.8–13.10). The additive interaction index of synergy was 1.44 (95% CI = 1.26–1.77) and the multiplicative index = 0.91 (95% CI = 0.63–1.30). Corresponding values for cohort studies were 1.11 (95% CI = 1.00–1.28) and 0.51 (95% CI = 0.31–0.85). Our results point to an additive synergism for lung cancer with co-exposure of asbestos and cigarette smoking. Assessments of industrial health risks should take smoking and other airborne health risks when setting occupational asbestos exposure limits. PMID:26274395

  19. Additive Synergism between Asbestos and Smoking in Lung Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ngamwong, Yuwadee; Tangamornsuksan, Wimonchat; Lohitnavy, Ornrat; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Scholfield, C Norman; Reisfeld, Brad; Lohitnavy, Manupat

    2015-01-01

    Smoking and asbestos exposure are important risks for lung cancer. Several epidemiological studies have linked asbestos exposure and smoking to lung cancer. To reconcile and unify these results, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to provide a quantitative estimate of the increased risk of lung cancer associated with asbestos exposure and cigarette smoking and to classify their interaction. Five electronic databases were searched from inception to May, 2015 for observational studies on lung cancer. All case-control (N = 10) and cohort (N = 7) studies were included in the analysis. We calculated pooled odds ratios (ORs), relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a random-effects model for the association of asbestos exposure and smoking with lung cancer. Lung cancer patients who were not exposed to asbestos and non-smoking (A-S-) were compared with; (i) asbestos-exposed and non-smoking (A+S-), (ii) non-exposure to asbestos and smoking (A-S+), and (iii) asbestos-exposed and smoking (A+S+). Our meta-analysis showed a significant difference in risk of developing lung cancer among asbestos exposed and/or smoking workers compared to controls (A-S-), odds ratios for the disease (95% CI) were (i) 1.70 (A+S-, 1.31-2.21), (ii) 5.65; (A-S+, 3.38-9.42), (iii) 8.70 (A+S+, 5.8-13.10). The additive interaction index of synergy was 1.44 (95% CI = 1.26-1.77) and the multiplicative index = 0.91 (95% CI = 0.63-1.30). Corresponding values for cohort studies were 1.11 (95% CI = 1.00-1.28) and 0.51 (95% CI = 0.31-0.85). Our results point to an additive synergism for lung cancer with co-exposure of asbestos and cigarette smoking. Assessments of industrial health risks should take smoking and other airborne health risks when setting occupational asbestos exposure limits.

  20. Genetic predisposition to coronary heart disease and stroke using an additive genetic risk score: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To determine the extent to which the risk for incident coronary heart disease (CHD) increases in relation to a genetic risk score (GRS) that additively integrates the influence of high-risk alleles in nine documented single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CHD, and to examine whether t...

  1. Discovery and Refinement of Loci Associated with Lipid Levels

    PubMed Central

    Peloso, Gina M.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M.; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A.; Ehret, Georg B.; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M.; Freitag, Daniel F.; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U.; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian’an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K.; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Volcik, Kelly A.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F.; Bolton, Jennifer L.; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S.; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S.F.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E.; Ingi Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R.; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V.M.; Nsubuga, Rebecca N.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K.; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ridker, Paul M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J.; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F.; Young, Elizabeth H.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S.; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S.; Cooper, Richard S.; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B.; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B.; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Martin, Nicholas G.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Price, Jackie F.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Whitfield, John B.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Franks, Paul W.; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable, risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,578 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5×10−8, including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian, and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipids are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index. Our results illustrate the value of genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestries and provide insights into biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological, and therapeutic research. PMID:24097068

  2. Discovery and refinement of loci associated with lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Willer, Cristen J; Schmidt, Ellen M; Sengupta, Sebanti; Peloso, Gina M; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ganna, Andrea; Chen, Jin; Buchkovich, Martin L; Mora, Samia; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Demirkan, Ayşe; Den Hertog, Heleen M; Do, Ron; Donnelly, Louise A; Ehret, Georg B; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fraser, Ross M; Freitag, Daniel F; Gurdasani, Deepti; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hyppönen, Elina; Isaacs, Aaron; Jackson, Anne U; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Xiaohui; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mangino, Massimo; Mihailov, Evelin; Montasser, May E; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nolte, Ilja M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Palmer, Cameron D; Perola, Markus; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Sanna, Serena; Saxena, Richa; Service, Susan K; Shah, Sonia; Shungin, Dmitry; Sidore, Carlo; Song, Ci; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Van den Herik, Evita G; Voight, Benjamin F; Volcik, Kelly A; Waite, Lindsay L; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Weihua; Absher, Devin; Asiki, Gershim; Barroso, Inês; Been, Latonya F; Bolton, Jennifer L; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Burnett, Mary S; Cesana, Giancarlo; Dimitriou, Maria; Doney, Alex S F; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Epstein, Stephen E; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Gigante, Bruna; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Gravito, Martha L; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Göran; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Holm, Hilma; Hung, Yi-Jen; Illig, Thomas; Jones, Michelle R; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Eric; Klopp, Norman; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kumari, Meena; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lin, Shih-Yi; Lindström, Jaana; Loos, Ruth J F; Mach, François; McArdle, Wendy L; Meisinger, Christa; Mitchell, Braxton D; Müller, Gabrielle; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Narisu, Narisu; Nieminen, Tuomo V M; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Olafsson, Isleifur; Ong, Ken K; Palotie, Aarno; Papamarkou, Theodore; Pomilla, Cristina; Pouta, Anneli; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Scharnagl, Hubert; Seeley, Janet; Silander, Kaisa; Stancáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Swift, Amy J; Tiret, Laurence; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Pelt, L Joost; Vedantam, Sailaja; Wainwright, Nicholas; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Wilson, James F; Young, Elizabeth H; Zhao, Jing Hua; Adair, Linda S; Arveiler, Dominique; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Franklyn; Bochud, Murielle; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Bovet, Pascal; Burnier, Michel; Campbell, Harry; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Collins, Francis S; Cooper, Richard S; Danesh, John; Dedoussis, George; de Faire, Ulf; Feranil, Alan B; Ferrières, Jean; Ferrucci, Luigi; Freimer, Nelson B; Gieger, Christian; Groop, Leif C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hingorani, Aroon; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, G Kees; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Humphries, Steve E; Hunt, Steven C; Hveem, Kristian; Iribarren, Carlos; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kesäniemi, Antero; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S; Koudstaal, Peter J; Krauss, Ronald M; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Martin, Nicholas G; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; McKenzie, Colin A; Meneton, Pierre; Metspalu, Andres; Moilanen, Leena; Morris, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; Njølstad, Inger; Pedersen, Nancy L; Power, Chris; Pramstaller, Peter P; Price, Jackie F; Psaty, Bruce M; Quertermous, Thomas; Rauramaa, Rainer; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Saramies, Jouko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Sheu, Wayne H-H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Siegbahn, Agneta; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Strachan, David P; Tayo, Bamidele O; Tremoli, Elena; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas J; Whitfield, John B; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Ordovas, Jose M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Palmer, Colin N A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Chasman, Daniel I; Rotter, Jerome I; Franks, Paul W; Ripatti, Samuli; Cupples, L Adrienne; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Rich, Stephen S; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mohlke, Karen L; Ingelsson, Erik; Abecasis, Gonçalo R

    2013-11-01

    Levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and total cholesterol are heritable, modifiable risk factors for coronary artery disease. To identify new loci and refine known loci influencing these lipids, we examined 188,577 individuals using genome-wide and custom genotyping arrays. We identify and annotate 157 loci associated with lipid levels at P < 5 × 10(-8), including 62 loci not previously associated with lipid levels in humans. Using dense genotyping in individuals of European, East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry, we narrow association signals in 12 loci. We find that loci associated with blood lipid levels are often associated with cardiovascular and metabolic traits, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, waist-hip ratio and body mass index. Our results demonstrate the value of using genetic data from individuals of diverse ancestry and provide insights into the biological mechanisms regulating blood lipids to guide future genetic, biological and therapeutic research.

  3. Increased bioclogging and corrosion risk by sulfate addition during iodine recovery at a natural gas production plant.

    PubMed

    Lim, Choon-Ping; Zhao, Dan; Takase, Yuta; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Tomoko; Tomoe, Yasuyoshi; Tanji, Yasunori

    2011-02-01

    Iodine recovery at a natural gas production plant in Japan involved the addition of sulfuric acid for pH adjustment, resulting in an additional about 200 mg/L of sulfate in the waste brine after iodine recovery. Bioclogging occurred at the waste brine injection well, causing a decrease in well injectivity. To examine the factors that contribute to bioclogging, an on-site experiment was conducted by amending 10 L of brine with different conditions and then incubating the brine for 5 months under open air. The control case was exposed to open air but did not receive additional chemicals. When sulfate addition was coupled with low iodine, there was a drastic increase in the total amount of accumulated biomass (and subsequently the risk of bioclogging) that was nearly six times higher than the control. The bioclogging-associated corrosion rate of carbon steel was 84.5 μm/year, which is four times higher than that observed under other conditions. Analysis of the microbial communities by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that the additional sulfate established a sulfur cycle and induced the growth of phototrophic bacteria, including cyanobacteria and purple bacteria. In the presence of sulfate and low iodine levels, cyanobacteria and purple bacteria bloomed, and the accumulation of abundant biomass may have created a more conducive environment for anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is believed that the higher corrosion rate was caused by a differential aeration cell that was established by the heterogeneous distribution of the biomass that covered the surface of the test coupons. PMID:20922384

  4. Meat and bone meal and mineral feed additives may increase the risk of oral prion disease transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; McKenzie, Debbie; Pedersen, Joel A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer-sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 μm and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion-contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition.

  5. Meat and bone meal and mineral feed additives may increase the risk of oral prion disease transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; McKenzie, D.; Pedersen, J.A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer-sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 ??m and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion-contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  6. MEAT AND BONE MEAL AND MINERAL FEED ADDITIVES MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF ORAL PRION DISEASE TRANSMISSION

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher J.; McKenzie, Debbie; Pedersen, Joel A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer–sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 μm and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion–contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition. PMID:21218345

  7. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Five Susceptibility Loci for Follicular Lymphoma outside the HLA Region

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Vijai, Joseph; Conde, Lucia; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Foo, Jia-Nee; Bracci, Paige M.; Vermeulen, Roel C.H.; Slager, Susan L.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Wang, Sophia S.; Linet, Martha S.; Salles, Gilles; Lan, Qing; Severi, Gianluca; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Lightfoot, Tracy; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Ghesquières, Hervé; Link, Brian K.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Alex; Tinker, Lesley F.; Teras, Lauren R.; Kricker, Anne; Becker, Nikolaus; Purdue, Mark P.; Spinelli, John J.; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G.; Vineis, Paolo; Monnereau, Alain; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Albanes, Demetrius; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Gabbas, Attilio; Chung, Charles C.; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Liang, Liming; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Liu, Jianjun; Adami, Hans-Olov; Glimelius, Bengt; Ye, Yuanqing; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S.; Dogan, Ahmet; Thompson, Carrie A.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Novak, Anne J.; Liebow, Mark; Witzig, Thomas E.; Weiner, George J.; Schenk, Maryjean; Hartge, Patricia; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Cozen, Wendy; Zhi, Degui; Akers, Nicholas K.; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T.; Lacher, Mortimer; Villano, Danylo J.; Maria, Ann; Roman, Eve; Kane, Eleanor; Jackson, Rebecca D.; North, Kari E.; Diver, W. Ryan; Turner, Jenny; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; McKay, James; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Chamosa, Saioa; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kelly, Rachel S.; Ohlsson, Bodil; Travis, Ruth C.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Clavel, Jacqueline; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Virtamo, Jarmo; Mazza, Patrizio; Cocco, Pierluigi; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Chiu, Brian C.H.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Nieters, Alexandra; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; Cerhan, James R.; Smedby, Karin E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of follicular lymphoma (FL) have previously identified human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene variants. To identify additional FL susceptibility loci, we conducted a large-scale two-stage GWAS in 4,523 case subjects and 13,344 control subjects of European ancestry. Five non-HLA loci were associated with FL risk: 11q23.3 (rs4938573, p = 5.79 × 10−20) near CXCR5; 11q24.3 (rs4937362, p = 6.76 × 10−11) near ETS1; 3q28 (rs6444305, p = 1.10 × 10−10) in LPP; 18q21.33 (rs17749561, p = 8.28 × 10−10) near BCL2; and 8q24.21 (rs13254990, p = 1.06 × 10−8) near PVT1. In an analysis of the HLA region, we identified four linked HLA-DRβ1 multiallelic amino acids at positions 11, 13, 28, and 30 that were associated with FL risk (pomnibus = 4.20 × 10−67 to 2.67 × 10−70). Additional independent signals included rs17203612 in HLA class II (odds ratio [ORper-allele] = 1.44; p = 4.59 × 10−16) and rs3130437 in HLA class I (ORper-allele = 1.23; p = 8.23 × 10−9). Our findings further expand the number of loci associated with FL and provide evidence that multiple common variants outside the HLA region make a significant contribution to FL risk. PMID:25279986

  8. Age-at-Onset in Late Onset Alzheimer Disease is Modified by Multiple Genetic Loci

    PubMed Central

    Naj, Adam C.; Jun, Gyungah; Reitz, Christiane; Kunkle, Brian W.; Perry, William; Park, YoSon; Beecham, Gary W.; Rajbhandary, Ruchita A.; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Wang, Li-San; Kauwe, John S.K.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Myers, Amanda J.; Bird, Thomas D.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Crane, Paul K.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Barmada, Michael M.; Demirci, F. Yesim; Cruchaga, Carlos; Kramer, Patricia; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Hardy, John; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Larson, Eric B.; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Evans, Denis; Schneider, Julie A.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Saykin, Andrew J.; Reiman, Eric M.; De Jager, Philip L.; Bennett, David A.; Morris, John C.; Montine, Thomas J.; Goate, Alison M.; Blacker, Deborah; Tsuang, Debby W.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kukull, Walter A.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Martin, Eden R.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    variation (R2=0.198). Conclusions and Relevance We confirmed association of APOE variants with age-at-onset among late-onset Alzheimer disease cases and observed novel associations with age-at-onset in CR1, BIN1, and PICALM. In contrast to earlier hypothetical modeling, we show that the combined effects of Alzheimer disease risk variants on age-at-onset are on the scale of, but do not exceed, the APOE effect. While the aggregate effects of risk loci on age-at-onset may be significant, additional genetic contributions to age-at-onset are individually likely to be small. PMID:25199842

  9. Forty-three loci associated with plasma lipoprotein size, concentration, and cholesterol content in genome-wide analysis.

