Science.gov

Sample records for additional sample preparation

  1. Preparation of an additive-free sample with a MgH2 phase by planetary ball milling of Mg with10 wt% MgH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seong-Hyeon; Song, Myoung Youp

    2016-11-01

    In order to prepare an additive-free sample with a MgH2 phase, 90 wt% Mg+10 wt% MgH2 (named Mg-10MgH2) was milled under hydrogen atmosphere in a planetary ball mill for different durations (2 h, 5 h, and 10 h). The hydrogen absorption and release properties of the prepared samples were investigated and compared with those of purchased pure MgH2 samples. Mg-10MgH2 milled for 5 h had the largest quantity of hydrogen released at 648 K for 100 min of 5.96 wt%. Mg-10MgH2 milled for 5 h released 0.11 wt% H for 10 min, 4.85 wt% H for 30 min, and 5.83 wt% H for 60 min at 648 K at the first cycle. Mg-10MgH2 milled for 5 h absorbed 5.39 wt% H for 5 min and 5.92 wt% H for 60 min at 648 K at the second cycle. Dehydriding curves were also obtained at the first cycle of Mg-10MgH2 samples milled for 5 h using Mg powder with or without sieving (200 mesh). The dehydriding curve at 648 K of a Mg-10MgH2 sample milled for 5 h in the planetary ball mill was compared with that of the sample milled for 24 h in a horizontal ball mill.

  2. Sample preparation techniques.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, W A; Hill, V A

    1993-12-01

    Evidentiary false positives are caused by passive exposure to drugs in the environment rather than by active use of drugs. The avoidance of such positives is essential for both hair and urine analysis. Hair analysis enjoys the advantage over urinalysis in having a number of approaches for making this distinction. These include: methylene blue staining of the hair specimen for selecting the appropriate wash solvent; application of hair digestion techniques for the complete release of chemically unaltered analytes; the determination of three diagnostic ratios from wash and digestion data; the measurement of metabolite:drug ratios; the use of cut-off levels setting the limits for passive endogenous drug exposure; reproducibility of results (including segmental analysis) with a newly collected hair specimen; and the reporting of results as either negative, positive, or contaminated. Our sample preparation procedures have been effectively applied to the analyses of nearly 200,000 specimens, i.e. to approximately one million drug analyses for cocaine, opiates, methamphetamine, phencyclidine or marijuana. On the basis of this experience we conclude that hair analysis is a safe and effective method for workplace drug testing.

  3. Sample preparation for STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Christian A; Neumann, Daniel; Schmidt, Roman; Egner, Alexander; Jakobs, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of the diffraction barrier in the late nineteenth century, it has been commonly accepted that with far-field optical microscopy it is not possible to resolve structural details considerably finer than half the wavelength of light. The emergence of STED microscopy showed that, at least for fluorescence imaging, these limits can be overcome. Since STED microscopy is a far-field technique, in principle, the same sample preparation as for conventional confocal microscopy may be utilized. The increased resolution, however, requires additional precautions to ensure the structural preservation of the specimen. We present robust protocols to generate test samples for STED microscopy. These protocols for bead samples and immunolabeled mammalian cells may be used as starting points to adapt existing labeling strategies for the requirements of sub-diffraction resolution microscopy.

  4. Innovative methods for inorganic sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Essling, A.M.; Huff, E.A.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1992-04-01

    Procedures and guidelines are given for the dissolution of a variety of selected materials using fusion, microwave, and Parr bomb techniques. These materials include germanium glass, corium-concrete mixtures, and zeolites. Emphasis is placed on sample-preparation approaches that produce a single master solution suitable for complete multielement characterization of the sample. In addition, data are presented on the soil microwave digestion method approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Advantages and disadvantages of each sample-preparation technique are summarized.

  5. Microwave sample preparation for analysis of metals in environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.W.

    1996-10-01

    The unique nature of microwave energy enhances heating efficiency and improves acid digestion sample preparation. Faster sample preparation and improved precision of the analysis occur. These results will be illustrated in this presentation using various standard reference materials and environmentally important samples. The analytical microwave system used offers accurate temperature and pressure feedback control through the use of a hand-held controller or PC-based control. Digestions are performed in patented, user-friendly microwave vessels. USEPA Method 3015, {open_quotes}Microwave-Assisted Acid Digestion of Aqueous Samples and Extracts,{close_quotes} is properly performed when the sample is heated to 170{degrees}C within 10 minutes, and maintained for an additional 10 minutes. USEPA Method 3051, {open_quotes}Microwave-Assisted Acid Digestion of Sediments, Sludges, Soils, and Oils,{close_quotes} is properly performed when the sample is heated to 175{degrees}C within 5.5 minutes, and maintained at 175{degrees}C for an additional 4.5 minutes. After the timesaving microwave digestion period, the samples were analyzed for metals by ICP-AES. Excellent accuracy and precision were obtained, in addition to 90% time reduction when using microwave sample preparation.

  6. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S; Benett, W; Bettencourt, K; Chang, J; Fisher, K; Hamilton, J; Krulevitch, P; Park, C; Stockton, C; Tarte, L; Wang, A; Wilson, T

    2001-08-09

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. to support detection instruments, they are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. They are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Many of these fluidic functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure or dielectrophoresis. They are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow through the fluidic circuit.

  7. Optimising uncertainty in physical sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Lyn, Jennifer A; Ramsey, Michael H; Damant, Andrew P; Wood, Roger

    2005-11-01

    Uncertainty associated with the result of a measurement can be dominated by the physical sample preparation stage of the measurement process. In view of this, the Optimised Uncertainty (OU) methodology has been further developed to allow the optimisation of the uncertainty from this source, in addition to that from the primary sampling and the subsequent chemical analysis. This new methodology for the optimisation of physical sample preparation uncertainty (u(prep), estimated as s(prep)) is applied for the first time, to a case study of myclobutanil in retail strawberries. An increase in expenditure (+7865%) on the preparatory process was advised in order to reduce the s(prep) by the 69% recommended. This reduction is desirable given the predicted overall saving, under optimised conditions, of 33,000 pounds Sterling per batch. This new methodology has been shown to provide guidance on the appropriate distribution of resources between the three principle stages of a measurement process, including physical sample preparation.

  8. Final Report BW Sample Collection& Preparation Device

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R P; Belgrader, P; Meyer, G; Benett, W J; Richards, J B; Hadley, D R; Stratton, P L; Milanovich, F P

    2002-01-31

    The objective of this project was to develop the technique needed to prepare a field collected sample for laboratory analysis and build a portable integrated biological detection instrument with new miniaturized and automated sample purification capabilities. The device will prepare bacterial spores, bacterial vegetative cells, and viral particles for PCR amplification.

  9. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    DOEpatents

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  10. 40 CFR 761.323 - Sample preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 761.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL... Remediation Waste Samples § 761.323 Sample preparation. (a) The comparison study requires analysis of a minimum of 10 samples weighing at least 300 grams each. Samples of PCB remediation waste used in...

  11. Sub-sampling and preparing forensic samples for pollen analysis.

    PubMed

    Horrocks, Mark

    2004-09-01

    The main forensic application of palynology is in providing associative evidence, assisting to prove or disprove a link between people and objects with places or with other people. Although identification and interpretation of pollen is a specialist job, sub-sampling and preparing pollen samples for analysis may be carried out by non-specialists. As few forensic laboratories have residing palynologists, laboratories may wish to reduce the cost of analysis or risk of contamination by doing their own sub-sampling and preparation. Presented is a practical guide for sub-sampling and preparing forensic samples for pollen analysis, providing a complete standard procedure for both the palynologist and non-specialist. Procedures for sub-sampling include a wide variety of materials commonly collected for forensic analysis (soil, clothing and other fabrics, footwear, twine and rope, firearms, granulated materials, plant and animal material, and illicit drugs), many of which palynologists will not be familiar with. Procedures for preparation of samples (pollen concentration) are presented as a detailed, step-by-step method. Minimizing the risks of laboratory and cross-sample contamination during sub-sampling and preparation is emphasized.

  12. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Medical Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Cui, Francis; Rhee, Minsoung; Singh, Anup; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-01-01

    Fast and reliable diagnoses are invaluable in clinical care. Samples (e.g., blood, urine, and saliva) are collected and analyzed for various biomarkers to quickly and sensitively assess disease progression, monitor response to treatment, and determine a patient's prognosis. Processing conventional samples entails many manual time-consuming steps. Consequently, clinical specimens must be processed by skilled technicians before antigens or nucleic acids are detected, and these are often present at dilute concentrations. Recently, several automated microchip technologies have been developed that potentially offer many advantages over traditional bench-top extraction methods. The smaller length scales and more refined transport mechanisms that characterize these microfluidic devices enable faster and more efficient biomarker enrichment and extraction. Additionally, they can be designed to perform multiple tests or experimental steps on one integrated, automated platform. This review explores the current research on microfluidic methods of sample preparation that are designed to aid diagnosis, and covers a broad spectrum of extraction techniques and designs for various types of samples and analytes.

  13. Automated sample preparation for CE-SDS.

    PubMed

    Le, M Eleanor; Vizel, Alona; Hutterer, Katariina M

    2013-05-01

    Traditionally, CE with SDS (CE-SDS) places many restrictions on sample composition. Requirements include low salt content, known initial sample concentration, and a narrow window of final sample concentration. As these restrictions require buffer exchange for many sample types, sample preparation is often tedious and yields poor sample recoveries. To improve capacity and streamline sample preparation, an automated robotic platform was developed using the PhyNexus Micro-Extractor Automated Instrument (MEA) for both the reduced and nonreduced CE-SDS assays. This automated sample preparation normalizes sample concentration, removes salts and other contaminants, and adds the required CE-SDS reagents, essentially eliminating manual steps during sample preparation. Fc-fusion proteins and monoclonal antibodies were used in this work to demonstrate benefits of this approach when compared to the manual method. With optimized conditions, this application has demonstrated decreased analyst "hands on" time and reduced total assay time. Sample recovery greater than 90% can be achieved, regardless of initial composition and concentration of analyte.

  14. Microextraction sample preparation techniques in biomedical analysis.

    PubMed

    Szultka, Malgorzata; Pomastowski, Pawel; Railean-Plugaru, Viorica; Buszewski, Boguslaw

    2014-11-01

    Biologically active compounds are found in biological samples at relatively low concentration levels. The sample preparation of target compounds from biological, pharmaceutical, environmental, and food matrices is one of the most time-consuming steps in the analytical procedure. The microextraction techniques are dominant. Metabolomic studies also require application of proper analytical technique for the determination of endogenic metabolites present in biological matrix on trace concentration levels. Due to the reproducibility of data, precision, relatively low cost of the appropriate analysis, simplicity of the determination, and the possibility of direct combination of those techniques with other methods (combination types on-line and off-line), they have become the most widespread in routine determinations. Additionally, sample pretreatment procedures have to be more selective, cheap, quick, and environmentally friendly. This review summarizes the current achievements and applications of microextraction techniques. The main aim is to deal with the utilization of different types of sorbents for microextraction and emphasize the use of new synthesized sorbents as well as to bring together studies concerning the systematic approach to method development. This review is dedicated to the description of microextraction techniques and their application in biomedical analysis.

  15. Molecularly imprinted polymers for bioanalytical sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Gama, Mariana Roberto; Bottoli, Carla Beatriz Grespan

    2017-02-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are stable polymers with molecular recognition abilities, provided by the presence of a template during their synthesis, and are excellent materials with high selectivity for sample preparation in bioanalytical methods. This short review discusses aspects of MIP preparation and its applications as a sorbent material in pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis. MIP in different extraction configurations, including classical solid-phase extraction, solid-phase microextraction, magnetic molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction, microextraction by packed sorbent and solid-phase extraction in pipette tips, are used to illustrate the good performance of this type of sorbent for sample preparation procedures of complex matrices, especially prior to bioanalytical approaches.

  16. Photochemical preparation of olefin addition catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Harry B. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Gupta, Amitava (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Novel polymer supported catalysts are prepared by photo-irradiation of low valent transition metal compounds such as Co.sub.2 (CO).sub.8, Rh.sub.4 (CO).sub.12 or Ru.sub.3 (CO).sub.12 in the presence of solid polymers containing amine ligands such as polyvinyl pyridine. Hydroformylation of olefins to aldehydes at ambient conditions has been demonstrated.

  17. Precise and automated microfluidic sample preparation.

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, Robert W.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Mosier, Bruce P.; Harnett, Cindy K.

    2004-07-01

    Autonomous bio-chemical agent detectors require sample preparation involving multiplex fluid control. We have developed a portable microfluidic pump array for metering sub-microliter volumes at flowrates of 1-100 {micro}L/min. Each pump is composed of an electrokinetic (EK) pump and high-voltage power supply with 15-Hz feedback from flow sensors. The combination of high pump fluid impedance and active control results in precise fluid metering with nanoliter accuracy. Automated sample preparation will be demonstrated by labeling proteins with fluorescamine and subsequent injection to a capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) chip.

  18. 7 CFR 27.25 - Additional samples of cotton; drawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional samples of cotton; drawing. 27.25 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.25 Additional samples of cotton; drawing. In addition to the samples hereinbefore...

  19. 7 CFR 27.25 - Additional samples of cotton; drawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional samples of cotton; drawing. 27.25 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.25 Additional samples of cotton; drawing. In addition to the samples hereinbefore...

  20. 7 CFR 27.25 - Additional samples of cotton; drawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional samples of cotton; drawing. 27.25 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.25 Additional samples of cotton; drawing. In addition to the samples hereinbefore...

  1. 7 CFR 27.25 - Additional samples of cotton; drawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional samples of cotton; drawing. 27.25 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.25 Additional samples of cotton; drawing. In addition to the samples hereinbefore...

  2. 7 CFR 27.25 - Additional samples of cotton; drawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional samples of cotton; drawing. 27.25 Section... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.25 Additional samples of cotton; drawing. In addition to the samples hereinbefore...

  3. HASE - The Helsinki adaptive sample preparation line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palonen, V.; Pesonen, A.; Herranen, T.; Tikkanen, P.; Oinonen, M.

    2013-01-01

    We have designed and built an adaptive sample preparation line with separate modules for combustion, molecular sieve handling, CO2 gas cleaning, CO2 storage, and graphitization. The line is also connected to an elemental analyzer. Operation of the vacuum equipment, a flow controller, pressure sensors, ovens, and graphitization reactors are automated with a reliable NI-cRIO real-time system. Stepped combustion can be performed in two ovens at temperatures up to 900 °C. Depending on the application, CuO or O2-flow combustion can be used. A flow controller is used to adjust the O2 flow and pressure during combustion. For environmental samples, a module for molecular sieve regeneration and sample desorption is attached to the line replacing the combustion module. In the storage module, CO2 samples can be stored behind a gas-tight diaphragm valve and either stored for later graphitization or taken for measurements with separate equipment (AMS gas ion source or a separate mass spectrometer). The graphitization module consists of four automated reactors, capable of graphitizing samples with masses from 3 mg down to 50 μg.

  4. Chapter A1. Preparations for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses field-trip preparations, including selection of sample-collection sites for studies of surface-water quality, site reconnaissance and well selection for studies of groundwater quality, and the establishment of electronic files and field files and folders for a sampling site. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed Jan. 31, 2005).

  5. 21 CFR 71.4 - Samples; additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Samples; additional information. 71.4 Section 71.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR... samples of the color additive, articles used as components thereof, or of the food, drug, or cosmetic...

  6. 21 CFR 71.4 - Samples; additional information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Samples; additional information. 71.4 Section 71.4 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL COLOR... samples of the color additive, articles used as components thereof, or of the food, drug, or cosmetic...

  7. 7 CFR 27.21 - Preparation of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preparation of samples of cotton. 27.21 Section 27.21... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.21 Preparation of samples of cotton. The samples from each bale shall be prepared as specified in this...

  8. 7 CFR 27.21 - Preparation of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Preparation of samples of cotton. 27.21 Section 27.21... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.21 Preparation of samples of cotton. The samples from each bale shall be prepared as specified in this...

  9. 7 CFR 27.21 - Preparation of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparation of samples of cotton. 27.21 Section 27.21... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.21 Preparation of samples of cotton. The samples from each bale shall be prepared as specified in this...

  10. Sampling almonds for aflatoxin, part I: estimation of uncertainty associated with sampling, sample preparation, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andrew B; Jacobs, Merle; Hurley, J Michael; Adams, Julie G; Giesbrecht, Francis G

    2006-01-01

    Domestic and international regulatory limits have been established for aflatoxin in almonds and other tree nuts. It is difficult to obtain an accurate and precise estimate of the true aflatoxin concentration in a bulk lot because of the uncertainty associated with the sampling, sample preparation, and analytical steps of the aflatoxin test procedure. To evaluate the performance of aflatoxin sampling plans, the uncertainty associated with sampling lots of shelled almonds for aflatoxin was investigated. Twenty lots of shelled almonds were sampled for aflatoxin contamination. The total variance associated with measuring B1 and total aflatoxins in bulk almond lots was estimated and partitioned into sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variance components. All variances were found to increase with an increase in aflatoxin concentration (both B1 and total). By using regression analysis, mathematical expressions were developed to predict the relationship between each variance component (total, sampling, sample preparation, and analysis variances) and aflatoxin concentration. Variance estimates were the same for B1 and total aflatoxins. The mathematical relationships can be used to estimate each variance for a given sample size, subsample size, and number of analyses other than that measured in the study. When a lot with total aflatoxins at 15 ng/g was tested by using a 10 kg sample, a vertical cutter mixer type of mill, a 100 g subsample, and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, the sampling, sample preparation, analytical, and total variances (coefficient of variation, CV) were 394.7 (CV, 132.4%), 14.7 (CV, 25.5%), 0.8 (CV, 6.1%), and 410.2 (CV, 135.0%), respectively. The percentages of the total variance associated with sampling, sample preparation, and analytical steps were 96.2, 3.6, and 0.2, respectively.

  11. Sampling hazelnuts for aflatoxin: uncertainty associated with sampling, sample preparation, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozay, Guner; Seyhan, Ferda; Yilmaz, Aysun; Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andrew B; Giesbrecht, Francis

    2006-01-01

    The variability associated with the aflatoxin test procedure used to estimate aflatoxin levels in bulk shipments of hazelnuts was investigated. Sixteen 10 kg samples of shelled hazelnuts were taken from each of 20 lots that were suspected of aflatoxin contamination. The total variance associated with testing shelled hazelnuts was estimated and partitioned into sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variance components. Each variance component increased as aflatoxin concentration (either B1 or total) increased. With the use of regression analysis, mathematical expressions were developed to model the relationship between aflatoxin concentration and the total, sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variances. The expressions for these relationships were used to estimate the variance for any sample size, subsample size, and number of analyses for a specific aflatoxin concentration. The sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variances associated with estimating aflatoxin in a hazelnut lot at a total aflatoxin level of 10 ng/g and using a 10 kg sample, a 50 g subsample, dry comminution with a Robot Coupe mill, and a high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical method are 174.40, 0.74, and 0.27, respectively. The sampling, sample preparation, and analytical steps of the aflatoxin test procedure accounted for 99.4, 0.4, and 0.2% of the total variability, respectively.

  12. Preparation of SELEX Samples for Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tolle, Fabian; Mayer, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Fuelled by massive whole genome sequencing projects such as the human genome project, enormous technological advancements and therefore tremendous price drops could be achieved, rendering next-generation sequencing very attractive for deep sequencing of SELEX libraries. Herein we describe the preparation of SELEX samples for Illumina sequencing, based on the already established whole genome sequencing workflow. We describe the addition of barcode sequences for multiplexing and the adapter ligation, avoiding associated pitfalls.

  13. [Factors associated with the addition of salt to prepared food].

    PubMed

    de Castro, Raquel da Silva Assunção; Giatti, Luana; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    2014-05-01

    The scope of this research was to investigate the potential differences between men and women in the addition of salt to prepared food. The study included 47,557 individuals aged 18 to 64 participating in the Risk and Protection Factors for Chronic Disease Surveillance System by Telephone Interview carried out in 26 Brazilian state capitals and the Federal District in 2006. Differences between men and women were tested by the chi-square test and the association magnitudes between the dependent and independent variables were estimated by the Odds Ratio obtained by Multiple Logistic Regression analysis. The prevalence of the addition of salt to prepared food was 8.3%, being higher among men (9,8% vs 6,9%, p < 0.01). After adjustment, the addition of salt to prepared food was higher in individuals with self-rated fair to poor health, reporting cardiovascular disease and living in the North of Brazil. Hypertensive individuals reported addition of less salt to prepared food. Educational level was not associated with salt usage. Men add more salt than women. Public health policies aimed at reducing salt intake by the population should take into account the gender differences in salt intake and the factors that contribute to such differences.

  14. Preparation of urine samples for proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Rembert

    2008-01-01

    Reproducible procedures for the preparation of protein samples isolated from human urine are essential for meaningful proteomic analyses. Key applications are the discovery of novel proteins or their modifications in the human urine as well as protein biomarker discovery for diseases and drug treatments. The methodology presented here features experimental steps aimed at limiting protein losses because of organic solvent precipitation, effective separation of proteins from other compounds in the human urine and molecular weight-based enrichment of proteins in two distinct fractions. Urinary proteins are separated from cellular debris in the urine via centrifugation, concentrated with 5-kDa-cutoff membrane concentration devices and separated via size exclusion chromatography into fractions with a higher and a lower molecular weight than 30 kDa, respectively. A successive optional affinity removal step for highly abundant plasma proteins is described. Finally, buffer exchange steps useful for specific downstream proteomic analysis experiments of urinary proteins are presented, such as 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, differential protein or peptide labeling and digestion with trypsin for LC-MS/MS analysis.

  15. Microfluidic DNA sample preparation method and device

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Mariella, Raymond P.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Balch, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    Manipulation of DNA molecules in solution has become an essential aspect of genetic analyses used for biomedical assays, the identification of hazardous bacterial agents, and in decoding the human genome. Currently, most of the steps involved in preparing a DNA sample for analysis are performed manually and are time, labor, and equipment intensive. These steps include extraction of the DNA from spores or cells, separation of the DNA from other particles and molecules in the solution (e.g. dust, smoke, cell/spore debris, and proteins), and separation of the DNA itself into strands of specific lengths. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a phenomenon whereby polarizable particles move in response to a gradient in electric field, can be used to manipulate and separate DNA in an automated fashion, considerably reducing the time and expense involved in DNA analyses, as well as allowing for the miniaturization of DNA analysis instruments. These applications include direct transport of DNA, trapping of DNA to allow for its separation from other particles or molecules in the solution, and the separation of DNA into strands of varying lengths.

  16. Digital microfluidic hub for automated nucleic acid sample preparation.

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jim; Bartsch, Michael S.; Patel, Kamlesh D.; Kittlaus, Eric A.; Remillared, Erin M.; Pezzola, Genevieve L.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Kim, Hanyoup

    2010-07-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and characterized a digital microfluidic (DMF) platform to function as a central hub for interfacing multiple lab-on-a-chip sample processing modules towards automating the preparation of clinically-derived DNA samples for ultrahigh throughput sequencing (UHTS). The platform enables plug-and-play installation of a two-plate DMF device with consistent spacing, offers flexible connectivity for transferring samples between modules, and uses an intuitive programmable interface to control droplet/electrode actuations. Additionally, the hub platform uses transparent indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes to allow complete top and bottom optical access to the droplets on the DMF array, providing additional flexibility for various detection schemes.

  17. Preparation of Cytology Samples: Tricks of the Trade.

    PubMed

    Moore, A Russell

    2017-01-01

    General principles and techniques for collection, preparation, and staining of cytologic samples in the general practice setting are reviewed. Tips for collection of digital images are also discussed.

  18. Optimization for Peptide Sample Preparation for Urine Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Dai, Hong; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2014-02-25

    Analysis of native or endogenous peptides in biofluids can provide valuable insights into disease mechanisms. Furthermore, the detected peptides may also have utility as potential biomarkers for non-invasive monitoring of human diseases. The non-invasive nature of urine collection and the abundance of peptides in the urine makes analysis by high-throughput ‘peptidomics’ methods , an attractive approach for investigating the pathogenesis of renal disease. However, urine peptidomics methodologies can be problematic with regards to difficulties associated with sample preparation. The urine matrix can provide significant background interference in making the analytical measurements that it hampers both the identification of peptides and the depth of the peptidomics read when utilizing LC-MS based peptidome analysis. We report on a novel adaptation of the standard solid phase extraction (SPE) method to a modified SPE (mSPE) approach for improved peptide yield and analysis sensitivity with LC-MS based peptidomics in terms of time, cost, clogging of the LC-MS column, peptide yield, peptide quality, and number of peptides identified by each method. Expense and time requirements were comparable for both SPE and mSPE, but more interfering contaminants from the urine matrix were evident in the SPE preparations (e.g., clogging of the LC-MS columns, yellowish background coloration of prepared samples due to retained urobilin, lower peptide yields) when compared to the mSPE method. When we compared data from technical replicates of 4 runs, the mSPE method provided significantly improved efficiencies for the preparation of samples from urine (e.g., mSPE peptide identification 82% versus 18% with SPE; p = 8.92E-05). Additionally, peptide identifications, when applying the mSPE method, highlighted the biology of differential activation of urine peptidases during acute renal transplant rejection with distinct laddering of specific peptides, which was obscured for most proteins

  19. Rapid Automated Sample Preparation for Biological Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Shusteff, M

    2011-03-04

    Our technology utilizes acoustic, thermal, and electric fields to separate out contaminants such as debris or pollen from environmental samples, lyse open cells, and extract the DNA from the lysate. The objective of the project is to optimize the system described for a forensic sample, and demonstrate its performance for integration with downstream assay platforms (e.g. MIT-LL's ANDE). We intend to increase the quantity of DNA recovered from the sample beyond the current {approx}80% achieved using solid phase extraction methods. Task 1: Develop and test an acoustic filter for cell extraction. Task 2: Develop and test lysis chip. Task 3: Develop and test DNA extraction chip. All chips have been fabricated based on the designs laid out in last month's report.

  20. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Preparing validation study samples..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.392 Preparing validation study samples. (a)(1) To validate a procedure...

  1. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Preparing validation study samples..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.392 Preparing validation study samples. (a)(1) To validate a procedure...

  2. 40 CFR 761.392 - Preparing validation study samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Preparing validation study samples..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Comparison Study for Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.392 Preparing validation study samples. (a)(1) To validate a procedure...

  3. Ultra-Fast Sample Preparation for High-Throughput Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Hixson, Kim K.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-06-21

    Sample preparation oftentimes can be the Achilles Heel of any analytical process and in the field of proteomics, preparing samples for mass spectrometric analysis is no exception. Current goals, concerning proteomic sample preparation on a large scale, include efforts toward improving reproducibility, reducing the time of processing and ultimately the automation of the entire workflow. This chapter reviews an array of recent approaches applied to bottom-up proteomics sample preparation to reduce the processing time down from hours to minutes. The current state-of-the-art in the field uses different energy inputs like microwave, ultrasound or pressure to perform the four basic steps in sample preparation: protein extraction, denaturation, reduction and alkylation, and digestion. No single energy input for enhancement of proteome sample preparation has become the universal gold standard. Instead, a combination of different energy inputs tend to produce the best results. This chapter further describes the future trends in the field such as the hyphenation of sample preparation with downstream detection and analysis systems. Finally, a detailed protocol describing the combined use of both pressure cycling technology and ultrasonic energy inputs to hasten proteomic sample preparation is presented.

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Preparations for Additional Protocol Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    McCowan, Janie; Cain, Ronald A

    2009-01-01

    The United States Additional Protocol (AP) with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) entered into force (EIF) January 6, 2009. In anticipation of the EIF, the Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243) began the initial DOE AP data call on November 3, 2008. This paper describes the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) preparation, organization, and development efforts to successfully implement the AP and complete the AP data call. ORNL had 35 days to identify declarable activities and finalize the declaration line items (DLIs) for submission to NA-243. To be able to respond within the required time frame, many preparation activities at ORNL were necessary, such as determining the AP coordinator (APC) and team roles; conducting site awareness training; creating the ORNL Standards-Based Management System (SBMS) procedure Reporting of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Activities; training personnel; and defining site implementation software tools. Identifying, updating, compiling, reviewing, and submitting the DLIs to NA-243 were all critical activities for successfully implementing the AP and completing the AP data call at ORNL.

  5. Snow White Trench Prepared for Sample Collection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The informally named 'Snow White' trench is the source for the next sample to be acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander for analysis by the wet chemistry lab.

    The Surface Stereo Imager on Phoenix took this shadow-enhanced image of the trench, on the eastern end of Phoenix's work area, on Sol 103, or the 103rd day of the mission, Sept. 8, 2008. The trench is about 23 centimeters (9 inches) wide.

    The wet chemistry lab is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity suite of instruments.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. S- to N-Palmitoyl Transfer During Proteomic Sample Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yuhuan; Bachschmid, Markus M.; Costello, Catherine E.; Lin, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    N-palmitoylation has been reported in a number of proteins and suggested to play an important role in protein localization and functions. However, it remains unclear whether N-palmitoylation is a direct enzyme-catalyzed process, or results from intramolecular S- to N-palmitoyl transfer. Here, using the S-palmitoyl peptide standard, GCpalmLGNAK, as the model system, we observed palmitoyl migration from the cysteine residue to either the peptide N-terminus or the lysine side chain during incubation in both neutral and slightly basic buffers commonly used in proteomic sample preparation. Palmitoyl transfer can take place either intra- or inter-molecularly, with the peptide N-terminus being the preferred migration site, presumably because of its lower basicity. The extent of intramolecular palmitoyl migration was low in the system studied, as it required the formation of an entropically unfavored macrocycle intermediate. Intermolecular palmitoyl transfer, however, remained a tangible problem, and may lead to erroneous reporting of in vivo N-palmitoylation. It was found that addition of the MS-compatible detergent RapiGest could significantly inhibit intermolecular palmitoyl transfer, as well as thioester hydrolysis and DTT-induced thioester cleavage. Finally, palmitoyl transfer from the cysteine residue to the peptide N-terminus can also occur in the gas phase, during collision-induced dissociation, and result in false identification of N-palmitoylation. Therefore, one must be careful with both sample preparation and interpretation of tandem mass spectra in the study of N-palmitoylation.

  7. Microscale sample preparation for PCR of C. difficile infected stool

    PubMed Central

    Gillers, Sara; Atkinson, Christopher D.; Bartoo, Aaron C.; Mahalanabis, Madhumita; Boylan, Michael O.; Schwartz, John H.; Klapperich, Catherine; Singh, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design of a microfluidic sample preparation chip for human stool samples infected with Clostridium difficile. We established a polymerase chain reaction able to distinguish C. difficile in the presence of several other organisms found in the normal intestinal flora. A protocol for on-chip extraction of nucleic acids from clinical samples is described that can detect target DNA down to 5.0×10−3 ng of template. The assay and sample preparation chip were then validated using known positive and known negative clinical samples. The work presented has potential applications in both the developed and developing world. PMID:19505511

  8. Preparation of ultra small samples for optical and microprobe analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes a simple but satisfactory new method for the preparation of tiny, varied and specialized specimens for electron or ion-microprobe analysis developed over the past five years. Microtektites, individual chondrules, single grains, blebs from lunar samples and meteoritic minerals have been prepared by this technique. A description of the preparation of these usually difficult samples from the initial mounting through the various polishing steps to their final polish is presented in detail. The procedures used to prevent any contamination of these specimens by the polishing agents and to prevent cross contamination to the other samples used for geochronology studies are presented.

  9. Additional sampling directions improve detection range of wireless radiofrequency probes

    PubMed Central

    Mada, Marius; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Williams, Guy B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While MRI is enhancing our knowledge about the structure and function of the human brain, subject motion remains a problem in many clinical applications. Recently, the use of wireless radiofrequency markers with three one‐dimensional (1D) navigators for prospective correction was demonstrated. This method is restricted in the range of motion that can be corrected, however, because of limited information in the 1D readouts. Methods Here, the limitation of techniques for disambiguating marker locations was investigated. It was shown that including more sampling directions extends the tracking range for head rotations. The efficiency of trading readout resolution for speed was explored. Results Tracking of head rotations was demonstrated from −19.2 to 34.4°, −2.7 to 10.0°, and −60.9 to 70.9° in the x‐, y‐, and z‐directions, respectively. In the presence of excessive head motion, the deviation of marker estimates from SPM8 was reduced by 17.1% over existing three‐projection methods. This was achieved by using an additional seven directions, extending the time needed for readouts by a factor of 3.3. Much of this increase may be circumvented by reducing resolution, without compromising accuracy. Conclusion Including additional sampling directions extends the range in which markers can be used, for patients who move a lot. Magn Reson Med 76:913–918, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:26418189

  10. Curatorial Works for the Hayabusa-Returned Sample and Preparation for Hayabusa2 Sample Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yada, T.; Abe, M.; Okada, T.; Yurimoto, H.; Uesugi, M.; Karouji, Y.; Nakato, A.; Hashiguchi, M.; Nishimura, M.; Kumagai, K.; Matsui, S.; Yoshitake, M.; Sakamoto, K.; Nakano, Y.; Kawasaki, N.; Fujimoto, M.

    2016-08-01

    We continue describing Hayabusa-returned samples after its return in 2010. The number of described particles reaches around 650 and >540 of them are identified as Itokawa origin. We also start preparation for Hayabusa2 sample curation.

  11. [Recent advances in sample preparation methods of plant hormones].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Wang, Lus; Wu, Dapeng; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2014-04-01

    Plant hormones are a group of naturally occurring trace substances which play a crucial role in controlling the plant development, growth and environment response. With the development of the chromatography and mass spectroscopy technique, chromatographic analytical method has become a widely used way for plant hormone analysis. Among the steps of chromatographic analysis, sample preparation is undoubtedly the most vital one. Thus, a highly selective and efficient sample preparation method is critical for accurate identification and quantification of phytohormones. For the three major kinds of plant hormones including acidic plant hormones & basic plant hormones, brassinosteroids and plant polypeptides, the sample preparation methods are reviewed in sequence especially the recently developed methods. The review includes novel methods, devices, extractive materials and derivative reagents for sample preparation of phytohormones analysis. Especially, some related works of our group are included. At last, the future developments in this field are also prospected.

  12. Novel Sample-handling Approach for XRD Analysis with Minimal Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarrazin, P.; Chipera, S.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Feldman, S.; Vaniman, D.; Bryson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Sample preparation and sample handling are among the most critical operations associated with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. These operations require attention in a laboratory environment, but they become a major constraint in the deployment of XRD instruments for robotic planetary exploration. We are developing a novel sample handling system that dramatically relaxes the constraints on sample preparation by allowing characterization of coarse-grained material that would normally be impossible to analyze with conventional powder-XRD techniques.