    PubMed

    Chasman, Daniel I; Paré, Guillaume; Mora, Samia; Hopewell, Jemma C; Peloso, Gina; Clarke, Robert; Cupples, L Adrienne; Hamsten, Anders; Kathiresan, Sekar; Mälarstig, Anders; Ordovas, José M; Ripatti, Samuli; Parker, Alex N; Miletich, Joseph P; Ridker, Paul M

    2009-11-01

    While conventional LDL-C, HDL-C, and triglyceride measurements reflect aggregate properties of plasma lipoprotein fractions, NMR-based measurements more accurately reflect lipoprotein particle concentrations according to class (LDL, HDL, and VLDL) and particle size (small, medium, and large). The concentrations of these lipoprotein sub-fractions may be related to risk of cardiovascular disease and related metabolic disorders. We performed a genome-wide association study of 17 lipoprotein measures determined by NMR together with LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, ApoA1, and ApoB in 17,296 women from the Women's Genome Health Study (WGHS). Among 36 loci with genome-wide significance (P<5x10(-8)) in primary and secondary analysis, ten (PCCB/STAG1 (3q22.3), GMPR/MYLIP (6p22.3), BTNL2 (6p21.32), KLF14 (7q32.2), 8p23.1, JMJD1C (10q21.3), SBF2 (11p15.4), 12q23.2, CCDC92/DNAH10/ZNF664 (12q24.31.B), and WIPI1 (17q24.2)) have not been reported in prior genome-wide association studies for plasma lipid concentration. Associations with mean lipoprotein particle size but not cholesterol content were found for LDL at four loci (7q11.23, LPL (8p21.3), 12q24.31.B, and LIPG (18q21.1)) and for HDL at one locus (GCKR (2p23.3)). In addition, genetic determinants of total IDL and total VLDL concentration were found at many loci, most strongly at LIPC (15q22.1) and APOC-APOE complex (19q13.32), respectively. Associations at seven more loci previously known for effects on conventional plasma lipid measures reveal additional genetic influences on lipoprotein profiles and bring the total number of loci to 43. Thus, genome-wide associations identified novel loci involved with lipoprotein metabolism-including loci that affect the NMR-based measures of concentration or size of LDL, HDL, and VLDL particles-all characteristics of lipoprotein profiles that may impact disease risk but are not available by conventional assay. PMID:19936222

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Epistatic Cancellation of Additive Genetic Variance for Root Length in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lachowiec, Jennifer; Shen, Xia; Queitsch, Christine; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify loci underlying complex traits generally assume that most genetic variance is additive. Here, we examined the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana root length and found that the genomic narrow-sense heritability for this trait in the examined population was statistically zero. The low amount of additive genetic variance that could be captured by the genome-wide genotypes likely explains why no associations to root length could be found using standard additive-model-based genome-wide association (GWA) approaches. However, as the broad-sense heritability for root length was significantly larger, and primarily due to epistasis, we also performed an epistatic GWA analysis to map loci contributing to the epistatic genetic variance. Four interacting pairs of loci were revealed, involving seven chromosomal loci that passed a standard multiple-testing corrected significance threshold. The genotype-phenotype maps for these pairs revealed epistasis that cancelled out the additive genetic variance, explaining why these loci were not detected in the additive GWA analysis. Small population sizes, such as in our experiment, increase the risk of identifying false epistatic interactions due to testing for associations with very large numbers of multi-marker genotypes in few phenotyped individuals. Therefore, we estimated the false-positive risk using a new statistical approach that suggested half of the associated pairs to be true positive associations. Our experimental evaluation of candidate genes within the seven associated loci suggests that this estimate is conservative; we identified functional candidate genes that affected root development in four loci that were part of three of the pairs. The statistical epistatic analyses were thus indispensable for confirming known, and identifying new, candidate genes for root length in this population of wild-collected A. thaliana accessions. We also illustrate how epistatic cancellation of the additive genetic variance

  11. A Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Epistatic Cancellation of Additive Genetic Variance for Root Length in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lachowiec, Jennifer; Shen, Xia; Queitsch, Christine; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify loci underlying complex traits generally assume that most genetic variance is additive. Here, we examined the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana root length and found that the genomic narrow-sense heritability for this trait in the examined population was statistically zero. The low amount of additive genetic variance that could be captured by the genome-wide genotypes likely explains why no associations to root length could be found using standard additive-model-based genome-wide association (GWA) approaches. However, as the broad-sense heritability for root length was significantly larger, and primarily due to epistasis, we also performed an epistatic GWA analysis to map loci contributing to the epistatic genetic variance. Four interacting pairs of loci were revealed, involving seven chromosomal loci that passed a standard multiple-testing corrected significance threshold. The genotype-phenotype maps for these pairs revealed epistasis that cancelled out the additive genetic variance, explaining why these loci were not detected in the additive GWA analysis. Small population sizes, such as in our experiment, increase the risk of identifying false epistatic interactions due to testing for associations with very large numbers of multi-marker genotypes in few phenotyped individuals. Therefore, we estimated the false-positive risk using a new statistical approach that suggested half of the associated pairs to be true positive associations. Our experimental evaluation of candidate genes within the seven associated loci suggests that this estimate is conservative; we identified functional candidate genes that affected root development in four loci that were part of three of the pairs. The statistical epistatic analyses were thus indispensable for confirming known, and identifying new, candidate genes for root length in this population of wild-collected A. thaliana accessions. We also illustrate how epistatic cancellation of the additive genetic variance

  12. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic march.

    PubMed

    Marenholz, Ingo; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Strachan, David P; Spycher, Ben D; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Sääf, Annika; Kerkhof, Marjan; Ege, Markus; Baltic, Svetlana; Matheson, Melanie C; Li, Jin; Michel, Sven; Ang, Wei Q; McArdle, Wendy; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Demenais, Florence; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Söderhäll, Cilla; Pershagen, Göran; de Jongste, Johan C; Postma, Dirkje S; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Horak, Elisabeth; Ogorodova, Ludmila M; Puzyrev, Valery P; Bragina, Elena Yu; Hudson, Thomas J; Morin, Charles; Duffy, David L; Marks, Guy B; Robertson, Colin F; Montgomery, Grant W; Musk, Bill; Thompson, Philip J; Martin, Nicholas G; James, Alan; Sleiman, Patrick; Toskala, Elina; Rodriguez, Elke; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gieger, Christian; Heinzmann, Andrea; Rietschel, Ernst; Keil, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Pennell, Craig E; Sly, Peter D; Schmidt, Carsten O; Matanovic, Anja; Schneider, Valentin; Heinig, Matthias; Hübner, Norbert; Holt, Patrick G; Lau, Susanne; Kabesch, Michael; Weidinger, Stefan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferreira, Manuel A R; Laprise, Catherine; Freidin, Maxim B; Genuneit, Jon; Koppelman, Gerard H; Melén, Erik; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Henderson, A John; Lee, Young Ae

    2015-01-01

    Eczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the 'atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12 populations including 2,428 cases and 17,034 controls. Here we report two novel loci specific for the combined eczema plus asthma phenotype, which are associated with allergic disease for the first time; rs9357733 located in EFHC1 on chromosome 6p12.3 (OR 1.27; P=2.1 × 10(-8)) and rs993226 between TMTC2 and SLC6A15 on chromosome 12q21.3 (OR 1.58; P=5.3 × 10(-9)). Additional susceptibility loci identified at genome-wide significance are FLG (1q21.3), IL4/KIF3A (5q31.1), AP5B1/OVOL1 (11q13.1), C11orf30/LRRC32 (11q13.5) and IKZF3 (17q21). We show that predominantly eczema loci increase the risk for the atopic march. Our findings suggest that eczema may play an important role in the development of asthma after eczema. PMID:26542096

  13. Genome-wide association study in Chinese identifies novel loci for blood pressure and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiangfeng; Wang, Laiyuan; Lin, Xu; Huang, Jianfeng; Charles Gu, C; He, Meian; Shen, Hongbing; He, Jiang; Zhu, Jingwen; Li, Huaixing; Hixson, James E; Wu, Tangchun; Dai, Juncheng; Lu, Ling; Shen, Chong; Chen, Shufeng; He, Lin; Mo, Zengnan; Hao, Yongchen; Mo, Xingbo; Yang, Xueli; Li, Jianxin; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jichun; Fan, Zhongjie; Li, Ying; Zhao, Liancheng; Li, Hongfan; Lu, Fanghong; Yao, Cailiang; Yu, Lin; Xu, Lihua; Mu, Jianjun; Wu, Xianping; Deng, Ying; Hu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Weidong; Ji, Xu; Guo, Dongshuang; Guo, Zhirong; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Yang, Zili; Wang, Renping; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Yan, Weili; Sun, Ningling; Gao, Pingjin; Gu, Dongfeng

    2015-02-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder and the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature deaths worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in the European population have identified multiple chromosomal regions associated with blood pressure, and the identified loci altogether explain only a small fraction of the variance for blood pressure. The differences in environmental exposures and genetic background between Chinese and European populations might suggest potential different pathways of blood pressure regulation. To identify novel genetic variants affecting blood pressure variation, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWASs of blood pressure and hypertension in 11 816 subjects followed by replication studies including 69 146 additional individuals. We identified genome-wide significant (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)) associations with blood pressure, which included variants at three new loci (CACNA1D, CYP21A2, and MED13L) and a newly discovered variant near SLC4A7. We also replicated 14 previously reported loci, 8 (CASZ1, MOV10, FGF5, CYP17A1, SOX6, ATP2B1, ALDH2, and JAG1) at genome-wide significance, and 6 (FIGN, ULK4, GUCY1A3, HFE, TBX3-TBX5, and TBX3) at a suggestive level of P = 1.81 × 10(-3) to 5.16 × 10(-8). These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation of blood pressure and potential targets for treatments. PMID:25249183

  14. Whole-exome SNP array identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Yin, Xianyong; Gao, Jinping; Sheng, Yujun; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Jianzhong; He, Chundi; Qiu, Ying; Wen, Guangdong; Tian, Hongqing; Zheng, Xiaodong; Liu, Shengxiu; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Weiran; Cheng, Yuyan; Liu, Longdan; Chang, Yan; Wang, Zaixing; Li, Zenggang; Li, Longnian; Wu, Jianping; Fang, Ling; Shen, Changbing; Zhou, Fusheng; Liang, Bo; Chen, Gang; Li, Hui; Cui, Yong; Xu, Aie; Yang, Xueqin; Hao, Fei; Xu, Limin; Fan, Xing; Li, Yuzhen; Wu, Rina; Wang, Xiuli; Liu, Xiaoming; Zheng, Min; Song, Shunpeng; Ji, Bihua; Fang, Hong; Yu, Jianbin; Sun, Yongxin; Hui, Yan; Zhang, Furen; Yang, Rongya; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have reproducibly associated ∼40 susceptibility loci with psoriasis. However, the missing heritability is evident and the contributions of coding variants have not yet been systematically evaluated. Here, we present a large-scale whole-exome array analysis for psoriasis consisting of 42,760 individuals. We discover 16 SNPs within 15 new genes/loci associated with psoriasis, including C1orf141, ZNF683, TMC6, AIM2, IL1RL1, CASR, SON, ZFYVE16, MTHFR, CCDC129, ZNF143, AP5B1, SYNE2, IFNGR2 and 3q26.2-q27 (P<5.00 × 10−08). In addition, we also replicate four known susceptibility loci TNIP1, NFKBIA, IL12B and LCE3D–LCE3E. These susceptibility variants identified in the current study collectively account for 1.9% of the psoriasis heritability. The variant within AIM2 is predicted to impact protein structure. Our findings increase the number of genetic risk factors for psoriasis and highlight new and plausible biological pathways in psoriasis. PMID:25854761

  15. Whole-exome SNP array identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Yin, Xianyong; Gao, Jinping; Sheng, Yujun; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Jianzhong; He, Chundi; Qiu, Ying; Wen, Guangdong; Tian, Hongqing; Zheng, Xiaodong; Liu, Shengxiu; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Weiran; Cheng, Yuyan; Liu, Longdan; Chang, Yan; Wang, Zaixing; Li, Zenggang; Li, Longnian; Wu, Jianping; Fang, Ling; Shen, Changbing; Zhou, Fusheng; Liang, Bo; Chen, Gang; Li, Hui; Cui, Yong; Xu, Aie; Yang, Xueqin; Hao, Fei; Xu, Limin; Fan, Xing; Li, Yuzhen; Wu, Rina; Wang, Xiuli; Liu, Xiaoming; Zheng, Min; Song, Shunpeng; Ji, Bihua; Fang, Hong; Yu, Jianbin; Sun, Yongxin; Hui, Yan; Zhang, Furen; Yang, Rongya; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have reproducibly associated ∼40 susceptibility loci with psoriasis. However, the missing heritability is evident and the contributions of coding variants have not yet been systematically evaluated. Here, we present a large-scale whole-exome array analysis for psoriasis consisting of 42,760 individuals. We discover 16 SNPs within 15 new genes/loci associated with psoriasis, including C1orf141, ZNF683, TMC6, AIM2, IL1RL1, CASR, SON, ZFYVE16, MTHFR, CCDC129, ZNF143, AP5B1, SYNE2, IFNGR2 and 3q26.2-q27 (P<5.00 × 10(-08)). In addition, we also replicate four known susceptibility loci TNIP1, NFKBIA, IL12B and LCE3D-LCE3E. These susceptibility variants identified in the current study collectively account for 1.9% of the psoriasis heritability. The variant within AIM2 is predicted to impact protein structure. Our findings increase the number of genetic risk factors for psoriasis and highlight new and plausible biological pathways in psoriasis.

  16. Genome-wide association study in Chinese identifies novel loci for blood pressure and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiangfeng; Wang, Laiyuan; Lin, Xu; Huang, Jianfeng; Charles Gu, C; He, Meian; Shen, Hongbing; He, Jiang; Zhu, Jingwen; Li, Huaixing; Hixson, James E; Wu, Tangchun; Dai, Juncheng; Lu, Ling; Shen, Chong; Chen, Shufeng; He, Lin; Mo, Zengnan; Hao, Yongchen; Mo, Xingbo; Yang, Xueli; Li, Jianxin; Cao, Jie; Chen, Jichun; Fan, Zhongjie; Li, Ying; Zhao, Liancheng; Li, Hongfan; Lu, Fanghong; Yao, Cailiang; Yu, Lin; Xu, Lihua; Mu, Jianjun; Wu, Xianping; Deng, Ying; Hu, Dongsheng; Zhang, Weidong; Ji, Xu; Guo, Dongshuang; Guo, Zhirong; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Yang, Zili; Wang, Renping; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Yan, Weili; Sun, Ningling; Gao, Pingjin; Gu, Dongfeng

    2015-02-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder and the leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature deaths worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in the European population have identified multiple chromosomal regions associated with blood pressure, and the identified loci altogether explain only a small fraction of the variance for blood pressure. The differences in environmental exposures and genetic background between Chinese and European populations might suggest potential different pathways of blood pressure regulation. To identify novel genetic variants affecting blood pressure variation, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWASs of blood pressure and hypertension in 11 816 subjects followed by replication studies including 69 146 additional individuals. We identified genome-wide significant (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)) associations with blood pressure, which included variants at three new loci (CACNA1D, CYP21A2, and MED13L) and a newly discovered variant near SLC4A7. We also replicated 14 previously reported loci, 8 (CASZ1, MOV10, FGF5, CYP17A1, SOX6, ATP2B1, ALDH2, and JAG1) at genome-wide significance, and 6 (FIGN, ULK4, GUCY1A3, HFE, TBX3-TBX5, and TBX3) at a suggestive level of P = 1.81 × 10(-3) to 5.16 × 10(-8). These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the regulation of blood pressure and potential targets for treatments.

  17. Meta-analysis identifies seven susceptibility loci involved in the atopic march

    PubMed Central

    Marenholz, Ingo; Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Rüschendorf, Franz; Bauerfeind, Anja; Strachan, David P.; Spycher, Ben D.; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Sääf, Annika; Kerkhof, Marjan; Ege, Markus; Baltic, Svetlana; Matheson, Melanie C.; Li, Jin; Michel, Sven; Ang, Wei Q.; McArdle, Wendy; Arnold, Andreas; Homuth, Georg; Demenais, Florence; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Söderhäll, Cilla; Pershagen, Göran; de Jongste, Johan C.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Horak, Elisabeth; Ogorodova, Ludmila M.; Puzyrev, Valery P.; Bragina, Elena Yu; Hudson, Thomas J.; Morin, Charles; Duffy, David L.; Marks, Guy B.; Robertson, Colin F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Musk, Bill; Thompson, Philip J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; James, Alan; Sleiman, Patrick; Toskala, Elina; Rodriguez, Elke; Fölster-Holst, Regina; Franke, Andre; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gieger, Christian; Heinzmann, Andrea; Rietschel, Ernst; Keil, Thomas; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M.; Pennell, Craig E.; Sly, Peter D.; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Matanovic, Anja; Schneider, Valentin; Heinig, Matthias; Hübner, Norbert; Holt, Patrick G.; Lau, Susanne; Kabesch, Michael; Weidinger, Stefan; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ferreira, Manuel A. R.; Laprise, Catherine; Freidin, Maxim B.; Genuneit, Jon; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Melén, Erik; Dizier, Marie- Hélène; Henderson, A John; Lee, Young Ae

    2015-01-01

    Eczema often precedes the development of asthma in a disease course called the ‘atopic march'. To unravel the genes underlying this characteristic pattern of allergic disease, we conduct a multi-stage genome-wide association study on infantile eczema followed by childhood asthma in 12 populations including 2,428 cases and 17,034 controls. Here we report two novel loci specific for the combined eczema plus asthma phenotype, which are associated with allergic disease for the first time; rs9357733 located in EFHC1 on chromosome 6p12.3 (OR 1.27; P=2.1 × 10−8) and rs993226 between TMTC2 and SLC6A15 on chromosome 12q21.3 (OR 1.58; P=5.3 × 10−9). Additional susceptibility loci identified at genome-wide significance are FLG (1q21.3), IL4/KIF3A (5q31.1), AP5B1/OVOL1 (11q13.1), C11orf30/LRRC32 (11q13.5) and IKZF3 (17q21). We show that predominantly eczema loci increase the risk for the atopic march. Our findings suggest that eczema may play an important role in the development of asthma after eczema. PMID:26542096

  18. Seven novel prostate cancer susceptibility loci identified by a multi-stage genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Canzian, Frederico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim; Gronberg, Henrik; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Thun, Michael J; Ingles, Sue; Chanock, Stephen; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Pharoah, Paul; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E.; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Dörk, Thilo; Andriole, Gerald; Dickinson, Joanne L.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Spurdle, Amanda; Clements, Judith A.; Chambers, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Frank Gardiner, R. A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Schaid, Dan; John, Esther M.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Park, Jong Y.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Habuchi, Tomonori; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Kaneva, Radka; Muir, Ken; Benlloch, Sara; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Saunders, Edward J.; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Mahmud, Nadiya; Guy, Michelle; O’Brien, Lynne T.; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Hall, Amanda L.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Morrison, Jonathan; Dearnaley, David P.; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Parker, Christopher C.; Van As, Nicholas; Woodhouse, Christopher J.; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin S.; Lophatonanon, Aritaya; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo LJ; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Røder, M. Andreas; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Bojesen, Stig E.; Travis, Ruth; Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Wiklund, Fredrik; Aly, Markus; Lindstrom, Sara; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan; Stern, Mariana C; Corral, Roman; Virtamo, Jarmo; Cox, Angela; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; FitzGerald, Liesel; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika M.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Borre, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Serth, Jürgen; Yeager, Meredith; Berndt, Sonja I.; Marthick, James R; Patterson, Briony; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Batra, Jyotsna; Lose, Felicity; McDonnell, Shannon K; Joshi, Amit D.; Shahabi, Ahva; Rinckleb, Antje E.; Ray, Ana; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lin, Huo-Yi; Stephenson, Robert A; Farnham, James; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Narita, Shintaro; Cao, Guang-Wen; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. To identify common PrCa susceptibility alleles, we conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study and previously reported the results of the first two stages, which identified 16 novel susceptibility loci for PrCa. Here we report the results of stage 3 in which we evaluated 1,536 SNPs in 4,574 cases and 4,164 controls. Ten novel association signals were followed up through genotyping in 51,311 samples in 30 studies through the international PRACTICAL consortium. In addition to previously reported loci, we identified a further seven new prostate cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 2p, 3q, 5p, 6p, 12q and Xq (P=4.0 ×10−8 to P=2.7 ×10−24). We also identified a SNP in TERT more strongly associated with PrCa than that previously reported. More than 40 PrCa susceptibility loci, explaining ~25% of the familial risk in this disease, have now been identified. PMID:21743467

  19. Body Mass Index Genetic Risk Score and Endometrial Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jennifer; Setiawan, Veronica W.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Schumacher, Fredrick; Yu, Herbert; Delahanty, Ryan; Bernstein, Leslie; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Chu; Cook, Linda S.; Friedenreich, Christine; Garcia-Closas, Monserrat; Haiman, Christopher A.; Le Marchand, Loic; Liang, Xiaolin; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Olson, Sara H.; Risch, Harvey A.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ursin, Giske; Yang, Hannah P.; Kraft, Peter; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common variants that predispose individuals to a higher body mass index (BMI), an independent risk factor for endometrial cancer. Composite genotype risk scores (GRS) based on the joint effect of published BMI risk loci were used to explore whether endometrial cancer shares a genetic background with obesity. Genotype and risk factor data were available on 3,376 endometrial cancer case and 3,867 control participants of European ancestry from the Epidemiology of Endometrial Cancer Consortium GWAS. A BMI GRS was calculated by summing the number of BMI risk alleles at 97 independent loci. For exploratory analyses, additional GRSs were based on subsets of risk loci within putative etiologic BMI pathways. The BMI GRS was statistically significantly associated with endometrial cancer risk (P = 0.002). For every 10 BMI risk alleles a woman had a 13% increased endometrial cancer risk (95% CI: 4%, 22%). However, after adjusting for BMI, the BMI GRS was no longer associated with risk (per 10 BMI risk alleles OR = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.91, 1.07; P = 0.78). Heterogeneity by BMI did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.06), and no effect modification was noted by age, GWAS Stage, study design or between studies (P≥0.58). In exploratory analyses, the GRS defined by variants at loci containing monogenic obesity syndrome genes was associated with reduced endometrial cancer risk independent of BMI (per BMI risk allele OR = 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88, 0.96; P = 2.1 x 10−5). Possessing a large number of BMI risk alleles does not increase endometrial cancer risk above that conferred by excess body weight among women of European descent. Thus, the GRS based on all current established BMI loci does not provide added value independent of BMI. Future studies are required to validate the unexpected observed relation between monogenic obesity syndrome genetic variants and endometrial cancer risk. PMID:26606540

  20. Prediction of causal candidate genes in coronary artery disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Brænne, Ingrid; Civelek, Mete; Vilne, Baiba; Di Narzo, Antonio; Johnson, Andrew D.; Zhao, Yuqi; Reiz, Benedikt; Codoni, Veronica; Webb, Thomas R.; Asl, Hassan Foroughi; Hamby, Stephen E.; Zeng, Lingyao; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Hao, Ke; Topol, Eric J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Yang, Xia; Samani, Nilesh J.; Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far identified 159 significant and suggestive loci for coronary artery disease (CAD). We now report comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of sequence variation in these loci to predict candidate causal genes. Approach and Results All annotated genes in the loci were evaluated with respect to protein coding SNPs and gene expression parameters. The latter included expression quantitative trait loci, tissue specificity, and miRNA binding. High priority candidate genes were further identified based on literature searches and our experimental data. We conclude that the great majority of causal variations affecting CAD risk occur in non-coding regions, with 41 % affecting gene expression robustly versus 6% leading to amino acid changes. Many of these genes differed from the traditionally annotated genes, which was usually based on proximity to the lead SNP. Indeed, we obtained evidence that genetic variants at CAD loci affect 98 genes which had not been linked to CAD previously. Conclusions Our results substantially revise the list of likely candidates for CAD and suggest that GWAS efforts in other diseases may benefit from similar bioinformatics analyses. PMID:26293461

  1. Hazard and risk assessment of a nanoparticulate cerium oxide-based diesel fuel additive - a case study.

    PubMed

    Park, Barry; Donaldson, Kenneth; Duffin, Rodger; Tran, Lang; Kelly, Frank; Mudway, Ian; Morin, Jean-Paul; Guest, Robert; Jenkinson, Peter; Samaras, Zissis; Giannouli, Myrsini; Kouridis, Haris; Martin, Patricia

    2008-04-01

    Envirox is a scientifically and commercially proven diesel fuel combustion catalyst based on nanoparticulate cerium oxide and has been demonstrated to reduce fuel consumption, greenhouse gas emissions (CO(2)), and particulate emissions when added to diesel at levels of 5 mg/L. Studies have confirmed the adverse effects of particulates on respiratory and cardiac health, and while the use of Envirox contributes to a reduction in the particulate content in the air, it is necessary to demonstrate that the addition of Envirox does not alter the intrinsic toxicity of particles emitted in the exhaust. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety in use of Envirox by addressing the classical risk paradigm. Hazard assessment has been addressed by examining a range of in vitro cell and cell-free endpoints to assess the toxicity of cerium oxide nanoparticles as well as particulates emitted from engines using Envirox. Exposure assessment has taken data from modeling studies and from airborne monitoring sites in London and Newcastle adjacent to routes where vehicles using Envirox passed. Data have demonstrated that for the exposure levels measured, the estimated internal dose for a referential human in a chronic exposure situation is much lower than the no-observed-effect level (NOEL) in the in vitro toxicity studies. Exposure to nano-size cerium oxide as a result of the addition of Envirox to diesel fuel at the current levels of exposure in ambient air is therefore unlikely to lead to pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation, which are the precursors for respiratory and cardiac health problems. PMID:18444008

  2. Identification of Multiple Genetic Susceptibility Loci in Takayasu Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hughes, Travis; Aksu, Kenan; Keser, Gokhan; Coit, Patrick; Aydin, Sibel Z.; Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Kamalı, Sevil; Inanc, Murat; Carette, Simon; Hoffman, Gary S.; Akar, Servet; Onen, Fatos; Akkoc, Nurullah; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry; Karadag, Omer; Kiraz, Sedat; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Ozbalkan, Zeynep; Ates, Askin; Karaaslan, Yasar; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; Monach, Paul A.; Ozer, Hüseyin T.; Seyahi, Emire; Fresko, Izzet; Cefle, Ayse; Seo, Philip; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ozturk, Mehmet A.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Cobankara, Veli; Onat, A. Mesut; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A.; Tunc, Ercan; Duzgun, Nurşen; Bıcakcıgil, Muge; Yentür, Sibel P.; Merkel, Peter A.; Direskeneli, Haner; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2013-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis is a rare inflammatory disease of large arteries. The etiology of Takayasu arteritis remains poorly understood, but genetic contribution to the disease pathogenesis is supported by the genetic association with HLA-B∗52. We genotyped ∼200,000 genetic variants in two ethnically divergent Takayasu arteritis cohorts from Turkey and North America by using a custom-designed genotyping platform (Immunochip). Additional genetic variants and the classical HLA alleles were imputed and analyzed. We identified and confirmed two independent susceptibility loci within the HLA region (r2 < 0.2): HLA-B/MICA (rs12524487, OR = 3.29, p = 5.57 × 10−16) and HLA-DQB1/HLA-DRB1 (rs113452171, OR = 2.34, p = 3.74 × 10−9; and rs189754752, OR = 2.47, p = 4.22 × 10−9). In addition, we identified and confirmed a genetic association between Takayasu arteritis and the FCGR2A/FCGR3A locus on chromosome 1 (rs10919543, OR = 1.81, p = 5.89 × 10−12). The risk allele in this locus results in increased mRNA expression of FCGR2A. We also established the genetic association between IL12B and Takayasu arteritis (rs56167332, OR = 1.54, p = 2.18 × 10−8). PMID:23830517

  3. Predicting contamination by the fuel additive cerium oxide engineered nanoparticles within the United Kingdom and the associated risks.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew C; Park, Barry

    2012-11-01

    As a fuel additive, cerium oxide nanoparticles may become widely dispersed throughout the environment. Commercial information from the United Kingdom (UK) on the use of cerium oxide nanoparticles was used to perform a modeling and risk assessment exercise. Discharge from exhausts took into account the likely removal by filters fitted to these vehicles. For predicting current soil exposure, scenarios were examined, ranging from dispersion occurring across the entire UK landmass to only within the urban area to only 20 m on either side of road networks. For soils, the highest predicted contamination level was 0.016 mg/kg within 20 m of a road following seven years of continuous deposition. This value would represent 0.027% of reported natural background cerium. If usage were to double for five more years, levels would not be expected to exceed 0.04 mg/kg. River water contamination considered direct aerial deposition and indirect contamination via runoff in the water and entrained soil sediment, with the highest level of 0.02 ng/L predicted. The highest predicted water concentration of 300 ng/L was associated with water draining from a road surface, assuming a restricted deposition spread. These predictions are well below most toxicological levels of concern.

  4. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index.

    PubMed

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Willer, Cristen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Monda, Keri L; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U; Lango Allen, Hana; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Weedon, Michael N; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J; Segrè, Ayellet V; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K; Absher, Devin M; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L; Goddard, Michael E; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F; Myers, Richard H; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M; White, Charles C; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T S; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J; Bennett, Amanda J; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Buchanan, Thomas A; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N M; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Facheris, Maurizio F; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V; Geus, Eco J C; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Grässler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Groves, Christopher J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew P; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S; Smit, Jan H; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thompson, John R; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I G; Voight, Benjamin F; Waite, Lindsay L; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Collins, Francis S; Cupples, L Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hayes, Richard B; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Spector, Timothy D; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E; Visscher, Peter M; Assimes, Themistocles L; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E; McCarthy, Mark I; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J F

    2010-11-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and ∼ 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with body mass index (P < 5 × 10⁻⁸), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (at MC4R, POMC, SH2B1 and BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one of these loci is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly associated loci may provide new insights into human body weight regulation.

  5. Development of microsatellite loci in Artocarpus altilis (Moraceae) and cross-amplification in congeneric species1

    PubMed Central

    Witherup, Colby; Ragone, Diane; Wiesner-Hanks, Tyr; Irish, Brian; Scheffler, Brian; Simpson, Sheron; Zee, Francis; Zuberi, M. Iqbal; Zerega, Nyree J. C.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Microsatellite loci were isolated and characterized from enriched genomic libraries of Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit) and tested in four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. The microsatellite markers provide new tools for further studies in Artocarpus. • Methods and Results: A total of 25 microsatellite loci were evaluated across four Artocarpus species and one hybrid. Twenty-one microsatellite loci were evaluated on A. altilis (241), A. camansi (34), A. mariannensis (15), and A. altilis × mariannensis (64) samples. Nine of those loci plus four additional loci were evaluated on A. heterophyllus (jackfruit, 426) samples. All loci are polymorphic for at least one species. The average number of alleles ranges from two to nine within taxa. • Conclusions: These microsatellite primers will facilitate further studies on the genetic structure and evolutionary and domestication history of Artocarpus species. They will aid in cultivar identification and establishing germplasm conservation strategies for breadfruit and jackfruit. PMID:25202565

  6. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal 18 new loci associated with body mass index.

    PubMed

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Willer, Cristen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Monda, Keri L; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U; Lango Allen, Hana; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Weedon, Michael N; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J; Segrè, Ayellet V; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K; Absher, Devin M; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L; Goddard, Michael E; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Asa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F; Myers, Richard H; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan P; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M; White, Charles C; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T S; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J; Bennett, Amanda J; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Brown, Morris J; Buchanan, Thomas A; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N M; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Facheris, Maurizio F; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V; Geus, Eco J C; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Grässler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M; Groves, Christopher J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S; Havulinna, Aki S; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew P; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Nyholt, Dale R; O'Donnell, Christopher J; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S; Smit, Jan H; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M; Thompson, John R; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I G; Voight, Benjamin F; Waite, Lindsay L; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Witteman, Jacqueline C; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Collins, Francis S; Cupples, L Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hayes, Richard B; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J; Schwarz, Peter E H; Shuldiner, Alan R; Spector, Timothy D; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E; Visscher, Peter M; Assimes, Themistocles L; Borecki, Ingrid B; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S; Groop, Leif C; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J; Kaplan, Robert C; Mohlke, Karen L; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E; McCarthy, Mark I; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J F

    2010-11-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but its underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index and ∼ 2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals with targeted follow up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with body mass index (P < 5 × 10⁻⁸), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (at MC4R, POMC, SH2B1 and BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one of these loci is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly associated loci may provide new insights into human body weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  7. Variants at IRX4 as prostate cancer expression quantitative trait loci.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Hussain, Wasay M; Vijai, Joseph; Offit, Kenneth; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca; Klein, Robert J

    2014-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified numerous prostate cancer-associated risk loci. Some variants at these loci may be regulatory and influence expression of nearby genes. Such loci are known as cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL). As cis-eQTLs are highly tissue-specific, we asked if GWAS-identified prostate cancer risk loci are cis-eQTLs in human prostate tumor tissues. We investigated 50 prostate cancer samples for their genotype at 59 prostate cancer risk-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and performed cis-eQTL analysis of transcripts from paired primary tumors within two megabase windows. We tested 586 transcript-genotype associations, of which 27 were significant (false discovery rate ≤10%). An equivalent eQTL analysis of the same prostate cancer risk loci in lymphoblastoid cell lines did not result in any significant associations. The top-ranked cis-eQTL involved the IRX4 (Iroquois homeobox protein 4) transcript and rs12653946, tagged by rs10866528 in our study (P=4.91 × 10(-5)). Replication studies, linkage disequilibrium, and imputation analyses highlight population specificity at this locus. We independently validated IRX4 as a potential prostate cancer risk gene through cis-eQTL analysis of prostate cancer risk variants. Cis-eQTL analysis in relevant tissues, even with a small sample size, can be a powerful method to expedite functional follow-up of GWAS.