  13. Nucleic Acid Sample Preparation using Spontaneous Biphasic Plug Flow

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter C.; Strotman, Lindsay N.; Theberge, Ashleigh B.; Berthier, Erwin; O’Connell, Rachel; Loeb, Jennifer M.; Berry, Scott M.; Beebe, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid (NA) extraction and purification has become a common technique in both research and clinical laboratories. Current methods require repetitive wash steps with a pipette that is laborious and time consuming making it inefficient for clinical settings. We present here a simple technique that relies on spontaneous biphasic plug flow inside a capillary to achieve sample preparation. By filling the sample with oil, aqueous contaminants were displaced from the captured NA without pipetting wash buffers or use of external force and equipment. mRNA from mammalian cell culture was purified and PCR amplification showed similar threshold cycle values as those obtained from a commercially available kit. HIV viral like particles were spiked into serum and a 5-fold increase in viral RNA extraction yield was achieved compared to the conventional wash method. In addition, viral RNA was successfully purified from human whole blood, and a limit of detection of approximately 14 copies of RNA extracted per sample. The results demonstrate the utility of the current technique for nucleic acid purification for clinical purposes, and the overall approach provides a potential method to implement nucleic acid testing in low resource settings. PMID:23941230

  14. Nucleic acid sample preparation using spontaneous biphasic plug flow.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter C; Strotman, Lindsay N; Theberge, Ashleigh B; Berthier, Erwin; O'Connell, Rachel; Loeb, Jennifer M; Berry, Scott M; Beebe, David J

    2013-09-17

    Nucleic acid (NA) extraction and purification has become a common technique in both research and clinical laboratories. Current methods require repetitive wash steps with a pipet that are laborious and time-consuming, making the procedure inefficient for clinical settings. We present here a simple technique that relies on spontaneous biphasic plug flow inside a capillary to achieve sample preparation. By filling the sample with oil, aqueous contaminants were displaced from the captured NA without pipetting wash buffers or use of external force and equipment. mRNA from mammalian cell culture was purified, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification showed similar threshold cycle values as those obtained from a commercially available kit. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral-like particles were spiked into serum and a 5-fold increase in viral RNA extraction yield was achieved compared to the conventional wash method. In addition, viral RNA was successfully purified from human whole blood, and a limit of detection of approximately 14 copies of RNA extracted per sample was determined. The results demonstrate the utility of the current technique for nucleic acid purification for clinical purposes, and the overall approach provides a potential method to implement nucleic acid testing in low-resource settings.

  15. Preparation of privatization samples for envelopes `A` and `C`

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17

    As part of the TWRS Privatization process, the DOE has committed to provide each of the two contractors who submitted successful bids with ten 125 mL samples of Hanford tank waste meeting chemical and radionuclide criteria specified as Waste Envelope A, B, and C. This test plan describes how the samples will be prepared before shipment.

  16. Soil sample preparation using microwave digestion for uranium analysis

    SciTech Connect

    MOHAGHEGHI,AMIR H.; PRESTON,ROSE; AKBARZADEH,MANSOOR; BAKHTIAR,STEVEN

    2000-04-05

    A new sample preparation procedure has been developed for digestion of soil samples for uranium analysis. The technique employs a microwave oven digestion system to digest the sample and to prepare it for separation chemistry and analysis. The method significantly reduces the volume of acids used, eliminates a large fraction of acid vapor emissions, and speeds up the analysis time. The samples are analyzed by four separate techniques: Gamma Spectrometry, Alpha Spectroscopy using the open digestion method, Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA) using open digestion, and KPA by Microwave digestion technique. The results for various analytical methods are compared and used to confirm the validity of the new procedure. The details of the preparation technique along with its benefits are discussed.

  17. Effect of sample preparation on charged impurities in graphene substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, K. M.; Dean, C. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Hone, J.; Kim, P.; Cullen, W. G.; Fuhrer, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    The mobility of graphene as fabricated on SiO2 has been found to vary widely depending on sample preparation conditions. Additionally, graphene mobility on SiO2 appears to be limited to ~20,000 cm2/Vs, likely due to charged impurities in the substrate. Here we present a study of the effect of fabrication procedures on substrate charged impurity density (nimp) utilizing ultrahigh-vacuum Kelvin probe force microscopy. We conclude that even minimal SEM exposure, as from e-beam lithography, induces an increased impurity density, while heating reduces the number of charges for sample substrates which already exhibit a higher impurity density. We measure both SiO2 and h-BN and find that all nimp values observed for SiO2 are higher than those observed for h-BN; this is consistent with the observed improvement in mobility for graphene devices fabricated on h-BN over those fabricated on SiO2 substrates. This work was supported by the US ONR MURI program, and the University of Maryland NSF-MRSEC under Grant No. DMR 05-20471.

  18. Preparation of bone samples in the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory for AMS radiocarbon dating.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, N; Goslar, T

    2002-12-01

    In the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory, a system for preparation of samples for AMS dating has been built. At first it was used to produce graphite targets from plant macrofossils and sediments. In this study we extended its capabilities with the preparation of bones. We dealt with 3 methods; the first was the classical Longin method of collagen extraction, the second one included additional treatment of powdered bone in alkali solution, while in the third one carboxyl carbon was separated from amino acids obtained after hydrolysis of protein. The suitability of the methods was tested on 2 bone samples. Most of our samples gave ages > 40 kyr BP, suggesting good performance of the adapted methods, except for one sample prepared with simple Longin method. For routine preparation of bones we chose the Longin method with additional alkali treatment.

  19. New materials for sample preparation techniques in bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Nazario, Carlos Eduardo Domingues; Fumes, Bruno Henrique; da Silva, Meire Ribeiro; Lanças, Fernando Mauro

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of biological samples is a complex and difficult task owing to two basic and complementary issues: the high complexity of most biological matrices and the need to determine minute quantities of active substances and contaminants in such complex sample. To succeed in this endeavor samples are usually subject to three steps of a comprehensive analytical methodological approach: sample preparation, analytes isolation (usually utilizing a chromatographic technique) and qualitative/quantitative analysis (usually with the aid of mass spectrometric tools). Owing to the complex nature of bio-samples, and the very low concentration of the target analytes to be determined, selective sample preparation techniques is mandatory in order to overcome the difficulties imposed by these two constraints. During the last decade new chemical synthesis approaches has been developed and optimized, such as sol-gel and molecularly imprinting technologies, allowing the preparation of novel materials for sample preparation including graphene and derivatives, magnetic materials, ionic liquids, molecularly imprinted polymers, and much more. In this contribution we will review these novel techniques and materials, as well as their application to the bioanalysis niche.

  20. Sample Preparation Report of the Fourth OPCW Confidence Building Exercise on Biomedical Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Udey, R. N.; Corzett, T. H.; Alcaraz, A.

    2014-07-03

    Following the successful completion of the 3rd biomedical confidence building exercise (February 2013 – March 2013), which included the analysis of plasma and urine samples spiked at low ppb levels as part of the exercise scenario, another confidence building exercise was targeted to be conducted in 2014. In this 4th exercise, it was desired to focus specifically on the analysis of plasma samples. The scenario was designed as an investigation of an alleged use of chemical weapons where plasma samples were collected, as plasma has been reported to contain CWA adducts which remain present in the human body for several weeks (Solano et al. 2008). In the 3rd exercise most participants used the fluoride regeneration method to analyze for the presence of nerve agents in plasma samples. For the 4th biomedical exercise it was decided to evaluate the analysis of human plasma samples for the presence/absence of the VX adducts and aged adducts to blood proteins (e.g., VX-butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and aged BuChE adducts using a pepsin digest technique to yield nonapeptides; or equivalent). As the aging of VX-BuChE adducts is relatively slow (t1/2 = 77 hr at 37 °C [Aurbek et al. 2009]), soman (GD), which ages much more quickly (t1/2 = 9 min at 37 °C [Masson et al. 2010]), was used to simulate an aged VX sample. Additional objectives of this exercise included having laboratories assess novel OP-adducted plasma sample preparation techniques and analytical instrumentation methodologies, as well as refining/designating the reporting formats for these new techniques.

  1. A simple supported liquid hollow fiber membrane microextraction for sample preparation of trihalomethanes in water samples.

    PubMed

    Vora-adisak, Narongchai; Varanusupakul, Pakorn

    2006-07-21

    A simple and efficient liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) technique using a supported liquid hollow fiber membrane, in conjunction with gas chromatography-electron capture detector has been developed for extraction and determination of trihalomethanes (THMs) in water samples. THMs were extracted from water samples through an organic extracting solvent impregnated in the pores and filled inside the porous hollow fiber membrane. Our simple conditions were conducted at 35 degrees C with no stirring and no salt addition in order to minimize sample preparation steps. Parameters such as types of hollow fiber membranes, extracting solvents and extraction time were studied and optimized. The method exhibited enrichment factors ranged from 28- to 62-fold within 30 min extraction time. The linearity of the method ranged from 0.2 to 100 microg l(-1). The limits of detection were in the low microg l(-1) level, ranging between 0.01 and 0.2 microg l(-1). The recoveries of spiked THMs at 5 microg l(-1) in water were between 98 and 105% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 4%. Furthermore, the method was applied for determination of THMs in drinking water and tap water samples was reported.

  2. Advanced Curation Preparation for Mars Sample Return and Cold Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fries, M. D.; Harrington, A. D.; McCubbin, F. M.; Mitchell, J.; Regberg, A. B.; Snead, C.

    2017-01-01

    NASA Curation is tasked with the care and distribution of NASA's sample collections, such as the Apollo lunar samples and cometary material collected by the Stardust spacecraft. Curation is also mandated to perform Advanced Curation research and development, which includes improving the curation of existing collections as well as preparing for future sample return missions. Advanced Curation has identified a suite of technologies and techniques that will require attention ahead of Mars sample return (MSR) and missions with cold curation (CCur) requirements, perhaps including comet sample return missions.

  3. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  4. Advances in sample preparation in electromigration, chromatographic and mass spectrometric separation methods.

    PubMed

    Gilar, M; Bouvier, E S; Compton, B J

    2001-02-16

    The quality of sample preparation is a key factor in determining the success of analysis. While analysis of pharmaceutically important compounds in biological matrixes has driven forward the development of sample clean-up procedures in last 20 years, today's chemists face an additional challenge: sample preparation and analysis of complex biochemical samples for characterization of genotypic or phenotypic information contained in DNA and proteins. This review focuses on various sample pretreatment methods designed to meet the requirements for the analysis of biopolymers and small drugs in complex matrices. We discuss the advances in development of solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbents, on-line SPE, membrane-based sample preparation, and sample clean-up of biopolymers prior to their analysis by mass spectrometry.

  5. 52 additional reference population samples for the 55 AISNP panel.

    PubMed

    Pakstis, Andrew J; Haigh, Eva; Cherni, Lotfi; ElGaaied, Amel Ben Ammar; Barton, Alison; Evsanaa, Baigalmaa; Togtokh, Ariunaa; Brissenden, Jane; Roscoe, Janet; Bulbul, Ozlem; Filoglu, Gonul; Gurkan, Cemal; Meiklejohn, Kelly A; Robertson, James M; Li, Cai-Xia; Wei, Yi-Liang; Li, Hui; Soundararajan, Usha; Rajeevan, Haseena; Kidd, Judith R; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2015-11-01

    Ancestry inference for a person using a panel of SNPs depends on the variation of frequencies of those SNPs around the world and the amount of reference data available for calculation/comparison. The Kidd Lab panel of 55 AISNPs has been incorporated in commercial kits by both Life Technologies and Illumina for massively parallel sequencing. Therefore, a larger set of reference populations will be useful for researchers using those kits. We have added reference population allele frequencies for 52 population samples to the 73 previously entered so that there are now allele frequencies publicly available in ALFRED and FROG-kb for a total of 125 population samples.

  6. New Methods of Sample Preparation for Atom Probe Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, Kimberly, R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Ward, Jennifer R.; Wishard, James L.; Martens, Richard L.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetite is a common conductive mineral found on Earth and Mars. Disk-shaped precipitates approximately 40 nm in diameter have been shown to have manganese and aluminum concentrations. Atom-probe field-ion microscopy (APFIM) is the only technique that can potentially quantify the composition of these precipitates. APFIM will be used to characterize geological and planetary materials, analyze samples of interest for geomicrobiology; and, for the metrology of nanoscale instrumentation. Prior to APFIM sample preparation was conducted by electropolishing, the method of sharp shards (MSS), or Bosch process (deep reactive ion etching) with focused ion beam (FIB) milling as a final step. However, new methods are required for difficult samples. Many materials are not easily fabricated using electropolishing, MSS, or the Bosch process, FIB milling is slow and expensive, and wet chemistry and the reactive ion etching are typically limited to Si and other semiconductors. APFIM sample preparation using the dicing saw is commonly used to section semiconductor wafers into individual devices following manufacture. The dicing saw is a time-effective method for preparing high aspect ratio posts of poorly conducting materials. Femtosecond laser micromachining is also suitable for preparation of posts. FIB time required is reduced by about a factor of 10 and multi-tip specimens can easily be fabricated using the dicing saw.

  7. Potential artifacts associated with historical preparation of joint compound samples and reported airborne asbestos concentrations.

    PubMed

    Brorby, G P; Sheehan, P J; Berman, D W; Bogen, K T; Holm, S E

    2011-05-01

    Airborne samples collected in the 1970s for drywall workers using asbestos-containing joint compounds were likely prepared and analyzed according to National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Method P&CAM 239, the historical precursor to current Method 7400. Experimentation with a re-created, chrysotile-containing, carbonate-based joint compound suggested that analysis following sample preparation by the historical vs. current method produces different fiber counts, likely because of an interaction between the different clearing and mounting chemicals used and the carbonate-based joint compound matrix. Differences were also observed during analysis using Method 7402, depending on whether acetic acid/dimethylformamide or acetone was used during preparation to collapse the filter. Specifically, air samples of sanded chrysotile-containing joint compound prepared by the historical method yielded fiber counts significantly greater (average of 1.7-fold, 95% confidence interval: 1.5- to 2.0-fold) than those obtained by the current method. In addition, air samples prepared by Method 7402 using acetic acid/dimethylformamide yielded fiber counts that were greater (2.8-fold, 95% confidence interval: 2.5- to 3.2-fold) than those prepared by this method using acetone. These results indicated (1) there is an interaction between Method P&CAM 239 preparation chemicals and the carbonate-based joint compound matrix that reveals fibers that were previously bound in the matrix, and (2) the same appeared to be true for Method 7402 preparation chemicals acetic acid/dimethylformamide. This difference in fiber counts is the opposite of what has been reported historically for samples of relatively pure chrysotile dusts prepared using the same chemicals. This preparation artifact should be considered when interpreting historical air samples for drywall workers prepared by Method P&CAM 239.

  8. Sample treatment and preparation for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantzi, Sarah C.; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Trichard, Florian; Markushin, Yuri; Melikechi, Noureddine; De Giacomo, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    One of the most widely cited advantages of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is that it does not require sample preparation, but this may also be the biggest factor holding it back from becoming a mature analytical technique like LA-ICP-MS, ICP-OES, or XRF. While there are certain specimen types that have enjoyed excellent LIBS results without any sample treatment (mostly homogeneous solids such as metals, glass, and polymers), the possible applications of LIBS have been greatly expanded through the use of sample preparation techniques that have resulted in analytical performance (i.e., limits of detection, accuracy, and repeatability) on par with XRF, ICP-OES, and often ICP-MS. This review highlights the work of many LIBS researchers who have developed, adapted, and improved upon sample preparation techniques for various specimen types in order to improve the quality of the analytical data that LIBS can produce in a large number of research domains. Strategies, not only for solids, but also liquids, gases, and aerosols are discussed, including newly developed nanoparticle enhancement and biological imaging and tagging techniques.

  9. [Optimized sample preparation for metabolome studies on Streptomyces coelicolor].

    PubMed

    Li, Yihong; Li, Shanshan; Ai, Guomin; Wang, Weishan; Zhang, Buchang; Yang, Keqian

    2014-04-01

    Streptomycetes produce many antibiotics and are important model microorgansims for scientific research and antibiotic production. Metabolomics is an emerging technological platform to analyze low molecular weight metabolites in a given organism qualitatively and quantitatively. Compared to other Omics platform, metabolomics has greater advantage in monitoring metabolic flux distribution and thus identifying key metabolites related to target metabolic pathway. The present work aims at establishing a rapid, accurate sample preparation protocol for metabolomics analysis in streptomycetes. In the present work, several sample preparation steps, including cell quenching time, cell separation method, conditions for metabolite extraction and metabolite derivatization were optimized. Then, the metabolic profiles of Streptomyces coelicolor during different growth stages were analyzed by GC-MS. The optimal sample preparation conditions were as follows: time of low-temperature quenching 4 min, cell separation by fast filtration, time of freeze-thaw 45 s/3 min and the conditions of metabolite derivatization at 40 degrees C for 90 min. By using this optimized protocol, 103 metabolites were finally identified from a sample of S. coelicolor, which distribute in central metabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway and citrate cycle), amino acid, fatty acid, nucleotide metabolic pathways, etc. By comparing the temporal profiles of these metabolites, the amino acid and fatty acid metabolic pathways were found to stay at a high level during stationary phase, therefore, these pathways may play an important role during the transition between the primary and secondary metabolism. An optimized protocol of sample preparation was established and applied for metabolomics analysis of S. coelicolor, 103 metabolites were identified. The temporal profiles of metabolites reveal amino acid and fatty acid metabolic pathways may play an important role in the transition from primary to

  10. Quantitation of protein in samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The concentration of protein in a sample prepared for two dimensional (2-D) electrophoretic analysis is usually determined by protein assay. Reasons for this include the following. (1) Protein quantitation ensures that the amount of protein to be separated is appropriate for the gel size and visualization method. (2) Protein quantitation facilitates comparison among similar samples, as image-based analysis is simplified when equivalent quantities of proteins have been loaded on the gels to be compared. (3) Quantitation is necessary in cases where the protein sample is labeled with dye before separation (1,2). The labeling chemistry is affected by the dye to protein ratio so it is essential to know the protein concentration before setting up the labeling reaction.A primary consideration with quantitating protein in samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis is interference by nonprotein substances that may be present in the sample. These samples generally contain chaotropic solubilizing agents, detergents, reductants, buffers or carrier ampholytes, all of which potentially interfere with protein quantitation. The most commonly used protein assays in proteomics research are colorimetric assays in which the presence of protein causes a color change that can be measured spectrophotometrically (3). All protein assays utilize standards, a dilution series of a known concentration of a known protein, to create a standard curve. Two methods will be considered that circumvent some of the problems associated with interfering substances and are well suited for samples prepared for 2-D electrophoresis. The first method (4.1.1) relies on a color change that occurs upon binding of a dye to protein and the second (4.1.2) relies on binding and reduction of cupric ion (Cu2+) ion to cuprous ion (Cu+) by proteins.

  11. Sample preparation methods for determination of drugs of abuse in hair samples: A review.

    PubMed

    Vogliardi, Susanna; Tucci, Marianna; Stocchero, Giulia; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Favretto, Donata

    2015-02-01

    Hair analysis has assumed increasing importance in the determination of substances of abuse, both in clinical and forensic toxicology investigations. Hair analysis offers particular advantages over other biological matrices (blood and urine), including a larger window of detection, ease of collection and sample stability. In the present work, an overview of sample preparation techniques for the determination of substances of abuse in hair is provided, specifically regarding the principal steps in hair sample treatment-decontamination, extraction and purification. For this purpose, a survey of publications found in the MEDLINE database from 2000 to date was conducted. The most widely consumed substances of abuse and psychotropic drugs were considered. Trends in simplification of hair sample preparation, washing procedures and cleanup methods are discussed. Alternative sample extraction techniques, such as head-space solid phase microextraction (HS-SPDE), supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) are also reported.

  12. Sample preparation and detection device for infectious agents

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy W.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Yu, June

    2003-06-10

    A sample preparation and analysis device which incorporates both immunoassays and PCR assays in one compact, field-portable microchip. The device provides new capabilities in fluid and particle control which allows the building of a fluidic chip with no moving parts, thus decreasing fabrication cost and increasing the robustness of the device. The device can operate in a true continuous (not batch) mode. The device incorporates magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumps to move the fluid through the system, acoustic mixing and fractionation, dielectropheretic (DEP) sample concentration and purification, and on-chip optical detection capabilities.

  13. Drug discovery from Nature: automated high-quality sample preparation

    PubMed Central

    Thiericke, Ralf

    2000-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from plants, animals and microorganisms have been proven to be an outstanding source for new and innovative drugs and show a striking structural diversity that supplements chemically synthesized compounds or libraries in drug discovery programs. Unfortunately, extracts from natural sources are usually complex mixtures of compounds:: often generated in time consuming and for the most part manual processes. As quality and quantity of the provided samples play a pivotal role in the success of high-throughput screening programs this poses serious problems. In order to make samples of natural origin competitive with synthetic compound libraries, we devised a novel, automated sample preparation procedure based on solid-phase extraction (SPE). By making use of a modified Zymark RapidTrace® SPE workstation an easy-to-handle and effective fractionation method has been developed which allows the generation of highquality samples from natural origin, fulfilling the requirements of an integration into high-throughput screening programs. PMID:18924703

  14. Apparatus for preparing a sample for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    1994-05-10

    An apparatus is described for preparing a sample for analysis by a mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an entry chamber and an ionization chamber separated by a skimmer. A capacitor having two space-apart electrodes followed by one or more ion-imaging lenses is disposed in the ionization chamber. The chamber is evacuated and the capacitor is charged. A valve injects a sample gas in the form of sample pulses into the entry chamber. The pulse is collimated by the skimmer and enters the ionization chamber. When the sample pulse passes through the gap between the electrodes, it discharges the capacitor and is thereby ionized. The ions are focused by the imaging lenses and enter the mass analyzer, where their mass and charge are analyzed. 1 figures.

  15. Apparatus for preparing a sample for mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for preparing a sample for analysis by a mass spectrometer system. The apparatus has an entry chamber and an ionization chamber separated by a skimmer. A capacitor having two space-apart electrodes followed by one or more ion-imaging lenses is disposed in the ionization chamber. The chamber is evacuated and the capacitor is charged. A valve injects a sample gas in the form of sample pulses into the entry chamber. The pulse is collimated by the skimmer and enters the ionization chamber. When the sample pulse passes through the gap between the electrodes, it discharges the capacitor and is thereby ionized. The ions are focused by the imaging lenses and enter the mass analyzer, where their mass and charge are analyzed.

  16. Recent advances in sample preparation techniques for effective bioanalytical methods.

    PubMed

    Kole, Prashant Laxman; Venkatesh, Gantala; Kotecha, Jignesh; Sheshala, Ravi

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent developments in bioanalysis sample preparation techniques and gives an update on basic principles, theory, applications and possibilities for automation, and a comparative discussion on the advantages and limitation of each technique. Conventional liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), protein precipitation (PP) and solid-phase extraction (SPE) techniques are now been considered as methods of the past. The last decade has witnessed a rapid development of novel sample preparation techniques in bioanalysis. Developments in SPE techniques such as selective sorbents and in the overall approach to SPE, such as hybrid SPE and molecularly imprinted polymer SPE, have been addressed. Considerable literature has been published in the area of solid-phase micro-extraction and its different versions, e.g. stir bar sorptive extraction, and their application in the development of selective and sensitive bioanalytical methods. Techniques such as dispersive solid-phase extraction, disposable pipette extraction and micro-extraction by packed sorbent offer a variety of extraction phases and provide unique advantages to bioanalytical methods. On-line SPE utilizing column-switching techniques is rapidly gaining acceptance in bioanalytical applications. PP sample preparation techniques such as PP filter plates/tubes offer many advantages like removal of phospholipids and proteins in plasma/serum. Newer approaches to conventional LLE techniques (salting-out LLE) are also covered in this review article.

  17. [Progress in sample preparation and analytical methods for trace polar small molecules in complex samples].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianchun; Luo, Xialin; Li, Gongke; Xiao, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Small polar molecules such as nucleosides, amines, amino acids are important analytes in biological, food, environmental, and other fields. It is necessary to develop efficient sample preparation and sensitive analytical methods for rapid analysis of these polar small molecules in complex matrices. Some typical materials in sample preparation, including silica, polymer, carbon, boric acid and so on, are introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the applications and developments of analytical methods of polar small molecules, such as reversed-phase liquid chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, etc., are also reviewed.

  18. Sampling of illicit drugs for quantitative analysis--part III: sampling plans and sample preparations.

    PubMed

    Csesztregi, T; Bovens, M; Dujourdy, L; Franc, A; Nagy, J

    2014-08-01

    The findings in this paper are based on the results of our drug homogeneity studies and particle size investigations. Using that information, a general sampling plan (depicted in the form of a flow-chart) was devised that could be applied to the quantitative instrumental analysis of the most common illicit drugs: namely heroin, cocaine, amphetamine, cannabis resin, MDMA tablets and herbal cannabis in 'bud' form (type I). Other more heterogeneous forms of cannabis (type II) were found to require alternative, more traditional sampling methods. A table was constructed which shows the sampling uncertainty expected when a particular number of random increments are taken and combined to form a single primary sample. It also includes a recommended increment size; which is 1 g for powdered drugs and cannabis resin, 1 tablet for MDMA and 1 bud for herbal cannabis in bud form (type I). By referring to that table, individual laboratories can ensure that the sampling uncertainty for a particular drug seizure can be minimised, such that it lies in the same region as their analytical uncertainty for that drug. The table shows that assuming a laboratory wishes to quantitatively analyse a seizure of powdered drug or cannabis resin with a 'typical' heterogeneity, a primary sample of 15×1 g increments is generally appropriate. The appropriate primary sample for MDMA tablets is 20 tablets, while for herbal cannabis (in bud form) 50 buds were found to be appropriate. Our study also showed that, for a suitably homogenised primary sample of the most common powdered drugs, an analytical sample size of between 20 and 35 mg was appropriate and for herbal cannabis the appropriate amount was 200 mg. The need to ensure that the results from duplicate or multiple incremental sampling were compared, to demonstrate whether or not a particular seized material has a 'typical' heterogeneity and that the sampling procedure applied has resulted in a 'correct sample', was highlighted and the setting

  19. Combining Electrochemical Sensors with Miniaturized Sample Preparation for Rapid Detection in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bunyakul, Natinan; Baeumner, Antje J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical analyses benefit world-wide from rapid and reliable diagnostics tests. New tests are sought with greatest demand not only for new analytes, but also to reduce costs, complexity and lengthy analysis times of current techniques. Among the myriad of possibilities available today to develop new test systems, amperometric biosensors are prominent players—best represented by the ubiquitous amperometric-based glucose sensors. Electrochemical approaches in general require little and often enough only simple hardware components, are rugged and yet provide low limits of detection. They thus offer many of the desirable attributes for point-of-care/point-of-need tests. This review focuses on investigating the important integration of sample preparation with (primarily electrochemical) biosensors. Sample clean up requirements, miniaturized sample preparation strategies, and their potential integration with sensors will be discussed, focusing on clinical sample analyses. PMID:25558994

  20. Preparation of graphene thin films for radioactive samples.

    PubMed

    Roteta, Miguel; Fernández-Martínez, Rodolfo; Mejuto, Marcos; Rucandio, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    A new method for the preparation of conductive thin films is presented. The metallization of VYNS films guarantees the electrical conductivity but it results in the breaking of a high proportion of them. Graphene, a two-dimensional nanostructure of monolayer or few layers graphite has attracted a great deal of attention because of its excellent properties such as a good chemical stability, mechanical resistance and extraordinary electronic transport properties. In this work, the possibilities of graphene have been explored as a way to produce electrical conductive thin films without an extra metallization process. The procedure starts with preparing homogenous suspensions of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in conventional VYNS solutions. Ultra-sonication is used to ensure a good dispersibility of rGO. Graphene oxide (GO) is prepared via oxidation of graphite and subsequent exfoliation by sonication. Different chemically rGO were obtained by reaction with hydrazine sulfate, sodium borohydride, ascorbic acid and hydroiodic acid as reducing agents. The preparation of the thin graphene films is done in a similar way as the conventional VYNS foil preparation procedure. Drops of the solution are deposited onto water. The graphene films have been used to prepare sources containing some electron capture radionuclides ((109)Cd, (55)Fe, (139)Ce) with an activity in the order of 3kBq. The samples have been measured to test the attainable low energy electron efficiency and the energy resolution of Auger and conversion electrons by 4π (electron capture)-γ coincidence measurements. The 4π (electron capture)-γ coincidence setup includes a pressurized proportional counter and a NaI(Tl) detector. Tests with different pressures up to 1000kPa were carried out. All these tests show similar values in both parameters (efficiency and resolution) as those obtained by using the conventional metallized films without the drawback of the high percentage of broken films.

  1. Effects of sample preparation on bacterial colonization of polymers.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Diana N; Stafford, Christopher M; Cheng, Yajun; Leigh, Stefan D; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Lin, Nancy J

    2010-02-16

    Characterization of materials developed for medical usage frequently includes studies in which the materials are inoculated with bacteria in order to assess bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Observed differences in bacterial growth are typically considered to be due to the material or the incubation conditions. To our knowledge, the method used to prepare the materials has generally not been considered with regard to its influence on bacterial colonization. The objective of this study was to determine the effects that various preparation methods exert on bacterial colonization of polymer disks. Polymer disks of the same dimethacrylate composition were photopolymerized: (1) between untreated glass slides, (2) between polyester release film, (3) between glass slides treated with an alkyl silane, (4) between glass slides treated with a perfluorinated silane, or (5) with one free surface in an argon-purged chamber. Surface chemistry was quantified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, hydrophobicity was assessed by water contact angle, and topography was characterized using atomic force microscopy. The disks were inoculated with Streptococcus mutans for 4 h, fixed, and visualized using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Differences among all groups were found with regard to surface chemistry, hydrophobicity, topography, and bacteria morphology, density, and coverage, indicating that the method of sample preparation strongly affects both the surface properties and the initial bacterial colonization. Polymerization on untreated slides was selected as the preferred method of preparation due to minimal material transfer to the polymer and consistent, reproducible bacterial colonization.

  2. Preparation of DNA and nucleoprotein samples for AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2010-01-01

    Sample preparation techniques allowing reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA with various structures, topologies and complexes with proteins are reviewed. The major emphasis is given to methods utilizing chemical functionalization of mica, enabling preparation of the surfaces with required characteristics. The methods are illustrated by examples of imaging of different DNA structures. Special attention is given to the possibility of AFM to image the dynamics of DNA at the nanoscale. The capabilities of time-lapse AFM in aqueous solutions are illustrated by imaging of dynamic processes as transitions of local alternative structures (transition of DNA between H and B forms). The application of AFM to studies of protein-DNA complexes is illustrated by a few examples of imaging site-specific complexes, as well as such systems as chromatin. The time-lapse AFM studies of protein-DNA complexes including very recent advances with the use of high-speed AFM are reviewed. PMID:20864349

  3. Isotopic analysis of eggs: evaluating sample collection and preparation.

    PubMed

    Rock, Luc; Rowe, Sylwia; Czerwiec, Agnieszka; Richmond, Harold

    2013-02-15

    Egg traceability/authenticity is a worldwide concern. Stable isotope techniques have been suggested as a tool to address this issue. To further validate the use of these techniques, a research project was undertaken to evaluate what effect sample collection and preparation have on the measured isotopic composition of egg components. The timing of egg collection, the timing of egg preparation after collection, and the use of pasteurisation were investigated. The C, N, O, and S isotopic compositions of egg components from 7 different production systems were measured. Two sets of eggs were collected (4 months apart). It was found that the 'isotopic fingerprint' of a particular production system was maintained over time, and that it may be possible to trace liquid egg products based on isotopic data from fresh eggs. The findings from this study support the integration of stable isotope techniques in egg traceability/authenticity systems.

  4. Solventless and solvent-minimized sample preparation techniques for determining currently used pesticides in water samples: a review.

    PubMed

    Tankiewicz, Maciej; Fenik, Jolanta; Biziuk, Marek

    2011-10-30

    The intensification of agriculture means that increasing amounts of toxic organic and inorganic compounds are entering the environment. The pesticides generally applied nowadays are regarded as some of the most dangerous contaminants of the environment. Their presence in the environment, especially in water, is hazardous because they cause human beings to become more susceptible to disease. For these reasons, it is essential to monitor pesticide residues in the environment with the aid of all accessible analytical methods. The analysis of samples for the presence of pesticides is problematic, because of the laborious and time-consuming operations involved in preparing samples for analysis, which themselves may be a source of additional contaminations and errors. To date, it has been standard practice to use large quantities of organic solvents in the sample preparation process; but as these solvents are themselves hazardous, solventless and solvent-minimized techniques are coming into use. This paper discusses the most commonly used over the last 15 years sample preparation techniques for monitoring organophosphorus and organonitrogen pesticides residue in water samples. Furthermore, a significant trend in sample preparation, in accordance with the principles of 'Green Chemistry' is the simplification, miniaturization and automation of analytical techniques. In view of this aspect, several novel techniques are being developed in order to reduce the analysis step, increase the sample throughput and to improve the quality and the sensitivity of analytical methods. The paper describes extraction techniques requiring the use of solvents - liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and its modifications, membrane extraction techniques, hollow fibre-protected two-phase solvent microextraction, liquid phase microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic drop (LPME-SFO), solid-phase extraction (SPE) and single-drop microextraction (SDME) - as well as solvent

  5. 40 CFR 1065.1107 - Sample media and sample system preparation; sample system assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... number of repeat tests. Note that when repeating test cycles to increase sample mass, you may replace the... with methylene chloride for 24 hours and dry over dry nitrogen in a low-temperature vacuum oven. (2... methanol, 22 hours with methylene chloride, and 22 hours with toluene, followed by drying with nitrogen....

  6. Sampling and sample preparation methods for determining concentrations of mycotoxins in foods and feeds.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Sample variation is often the largest error in determining concentrations of mycotoxins in food commodities. The worldwide safety evaluation of mycotoxins requires sampling plans that give acceptably accurate values for the levels of contamination in specific batches or lots of a commodity. Mycotoxin concentrations show a skewed or uneven distribution in foods and feeds, especially in whole kernels (or nuts), so it is extremely difficult to collect a sample that accurately represents the mean batch concentration. Sample variance studies and sampling plans have been published for select mycotoxins such as aflatoxin, fumonisin, and deoxynivalenol, emphasizing the importance of sample selection, sample size, and the number of incremental samples. For meaningful data to be generated from surveillance studies, representative samples should be collected from carefully selected populations (batches or lots) of food that, in turn, should be representative of clearly defined locations (e.g. a country, a region within a country). Although sampling variability is unavoidable, it is essential that the precision of the sampling plan be clearly defined and be considered acceptable by those responsible for interpreting and reporting the surveillance data. The factors influencing variability are detailed here, with reference to both major mycotoxins and major commodities. Sampling of large bag stacks, bulk shipments, and domestic supplies are all discussed. Sampling plans currently accepted in international trade are outlined. Acceptance sampling plans and the variabilities that affect operating characteristic curves of such plans are also detailed. The constraints and issues related to the sampling of harvested crops within subsistence farming areas are also discussed in this chapter, as are the essential rules of sample labelling and storage. The chapter concludes with a short section on sample preparation methods.