  8. Genome-wide meta-analyses of multiancestry cohorts identify multiple new susceptibility loci for refractive error and myopia.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hysi, Pirro G; Wojciechowski, Robert; Fan, Qiao; Guggenheim, Jeremy A; Höhn, René; MacGregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W; Nag, Abhishek; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M Kamran; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H S; McMahon, George; Kemp, John P; Pourcain, Beate St; Simpson, Claire L; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Paterson, Andrew D; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Wong, Hoi Suen; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W H; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Burdon, Kathryn P; Craig, Jamie E; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Haller, Toomas; Metspalu, Andres; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Tai, E-Shyong; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga; Tay, Wan-Ting; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Liao, Jiemin; Zheng, Yingfeng; Ong, Rick T; Döring, Angela; Evans, David M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Verkerk, Annemieke J M H; Meitinger, Thomas; Raitakari, Olli; Hawthorne, Felicia; Spector, Tim D; Karssen, Lennart C; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Ang, Wei; Mishra, Aniket; Montgomery, Grant W; Pennell, Craig E; Cumberland, Phillippa M; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Schache, Maria; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Igo, Robert P; Lass, Jonathan H; Chew, Emily; Iyengar, Sudha K; Gorgels, Theo G M F; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F; Polasek, Ozren; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F; Fleck, Brian; Zeller, Tanja; Mirshahi, Alireza; Müller, Christian; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Vingerling, Johannes R; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Amin, Najaf; Bergen, Arthur A B; Teo, Yik-Ying; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Vitart, Veronique; Williams, Cathy; Baird, Paul N; Wong, Tien-Yin; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mackey, David A; Young, Terri L; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saw, Seang-Mei; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Stambolian, Dwight; Klaver, Caroline C; Hammond, Christopher J

    2013-03-01

    Refractive error is the most common eye disorder worldwide and is a prominent cause of blindness. Myopia affects over 30% of Western populations and up to 80% of Asians. The CREAM consortium conducted genome-wide meta-analyses, including 37,382 individuals from 27 studies of European ancestry and 8,376 from 5 Asian cohorts. We identified 16 new loci for refractive error in individuals of European ancestry, of which 8 were shared with Asians. Combined analysis identified 8 additional associated loci. The new loci include candidate genes with functions in neurotransmission (GRIA4), ion transport (KCNQ5), retinoic acid metabolism (RDH5), extracellular matrix remodeling (LAMA2 and BMP2) and eye development (SIX6 and PRSS56). We also confirmed previously reported associations with GJD2 and RASGRF1. Risk score analysis using associated SNPs showed a tenfold increased risk of myopia for individuals carrying the highest genetic load. Our results, based on a large meta-analysis across independent multiancestry studies, considerably advance understanding of the mechanisms involved in refractive error and myopia.

  9. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses

    PubMed Central

    Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Li, Jian; Wu, Jian; Qi, Yanwei; Eastman, Richard T.; Zilversmit, Martine; Nair, Sethu C.; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Quinones, Mariam; Jiang, Hongying; Li, Na; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Keji; Kaneko, Osamu; Long, Carole A.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CC) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12, and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosome 7 and 13 had significant (p < 0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5, and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (p = 0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection. PMID:24452266

  10. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Andlauer, Till F M; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis.

  11. Lack of replication of higher genetic risk load in men than in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to replicate a recent study which showed higher genetic risk load at 15 loci in men than in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This difference was very significant, and it was interpreted as indicating that men require more genetic susceptibility than women to develop SLE. Methods Nineteen SLE-associated loci (thirteen of which are shared with the previous study) were analyzed in 1,457 SLE patients and 1,728 healthy controls of European ancestry. Genetic risk load was calculated as sex-specific sum genetic risk scores (GRSs). Results Our results did not replicate those of the previous study at either the level of individual loci or the global level of GRSs. GRSs were larger in women than in men (4.20 ± 1.07 in women vs. 3.27 ± 0.98 in men). This very significant difference (P < 10−16) was more dependent on the six new loci not included in the previous study (59% of the difference) than on the thirteen loci that are shared (the remaining 41%). However, the 13 shared loci also showed a higher genetic risk load in women than in men in our study (P = 6.6 × 10−7), suggesting that heterogeneity of participants, in addition to different loci, contributed to the opposite results. Conclusion Our results show the lack of a clear trend toward higher genetic risk in one of the sexes for the analyzed SLE loci. They also highlight several limitations of assessments of genetic risk load, including the possibility of ascertainment bias with loci discovered in studies that have included mainly women. PMID:24946689

  12. Identification of 23 new prostate cancer susceptibility loci using the iCOGS custom genotyping array

    PubMed Central

    Eeles, Rosalind A; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Benlloch, Sara; Saunders, Edward J; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Ghoussaini, Maya; Luccarini, Craig; Dennis, Joe; Jugurnauth-Little, Sarah; Dadaev, Tokhir; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Donovan, Jenny L; Muir, Ken; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Albanes, Demetrius; Andriole, Gerald; Schleutker, Johanna; Weischer, Maren; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Tim J; Travis, Ruth; Campa, Daniele; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Hayes, Richard B; Pharoah, Paul DP; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet; Ostrander, Elaine A; Signorello, Lisa B; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Dan; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Cannon-Albright; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong Y; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Spurdle, Amanda B; Clements, Judith A; Teixeira, Manuel R; Dicks, Ed; Lee, Andrew; Dunning, Alison; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Melanie J; Ahmed, Shahana; Govindasami, Koveela; Guy, Michelle; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Sawyer, Emma J; Morgan, Angela; Dearnaley, David P; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Van As, Nicholas J; Woodhouse, J; Thompson, Alan; Dudderidge, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Cox, Angela; Southey, Melissa; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Aly, Markus; Adolfsson, Jan; Xu, Jiangfeng; Zheng, Siqun; Yeager, Meredith; Kaaks, Rudolf; Diver, W Ryan; Gaudet, Mia M; Stern, Mariana; Corral, Roman; Joshi, Amit D; Shahabi, Ahva; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo J; Auvinen, Anssi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Røder, Andreas; Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Siddiq, Afshan; FitzGerald, Liesel; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika; Karyadi, Danielle; Blot, William J; Zheng, Wei; Cai, Qiuyin; McDonnell, Shannon K; Rinckleb, Antje; Drake, Bettina; Colditz, Graham; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Stephenson, Robert A; Teerlink, Craig; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Sellers, Thomas A; Lin, Hui-Yi; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Lose, Felicity; Srinivasan, Srilakshmi; Maia, Sofia; Paulo, Paula; Lange, Ethan; Cooney, Kathleen A; Antoniou, Antonis; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, François; Tessier; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas F

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in males in developed countries. To identify common prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, we genotyped 211,155 SNPs on a custom Illumina array (iCOGS) in blood DNA from 25,074 prostate cancer cases and 24,272 controls from the international PRACTICAL Consortium. Twenty-three new prostate cancer susceptibility loci were identified at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8). More than 70 prostate cancer susceptibility loci, explaining ~30% of the familial risk for this disease, have now been identified. On the basis of combined risks conferred by the new and previously known risk loci, the top 1% of the risk distribution has a 4.7-fold higher risk than the average of the population being profiled. These results will facilitate population risk stratification for clinical studies. PMID:23535732

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kinnersley, Ben; Labussière, Marianne; Holroyd, Amy; Di Stefano, Anna-Luisa; Broderick, Peter; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Fleming, Sarah J.; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Nöthen, Markus M.; Swerdlow, Anthony; Lathrop, Mark; Simon, Matthias; Bondy, Melissa; Sanson, Marc; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have shown that common genetic variation contributes to the heritable risk of glioma. To identify new glioma susceptibility loci, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS (totalling 4,147 cases and 7,435 controls), with imputation using 1000 Genomes and UK10K Project data as reference. After genotyping an additional 1,490 cases and 1,723 controls we identify new risk loci for glioblastoma (GBM) at 12q23.33 (rs3851634, near POLR3B, P=3.02 × 10−9) and non-GBM at 10q25.2 (rs11196067, near VTI1A, P=4.32 × 10−8), 11q23.2 (rs648044, near ZBTB16, P=6.26 × 10−11), 12q21.2 (rs12230172, P=7.53 × 10−11) and 15q24.2 (rs1801591, near ETFA, P=5.71 × 10−9). Our findings provide further insights into the genetic basis of the different glioma subtypes. PMID:26424050

  14. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genes involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.

  15. Identification of genetic loci that control mammary tumor susceptibility through the host microenvironment

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pengju; Lo, Alvin; Huang, Yurong; Huang, Ge; Liang, Guozhou; Mott, Joni; Karpen, Gary H.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; et al

    2015-03-09

    The interplay between host genetics, tumor microenvironment and environmental exposure in cancer susceptibility remains poorly understood. Here we assessed the genetic control of stromal mediation of mammary tumor susceptibility to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) using backcrossed F1 into BALB/c (F1Bx) between cancer susceptible (BALB/c) and resistant (SPRET/EiJ) mouse strains. Tumor formation was evaluated after transplantation of non-irradiated Trp53-/- BALB/c mammary gland fragments into cleared fat pads of F1Bx hosts. Genome-wide linkage analysis revealed 2 genetic loci that constitute the baseline susceptibility via host microenvironment. However, once challenged with LDIR, we discovered 13 additional loci that were enriched for genesmore » involved in cytokines, including TGFβ1 signaling. Surprisingly, LDIR-treated F1Bx cohort significantly reduced incidence of mammary tumors from Trp53-/- fragments as well as prolonged tumor latency, compared to sham-treated controls. We demonstrated further that plasma levels of specific cytokines were significantly correlated with tumor latency. Using an ex vivo 3-D assay, we confirmed TGFβ1 as a strong candidate for reduced mammary invasion in SPRET/EiJ, which could explain resistance of this strain to mammary cancer risk following LDIR. Our results open possible new avenues to understand mechanisms of genes operating via the stroma that affect cancer risk from external environmental exposures.« less

  16. A first screening and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products in waste water, sludge, recipient water and sediment from Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland.

    PubMed

    Huber, Sandra; Remberger, Mikael; Kaj, Lennart; Schlabach, Martin; Jörundsdóttir, Hrönn Ó; Vester, Jette; Arnórsson, Mímir; Mortensen, Inge; Schwartson, Richard; Dam, Maria

    2016-08-15

    A screening of a broad range of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products (PPCPs) in sub-arctic locations of the Faroe Islands (FO), Iceland (IS) and Greenland (GL) was conducted. In total 36 pharmaceuticals including some metabolites, and seven additives in personal care products were investigated in influent and effluent waters as well as sludge of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) and in water and sediment of recipients. Concentrations and distribution patterns for PPCPs discharged via sewage lines (SLs) to the marine environment were assessed. Of the 36 pharmaceuticals or metabolites analysed 33 were found close to or above the limit of detection (LOD) in all or a part of the samples. All of the seven investigated additives in personal care products were detected above the LOD. Some of the analysed PPCPs occurred in every or almost every sample. Among these were diclofenac, ibuprofen, lidocaine, naproxen, metformin, citalopram, venlafaxine, amiloride, furosemide, metoprolol, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and cetrimonium salt (ATAC-C16). Additionally, the study encompasses ecotoxicological risk assessment of 2/3 of the analysed PPCPs in recipient and diluted effluent waters. For candesartan only a small margin to levels with inacceptable risks was observed in diluted effluent waters at two locations (FO). Chronical risks for aquatic organisms staying and/or living around WWTP effluent pipe-outlets were indicated for 17β-estradiol and estriol in the three countries. Additives in PCPs were found to pose the largest risk to the aquatic environment. The surfactants CAPB and ATAC-C16 were found in concentrations resulting in risk factors up to 375 for CAPB and 165 for ATAC-C16 in recipients for diluted effluents from Iggia, Nuuk (GL) and Torshavn (FO) respectively. These results demonstrates a potentially high ecological risk stemming from discharge of surfactants as used in household and industrial detergents as well as additives in personal care

  17. A first screening and risk assessment of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products in waste water, sludge, recipient water and sediment from Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland.

    PubMed

    Huber, Sandra; Remberger, Mikael; Kaj, Lennart; Schlabach, Martin; Jörundsdóttir, Hrönn Ó; Vester, Jette; Arnórsson, Mímir; Mortensen, Inge; Schwartson, Richard; Dam, Maria

    2016-08-15

    A screening of a broad range of pharmaceuticals and additives in personal care products (PPCPs) in sub-arctic locations of the Faroe Islands (FO), Iceland (IS) and Greenland (GL) was conducted. In total 36 pharmaceuticals including some metabolites, and seven additives in personal care products were investigated in influent and effluent waters as well as sludge of waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) and in water and sediment of recipients. Concentrations and distribution patterns for PPCPs discharged via sewage lines (SLs) to the marine environment were assessed. Of the 36 pharmaceuticals or metabolites analysed 33 were found close to or above the limit of detection (LOD) in all or a part of the samples. All of the seven investigated additives in personal care products were detected above the LOD. Some of the analysed PPCPs occurred in every or almost every sample. Among these were diclofenac, ibuprofen, lidocaine, naproxen, metformin, citalopram, venlafaxine, amiloride, furosemide, metoprolol, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and cetrimonium salt (ATAC-C16). Additionally, the study encompasses ecotoxicological risk assessment of 2/3 of the analysed PPCPs in recipient and diluted effluent waters. For candesartan only a small margin to levels with inacceptable risks was observed in diluted effluent waters at two locations (FO). Chronical risks for aquatic organisms staying and/or living around WWTP effluent pipe-outlets were indicated for 17β-estradiol and estriol in the three countries. Additives in PCPs were found to pose the largest risk to the aquatic environment. The surfactants CAPB and ATAC-C16 were found in concentrations resulting in risk factors up to 375 for CAPB and 165 for ATAC-C16 in recipients for diluted effluents from Iggia, Nuuk (GL) and Torshavn (FO) respectively. These results demonstrates a potentially high ecological risk stemming from discharge of surfactants as used in household and industrial detergents as well as additives in personal care

  18. Analysis of Air Toxics From NOAA WP-3 Aircraft Measurements During the TexAQS 2006 Campaign: Comparison With Emission Inventories and Additive Inhalation Risk Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Negro, L. A.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Atlas, E.; Lueb, R.; Zhu, X.; Pope, L.; Schauffler, S.; Hendershot, R.; Washenfelder, R.; Fried, A.; Richter, D.; Walega, J. G.; Weibring, P.

    2007-12-01

    Benzene and nine other air toxics classified as human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) were measured from the NOAA WP-3 aircraft during the TexAQS 2006 campaign. In-situ measurements of benzene, measured with a PTR-MS instrument, are used to estimate emission fluxes for comparison with point source emission inventories developed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Mean and median mixing ratios for benzene, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane, dibromoethane, dichloromethane, and vinyl chloride, encountered over the city of Houston during the campaign, are combined with inhalation unit risk factor values developed by the California Environmental Protection Agency and the United States Environmental Protection Agency to estimate the additive inhalation risk factor. This additive risk factor represents the risk associated with lifetime (70 year) exposure at the levels measured and should not be used as an absolute indicator of risk to individuals. However, the results are useful for assessments of changing relative risk over time, and for identifying dominant contributions to the overall air toxic risk.

  19. A method for estimating the effective number of loci affecting a quantitative character.

    PubMed

    Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-11-01

    A likelihood method is introduced that jointly estimates the number of loci and the additive effect of alleles that account for the genetic variance of a normally distributed quantitative character in a randomly mating population. The method assumes that measurements of the character are available from one or both parents and an arbitrary number of full siblings. The method uses the fact, first recognized by Karl Pearson in 1904, that the variance of a character among offspring depends on both the parental phenotypes and on the number of loci. Simulations show that the method performs well provided that data from a sufficient number of families (on the order of thousands) are available. This method assumes that the loci are in Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium but does not assume anything about the linkage relationships. It performs equally well if all loci are on the same non-recombining chromosome provided they are in linkage equilibrium. The method can be adapted to take account of loci already identified as being associated with the character of interest. In that case, the method estimates the number of loci not already known to affect the character. The method applied to measurements of crown-rump length in 281 family trios in a captive colony of African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiopus sabaeus) estimates the number of loci to be 112 and the additive effect to be 0.26 cm. A parametric bootstrap analysis shows that a rough confidence interval has a lower bound of 14 loci. PMID:23973416

  20. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Yiannakouris, Nikos; Katsoulis, Michail; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Ordovas, Jose M; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Objectives An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for several conventional cardiovascular risk factors (ConvRFs), including smoking, hypertension, type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), body mass index (BMI), physical activity and adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Design A case–control study. Setting The general Greek population of the EPIC study. Participants and outcome measures 477 patients with medically confirmed incident CHD and 1271 controls participated in this study. We estimated the ORs for CHD by dividing participants at higher or lower GRS and, alternatively, at higher or lower ConvRF, and calculated the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI) as a measure of deviation from additivity. Results The joint presence of higher GRS and higher risk ConvRF was in all instances associated with an increased risk of CHD, compared with the joint presence of lower GRS and lower risk ConvRF. The OR (95% CI) was 1.7 (1.2 to 2.4) for smoking, 2.7 (1.9 to 3.8) for hypertension, 4.1 (2.8 to 6.1) for T2DM, 1.9 (1.4 to 2.5) for lower physical activity, 2.0 (1.3 to 3.2) for high BMI and 1.5 (1.1 to 2.1) for poor adherence to the Mediterranean diet. In all instances, RERI values were fairly small and not statistically significant, suggesting that the GRS and the ConvRFs do not have effects beyond additivity. Conclusions Genetic predisposition to CHD, operationalised through a multilocus GRS, and ConvRFs have essentially additive effects on CHD risk. PMID:24500614

  1. Can Genetic Analysis of Putative Blood Alzheimer’s Disease Biomarkers Lead to Identification of Susceptibility Loci?

    PubMed Central

    Huebinger, Ryan M.; Shewale, Shantanu J.; Koenig, Jessica L.; Mitchel, Jeffrey S.; O’Bryant, Sid E.; Waring, Stephen C.; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Chasse, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Although 24 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) risk loci have been reliably identified, a large portion of the predicted heritability for AD remains unexplained. It is expected that additional loci of small effect will be identified with an increased sample size. However, the cost of a significant increase in Case-Control sample size is prohibitive. The current study tests whether exploring the genetic basis of endophenotypes, in this case based on putative blood biomarkers for AD, can accelerate the identification of susceptibility loci using modest sample sizes. Each endophenotype was used as the outcome variable in an independent GWAS. Endophenotypes were based on circulating concentrations of proteins that contributed significantly to a published blood-based predictive algorithm for AD. Endophenotypes included Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP1), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM1), Pancreatic Polypeptide (PP), Beta2 Microglobulin (B2M), Factor VII (F7), Adiponectin (ADN) and Tenascin C (TN-C). Across the seven endophenotypes, 47 SNPs were associated with outcome with a p-value ≤1x10-7. Each signal was further characterized with respect to known genetic loci associated with AD. Signals for several endophenotypes were observed in the vicinity of CR1, MS4A6A/MS4A4E, PICALM, CLU, and PTK2B. The strongest signal was observed in association with Factor VII levels and was located within the F7 gene. Additional signals were observed in MAP3K13, ZNF320, ATP9B and TREM1. Conditional regression analyses suggested that the SNPs contributed to variation in protein concentration independent of AD status. The identification of two putatively novel AD loci (in the Factor VII and ATP9B genes), which have not been located in previous studies despite massive sample sizes, highlights the benefits of an endophenotypic approach for resolving the genetic basis for complex diseases. The coincidence of several of the endophenotypic signals with known AD loci may point to novel

  2. The benefits of an additional worker are task-dependent: assessing low-back injury risks during prefabricated (panelized) wall construction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunwook; Nussbaum, Maury A; Jia, Bochen

    2012-09-01

    Team manual material handling is a common practice in residential construction where prefabricated building components (e.g., wall panels) are increasingly used. As part of a larger effort to enable proactive control of ergonomic exposures among workers handling panels, this study explored the effects of additional workers on injury risks during team-based panel erection tasks, specifically by quantifying how injury risks are affected by increasing the number of workers (by one, above the nominal or most common number). Twenty-four participants completed panel erection tasks with and without an additional worker under different panel mass and size conditions. Four risk assessment methods were employed that emphasized the low back. Though including an additional worker generally reduced injury risk across several panel masses and sizes, the magnitude of these benefits varied depending on the specific task and exhibited somewhat high variability within a given task. These results suggest that a simple, generalizable recommendation regarding team-based panel erection tasks is not warranted. Rather, a more systems-level approach accounting for both injury risk and productivity (a strength of panelized wall systems) should be undertaken.

  3. Generalization of adiposity genetic loci to US Hispanic women

    PubMed Central

    Graff, M; Fernández-Rhodes, L; Liu, S; Carlson, C; Wassertheil-Smoller, S; Neuhouser, M; Reiner, A; Kooperberg, C; Rampersaud, E; Manson, J E; Kuller, L H; Howard, B V; Ochs-Balcom, H M; Johnson, K C; Vitolins, M Z; Sucheston, L; Monda, K; North, K E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is a public health concern. Yet the identification of adiposity-related genetic variants among United States (US) Hispanics, which is the largest US minority group, remains largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: To interrogate an a priori list of 47 (32 overall body mass and 15 central adiposity) index single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously studied in individuals of European descent among 3494 US Hispanic women in the Women's Health Initiative SNP Health Association Resource (WHI SHARe). DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of measured body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were inverse normally transformed after adjusting for age, smoking, center and global ancestry. WC and WHR models were also adjusted for BMI. Genotyping was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 array. In the absence of an a priori selected SNP, a proxy was selected (r2⩾0.8 in CEU). RESULTS: Six BMI loci (TMEM18, NUDT3/HMGA1, FAIM2, FTO, MC4R and KCTD15) and two WC/WHR loci (VEGFA and ITPR2-SSPN) were nominally significant (P<0.05) at the index or proxy SNP in the corresponding BMI and WC/WHR models. To account for distinct linkage disequilibrium patterns in Hispanics and further assess generalization of genetic effects at each locus, we interrogated the evidence for association at the 47 surrounding loci within 1 Mb region of the index or proxy SNP. Three additional BMI loci (FANCL, TFAP2B and ETV5) and five WC/WHR loci (DNM3-PIGC, GRB14, ADAMTS9, LY86 and MSRA) displayed Bonferroni-corrected significant associations with BMI and WC/WHR. Conditional analyses of each index SNP (or its proxy) and the most significant SNP within the 1 Mb region supported the possible presence of index-independent signals at each of these eight loci as well as at KCTD15. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence for the generalization of nine BMI and seven central adiposity loci in Hispanic women. This study expands the current knowledge of common adiposity

  4. Cognitive Processes that Account for Mental Addition Fluency Differences between Children Typically Achieving in Arithmetic and Children At-Risk for Failure in Arithmetic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Derek H.; Hutchinson, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether processing speed, short-term memory, and working memory accounted for the differential mental addition fluency between children typically achieving in arithmetic (TA) and children at-risk for failure in arithmetic (AR). Further, we drew attention to fluency differences in simple (e.g., 5 + 3) and complex (e.g., 16 +…

  5. Additive influence of genetic predisposition and conventional risk factors in the incidence of coronary heart disease: a population-based study in Greece

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An additive genetic risk score (GRS) for coronary heart disease (CHD) has previously been associated with incident CHD in the population-based Greek European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In this study, we explore GRS-‘environment’ joint actions on CHD for severa...

  6. Association analyses of 249,796 individuals reveal eighteen new loci associated with body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Willer, Cristen J.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Monda, Keri L.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Allen, Hana Lango; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Winkler, Thomas W.; Qi, Lu; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Heid, Iris M.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R.; Ferreira, Teresa; Weyant, Robert J.; Segré, Ayellet V.; Estrada, Karol; Liang, Liming; Nemesh, James; Park, Ju-Hyun; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Yang, Jian; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Esko, Tõnu; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Mangino, Massimo; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Scherag, Andre; Smith, Albert Vernon; Welch, Ryan; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aben, Katja K.; Absher, Devin M.; Amin, Najaf; Dixon, Anna L.; Fisher, Eva; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goddard, Michael E.; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hoesel, Volker; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Lamina, Claudia; Li, Shengxu; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Myers, Richard H.; Narisu, Narisu; Perry, John R.B.; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; van Wingerden, Sophie; Watanabe, Richard M.; White, Charles C.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Barlassina, Christina; Chasman, Daniel I.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Jansson, John-Olov; Lawrence, Robert W.; Pellikka, Niina; Prokopenko, Inga; Shi, Jianxin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Alavere, Helene; Alibrandi, Maria T. S.; Almgren, Peter; Arnold, Alice M.; Aspelund, Thor; Atwood, Larry D.; Balkau, Beverley; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Bennett, Amanda J.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Biebermann, Heike; Blakemore, Alexandra I.F.; Boes, Tanja; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Brown, Morris J.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Chih-Mei; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Coin, Lachlan; Connell, John; Day, Ian N.M.; den Heijer, Martin; Duan, Jubao; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Facheris, Maurizio F.; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela; Folsom, Aaron R.; Friedrich, Nele; Freimer, Nelson B.; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Gejman, Pablo V.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Gieger, Christian; Gjesing, Anette P.; Goel, Anuj; Goyette, Philippe; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Groves, Christopher J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Hall, Alistair S.; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jarick, Ivonne; Jewell, Elizabeth; John, Ulrich; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kaakinen, Marika; Kajantie, Eero; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kettunen, Johannes; Kinnunen, Leena; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolcic, Ivana; König, Inke R.; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kraft, Peter; Kvaløy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lanzani, Chiara; Launer, Lenore J.; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lettre, Guillaume; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Ludwig, Barbara; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; Marre, Michel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarthy, Anne; McKnight, Barbara; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meyre, David; Midthjell, Kristian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mulic, Rosanda; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Perola, Markus; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Platou, Carl G.P.; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Rafelt, Suzanne; Raitakari, Olli; Rayner, Nigel W.; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rief, Winfried; Ruokonen, Aimo; Robertson, Neil R.; Rzehak, Peter; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Savolainen, Markku J.; Scherag, Susann; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Silander, Kaisa; Sinisalo, Juha; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Jan H.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Stephens, Jonathan; Surakka, Ida; Swift, Amy J.; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Teder-Laving, Maris; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Thompson, John R.; Thomson, Brian; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Viikari, Jorma; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Vogel, Carla I. G.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G. Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wiegand, Susanna; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Zgaga, Lina; Ziegler, Andreas; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P.; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huikuri, Heikki V.; James, Alan L.; Kähönen, Mika; Levinson, Douglas F.; Macciardi, Fabio; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J.; Ridker, Paul M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Collins, Francis S.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Smith, George Davey; Erdmann, Jeanette; Froguel, Philippe; Grönberg, Henrik; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hall, Per; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hayes, Richard B.; Heinrich, Joachim; Hu, Frank B.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krude, Heiko; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Metspalu, Andres; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pedersen, Oluf; Penninx, Brenda W.; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Reinehr, Thomas; Rissanen, Aila; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André; Valle, Timo T.; Wabitsch, Martin; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; McCarroll, Steven A.; Purcell, Shaun; Schadt, Eric E.; Visscher, Peter M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hunter, David J.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Peltonen, Leena; Schlessinger, David; Strachan, David P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Stefansson, Kari; North, Kari E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Loos, Ruth J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is globally prevalent and highly heritable, but the underlying genetic factors remain largely elusive. To identify genetic loci for obesity-susceptibility, we examined associations between body mass index (BMI) and ~2.8 million SNPs in up to 123,865 individuals, with targeted follow-up of 42 SNPs in up to 125,931 additional individuals. We confirmed 14 known obesity-susceptibility loci and identified 18 new loci associated with BMI (P<5×10−8), one of which includes a copy number variant near GPRC5B. Some loci (MC4R, POMC, SH2B1, BDNF) map near key hypothalamic regulators of energy balance, and one is near GIPR, an incretin receptor. Furthermore, genes in other newly-associated loci may provide novel insights into human body weight regulation. PMID:20935630

  7. Genome-wide association study for Crohn's disease in the Quebec Founder Population identifies multiple validated disease loci

    PubMed Central

    Raelson, John V.; Little, Randall D.; Ruether, Andreas; Fournier, Hélène; Paquin, Bruno; Van Eerdewegh, Paul; Bradley, W. E. C.; Croteau, Pascal; Nguyen-Huu, Quynh; Segal, Jonathan; Debrus, Sophie; Allard, René; Rosenstiel, Philip; Franke, Andre; Jacobs, Gunnar; Nikolaus, Susanna; Vidal, Jean-Michel; Szego, Peter; Laplante, Nathalie; Clark, Hilary F.; Paulussen, René J.; Hooper, John W.; Keith, Tim P.; Belouchi, Abdelmajid; Schreiber, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies offer a powerful unbiased method for the identification of multiple susceptibility genes for complex diseases. Here we report the results of a GWA study for Crohn's disease (CD) using family trios from the Quebec Founder Population (QFP). Haplotype-based association analyses identified multiple regions associated with the disease that met the criteria for genome-wide significance, with many containing a gene whose function appears relevant to CD. A proportion of these were replicated in two independent German Caucasian samples, including the established CD loci NOD2 and IBD5. The recently described IL23R locus was also identified and replicated. For this region, multiple individuals with all major haplotypes in the QFP were sequenced and extensive fine mapping performed to identify risk and protective alleles. Several additional loci, including a region on 3p21 containing several plausible candidate genes, a region near JAKMIP1 on 4p16.1, and two larger regions on chromosome 17 were replicated. Together with previously published loci, the spectrum of CD genes identified to date involves biochemical networks that affect epithelial defense mechanisms, innate and adaptive immune response, and the repair or remodeling of tissue. PMID:17804789

  8. Pathway analysis supports association of nonsyndromic cryptorchidism with genetic loci linked to cytoskeleton-dependent functions