  7. Mixing apparatus for preparing NMR samples under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Jin; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Mooberry, Ed S.; Westler, William M.; Markley, John L.

    2003-09-01

    The size limit for protein NMR spectroscopy in solution arises in large part from line broadening caused by slow molecular tumbling. One way to alleviate this problem is to increase the effective tumbling rate by reducing the viscosity of the solvent. Because proteins generally require an aqueous environment to remain folded, one approach has been to encapsulate hydrated proteins in reverse micelles formed by a detergent and to dissolve the encapsulated protein in a low-viscosity fluid. The high volatility of suitable low-viscosity fluids requires that the samples be prepared and maintained under pressure. We describe a novel apparatus used for the preparation of such samples. The apparatus includes a chamber for mixing the detergent with the low-viscosity solvent, a second chamber for mixing this with hydrated protein, and a 5-mm (o.d.) zirconium oxide NMR sample tube with shut-off valves designed to contain pressures on the order of 10 bar, sufficient for liquid propane. Liquids are moved from one location to another by introducing minor pressure differentials between two pressurization vessels. We discuss the operation of this apparatus and illustrate this with data on a 30-kDa protein complex (chymotrypsin:turkey ovomucoid third domain) encapsulated in reverse micelles of the detergent, sodium bis (2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate, aerosol-ot (AOT), dissolved in liquid propane.

  8. Sample preparation and EFTEM of Meat Samples for Nanoparticle Analysis in Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, L.; Dudkiewicz, A.

    2014-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used in industry for personal care products and the preparation of food. In the latter application, their functions include the prevention of microbes' growth, increase of the foods nutritional value and sensory quality. EU regulations require a risk assessment of the nanoparticles used in foods and food contact materials before the products can reach the market. However, availability of validated analytical methodologies for detection and characterisation of the nanoparticles in food hampers appropriate risk assessment. As part of a research on the evaluation of the methods for screening and quantification of Ag nanoparticles in meat we have tested a new TEM sample preparation alternative to resin embedding and cryo-sectioning. Energy filtered TEM analysis was applied to evaluate thickness and the uniformity of thin meat layers acquired at increasing input of the sample demonstrating that the protocols used ensured good stability under the electron beam, reliable sample concentration and reproducibility.

  9. Automation of preparation of nonmetallic samples for analysis by atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmann, A.; Willay, G.

    1986-01-01

    For a rapid preparation of solutions intended for analysis by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry or atomic absorption spectrometry, an automatic device called Plasmasol was developed. This apparatus used the property of nonwettability of glassy C to fuse the sample in an appropriate flux. The sample-flux mixture is placed in a composite crucible, then heated at high temperature, swirled until full dissolution is achieved, and then poured into a water-filled beaker. After acid addition, dissolution of the melt, and filling to the mark, the solution is ready for analysis. The analytical results obtained, either for oxide samples or for prereduced iron ores show that the solutions prepared with this device are undistinguished from those obtained by manual dissolutions done by acid digestion or by high temperature fusion. Preparation reproducibility and analytical tests illustrate the performance of Plasmasol.

  10. An apparatus for preparing benthic samples aboard ship

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepper, Phillip N.; Girard, Thomas L.; Stapanian, Martin A.

    2001-01-01

    We describe a safe and effective apparatus for washing and reducing the volume of benthic samples collected by grab samplers aboard ship. The sample is transferred directly from the dredge to the apparatus and then washed with water pumped through pipes in the apparatus and from onboard hoses. Wastewater and materials smaller than 0.541 mm in diameter are washed overboard. Larger materials, including benthic organisms, collect on an upper 0.64-cm screen and on a lower 30-mm-mesh stainless steel bolt cloth. A collection jar is screwed into the bottom of the apparatus. Therefore, transfer of sample material from the apparatus to the jar is quick and easy. This apparatus has several advantages for use aboard ship over others described in the literature, especially in rough seas, in cold weather, and at night. The apparatus provides a safe and convenient platform for washing and reducing samples, and samples can be prepared while the vessel is traveling at full speed.

  11. An efficient and cost-effective method for preparing transmission electron microscopy samples from powders

    DOE PAGES

    Wen, Haiming; Lin, Yaojun; Seidman, David N.; ...

    2015-09-09

    The preparation of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) samples from powders with particle sizes larger than ~100 nm poses a challenge. The existing methods are complicated and expensive, or have a low probability of success. Herein, we report a modified methodology for preparation of TEM samples from powders, which is efficient, cost-effective, and easy to perform. This method involves mixing powders with an epoxy on a piece of weighing paper, curing the powder–epoxy mixture to form a bulk material, grinding the bulk to obtain a thin foil, punching TEM discs from the foil, dimpling the discs, and ion milling the dimpledmore » discs to electron transparency. Compared with the well established and robust grinding–dimpling–ion-milling method for TEM sample preparation for bulk materials, our modified approach for preparing TEM samples from powders only requires two additional simple steps. In this article, step-by-step procedures for our methodology are described in detail, and important strategies to ensure success are elucidated. Furthermore, our methodology has been applied successfully for preparing TEM samples with large thin areas and high quality for many different mechanically milled metallic powders.« less

  12. An efficient and cost-effective method for preparing transmission electron microscopy samples from powders

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haiming; Lin, Yaojun; Seidman, David N.; Schoenung, Julie M.; van Rooyen, Isabella J.; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2015-09-09

    The preparation of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) samples from powders with particle sizes larger than ~100 nm poses a challenge. The existing methods are complicated and expensive, or have a low probability of success. Herein, we report a modified methodology for preparation of TEM samples from powders, which is efficient, cost-effective, and easy to perform. This method involves mixing powders with an epoxy on a piece of weighing paper, curing the powder–epoxy mixture to form a bulk material, grinding the bulk to obtain a thin foil, punching TEM discs from the foil, dimpling the discs, and ion milling the dimpled discs to electron transparency. Compared with the well established and robust grinding–dimpling–ion-milling method for TEM sample preparation for bulk materials, our modified approach for preparing TEM samples from powders only requires two additional simple steps. In this article, step-by-step procedures for our methodology are described in detail, and important strategies to ensure success are elucidated. Furthermore, our methodology has been applied successfully for preparing TEM samples with large thin areas and high quality for many different mechanically milled metallic powders.

  13. Focused ion beam preparation of samples for X-ray nanotomography.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Jeffrey J; Ristau, Roger A; Harris, William M; Chiu, Wilson K S

    2012-09-01

    The preparation of hard material samples with the necessary size and shape is critical to successful material analysis. X-ray nanotomography requires that samples are sufficiently thin for X-rays to pass through the sample during rotation for tomography. One method for producing samples that fit the criteria for X-ray nanotomography is focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) which uses a focused beam of ions to selectively mill around a region of interest and then utilizes a micromanipulator to remove the milled-out sample from the bulk material and mount it on a sample holder. In this article the process for preparing X-ray nanotomography samples in multiple shapes and sizes is discussed. Additionally, solid-oxide fuel cell anode samples prepared through the FIB/SEM technique underwent volume-independence studies for multiple properties such as volume fraction, average particle size, tortuosity and contiguity to observe the characteristics of FIB/SEM samples in X-ray nanotomography.

  14. On sample preparation and dielectric breakdown in nanostructured epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, M.; Xu, Z.; Vaughan, A. S.; Lewin, P. L.

    2011-08-01

    There are many methods available to achieve a good dispersion of fillers within a polymeric matrix. This investigation considered several methods of dispersing three chosen fillers within an epoxy resin; the same processes were also performed on unfilled materials to investigate any effects they may have on the host material. For this investigation, the epoxy system (EP) was combined with sodium montmorillonite (MMT), micrometric silicon dioxide (SD) or nanometric silicon dioxide (NSD) as fillers. The effect of the different sample preparation routes on breakdown behaviour was then evaluated. While more thorough mixing protocols were found to lead to improved breakdown behaviour in the case of the various filled systems, surprisingly, an entirely equivalent form of behaviour was also seen in the unfilled epoxy. The influence of changes in sample geometry on the breakdown strength was established.

  15. Porous monoliths for on-line sample preparation: A review.

    PubMed

    Masini, Jorge C; Svec, Frantisek

    2017-04-29

    This review aims at presenting the state of the art concerning monolithic materials for on-line sample preparation emphasizing solid-phase extraction, matrix exchange, and analyte conversion. Emphasis was given to organic and silica-based, as well as hybrid monoliths reported in the literature mostly after 2010. The first part of this review presents materials and strategies for enrichment of inorganic species in environmental and biological samples using mostly ICP-MS detectors. In the second part we focus on organic analytes, discussing the role of surface area of the polymer monoliths and density of adsorption sites for specific interactions, including incorporation of nanoparticles, metal organic frameworks, as well as the preparation of hybrid organic-silica monoliths to increase the surface area. Incorporation of ionic liquids to increase the number of types of interaction mechanisms available for retention is also discussed. Monoliths affording molecular recognition properties achieved by including boronate moieties for cis-diol recognition, as well as antibodies and aptamers for specific molecular recognition are also reviewed. The largest number of applications of molecular recognition mechanisms was observed for molecularly imprinted polymer monoliths as a consequence of the simplicity of this approach when compared to the use of immunosorbents or aptamers. The final part examines the on-line applications of immobilized enzyme reactors used for protein digestion in proteomic analysis and for kinetic studies in drug discovery and clinical assays usually coupling the reactors to mass spectrometers.

  16. Preparation of Soybean Seed Samples for FT-IR Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,S.; Pietrzak, L.

    2005-01-01

    Typical preparation of seed samples for infrared (IR) microspectroscopy involves imbibition of the seed for varying time periods followed by cryosectioning. Imbibition, however, may initiate germination even at 4 C with associated changes in the chemistry of the sample. We have found that it is possible to section seeds that are sufficiently hard, such as soybeans, on a standard laboratory microtome without imbibition. The use of dry sectioning of unimbibed seeds is reported here, as well as a comparison of different mounting media and modes of analysis. Glycerol, Tissue-Tek, and ethanol were used as mounting media, and the quality of the resulting spectra was assessed. Ethanol was the preferred mountant, because it dried quickly with no residue and thus did not interfere with the spectrum of interest. Analysis in transmission mode using barium fluoride windows to hold the samples was compared with transmission-reflection analysis with sections mounted on special infrared-reflecting slides. The two modes of analysis performed well in different regions of the spectrum. The mode of analysis (transmission vs. transmission-reflection) should be based on the components of greatest interest in the sample.

  17. Waste minimization in analytical chemistry through innovative sample preparation techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L. L.

    1998-05-28

    Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are commonly used in analytical methods, characterization procedures result in significant and costly amount of waste. We are developing alternative analytical methods in the radiological and organic areas to reduce the volume or form of the hazardous waste produced during sample analysis. For the radiological area, we have examined high-pressure, closed-vessel microwave digestion as a way to minimize waste from sample preparation operations. Heated solutions of strong mineral acids can be avoided for sample digestion by using the microwave approach. Because reactivity increases with pressure, we examined the use of less hazardous solvents to leach selected contaminants from soil for subsequent analysis. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach by extracting plutonium from a NET reference material using citric and tartaric acids with microwave digestion. Analytical results were comparable to traditional digestion methods, while hazardous waste was reduced by a factor often. We also evaluated the suitability of other natural acids, determined the extraction performance on a wider variety of soil types, and examined the extraction efficiency of other contaminants. For the organic area, we examined ways to minimize the wastes associated with the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in environmental samples. Conventional methods for analyzing semivolatile organic compounds are labor intensive and require copious amounts of hazardous solvents. For soil and sediment samples, we have a method to analyze PCBs that is based on microscale extraction using benign solvents (e.g., water or hexane). The extraction is performed at elevated temperatures in stainless steel cells containing the sample and solvent. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitate the analytes in the isolated extract. More recently, we developed a method utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for natural

  18. Electric transport measurements on bulk, polycrystalline MgB2 samples prepared at various reaction temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederhold, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Inoue, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Murakami, M.; Hartmann, U.

    2016-03-01

    A series of disk-shaped, bulk MgB2 superconductors (sample diameter up to 4 cm) was prepared in order to improve the performance for superconducting super-magnets. Several samples were fabricated using a solid state reaction in pure Ar atmosphere from 750 to 950oC in order to determine the optimum processing parameters to obtain the highest critical current density as well as large trapped field values. Additional samples were prepared with added silver (up to 10 wt.-%) to the Mg and B powder. Magneto-resistance data and I/V-characteristics were recorded using an Oxford Instruments Teslatron system. From Arrhenius plots, we determine the TAFF pinning potential, U 0. The I/V-characteristics yield detailed information on the current flow through the polycrystalline samples. The current flow is influenced by the presence of pores in the samples. Our analysis of the achieved critical currents together with a thorough microstructure investigation reveals that the samples prepared at temperatures between 775°C and 805°C exhibit the smallest grains and the best connectivity between them, while the samples fabricated at higher reaction temperatures show a reduced connectivity and lower pinning potential. Doping the samples with silver leads to a considerable increase of the pinning potential and hence, the critical current densities.

  19. Automated acoustic matrix deposition for MALDI sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Aerni, Hans-Rudolf; Cornett, Dale S; Caprioli, Richard M

    2006-02-01

    Novel high-throughput sample preparation strategies for MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and profiling are presented. An acoustic reagent multispotter was developed to provide improved reproducibility for depositing matrix onto a sample surface, for example, such as a tissue section. The unique design of the acoustic droplet ejector and its optimization for depositing matrix solution are discussed. Since it does not contain a capillary or nozzle for fluid ejection, issues with clogging of these orifices are avoided. Automated matrix deposition provides better control of conditions affecting protein extraction and matrix crystallization with the ability to deposit matrix accurately onto small surface features. For tissue sections, matrix spots of 180-200 microm in diameter were obtained and a procedure is described for generating coordinate files readable by a mass spectrometer to permit automated profile acquisition. Mass spectral quality and reproducibility was found to be better than that obtained with manual pipet spotting. The instrument can also deposit matrix spots in a dense array pattern so that, after analysis in a mass spectrometer, two-dimensional ion images may be constructed. Example ion images from a mouse brain are presented.

  20. Miniaturized sample preparation method for determination of amphetamines in urine.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Manami; Namera, Akira; Yashiki, Mikio; Kimura, Kojiro

    2004-07-16

    A simple and miniaturized sample preparation method for determination of amphetamines in urine was developed using on-column derivatization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Urine was directly applied to the extraction column that was pre-packed with Extrelut and sodium carbonate. Amphetamine (AP) and methamphetamine (MA) in urine were adsorbed on the surface of Extrelut. AP and MA were then converted to a free base and derivatized to N-propoxycarbonyl derivatives using propylchloroformate on the column. Pentadeuterated MA was used as an internal standard. The recoveries of AP and MA from urine were 100 and 102%, respectively. The calibration curves showed linearity in the range of 0.50-50 microg/mL for AP and MA in urine. When urine samples containing two different concentrations (0.50 and 5.0 microg/mL) of AP and MA were determined, the intra-day and inter-day coefficients of variation were 1.4-7.7%. This method was applied to 14 medico-legal cases of MA intoxication. The results were compared and a good agreement was obtained with a HPLC method.

  1. The planning and establishment of a sample preparation laboratory for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Dufresne, Claude

    2000-01-01

    Nature has always been a productive source of new drugs. With the advent of high-throughput screening, it has now become possible to rapidly screen large sample collections. In addition to seeking greater diversity from natural product sources (micro-organisms, plants, etc.), fractionation of the crude extracts prior to screening is becoming a more important part of our efforts. As sample preparation protocols become more involved, automation can help to achieve and maintain a desired sample throughput. To address the needs of our screening program, two robotic systems were designed. The first system processes crude extracts all the way to 96-well plates, containing solutions suitable for screening in biological and biochemical assays. The system can dissolve crude extracts, fractionate them on solid-phase extraction cartridges, dry and weigh each fraction, re-dissolve them to a known concentration, and prepare mother plates. The second system replicates mother plates into a number of daughter plates. PMID:18924691

  2. Components for automated microfluidics sample preparation and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, M.; Erickson, J. S.; Hilliard, L. R.; Howell, P. B., Jr.; Stenger, D. A.; Ligler, F. S.; Lin, B.

    2008-02-01

    The increasing demand for portable devices to detect and identify pathogens represents an interdisciplinary effort between engineering, materials science, and molecular biology. Automation of both sample preparation and analysis is critical for performing multiplexed analyses on real world samples. This paper selects two possible components for such automated portable analyzers: modified silicon structures for use in the isolation of nucleic acids and a sheath flow system suitable for automated microflow cytometry. Any detection platform that relies on the genetic content (RNA and DNA) present in complex matrices requires careful extraction and isolation of the nucleic acids in order to ensure their integrity throughout the process. This sample pre-treatment step is commonly performed using commercially available solid phases along with various molecular biology techniques that require multiple manual steps and dedicated laboratory space. Regardless of the detection scheme, a major challenge in the integration of total analysis systems is the development of platforms compatible with current isolation techniques that will ensure the same quality of nucleic acids. Silicon is an ideal candidate for solid phase separations since it can be tailored structurally and chemically to mimic the conditions used in the laboratory. For analytical purposes, we have developed passive structures that can be used to fully ensheath one flow stream with another. As opposed to traditional flow focusing methods, our sheath flow profile is truly two dimensional, making it an ideal candidate for integration into a microfluidic flow cytometer. Such a microflow cytometer could be used to measure targets captured on either antibody- or DNA-coated beads.

  3. An enzyme-based DNA preparation method for application to forensic biological samples and degraded stains.

    PubMed

    Lounsbury, Jenny A; Coult, Natalie; Miranian, Daniel C; Cronk, Stephen M; Haverstick, Doris M; Kinnon, Paul; Saul, David J; Landers, James P

    2012-09-01

    Extraction of DNA from forensic samples typically uses either an organic extraction protocol or solid phase extraction (SPE) and these methods generally involve numerous sample transfer, wash and centrifugation steps. Although SPE has been successfully adapted to the microdevice, it can be problematic because of lengthy load times and uneven packing of the solid phase. A closed-tube enzyme-based DNA preparation method has recently been developed which uses a neutral proteinase to lyse cells and degrade proteins and nucleases [14]. Following a 20 min incubation of the buccal or whole blood sample with this proteinase, DNA is polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-ready. This paper describes the optimization and quantitation of DNA yield using this method, and application to forensic biological samples, including UV- and heat-degraded whole blood samples on cotton or blue denim substrates. Results demonstrate that DNA yield can be increased from 1.42 (±0.21)ng/μL to 7.78 (±1.40)ng/μL by increasing the quantity of enzyme per reaction by 3-fold. Additionally, there is a linear relationship between the amount of starting cellular material added and the concentration of DNA in the solution, thereby allowing DNA yield estimations to be made. In addition, short tandem repeat (STR) profile results obtained using DNA prepared with the enzyme method were comparable to those obtained with a conventional SPE method, resulting in full STR profiles (16 of 16 loci) from liquid samples (buccal swab eluate and whole blood), dried buccal swabs and bloodstains and partial profiles from UV or heat-degraded bloodstains on cotton or blue denim substrates. Finally, the DNA preparation method is shown to be adaptable to glass or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microdevices with little impact on STR peak height but providing a 20-fold reduction in incubation time (as little as 60 s), leading to a ≥1 h reduction in DNA preparation time.

  4. Author Contribution to the Pu Handbook II: Chapter 37 LLNL Integrated Sample Preparation Glovebox (TEM) Section

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Mark A.

    2016-10-25

    The development of our Integrated Actinide Sample Preparation Laboratory (IASPL) commenced in 1998 driven by the need to perform transmission electron microscopy studies on naturally aged plutonium and it’s alloys looking for the microstructural effects of the radiological decay process (1). Remodeling and construction of a laboratory within the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate facilities at LLNL was required to turn a standard radiological laboratory into a Radiological Materials Area (RMA) and Radiological Buffer Area (RBA) containing type I, II and III workplaces. Two inert atmosphere dry-train glove boxes with antechambers and entry/exit fumehoods (Figure 1), having a baseline atmosphere of 1 ppm oxygen and 1 ppm water vapor, a utility fumehood and a portable, and a third double-walled enclosure have been installed and commissioned. These capabilities, along with highly trained technical staff, facilitate the safe operation of sample preparation processes and instrumentation, and sample handling while minimizing oxidation or corrosion of the plutonium. In addition, we are currently developing the capability to safely transfer small metallographically prepared samples to a mini-SEM for microstructural imaging and chemical analysis. The gloveboxes continue to be the most crucial element of the laboratory allowing nearly oxide-free sample preparation for a wide variety of LLNL-based characterization experiments, which includes transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electrical resistivity, ion implantation, X-ray diffraction and absorption, magnetometry, metrological surface measurements, highpressure diamond anvil cell equation-of-state, phonon dispersion measurements, X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The sample preparation and materials processing capabilities in the IASPL have also facilitated experimentation at world-class facilities such as the

  5. Applied Focused Ion Beam Techniques for Sample Preparation of Astromaterials for Integrated Nano-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, G A; Teslich, N E; Kearsley, A T; Stadermann, F J; Stroud, R M; Dai, Z R; Ishii, H A; Hutcheon, I D; Bajt, S; Snead, C J; Weber, P K; Bradley, J P

    2007-02-20

    Sample preparation is always a critical step in study of micrometer sized astromaterials available for study in the laboratory, whether their subsequent analysis is by electron microscopy or secondary ion mass spectrometry. A focused beam of gallium ions has been used to prepare electron transparent sections from an interplanetary dust particle, as part of an integrated analysis protocol to maximize the mineralogical, elemental, isotopic and spectroscopic information extracted from one individual particle. In addition, focused ion beam techniques have been employed to extract cometary residue preserved on the rims and walls of micro-craters in 1100 series aluminum foils that were wrapped around the sample tray assembly on the Stardust cometary sample collector. Non-ideal surface geometries and inconveniently located regions of interest required creative solutions. These include support pillar construction and relocation of a significant portion of sample to access a region of interest. Serial sectioning, in a manner similar to ultramicrotomy, is a significant development and further demonstrates the unique capabilities of focused ion beam microscopy for sample preparation of astromaterials.

  6. Novel Sample Preparation Technique To Improve Spectromicroscopic Analyses of Micrometer-Sized Particles.

    PubMed

    Höschen, Carmen; Höschen, Till; Mueller, Carsten W; Lugmeier, Johann; Elgeti, Stefan; Rennert, Thilo; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2015-08-18

    Microscale processes occurring at biogeochemical interfaces in soils and sediments have fundamental impacts on phenomena at larger scales. To obtain the organo-mineral associations necessary for the study of biogeochemical interfaces, bulk samples are usually fractionated into microaggregates or micrometer-sized single particles. Such fine-grained mineral particles are often prepared for nanoscale secondary ion mass spectroscopy (NanoSIMS) investigations by depositing them on a carrier. This introduces topographic differences, which can strongly affect local sputtering efficiencies. Embedding in resin causes undesired C impurities. We present a novel method for preparing polished cross-sections of micrometer-sized primary soil particles that overcomes the problems of topography and C contamination. The particles are coated with a marker layer, embedded, and well-polished. The interpretation of NanoSIMS data is assisted by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy on cross-sections prepared by a focused ion beam. In the cross-sections, organic assemblages on the primary soil particles become visible. This novel method significantly improves the quality of NanoSIMS measurements on grainy mineral samples, enabling better characterization of soil biogeochemical interfaces. In addition, this sample preparation technique may also improve results from other (spectro-) microscopic techniques.

  7. 40 CFR 80.8 - Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels. 80.8 Section 80.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Provisions § 80.8 Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels. The..., blendstocks, fuel additives and renewable fuels for purposes of determining compliance with the...

  8. Cytology Preparations of Formalin Fixative Aid Detection of Giardia in Duodenal Biopsy Samples.

    PubMed

    Panarelli, Nicole C; Gobara, Nariman; Hoda, Rana S; Chaump, Michael; Jessurun, Jose; Yantiss, Rhonda K

    2017-04-01

    Giardiasis is the most common intestinal parasitic infection in the United States. The organism elicits no, or minimal, inflammatory changes in duodenal biopsy samples, so it can be easily overlooked. We performed this study to determine whether Giardia could be isolated from the formalin fixative of biopsy samples, and to evaluate the value of fluid analysis in the assessment for potential infection. We prospectively evaluated duodenal biopsy samples from 92 patients with a clinical suspicion of giardiasis or symptoms compatible with that diagnosis (ie, diarrhea, bloating, or abdominal pain) Biopsy samples were routinely processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histologic diagnoses included giardiasis (5 cases, 4%), normal findings (64 cases, 70%), peptic injury/active duodenitis (12 cases, 13%), and intraepithelial lymphocytosis with villous blunting (10 cases, 12%). Fifteen cases (13%) showed detached degenerated epithelial cells or mucus droplets in the intervillous space that resembled Giardia. Cytology slides were prepared from formalin in the biopsy container using the standard Cytospin protocol and reviewed by a cytopathologist blinded to the biopsy findings. Cytologic evaluation revealed Giardia spp. in all 5 biopsy-proven cases, and identified an additional case that was not detected by biopsy analysis. Organisms were significantly more numerous (mean: 400 trophozoites; range, 120 to 810) and showed better morphologic features in cytology preparations compared with tissue sections (mean: 129 trophozoites; range, 37 to 253 organisms; P=0.05). Our findings suggest that cytology preparations from formalin fixative can resolve diagnostically challenging cases and even enhance Giardia detection in some cases.

  9. Multiplexed efficient on-chip sample preparation and sensitive amplification-free detection of Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Du, K; Cai, H; Park, M; Wall, T A; Stott, M A; Alfson, K J; Griffiths, A; Carrion, R; Patterson, J L; Hawkins, A R; Schmidt, H; Mathies, R A

    2017-05-15

    An automated microfluidic sample preparation multiplexer (SPM) has been developed and evaluated for Ebola virus detection. Metered air bubbles controlled by microvalves are used to improve bead-solution mixing thereby enhancing the hybridization of the target Ebola virus RNA with capture probes bound to the beads. The method uses thermally stable 4-formyl benzamide functionalized (4FB) magnetic beads rather than streptavidin coated beads with a high density of capture probes to improve the target capture efficiency. Exploiting an on-chip concentration protocol in the SPM and the single molecule detection capability of the antiresonant reflecting optical waveguide (ARROW) biosensor chip, a detection limit of 0.021pfu/mL for clinical samples is achieved without target amplification. This RNA target capture efficiency is two orders of magnitude higher than previous results using streptavidin beads and the limit of detection (LOD) improves 10×. The wide dynamic range of this technique covers the whole clinically applicable concentration range. In addition, the current sample preparation time is ~1h which is eight times faster than previous work. This multiplexed, miniaturized sample preparation microdevice establishes a key technology that intended to develop next generation point-of-care (POC) detection system.

  10. Molecularly imprinted polymers for sample preparation and biosensing in food analysis: Progress and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Jon; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Kant, Krishna; Chidambara, Vinayaka Aaydha; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong; Sun, Yi

    2017-05-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are biomimetics which can selectively bind to analytes of interest. One of the most interesting areas where MIPs have shown the biggest potential is food analysis. MIPs have found use as sorbents in sample preparation attributed to the high selectivity and high loading capacity. MIPs have been intensively employed in classical solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction. More recently, MIPs have been combined with magnetic bead extraction, which greatly simplifies sample handling procedures. Studies have consistently shown that MIPs can effectively minimize complex food matrix effects, and improve recoveries and detection limits. In addition to sample preparation, MIPs have also been viewed as promising alternatives to bio-receptors due to the inherent molecular recognition abilities and the high stability in harsh chemical and physical conditions. MIPs have been utilized as receptors in biosensing platforms such as electrochemical, optical and mass biosensors to detect various analytes in food. In this review, we will discuss the current state-of-the-art of MIP synthesis and applications in the context of food analysis. We will highlight the imprinting methods which are applicable for imprinting food templates, summarize the recent progress in using MIPs for preparing and analysing food samples, and discuss the current limitations in the commercialisation of MIPs technology. Finally, future perspectives will be given.

  11. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Schroeder, Allan; Eom, Daejin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  12. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Schroeder, Allan; Shih, Chih-Kang; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Eom, Daejin

    2015-09-15

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  13. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Schroeder, Allan; Eom, Daejin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  14. Review of sample preparation techniques for the analysis of pesticide residues in soil.

    PubMed

    Tadeo, José L; Pérez, Rosa Ana; Albero, Beatriz; García-Valcárcel, Ana I; Sánchez-Brunete, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the sample preparation techniques used for the analysis of pesticides in soil. The present status and recent advances made during the last 5 years in these methods are discussed. The analysis of pesticide residues in soil requires the extraction of analytes from this matrix, followed by a cleanup procedure, when necessary, prior to their instrumental determination. The optimization of sample preparation is a very important part of the method development that can reduce the analysis time, the amount of solvent, and the size of samples. This review considers all aspects of sample preparation, including extraction and cleanup. Classical extraction techniques, such as shaking, Soxhlet, and ultrasonic-assisted extraction, and modern techniques like pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, solid-phase microextraction and QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) are reviewed. The different cleanup strategies applied for the purification of soil extracts are also discussed. In addition, the application of these techniques to environmental studies is considered.

  15. Total airborne mold particle sampling: evaluation of sample collection, preparation and counting procedures, and collection devices.

    PubMed

    Godish, Diana; Godish, Thad

    2008-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate (i) procedures used to collect, prepare, and count total airborne mold spore/particle concentrations, and (ii) the relative field performance of three commercially available total airborne mold spore/particle sampling devices. Differences between factory and laboratory airflow calibration values of axial fan-driven sampling instruments (used in the study) indicated a need for laboratory calibration using a mass flow meter to ensure that sample results were accurately calculated. An aniline blue-amended Calberla's solution adjusted to a pH of 4.2-4.4 provided good sample mounting/counting results using Dow Corning high vacuum grease, Dow Corning 280A adhesive, and Dow Corning 316 silicone release spray for samples collected using mini-Burkard and Allergenco samplers. Count variability among analysts was most pronounced in 5% counts of relatively low mold particle deposition density samples and trended downward with increased count percentage and particle deposition density. No significant differences were observed among means of 5, 10, and 20% counts and among analysts; a significant interaction effect was observed between analysts' counts and particle deposition densities. Significantly higher mini-Burkard and Air-O-Cell total mold spore/particle counts for 600x vs. 400x (1.9 and 2.3 x higher, respectively), 1000x vs. 600x (1.9 and 2.2 x higher, respectively) and 1000x vs. 400x (3.6 and 4.6 x higher, respectively) comparisons indicated that 1000x magnification counts best quantified total airborne mold spore/particles using light microscopy, and that lower magnification counts may result in unacceptable underreporting of airborne mold spore/particle concentrations. Modest but significantly higher (1.2x) total mold spore concentrations were observed with Allergenco vs. mini-Burkard samples collected in co-located, concurrently operated sampler studies; moderate but significantly higher mini-Burkard count values (1.4x) were

  16. A fully automated plasma protein precipitation sample preparation method for LC-MS/MS bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Shi, Jianxia; Le, Hoa; Cho, Robert; Huang, Judy Chi-jou; Miao, Shichang; Wong, Bradley K

    2008-02-01

    This report describes the development and validation of a robust robotic system that fully integrates all peripheral devices needed for the automated preparation of plasma samples by protein precipitation. The liquid handling system consisted of a Tecan Freedom EVO 200 liquid handling platform equipped with an 8-channel liquid handling arm, two robotic plate-handling arms, and two plate shakers. Important additional components integrated into the platform were a robotic temperature-controlled centrifuge, a plate sealer, and a plate seal piercing station. These enabled unattended operation starting from a stock solution of the test compound, a set of test plasma samples and associated reagents. The stock solution of the test compound was used to prepare plasma calibration and quality control samples. Once calibration and quality control samples were prepared, precipitation of plasma proteins was achieved by addition of three volumes of acetonitrile. Integration of the peripheral devices allowed automated sequential completion of the centrifugation, plate sealing, piercing and supernatant transferral steps. The method produced a sealed, injection-ready 96-well plate of plasma extracts. Accuracy and precision of the automated system were satisfactory for the intended use: intra-day and the inter-day precision were excellent (C.V.<5%), while the intra-day and inter-day accuracies were acceptable (relative error<8%). The flexibility of the platform was sufficient to accommodate pharmacokinetic studies of different numbers of animals and time points. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first complete automation of the protein precipitation method for plasma sample analysis.

  17. 49 CFR 199.111 - Retention of samples and additional testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.111 Retention of samples and additional testing. (a...) Since some analytes may deteriorate during storage, detected levels of the drug below the...

  18. 49 CFR 199.111 - Retention of samples and additional testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SAFETY DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING Drug Testing § 199.111 Retention of samples and additional testing. (a...) Since some analytes may deteriorate during storage, detected levels of the drug below the...

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. [Analysis of lead in unknown samples based on the standard addition method using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Zhao, Nan-jing; Meng, De-shuo; Yuan, Jing; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yin; Yu, Yang; Ma, Ming-jun; Hu, Li; Zhang, Da-hai; Xiao, Xue; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2015-01-01

    The standard addition method with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy was used to analyze an unknown sample taken from a lead battery factory. the matrix influence on the results was effectively avoided when the external or internal standard method was used, and the pretreatment of samples was simple and quick. The Nd ' YAG pulse laser with wavelength 1 064 nm was used as the excitation source. The echelle spectroscopy with high resolution and wide spectral range was used as the spectral separation device, and the intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) as the spectral detection device in the experiment. The characteristic line at 405. 78 nrn was chosen as the analysis line to measure Pb concentration. Fe I : 404. 58 line was chosen as the internal standard. Pre-experiment was carried out to confirm the appropriate condition. Under the laser energy of 128. 5 mJ, the delay time of 2. 5 tps, and the gate width of 3 ps, it was determined that with the addition of Pb to the sample in the range of 0 and 25 000 mg . kg-1, there wasn't self-absorption. There was a good linear relationship between the intensity of the spectral line of 405. 78 nm and the addition of Pb. The appropriate concentration of Pb added into the sample for analysis was determined by this series of samples. On this basis, four samples were prepared with three parallel samples for each sample in order to verify the repeatability and reliability of the method, i. e. 5 000, 10 000, 15 000, 20 000 mg . kg-1 Pb was added into the original sample. The results were compared with the result of ICP-MS. The twelve samples' relative errors were between -24. 6% and 17. 6%. The average result was 43 069 mg . kg-1 with the relative error -2. 44%.

  1. Portable system for microbial sample preparation and oligonucleotide microarray analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Bavykin, S. G.; Akowski, J. P.; Zakhariev, V. M.; Barsky, V. E.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Perov, A. N.; Biochip Technology Center; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology

    2001-02-01

    We have developed a three-component system for microbial identification that consists of (i) a universal syringe-operated silica minicolumn for successive DNA and RNA isolation, fractionation, fragmentation, fluorescent labeling, and removal of excess free label and short oligonucleotides; (ii) microarrays of immobilized oligonucleotide probes for 16S rRNA identification; and (iii) a portable battery-powered device for imaging the hybridization of fluorescently labeled RNA fragments with the arrays. The minicolumn combines a guanidine thiocyanate method of nucleic acid isolation with a newly developed hydroxyl radical-based technique for DNA and RNA labeling and fragmentation. DNA and RNA can also be fractionated through differential binding of double- and single-stranded forms of nucleic acids to the silica. The procedure involves sequential washing of the column with different solutions. No vacuum filtration steps, phenol extraction, or centrifugation is required. After hybridization, the overall fluorescence pattern is captured as a digital image or as a Polaroid photo. This three-component system was used to discriminate Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis, and human HL60 cells. The procedure is rapid: beginning with whole cells, it takes approximately 25 min to obtain labeled DNA and RNA samples and an additional 25 min to hybridize and acquire the microarray image using a stationary image analysis system or the portable imager.

  2. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  3. Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Clague, David S.; Wheeler, Elizabeth K.; Lee, Abraham P.

    2006-07-25

    A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

  4. Amphiphilic mediated sample preparation for micro-flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Clague, David S.; Wheeler, Elizabeth K.; Lee, Abraham P.

    2009-03-17

    A flow cytometer includes a flow cell for detecting the sample, an oil phase in the flow cell, a water phase in the flow cell, an oil-water interface between the oil phase and the water phase, a detector for detecting the sample at the oil-water interface, and a hydrophobic unit operatively connected to the sample. The hydrophobic unit is attached to the sample. The sample and the hydrophobic unit are placed in an oil and water combination. The sample is detected at the interface between the oil phase and the water phase.

  5. Validation of a fully automated robotic setup for preparation of whole blood samples for LC-MS toxicology analysis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, David; Rasmussen, Brian; Linnet, Kristian

    2012-05-01

    A fully automated setup was developed for preparing whole blood samples using a Tecan Evo workstation. By integrating several add-ons to the robotic platform, the flexible setup was able to prepare samples from sample tubes to a 96-well sample plate ready for injection on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry using several preparation techniques, including protein precipitation, solid-phase extraction and centrifugation, without any manual intervention. Pipetting of a known aliquot of whole blood was achieved by integrating a balance and performing gravimetric measurements. The system was able to handle 1,073 of 1,092 (98.3%) samples of whole blood from forensic material, including postmortem samples, without any need for repeating sample preparation. Only three samples required special treatment such as dilution. The addition of internal and calibration standards were validated by pipetting a solution of Orange G and measuring the weight and absorbance. Internal standard (20 µL) was added in a multi-pipetting sequence with an accuracy of 99.9% and imprecision (coefficient of variation) of 1.6%. Calibration standards were added with high accuracy at volumes as low as 6.00 µL (±0.21 µL). The general setup of the offline sample preparation and key validation parameters of a quantitative analysis of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol is presented.

  6. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Aasebø, Elise; Selheim, Frode; Berven, Frode S.; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Global mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility. PMID:28248234

  7. Preparation of Samples for Single-Worm Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Yemini, Eviatar; Kerr, Rex A.; Schafer, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Neurobiological research in genetically tractable organisms relies heavily on robust assays for behavioral phenotypes. The simple body plan of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans makes it particularly amenable to the use of automated microscopy and image analysis to describe behavioral patterns quantitatively. This protocol first describes the preparation and use of media for growing and maintaining worms for tracking. The second part of the protocol describes how to prepare a single young adult worm for recording during video analysis. Although the protocol was developed for use in a single-worm tracker, it addresses factors important for the generation of reproducible, standardized images in all systems. PMID:22135667

  8. A Method for Microalgae Proteomics Analysis Based on Modified Filter-Aided Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Cao, Xupeng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhen; Zhang, Haowei; Xue, Song; Tian, Jing

    2017-04-11

    With the fast development of microalgal biofuel researches, the proteomics studies of microalgae increased quickly. A filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) method is widely used proteomics sample preparation method since 2009. Here, a method of microalgae proteomics analysis based on modified filter-aided sample preparation (mFASP) was described to meet the characteristics of microalgae cells and eliminate the error caused by over-alkylation. Using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as the model, the prepared sample was tested by standard LC-MS/MS and compared with the previous reports. The results showed mFASP is suitable for most of occasions of microalgae proteomics studies.

  9. Sorbent preparation/modification/additives. Final report, September 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Prudich, M.E.; Venkataramakrishnan, R.

    1994-02-01

    Sorbent preparation techniques used today have generally been adapted from techniques traditionally used by the lime industry. Traditional dry hydration and slaking processes have been optimized to produce materials intended for use in the building industry. These preparation techniques should be examined with an eye to optimization of properties important to the SO{sub 2} capture process. The study of calcium-based sorbents for sulfur dioxide capture is complicated by two factors: (1) little is known about the chemical mechanisms by which the standard sorbent preparation and enhancement techniques work, and (2) a sorbent preparation technique that produces a calcium-based sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in one regime of operation [flame zone (>2400 F), in-furnace (1600--2400 F), economizer (800--1100 F), after air preheater (<350 F)] may not produce a sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in the other reaction zones. Again, an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of sorbent enhancement is necessary if a systematic approach to sorbent development is to be used. As a long-term goal, an experimental program is being carried out for the purpose of (1) defining the effects of slaking conditions on the properties of calcium-based sorbents, (2) determining how the parent limestone properties of calcium-based sorbents, and (3) elucidating the mechanism(s) relating to the activity of various dry sorbent additives. An appendix contains a one-dimensional duct injection model with modifications to handle the sodium additives.

  10. Preparation of polyvinylidene fluoride/cellulose acetate blend membrane with polyethylene glycol additive for apple juice clarification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitri, Shatila Jihadiyah; Widiastuti, Nurul

    2017-03-01

    Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF)/Cellulose Acetate (CA) blend membrane with polyethylene (PEG) addition of casting solution were synthesised to determine its morphology. This purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of PEG addition to membrane performance and its application to the clarification of apple juice. The membranes were prepared from polymer blends of CA and PVDF, dimethyl acetamide (DMAc) as solvent, and PEG as additive. Phase inversion was used to prepare membranes by mixing the polymer blends, solvent and additive to be reacted at temperature 60 °C for 24 hours. The variation of PEG weight percentage were 0, 1 wt%, 3 wt%, and 5 wt%. The addition of PEG increased porosity and fluxes, but decreased membrane rejection. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) were applied to evaluate the morphology of membranes, which investigated increasing of pore size, pore distribution, and surface roughness. Apple juice clarification by membrane with 1% PEG was obtained 95,1% clearer than the pure sample.

  11. Preview of the NASA NNWG NDE Sample Preparation Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presents a step-by-step how-to fabrication documentation of every kind of sample that is fabricated for MSFC by UA Huntsville, including photos and illustrations. The tabulation of what kind of samples are being fabricated for what NDE method, detailed instructions/documentation of the inclusion/creation of defects, detailed specifications for materials, processes, and equipment, case histories and/or experiences with the different fabrication methods and defect inclusion techniques, discussion of pitfalls and difficulties associated with sample fabrication and defect inclusion techniques, and a discussion of why certain fabrication techniques are needed as related to the specific NDE methods are included in this presentation.

  12. 7 CFR 61.34 - Drawing and preparation of sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... forwarding to a licensed cottonseed chemist for analysis and grading. The duplicate shall be sealed and retained by the sampler until the original official sample shall have been analyzed by a licensed...

  13. 7 CFR 61.34 - Drawing and preparation of sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... forwarding to a licensed cottonseed chemist for analysis and grading. The duplicate shall be sealed and retained by the sampler until the original official sample shall have been analyzed by a licensed...

  14. 7 CFR 61.34 - Drawing and preparation of sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... forwarding to a licensed cottonseed chemist for analysis and grading. The duplicate shall be sealed and retained by the sampler until the original official sample shall have been analyzed by a licensed...

  15. 7 CFR 61.34 - Drawing and preparation of sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... forwarding to a licensed cottonseed chemist for analysis and grading. The duplicate shall be sealed and retained by the sampler until the original official sample shall have been analyzed by a licensed...

  16. 7 CFR 61.34 - Drawing and preparation of sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... forwarding to a licensed cottonseed chemist for analysis and grading. The duplicate shall be sealed and retained by the sampler until the original official sample shall have been analyzed by a licensed...

  17. Influence of sample preparation on the assay of isoflavones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complexity of sample matrices, coexistence of multiple forms of bioactive phytochemicals, and their interaction of with other cellular components pose a significant challenge for optimize extraction and accurate estimation of bioactive phytochemicals in foods and dietary supplements. This artic...

  18. Improved sample preparation and counting techniques for enhanced tritium measurement sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, J.; Aalseth, C.; Bailey, V. L.; Mace, E. K.; Overman, C.; Seifert, A.; Wilcox Freeburg, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Tritium (T) measurements offer insight to a wealth of environmental applications including hydrologic tracking, discerning ocean circulation patterns, and aging ice formations. However, the relatively short half-life of T (12.3 years) limits its effective age dating range. Compounding this limitation is the decrease in atmospheric T content by over two orders of magnitude (from 1000-2000 TU in 1962 to < 10 TU currently) since the cessation of above ground nuclear testing in the 1960's. We are developing sample preparation methods coupled to direct counting of T via ultra-low background proportional counters which, when combined, offer improved T measurement sensitivity (~4.5 mmoles of H2 equivalent) and will help expand the application of T age dating to smaller sample sizes linked to persistent environmental questions despite the limitations above. For instance, this approach can be used to T date ~ 2.2 mmoles of CH4 collected from sample-limited systems including microbial communities, soils, or subsurface aquifers and can be combined with radiocarbon dating to distinguish the methane's formation age from C age in a system. This approach can also expand investigations into soil organic C where the improved sensitivity will permit resolution of soil C into more descriptive fractions and provide direct assessments of the stability of specific classes of organic matter in soils environments. We are employing a multiple step sample preparation system whereby organic samples are first combusted with resulting CO2 and H2O being used as a feedstock to synthesize CH4. This CH4 is mixed with Ar and loaded directly into an ultra-low background proportional counter for measurement of T β decay in a shallow underground laboratory. Analysis of water samples requires only the addition of geologic CO2 feedstock with the sample for methane synthesis. The chemical nature of the preparation techniques enable high sample throughput with only the final measurement requiring T decay

  19. Preparation of water samples for carbon-14 dating

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feltz, H.R.; Hanshaw, Bruce B.

    1963-01-01

    For most natural water, a large sample is required to provide the 3 grams of carbon needed for a carbon-14 determination. A field procedure for isolating total dissolved-carbonate species is described. Carbon dioxide gas is evolved by adding sulfuric acid to the water sample; the gas is then collected in a sodium hydroxide trap by recycling in a closed system. The trap is then transported to the dating laboratory where the carbon-14 is counted.

  20. Sample preparation of solid samples for metal determination by atomic spectroscopy - An overview and selected recent applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, J.; Hardaway, C.; Bobbadi, K.; Reddy, A.

    2006-07-01

    Classical methods involving dry dissolution, wet decomposition, and microwave methods for digestion/dissolution of solid samples for metal determination by various atomic spectroscopic techniques are discussed. Recent applications of solid sample preparation are presented including soils, sediments, food, cosmetics, oils, and coal.

  1. Optimized sample preparation of endoscopic collected pancreatic fluid for SDS-PAGE analysis.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; Lee, Linda S; Wu, Bechien; Repas, Kathryn; Banks, Peter A; Conwell, Darwin L; Steen, Hanno

    2010-07-01

    The standardization of methods for human body fluid protein isolation is a critical initial step for proteomic analyses aimed to discover clinically relevant biomarkers. Several caveats have hindered pancreatic fluid proteomics, including the heterogeneity of samples and protein degradation. We aim to optimize sample handling of pancreatic fluid that has been collected using a safe and effective endoscopic collection method (endoscopic pancreatic function test). Using SDS-PAGE protein profiling, we investigate (i) precipitation techniques to maximize protein extraction, (ii) auto-digestion of pancreatic fluid following prolonged exposure to a range of temperatures, (iii) effects of multiple freeze-thaw cycles on protein stability, and (iv) the utility of protease inhibitors. Our experiments revealed that TCA precipitation resulted in the most efficient extraction of protein from pancreatic fluid of the eight methods we investigated. In addition, our data reveal that although auto-digestion of proteins is prevalent at 23 and 37 degrees C, incubation on ice significantly slows such degradation. Similarly, when the sample is maintained on ice, proteolysis is minimal during multiple freeze-thaw cycles. We have also determined the addition of protease inhibitors to be assay-dependent. Our optimized sample preparation strategy can be applied to future proteomic analyses of pancreatic fluid.

  2. 31. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST TO CORNER WHERE SAMPLING/CRUSHING ADDITIONS ABUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST TO CORNER WHERE SAMPLING/CRUSHING ADDITIONS ABUT CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. INTACT BARREN SOLUTION TANK VISIBLE IN FRONT OF CRUSHED ORE BIN. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  3. Effects of Sample Preparation on the Infrared Reflectance Spectra of Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Blake, Thomas A.; Forland, Brenda M.

    2015-05-22

    While reflectance spectroscopy is a useful tool in identifying molecular compounds, laboratory measurement of solid (particularly powder) samples often is confounded by sample preparation methods. For example, both the packing density and surface roughness can have an effect on the quantitative reflectance spectra of powdered samples. Recent efforts in our group have focused on developing standard methods for measuring reflectance spectra that accounts for sample preparation, as well as other factors such as particle size and provenance. In this work, the effect of preparation method on sample reflectivity was investigated by measuring the directional-hemispherical spectra of samples that were hand-packed as well as pressed into pellets using an integrating sphere attached to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The results show that the methods used to prepare the sample have a substantial effect on the measured reflectance spectra, as do other factors such as particle size.

  4. Microsystem strategies for sample preparation in biological detection.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Bennett, Dawn Jonita; Manginell, Monica; Okandan, Murat; Acrivos, Andreas; Brozik, Susan Marie; Khusid, Boris

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this LDRD was to develop microdevice strategies for dealing with samples to be examined in biological detection systems. This includes three sub-components: namely, microdevice fabrication, sample delivery to the microdevice, and sample processing within the microdevice. The first component of this work focused on utilizing Sandia's surface micromachining technology to fabricate small volume (nanoliter) fluidic systems for processing small quantities of biological samples. The next component was to develop interfaces for the surface-micromachined silicon devices. We partnered with Micronics, a commercial company, to produce fluidic manifolds for sample delivery to our silicon devices. Pressure testing was completed to examine the strength of the bond between the pressure-sensitive adhesive layer and the silicon chip. We are also pursuing several other methods, both in house and external, to develop polymer-based fluidic manifolds for packaging silicon-based microfluidic devices. The second component, sample processing, is divided into two sub-tasks: cell collection and cell lysis. Cell collection was achieved using dielectrophoresis, which employs AC fields to collect cells at energized microelectrodes, while rejecting non-cellular particles. Both live and dead Staph. aureus bacteria have been collected using RF frequency dielectrophoresis. Bacteria have been separated from polystyrene microspheres using frequency-shifting dielectrophoresis. Computational modeling was performed to optimize device separation performance, and to predict particle response to the dielectrophoretic traps. Cell lysis is continuing to be pursued using microactuators to mechanically disrupt cell membranes. Novel thermal actuators, which can generate larger forces than previously tested electrostatic actuators, have been incorporated with and tested with cell lysis devices. Significant cell membrane distortion has been observed, but more experiments need to be conducted to

  5. Studies of levels of biogenic amines in meat samples in relation to the content of additives.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Aneta; Kowalska, Sylwia; Szłyk, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The impact of meat additives on the concentration of biogenic amines and the quality of meat was studied. Fresh white and red meat samples were fortified with the following food additives: citric and lactic acids, disodium diphosphate, sodium nitrite, sodium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, sodium chloride, ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, propyl 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate (propyl gallate) and butylated hydroxyanisole. The content of spermine, spermidine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, tryptamine and 2-phenylethylamine was determined by capillary isotachophoretic methods in meat samples (fresh and fortified) during four days of storage at 4°C. The results were applied to estimate the impact of the tested additives on the formation of biogenic amines in white and red meat. For all tested meats, sodium nitrite, sodium chloride and disodium diphosphate showed the best inhibition. However, cadaverine and putrescine were characterised by the biggest changes in concentration during the storage time of all the additives. Based on the presented data for the content of biogenic amines in meat samples analysed as a function of storage time and additives, we suggest that cadaverine and putrescine have a significant impact on meat quality.

  6. EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting

  7. Sample preparation and assay refinements for pathogen detection platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Daniel V.; Kearns, Elizabeth A.; Leskinen, Stephaney D.; Magaña, Sonia; Stroot, Joyce M.; Hunter, Dawn M.; Schlemmer, Sarah M.

    2009-02-01

    Food-borne and waterborne microbial pathogens are a potential problem in biowarfare and public health. Such pathogens can affect the health, combat readiness, and effectiveness of the warfighter in a battlefield environment and present potential threats to the civilian population through intentional or natural contamination of food and water. Conventional procedures to detect and identify microbial pathogens in food, water, and other materials can take days to perform and may provide inconclusive information. Research at the University of South Florida's Advanced Biosensors Laboratory (ABL) focuses on development of sample processing procedures and biosensor-based assays for rapid detection of biothreat agents. Rapid processing methods, including use of an automated concentrator of microorganisms in water, have been developed for complex matrix samples including ground beef, apple juice, produce, potable water and recreational water, enabling such samples to be directly tested by biosensor assays for target analytes. Bacillus atrophaeus spores and other bacteria can be concentrated from potable and recreational water at low levels with a dead-end hollow-fiber ultrafiltration concentration system. Target bacteria recovered by these processing procedures can be identified by evanescent wave, fiber optic biosensors or other detection platforms. Fiber optic biosensor assays have been improved to include subsequent PCR analysis and viability determination of captured target bacteria using broth enrichment and/or ATP luminescence.

  8. Sample preparation in determination of lead in garden vegetables by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Preer, J R; Stephens, B R; Bland, C W

    1982-07-01

    Dry and wet ashing methods have been used in the analysis of garden vegetables for Pb. The reliability of wet ashing has been verified by the method of standard additions. Comparison of dry and wet ashing showed good agreement for a variety of garden vegetables. Sample size was more strictly limited for the wet-ashed samples, which led to lower sensitivity. Vegetable samples are commonly analyzed for a number of trace elements, which introduces additional constraints on sample preparation, notably because of Cd loss on dry ashing. Pretreatment with HNO3/H2SO4 ash aid eliminated Cd loss. Reliability of dry ashing with pretreatment was shown with NBS SRM Orchard Leaves, Pine Needles, Spinach, and Tomato Leaves. The analysis was insensitive to ashing temperature in the range 480-625 degrees C. A practical detection limit for the method is about 2 ppm Pb, dry weight basis (DWB). Care must be exercised to avoid contamination of the sample with lead at this level by improper handling. Segregation and acid washing of glassware and protection of the sample from contact with any object not demonstrably clean was necessary. No evidence was found of Pb contamination at this level from tap water washing of fresh vegetables, forced-air oven drying, or grinding with mortar and pestle. No special clean room facilities or laboratory air purification measures were used. Sensitivity was increased 3-fold by extraction with dithizone in CHCl3 followed by back-extraction into dilute HCl. Detection limits were not improved, however, because of variation in the extraction results. The instrumental method for assessing effective correction for back-ground absorbance showed adequate compensation, although comparison of direct and extractive determinations showed a small but significant difference between the methods of about 1 ppm Pb (DWB).

  9. Effect of additives on the properties of polyaniline nanofibers prepared by high gravity chemical oxidative polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yibo; Arowo, Moses; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianfeng

    2015-05-12

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers with improved properties were prepared by high gravity chemical oxidative polymerization in a rotating packed bed with the assistance of p-aminodiphenylamine (AD) and p-phenylenediamine (AP). The effects of reactor type, additive dosage, reaction temperature, and high-gravity level on the properties of products were investigated in detail. Three conclusions were made: (1) a small amount of additive can significantly improve some properties of the nanofibers such as uniformity, specific surface area, and specific capacitance; (2) in order to obtain high-quality nanofibers, the high-gravity level should coordinate with the reaction rate; (3) the molecular weight and conductivity of PANI decrease with the increase of additive dosage. The products have larger specific surface areas of up to 73.9 and 68.4 m(2)/g and consequently improved specific capacitance of up to 527.5 and 552 F/g for the PANI nanofibers prepared with AD and AP, respectively. However, the specific surface area and specific capacitance of pure PANI are only 49.1 m(2)/g and 333.3 F/g, respectively. This research provides a simple, reliable, and scalable method to produce PANI nanofibers of high performances.

  10. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  11. Sample preparation of metal alloys by electric discharge machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. B., II; Gordon, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electric discharge machining was investigated as a noncontaminating method of comminuting alloys for subsequent chemical analysis. Particulate dispersions in water were produced from bulk alloys at a rate of about 5 mg/min by using a commercially available machining instrument. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by results obtained when acidified dispersions were substituted for true acid solutions in an established spectrochemical method. The analysis results were not significantly different for the two sample forms. Particle size measurements and preliminary results from other spectrochemical methods which require direct aspiration of liquid into flame or plasma sources are reported.

  12. Microfluidic devices for DNA sequencing: sample preparation and electrophoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Paegel, Brian M; Blazej, Robert G; Mathies, Richard A

    2003-02-01

    Modern DNA sequencing 'factories' have revolutionized biology by completing the human genome sequence, but in the race to completion we are left with inefficient, cumbersome, and costly macroscale processes and supporting facilities. During the same period, microfabricated DNA sequencing, sample processing and analysis devices have advanced rapidly toward the goal of a 'sequencing lab-on-a-chip'. Integrated microfluidic processing dramatically reduces analysis time and reagent consumption, and eliminates costly and unreliable macroscale robotics and laboratory apparatus. A microfabricated device for high-throughput DNA sequencing that couples clone isolation, template amplification, Sanger extension, purification, and electrophoretic analysis in a single microfluidic circuit is now attainable.

  13. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2006-01-17

    The present invention relates to a new class of surface modified particles and to a multi-step surface modification process for the preparation of the same. The multi-step surface functionalization process involves two or more reactions to produce particles that are compatible with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through organic linking groups.

  14. Evaluation of Sampling and Sample Preparation Modifications for Soil Containing Metallic Residues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Depth Interval Number of Increments per Sample Field Implementation Sample Tool Selection Collection of Soil Sample Sample Processing Air Drying...86 159 29 Palms (CA)4 IA  Artillery/ Bombing 100 6 100 x 100 RDX 9.4 3.9 4.8 5.6 2.1 38 Hill AFB (UT)5 TTA  Thermal treatment 100 3 100 x 100...representation of the overall experimental design. Soil samples were transported to CRREL and air -dried on alumi- num trays. Once air -dried, each

  15. Preparing monodisperse macromolecular samples for successful biological small-angle X-ray and neutron-scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Cy M; Graewert, Melissa A; Blanchet, Clément E; Langley, David B; Whitten, Andrew E; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2016-11-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are techniques used to extract structural parameters and determine the overall structures and shapes of biological macromolecules, complexes and assemblies in solution. The scattering intensities measured from a sample contain contributions from all atoms within the illuminated sample volume, including the solvent and buffer components, as well as the macromolecules of interest. To obtain structural information, it is essential to prepare an exactly matched solvent blank so that background scattering contributions can be accurately subtracted from the sample scattering to obtain the net scattering from the macromolecules in the sample. In addition, sample heterogeneity caused by contaminants, aggregates, mismatched solvents, radiation damage or other factors can severely influence and complicate data analysis, so it is essential that the samples be pure and monodisperse for the duration of the experiment. This protocol outlines the basic physics of SAXS and SANS, and it reveals how the underlying conceptual principles of the techniques ultimately 'translate' into practical laboratory guidance for the production of samples of sufficiently high quality for scattering experiments. The procedure describes how to prepare and characterize protein and nucleic acid samples for both SAXS and SANS using gel electrophoresis, size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and light scattering. Also included are procedures that are specific to X-rays (in-line SEC-SAXS) and neutrons, specifically preparing samples for contrast matching or variation experiments and deuterium labeling of proteins.

  16. Matrix compatible solid phase microextraction coating, a greener approach to sample preparation in vegetable matrices.

    PubMed

    Naccarato, Attilio; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    This work proposes the novel PDMS/DVB/PDMS fiber as a greener strategy for analysis by direct immersion solid phase microextraction (SPME) in vegetables. SPME is an established sample preparation approach that has not yet been adequately explored for food analysis in direct immersion mode due to the limitations of the available commercial coatings. The robustness and endurance of this new coating were investigated by direct immersion extractions in raw blended vegetables without any further sample preparation steps. The PDMS/DVB/PDMS coating exhibited superior features related to the capability of the external PDMS layer to protect the commercial coating, and showed improvements in terms of extraction capability and in the cleanability of the coating surface. In addition to having contributed to the recognition of the superior features of this new fiber concept before commercialization, the outcomes of this work serve to confirm advancements in the matrix compatibility of the PDMS-modified fiber, and open new prospects for the development of greener high-throughput analytical methods in food analysis using solid phase microextraction in the near future.

  17. Current trends and challenges in sample preparation for metallic nanoparticles analysis in daily products and environmental samples: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Calle, Inmaculada; Menta, Mathieu; Séby, Fabienne

    2016-11-01

    Due to the increasing use of nanoparticles (NPs) in consumer products, it becomes necessary to develop different strategies for their detection, identification, characterization and quantification in a wide variety of samples. Since the analysis of NPs in consumer products and environmental samples is particularly troublesome, a detailed description of challenges and limitations is given here. This review mainly focuses on sample preparation procedures applied for the mostly used techniques for metallic and metal oxide NPs characterization in consumer products and most outstanding publications of biological and environmental samples (from 2006 to 2015). We summarize the procedures applied for total metal content, extraction/separation and/or preconcentration of NPs from the matrix, separation of metallic NPs from their ions or from larger particles and NPs' size fractionation. Sample preparation procedures specifically for microscopy are also described. Selected applications in cosmetics, food, other consumer products, biological tissues and environmental samples are presented. Advantages and inconveniences of those procedures are considered. Moreover, selected simplified schemes for NPs sample preparation, as well as usual techniques applied are included. Finally, promising directions for further investigations are discussed.

  18. A multi-step transmission electron microscopy sample preparation technique for cracked, heavily damaged, brittle materials.

    PubMed

    Weiss Brennan, Claire V; Walck, Scott D; Swab, Jeffrey J

    2014-12-01

    A new technique for the preparation of heavily cracked, heavily damaged, brittle materials for examination in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is described in detail. In this study, cross-sectional TEM samples were prepared from indented silicon carbide (SiC) bulk ceramics, although this technique could also be applied to other brittle and/or multiphase materials. During TEM sample preparation, milling-induced damage must be minimized, since in studying deformation mechanisms, it would be difficult to distinguish deformation-induced cracking from cracking occurring due to the sample preparation. The samples were prepared using a site-specific, two-step ion milling sequence accompanied by epoxy vacuum infiltration into the cracks. This technique allows the heavily cracked, brittle ceramic material to stay intact during sample preparation and also helps preserve the true microstructure of the cracked area underneath the indent. Some preliminary TEM results are given and discussed in regards to deformation studies in ceramic materials. This sample preparation technique could be applied to other cracked and/or heavily damaged materials, including geological materials, archaeological materials, fatigued materials, and corrosion samples.

  19. Additional of polyethylene glycol on the preparation of LaPO4:Eu3+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panatarani, Camellia; Joni, I. Made

    2013-09-01

    Solution phase method was used to synthesis nanocrystal LaPO4:Eu3+. Polyethylene glycol with vary molecular weight (MW) was added to allow an exothermic reaction to get a high crystalinity of LaPO4:Eu3+. The x-ray pattern of as prepared LaPO4 was obtained by using an X'pert PANalytical diffractometer with CuKα radiation (λ = 1.5406 Å) and the photoluminescent measurement spectra is obtained by using Fluorescence Spectrometer LS55, Perkin Elmer. The additional of various MW of polyethylene glycol into the precursor solution of LaPO4:Eu3+ affected the crystal structure and luminescent properties. Higher MW of PEG depressing the luminescent spectra. The emission origin from 5D0-7F4 transition vanished by additional 500,000 and 2,000,000 MW of PEG.

  20. Study of exhaled breath condensate sample preparation for metabolomics analysis by LC-MS/MS in high resolution mode.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Peralbo, M A; Calderón Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolomic analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) requires an unavoidable sample preparation step because of the low concentration of its components, and potential cleanup for possible interferents. Sample preparation based on protein precipitation (PP), solid-phase extraction (SPE) by hydrophilic and lipophilic sorbents or lyophilization has demonstrated that the analytical sample from the last is largely the best because lyophilization allows reconstitution in a volume as small as required (preconcentration factors up to 80-times with respect to the original sample), thus doubling the number of detected compounds as compared with the other alternatives (47 versus 25). In addition, PP and/or SPE cleanup are unnecessary as no effect from the EBC components removed by these steps appears in the chromatograms. The total 49 EBC compounds tentatively identified and confirmed by MS/MS in this research include amino acids, fatty acids, fatty amides, fatty aldehydes, sphingoid bases, oxoanionic compounds, imidazoles, hydroxy acids and aliphatic acyclic acids.

  1. Automation of sample preparation for mass cytometry barcoding in support of clinical research: protocol optimization.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Ala F; Wisnewski, Adam V; Raddassi, Khadir

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of multiplexed assays is highly important for clinical diagnostics and other analytical applications. Mass cytometry enables multi-dimensional, single-cell analysis of cell type and state. In mass cytometry, the rare earth metals used as reporters on antibodies allow determination of marker expression in individual cells. Barcode-based bioassays for CyTOF are able to encode and decode for different experimental conditions or samples within the same experiment, facilitating progress in producing straightforward and consistent results. Herein, an integrated protocol for automated sample preparation for barcoding used in conjunction with mass cytometry for clinical bioanalysis samples is described; we offer results of our work with barcoding protocol optimization. In addition, we present some points to be considered in order to minimize the variability of quantitative mass cytometry measurements. For example, we discuss the importance of having multiple populations during titration of the antibodies and effect of storage and shipping of labelled samples on the stability of staining for purposes of CyTOF analysis. Data quality is not affected when labelled samples are stored either frozen or at 4 °C and used within 10 days; we observed that cell loss is greater if cells are washed with deionized water prior to shipment or are shipped in lower concentration. Once the labelled samples for CyTOF are suspended in deionized water, the analysis should be performed expeditiously, preferably within the first hour. Damage can be minimized if the cells are resuspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) rather than deionized water while waiting for data acquisition.

  2. Novel techniques of preparing TEM samples for characterization of irradiation damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H K; Long, F; Yao, Z; Daymond, M R

    2013-12-01

    Focus ion beam preparation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples has become increasingly popular due to the relative ease of extraction of TEM foils from specific locations within a larger sample. However the sputtering damage induced by Ga ion bombardment in focus ion beam means that traditional electropolishing may be a preferable method. First, we describe a special electropolishing method for the preparation of irregular TEM samples from ex-service nuclear reactor components, spring-shaped spacers. This method has also been used to prepare samples from a nonirradiated component for a TEM in situ heavy ion irradiation study. Because the specimen size is small (0.7 × 0.7 × 3 mm), a sandwich installation is adopted to obtain high quality polishing. Second, we describe some modifications to a conventional TEM cross-section sample preparation method that employs Ni electroplating. There are limitations to this method when preparing cross-section samples from either (1) metals which are difficult to activate for electroplating, or (2) a heavy ion irradiated foil with a very shallow damage layer close to the surface, which may be affected by the electroplating process. As a consequence, a novel technique for preparing cross-section samples was developed and is described.

  3. Influence of preparation conditions on 211 particle refinement in YBCO bulk superconductors with Ce addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diko, Pavel; Volochová, Daniela; Radušovská, Monika; Zmorayová, Katarína; Šefčiková, Martina; Antal, Vitalij; Jurek, Karel; Jirsa, Miloš; Kováč, Jozef

    2013-11-01

    The influence of CeO2 and BaCeO3 addition and the influence of processing conditions on Y2BaCuO5 (Y211) particle size and particle distribution in melt-processed YBa2Cu3O7/Y2BaCuO5 (Y123/Y211) bulk superconductors with nominal composition Y1.5Ba2Cu3Ox was investigated. Ce dissolved in the peritectic melt can actively hinder the Y211 particle growth by the Ostwald ripening process at melting stage. At sintering of intensively milled samples, Y211 particles in the charge free of CeO2 are smaller than Y211 particles formed in the charge with CeO2 addition and this behaviour can be related to the melt formation around added CeO2. The Y211 particle refinement in the mildly milled samples with large Y123 particles in the pressed green bodies is caused by very dense Y211 skeleton resistant to melt formation at the sintering stage. This skeleton is a barrier for pollution of the sample from the substrate and from the seed. BaCeO3 added instead CeO2 causes significant Y211 particle refinement also in the samples with homogenously distributed Y211 particles.

  4. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Furthermore, precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  5. Microwave-assisted sample preparation of coal and coal fly ash for subsequent metal determination

    SciTech Connect

    Srogi, K.

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this paper is to review microwave-assisted digestion of coal and coal fly ash. A brief description of microwave heating principles is presented. Microwave-assisted digestion appears currently to be the most popular preparation technique, possibly due to the comparatively rapid sample preparation and the reduction of contamination, compared to the conventional hot-plate digestion methods.

  6. In-Situ Sample Preparation Development for Extraterrestrial Life Detection and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, K. L.; Bradburne, C.; Tiffany, J.; Hagedon, M.; Hibbitts, C.; Vandegriff, J.; Horst, S.

    2017-02-01

    In-situ life detection instrumentation require robust sample preparation techniques that need further development in the coming years to enable the exciting life discoveries we seek in both familiar and unfamiliar planetary environments.

  7. Preparation of pure microbiological samples for pyrolysis gas-liquid chromatography studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxborrow, G. S.; Fields, N. D.; Puleo, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Bacterial samples were prepared for pyrolysis gas-liquid chromatography using cells grown on membrane filters. Pyrochromatograms were reproducible when cells harvested from the filters were pyrolyzed without being washed.

  8. Sample preparation with solid phase microextraction and exhaustive extraction approaches: Comparison for challenging cases.