    PubMed Central

    Barthold, Julia Spencer; Wang, Yanping; Kolon, Thomas F.; Kollin, Claude; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Olivant Fisher, Alicia; Figueroa, T. Ernesto; BaniHani, Ahmad H.; Hagerty, Jennifer A.; Gonzaléz, Ricardo; Noh, Paul H.; Chiavacci, Rosetta M.; Harden, Kisha R.; Abrams, Debra J.; Kim, Cecilia E.; Li, Jin; Hakonarson, Hakon; Devoto, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    top loci, none reaching genome-wide significance, but one passing this threshold in a subphenotype analysis of proximal testis position (rs55867206, near SH3PXD2B, odds ratio = 2.2 (95% confidence interval 1.7, 2.9), P = 2 × 10−9). An additional 127 top loci emerged in at least one secondary analysis, particularly of more severe phenotypes. Cytoskeleton-dependent molecular and cellular functions were prevalent in pathway analysis of suggestive signals, and may implicate loci encoding cytoskeletal proteins that participate in androgen receptor signaling. Genes linked to human syndromic cryptorchidism, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and to hormone-responsive and/or differentially expressed genes in normal and cryptorchid rat gubernaculum, were also significantly overrepresented. No tested marker showed significant replication in an independent population. The results suggest heterogeneous, multilocus and potentially multifactorial susceptibility to nonsyndromic cryptorchidism. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION The present study failed to identify genome-wide significant markers associated with cryptorchidism that could be replicated in an independent population, so further studies are required to define true positive signals among suggestive loci. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS As the only GWAS to date of nonsyndromic cryptorchidism, these data will provide a basis for future efforts to understand genetic susceptibility to this common reproductive anomaly and the potential for additive risk from environmental exposures. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTERESTS This work was supported by R01HD060769 (the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD)), P20RR20173 (the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), currently P20GM103464 from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)), an Institute Development Fund to the Center for Applied Genomics at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and Nemours

  9. Pleiotropy among Common Genetic Loci Identified for Cardiometabolic Disorders and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ligthart, Symen; de Vries, Paul S.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Dehghan, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotropic genetic variants have independent effects on different phenotypes. C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with several cardiometabolic phenotypes. Shared genetic backgrounds may partially underlie these associations. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify the shared genetic background of inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes using published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We also evaluated whether the pleiotropic effects of such loci were biological or mediated in nature. First, we examined whether 283 common variants identified for 10 cardiometabolic phenotypes in GWAS are associated with CRP level. Second, we tested whether 18 variants identified for serum CRP are associated with 10 cardiometabolic phenotypes. We used a Bonferroni corrected p-value of 1.1×10-04 (0.05/463) as a threshold of significance. We evaluated the independent pleiotropic effect on both phenotypes using individual level data from the Women Genome Health Study. Evaluating the genetic overlap between inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes, we found 13 pleiotropic regions. Additional analyses showed that 6 regions (APOC1, HNF1A, IL6R, PPP1R3B, HNF4A and IL1F10) appeared to have a pleiotropic effect on CRP independent of the effects on the cardiometabolic phenotypes. These included loci where individuals carrying the risk allele for CRP encounter higher lipid levels and risk of type 2 diabetes. In addition, 5 regions (GCKR, PABPC4, BCL7B, FTO and TMEM18) had an effect on CRP largely mediated through the cardiometabolic phenotypes. In conclusion, our results show genetic pleiotropy among inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes. In addition to reverse causation, our data suggests that pleiotropic genetic variants partially underlie the association between CRP and cardiometabolic phenotypes. PMID:25768928

  10. Polymorphic microsatellite loci identified through development and cross-species amplification within shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, I.; Guzzetti, B.M.; Gust, J.R.; Sage, G.K.; Gill, R.E.; Tibbitts, T.L.; Sonsthagen, S.A.; Talbot, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    We developed microsatellite loci for demographic assessments of shorebirds, a group with limited markers. First, we isolated five dinucleotide repeat microsatellite loci from the Black Oystercatcher (Haematopodidae: Haematopus bachmani), and three from the Bristle-thighed Curlew (Scolopacidae: Numenius tahitiensis); both species are of conservation concern. All eight loci were polymorphic in their respective target species. Hbaμ loci were characterized by two to three alleles with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.07 to 0.33, and two to nine alleles were detected for Nut loci with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.08 to 0.72. No linkage disequilibrium or departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium were observed. The eight loci were also tested for cross-species amplification in 12 other species within Charadriidae and Scolopacidae, and the results demonstrated transferability across several genera. We further tested all 14 species at 12 additional microsatellite markers developed for other shorebirds: Dunlin (Calidris alpina; four loci) and Ruff (Philomachus pugnax; eight loci). Two markers (Hbaμ4 and Ruff6) were polymorphic in 13 species, while two (Calp6 and Ruff9) were monomorphic. The remaining eight markers revealed polymorphism in one to nine species each. Our results provide further evidence that locus Ruff10 is sex-linked, contrary to the initial description. These markers can be used to enhance our understanding of shorebird biology by, for example, helping to determine migratory connectivity among breeding and wintering populations and detecting relatedness among individuals.

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies two new susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer at 5q23.3 and 17q12 in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kewei; Sun, Yimin; Wang, Cheng; Ji, Jiafu; Li, Yaoping; Ye, Yingjiang; Lv, Liang; Guo, Yong; Guo, Sutang; Li, Hai; Zhang, Lianhai; Zhou, Yanbing; Jiang, Bo; Ren, Yonghong; Xu, Youchun; Yang, Xiongfei; Liu, Hongxia; Wang, Yirui; Shen, Zhanlong; Qin, Wenyan; Guo, Peng; Jiang, Yuyang; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Cheng, Jing; Yang, Yinxue; Wang, Shan

    2015-11-24

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have reported a number of loci harboring common variants that influence risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) in European descent. But all the SNPs identified explained a small fraction of total heritability. To identify more genetic factors that modify the risk of CRC, especially Chinese Han specific, we conducted a three-stage GWAS including a screening stage (932 CRC cases and 966 controls) and two independent validations (Stage 2: 1,759 CRC cases and 1,875 controls; Stage 3: 943 CRC cases and 1,838 controls). In the combined analyses, we discovered two novel loci associated with CRC: rs12522693 at 5q23.3 (CDC42SE2-CHSY3, OR = 1.31, P = 2.08 × 10-8) and rs17836917 at 17q12 (ASIC2-CCL2, OR = 0.75, P = 4.55 × 10-8). Additionally, we confirmed two previously reported risk loci, rs6983267 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.17, P = 7.17 × 10-7) and rs10795668 at 10p14 (OR = 0.86, P = 2.96 × 10-6) in our cohorts. These results bring further insights into the CRC susceptibility and advance our understanding on etiology of CRC.

  12. Association analysis of GWAS and candidate gene loci in a Pakistani population with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Munir, Saeeda; ber Rahman, Simeen; Rehman, Sadia; Saba, Nusrat; Ahmad, Wasim; Nilsson, Staffan; Mazhar, Kehkashan; Naluai, Åsa Torinsson

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory and hyper proliferative condition of the skin and a serious chronic systemic autoimmune disease. We undertook an association study to investigate the genetic etiology of psoriasis in a Pakistani population by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be associated in genome-wide association (GWAS) or in candidate gene studies of psoriasis. Fifty seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 42 loci were genotyped in 533 psoriasis patients and 373 controls. Our results showed genome wide significant association of the MHC region (rs1265181 being the most significant from five SNPs used with overall OR=3.38; p=2.97E-18), as well as nominally significant associations at ten other loci (p<0.05) in the Pakistani population (LCE3B, REL, IL13/IL4, TNIP1, IL12B, TRAF3IP2, ZC3H12C, NOS2 and RNF114 from GWAS and PRR9 from a previous candidate gene study). Overall, only nine SNPs out of the 42 GWAS loci, displayed an odds ratio in the opposite allelic direction and only three did not reach similar odds ratio within 95% confidence interval as previously reported (SLC45A1/TNFRSF9, ELMO1 and IL28RA). This indicates similar genetic risk factors and molecular mechanisms behind disease in Pakistani psoriasis patients as in other populations. In addition, we show that the MHC and TNIP1 regions are significantly different in patients with psoriasis onset before the age of 40 (type I) compared to after 40 years of age (type II). MHC being associated mainly with type I while TNIP1 with type II patients.

  13. Ten microsatellite loci from Zamia integrifolia (Zamiaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ten microsatellite loci isolated from Zamia integrifolia are described. All 10 are polymorphic, with three to ten alleles across 36 members of a single population from South Florida. Heterozygosity ranged from 0.067 to 1. Two loci depart significantly from Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium, and exhibit het...

  14. Additive Effects of the Risk Alleles of PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 on Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Zhipeng; Wang, Kai; Wang, Zhaowen; Sun, Xing; Zhong, Lin; Deng, Guilong; Song, Guohe; Sun, Baining; Peng, Zhihai; Liu, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified that variants in or near PNPLA3, NCAN, GCKR, LYPLAL1, and TM6SF2 are significantly associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in multiple ethnic groups. Studies on their impact on NAFLD in Han Chinese are still limited. In this study, we examined the relevance of these variants to NAFLD in a community-based Han Chinese population and further explored their potential joint effect on NAFLD. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (PNPLA3 rs738409, rs2294918, NCAN rs2228603, GCKR rs780094, LYPLAL1 rs12137855, and TM6SF2 rs58542926) previously identified in genome-wide analyses, to be associated with NAFLD were genotyped in 384 NAFLD patients and 384 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. We found two out of the six polymorphisms, PNPLA3 rs738409 (OR = 1.52, 95%CI: 1.19–1.96; P = 0.00087) and TM6SF2 rs58542926 (OR = 2.11, 95%CI: 1.34–3.39; P = 0.0016) are independently associated with NAFLD after adjustment for the effects of age, gender, and BMI. Our analysis further demonstrated the strong additive effects of the risk alleles of PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 with an overall significance between the number of risk alleles and NAFLD (OR = 1.64, 95%CI: 1.34–2.01; P = 1.4 × 10-6). The OR for NAFLD increased in an additive manner, with an average increase in OR of 1.52 per additional risk allele. Our results confirmed that the PNPLA3 and TM6SF2 variants were the most significant risk alleles for NAFLD in Chinese population. Therefore, genotyping these two genetic risk factors may help identify individuals with the highest risk of NAFLD. PMID:27532011

  15. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22922229

  16. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases.

  17. Genome-Wide Meta-Analysis of Myopia and Hyperopia Provides Evidence for Replication of 11 Loci

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Claire L.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Oexle, Konrad; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Li, Xiaohui; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Vitart, Veronique; Schache, Maria; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Hysi, Pirro G.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Cotch, Mary Frances; Chew, Emily; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Yin; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Mitchell, Paul; Saw, Seang Mei; Fossarello, Maurizio; Wang, Jie Jin; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Döring, Angela; Bettecken, Thomas; Bencic, Goran; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Venturini, Cristina; Fleck, Brian; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Hammond, Chris J.; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Baird, Paul N.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Pirastu, Mario; Meitinger, Thomas; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Stambolian, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Refractive error (RE) is a complex, multifactorial disorder characterized by a mismatch between the optical power of the eye and its axial length that causes object images to be focused off the retina. The two major subtypes of RE are myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness), which represent opposite ends of the distribution of the quantitative measure of spherical refraction. We performed a fixed effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association results of myopia and hyperopia from 9 studies of European-derived populations: AREDS, KORA, FES, OGP-Talana, MESA, RSI, RSII, RSIII and ERF. One genome-wide significant region was observed for myopia, corresponding to a previously identified myopia locus on 8q12 (p = 1.25×10−8), which has been reported by Kiefer et al. as significantly associated with myopia age at onset and Verhoeven et al. as significantly associated to mean spherical-equivalent (MSE) refractive error. We observed two genome-wide significant associations with hyperopia. These regions overlapped with loci on 15q14 (minimum p value = 9.11×10−11) and 8q12 (minimum p value 1.82×10−11) previously reported for MSE and myopia age at onset. We also used an intermarker linkage- disequilibrium-based method for calculating the effective number of tests in targeted regional replication analyses. We analyzed myopia (which represents the closest phenotype in our data to the one used by Kiefer et al.) and showed replication of 10 additional loci associated with myopia previously reported by Kiefer et al. This is the first replication of these loci using myopia as the trait under analysis. “Replication-level” association was also seen between hyperopia and 12 of Kiefer et al.'s published loci. For the loci that show evidence of association to both myopia and hyperopia, the estimated effect of the risk alleles were in opposite directions for the two traits. This suggests that these loci are important contributors to variation of

  18. Genome-wide meta-analysis of myopia and hyperopia provides evidence for replication of 11 loci.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Claire L; Wojciechowski, Robert; Oexle, Konrad; Murgia, Federico; Portas, Laura; Li, Xiaohui; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Vitart, Veronique; Schache, Maria; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Hysi, Pirro G; Raffel, Leslie J; Cotch, Mary Frances; Chew, Emily; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Yin; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Mitchell, Paul; Saw, Seang Mei; Fossarello, Maurizio; Wang, Jie Jin; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Vingerling, Johannes R; Döring, Angela; Bettecken, Thomas; Bencic, Goran; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wilson, James F; Venturini, Cristina; Fleck, Brian; Cumberland, Phillippa M; Rahi, Jugnoo S; Hammond, Chris J; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F; Paterson, Andrew D; Baird, Paul N; Klaver, Caroline C W; Rotter, Jerome I; Pirastu, Mario; Meitinger, Thomas; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Stambolian, Dwight

    2014-01-01

    Refractive error (RE) is a complex, multifactorial disorder characterized by a mismatch between the optical power of the eye and its axial length that causes object images to be focused off the retina. The two major subtypes of RE are myopia (nearsightedness) and hyperopia (farsightedness), which represent opposite ends of the distribution of the quantitative measure of spherical refraction. We performed a fixed effects meta-analysis of genome-wide association results of myopia and hyperopia from 9 studies of European-derived populations: AREDS, KORA, FES, OGP-Talana, MESA, RSI, RSII, RSIII and ERF. One genome-wide significant region was observed for myopia, corresponding to a previously identified myopia locus on 8q12 (p = 1.25×10(-8)), which has been reported by Kiefer et al. as significantly associated with myopia age at onset and Verhoeven et al. as significantly associated to mean spherical-equivalent (MSE) refractive error. We observed two genome-wide significant associations with hyperopia. These regions overlapped with loci on 15q14 (minimum p value = 9.11×10(-11)) and 8q12 (minimum p value 1.82×10(-11)) previously reported for MSE and myopia age at onset. We also used an intermarker linkage- disequilibrium-based method for calculating the effective number of tests in targeted regional replication analyses. We analyzed myopia (which represents the closest phenotype in our data to the one used by Kiefer et al.) and showed replication of 10 additional loci associated with myopia previously reported by Kiefer et al. This is the first replication of these loci using myopia as the trait under analysis. "Replication-level" association was also seen between hyperopia and 12 of Kiefer et al.'s published loci. For the loci that show evidence of association to both myopia and hyperopia, the estimated effect of the risk alleles were in opposite directions for the two traits. This suggests that these loci are important contributors to variation of refractive

  19. Tritrichomonas foetus isolates from cats and cattle show minor genetic differences in unrelated loci ITS-2 and EF-1α.