    PubMed

    Boyacı, Ezel; Rodríguez-Lafuente, Ángel; Gorynski, Krzysztof; Mirnaghi, Fatemeh; Souza-Silva, Érica A; Hein, Dietmar; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-05-11

    In chemical analysis, sample preparation is frequently considered the bottleneck of the entire analytical method. The success of the final method strongly depends on understanding the entire process of analysis of a particular type of analyte in a sample, namely: the physicochemical properties of the analytes (solubility, volatility, polarity etc.), the environmental conditions, and the matrix components of the sample. Various sample preparation strategies have been developed based on exhaustive or non-exhaustive extraction of analytes from matrices. Undoubtedly, amongst all sample preparation approaches, liquid extraction, including liquid-liquid (LLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE), are the most well-known, widely used, and commonly accepted methods by many international organizations and accredited laboratories. Both methods are well documented and there are many well defined procedures, which make them, at first sight, the methods of choice. However, many challenging tasks, such as complex matrix applications, on-site and in vivo applications, and determination of matrix-bound and free concentrations of analytes, are not easily attainable with these classical approaches for sample preparation. In the last two decades, the introduction of solid phase microextraction (SPME) has brought significant progress in the sample preparation area by facilitating on-site and in vivo applications, time weighted average (TWA) and instantaneous concentration determinations. Recently introduced matrix compatible coatings for SPME facilitate direct extraction from complex matrices and fill the gap in direct sampling from challenging matrices. Following introduction of SPME, numerous other microextraction approaches evolved to address limitations of the above mentioned techniques. There is not a single method that can be considered as a universal solution for sample preparation. This review aims to show the main advantages and limitations of the above mentioned sample

  9. Inert sampling and sample preparation--the influence of oxygen on heavy metal mobility in river sediments.

    PubMed

    Einax, J W; Nischwitz, V

    2001-11-01

    Two approaches have been used to investigate changes in the nature of metal binding in river sediments caused by atmospheric oxygen. Firstly, non-inert and inert sample preparation were applied, in combination with sequential extraction, to determine for which metals inert sample preparation is necessary for correct determination of metal mobility under environmental conditions. Secondly, the metal contents of sediments sampled before and after a river weir were fractionated by sequential extraction to study the effect of the oxygen impact at the weir on heavy metal mobility in the sediments. Different grain-size fractions from one sample were also extracted, to enable selection of the upper grain-size limit most suitable for answering this analytical question. The results showed the need for the inert sample preparation technique for Cd, Zn, Pb, Mn, and Fe, but not for Co, Ni, Cu, and Cr. No significant change of heavy metal mobility at the weir could be proved, although the mobilization behavior of some elements was different. The optimum upper grain-size limit was 63 microm.

  10. Sample preparation method for glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses yields higher seam strength

    SciTech Connect

    Cvecek, K.; Miyamoto, I.; Strauss, J.; Wolf, M.; Frick, T.; Schmidt, M.

    2011-05-01

    Glass welding by ultrashort laser pulses allows joining without the need of an absorber or a preheating and postheating process. However, cracks generated during the welding process substantially impair the joining strength of the welding seams. In this paper a sample preparation method is described that prevents the formation of cracks. The measured joining strength of samples prepared by this method is substantially higher than previously reported values.

  11. Preparation and Characterization of SN-38-Encapsulated Phytantriol Cubosomes Containing α-Monoglyceride Additives.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ashraf; Noguchi, Shuji; Iwao, Yasunori; Oka, Toshihiko; Itai, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    SN-38 is a potent active metabolite of irinotecan that has been considered as an anticancer candidate. However, the clinical development of this compound has been hampered by its poor aqueous solubility and chemical instability. In this study, we developed SN-38-encapsulated cubosomes to resolve these problems. Six α-monoglyceride additives, comprising monocaprylin, monocaprin, monolaurin, monomyristin, monopalmitin, and monostearin, were used to prepare phytantriol (PHYT) cubosomes by probe sonication. The mean particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential values of these systems were around 190-230 nm, 0.19-0.25 and -17 to -22 mV, respectively. Small-angle X-ray scattering analyses confirmed that the SN-38-encapsulated cubosomes existed in the Pn̄3m space group both with and without the additives. The monoglyceride additives led to around a two-fold increase in the solubility of SN-38 compared with the PHYT cubosome. The drug entrapment efficiency of PHYT cubosomes with additives was greater than 97%. The results of a stability study at 25°C showed no dramatic changes in the particle size or polydispersity index characteristics, with at least 85% of the SN-38 existing in its active lactone form after 10 d, demonstrating the high stability of the cubosome nanoparticles. Furthermore, approximately 55% of SN-38 was slowly released from the cubosomes with additives over 96 h in vitro under physiological conditions. Taken together, these results show that the SN-38-encapsulated PHYT cubosome particles are promising drug carriers that should be considered for further in vivo experiments, including drug delivery to tumor cells using the enhanced permeability and retention effect.

  12. Optimisation of a sample preparation method for the determination of fumonisin B(1) in rice.

    PubMed

    Petrarca, Mateus Henrique; Rodrigues, Maria Isabel; Rossi, Elizeu Antonio; de Sylos, Célia Maria

    2014-09-01

    A simple, rapid and cost-effective sample preparation method for the determination of fumonisin B1 in rice was optimised using a strategy of sequential experimental designs. Initially, a Plackett-Burman design was applied to select the statistically significant variables for the determination of fumonisin B1, and then, a central composite rotatable design was used to define the optimal conditions of these variables. The method involves extraction with a 50% acetonitrile aqueous solution and glacial acetic acid, liquid-liquid partitioning with addition of anhydrous sodium sulphate and sodium chloride, followed by dispersive SPE clean-up with diatomaceous earth. The final extract was analysed by HPLC-FLD after precolumn derivatisation with ortho-phthaldialdehyde. The optimised method was validated for selectivity, linearity, matrix effect, limits of detection and quantification, trueness, and precision, and then applied to commercial samples of polished rice. This is the first report of the occurrence of fumonisin B1 in commercial samples of polished rice from the Southeast region of Brazil.

  13. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 2, Sample preparation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for sample preparation methods. Covered are: acid digestion for metals analysis, fusion of Hanford tank waste solids, water leach of sludges/soils/other solids, extraction procedure toxicity (simulate leach in landfill), sample preparation for gamma spectroscopy, acid digestion for radiochemical analysis, leach preparation of solids for free cyanide analysis, aqueous leach of solids for anion analysis, microwave digestion of glasses and slurries for ICP/MS, toxicity characteristic leaching extraction for inorganics, leach/dissolution of activated metal for radiochemical analysis, extraction of single-shell tank (SST) samples for semi-VOC analysis, preparation and cleanup of hydrocarbon- containing samples for VOC and semi-VOC analysis, receiving of waste tank samples in onsite transfer cask, receipt and inspection of SST samples, receipt and extrusion of core samples at 325A shielded facility, cleaning and shipping of waste tank samplers, homogenization of solutions/slurries/sludges, and test sample preparation for bioassay quality control program.

  14. Proteomic Challenges: Sample Preparation Techniques for Microgram-Quantity Protein Analysis from Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Feist, Peter; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins regulate many cellular functions and analyzing the presence and abundance of proteins in biological samples are central focuses in proteomics. The discovery and validation of biomarkers, pathways, and drug targets for various diseases can be accomplished using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. However, with mass-limited samples like tumor biopsies, it can be challenging to obtain sufficient amounts of proteins to generate high-quality mass spectrometric data. Techniques developed for macroscale quantities recover sufficient amounts of protein from milligram quantities of starting material, but sample losses become crippling with these techniques when only microgram amounts of material are available. To combat this challenge, proteomicists have developed micro-scale techniques that are compatible with decreased sample size (100 μg or lower) and still enable excellent proteome coverage. Extraction, contaminant removal, protein quantitation, and sample handling techniques for the microgram protein range are reviewed here, with an emphasis on liquid chromatography and bottom-up mass spectrometry-compatible techniques. Also, a range of biological specimens, including mammalian tissues and model cell culture systems, are discussed. PMID:25664860

  15. On the asymptotic improvement of supervised learning by utilizing additional unlabeled samples - Normal mixture density case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahshahani, Behzad M.; Landgrebe, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of additional unlabeled samples in improving the supervised learning process is studied in this paper. Three learning processes. supervised, unsupervised, and combined supervised-unsupervised, are compared by studying the asymptotic behavior of the estimates obtained under each process. Upper and lower bounds on the asymptotic covariance matrices are derived. It is shown that under a normal mixture density assumption for the probability density function of the feature space, the combined supervised-unsupervised learning is always superior to the supervised learning in achieving better estimates. Experimental results are provided to verify the theoretical concepts.

  16. Sample Preparation and Identification of Biological, Chemical and Mid-Spectrum Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    mL sterile PBS. Form a suspension by vigorous agitation using a vortex mixer for 10-15 seconds. Soil and Other Solid Environmental Samples. To 5...grams of sample add two equivalent volumes of sterile PBS. Form a suspension by vigorous agitation on vortex mixer for 10-15 seconds. Filter sample...Micro-Extraction Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is a relatively new analytical technique. It can combine sample preparation and GC or LC analysis in

  17. Multiplex short tandem repeat amplification of low template DNA samples with the addition of proofreading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Carey P; Chelland, Lynzee A; Pavlova, Victoria R; Illescas, María J; Brown, Kelly L; Cruz, Tracey Dawson

    2011-05-01

    With <100 pg of template DNA, routine short tandem repeat (STR) analysis often fails, resulting in no or partial profiles and increased stochastic effects. To overcome this, some have investigated preamplification methods that include the addition of proofreading enzymes to the PCR cocktail. This project sought to determine whether adding proofreading polymerases directly in the STR amplification mixture would improve the reaction when little template DNA is available. Platinum Taq High Fidelity and GeneAmp High Fidelity were tested in Profiler Plus™ STR reactions alone and in combination with AmpliTaq(®) Gold. All reactions included the additional step of a post-PCR purification step. With both pristine low template DNA and casework samples, the addition of these polymerases resulted in comparable or no improvement in the STR amplification signal. Further, stochastic effects and artifacts were observed equally across all enzyme conditions. Based on these studies, the addition of these proofreading enzymes to a multiplex STR amplification is not recommended for low template DNA work.

  18. Falcon: Visual analysis of large, irregularly sampled, and multivariate time series data in additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Steed, Chad A.; Halsey, William; Dehoff, Ryan; ...

    2017-02-16

    Flexible visual analysis of long, high-resolution, and irregularly sampled time series data from multiple sensor streams is a challenge in several domains. In the field of additive manufacturing, this capability is critical for realizing the full potential of large-scale 3D printers. Here, we propose a visual analytics approach that helps additive manufacturing researchers acquire a deep understanding of patterns in log and imagery data collected by 3D printers. Our specific goals include discovering patterns related to defects and system performance issues, optimizing build configurations to avoid defects, and increasing production efficiency. We introduce Falcon, a new visual analytics system thatmore » allows users to interactively explore large, time-oriented data sets from multiple linked perspectives. Falcon provides overviews, detailed views, and unique segmented time series visualizations, all with adjustable scale options. To illustrate the effectiveness of Falcon at providing thorough and efficient knowledge discovery, we present a practical case study involving experts in additive manufacturing and data from a large-scale 3D printer. The techniques described are applicable to the analysis of any quantitative time series, though the focus of this paper is on additive manufacturing.« less

  19. Magnetic separation techniques in sample preparation for biological analysis: a review.

    PubMed

    He, Jincan; Huang, Meiying; Wang, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhuomin; Li, Gongke

    2014-12-01

    Sample preparation is a fundamental and essential step in almost all the analytical procedures, especially for the analysis of complex samples like biological and environmental samples. In past decades, with advantages of superparamagnetic property, good biocompatibility and high binding capacity, functionalized magnetic materials have been widely applied in various processes of sample preparation for biological analysis. In this paper, the recent advancements of magnetic separation techniques based on magnetic materials in the field of sample preparation for biological analysis were reviewed. The strategy of magnetic separation techniques was summarized. The synthesis, stabilization and bio-functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles were reviewed in detail. Characterization of magnetic materials was also summarized. Moreover, the applications of magnetic separation techniques for the enrichment of protein, nucleic acid, cell, bioactive compound and immobilization of enzyme were described. Finally, the existed problems and possible trends of magnetic separation techniques for biological analysis in the future were proposed.

  20. Sample preparation for mass spectrometry imaging: small mistakes can lead to big consequences.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Richard J A

    2012-08-30

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables the direct analysis of molecules from the surface of a wide variety of samples, allowing the multiplex measurement of both abundance and distribution of small molecules, lipids, peptides and proteins. As the technology has been refined an increasing number of ionization methods and mass analyzers has been used that enable increased spatial and spectral resolution measurements to be made at an increased speed. Alongside the instrumentation improvements there has been optimization of sample preparation procedures that allow the highest quality data to be obtained, reproducibly, from an ever increasing diversity of samples. This review will consider the development and standardization of sample preparation methods applicable to MSI, describing the stages and procedures undertaken from the instance of sample collection, through storage, preparation and on through final processing prior to analysis. Recent technical advancements will be highlighted and areas where further experimentation and optimization may well be required will be described. All aspects of the sample preparation pipeline will be considered in detail, with examples from the literature used to emphasize why rigorous sample preparation for MSI is vital to achieve the most accurate, reproducible and validated MSI data possible.

  1. Sample preparation for thermo-gravimetric determination and thermo-gravimetric characterization of refuse derived fuel.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T; Bronson, B; Gogolek, P; Mehrani, P

    2016-02-01

    Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) is a useful method for characterizing fuels. In the past it has been applied to the study of refuse derived fuel (RDF) and related materials. However, the heterogeneity of RDF makes the preparation of small representative samples very difficult and this difficulty has limited the effectiveness of TGA for characterization of RDF. A TGA method was applied to a variety of materials prepared from a commercially available RDF using a variety of procedures. Applicability of TGA method to the determination of the renewable content of RDF was considered. Cryogenic ball milling was found to be an effective means of preparing RDF samples for TGA. When combined with an effective sample preparation, TGA could be used as an alternative method for assessing the renewable content of RDF.

  2. Refining of Military Jet Fuels from Shale Oil. Volume I. Part II. Preparation of Laboratory-Scale Fuel Samples.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Sulfide Hydrog . Hydrogenated xix t ABBREVIATIONS (CONT’D) IBP initial Boiling Point 1.0. inside Diameter in Inches JP-4 military Specification MIL-T...were prepared in addition to a combined JP-4/JP-8 type of fuel. These samples were provided with a range of aromatics content and freeze point...slate of fuels shall include motor gasoline , aviation turbine fuels (grade JP-4 or JP-8 and grade JP-5), diesel fuel, diesel fuel marine and residual

  3. Statistical inference for the additive hazards model under outcome-dependent sampling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jichang; Liu, Yanyan; Sandler, Dale P; Zhou, Haibo

    2015-09-01

    Cost-effective study design and proper inference procedures for data from such designs are always of particular interests to study investigators. In this article, we propose a biased sampling scheme, an outcome-dependent sampling (ODS) design for survival data with right censoring under the additive hazards model. We develop a weighted pseudo-score estimator for the regression parameters for the proposed design and derive the asymptotic properties of the proposed estimator. We also provide some suggestions for using the proposed method by evaluating the relative efficiency of the proposed method against simple random sampling design and derive the optimal allocation of the subsamples for the proposed design. Simulation studies show that the proposed ODS design is more powerful than other existing designs and the proposed estimator is more efficient than other estimators. We apply our method to analyze a cancer study conducted at NIEHS, the Cancer Incidence and Mortality of Uranium Miners Study, to study the risk of radon exposure to cancer.

  4. Statistical inference for the additive hazards model under outcome-dependent sampling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jichang; Liu, Yanyan; Sandler, Dale P.; Zhou, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective study design and proper inference procedures for data from such designs are always of particular interests to study investigators. In this article, we propose a biased sampling scheme, an outcome-dependent sampling (ODS) design for survival data with right censoring under the additive hazards model. We develop a weighted pseudo-score estimator for the regression parameters for the proposed design and derive the asymptotic properties of the proposed estimator. We also provide some suggestions for using the proposed method by evaluating the relative efficiency of the proposed method against simple random sampling design and derive the optimal allocation of the subsamples for the proposed design. Simulation studies show that the proposed ODS design is more powerful than other existing designs and the proposed estimator is more efficient than other estimators. We apply our method to analyze a cancer study conducted at NIEHS, the Cancer Incidence and Mortality of Uranium Miners Study, to study the risk of radon exposure to cancer. PMID:26379363

  5. Reducing Spatial Heterogeneity of MALDI Samples with Marangoni Flows During Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yin-Hung; Cai, Yi-Hong; Lee, Hsun; Ou, Yu-Meng; Hsiao, Chih-Hao; Tsao, Chien-Wei; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Wang, Yi-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates a method to prepare homogeneous distributions of analytes to improve data reproducibility in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS). Natural-air drying processes normally result in unwanted heterogeneous spatial distributions of analytes in MALDI crystals and make quantitative analysis difficult. This study demonstrates that inducing Marangoni flows within drying droplets can significantly reduce the heterogeneity problem. The Marangoni flows are accelerated by changing substrate temperatures to create temperature gradients across droplets. Such hydrodynamic flows are analyzed semi-empirically. Using imaging mass spectrometry, changes of heterogeneity of molecules with the change of substrate temperature during drying processes are demonstrated. The observed heterogeneities of the biomolecules reduce as predicted Marangoni velocities increase. In comparison to conventional methods, drying droplets on a 5 °C substrate while keeping the surroundings at ambient conditions typically reduces the heterogeneity of biomolecular ions by 65%-80%. The observation suggests that decreasing substrate temperature during droplet drying processes is a simple and effective means to reduce analyte heterogeneity for quantitative applications. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  6. Preparation and analysis of standardized waste samples for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, J. L.; Browner, R.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation and analysis of standardized waste samples for controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) are considered. Analysis of samples from wet oxidation experiments, the development of ion chromatographic techniques utilizing conventional high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment, and an investigation of techniques for interfacing an ion chromatograph (IC) with an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICPOES) are discussed.

  7. 40 CFR 205.171-2 - Test exhaust system sample selection and preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test exhaust system sample selection... (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems § 205.171-2 Test exhaust system sample selection and preparation. (a)(1) Exhaust...

  8. Influence of rice sample preparation and milling procedures on milling quality appraisals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of sample preparation and milling procedure on milling quality appraisals of rough rice. Samples of freshly harvested medium-grain rice (M202) with different initial moisture contents (MCs) ranging from 20.2% to 25.1% (w.b.) were used for...

  9. Spectral Reproducibility and Quantification of Peptides in MALDI of Samples Prepared by Micro-Spotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Yong Jin; Park, Kyung Man; Ahn, Sung Hee; Moon, Jeong Hee; Kim, Myung Soo

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we reported that MALDI spectra of peptides became reproducible when temperature was kept constant. Linear calibration curves derived from such spectral data could be used for quantification. Homogeneity of samples was one of the requirements. Among the three popular matrices used in peptide MALDI [i.e., α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), and sinapinic acid (SA)], homogeneous samples could be prepared by conventional means only for CHCA. In this work, we showed that sample preparation by micro-spotting improved the homogeneity for all three cases.

  10. A combinatorial sample-preparation robot system using the volumetric-weighing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suehara, S.; Konishi, T.; Fujimoto, K.; Takeda, T.; Fukuda, M.; Koike, M.; Inoue, S.; Watanabe, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a new automatic sample-preparation robot system with use of the volumetric-weighing method. In this system, slurries, aqueous solutions, and other wet reagents are employed as starting materials and 64 ( 8×8) samples at the maximum are prepared on a library plate of 35 mm × 35 mm size. Volumetric-weighing and mixing of the starting materials and distributing reaction mixtures to the library plate are automatically performed by computer-controlled mechanisms with an easy-to-use programming software interface. While this robot is designed in terms of space saving and portability, it is able to equip with an atmosphere-controlled furnace to sinter the samples on the library plate. Typical preparation time for a library plate of 36 ( 6×6) samples is less than 40 min. This robot system is promising in enhancing throughput of wet-chemically synthesized materials researches.

  11. Preparation and characterization of microporous fibers for sample preparation and LC-MS determination of drugs.

    PubMed

    Buszewski, Boguslaw; Nowaczyk, Jacek; Ligor, Tomasz; Olszowy, Pawel; Ligor, Magdalena; Wasiniak, Bartlomiej; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen K; Amann, Anton

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation of polypyrrole (PPy) fibers for solid phase microextraction (SPME). PPy coatings were obtained during the electrochemical polymerization process. The utility of various metal wires (Fe, Cu, Ag, Cu/Ag, kanthal and medical stainless steel) as a support for polymers was compared. Various experimental conditions of the synthesis process such as scan rate, voltage limits and number of scans and deposition time were applied. The average polymer thickness was in the range of 7-125 microm and its weight was in the scope of 0.65-5.6 mg. Different techniques, mainly elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, microscopy, and chromatography were performed for the characterization of obtained fibers with microporous structure. The extraction efficiency of cardiovascular drugs (metoprolol, propranolol, oxprenolol, propafenone and mexiletine) by means of fibers was tested. The concentration of mentioned compounds in standard solution was in the span of 10-150 ng/mL. LC-MS was employed for determination of drugs in desorption solution. LODs varied from 0.013 to 1.51 ng/mL for metoprolol and mexiletine respectively. The repeatability of extraction was obtained with the RSD values lower than 10%.

  12. Impact of sample preparation on mineralogical analysis of zero-valent iron reactive barrier materials

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Debra Helen; Gu, Baohua; Watson, David B; Roh, Yul

    2003-03-01

    Permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) of zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) are increasingly being used to remediate contaminated ground water. Corrosion of Fe{sup 0} filings and the formation of precipitates can occur when the PRB material comes in contact with ground water and may reduce the lifespan and effectiveness of the barrier. At present, there are no routine procedures for preparing and analyzing the mineral precipitates from Fe{sup 0} PRB material. These procedures are needed because mineralogical composition of corrosion products used to interpret the barrier processes can change with iron oxidation and sample preparation. The objectives of this study were (i) to investigate a method of preparing Fe{sup 0} reactive barrier material for mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and (ii) to identify Fe mineral phases and rates of transformations induced by different mineralogical preparation techniques. Materials from an in situ Fe{sup 0} PRB were collected by undisturbed coring and processed for XRD analysis after different times since sampling for three size fractions and by various drying treatments. We found that whole-sample preparation for analysis was necessary because mineral precipitates occurred within the PRB material in different size fractions of the samples. Green rusts quickly disappeared from acetone-dried samples and were not present in air-dried and oven-dried samples. Maghemite/magnetite content increased over time and in oven-dried samples, especially after heating to 105 C. We conclude that care must be taken during sample preparation of Fe{sup 0} PRB material, especially for detection of green rusts, to ensure accurate identification of minerals present within the barrier system.

  13. Design and construction of a sample preparation chamber for atomic beam scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, C.

    1992-05-18

    A new type of atomic beam scattering spectrometer was built to advance the usefulness of the atomic beam scattering technique as a surface dynamics probe. The facility was not only built to investigate the typical alkali halide samples such as NaCl, NaF, and LiF, but also to investigate metallic surfaces. Metal samples are more complicated to study, due to their reactive surfaces and the sample preparation process. A surface analysis chamber was constructed as an attachment to the scattering facility to treat samples under ultra high vacuum (UHV) and then transfer these samples into the scattering facility. This surface analysis chamber is referred to as the sample preparation chamber and is the basis for this thesis.

  14. Detection of genetically modified crops and their derivatives: critical steps in sample preparation and extraction.

    PubMed

    Terry, Catherine F; Harris, Neil; Parkes, Helen C

    2002-01-01

    The detection of genetically modified crops in foodstuff relies on detection of transgenic DNA or protein material in the sample matrix. Purified DNA or proteins are used as analytical material for polymerase chain reaction technologies and immunodiagnostics. Successful sample preparation is critical to the validity of subsequent analysis. For routine analysis, a good sample preparation technique should be simple, safe, and inexpensive while reproducibly generating DNA/protein of sufficient quality and yield. The suitability of isolated DNA or protein as an analyte for a detection or characterization technique depends on amount or concentration, purity, and integrity, each of which may be influenced by sample matrix and the extraction technique, and, in turn, may impact the validity of analytical techniques. The key sample preparation steps of homogenization, pretreatment, extraction, and purification are discussed as well as typical analytical methods. Consideration is given to application of these steps for particular sample matrixes to maximize yield, reduce inhibition effects, and minimize contamination. The choice of the most appropriate and valid methods for sample preparation from particular foods is discussed with respect to DNA analysis. Attention is also given to ease of use, cost, and generic applicability of the procedures.

  15. Preparation of protein samples for mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Gary

    2014-01-01

    The preparation of protein samples for mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing is a key step in successfully identifying proteins. Mass spectrometry is a very sensitive technique, and as such, samples must be prepared carefully since they can be subject to contamination of the sample (e.g., due to incomplete subcellular fractionation or purification of a multiprotein complex), overwhelming of the sample by highly abundant proteins, and contamination from skin or hair (keratin can be a very common hit). One goal of sample preparation for mass spec is to reduce the complexity of the sample - in the example presented here, mitochondria are purified, solubilized, and fractionated by sucrose density gradient sedimentation prior to preparative 1D SDS-PAGE. It is important to verify the purity and integrity of the sample so that you can have confidence in the hits obtained. More protein is needed for N-terminal sequencing and ideally it should be purified to a single band when run on an SDS-polyacrylamide gel. The example presented here involves stably expressing a tagged protein in HEK293 cells and then isolating the protein by affinity purification and SDS-PAGE.

  16. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Cancer.gov

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  17. Toward a Fieldable Atomic Mass Spectrometer for Safeguards Applications: Sample Preparation and Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Barinaga, Charles J.; Hager, George J.; Hart, Garret L.; Koppenaal, David W.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Jones, Sarah MH; Manard, Benjamin T.

    2014-10-31

    The International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA’s) long-term research and development plan calls for the development of new methods to detect misuse at nuclear fuel cycle facilities such as reprocessing and enrichment plants. At enrichment plants, for example, the IAEA’s contemporary safeguards approaches are based on a combination of routine and random inspections that include collection of UF6 samples from in-process material and selected cylinders for subsequent analyses. These analyses include destructive analysis (DA) in a laboratory (typically by mass spectrometry [MS]) for isotopic characterization, and environmental sampling (ES) for subsequent laboratory elemental and isotopic analysis (also both typically by MS). One area of new method development includes moving this kind of isotope ratio analytical capability for DA and ES activities into the field. Some of the reasons for these developments include timeliness of results, avoidance of hazardous material shipments, and guidance for additional sample collecting. However, this capability does not already exist for several reasons, such as that most lab-based chemical and instrumental methods rely on laboratory infrastructure (highly trained staff, power, space, hazardous material handling, etc.) and require significant amounts of consumables (power, compressed gases, etc.). In addition, there are no currently available, fieldable instruments for atomic or isotope ratio analysis. To address these issues, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and collaborator, Clemson University, are studying key areas that limit the fieldability of isotope ratio mass spectrometry for atomic ions: sample preparation and ionization, and reducing the physical size of a fieldable mass spectrometer. PNNL is seeking simple and robust techniques that could be effectively used by inspectors who may have no expertise in analytical MS. In this report, we present and describe the preliminary findings for three candidate

  18. Additive concentration effects on dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using monocalcium phosphate monohydrate and hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Santa Cruz Chavez, Grace; Alge, Daniel L; Chu, Tien-Min Gabriel

    2011-12-01

    In our previous study, we investigated the setting time, mechanical properties and microstructure of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate cements prepared using monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and hydroxyapatite (HA). Despite the use of sodium citrate as a setting regulator, setting occurs rapidly in the MCPM/HA system and further studies on other retardants are needed. In the present study, sodium pyrophosphate and sulfuric acid were tested to evaluate their effectiveness in maintaining workability of the cement paste. MCPM/HA cements at a powder to liquid ratio of 1.0 with sodium pyrophosphate and sulfuric acid at 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mM were manufactured and studied based on their setting time, mechanical and porosity properties, phase composition, and microstructure. These measurements were compared to our previous data using sodium citrate. The results showed that the additives have a dose-dependent effect on the setting time. Their order of efficiency is sodium pyrophosphate > sodium citrate > sulfuric acid. However, the sulfuric acid group exhibited the highest compressive strength (CS) compared to the other groups. A lack of correlation between the CS and the porosity of the cements suggested that a mechanism other than porosity reduction was responsible for the CS increase. Since x-ray diffraction analysis did not indicate an effect on composition, explanations based on calcium sulfate dihydrate formation and changes in microstructure were proposed based on scanning electron micrograph observations.

  19. A critical review of protocols for moss biomonitoring of atmospheric deposition: sampling and sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Fernández, J A; Boquete, M T; Carballeira, A; Aboal, J R

    2015-06-01

    Currently, the most important guideline for the application of the moss technique to monitor the atmospheric deposition of heavy metals is the "Heavy metals, nitrogen and POPs in European mosses: 2015 survey" published by the UNECE ICP Vegetation. Two main problems have been identified with this guideline: i) some of the recommendations regarding the methodological aspects involved in the application of the moss technique are not based on scientific criteria; and, ii) some recommendations in the manual are very vague and some aspects are even left out (e.g., elevation, distance to the coast). As a result there exists a high variability in the application of the protocol and many scientists adapt it to the specific conditions in the studied areas without evaluating how changes affect the results obtained. Therefore, in this article a total of 369 studies were reviewed including both methodological and application studies of the passive biomonitoring of the atmospheric deposition of heavy metals with terrestrial mosses. The results of this review have shown on the one hand, that none of the articles completely accomplished the ICP-Vegetation protocol suggestions, either because the information regarding some aspects was lacking or simply because the authors did not follow the manual suggestions. On the other hand, it was found that the results of methodological studies sometimes contradicted the ICP Vegetation manual recommendations. Thus, a new protocol in which each suggestion has been carefully and rigorously contrasted with the available literature has been proposed in this paper. In addition, practical and economic issues have also been considered and much more concise suggestions have been proposed which would facilitate its fulfilment in a more objective way.

  20. Sample preparation of energy materials for X-ray nanotomography with micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Camino, Fernando E; Wang, Jun

    2014-06-06

    X-ray nanotomography presents an unprecedented opportunity to study energy storage/conversion materials at nanometer scales in three dimensions, with both elemental and chemical sensitivity. A critical step in obtaining high-quality X-ray nanotomography data is reliable sample preparation to ensure that the entire sample fits within the field of view of the X-ray microscope. Although focused-ion-beam lift-out has previously been used for large sample (few to tens of microns) preparation, a difficult undercut and lift-out procedure results in a time-consuming sample preparation process. Herein, we propose a much simpler and direct sample preparation method to resolve the issues that block the view of the sample base after milling and during the lift-out process. This method is applied on a solid-oxide fuel cell and a lithium-ion battery electrode, before numerous critical 3D morphological parameters are extracted, which are highly relevant to their electrochemical performance. A broad application of this method for microstructure study with X-ray nanotomography is discussed and presented.

  1. High-throughput automated microfluidic sample preparation for accurate microbial genomics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soohong; De Jonghe, Joachim; Kulesa, Anthony B.; Feldman, David; Vatanen, Tommi; Bhattacharyya, Roby P.; Berdy, Brittany; Gomez, James; Nolan, Jill; Epstein, Slava; Blainey, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    Low-cost shotgun DNA sequencing is transforming the microbial sciences. Sequencing instruments are so effective that sample preparation is now the key limiting factor. Here, we introduce a microfluidic sample preparation platform that integrates the key steps in cells to sequence library sample preparation for up to 96 samples and reduces DNA input requirements 100-fold while maintaining or improving data quality. The general-purpose microarchitecture we demonstrate supports workflows with arbitrary numbers of reaction and clean-up or capture steps. By reducing the sample quantity requirements, we enabled low-input (∼10,000 cells) whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and soil micro-colonies with superior results. We also leveraged the enhanced throughput to sequence ∼400 clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa libraries and demonstrate excellent single-nucleotide polymorphism detection performance that explained phenotypically observed antibiotic resistance. Fully-integrated lab-on-chip sample preparation overcomes technical barriers to enable broader deployment of genomics across many basic research and translational applications. PMID:28128213

  2. Two-in-one sample preparation for plan-view TEM.

    PubMed

    Sáfrán, György; Szász, Noémi; Sáfrán, Eszter

    2015-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample preparation requires special skills, it is time consuming and costly, hence, an increase of the efficiency is of primary importance. This article describes a method that duplicates the yield of the conventional mechanical and ion beam preparation of plan-view TEM samples. As a modification of the usual procedures, instead of one two different samples are comprised in a single specimen. The two pre-cut slabs, one from each samples, are embedded side by side in the window of a 3 mm dia Ti disk and the specimen is thinned mechanically and by ion milling until perforation that occurs at the interface of the two different slabs. That, with proper implementation, provides acceptable size thin area for the TEM study of both samples. The suitability of the two-in-one method has been confirmed through examples.

  3. [Preparation of samples for proficiency testing of pesticide residue analysis in processed foods].

    PubMed

    Okihashi, Masahiro; Osakada, Masakazu; Uchida, Kotaro; Nagayoshi, Haruna; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kakimoto, Kensaku; Nakayama, Yukiko; Obana, Hirotaka

    2010-01-01

    To conduct proficiency testing for the analysis of pesticide residues in processed foods, fortified samples of retort curry and pancake were examined. In the case of retort curry, heating and mixing were necessary at the time of preparation to provide a homogenous analytical sample. A mixture of 4 carbamates and 11 organophosphorus pesticides was spiked and 14 of them showed consistent results in the samples. In the case of pancake, 10 kinds of pesticides were added to the pastry. The prepared pastry was them cooked. The relative concentrations of most of the pesticides in the pancake were not affected and all the pesticides showed consistent results in the samples. These results showed that the two tested samples were suitable for proficiency testing.

  4. Target preparation for milligram sized 14C samples and data evaluation for AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andree, Michael; Beer, Jürg; Oeschger, Hans; Bonani, G.; Hofmann, H. J.; Morenzoni, E.; Nessi, M.; Suter, M.; Wölfli, W.

    1984-11-01

    Our preparation technique produces in a glow-discharge an amorphous carbon deposit on a copper substrate. The process starts with 1.6 cm 3 CO 2 STP (900 μg carbon) which is reduced over hot zinc to CO and subsequently cracked in the discharge. The yield of the process is typically 80%. With these targets in the Zürich ion source ion currents up to 20 μA are obtained. The background of samples prepared with this technique is presently around 30 ka (2.5% MODERN). The precision after half an hour measuring time for a modern sample is 0.7% and 2.7% for a three half-lives old sample, including the errors of the background and the NBS oxalic acid measurement. The method we use to correct for the background of the preparation and the accelerator as well as for the fractionation in the accelerator is presented.

  5. Specific features of sample preparation from amorphous aluminum alloys for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Volkov, P. A.; Todorova, E. V.; Bakhteeva, N. D.; Ivanova, A. G.; Vasil'ev, A. L.

    2011-05-15

    An aluminum amorphous alloy doped with transition (Fe and Ni) and rare earth (La) metals has been used as an object of systematic study of the structural transformations that are characteristic of different methods of sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy (the mechanical tearing of ribbons, electrochemical thinning, and Ar{sup +}-ion etching under different conditions). The results of X-ray diffraction analysis and a calorimetric study of the structure in comparison with electron microscopy data made it possible to determine the optimal method of sample preparation, which ensures minimum distortions in the structure of metastable amorphous alloys with a low crystallization temperature.

  6. Open focused microwave-assisted sample preparation for rapid total and mercury species determination in environmental solid samples.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C M; Garraud, H; Amouroux, D; Donard, O F; de Diego, A

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes rapid, simple microwave-assisted leaching/ digestion procedures for total and mercury species determination in sediment samples and biomaterials. An open focused microwave system allowed the sample preparation time to be dramatically reduced to only 24 min when a power of 40-80 W was applied. Quantitative leaching of methylmercury from sediments by HNO(3) solution and complete dissolution of biomaterials by an alkaline solution, such as 25% TMAH solution, were obtained. Methylmercury compounds were kept intact without decomposition or losses by evaporation. Quantitative recoveries of total mercury were achieved with a two-step microwave attack using a combination of HNO(3) and H(2)0(2) solutions as extractant. The whole pretreatment procedure only takes 15 min, which can be further shortened by an automated robust operation with an open focused system. These analytical procedures were validated by the analysis of environmental certified reference materials. The results confirm that the open focused microwave technique is a promising tool for solid sample preparation in analytical and environmental chemistry.

  7. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  8. Titanate nanotube thin films with enhanced thermal stability and high-transparency prepared from additive-free sols

    SciTech Connect

    Koroesi, Laszlo; Papp, Szilvia; Hornok, Viktoria; Oszko, Albert; Petrik, Peter; Patko, Daniel; Horvath, Robert; Dekany, Imre

    2012-08-15

    Titanate nanotubes were synthesized from TiO{sub 2} in alkaline medium by a conventional hydrothermal method (150 Degree-Sign C, 4.7 bar). To obtain hydrogen titanates, the as-prepared sodium titanates were treated with either HCl or H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} aqueous solutions. A simple synthesis procedure was devised for stable titanate nanotube sols without using any additives. These highly stable ethanolic sols can readily be used to prepare transparent titanate nanotube thin films of high quality. The resulting samples were studied by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2}-sorption measurements, Raman spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The comparative results of using two kinds of acids shed light on the superior thermal stability of the H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated titanate nanotubes (P-TNTs). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that P-TNTs contains P in the near-surface region and the thermal stability was enhanced even at a low ({approx}0.5 at%) concentration of P. After calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C, the specific surface areas of the HCl- and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated samples were 153 and 244 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, respectively. The effects of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment on the structure, morphology and porosity of titanate nanotubes are discussed. - Graphical Abstract: TEM picture (left) shows P-TNTs with diameters about 5-6 nm. Inset shows a stable titanate nanotube sol illuminated by a 532 nm laser beam. Due to the presence of the nanoparticles the way of the light is visible in the sol. Cross sectional SEM picture (right) as well as ellipsometry revealed the formation of optical quality P-TNT films with thicknesses below 50 nm. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} treatment led to TNTs with high surface area even after calcination at 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-treated TNTs preserved their nanotube morphology up to 500

  9. Effort versus Reward: Preparing Samples for Fungal Community Characterization in High-Throughput Sequencing Surveys of Soils

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zewei; Schlatter, Dan; Kennedy, Peter; Kinkel, Linda L.; Kistler, H. Corby; Nguyen, Nhu; Bates, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Next generation fungal amplicon sequencing is being used with increasing frequency to study fungal diversity in various ecosystems; however, the influence of sample preparation on the characterization of fungal community is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of four procedural modifications to library preparation for high-throughput sequencing (HTS). The following treatments were considered: 1) the amount of soil used in DNA extraction, 2) the inclusion of additional steps (freeze/thaw cycles, sonication, or hot water bath incubation) in the extraction procedure, 3) the amount of DNA template used in PCR, and 4) the effect of sample pooling, either physically or computationally. Soils from two different ecosystems in Minnesota, USA, one prairie and one forest site, were used to assess the generality of our results. The first three treatments did not significantly influence observed fungal OTU richness or community structure at either site. Physical pooling captured more OTU richness compared to individual samples, but total OTU richness at each site was highest when individual samples were computationally combined. We conclude that standard extraction kit protocols are well optimized for fungal HTS surveys, but because sample pooling can significantly influence OTU richness estimates, it is important to carefully consider the study aims when planning sampling procedures. PMID:25974078

  10. A Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay and Sample Preparation Procedure for Sensitive Detection of Xanthomonas fragariae in Strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hehe; Turechek, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas fragariae is a bacterium that causes angular leaf spot of strawberry. Asymptomatic infection is common and contributes to the difficulties in disease management. The aim of this study was to develop a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay as an efficient method for detection of asymptomatic infections of X. fragariae. In addition, a new method of sample preparation was developed that allows sampling of a larger amount of plant tissue, hence increasing the detection rate in real-life samples. The sample preparation procedure includes an overnight incubation of strawberry tissues in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), followed by a quick sample concentration and a boiling step to extract DNA for amplification. The detection limit of the LAMP assay was approximately 2×103 CFU/mL for pure bacteria culture and 300 CFU/mL for bacteria spiked strawberry leaf and petiole samples. LAMP provided a 2–3 fold lower detection limit than the standard qPCR assay but was faster, and more user-friendly. The LAMP assay should serve as a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective tool for detecting asymptomatic infections of X. fragariae in strawberry nursery stock and contribute to improved disease management. PMID:26766068

  11. Recent advances in sample preparation techniques and methods of sulfonamides detection - A review.

    PubMed

    Dmitrienko, Stanislava G; Kochuk, Elena V; Apyari, Vladimir V; Tolmacheva, Veronika V; Zolotov, Yury A

    2014-11-19

    Sulfonamides (SAs) have been the most widely used antimicrobial drugs for more than 70 years, and their residues in foodstuffs and environmental samples pose serious health hazards. For this reason, sensitive and specific methods for the quantification of these compounds in numerous matrices have been developed. This review intends to provide an updated overview of the recent trends over the past five years in sample preparation techniques and methods for detecting SAs. Examples of the sample preparation techniques, including liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and QuEChERS, are given. Different methods of detecting the SAs present in food and feed and in environmental, pharmaceutical and biological samples are discussed.

  12. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Micro- and Nanoscale Proteomic Sample Preparation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haixing H.; Qian, Weijun; Mottaz, Heather M.; Clauss, Therese R.W.; Anderson, David J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Sforza, Daniel M.; Pallavicini, Maria; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-10-05

    Efficient and effective sample preparation of micro- and nano-scale (micro- and nano-gram) clinical specimens for proteomic applications is often difficult due to losses during the processing steps. Herein we describe a simple “single-tube” preparation protocol appropriate for small proteomic samples using the organic co-solvent, trifluoroethanol (TFE). TFE facilitates both protein extraction and protein denaturation without requiring a separate cleanup step, thus minimizing sample loss. The performance of the TFE method was initially evaluated by comparing to traditional detergent-based methods on relatively large scale sample processing using human breast cancer cells and mouse brain tissue. The results demonstrated that the TFE protocol provided comparable results to the traditional detergent-based protocols for larger samples (milligrams), based on both sample recovery and peptide/protein identification. The effectiveness of this protocol for micro- and nano-scale sample processing was then evaluated for the extraction of proteins/peptides and shown effective for small mouse brain tissue samples (~ 20 μg total protein content) and also for samples of ~ 5 000 human breast cancer MCF-7 cells (~ 500 ng total protein content), where the detergent-based methods were ineffective due to losses during cleanup and transfer steps.

  14. Optimization of sample preparation for accurate results in quantitative NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Taichi; Nakamura, Satoe; Saito, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) spectroscopy has received high marks as an excellent measurement tool that does not require the same reference standard as the analyte. Measurement parameters have been discussed in detail and high-resolution balances have been used for sample preparation. However, the high-resolution balances, such as an ultra-microbalance, are not general-purpose analytical tools and many analysts may find those balances difficult to use, thereby hindering accurate sample preparation for qNMR measurement. In this study, we examined the relationship between the resolution of the balance and the amount of sample weighed during sample preparation. We were able to confirm the accuracy of the assay results for samples weighed on a high-resolution balance, such as the ultra-microbalance. Furthermore, when an appropriate tare and amount of sample was weighed on a given balance, accurate assay results were obtained with another high-resolution balance. Although this is a fundamental result, it offers important evidence that would enhance the versatility of the qNMR method.

  15. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    DOE PAGES

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; ...

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Furthermore, precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powdermore » prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.« less

  16. Sample Preparation and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Multiple Steroids in Mammalian and Avian Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Kiran K.; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Blood samples from wild mammals and birds are often limited in volume, allowing researchers to quantify only one or two steroids from a single sample by immunoassays. In addition, wildlife serum or plasma samples are often lipemic, necessitating stringent sample preparation. Here, we validated sample preparation for simultaneous liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) quantitation of cortisol, corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), 17β-estradiol, progesterone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone and testosterone from diverse mammalian (7 species) and avian (5 species) samples. Using 100 µL of serum or plasma, we quantified (signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio ≥10) 4–7 steroids depending on the species and sample, without derivatization. Steroids were extracted from serum or plasma using automated solid-phase extraction where samples were loaded onto C18 columns, washed with water and hexane, and then eluted with ethyl acetate. Quantitation by LC-MS/MS was done in positive ion, multiple reaction-monitoring (MRM) mode with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source and heated nebulizer (500°C). Deuterated steroids served as internal standards and run time was 15 minutes. Extraction recoveries were 87–101% for the 8 analytes, and all intra- and inter-run CVs were ≤8.25%. This quantitation method yields good recoveries with variable lipid-content samples, avoids antibody cross-reactivity issues, and delivers results for multiple steroids. Thus, this method can enrich datasets by providing simultaneous quantitation of multiple steroids, and allow researchers to reimagine the hypotheses that could be tested with their volume-limited, lipemic, wildlife samples. PMID:22384262

  17. The influence of target preparation and mode of irradiation on PIXE analysis of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galuszka, Janusz; Jarczyk, Lucjan; Rokita, Eugeniusz; Strzalkowski, Adam; Sych, Marek

    1984-04-01

    The following methods of target preparation were examined and compared: dry ashing at high temperature, low temperature ashing in plasma asher, wet ashing, lyophilization at a temperature of 35°C, cryofixation with drying in vacuum and dehydration in alcohol with drying in vacuum. All these techniques were applied to prepare targets from five different rat organs: liver, kidney, brain, lung and muscle tissue. The dried and powdered sample material was pressed into pellets or was distributed on formvar film. The evaporation of the thin carbon layer on the investigated target and placing of the thin carbon film in front of a target were also tested. The targets were irradiated in vacuum using an external beam in the air chamber. The influence of the method of target preparation on the detection limits, time requirements and escape of elements from the sample material is discussed.

  18. Optimized Ar(+)-ion milling procedure for TEM cross-section sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Dieterle, Levin; Butz, Benjamin; Müller, Erich

    2011-11-01

    High-quality samples are indispensable for every reliable transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation. In order to predict optimized parameters for the final Ar(+)-ion milling preparation step, topographical changes of symmetrical cross-section samples by the sputtering process were modeled by two-dimensional Monte-Carlo simulations. Due to its well-known sputtering yield of Ar(+)-ions and its easiness in mechanical preparation Si was used as model system. The simulations are based on a modified parameterized description of the sputtering yield of Ar(+)-ions on Si summarized from literature. The formation of a wedge-shaped profile, as commonly observed during double-sector ion milling of cross-section samples, was reproduced by the simulations, independent of the sputtering angle. Moreover, the preparation of wide, plane parallel sample areas by alternating single-sector ion milling is predicted by the simulations. These findings were validated by a systematic ion-milling study (single-sector vs. double-sector milling at various sputtering angles) using Si cross-section samples as well as two other material-science examples. The presented systematic single-sector ion-milling procedure is applicable for most Ar(+)-ion mills, which allow simultaneous milling from both sides of a TEM sample (top and bottom) in an azimuthally restricted sector perpendicular to the central epoxy line of that cross-sectional TEM sample. The procedure is based on the alternating milling of the two halves of the TEM sample instead of double-sector milling of the whole sample. Furthermore, various other practical aspects are issued like the dependency of the topographical quality of the final sample on parameters like epoxy thickness and incident angle.

  19. 40 CFR 205.160-2 - Test sample selection and preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test sample selection and preparation. 205.160-2 Section 205.160-2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycles § 205.160-2...

  20. Soil and Water – What is Detectable through Microbiological Sample Preparation Techniques

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concerns of a potential terrorist’s use of biological agents in soil and ground water are articulated by comparisons to major illnesses in this Country involving contaminated drinking water sources. Objectives are focused on the importance of sample preparation in the rapid, ...

  1. Refining of Military Jet Fuels from Shale Oil. Part III. Pilot Plant Sample Preparation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    of Last MRCC Run 1190 Sample(s) Retained* 25.75 Gasoline Sample From JP-4 Reformate 32.1 ’. *Approximately 10 pounds additional sample removed during...were supplied to AFWAL, along with a gasoline blending component, diesel fuels, and residual fuels for chose evaluations. Also, the scaled-up data from...COMPONENT SOURCE: JP-4 GCHT FRACTIONATION .................... 163 57 GASOLINE BLENDING COMPONENT SOURCE: JP-4 REFORMATE ..................... to

  2. The role of sample preparation in interpretation of trace element concentration variability in moss bioindication studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Lamothe, P.J.; Crock, J.G.; Galuszka, A.; Dolegowska, S.

    2011-01-01

    Trace element concentrations in plant bioindicators are often determined to assess the quality of the environment. Instrumental methods used for trace element determination require digestion of samples. There are different methods of sample preparation for trace element analysis, and the selection of the best method should be fitted for the purpose of a study. Our hypothesis is that the method of sample preparation is important for interpretation of the results. Here we compare the results of 36 element determinations performed by ICP-MS on ashed and on acid-digested (HNO3, H2O2) samples of two moss species (Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi) collected in Alaska and in south-central Poland. We found that dry ashing of the moss samples prior to analysis resulted in considerably lower detection limits of all the elements examined. We also show that this sample preparation technique facilitated the determination of interregional and interspecies differences in the chemistry of trace elements. Compared to the Polish mosses, the Alaskan mosses displayed more positive correlations of the major rock-forming elements with ash content, reflecting those elements' geogenic origin. Of the two moss species, P. schreberi from both Alaska and Poland was also highlighted by a larger number of positive element pair correlations. The cluster analysis suggests that the more uniform element distribution pattern of the Polish mosses primarily reflects regional air pollution sources. Our study has shown that the method of sample preparation is an important factor in statistical interpretation of the results of trace element determinations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Gas-assisted annular microsprayer for sample preparation for time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A.; Yassin, Aymen S.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Time-resolved cryo-electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, a microfluidic device has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using a microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, whilst not being so thin that it dries out before freezing, i.e. an optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6 and 9 μm, which fulfilled the droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size 58  ×  58 μm), and a data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 h period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieving using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection with the previous device has been shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliters of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction.

  4. Comparison of sample preparation methods for the recovery of foodborne pathogens from fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se-Ri; Yoon, Yohan; Kim, Won-Il; Park, Kyeong-Hun; Yun, Hye-Jeong; Chung, Duck Hwa; Yun, Jong Chul; Ryu, Kyoung Yul

    2012-07-01

    Sample preparation methods (pummeling, pulsifying, sonication, and shaking by hand) were compared for achieving maximum recovery of foodborne pathogens from iceberg lettuce, perilla leaves, cucumber, green pepper, and cherry tomato. Antimicrobial and dehydration effects also were examined to investigate causes of poor recovery of pathogens. Each produce type was inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus cereus at 6.0 log CFU/cm(2), and samples were prepared using the four methods. Bacterial populations recovered from the five types of produce were significantly different (P < 0.05) according to sample preparation methods and produce type. The bacterial populations recovered from pummeled and pulsified samples were higher (P < 0.05) than those recovered from sonicated and hand-shaken samples, except for cherry tomato. The number of bacteria recovered from produce was reduced (P < 0.05) from that of the inoculum by 0.16 to 2.69 log CFU/cm(2). Although extracts of iceberg lettuce, perilla leaves, cucumber, and green pepper had no antimicrobial activity, the populations of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, B. cereus, and L. monocytogenes in cherry tomato extract were slightly reduced after these treatments (P < 0.05). The pathogen populations on perilla leaves and cherry tomatoes decreased by >2 log CFU/cm(2) after exposure to 40% relative humidity for 1 h. No reduction was observed when the five pathogens were exposed to 90% relative humidity. These data suggest that pummeling and pulsifying are optimal sample preparation methods for detection of microorganisms. Acidic produce such as cherry tomato should be treated with a method that does not cause sample breakdown so that acid stress on the bacteria can be minimized. Dehydration stress also affects recovery of pathogens from produce.

  5. Gas-Assisted Annular Microsprayer for Sample Preparation for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R.; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A.; Yassin, Aymen; Agrawal, Rajendra; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved cryo electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, microfluidic device [9] has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate the thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, while not too thin to be dried out before freezing, i.e., optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6-9 μm, which fulfilled the above droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size is 58×58 μm), and the data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 hour period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieved using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection process with the previous device [9] has shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliter of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction. PMID:25530679

  6. SLUDGE BATCH 7 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB7 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J.; Hay, M.

    2011-02-22

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides

  7. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  8. Polymer-grafted lignin surfactants prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chetali; Washburn, Newell R

    2014-08-12

    Kraft lignin grafted with hydrophilic polymers has been prepared using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization and investigated for use as a surfactant. In this preliminary study, polyacrylamide and poly(acrylic acid) were grafted from a lignin RAFT macroinitiator at average initiator site densities estimated to be 2 per particle and 17 per particle. The target degrees of polymerization were 50 and 100, but analysis of cleaved polyacrylamide was consistent with a higher average molecular weight, suggesting not all sites were able to participate in the polymerization. All materials were readily soluble in water, and dynamic light scattering data indicate polymer-grafted lignin coexisted in isolated and aggregated forms in aqueous media. The characteristic size was 15-20 nm at low concentrations, and aggregation appeared to be a stronger function of degree of polymerization than graft density. These species were surface active, reducing the surface tension to as low as 60 dyn/cm at 1 mg/mL, and a greater decrease was observed than for polymer-grafted silica nanoparticles, suggesting that the lignin core was also surface active. While these lignin surfactants were soluble in water, they were not soluble in hexanes. Thus, it was unexpected that water-in-oil emulsions formed in all surfactant compositions and solvent ratios tested, with average droplet sizes of 10-20 μm. However, although polymer-grafted lignin has structural features similar to nanoparticles used in Pickering emulsions, its interfacial behavior was qualitatively different. While at air-water interfaces, the hydrophilic grafts promote effective reductions in surface tension, we hypothesize that the low grafting density in these lignin surfactants favors partitioning into the hexanes side of the oil-water interface because collapsed conformations of the polymer grafts improve interfacial coverage and reduce water-hexanes interactions. We propose that polymer-grafted lignin

  9. Challenges of biological sample preparation for SIMS imaging of elements and molecules at subcellular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2008-12-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging techniques capable of subcellular resolution characterization of elements and molecules are becoming valuable tools in many areas of biology and medicine. Due to high vacuum requirements of SIMS, the live cells cannot be analyzed directly in the instrument. The sample preparation, therefore, plays a critical role in preserving the native chemical composition for SIMS analysis. This work focuses on the evaluation of frozen-hydrated and frozen freeze-dried sample preparations for SIMS studies of cultured cells with a CAMECA IMS-3f dynamic SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing SIMS images with a spatial resolution of 500 nm. The sandwich freeze-fracture method was used for fracturing the cells. The complimentary fracture planes in the plasma membrane were characterized by field-emission secondary electron microscopy (FESEM) in the frozen-hydrated state. The cells fractured at the dorsal surface were used for SIMS analysis. The frozen-hydrated SIMS analysis of individual cells under dynamic primary ion beam (O 2+) revealed local secondary ion signal enhancements correlated with the water image signals of 19(H 3O) +. A preferential removal of water from the frozen cell matrix in the Z-axis was also observed. These complications render the frozen-hydrated sample type less desirable for subcellular dynamic SIMS studies. The freeze-drying of frozen-hydrated cells, either inside the instrument or externally in a freeze-drier, allowed SIMS imaging of subcellular chemical composition. Morphological evaluations of fractured freeze-dried cells with SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed well-preserved mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and stress fibers. SIMS analysis of fractured freeze-dried cells revealed well-preserved chemical composition of even the most highly diffusible ions like K + and Na + in physiologically relevant concentrations. The high K-low Na signature in individual cells

  10. Community-Level Physiological Profiling of Microbial Communities in Constructed Wetlands: Effects of Sample Preparation.

    PubMed

    Button, Mark; Weber, Kela; Nivala, Jaime; Aubron, Thomas; Müller, Roland Arno

    2016-03-01

    Community-level physiological profiling (CLPP) using BIOLOG® EcoPlates™ has become a popular method for characterizing and comparing the functional diversity, functional potential, and metabolic activity of heterotrophic microbial communities. The method was originally developed for profiling soil communities; however, its usage has expanded into the fields of ecotoxicology, agronomy, and the monitoring and profiling of microbial communities in various wastewater treatment systems, including constructed wetlands for water pollution control. When performing CLPP on aqueous samples from constructed wetlands, a wide variety of sample characteristics can be encountered and challenges may arise due to excessive solids, color, or turbidity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of different sample preparation methods on CLPP performed on a variety of aqueous samples covering a broad range of physical and chemical characteristics. The results show that using filter paper, centrifugation, or settling helped clarify samples for subsequent CLPP analysis, however did not do so as effectively as dilution for the darkest samples. Dilution was able to provide suitable clarity for the darkest samples; however, 100-fold dilution significantly affected the carbon source utilization patterns (CSUPs), particularly with samples that were already partially or fully clear. Ten-fold dilution also had some effect on the CSUPs of samples which were originally clear; however, the effect was minimal. Based on these findings, for this specific set of samples, a 10-fold dilution provided a good balance between ease of use, sufficient clarity (for dark samples), and limited effect on CSUPs. The process and findings outlined here can hopefully serve future studies looking to utilize CLPP for functional analysis of microbial communities and also assist in comparing data from studies where different sample preparation methods were utilized.

  11. Method and apparatus for the preparation of liquid samples for determination of boron

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.

    1986-03-04

    A method and apparatus for the preparation of a liquid sample for the quantitative determination of boron by flame photometry. The sample is combined in a vessel with sulfuric acid, and an excess of methanol is added thereto. The methanol reacts with any boron present in the sample to form trimethyl borate which is volatilized by the heat of reaction between the excess methanol and sulfuric acid. The volatilized trimethyl borate is withdrawn from the vessel by either a partial vacuum or a positive pressure and is rapidly transferred to a standard flame photometer. The method is free of interference from typical boron concomitants.

  12. Method and apparatus for the preparation of liquid samples for determination of boron

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, Darryl D.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the preparation of a liquid sample for the quantitative determination of boron by flame photometry. The sample is combined in a vessel with sulfuric acid, and an excess of methanol is added thereto. The methanol reacts with any boron present in the sample to form trimethyl borate which is volatilized by the heat of reaction between the excess methanol and sulfuric acid. The volatilized trimethyl borate is withdrawn from the vessel by either a partial vacuum or a positive pressure and is rapidly transferred to a standard flame photometer. The method is free of interference from typical boron concomitants.

  13. Method and apparatus for the preparation of liquid samples for determination of boron

    DOEpatents

    Siemer, D.D.

    A method and apparatus are described for the preparation of a liquid sample for the quantitative determination of boron by flame photometry. The sample is combined in a vessel with sulfuric acid, and an excess of methanol is added thereto. The methanol reacts with any boron present in the sample to form trimethyl borate which is volatilized by the heat of reaction between the excess methanol and sulfuric acid. The volatilized trimethyl borate is withdrawn from the vessel by either a partial vacuum or a positive pressure and is rapidly transferred to a standard flame photometer. The method is free of interference from typical boron concomitants.

  14. Yeast metabolomics: sample preparation for a GC/MS-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sónia; Pereira, Rui; Rocha, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Metabolome sample preparation is one of the key factors in metabolomics analyses. The quality of the metabolome data will depend on the suitability of the experimental procedures to the cellular system (e.g., yeast cells) and the analytical performance. Here, we summarize a protocol for metabolome analysis of yeast cells using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). First, the main phases of a metabolomics analysis are identified: sample preparation, metabolite extraction, and analysis. We also provide an overview on different methods used to quench samples and extract intracellular metabolites from yeast cells. This protocol provides a detailed description of a GC-MS-based analysis of yeast metabolome, in particular for metabolites containing amino and/or carboxyl groups, which represent most of the compounds participating in the central carbon metabolism.

  15. Sample preparation of organic liquid for off-site analysis of chemical weapons convention related compounds.

    PubMed

    Pardasani, Deepak; Palit, Meehir; Gupta, A K; Shakya, Purushottam; Sekhar, K; Dubey, D K

    2005-02-15

    Off-site analysis of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and related compounds plays a key role in the verification program of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). The analysis results, aiming toward unambiguous identication of compounds, depend on the type of sample preparation method. Development of milder sample preparation methods, which offer good recoveries and do not alter the structure of analytes, is highly desirable. Organic liquid with high hydrocarbon background is a frequently encountered challenge in off-site analysis and in official proficiency tests conducted by OPCW. Sample cleanup procedures, namely, solvent exchange followed by cooling and liquid-liquid extraction were studied to eliminate the hydrocarbons from organic liquid. Acetonitrile, a polar aprotic solvent, was effectively used to remove the background in both methods, and recoveries of spiked CWAs by the two techniques were between 69 and 99%.

  16. Isolation and purification of heroin from heroin street samples by preparative high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Zheng, Hui; Lu, Yanzhen; Wei, Yun

    2012-09-10

    The present study established a novel method using preparative high performance liquid chromatography to isolate and purify heroin·HCl from heroin street samples to be used as a reference standard. Different kinds of mobile phases and columns were used, ultimately the mobile phase consisting of hexane-isopropanol-methanol (65:28:7, v/v) and the SIL preparative column prepared in laboratory were selected as the final condition. Heroin was further purified by the drowning-out crystallization method using isopropanol-methanol (50:1, v/v) and hexane as drowning-out anti-solvents and salting-out agents, respectively. The purity was assessed by analytical high performance liquid chromatography and the confirmation of the chemical structure was performed by IR and NMR. About 110.7mg of heroin·HCl at a purity of over 99.52% was obtained from 180mg of heroin street samples which contained 156.15mg of heroin·HCl component by preparative high performance liquid chromatography. This method is suitable for preparing heroin standards in forensic science area.

  17. Evidence That Certain Waste Tank Headspace Vapor Samples Were Contaminated by Semivolatile Polymer Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-09

    Vapor samples collected from the headspaces of the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks in 1994 and 1995 using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) were reported to contain trace levels of phthalates, antioxidants, and certain other industrial chemicals that did not have a logical origin in the waste. This report examines the evidence these chemicals were sampling artifacts (contamination) and identifies the chemicals reported as headspace constituents that may instead have been contaminants. Specific recommendations are given regarding the marking of certain chemicals as suspect on the basis they were sampling manifold contaminants.

  18. Guidance document for preparing water sampling and analysis plans for UMTRA sites. Final [report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    A water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is required for each Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site to provide rationale for groundwater and surface water sampling at disposal sites and former processing sites. The WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the groundwater and surface water monitoring stations at each site. Section 2.0 of this WSAP Guidance Document describes the WSAP format. Sections 3.0 and 4.0 provide guidance for selecting sampling frequencies and sampling locations, respectively. Section 5.0 contains criteria for selecting analytical parameters. Section 6.0 provides guidance for the contents of each site`s WSAP file. Finally, Section 7.0 presents the references used to prepare this document. The purpose of this guidance document is to provide a consistent technical approach for sampling and monitoring activities performed under WSAPs and a consistent format for WSAP documents. This document is designed for use by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to prepare WSAPs and by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Nuclear Regulatory Commission, state and tribal agencies, regulatory agencies, and the public to evaluate the contents of the WSAPS. This guidance document may be updated periodically based on new or changing regulations.

  19. MALDI MS sample preparation by using paraffin wax film: systematic study and application for peptide analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Chen, Ruibing; Ma, Mingming; Li, Lingjun

    2008-01-15

    Recently developed sample preparation techniques employing hydrophobic sample support have improved the detection sensitivity and mass spectral quality of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). These methods concentrate the samples on target by minimizing the sample area via the solvent repellent effect of the target surface. In the current study, we employed the use of paraffin wax film (Parafilm M) for improved MALDI MS analysis of low-abundance peptide mixtures, including neuronal tissue releasate and protein tryptic digests. This thin film was found to strongly repel polar solvents including water, methanol, and acetonitrile, which enabled the application of a wide range of sample preparation protocols that involved the use of various organic solvents. A "nanoliter-volume deposition" technique employing a capillary column has been used to produce tiny ( approximately 400 microm) matrix spots of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid on the film. By systematically optimizing the sample volume, solvent composition, and film treatment, the Parafilm M substrate in combination with the nanoliter-volume matrix deposition method allowed dilute sample to be concentrated on the film for MALDI MS analysis. Peptide mixtures with nanomolar concentrations have been detected by MALDI time-of-flight and MALDI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers. Overall, the use of Parafilm M enabled improved sensitivity and spectral quality for the analysis of complex peptide mixtures.

  20. Comparison of preparation techniques of mixed samples (fungi-helminth eggs) for scanning electron microscopy by critical point drying.

    PubMed

    Sarmiento, P L; Ciarmela, María L; Sánchez Thevenet, P; Minvielle, M C; Basualdo, J A

    2006-09-01

    We compared three preparation techniques for critical point drying of fungus Paecilomyces lilacinus (Thom) Samson with Toxocara canis (Werner) Johnston and Taenia hydatigena Linneo eggs by scanning electron microscopy. We evaluated filtration (first), centrifugation (second), and phytoplankton network (third) in critical point drying methods. The first and third methods were advantageous for T. canis eggs because they preserved the quantity and quality of samples to obtain better images definition. The best technique for T. hydatigena eggs was the addition of phytoplankton network in critical point drying which preserved these helminth eggs.

  1. Improvements in preparation of samples generated by SW-846 Method 0010

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.D.; Johnson, L.D.; McGaughey, J.F.; Wagoner, D.E.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1994-12-31

    A field evaluation study for SW-846 Method 0010 was conducted at a stationary source emission site with a high moisture content. The recovery of the dynamically spiked analytes and the spikes added before the laboratory preparation of the XAD-2{reg_sign} resin were low. The sampling train media had been prepared according to Method 0010 protocol, so the laboratory procedures were examined in detail for sources of error. The XAD-2{reg_sign}, wet because of the source matrix, was difficult to fully remove from the glass trap using only methylene chloride. Because Method 0010 does not specify the solvent to use for trap rinsing, and since the probe was washed in the field with a 50:50 mixture of methylene chloride and methanol, this mixture was used to transfer the XAD-2{reg_sign} from the trap to the Soxhlet extractor. The low recoveries were attributed to the presence of the methanol in the final extract. (The methanol is removed from the probe rinses during the laboratory sample preparation process.) A proposed method will be presented that permits the physical removal of wet XAD-2{reg_sign} from the sampling trap without the use of methanol and an alternate procedure is provided for removal of methanol from the trap rinse before sample extract concentration.

  2. A self-contained polymeric cartridge for automated biological sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guolin; Lee, Daniel Yoke San; Xie, Hong; Chiew, Deon; Hsieh, Tseng-Ming; Ali, Emril Mohamed; Lun Looi, Xing; Li, Mo-Huang; Ying, Jackie Y

    2011-09-01

    Sample preparation is one of the most crucial processes for nucleic acids based disease diagnosis. Several steps are required for nucleic acids extraction, impurity washes, and DNA/RNA elution. Careful sample preparation is vital to the obtaining of reliable diagnosis, especially with low copies of pathogens and cells. This paper describes a low-cost, disposable lab cartridge for automatic sample preparation, which is capable of handling flexible sample volumes of 10 μl to 1 ml. This plastic cartridge contains all the necessary reagents for pathogen and cell lysis, DNA/RNA extraction, impurity washes, DNA/RNA elution and waste processing in a completely sealed cartridge. The entire sample preparation processes are automatically conducted within the cartridge on a desktop unit using a pneumatic fluid manipulation approach. Reagents transportation is achieved with a combination of push and pull forces (with compressed air and vacuum, respectively), which are connected to the pneumatic inlets at the bottom of the cartridge. These pneumatic forces are regulated by pinch valve manifold and two pneumatic syringe pumps within the desktop unit. The performance of this pneumatic reagent delivery method was examined. We have demonstrated the capability of the on-cartridge RNA extraction and cancer-specific gene amplification from 10 copies of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. The on-cartridge DNA recovery efficiency was 54-63%, which was comparable to or better than the conventional manual approach using silica spin column. The lab cartridge would be suitable for integration with lab-chip real-time polymerase chain reaction devices in providing a portable system for decentralized disease diagnosis.