    PubMed

    Reinmann, Karin; Müller, Norbert; Kuhnert, Peter; Campero, Carlos M; Leitsch, David; Hess, Michael; Henning, Klaus; Fort, Marcelo; Müller, Joachim; Gottstein, Bruno; Frey, Caroline F

    2012-04-30

    The protozoan parasite Tritrichomonas foetus is well known as an important causative agent of infertility and abortion in cattle (bovine trichomonosis). This World Organisation for Animal Health (O.I.E.) notifiable disease is thought to be under control in many countries including Switzerland. In recent studies, however, T. foetus has also been identified as an intestinal parasite that causes chronic large-bowel diarrhoea in cats. Since the feline isolates were considered indistinguishable from bovine isolates, the possibility and risk of parasite transmission from cats to cattle and vice versa has been intensively discussed in current literature. Therefore, we investigated if cat and cattle isolates are genetically distinct from each other or in fact represent identical genotypes. For this purpose, two independent genetic loci were selected that turned out to be well-suited for a PCR sequencing-based genotyping of trichomonad isolates: (i) previously published internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS-2) and (ii) a semi-conserved sequence stretch of the elongation factor-1 alpha (EF-1α) gene used for the first time in the present study. Respective comparative analyses revealed that both loci were sufficiently variable to allow unambiguous genetic discrimination between different trichomonad species. Comparison of both genetic loci confirmed that T. suis and T. mobilensis are phylogenetically very close to T. foetus. Moreover, these two genetic markers were suited to define host-specific genotypes of T. foetus. Both loci showed single base differences between cat and cattle isolates but showed full sequence identity within strains from either cat or cattle isolates. Furthermore, an additional PCR with a forward primer designed to specifically amplify the bovine sequence of EF-1α was able to discriminate bovine isolates of T. foetus from feline isolates and also from other trichomonads. The implications these minor genetic differences may have on the biological

  20. Genomewide meta-analysis identifies novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To perform a one-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility and explore functional consequences of new susceptibility loci. Methods We synthesized 7 MS GWAS. Each dataset was imputed using HapMap phase II and a per-SNP meta-analysis was performed across the 7 datasets. We explored RNA expression data using a quantitative trait analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 228 subjects with demyelinating disease. Results We meta-analyzed 2,529,394 unique SNPs in 5,545 cases and 12,153 controls. We identified three novel susceptibility alleles: rs170934T at 3p24.1 (OR=1.17, P = 1.6 × 10−8) near EOMES, rs2150702G in the second intron of MLANA on chromosome 9p24.1 (OR = 1.16, P = 3.3 × 10−8), and rs6718520A in an intergenic region on chromosome 2p21, with THADA as the nearest flanking gene (OR = 1.17, P = 3.4 × 10−8). The three new loci do not have a strong “cis” effect on RNA expression in PBMCs. Ten other susceptibility loci had a suggestive P<1×10−6, some of which have evidence of association in other inflammatory diseases, i.e. IL12B, TAGAP, PLEK, and ZMIZ1. Interpretation We have performed a meta-analysis of GWAS in MS that more than doubles the size of previous gene discovery efforts and highlights three novel MS susceptibility loci. These and additional loci with suggestive evidence of association are excellent candidates for further investigations to refine and validate their role in the genetic architecture of MS. PMID:22190364

  1. Evolution of duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus possesses two parallel IgH isoloci (IGH-A and IGH-B), that are related to the genomic duplication event in the family Salmonidae. These duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon provide a unique opportunity to examine the mechanisms of genome diversity and genome evolution of the IgH loci in vertebrates. In this study, we defined the structure of these loci in Atlantic salmon, and sequenced 24 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that were assembled into the IGH-A (1.1 Mb) and IGH-B (0.9 Mb) loci. In addition, over 7,000 cDNA clones from the IgH variable (VH) region have been sequenced and analyzed. Results The present study shows that the genomic organization of the duplicated IgH loci in Atlantic salmon differs from that in other teleosts and other vertebrates. The loci possess multiple Cτ genes upstream of the Cμ region, with three of the Cτ genes being functional. Moreover, the duplicated loci possess over 300 VH segments which could be classified into 18 families. This is the largest number of VH families currently defined in any vertebrate. There were significant structural differences between the two loci, indicating that both IGH-A and -B loci have evolved independently in the short time after the recent genome duplication approximately 60 mya. Conclusions Our results indicate that the duplication of the IgH loci in Atlantic salmon significantly contributes to the increased diversity of the antibody repertoire, as compared with the single IgH locus in other vertebrates. PMID:20813058

  2. Changes in physical activity and modelled cardiovascular risk following diagnosis of diabetes: 1-year results from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, A; Williams, K M; Prevost, A T; Kinmonth, A-L; Wareham, N J; Griffin, S J; Simmons, R K

    2013-01-01

    Aims To describe change in physical activity over 1 year and associations with change in cardiovascular disease risk factors in a population with screen-detected Type 2 diabetes. Methods Eight hundred and sixty-seven individuals with screen-detected diabetes underwent measurement of self-reported physical activity, cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and 1 year (n = 736) in the ADDITION-Cambridge trial. Multiple linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in different physical activity domains and cardiovascular disease risk factors at 1 year. Results There was no change in self-reported physical activity over 12 months. Even relatively large changes in physical activity were associated with relatively small changes in cardiovascular disease risk factors after allowing for changes in self-reported medication and diet. For every 30 metabolic equivalent-h increase in recreational activity (equivalent to 10 h/brisk walking/week), there was an average reduction of 0.1% in HbA1c in men (95% CI −0.15 to −0.01, P = 0.021) and an average reduction of 2 mmHg in systolic blood pressure in women (95% CI −4.0 to −0.05, P = 0.045). Conclusions Few associations were observed between change in different physical activity domains and cardiovascular disease risk factors in this trial cohort. Cardiovascular disease risk reduction appeared to be driven largely by factors other than changes in self-reported physical activity in the first year following diagnosis. PMID:22913463

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel loci for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kazuo; Fujita, Hayato; Johnson, Todd A; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Yasuda, Kazuki; Horikoshi, Momoko; Peng, Chen; Hu, Cheng; Ma, Ronald C W; Imamura, Minako; Iwata, Minoru; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Morizono, Takashi; Shojima, Nobuhiro; So, Wing Yee; Leung, Ting Fan; Kwan, Patrick; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Jie; Yu, Weihui; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Hirose, Hiroshi; Kaku, Kohei; Ito, Chikako; Watada, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Yasushi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Jia, Weiping; Chan, Juliana C N; Teo, Yik Ying; Shyong, Tai E; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kubo, Michiaki; Maeda, Shiro; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Although over 60 loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified, there still remains a large genetic component to be clarified. To explore unidentified loci for T2D, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6 209 637 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were directly genotyped or imputed using East Asian references from the 1000 Genomes Project (June 2011 release) in 5976 Japanese patients with T2D and 20 829 nondiabetic individuals. Nineteen unreported loci were selected and taken forward to follow-up analyses. Combined discovery and follow-up analyses (30 392 cases and 34 814 controls) identified three new loci with genome-wide significance, which were MIR129-LEP [rs791595; risk allele = A; risk allele frequency (RAF) = 0.080; P = 2.55 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.17], GPSM1 [rs11787792; risk allele = A; RAF = 0.874; P = 1.74 × 10(-10); OR = 1.15] and SLC16A13 (rs312457; risk allele = G; RAF = 0.078; P = 7.69 × 10(-13); OR = 1.20). This study demonstrates that GWASs based on the imputation of genotypes using modern reference haplotypes such as that from the 1000 Genomes Project data can assist in identification of new loci for common diseases. PMID:23945395

  4. PGD for cystic fibrosis patients and couples at risk of an additional genetic disorder combined with 24-chromosome aneuploidy testing.

    PubMed

    Rechitsky, Svetlana; Verlinsky, Oleg; Kuliev, Anver

    2013-05-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for inherited disorders is presently applied for more than 300 different conditions. The most frequent PGD indication is cystic fibrosis (CF), the largest series of which is reviewed here, totalling 404 PGD cycles. This involved testing for 52 different CFTR mutations with almost half of the cases (195/404 cycles) performed for ΔF508 mutation, one-quarter (103/404 cycles) for six other frequent mutations and only a few for the remaining 45 CFTR mutations. There were 44 PGD cycles performed for 25 CF-affected homozygous or double-heterozygous CF patients (18 male and seven female partners), which involved testing simultaneously for three mutations, resulting in birth of 13 healthy CF-free children and no misdiagnosis. PGD was also performed for six couples at a combined risk of producing offspring with CF and another genetic disorder. Concomitant testing for CFTR and other mutations resulted in birth of six healthy children, free of both CF and another genetic disorder in all but one cycle. A total of 96 PGD cycles for CF were performed with simultaneous aneuploidy testing, including microarray-based 24-chromosome analysis, as a comprehensive PGD for two or more conditions in the same biopsy material.

  5. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Law, Matthew H.; Bishop, D. Timothy; Martin, Nicholas G.; Moses, Eric K.; Song, Fengju; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Kumar, Rajiv; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Kypreou, Katerina P.; Taylor, John C.; Harland, Mark; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Akslen, Lars A.; Andresen, Per A.; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Azizi, Esther; Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi; Brown, Kevin M.; Dębniak, Tadeusz; Duffy, David L.; Elder, David E.; Fang, Shenying; Friedman, Eitan; Galan, Pilar; Ghiorzo, Paola; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gruis, Nelleke A.; Hansson, Johan; Helsing, Per; Hočevar, Marko; Höiom, Veronica; Ingvar, Christian; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Chen, Wei V.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lang, Julie; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lubiński, Jan; Mackie, Rona M.; Mann, Graham J.; Molven, Anders; Montgomery, Grant W.; Novaković, Srdjan; Olsson, Håkan; Puig, Susana; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Radford-Smith, Graham L.; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Doorn, Remco; Whiteman, David C.; Craig, Jamie E.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Simms, Lisa A.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pooley, Karen A.; Orr, Nick; Stratigos, Alexander J.; Cust, Anne E.; Ward, Sarah V.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Han, Jiali; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Dunning, Alison M.; Bishop, Julia A. Newton; MacGregor, Stuart; Iles, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Thirteen common susceptibility loci have been reproducibly associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). We report the results of an international 2-stage meta-analysis of CMM genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This meta-analysis combines 11 GWAS (5 previously unpublished) and a further three stage 2 data sets, totaling 15,990 CMM cases and 26,409 controls. Five loci not previously associated with CMM risk reached genome-wide significance (P < 5×10–8), as did two previously-reported but un-replicated loci and all thirteen established loci. Novel SNPs fall within putative melanocyte regulatory elements, and bioinformatic and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data highlight candidate genes including one involved in telomere biology. PMID:26237428

  6. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for cutaneous malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Law, Matthew H; Bishop, D Timothy; Lee, Jeffrey E; Brossard, Myriam; Martin, Nicholas G; Moses, Eric K; Song, Fengju; Barrett, Jennifer H; Kumar, Rajiv; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D P; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Kypreou, Katerina P; Taylor, John C; Harland, Mark; Randerson-Moor, Juliette; Akslen, Lars A; Andresen, Per A; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Azizi, Esther; Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi; Brown, Kevin M; Dȩbniak, Tadeusz; Duffy, David L; Elder, David E; Fang, Shenying; Friedman, Eitan; Galan, Pilar; Ghiorzo, Paola; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gruis, Nelleke A; Hansson, Johan; Helsing, Per; Hočevar, Marko; Höiom, Veronica; Ingvar, Christian; Kanetsky, Peter A; Chen, Wei V; Landi, Maria Teresa; Lang, Julie; Lathrop, G Mark; Lubiński, Jan; Mackie, Rona M; Mann, Graham J; Molven, Anders; Montgomery, Grant W; Novaković, Srdjan; Olsson, Håkan; Puig, Susana; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Qureshi, Abrar A; Radford-Smith, Graham L; van der Stoep, Nienke; van Doorn, Remco; Whiteman, David C; Craig, Jamie E; Schadendorf, Dirk; Simms, Lisa A; Burdon, Kathryn P; Nyholt, Dale R; Pooley, Karen A; Orr, Nick; Stratigos, Alexander J; Cust, Anne E; Ward, Sarah V; Hayward, Nicholas K; Han, Jiali; Schulze, Hans-Joachim; Dunning, Alison M; Bishop, Julia A Newton; Demenais, Florence; Amos, Christopher I; MacGregor, Stuart; Iles, Mark M

    2015-09-01

    Thirteen common susceptibility loci have been reproducibly associated with cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). We report the results of an international 2-stage meta-analysis of CMM genome-wide association studies (GWAS). This meta-analysis combines 11 GWAS (5 previously unpublished) and a further three stage 2 data sets, totaling 15,990 CMM cases and 26,409 controls. Five loci not previously associated with CMM risk reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)), as did 2 previously reported but unreplicated loci and all 13 established loci. Newly associated SNPs fall within putative melanocyte regulatory elements, and bioinformatic and expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data highlight candidate genes in the associated regions, including one involved in telomere biology. PMID:26237428

  7. Development and characterization of thirteen microsatellite loci in Clark's nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Castoe, Todd A.; Tomback, Diana F.; Wunder, Michael B.; Schaming, Taza D.

    2013-01-01

    Clark’s nutcrackers are important seed dispersers for two widely-distributed western North American conifers, whitebark pine and limber pine, which are declining due to outbreaks of mountain pine beetle and white pine blister rust. Because nutcracker seed dispersal services are key to maintaining viable populations of these imperiled pines, knowledge of movement patterns of Clark’s nutcrackers helps managers understand local extinction risks for these trees. To investigate population structure within Clark’s nutcracker, we developed primers for and characterized 13 polymorphic microsatellite loci. In a screen of 22 individuals from one population, levels of variability ranged from 6 to 15 alleles. No loci were found to be linked, although 4 loci revealed significant departures from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium and evidence of null alleles. These microsatellite loci will enable population genetic analyses of Clark’s nutcrackers, which could provide insights into the spatial relationships between nutcrackers and the trees they help disperse.

  8. Regulation of gene expression in autoimmune disease loci and the genetic basis of proliferation in CD4+ effector memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinli; Kim, Hyun; Raj, Towfique; Brennan, Patrick J; Trynka, Gosia; Teslovich, Nikola; Slowikowski, Kamil; Chen, Wei-Min; Onengut, Suna; Baecher-Allan, Clare; De Jager, Philip L; Rich, Stephen S; Stranger, Barbara E; Brenner, Michael B; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and subsequent dense-genotyping of associated loci identified over a hundred single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants associated with the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type 1 diabetes (T1D), and celiac disease (CeD). Immunological and genetic studies suggest a role for CD4-positive effector memory T (CD+ TEM) cells in the pathogenesis of these diseases. To elucidate mechanisms of autoimmune disease alleles, we investigated molecular phenotypes in CD4+ effector memory T cells potentially affected by these variants. In a cohort of genotyped healthy individuals, we isolated high purity CD4+ TEM cells from peripheral blood, then assayed relative abundance, proliferation upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation, and the transcription of 215 genes within disease loci before and after stimulation. We identified 46 genes regulated by cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), the majority of which we detected in stimulated cells. Eleven of the 46 genes with eQTLs were previously undetected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Of 96 risk alleles of RA, T1D, and/or CeD in densely genotyped loci, eleven overlapped cis-eQTLs, of which five alleles completely explained the respective signals. A non-coding variant, rs389862A, increased proliferative response (p=4.75 × 10-8). In addition, baseline expression of seventeen genes in resting cells reliably predicted proliferative response after TCR stimulation. Strikingly, however, there was no evidence that risk alleles modulated CD4+ TEM abundance or proliferation. Our study underscores the power of examining molecular phenotypes in relevant cells and conditions for understanding pathogenic mechanisms of disease variants. PMID:24968232

  9. Mapping quantitative trait loci in noninbred mosquito crosses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Huang, Song; Zheng, Liangbiao; Zhao, Hongyu

    2006-04-01

    The identification of genes that affect quantitative traits has been of great interest to geneticists for many decades, and many statistical methods have been developed to map quantitative trait loci (QTL). Most QTL mapping studies in experimental organisms use purely inbred lines, where the two homologous chromosomes in each individual are identical. As a result, many existing QTL mapping methods developed for experimental organisms are applicable only to genetic crosses between inbred lines. However, it may be difficult to obtain inbred lines for certain organisms, e.g., mosquitoes. Although statistical methods for QTL mapping in outbred populations, e.g., humans, can be applied for such crosses, these methods may not fully take advantage of the uniqueness of these crosses. For example, we can generally assume that the two grandparental lines are homozygous at the QTL of interest, but such information is not be utilized through methods developed for outbred populations. In addition, mating types and phases can be relatively easy to establish through the analysis of adjacent markers due to the large number of offspring that can be collected, substantially simplifying the computational need. In this article, motivated by a mosquito intercross experiment involving two selected lines that are not genetically homozygous across the genome, we develop statistical methods for QTL mapping for genetic crosses involving noninbred lines. In our procedure, we first infer parental mating types and use likelihood-based methods to infer phases in each parent on the basis of genotypes of offspring and one parent. A hidden Markov model is then employed to estimate the number of high-risk alleles at marker positions and putative QTL positions between markers in each offspring, and QTL mapping is finally conducted through the inferred QTL configuration across all offspring in all crosses. The performance of the proposed methods is assessed through simulation studies, and the