  3. Homogeneous immunosubtraction integrated with sample preparation is enabled by a microfluidic format

    PubMed Central

    Apori, Akwasi A.; Herr, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Immunosubtraction is a powerful and resource-intensive laboratory medicine assay that reports both protein mobility and binding specificity. To expedite and automate this electrophoretic assay, we report on advances to the electrophoretic immunosubtraction assay by introducing a homogeneous, not heterogeneous, format with integrated sample preparation. To accomplish homogeneous immunosubtraction, a step-decrease in separation matrix pore-size at the head of a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) separation channel enables ‘subtraction’ of target analyte when capture antibody is present (as the large immune-complex is excluded from PAGE), but no subtraction when capture antibody is absent. Inclusion of sample preparation functionality via small pore size polyacrylamide membranes is also key to automated operation (i.e., sample enrichment, fluorescence sample labeling, and mixing of sample with free capture antibody). Homogenous sample preparation and assay operation allows on-the-fly, integrated subtraction of one to multiple protein targets and reuse of each device. Optimization of the assay is detailed which allowed for ~95% subtraction of target with 20% non-specific extraction of large species at the optimal antibody-antigen ratio, providing conditions needed for selective target identification. We demonstrate the assay on putative markers of injury and inflammation in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), an emerging area of diagnostics research, by rapidly reporting protein mobility and binding specificity within the sample matrix. We simultaneously detect S100B and C-reactive protein, suspected biomarkers for traumatic brain injury (TBI), in ~2 min. Lastly, we demonstrate S100B detection (65 nM) in raw human CSF with a lower limit of detection of ~3.25 nM, within the clinically relevant concentration range for detecting TBI in CSF. Beyond the novel CSF assay introduced here, a fully automated immunosubtraction assay would impact a spectrum of routine but labor

  4. Development of High-Antifouling PPSU Ultrafiltration Membrane by Using Compound Additives: Preparation, Morphologies, and Filtration Resistant Properties

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Zhong, Zhencheng; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Weichen; Li, Jiding

    2016-01-01

    In this study, flat sheet asymmetric polyphenylsulfone (PPSU) ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced antifouling properties were prepared with a non-solvent induced phase separation (NIPS) method through compound additives containing a polymeric pore-forming agent, a small molecular non-solvent and a surfactant. The formation processes of the porous asymmetric membranes with different kinds of additives were studied in detail, and the microstructure controllable preparation of membrane was achieved by establishing a bridge between the membrane preparation parameters and separation performances. All prepared membranes were characterized by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), contact angle analysis, porosity, maximum pore size, water and BSA solution permeability studies. The performance efficiency of the membrane was evaluated by using BSA as a model foulant in terms of permeability, solute rejection (R), Rm (membrane inherent resistance), Rc (cake layer resistance), and Rp (pore plugging resistance). The results showed that when the compound additives were used, the inter-connected pores were observed, maximum pore size, contact angle and membrane filtration resistance decreased, while the porosity increased. When PVP compound additives were added, the water flux increased from 80.4 to 148.1 L/(m2·h), the BSA rejection increased from 53.2% to 81.5%. A similar trend was observed for membranes with added PEG compound additives; the water flux and BSA rejection simultaneously increased. The filtration resistance decreased as a result of compound additives. The uniformity of membrane and the number of effective pores could be enhanced by adding compound additives through the cooperation of different additives. PMID:27338487

  5. Development of High-Antifouling PPSU Ultrafiltration Membrane by Using Compound Additives: Preparation, Morphologies, and Filtration Resistant Properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhong, Zhencheng; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Weichen; Li, Jiding

    2016-06-21

    In this study, flat sheet asymmetric polyphenylsulfone (PPSU) ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced antifouling properties were prepared with a non-solvent induced phase separation (NIPS) method through compound additives containing a polymeric pore-forming agent, a small molecular non-solvent and a surfactant. The formation processes of the porous asymmetric membranes with different kinds of additives were studied in detail, and the microstructure controllable preparation of membrane was achieved by establishing a bridge between the membrane preparation parameters and separation performances. All prepared membranes were characterized by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), contact angle analysis, porosity, maximum pore size, water and BSA solution permeability studies. The performance efficiency of the membrane was evaluated by using BSA as a model foulant in terms of permeability, solute rejection (R), Rm (membrane inherent resistance), Rc (cake layer resistance), and Rp (pore plugging resistance). The results showed that when the compound additives were used, the inter-connected pores were observed, maximum pore size, contact angle and membrane filtration resistance decreased, while the porosity increased. When PVP compound additives were added, the water flux increased from 80.4 to 148.1 L/(m²·h), the BSA rejection increased from 53.2% to 81.5%. A similar trend was observed for membranes with added PEG compound additives; the water flux and BSA rejection simultaneously increased. The filtration resistance decreased as a result of compound additives. The uniformity of membrane and the number of effective pores could be enhanced by adding compound additives through the cooperation of different additives.

  6. imFASP: An integrated approach combining in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment with microwave-assisted protein digestion for fast and efficient proteome sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Fang, Fei; Wu, Ci; Wu, Qi; Liang, Yu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-03-17

    An integrated sample preparation method, termed "imFASP", which combined in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment and microwave-assisted trypsin digestion, was developed for preparation of microgram and even nanogram amounts of complex protein samples with high efficiency in 1 h. For imFASP method, proteins dissolved in 8 M urea were loaded onto a filter device with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) as 10 kDa, followed by in-situ protein preconcentration, denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and microwave-assisted tryptic digestion. Compared with traditional in-solution sample preparation method, imFASP method generated more protein and peptide identifications (IDs) from preparation of 45 μg Escherichia coli protein sample due to the higher efficiency, and the sample preparation throughput was significantly improved by 14 times (1 h vs. 15 h). More importantly, when the starting amounts of E. coli cell lysate decreased to nanogram level (50-500 ng), the protein and peptide identified by imFASP method were improved at least 30% and 44%, compared with traditional in-solution preparation method, suggesting dramatically higher peptide recovery of imFASP method for trace amounts of complex proteome samples. All these results demonstrate that the imFASP method developed here is of high potential for high efficient and high throughput preparation of trace amounts of complex proteome samples.

  7. Preparation of layered thin film samples for angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S. E.; Zhou, B.; Huo, Y.; Harris, J. S.; Pushp, A.; Kellock, A. J.; Parkin, S. S. P.; Chen, Y.; Hesjedal, T.

    2014-09-22

    Materials with layered van der Waals crystal structures are exciting research topics in condensed matter physics and materials science due to outstanding physical properties associated with their strong two dimensional nature. Prominent examples include bismuth tritelluride and triselenide topological insulators (TIs), which are characterized by a bulk bandgap and pairwise counter-propagating spin-polarized electronic surface states. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) of ex-situ grown thin film samples has been limited by the lack of suitable surface preparation techniques. We demonstrate the shortcomings of previously successful conventional surface preparation techniques when applied to ternary TI systems which are susceptible to severe oxidation. We show that in-situ cleaving is a simple and effective technique for preparation of clean surfaces on ex-situ grown thin films for high quality ARPES measurements. The method presented here is universally applicable to other layered van der Waals systems as well.

  8. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry of bone-Impact of sample preparation and measurement conditions.

    PubMed

    Henss, Anja; Hild, Anne; Rohnke, Marcus; Wenisch, Sabine; Janek, Juergen

    2015-06-07

    Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) enables the simultaneous detection of organic and inorganic ions and fragments with high mass and spatial resolution. Due to recent technical developments, ToF-SIMS has been increasingly applied in the life sciences where sample preparation plays an eminent role for the quality of the analytical results. This paper focusses on sample preparation of bone tissue and its impact on ToF-SIMS analysis. The analysis of bone is important for the understanding of bone diseases and the development of replacement materials and new drugs for the cure of diseased bone. The main purpose of this paper is to find out which preparation process is best suited for ToF-SIMS analysis of bone tissue in order to obtain reliable and reproducible analytical results. The influence of the embedding process on the different components of bone is evaluated using principal component analysis. It is shown that epoxy resin as well as methacrylate based plastics (Epon and Technovit) as embedding materials do not infiltrate the mineralized tissue and that cut sections are better suited for the ToF-SIMS analysis than ground sections. In case of ground samples, a resin layer is smeared over the sample surface due to the polishing step and overlap of peaks is found. Beside some signals of fatty acids in the negative ion mode, the analysis of native, not embedded samples does not provide any advantage. The influence of bismuth bombardment and O2 flooding on the signal intensity of organic and inorganic fragments due to the variation of the ionization probability is additionally discussed. As C60 sputtering has to be applied to remove the smeared resin layer, its effect especially on the organic fragments of the bone is analyzed and described herein.

  9. On the use of ultracentrifugal devices for routine sample preparation in biomolecular magic-angle-spinning NMR.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhishek; Boatz, Jennifer C; Wheeler, Travis B; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2017-02-22

    A number of recent advances in the field of magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR have enabled its application to a range of biological systems of ever increasing complexity. To retain biological relevance, these samples are increasingly studied in a hydrated state. At the same time, experimental feasibility requires the sample preparation process to attain a high sample concentration within the final MAS rotor. We discuss these considerations, and how they have led to a number of different approaches to MAS NMR sample preparation. We describe our experience of how custom-made (or commercially available) ultracentrifugal devices can facilitate a simple, fast and reliable sample preparation process. A number of groups have since adopted such tools, in some cases to prepare samples for sedimentation-style MAS NMR experiments. Here we argue for a more widespread adoption of their use for routine MAS NMR sample preparation.

  10. Should the mass of a nanoferrite sample prepared by autocombustion method be considered as a realistic preparation parameter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahba, Adel Maher; Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr

    2017-02-01

    Detectable variations in structural, elastic and magnetic properties have been reported depending on the mass of the cobalt nanoferrite sample prepared by citrate autocombustion method. Heat released during the autocombustion process and its duration are directly proportional to the mass to be prepared, and is thus expected to affect both the crystallite size and the cation distribution giving rise to the reported variations in microstrain, magnetization, and coercivity. Formation of a pure spinel phase has been validated using X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. Crystallite sizes obtained from Williamson-Hall (W-H) method range from 28-87 nm, being further supported by images of high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Saturation magnetization and coercivity deduced from M-H hysteresis loops show a clear correlation with the cation distribution, which was proposed on the basis of experimentally obtained data of XRD, VSM, and IR. Elastic parameters have been estimated using the cation distribution and FTIR data, with a resulting trend quite opposite to that of the lattice parameter.

  11. An introduction to sample preparation and imaging by cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Rebecca F.; Walker, Matt; Siebert, C. Alistair; Muench, Stephen P.; Ranson, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (EM) is a versatile technique that can be used to image biological specimens ranging from intact eukaryotic cells to individual proteins >150 kDa. There are several strategies for preparing samples for imaging by EM, including negative staining and cryogenic freezing. In the last few years, cryo-EM has undergone a ‘resolution revolution’, owing to both advances in imaging hardware, image processing software, and improvements in sample preparation, leading to growing number of researchers using cryo-EM as a research tool. However, cryo-EM is still a rapidly growing field, with unique challenges. Here, we summarise considerations for imaging of a range of specimens from macromolecular complexes to cells using EM. PMID:26931652

  12. Optimization of proteomic sample preparation procedures for comprehensive protein characterization of pathogenic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Manes, Nathan P.; Ansong, Charles; Shi, Liang; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Kikuchi, Takane; Wong, Scott; Estep, Ryan D.; Heffron, Fred; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-12-19

    The elucidation of critical functional pathways employed by pathogens and hosts during an infectious cycle is both challenging and central to our understanding of infectious diseases. In recent years, mass spectrometry-based proteomics has been used as a powerful tool to identify key pathogenesis-related proteins and pathways. Despite the analytical power of mass spectrometry-based technologies, samples must be appropriately prepared to characterize the functions of interest (e.g. host-response to a pathogen or a pathogen-response to a host). The preparation of these protein samples requires multiple decisions about what aspect of infection is being studied, and it may require the isolation of either host and/or pathogen cellular material.

  13. Bio-sample preparation and gas chromatographic determination of benzodiazepines--a review.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammad Nasir; Samanidou, Victoria F; Papadoyannis, Ioannis N

    2013-08-01

    Benzodiazepines have become commonly prescribed medicines worldwide in the therapy of anxiety, sleep disorders and convulsive attacks because they are relatively safe, with mild side effects. The availability of rapid, sensitive and selective analytical methods is essential for the determination of these drugs in clinical and forensic cases. Benzodiazepines are usually present at trace levels (μg/mL or ng/mL) in a complex biological matrix, and the potentially interfering compounds need to be removed before analysis. Therefore, a sample preparation technique is often mandatory, both to extract the drugs of interest from the matrices and to increase their concentration. An extended and comprehensive review is presented herein, focusing on bio-sample preparation (pretreatment, extraction and derivatization) and gas chromatographic methods applied for the quantification of 1,4-benzodiazepines.

  14. New sample preparation for quantitative laser desorption mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefliger, Olivier P.; Zenobi, Renato

    1998-04-01

    Several analytical mass spectrometric and optical spectroscopic methods require a step during which a nonvolatile substance is desorbed by a laser pulse. It is, however, very difficult to use these methods for quantitative measurements because an accurate control over the amount desorbed by the laser pulse is generally not possible, especially when mixtures of several substances are used. We report a new fast and convenient sample preparation procedure that solves these problems. A solution of the analytes is mixed with a solution of poly(vinyl chloride) to obtain a homogeneous and vacuum-stable thin polymer membrane after the solvent has evaporated. Laser ablation is then performed directly from this membrane, allowing an accurate control of the amount of ablated analytes and excellent reproducibility. Quantitative laser desorption mass spectrometry over three orders of magnitude as well as optical spectroscopic measurements using this sample preparation method are demonstrated for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  15. Bio-sample preparation and analytical methods for the determination of tricyclic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammad N; Samanidou, Victoria F; Papadoyannis, Ioannis N

    2011-01-01

    An extended and comprehensive review is presented herein, focusing on sample preparation (pretreatment and extraction) and different analytical methods applied for the quantification of tricyclic antidepressants. These procedures are relevant tools in clinical and forensic toxicology. It is revealed that SPE, for sample preparation, and HPLC, using reversed-phase alkyl (C18) or cyanopropyl-bonded silica columns for the analytes separation, are effective and versatile methods for assay of tricyclic antidepressants. These methods enable achievable detection limits using UV/diode array detection, readily available in most laboratories, down to 1-8 ng ml(-1), and using electron capture detection better than 1 ng ml(-1), which is lower than that for nitrogen-phosphorus detector. MS interfaced with electrospray ionization offered similar sensitivity, whilst sonic spray ionization provided detection down to 0.03 ng ml(-1). A brief discussion on chemical structures, metabolism and mechanism of action of this group of drugs is also presented.

  16. Influence of x-ray diffraction sample preparation on quantitative mineralogy: implications for chromate waste treatment.

    PubMed

    Dermatas, Dimitris; Chrysochoou, Maria; Pardali, Sarra; Grubb, Dennis G

    2007-01-01

    Powders of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) were mineralogically evaluated using quantitative X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) to illustrate the impacts of sample preparation procedures. Chromite ore processing residue is strongly alkaline, reactive, contains minerals of varying hardness and absorption coefficients, and exhibits significant amorphicity. This poses a challenge to produce powders for XRPD analysis that are sufficiently fine and of uniform particle size while avoiding mineral reactions and overgrinding effects. Dry, hand pulverization to different grain sizes, and wet, mechanical pulverization (micromilling) using four milling liquids (cyclohexane, isopropanol, ethanol, and water), and variable milling durations (up to 15 min) were evaluated. Micromilling with a light, nonpolar, highly evaporative liquid such as cyclohexane with a milling time of 5 min mitigated systematic errors such as microabsorption and preferred orientation as it produced finer and more uniform particle size distributions than the hand-pulverized powders, while simultaneously affording the least time for sample preparation. Conversely, the use of water as milling liquid resulted in extensive hydration reactions during sample preparation, causing mischaracterization and significant underestimation of its reactive brownmillerite content, which can complicate the remediation design process for COPR. Hand pulverization emerged as a necessary complement to quantify Cr(VI)-containing, softer minerals destroyed during mechanical milling, the quantification of which has also important implications for COPR treatment design. The findings of this study may be applicable in a variety of geochemically complicated and reactive environmental media (metal-contaminated soils, stabilized/solidified media, inorganic waste), and points to the importance of the sample preparation method to obtain reliable quantitative XRPD results.

  17. Development of an automated sample preparation module for environmental monitoring of biowarfare agents.

    PubMed

    Hindson, Benjamin J; Brown, Steve B; Marshall, Graham D; McBride, Mary T; Makarewicz, Anthony J; Gutierrez, Dora M; Wolcott, Duane K; Metz, Thomas R; Madabhushi, Ramakrishna S; Dzenitis, John M; Colston, Billy W

    2004-07-01

    An automated sample preparation module, based upon sequential injection analysis (SIA), has been developed for use within an autonomous pathogen detection system. The SIA system interfaced aerosol sampling with multiplexed microsphere immunoassay-flow cytometric detection. Metering and sequestering of microspheres using SIA was found to be reproducible and reliable, over 24-h periods of autonomous operation. Four inbuilt immunoassay controls showed excellent immunoassay and system stability over five days of unattended continuous operation. Titration curves for two biological warfare agents, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, obtained using the automated SIA procedure were shown to be similar to those generated using a manual microtiter plate procedure.

  18. TMT One-Stop Shop: From Reliable Sample Preparation to Computational Analysis Platform.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mehdi; Pascovici, Dana; Wu, Jemma X; Chick, Joel; Wu, Yunqi; Cooke, Brett; Haynes, Paul; Molloy, Mark P

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we describe the workflow we use for labeled quantitative proteomics analysis using tandem mass tags (TMT) starting with the sample preparation and ending with the multivariate analysis of the resulting data. We detail the step-by-step process from sample processing, labeling, fractionation, and data processing using Proteome Discoverer through to data analysis and interpretation in the context of a multi-run experiment. The final analysis and data interpretation rely on an R package we call TMTPrepPro, which are deployed on a local GenePattern server, and used for generating various outputs which are also outlined herein.

  19. Optimization of Proteomic Sample Preparation Procedures for Comprehensive Protein Characterization of Pathogenic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mottaz-Brewer, Heather M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Manes, Nathan P.; Ansong, Charles; Shi, Liang; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Kikuchi, Takane; Wong, Scott W.; Estep, Ryan D.; Heffron, Fred; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a powerful analytical tool for investigating pathogens and their interactions within a host. The sensitivity of such analyses provides broad proteome characterization, but the sample-handling procedures must first be optimized to ensure compatibility with the technique and to maximize the dynamic range of detection. The decision-making process for determining optimal growth conditions, preparation methods, sample analysis methods, and data analysis techniques in our laboratory is discussed herein with consideration of the balance in sensitivity, specificity, and biomass losses during analysis of host-pathogen systems. PMID:19183792

  20. Simple Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Assisted Sample Preparation Method for LC-MS-based Proteomic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Shi, Tujin; Wang, Lu; Gao, Xiaoli; Su, Dian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Liu, Tao; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2012-03-10

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is one of the most popular laboratory reagents used for highly efficient biological sample extraction; however, SDS presents a significant challenge to LC-MS-based proteomic analyses due to its severe interference with reversed-phase LC separations and electrospray ionization interfaces. This study reports a simple SDS-assisted proteomic sample preparation method facilitated by a novel peptide-level SDS removal protocol. After SDS-assisted protein extraction and digestion, SDS was effectively (>99.9%) removed from peptides through ion substitution-mediated DS- precipitation with potassium chloride (KCl) followed by {approx}10 min centrifugation. Excellent peptide recovery (>95%) was observed for less than 20 {mu}g of peptides. Further experiments demonstrated the compatibility of this protocol with LC-MS/MS analyses. The resulting proteome coverage from this SDS-assisted protocol was comparable to or better than those obtained from other standard proteomic preparation methods in both mammalian tissues and bacterial samples. These results suggest that this SDS-assisted protocol is a practical, simple, and broadly applicable proteomic sample processing method, which can be particularly useful when dealing with samples difficult to solubilize by other methods.

  1. DNA isolation and sample preparation for quantification of adduct levels by accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dingley, Karen H; Ubick, Esther A; Vogel, John S; Ognibene, Ted J; Malfatti, Michael A; Kulp, Kristen; Haack, Kurt W

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is a highly sensitive technique used for the quantification of adducts following exposure to carbon-14- or tritium-labeled chemicals, with detection limits in the range of one adduct per 10(11)-10(12) nucleotides. The protocol described in this chapter provides an optimal method for isolating and preparing DNA samples to measure isotope-labeled DNA adducts by AMS. When preparing samples, special precautions must be taken to avoid cross-contamination of isotope among samples and produce a sample that is compatible with AMS. The DNA isolation method described is based upon digestion of tissue with proteinase K, followed by extraction of DNA using Qiagen isolation columns. The extracted DNA is precipitated with isopropanol, washed repeatedly with 70 % ethanol to remove salt, and then dissolved in water. DNA samples are then converted to graphite or titanium hydride and the isotope content measured by AMS to quantify adduct levels. This method has been used to reliably generate good yields of uncontaminated, pure DNA from animal and human tissues for analysis of adduct levels.

  2. Sample preparation for combined chemical analysis and in vitro bioassay application in water quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Annemieke; Schriks, Merijn; Brand, Walter; Bäuerlein, Patrick S; van der Kooi, Margaretha M E; van Doorn, René H; Emke, Erik; Reus, Astrid A; van der Linden, Sander C; de Voogt, Pim; Heringa, Minne B

    2013-11-01

    The combination of in vitro bioassays and chemical screening can provide a powerful toolbox to determine biologically relevant compounds in water extracts. In this study, a sample preparation method is evaluated for the suitability for both chemical analysis and in vitro bioassays. A set of 39 chemicals were spiked to surface water, which were extracted using Oasis MCX cartridges. The extracts were chemically analyzed by liquid chromatography linear ion trap Orbitrap analysis and recoveries appeared to be on average 61% Compounds with logK(ow) values in the range between 0 and 4 are recovered well using this method. In a next step, the same extracts were tested for genotoxic activity using the Comet assay and Ames fluctuation test and for specific endocrine receptor activation using a panel of CALUX assays, for estrogenic (ER), androgenic (AR), glucocorticoid (GR), progestagenic (PR), and thyroidogenic (TR) agonistic activities. The results of the genotoxicity assays indicated that spiked genotoxic compounds were preserved during sample preparation. The measured responses of the GR CALUX and ER CALUX assays were similar to the predicted responses. The measured responses in the AR CALUX and PR CALUX assays were much lower than expected from the analytical concentration, probably due to antagonistic effects of some spiked compounds. Overall, the presented sample preparation method seems to be suitable for both chemical analysis and specific in vitro bioassay applications.

  3. Error baseline rates of five sample preparation methods used to characterize RNA virus populations.

    PubMed

    Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Wiley, Michael R; Nagle, Elyse R; Reyes, Daniel; Pfeffer, Brad P; Kuhn, Jens H; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Palacios, Gustavo F

    2017-01-01

    Individual RNA viruses typically occur as populations of genomes that differ slightly from each other due to mutations introduced by the error-prone viral polymerase. Understanding the variability of RNA virus genome populations is critical for understanding virus evolution because individual mutant genomes may gain evolutionary selective advantages and give rise to dominant subpopulations, possibly even leading to the emergence of viruses resistant to medical countermeasures. Reverse transcription of virus genome populations followed by next-generation sequencing is the only available method to characterize variation for RNA viruses. However, both steps may lead to the introduction of artificial mutations, thereby skewing the data. To better understand how such errors are introduced during sample preparation, we determined and compared error baseline rates of five different sample preparation methods by analyzing in vitro transcribed Ebola virus RNA from an artificial plasmid-based system. These methods included: shotgun sequencing from plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a basic "no amplification" method, amplicon sequencing from the plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a "targeted" amplification method, sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA) as a "random" amplification method, rolling circle reverse transcription sequencing (CirSeq) as an advanced "no amplification" method, and Illumina TruSeq RNA Access as a "targeted" enrichment method. The measured error frequencies indicate that RNA Access offers the best tradeoff between sensitivity and sample preparation error (1.4-5) of all compared methods.

  4. Sample preparation: a critical step in the analysis of cholesterol oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christiana A; Constantinou, Michalis S; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P

    2014-02-15

    In recent years, cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) have drawn scientific interest, particularly due to their implications on human health. A big number of these compounds have been demonstrated to be cytotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. The main source of COPs is through diet, and particularly from the consumption of cholesterol-rich foods. This raises questions about the safety of consumers, and it suggests the necessity for the development of a sensitive and a reliable analytical method in order to identify and quantify these components in food samples. Sample preparation is a necessary step in the analysis of COPs in order to eliminate interferences and increase sensitivity. Numerous publications have, over the years, reported the use of different methods for the extraction and purification of COPs. However, no method has, so far, been established as a routine method for the analysis of COPs in foods. Therefore, it was considered important to overview different sample preparation procedures and evaluate the different preparative parameters, such as time of saponification, the type of organic solvents for fat extraction, the stationary phase in solid phase extraction, etc., according to recovery, precision and simplicity.

  5. Preparation of novel polydimethylsiloxane solid-phase microextraction film and its application in liquid sample pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Liao, Hui; Dong, Xu-Yan; Li, Yan-Hua; Chen, Hong

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, an extraction approach based on the use of a novel polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film as the extraction medium was described. Two kinds of PDMS films with smooth surface and frosted surface were prepared and were practically evaluated for extraction. A model analytical problem, the determination of organochlorine pesticides in water samples, was selected for practical evaluation of the film extraction procedure by direct extraction and solvent desorption, followed by gas chromatography (GC) analysis with electron capture detection (ECD). The main variables affecting the extraction process such as the extraction time, the extraction temperature, the elution conditions, etc. were studied. The method was characterized on the basis of its linearity, precision, and limits of detection. The novel approach was sensitive and precise enough for the detection of the target analytes in the low nanogram per liter range using 5 mL of sample. In fact, limits of detection ranging from 0.77 to 10.25 ng/L were obtained. Compared with the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber, the robust extraction film has a large extraction capacity, low cost of preparation. Besides, owing to the simplicity of the extraction procedures, in-site sample preparation for environmental monitor may be realized.

  6. Biochemical characteristics of non starch polysaccharide hydrolyzing enzyme preparations designed as feed additives for poultry and piglet nutrition.

    PubMed

    Vahjen, W; Simon, O

    1999-01-01

    Non starch polysaccharide hydrolyzing enzyme preparations analyzed in this study were composed of up to nine (1-3, 1-4)-beta-glucanase activities and up to six xylanase activities with different molecular weights in the range from 100 kD down to 18 kD as determined with SDS/PAGE zymograms. Partially purified enzyme fractions differed in terms of pH-optima, isoelectric point and thermal stability in aquaeous solutions. Different beta-glucanase activities were found in different production strains, although some enzymes were conserved over genus boundaries. Enzyme preparations from the same or related strains exhibited different patterns of enzyme activity, indicating modification of strain and/or fermentation conditions. Some enzyme preparations contained significant amounts of polygalacturonase and/or galactomannase activity. The pH profiles of whole enzyme preparations resulted from pH optima of isoenzyme fractions. Temperature optima for all preparations were between 50 and 60 degrees C. Thermal stability of high molecular weight components tended to be lower than for low molecular weight fractions. Fractions with cellulase activity were most stable, followed by (1-3, 1-4)-beta-glucanase activities, while fractions with xylanase activities exhibited low thermal stabilities. Incubation of enzyme preparations and their respective active fractions in digesta supernatants revealed only small differences in residual xylanase activity. Digesta from gizzard samples led to the highest inactivation. It is concluded that commercial enzyme preparations display different modes of action and that the development of improved enzyme preparations depends not only on thermal stability, but also on pH profile, substrate specificity and proteolytic stability within the digestive tract.

  7. Rapid Filtration Separation-Based Sample Preparation Method for Bacillus Spores in Powdery and Environmental Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Isabel, Sandra; Boissinot, Maurice; Charlebois, Isabelle; Fauvel, Chantal M.; Shi, Lu-E; Lévesque, Julie-Christine; Paquin, Amélie T.; Bastien, Martine; Stewart, Gale; Leblanc, Éric; Sato, Sachiko

    2012-01-01

    Authorities frequently need to analyze suspicious powders and other samples for biothreat agents in order to assess environmental safety. Numerous nucleic acid detection technologies have been developed to detect and identify biowarfare agents in a timely fashion. The extraction of microbial nucleic acids from a wide variety of powdery and environmental samples to obtain a quality level adequate for these technologies still remains a technical challenge. We aimed to develop a rapid and versatile method of separating bacteria from these samples and then extracting their microbial DNA. Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii was used as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. We studied the effects of a broad variety of powdery and environmental samples on PCR detection and the steps required to alleviate their interference. With a benchmark DNA extraction procedure, 17 of the 23 samples investigated interfered with bacterial lysis and/or PCR-based detection. Therefore, we developed the dual-filter method for applied recovery of microbial particles from environmental and powdery samples (DARE). The DARE procedure allows the separation of bacteria from contaminating matrices that interfere with PCR detection. This procedure required only 2 min, while the DNA extraction process lasted 7 min, for a total of <10 min. This sample preparation procedure allowed the recovery of cleaned bacterial spores and relieved detection interference caused by a wide variety of samples. Our procedure was easily completed in a laboratory facility and is amenable to field application and automation. PMID:22210204

  8. Rapid filtration separation-based sample preparation method for Bacillus spores in powdery and environmental matrices.

    PubMed

    Isabel, Sandra; Boissinot, Maurice; Charlebois, Isabelle; Fauvel, Chantal M; Shi, Lu-E; Lévesque, Julie-Christine; Paquin, Amélie T; Bastien, Martine; Stewart, Gale; Leblanc, Eric; Sato, Sachiko; Bergeron, Michel G

    2012-03-01

    Authorities frequently need to analyze suspicious powders and other samples for biothreat agents in order to assess environmental safety. Numerous nucleic acid detection technologies have been developed to detect and identify biowarfare agents in a timely fashion. The extraction of microbial nucleic acids from a wide variety of powdery and environmental samples to obtain a quality level adequate for these technologies still remains a technical challenge. We aimed to develop a rapid and versatile method of separating bacteria from these samples and then extracting their microbial DNA. Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii was used as a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. We studied the effects of a broad variety of powdery and environmental samples on PCR detection and the steps required to alleviate their interference. With a benchmark DNA extraction procedure, 17 of the 23 samples investigated interfered with bacterial lysis and/or PCR-based detection. Therefore, we developed the dual-filter method for applied recovery of microbial particles from environmental and powdery samples (DARE). The DARE procedure allows the separation of bacteria from contaminating matrices that interfere with PCR detection. This procedure required only 2 min, while the DNA extraction process lasted 7 min, for a total of <10 min. This sample preparation procedure allowed the recovery of cleaned bacterial spores and relieved detection interference caused by a wide variety of samples. Our procedure was easily completed in a laboratory facility and is amenable to field application and automation.

  9. A Simple Sample Preparation with HPLC-UV Method for Estimation of Clomipramine from Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Sayed Abolfazl; Tahvilian, Reza; Dehghani Poudeh, Masoumeh; Rafeepour, Zeinab

    2010-01-01

    Clomipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant. Different methods for determination of clomipramine hydrochloride in plasma have been described. Most of these procedures favor the use of acidic back-extraction in extraction procedure and HPLC as the analytical technique. In this study, the clomipramine extraction procedure was modified and a direct injection to the column was performed to shorten the time of sample preparation considerably. Furthermore, the method was applied in bioequivalence study of new formulations of clomipramine in comparison with reference tablets. The drug and internal standard were extracted from plasma with heptan : isoamyl alcohol (95:5) and re-extracted with 200 μL of orthophosphoric acid (0.3% v/v). The organic layer was discharged and analysis was performed on C8 reverse phase ODS2 HPLC column with a mobile phase, acetonitrile : water (75:25) and UV detection set at 215 nm. Additionally, a single dose study was carried out with a two-sequence, crossover block-randomized design for bioequivalence study. Clomipramine tablets (3 × 25 mg) of either formulations (reference or test products) were administered separately in two occasions to 12 fasting healthy male volunteers. Blood samples were taken prior to and at 9 points within 48 h after dose administration. The retention time of internal standard (cisapride), clomipramine, and desmethyl clomipramine were 5.6 ± 0.2, 10.3 ± 0.3, and 9.5 ± 0.3 min, respectively. The standard curve covering the concentration ranges of 2.5-120 ng/mL was linear (r2 = 0.9950 and 0.9979) for clomipramine and desmethyl clomipramine. The co-efficient of variation for intra-day and inter-day accuracy and precision was less than 18.3%. The pharmacokinetic parameters Cmax and Tmax were obtained directly from plasma clomipramine concentrations. Kel was estimated by log-linear regression and AUC was calculated by the linear trapezoidal rule. The pharmacokinetic parameters AUC and Cmax were tested for equivalence

  10. 49 CFR 199.111 - Retention of samples and additional testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... request, the sample may be discarded following the end of the 365-day period. (b) If the medical review officer (MRO) determines there is no legitimate medical explanation for a confirmed positive test result... and Human Services. The operator may require the employee to pay in advance the cost of shipment...

  11. Back-etch method for plan view transmission electron microscopy sample preparation of optically opaque films.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Coffey, Kevin R

    2008-04-01

    Back-etch methods have been widely used to prepare plan view transmission electron microscopy (TEM) samples of thin films on membranes by removal of the Si substrate below the membrane by backside etching. The conventional means to determine when to stop the etch process is to observe the color of the light transmitted through the sample, which is sensitive to the remaining Si thickness. However, most metallic films thicker than 75 nm are opaque, and there is no detectable color change prior to film perforation. In this paper, a back-etch method based on the observation of an abrupt change of optical reflection contrast is introduced as a means to determine the etch endpoint to prepare TEM samples for these films. As the acid etchant removes the Si substrate material a rough interface is generated. This interface becomes a relatively smooth and featureless region when the etchant reaches the membrane (film/SiO2). This featureless region is caused by the mirror reflection of the film plane (film/SiO2 interface) through the optically transparent SiO2 layer. The lower etch rate of SiO2 (compared with Si) gives the operator enough time to stop the etching without perforating the film. A clear view of the morphology and control of Si roughness during etching are critical to this method, which are discussed in detail. The procedures of mounting wax removal and sample rinsing are also described in detail, as during these steps damage to the membrane may easily occur without appropriate consideration. As examples, the preparation of 100-nm-thick Fe-based amorphous alloy thin film and 160-nm-thick Cu-thin film samples for TEM imaging is described.

  12. Rapid Measurement of Food Adulteration with Minimal Sample Preparation and No Chromatography Using Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dalmia, Avinash

    2017-03-01

    A rapid method, with minimal sample preparation and no chromatography, was developed for analyzing food samples such as olive oil and pomegranate juice to measure adulteration with cheaper ingredients using the novel Direct Sample Analysis™ (DSA) ion source in conjunction with a time-of-flight (TOF)-MS. In less than 30 s, with minimal sample preparation and method development, adulteration of olive oil and pomegranate juice with cheaper seed oils and fruit juices, respectively, was measured with DSA/TOF-MS.

  13. Controlled antibody release from gelatin for on-chip sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xichen; Wasserberg, Dorothee; Breukers, Christian; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Beck, Markus

    2016-05-10

    A practical way to realize on-chip sample preparation for point-of-care diagnostics is to store the required reagents on a microfluidic device and release them in a controlled manner upon contact with the sample. For the development of such diagnostic devices, a fundamental understanding of the release kinetics of reagents from suitable materials in microfluidic chips is therefore essential. Here, we study the release kinetics of fluorophore-conjugated antibodies from (sub-) μm thick gelatin layers and several ways to control the release time. The observed antibody release is well-described by a diffusion model. Release times ranging from ∼20 s to ∼650 s were determined for layers with thicknesses (in the dry state) between 0.25 μm and 1.5 μm, corresponding to a diffusivity of 0.65 μm(2) s(-1) (in the swollen state) for our standard layer preparation conditions. By modifying the preparation conditions, we can influence the properties of gelatin to realize faster or slower release. Faster drying at increased temperatures leads to shorter release times, whereas slower drying at increased humidity yields slower release. As expected in a diffusive process, the release time increases with the size of the antibody. Moreover, the ionic strength of the release medium has a significant impact on the release kinetics. Applying these findings to cell counting chambers with on-chip sample preparation, we can tune the release to control the antibody distribution after inflow of blood in order to achieve homogeneous cell staining.