  10. Additional cytosine inside mitochondrial C-tract D-loop as a progression risk factor in oral precancer cases

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Rahul; Mehrotra, Divya; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Sarin, Rajiv; Kowtal, Pradnya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Alterations inside Polycytosine tract (C-tract) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been described in many different tumor types. The Poly-Cytosine region is located within the mtDNA D-loop region which acts as point of mitochondrial replication origin. A suggested pathogenesis is that it interferes with the replication process of mtDNA which in turn affects the mitochondrial functioning and generates disease. Methodology 100 premalignant cases (50 leukoplakia & 50 oral submucous fibrosis) were selected and the mitochondrial DNA were isolated from the lesion tissues and from the blood samples. Polycytosine tract in mtDNA was sequenced by direct capillary sequencing. Results 40 (25 leukoplakia & 15 oral submucous fibrosis) patients harbored lesions that displayed one additional cytosine after nucleotide thymidine (7CT6C) at nt position 316 in C-tract of mtDNA which were absent in corresponding mtDNA derived from blood samples. Conclusion Our results show an additional cytosine in the mtDNA at polycytosine site in oral precancer cases. It is postulated that any increase/decrease in the number of cytosine residues in the Poly-Cytosine region may affect the rate of mtDNA replication by impairing the binding of polymerase and other transacting factors. By promoting mitochondrial genomic instability, it may have a central role in the dysregulation of mtDNA functioning, for example alterations in energy metabolism that may promote tumor development. We, therefore, report and propose that this alteration may represent the early development of oral cancer. Further studies with large number of samples are needed in to confirm the role of such mutation in carcinogenesis. PMID:25737911

  11. Evaluation of Genome Wide Association Study Associated Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci in Sub Saharan Africans

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Doumatey, Ayo P.; Bentley, Amy R.; Chen, Guanjie; Huang, Hanxia; Zhou, Jie; Shriner, Daniel; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Okafor, Godfrey; Eghan, Benjamin; Agyenim-Boateng, Kofi; Adeleye, Jokotade; Balogun, Williams; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Owusu, Samuel; Amoah, Albert; Acheampong, Joseph; Johnson, Thomas; Oli, Johnnie; Adebamowo, Clement; Collins, Francis; Dunston, Georgia; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) undertaken in European and Asian ancestry populations have yielded dozens of robustly associated loci. However, the genomics of T2D remains largely understudied in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where rates of T2D are increasing dramatically and where the environmental background is quite different than in these previous studies. Here, we evaluate 106 reported T2D GWAS loci in continental Africans. We tested each of these SNPs, and SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with these index SNPs, for an association with T2D in order to assess transferability and to fine map the loci leveraging the generally reduced LD of African genomes. The study included 1775 unrelated Africans (1035 T2D cases, 740 controls; mean age 54 years; 59% female) enrolled in Nigeria, Ghana, and Kenya as part of the Africa America Diabetes Mellitus (AADM) study. All samples were genotyped on the Affymetrix Axiom PanAFR SNP array. Forty-one of the tested loci showed transferability to this African sample (p < 0.05, same direction of effect), 11 at the exact reported SNP and 30 others at SNPs in LD with the reported SNP (after adjustment for the number of tested SNPs). TCF7L2 SNP rs7903146 was the most significant locus in this study (p = 1.61 × 10−8). Most of the loci that showed transferability were successfully fine-mapped, i.e., localized to smaller haplotypes than in the original reports. The findings indicate that the genetic architecture of T2D in SSA is characterized by several risk loci shared with non-African ancestral populations and that data from African populations may facilitate fine mapping of risk loci. The study provides an important resource for meta-analysis of African ancestry populations and transferability of novel loci. PMID:26635871

  12. Genome-wide meta-analyses of multi-ethnic cohorts identify multiple new susceptibility loci for refractive error and myopia

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, Virginie J.M.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Fan, Qiao; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Höhn, René; MacGregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W.; Nag, Abhishek; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H.S.; McMahon, George; Kemp, John P.; St. Pourcain, Beate; Simpson, Claire L.; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Wong, Hoi Suen; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B.; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W. H.; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Haller, Toomas; Metspalu, Andres; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Tai, E-Shyong; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga; Tay, Wan-Ting; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Liao, Jiemin; Zheng, Yingfeng; Ong, Rick T.; Döring, Angela; Evans, David M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Verkerk, Annemieke J.M.H.; Meitinger, Thomas; Raitakari, Olli; Hawthorne, Felicia; Spector, Tim D.; Karssen, Lennart C.; Pirastu, Mario; Murgia, Federico; Ang, Wei; Mishra, Aniket; Montgomery, Grant W.; Pennell, Craig E.; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Schache, Maria; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Igo, Robert P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Chew, Emily; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Gorgels, Theo G.M.F.; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Wright, Alan F.; Polasek, Ozren; Vatavuk, Zoran; Wilson, James F.; Fleck, Brian; Zeller, Tanja; Mirshahi, Alireza; Müller, Christian; Uitterlinden, Andre’ G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A.; Amin, Najaf; Bergen, Arthur A.B.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Vitart, Veronique; Williams, Cathy; Baird, Paul N.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mackey, David A.; Young, Terri L.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saw, Seang-Mei; Wilson, Joan E. Bailey; Stambolian, Dwight; Klaver, Caroline C.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Refractive error is the most common eye disorder worldwide, and a prominent cause of blindness. Myopia affects over 30% of Western populations, and up to 80% of Asians. The CREAM consortium conducted genome-wide meta-analyses including 37,382 individuals from 27 studies of European ancestry, and 8,376 from 5 Asian cohorts. We identified 16 new loci for refractive error in subjects of European ancestry, of which 8 were shared with Asians. Combined analysis revealed 8 additional loci. The new loci include genes with functions in neurotransmission (GRIA4), ion channels (KCNQ5), retinoic acid metabolism (RDH5), extracellular matrix remodeling (LAMA2, BMP2), and eye development (SIX6, PRSS56). We also confirmed previously reported associations with GJD2 and RASGRF1. Risk score analysis using associated SNPs showed a tenfold increased risk of myopia for subjects with the highest genetic load. Our results, accumulated across independent multi-ethnic studies, considerably advance understanding of mechanisms involved in refractive error and myopia. PMID:23396134

  13. Seven New Loci Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness in older individuals. To accelerate understanding of AMD biology and help design new therapies, we executed a collaborative genomewide association study, examining >17,100 advanced AMD cases and >60,000 controls of European and Asian ancestry. We identified 19 genomic loci associated with AMD with p<5×10−8 and enriched for genes involved in regulation of complement activity, lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. Our results include 7 loci reaching p<5×10−8 for the first time, near the genes COL8A1/FILIP1L, IER3/DDR1, SLC16A8, TGFBR1, RAD51B, ADAMTS9/MIR548A2, and B3GALTL. A genetic risk score combining SNPs from all loci displayed similar good ability to distinguish cases and controls in all samples examined. Our findings provide new directions for biological, genetic and therapeutic studies of AMD. PMID:23455636

  14. Multiple newly identified loci associated with prostate cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Eeles, Rosalind A; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Giles, Graham G; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Guy, Michelle; Jugurnauth, Sarah K; Mulholland, Shani; Leongamornlert, Daniel A; Edwards, Stephen M; Morrison, Jonathan; Field, Helen I; Southey, Melissa C; Severi, Gianluca; Donovan, Jenny L; Hamdy, Freddie C; Dearnaley, David P; Muir, Kenneth R; Smith, Charmaine; Bagnato, Melisa; Ardern-Jones, Audrey T; Hall, Amanda L; O'Brien, Lynne T; Gehr-Swain, Beatrice N; Wilkinson, Rosemary A; Cox, Angie; Lewis, Sarah; Brown, Paul M; Jhavar, Sameer G; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Bryant, Sarah L; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A; Khoo, Vincent S; Parker, Christopher C; Woodhouse, Christopher J; Thompson, Alan; Christmas, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Fisher, Cyril; Jamieson, Charles; Cooper, Colin S; English, Dallas R; Hopper, John L; Neal, David E; Easton, Douglas F

    2008-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer affecting males in developed countries. It shows consistent evidence of familial aggregation, but the causes of this aggregation are mostly unknown. To identify common alleles associated with prostate cancer risk, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using blood DNA samples from 1,854 individuals with clinically detected prostate cancer diagnosed at loci associated with prostate cancer on chromosomes 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 19 and X (P = 2.7 x 10(-8) to P = 8.7 x 10(-29)). We confirmed previous reports of common loci associated with prostate cancer at 8q24 and 17q. Moreover, we found that three of the newly identified loci contain candidate susceptibility genes: MSMB, LMTK2 and KLK3.

  15. Homology of Melanoma-Inducing Loci in the Genus Xiphophorus

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, M.

    1990-01-01

    Several species of the genus Xiphophorus are polymorphic for specific pigment patterns. Some of these give rise to malignant melanoma following the appropriate crossings. For one of these pattern loci from the platyfish Xiphophorus maculatus the melanoma-inducing gene has been cloned and found to encode a novel receptor tyrosine kinase, designated Xmrk. Using molecular probes from this gene in Southern blot analyses on single fish DNA preparations from 600 specimens of different populations of various species of the genus Xiphophorus and their hybrids, either with or without melanoma-predisposing pattern, it was shown that all individuals contain the Xmrk gene as a proto-oncogene. It is located on the sex chromosome. All fish that carry a melanoma-predisposing locus which has been identified by Mendelian genetics contain an additional copy of Xmrk, closely linked to a specific melanophore pattern locus on the sex chromosome. The melanoma-inducing loci of the different species and populations are homologous. The additional copy of Xmrk obviously arose by a gene-duplication event, thereby acquiring the oncogenic potential. The homology of the melanoma-inducing loci points to a similar mechanism of tumor suppression in all feral fish populations of the different species of the genus Xiphophorus. PMID:1981761

  16. Allele imbalance at tumour suppressor loci during the indolent phase of follicle centre cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Randerson, J; Cawkwell, L; Jack, A S; Child, A J; Shiach, C R; Lewis, F; Johnson, P; Evans, P; Barrans, S; Morgan, G J

    1996-06-01

    We have examined 41 cases of follicle centre cell lymphoma with fluorescent PCR of microsatellite repeats closely linked to or within six tumour suppressor gene loci (APC, DCC, P53, RB1, WT1 and NM23). These probes are highly informative with heterozygousity rates in the range of 57%-90%. In addition we have used four loci from chromosome 6 (D6S260, TNFa, D6S281 and D6S262) as control loci which are unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of lymphoma. Of 369 informative PCR reactions allele imbalance was identified in 38 (10%) and this was seen in 23 of the 41 cases. Looking at individual loci allele imbalance was seen in APC(1) 11%, APC(2) 12%, P53(1) 5%, P53 (2) 7%, WT1 5%, RB1 13%, DCC 18% and NM23 0%. This frequency of change was no different from that seen at the control loci D6S260 16%, TNFa 20%, D6S281 4% and D6S262 9%. In the indolent phase of germinal centre cell lymphoma there is therefore quite a high rate of allele imbalance at all loci but this is no higher in those loci linked to tumour suppressor genes. PMID:8724537

  17. High density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E.M.; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the Immunochip custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, designed for dense genotyping of 186 genome wide association study (GWAS) confirmed loci we analysed 11,475 rheumatoid arthritis cases of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. The data were combined in meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n=2,363) and controls (n=17,872). We identified fourteen novel loci; nine were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and 5 specifically in anti-citrillunated peptide antibody positive disease, bringing the number of confirmed European ancestry rheumatoid arthritis loci to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at six loci and association to low frequency variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analysis of the data generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  18. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined.

  19. Naturally segregating loci exhibit epistasis for fitness

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which gene interaction or epistasis contributes to fitness variation within populations remains poorly understood, despite its importance to a myriad of evolutionary questions. Here, we report a multi-year field study estimating fitness of Mimulus guttatus genetic lines in which pairs of naturally segregating loci exist in an otherwise uniform background. An allele at QTL x5b—a locus originally mapped for its effect on flower size—positively affects survival if combined with one genotype at quantitative trait locus x10a (aa) but has negative effects when combined with the other genotypes (Aa and AA). The viability differences between genotypes parallel phenotypic differences for the time and node at which a plant flowers. Viability is negatively correlated with fecundity across genotypes, indicating antagonistic pleiotropy for fitness components. This trade-off reduces the genetic variance for total fitness relative to the individual fitness components and thus may serve to maintain variation. Additionally, we find that the effects of each locus and their interaction often vary with the environment. PMID:26246336

  20. Genetic loci for retinal arteriolar microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Sim, Xueling; Jensen, Richard A; Ikram, M Kamran; Cotch, Mary Frances; Li, Xiaohui; MacGregor, Stuart; Xie, Jing; Smith, Albert Vernon; Boerwinkle, Eric; Mitchell, Paul; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E K; Glazer, Nicole L; Lumley, Thomas; McKnight, Barbara; Psaty, Bruce M; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Harris, Tamara B; Jonasson, Fridbert; Launer, Lenore J; Attia, John; Baird, Paul N; Harrap, Stephen; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Inouye, Michael; Rochtchina, Elena; Scott, Rodney J; Viswanathan, Ananth; Li, Guo; Smith, Nicholas L; Wiggins, Kerri L; Kuo, Jane Z; Taylor, Kent D; Hewitt, Alex W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Sun, Cong; Young, Terri L; Mackey, David A; van Zuydam, Natalie R; Doney, Alex S F; Palmer, Colin N A; Morris, Andrew D; Rotter, Jerome I; Tai, E Shyong; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Vingerling, Johannes R; Siscovick, David S; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Narrow arterioles in the retina have been shown to predict hypertension as well as other vascular diseases, likely through an increase in the peripheral resistance of the microcirculatory flow. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study in 18,722 unrelated individuals of European ancestry from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium and the Blue Mountain Eye Study, to identify genetic determinants associated with variations in retinal arteriolar caliber. Retinal vascular calibers were measured on digitized retinal photographs using a standardized protocol. One variant (rs2194025 on chromosome 5q14 near the myocyte enhancer factor 2C MEF2C gene) was associated with retinal arteriolar caliber in the meta-analysis of the discovery cohorts at genome-wide significance of P-value <5×10(-8). This variant was replicated in an additional 3,939 individuals of European ancestry from the Australian Twins Study and Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (rs2194025, P-value = 2.11×10(-12) in combined meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts). In independent studies of modest sample sizes, no significant association was found between this variant and clinical outcomes including coronary artery disease, stroke, myocardial infarction or hypertension. In conclusion, we found one novel loci which underlie genetic variation in microvasculature which may be relevant to vascular disease. The relevance of these findings to clinical outcomes remains to be determined. PMID:23776548

  1. Phenotypic associations of genetic susceptibility loci in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Elena; Nadig, Ajay; Richardson, Bruce C; Freedman, Barry I; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kelly, Jennifer A; Niewold, Timothy B; Kamen, Diane L; Gilkeson, Gary S; Ziegler, Julie T; Langefeld, Carl D; Alarcón, Graciela S; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle; Brown, Elizabeth E; Kimberly, Robert P; Reveille, John D; Vilá, Luis M; Merrill, Joan T; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; James, Judith A; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A; Martin, Javier; Park, So-Yeon; Bang, So-Young; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Moser, Kathy L; Vyse, Timothy J; Criswell, Lindsey A; Gaffney, Patrick M; Tsao, Betty P; Jacob, Chaim O; Harley, John B; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Sawalha, Amr H

    2011-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus is a clinically heterogeneous autoimmune disease. A number of genetic loci that increase lupus susceptibility have been established. This study examines if these genetic loci also contribute to the clinical heterogeneity in lupus. Materials and methods 4001