  14. Soybean and Lactose in Meat Products and Preparations Sampled at Retail

    PubMed Central

    Piccolo, Filomena; Vollano, Lucia; Base, Giuseppe; Girasole, Mariagrazia; Smaldone, Giorgio; Cortesi, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies and intolerances have increased during the last decades and regulatory authorities have taken different measures to prevent and manage consumers’ adverse reactions, including correct labelling of foods. Aim of this work was to search for soybean and lactose in meat products and meat preparations taken from retail in some provinces of Campania Region (Southern Italy) and to evaluate the food labels compliance with Regulation (EU) n.1169/2011. Soybean and lactose were searched using commercial kits in n. 58 samples of meat products produced in or distributed by 19 establishments, and in n. 55 samples of meat products and n. 8 of meat preparations produced in 21 plants. All samples were selected on the basis of the absence of any information on the labels about the presence of the two searched allergens, with the exception of n. 5 samples tested for lactose. Traces of soybean were detected in 50 out of the 58 examined samples, at concentrations up to 0.93 mg kg–1. Only two samples contained levels above the detection limit of 0.31 mg kg–1. Lactose levels ranging from 0.11 to 2.95 g/100 g, i.e. above the detection limit, were found in all the tested samples (n. 63). The results of the present research underline the need for careful controls and planning by operators as part of the self-control plans, and deserve attention from the competent authorities considering not only the consumers’ health but also the great attention media pay to regulations providing consumers with information on food. PMID:27853709

  15. Soybean and Lactose in Meat Products and Preparations Sampled at Retail.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Filomena; Vollano, Lucia; Base, Giuseppe; Girasole, Mariagrazia; Smaldone, Giorgio; Cortesi, Maria Luisa

    2016-06-03

    Food allergies and intolerances have increased during the last decades and regulatory authorities have taken different measures to prevent and manage consumers' adverse reactions, including correct labelling of foods. Aim of this work was to search for soybean and lactose in meat products and meat preparations taken from retail in some provinces of Campania Region (Southern Italy) and to evaluate the food labels compliance with Regulation (EU) n.1169/2011. Soybean and lactose were searched using commercial kits in n. 58 samples of meat products produced in or distributed by 19 establishments, and in n. 55 samples of meat products and n. 8 of meat preparations produced in 21 plants. All samples were selected on the basis of the absence of any information on the labels about the presence of the two searched allergens, with the exception of n. 5 samples tested for lactose. Traces of soybean were detected in 50 out of the 58 examined samples, at concentrations up to 0.93 mg kg(-1). Only two samples contained levels above the detection limit of 0.31 mg kg(-1). Lactose levels ranging from 0.11 to 2.95 g/100 g, i.e. above the detection limit, were found in all the tested samples (n. 63). The results of the present research underline the need for careful controls and planning by operators as part of the self-control plans, and deserve attention from the competent authorities considering not only the consumers' health but also the great attention media pay to regulations providing consumers with information on food.

  16. The effects of water sample treatment, preparation, and storage prior to cyanotoxin analysis for cylindrospermopsin, microcystin and saxitoxin.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Lisa; Church, Jennifer L; Carpino, Justin; Faltin-Mara, Erin; Rubio, Fernando

    2016-02-25

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms occur in freshwater lakes, ponds, rivers, and reservoirs, and in brackish waters throughout the world. The wide variety of cyanotoxins and their congeners can lead to frequent exposure of humans through consumption of meat, fish, seafood, blue-green algal products and water, accidental ingestion of contaminated water and cyanobacterial scum during recreational activities, and inhalation of cyanobacterial aerosols. Cyanotoxins can also occur in the drinking water supply. In order to monitor human exposure, sensitive analytical methods such as enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry are often used. Regardless of the analytical method of choice, some problems regularly occur during sample collection, treatment, storage, and preparation which cause toxin loss and therefore underestimation of the true concentration. To evaluate the potential influence of sample treatment, storage and preparation materials on surface and drinking water samples, the effects of different types of materials on toxin recovery were compared. Collection and storage materials included glass and various types of plastics. It was found that microcystin congeners LA and LF adsorbed to polystyrene, polypropylene, high density polyethylene and polycarbonate storage containers, leading to low recoveries (<70%), cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxin did not adsorb to the containers tested. Therefore, this study shows that glass or polyethylene terephthalate glycol containers are the materials of choice for collection and storage of samples containing the cyanotoxins cylindrospermopsin, microcystins, and saxitoxin. This study also demonstrated that after 15 min chlorine decreased the concentration of microcystin LR to <40%, microcystin LA and saxitoxin to <15%, therefore quenching of drinking water samples immediately upon sample collection is critical for accurate analysis. In addition, the effect of various drinking water treatment

  17. Membrane-based sample preparation for ion chromatography-Techniques, instrumental configurations and applications.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Wolfgang; Markeviciute, Inga

    2017-01-06

    Sample preparation is the bottleneck of many analytical methods, including ion chromatography (IC). Procedures based on the application of membranes are important, yet not well appreciated means for clean-up and analyte preconcentration of liquid samples. Filtration, ultrafiltration, the variety of dialysis techniques, i.e. passive dialysis, Donnan dialysis and electrodialysis, as well as gas-diffusion are being reviewed here with respect to their application in combination with IC. Instrumental aspects including hardware requirements, configuration of membrane separation units and membrane characteristics are presented. Operation in batch and flow-through mode is described with emphasis on the latter to in-line coupling with IC, permitting fully automated operation. Attention is also drawn to dialysis probes and microdialysis both providing options for in-situ measurements with inherent selective sampling of analytes and sample preparation. The respective features of the various techniques are outlined with respect to the possibilities of matrix removal and selectivity enhancement. In this article, we provide examples of application of the diverse membrane separation techniques and discuss the benefits and limitations thereof.

  18. Sample preparation for precise and quantitative electron holographic analysis of semiconductor devices.

    PubMed

    Han, Myung-Geun; Li, Jing; Xie, Qianghua; Fejes, Peter; Conner, James; Taylor, Bill; McCartney, Martha R

    2006-08-01

    Wedge polishing was used to prepare one-dimensional Si n-p junction and Si p-channel metal-oxide-silicon field effect transistor (pMOSFET) samples for precise and quantitative electrostatic potential analysis using off-axis electron holography. To avoid artifacts associated with ion milling, cloth polishing with 0.02-microm colloidal silica suspension was used for final thinning. Uniform thickness and no significant charging were observed by electron holography analysis for samples prepared entirely by this method. The effect of sample thickness was investigated and the minimum thickness for reliable results was found to be approximately 160 nm. Below this thickness, measured phase changes were smaller than expected. For the pMOSFET sample, quantitative analysis of two-dimensional electrostatic potential distribution showed that the metallurgical gate length (separation between two extension junctions) was approximately 54 nm, whereas the actual gate length was measured to be approximately 70 nm by conventional transmission electron microscopy. Thus, source and drain junction encroachment under the gate was 16 nm.

  19. SLUDGE BATCH 6 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB6 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

    2010-05-21

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Six (SB6) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB6 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB5. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-09-110) taken on October 8, 2009. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by eight washes, nine decants, an addition of Pu from Canyon Tank 16.3, and an addition of NaNO{sub 2}. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task II.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB6 will be taken and transferred

  20. Shelf life of cooked goat blood sausage prepared with the addition of heart and kidney.

    PubMed

    Silva, F A P; Amaral, D S; Guerra, I C D; Arcanjo, N M O; Bezerra, T K A; Ferreira, V C S; Araújo, I B S; Dalmás, P S; Madruga, M S

    2014-08-01

    This study focused on the effect of two packaging formats (vacuum packaging and over-wrap packaging) on the shelf life of cooked sausage prepared with blood, heart, kidney and goat meat fragments under storage at 4±1°C for a period of 90 days. The storage time and type of packaging significantly affected the chemical (pH, moisture, protein and TBARS number), physical (shear force) and microbial (mould and yeast) parameters of cooked sausage. Vacuum packaging maintained the microbiological and chemical qualities of cooked goat blood sausage for a longer period of time (63 days) compared to over-wrap packaging (41 days) and could be a viable alternative to refrigerated storage of the product for quality maintenance.

  1. Powder Layer Preparation Using Vibration-controlled Capillary Steel Nozzles for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stichel, Thomas; Laumer, Tobias; Baumüller, Tobias; Amend, Philipp; Roth, Stephan

    In this report, the dry delivery of polyamide 12 powders by vibrating capillary steel nozzles is investigated and discussed regarding its potential for powder layer preparation in Laser Beam Melting. Therefore, a setup including a steel nozzle assembled on a piezoelectric actuator is presented, which enables the precise control over very small powder quantities by vibration excitation. An analysis reveals that the mass flow through the nozzle can be adjusted by the vibration modes in a certain range depending on the nozzle's specifications, whereas the vibration modes themselves show a complicated behaviour. Using a positioning system in combination with the vibrating nozzle, single-layer patterns consisting of polyamide 12 are produced and characterized regarding surface homogeneity and selectivity using a laser stripe sensor.

  2. Centrifugal concentrator for the substitution of nitrogen blow-down micro-concentration in dioxin/polychlorinated biphenyl sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Kemmochi, Yukio; Tsutsumi, Kaori; Arikawa, Akihiro; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2002-01-18

    A centrifugal concentrator was applied for the substitution of nitrogen blow-down micro-concentration in dioxin/PCB sample preparation. Automation was achieved through this apparatus and resulted in significant improvements in sample preparation productivity, along with excellent reproducibility and recovery rate of dioxin/PCB. Mean recoveries of dioxin congeners were 90-106%, respectively.

  3. Sources of variability in collection and preparation of paint and lead-coating samples.

    PubMed

    Harper, S L; Gutknecht, W F

    2001-06-01

    Chronic exposure of children to lead (Pb) can result in permanent physiological impairment. Since surfaces coated with lead-containing paints and varnishes are potential sources of exposure, it is extremely important that reliable methods for sampling and analysis be available. The sources of variability in the collection and preparation of samples were investigated to improve the performance and comparability of methods and to ensure that data generated will be adequate for its intended use. Paint samples of varying sizes (areas and masses) were collected at different locations across a variety of surfaces including metal, plaster, concrete, and wood. A variety of grinding techniques were compared. Manual mortar and pestle grinding for at least 1.5 min and mechanized grinding techniques were found to generate similar homogenous particle size distributions required for aliquots as small as 0.10 g. When 342 samples were evaluated for sample weight loss during mortar and pestle grinding, 4% had 20% or greater loss with a high of 41%. Homogenization and sub-sampling steps were found to be the principal sources of variability related to the size of the sample collected. Analysis of samples from different locations on apparently identical surfaces were found to vary by more than a factor of two both in Pb concentration (mg cm-2 or %) and areal coating density (g cm-2). Analyses of substrates were performed to determine the Pb remaining after coating removal. Levels as high as 1% Pb were found in some substrate samples, corresponding to more than 35 mg cm-2 Pb. In conclusion, these sources of variability must be considered in development and/or application of any sampling and analysis methodologies.

  4. A user-friendly robotic sample preparation program for fully automated biological sample pipetting and dilution to benefit the regulated bioanalysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Ouyang, Zheng; Zeng, Jianing; Yuan, Long; Zheng, Naiyu; Jemal, Mohammed; Arnold, Mark E

    2012-06-01

    Biological sample dilution is a rate-limiting step in bioanalytical sample preparation when the concentrations of samples are beyond standard curve ranges, especially when multiple dilution factors are needed in an analytical run. We have developed and validated a Microsoft Excel-based robotic sample preparation program (RSPP) that automatically transforms Watson worklist sample information (identification, sequence and dilution factor) to comma-separated value (CSV) files. The Freedom EVO liquid handler software imports and transforms the CSV files to executable worklists (.gwl files), allowing the robot to perform sample dilutions at variable dilution factors. The dynamic dilution range is 1- to 1000-fold and divided into three dilution steps: 1- to 10-, 11- to 100-, and 101- to 1000-fold. The whole process, including pipetting samples, diluting samples, and adding internal standard(s), is accomplished within 1 h for two racks of samples (96 samples/rack). This platform also supports online sample extraction (liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, protein precipitation, etc.) using 96 multichannel arms. This fully automated and validated sample dilution and preparation process has been applied to several drug development programs. The results demonstrate that application of the RSPP for fully automated sample processing is efficient and rugged. The RSPP not only saved more than 50% of the time in sample pipetting and dilution but also reduced human errors. The generated bioanalytical data are accurate and precise; therefore, this application can be used in regulated bioanalysis.

  5. Evaluation of neon focused ion beam milling for TEM sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Pekin, T C; Allen, F I; Minor, A M

    2016-10-01

    Gallium-based focused ion beams generated from liquid-metal sources are widely used in micromachining and sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy, with well-known drawbacks such as sample damage and contamination. In this work, an alternative (neon) focused ion beam generated by a gas field-ionization source is evaluated for the preparation of electron-transparent specimens. To do so, electron-transparent sections of Si and an Al alloy are prepared with both Ga and Ne ion beams for direct comparison. Diffraction-contrast imaging and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are used to evaluate the relative damage induced by the two beams, and cross-sections of milled trenches are examined to compare the implantation depth with theoretical predictions from Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that for the beam voltages and materials systems investigated, Ne ion beam milling does not significantly reduce the focused ion beam induced artefacts. However, the Ne ion beam does enable more precise milling and may be of interest in cases where Ga contamination cannot be tolerated.

  6. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R E

    1991-08-20

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) and radiocalcium ({sup 41}Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS {sup 14}C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO{sub 2} to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high {sup 13}C{sup {minus}} ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, {sup 14}C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP.

  7. Rapid determination of ethylene oxide with fiber-packed sample preparation needle.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Ikuo; Saito, Yoshihiro; Ghani, Nadia Binti Abdul; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Yogo, Kentaro; Abe, Akira; Shirai, Shingoro; Jinno, Kiyokatsu

    2009-04-03

    Fiber-packed sample preparation device was applied to the simultaneous derivatization/preconcentration of ethylene oxide (EO) in air samples. The polymer-coated filaments were packed longitudinally into the needle, and hydrogen bromide (HBr) was loaded onto the filaments in the preconditioning process. Simultaneous derivatization with HBr in the needle was made during the sampling process of the gaseous EO, and the corresponding derivatized analyte, 2-bromoethanol, was desorbed by passing a small amount of methanol through the extraction needle in the heated gas chromatograph (GC) injector. The basic extraction/desorption parameters for EO have been evaluated. The limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of run-to-run repeatability were 1.8 ng/L, 5.4 ng/L and less than 4%, respectively, with an extraction time of about 10 min. Satisfactory storage performance for three days at room temperature was also confirmed.

  8. Rapid Microbial Sample Preparation from Blood Using a Novel Concentration Device

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Anna K.; Campbell, Jennifer; Wirz, Holger; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate care for bacteremic patients is dictated by the amount of time needed for an accurate diagnosis. However, the concentration of microbes in the blood is extremely low in these patients (1–100 CFU/mL), traditionally requiring growth (blood culture) or amplification (e.g., PCR) for detection. Current culture-based methods can take a minimum of two days, while faster methods like PCR require a sample free of inhibitors (i.e., blood components). Though commercial kits exist for the removal of blood from these samples, they typically capture only DNA, thereby necessitating the use of blood culture for antimicrobial testing. Here, we report a novel, scaled-up sample preparation protocol carried out in a new microbial concentration device. The process can efficiently lyse 10 mL of bacteremic blood while maintaining the microorganisms’ viability, giving a 30‑μL final output volume. A suite of six microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans) at a range of clinically relevant concentrations was tested. All of the microorganisms had recoveries greater than 55% at the highest tested concentration of 100 CFU/mL, with three of them having over 70% recovery. At the lowest tested concentration of 3 CFU/mL, two microorganisms had recoveries of ca. 40–50% while the other four gave recoveries greater than 70%. Using a Taqman assay for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA)to prove the feasibility of downstream analysis, we show that our microbial pellets are clean enough for PCR amplification. PCR testing of 56 spiked-positive and negative samples gave a specificity of 0.97 and a sensitivity of 0.96, showing that our sample preparation protocol holds great promise for the rapid diagnosis of bacteremia directly from a primary sample. PMID:25675242

  9. 14C sample preparation for AMS microdosing studies at Lund University using online combustion and septa-sealed vials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydoff, Marie; Stenström, Kristina

    2010-04-01

    The Department of Physics at Lund University is participating in a European Union project called EUMAPP (European Union Microdose AMS Partnership Programme), in which sample preparation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of biological samples from microdosing studies have been made. This paper describes a simplified method of converting biological samples to solid graphite for 14C analysis with AMS. The method is based on online combustion of the samples, and reduction of CO 2 in septa-sealed vials. The septa-sealed vials and disposable materials are used to eliminate sample cross-contamination. Measurements of ANU and Ox I standards show deviations of 2% and 3%, respectively, relative to reference values. This level of accuracy is sufficient for biological samples from microdosing studies. Since the method has very few handling steps from sample to graphite, the risk of failure during the sample preparation process is minimized, making the method easy to use in routine preparation of samples.

  10. Sample preparation for single virion atomic force microscopy and super-resolution fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Jeffery A; Saffarian, Saveez

    2014-01-02

    Immobilization of virions to glass surfaces is a critical step in single virion imaging. Here we present a technique adopted from single molecule imaging assays which allows adhesion of single virions to glass surfaces with specificity. This preparation is based on grafting the surface of the glass with a mixture of PLL-g-PEG and PLL-g-PEG-Biotin, adding a layer of avidin, and finally creating virion anchors through attachment of biotinylated virus specific antibodies. We have applied this technique across a range of experiments including atomic force microscopy (AFM) and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. This sample preparation method results in a control adhesion of the virions to the surface.

  11. Biological sample preparation and {sup 41}Ca AMS measurement at LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T.; Southon, J.R.; Bench, G.S.; McAninch, J.E.; Serfass, R.E.; Fang, Y.; King, J.C.; Woodhouse, L.R.

    1994-10-10

    Calcium metabolism in biology may be better understood by the use of {sup 41}Ca labels, although detection by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is required. Methodologies for preparation of urine samples and subsequent AMS measurement were investigated. Novel attempts at preparing CaH{sub 2} were unsuccessful, but CaF{sub 2} of sufficient purity could be produced by precipitation of calcium from urine as oxalate, followed by separation of calcium by cation exchange chromatography and washing the CaF{sub 2} precipitate. The presence of some remaining impurities could be compensated for by selecting the appropriate accelerated ion charge state for AMS. The use of projectile x rays for isobar discrimination was explored as an alternative to the conventional dE/dx device.

  12. Sample preparation for avian and porcine influenza virus cDNA amplification simplified: Boiling vs. conventional RNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Fereidouni, Sasan R; Starick, Elke; Ziller, Mario; Harder, Timm C; Unger, Hermann; Hamilton, Keith; Globig, Anja

    2015-09-01

    RNA extraction and purification is a fundamental step that allows for highly sensitive amplification of specific RNA targets in PCR applications. However, commercial extraction kits that are broadly used because of their robustness and high yield of purified RNA are expensive and labor-intensive. In this study, boiling in distilled water or a commercial lysis buffer of different sample matrices containing avian or porcine influenza viruses was tested as an alternative. Real-time PCR (RTqPCR) for nucleoprotein gene fragment was used as read out. Results were compared with freshly extracted RNA by use of a commercial extraction kit. Different batches of virus containing materials, including diluted virus positive allantoic fluid or cell culture supernatant, and avian faecal, cloacal or oropharyngeal swab samples were used in this study. Simple boiling of samples without any additional purification steps can be used as an alternative RNA preparation method to detect influenza A virus nucleoprotein RNA in oropharyngeal swab samples, allantoic fluid or cell-culture supernatant. The boiling method is not applicable for sample matrices containing faecal material.

  13. In Situ-Forming Polyamidoamine Dendrimer Hydrogels with Tunable Properties Prepared via Aza-Michael Addition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; He, Hongliang; Cooper, Remy C; Yang, Hu

    2017-03-29

    In this work, we describe synthesis and characterization of novel in situ-forming polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer hydrogels (DHs) with tunable properties prepared via highly efficient aza-Michael addition reaction. PAMAM dendrimer G5 was chosen as the underlying core and functionalized with various degrees of acetylation using acetic anhydride. The nucleophilic amines on the dendrimer surface reacted with α, β-unsaturated ester in acrylate groups of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEG-DA, Mn = 575 g/mol) via aza-Michael addition reaction to form dendrimer hydrogels without the use of any catalyst. The solidification time, rheological behavior, network structure, swelling, and degradation properties of the hydrogel were tuned by adjusting the dendrimer surface acetylation degree and dendrimer concentration. The DHs were shown to be highly cytocompatible and support cell adhesion and proliferation. We also prepared an injectable dendrimer hydrogel formulation to deliver the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and demonstrated that the injectable formulation efficiently inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection. Taken together, this new class of dendrimer hydrogel prepared by aza-Michael addition reaction can serve as a safe tunable platform for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  14. microPREP: a new laser tool for high-volume sample preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Uwe; Petsch, Tino; Krause, Michael; Höche, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Over the past fifty year, lasers have perpetuated to find new, often groundbreaking applications in science and technology. The most important features of lasers are that photons are inherently free of elemental contamination, extremely high energy densities can be focused in very small areas and the laser beam can be precisely positioned using deflection mirrors. By reducing pulse lengths from a few nanoseconds down to the picosecond or femtosecond range, material's ablation is becoming increasingly "athermal", i.e. structure damage by local heating is reduced to well below a few microns. In view of these outstanding characteristics of lasers as tools for micromachining, it is very surprising that sample preparation for microstructure diagnostics so far hasn't made use of laser technology. microPREPTM, the all-new, patented laser-micromachining tool developed by 3D-Micromac is the first instrument to make fast, clean, and efficient laser ablation available for the preparation of samples for microstructure diagnostics. Exemplified for a sample to be investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and following a three-stage approach, a supporting basic structure is cut from the feedstock first. Second, the supported structure is thinned down to a few micron of residual thickness and third, the supported and thinned structure is polished using an ion broad beam. Illustrated by numerous examples, it is shown that this technology is ready to be applied on different areas of microstructure diagnostics and has very high potential for failure diagnostics.

  15. A sample preparation method for recovering suppressed analyte ions in MALDI TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xianwen; de Waal, Bas F M; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; van Dongen, Joost L J

    2015-05-01

    In matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS), analyte signals can be substantially suppressed by other compounds in the sample. In this technical note, we describe a modified thin-layer sample preparation method that significantly reduces the analyte suppression effect (ASE). In our method, analytes are deposited on top of the surface of matrix preloaded on the MALDI plate. To prevent embedding of analyte into the matrix crystals, the sample solution were prepared without matrix and efforts were taken not to re-dissolve the preloaded matrix. The results with model mixtures of peptides, synthetic polymers and lipids show that detection of analyte ions, which were completely suppressed using the conventional dried-droplet method, could be effectively recovered by using our method. Our findings suggest that the incorporation of analytes in the matrix crystals has an important contributory effect on ASE. By reducing ASE, our method should be useful for the direct MALDI MS analysis of multicomponent mixtures.

  16. Surface Modified Particles By Multi-Step Michael-Type Addition And Process For The Preparation Thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Ronald Lee; Elliott, Brian John; Luebben, Silvia DeVito; Myers, Andrew William; Smith, Bryan Matthew

    2005-05-03

    A new class of surface modified particles and a multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process for the preparation of the same is provided. The multi-step Michael-type addition surface modification process involves two or more reactions to compatibilize particles with various host systems and/or to provide the particles with particular chemical reactivities. The initial step comprises the attachment of a small organic compound to the surface of the inorganic particle. The subsequent steps attach additional compounds to the previously attached organic compounds through reactive organic linking groups. Specifically, these reactive groups are activated carbon—carbon pi bonds and carbon and non-carbon nucleophiles that react via Michael or Michael-type additions.

  17. Comparison of blood plasma sample preparation methods for combined LC-MS lipidomics and metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Rainey E; Ducrocq, Antoine J; McDougall, Danielle J; Garrett, Timothy J; Yost, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this research was to find the most comprehensive lipid extraction of blood plasma, while also providing adequate aqueous preparation for metabolite analysis. Comparisons have been made previously of the Folch, Bligh-Dyer, and Matyash lipid extractions; furthermore, this paper provides an additional comparison of a phospholipid removal plate for analysis. This plate was used for lipid extraction rather than its intended use in lipid removal for polar analysis, and it proves to be robust for targeted lipid analysis. Folch and Matyash provided reproducible recovery over a range of lipid classes, however the Matyash aqueous layer compared well to a typical methanol preparation for polar metabolite analysis. Thus, the Matyash method is the best choice for an untargeted biphasic extraction for metabolomics and lipidomics in blood plasma.

  18. Simple, Expendable, 3D-Printed Microfluidic Systems for Sample Preparation of Petroleum.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Érica M; Murer, Rui C; Santos, Jandyson M; Carvalho, Rogério M; Eberlin, Marcos N; Augusto, Fabio; Poppi, Ronei J; Gobbi, Angelo L; Hantao, Leandro W

    2017-03-21

    In this study, we introduce a simple protocol to manufacture disposable, 3D-printed microfluidic systems for sample preparation of petroleum. This platform is produced with a consumer-grade 3D-printer, using fused deposition modeling. Successful incorporation of solid-phase extraction (SPE) to microchip was ensured by facile 3D element integration using proposed approach. This 3D-printed μSPE device was applied to challenging matrices in oil and gas industry, such as crude oil and oil-brine emulsions. Case studies investigated important limitations of nonsilicon and nonglass microchips, namely, resistance to nonpolar solvents and conservation of sample integrity. Microfluidic features remained fully functional even after prolonged exposure to nonpolar solvents (20 min). Also, 3D-printed μSPE devices enabled fast emulsion breaking and solvent deasphalting of petroleum, yielding high recovery values (98%) without compromising maltene integrity. Such finding was ascertained by high-resolution molecular analyses using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry by monitoring important biomarker classes, such as C10 demethylated terpanes, ααα-steranes, and monoaromatic steroids. 3D-Printed chips enabled faster and reliable preparation of maltenes by exhibiting a 10-fold reduction in sample processing time, compared to the reference method. Furthermore, polar (oxygen-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing) analytes found in low-concentrations were analyzed by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Analysis results demonstrated that accurate characterization may be accomplished for most classes of polar compounds, except for asphaltenes, which exhibited lower recoveries (82%) due to irreversible adsorption to sorbent phase. Therefore, 3D-printing is a compelling alternative to existing microfabrication solutions, as robust devices were easy to prepare and operate.

  19. Error baseline rates of five sample preparation methods used to characterize RNA virus populations

    PubMed Central

    Kugelman, Jeffrey R.; Wiley, Michael R.; Nagle, Elyse R.; Reyes, Daniel; Pfeffer, Brad P.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Palacios, Gustavo F.

    2017-01-01

    Individual RNA viruses typically occur as populations of genomes that differ slightly from each other due to mutations introduced by the error-prone viral polymerase. Understanding the variability of RNA virus genome populations is critical for understanding virus evolution because individual mutant genomes may gain evolutionary selective advantages and give rise to dominant subpopulations, possibly even leading to the emergence of viruses resistant to medical countermeasures. Reverse transcription of virus genome populations followed by next-generation sequencing is the only available method to characterize variation for RNA viruses. However, both steps may lead to the introduction of artificial mutations, thereby skewing the data. To better understand how such errors are introduced during sample preparation, we determined and compared error baseline rates of five different sample preparation methods by analyzing in vitro transcribed Ebola virus RNA from an artificial plasmid-based system. These methods included: shotgun sequencing from plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a basic “no amplification” method, amplicon sequencing from the plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a “targeted” amplification method, sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA) as a “random” amplification method, rolling circle reverse transcription sequencing (CirSeq) as an advanced “no amplification” method, and Illumina TruSeq RNA Access as a “targeted” enrichment method. The measured error frequencies indicate that RNA Access offers the best tradeoff between sensitivity and sample preparation error (1.4−5) of all compared methods. PMID:28182717

  20. Workshop on Mars 2001: Integrated Science in Preparation for Sample Return and Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, John (Editor); Weitz, Cathy (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The Workshop on Mars 2001: Integrated Science in Preparation for Sample Return and Human Exploration was held on October 2-4, 1999, at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas. The workshop was sponsored by the Lunar and Planetary Institute, the Mars Program Office of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The three-day meeting was attended by 133 scientists whose purpose was to share results from recent missions, to share plans for the 2001 mission, and to come to an agreement on a landing site for this mission.

  1. Preparation and Characterization of Nanocomposite Polymer Membranes Containing Functionalized SnO2 Additives

    PubMed Central

    Scipioni, Roberto; Gazzoli, Delia; Teocoli, Francesca; Palumbo, Oriele; Paolone, Annalisa; Ibris, Neluta; Brutti, Sergio; Navarra, Maria Assunta

    2014-01-01

    In the research of new nanocomposite proton-conducting membranes, SnO2 ceramic powders with surface functionalization have been synthesized and adopted as additives in Nafion-based polymer systems. Different synthetic routes have been explored to obtain suitable, nanometer-sized sulphated tin oxide particles. Structural and morphological characteristics, as well as surface and bulk properties of the obtained oxide powders, have been determined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopies, N2 adsorption, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermal investigations, water uptake (WU) measurements, and ionic exchange capacity (IEC) tests have been used as characterization tools for the nanocomposite membranes. The nature of the tin oxide precursor, as well as the synthesis procedure, were found to play an important role in determining the morphology and the particle size distribution of the ceramic powder, this affecting the effective functionalization of the oxides. The incorporation of such particles, having sulphate groups on their surface, altered some peculiar properties of the resulting composite membrane, such as water content, thermo-mechanical, and morphological characteristics. PMID:24957125

  2. Background and Artifacts Generated by the by the Sample Preparation Experiment on SAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmahdi, Imene; Buch, Arnaud; Szopa, Cyril; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel; Coll, Patrice; Cabane, Michel; Millan, Maeva; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Navarro-Gonzalez, Rafael; Stern, Jennifer; Coscia, David; Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Teinturier, Samuel; Morisson, Marietta; Stambouli, Moncef; Dequaire, Tristan; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) is one of the instruments of the Mars Science Laboratory mission. Three analytical devices composed the SAM experiment: the Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS), the Gas Chromatography (GC) and the Mass Spectrometer (MS). To adapt the nature of a sample to the analytical devices used, a sample preparation and gas processing system implemented with (a) a pyrolysis system, (b) wet chemistry: MTBSTFA and TMAH (c) the hydrocarbon trap (silica beads, Tenax® TA and Carbosieve G) and the injection trap (Tenax® GR composed of Tenax® TA and 30% of graphite) are employed to concentrate volatiles released from the sample prior to GC-MS analysis. Our study investigates several propositions for chlorinated hydrocarbon formation detected in the SAM background by looking for: (a) all products coming from the interaction of Tenax® and perchlorates present on Mars, (b) also between some soil sample and perchlorates and (c) sources of chlorinated hydrocarbon precursors. Here we report on the detection of chlorohydrocarbon compounds and their potential origin.

  3. Determination of flavor enhancers in milk powder by one-step sample preparation and two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Yunan; Hou, Xiaofang; He, Langchong

    2014-04-01

    Maltol, ethyl maltol, vanillin, and ethyl vanillin are important food additives as flavor enhancers. To quantify the four additives in milk powder, a novel 2D liquid chromatographic (2DLC) method was developed in this article. In such a 2DLC system, the target fractions eluted from the first dimensional column (C4) are stored onto the trapping column (C8) for subsequent analysis; after that, they were switched into the second dimensional column (C18) by a two-position six-port switching valve. A one-step sample preparation method was used prior to 2DLC chromatographic analysis, which was easy and convenient. After optimization of all experimental parameters, the new method was validated in terms of linearity, LODs, and LOQs, intra- and interday precision, and accuracy. A conventional single-dimensional liquid chromatographic method was also proposed in this work for comparison. In order to evaluate the applicability of the new 2DLC method, five brands of commercial milk powder samples (n = 8) were analyzed. Vanillin and ethyl vanillin were detected in two samples, respectively. It is showed that the 2DLC method is effective in quality control programs of milk powder products.

  4. Evaluation of sample preparation methods for water activity determination in jerky and kippered beef: a research note.

    PubMed

    Harper, N M; Getty, K J K; Boyle, E A E

    2010-10-01

    Commercially available packaged whole muscle beef jerky, chopped and formed beef jerky, and kippered beef steak were obtained from retail stores to determine the effect of two sample preparation methods on water activity (a(w)). Intact samples were prepared by cutting product into a hexagonal shape with a 3.2 cm diameter. Diced samples were prepared by cutting the product into 0.4 x 0.4 cm squares. Whole muscle jerky a(w) was higher (0.016 units; P<0.001) using the intact method compared to the diced method. There was no difference (P>0.05) in a(w) levels between the two preparation methods for chopped and formed jerky or kippered beef steak. An intact sample preparation method is recommended for a(w) determination of whole muscle jerky to obtain a more conservative value, especially if a(w) is near the margin of safety.

  5. KF addition to Cu2SnS3 thin films prepared by sulfurization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Mitsuki; Fujimoto, Junya; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Sasano, Junji; Izaki, Masanobu

    2017-04-01

    Cu2SnS3 thin films were fabricated by sulfurization with KF addition and applied to photovoltaic devices. Two methods, two-stage annealing and the use of four-layer precursors, were employed, and the quantity of NaF and KF and the annealing temperature were changed. By electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), the Cu/Sn mole ratio was found to range from 0.81 to 1.51. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and Raman spectra indicated that the fabricated thin films had a monoclinic Cu2SnS3 structure. The Cu2SnS3 thin films fabricated by two-stage annealing had a close-packed structure and a pinhole-free surface morphology. The best solar cell in this study showed V oc of 293 mV, which surpassed the previously reported value.

  6. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  7. Sample preparation and separation techniques for bioanalysis of morphine and related substances.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2009-03-01

    In present time the use or misuse of morphine and its derivatives are monitored by assaying the presence of the drug and its metabolites in biofluids. In the present review, focus is placed on the sample preparation and on the separation techniques used in the current best practices of bioanalysis of morphine and its major metabolites. However, as methods for testing the misuse of heroin, a morphine derivative, often involve bioanalytical methods that cover a number of other illicit drug substances, such methods are also included in the review. Furthermore, the review also includes bioanalysis in a broader perspective as analysis of plant materials, cell cultures and environmental samples. The review is not intended to cover all publications that include bioanalysis of morphine but is more to be considered a view into the current best practices of bioanalysis of morphine, its metabolites and other related substances.

  8. Sample preparation for the determination of steroids (corticoids and anabolics) in feed using LC.

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Valencia, Roberto; Ceballos-Magaña, Silvia G; Gonzalo-Lumbreras, Raquel; Santos-Montes, Ana; Izquierdo-Hornillos, Roberto C

    2008-07-01

    An improved sample preparation procedure for the determination of 17 steroids (corticoids (CC) and androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS)), used potentially as growth promoters, in feed samples has been developed. This procedure is based on two reported LC-UV methods. The improved procedure includes a leaching process using ACN, saponification, and SPE using polymeric cartridges. The proposed method was validated according to the EU criteria established for quantitative screening methods in PFS. The extraction efficiencies, decision limits (CCalpha) and detection capabilities (CCbeta), for these compounds were in the ranges of 82-100%, 19-40, and 24-53 microg/kg, respectively. The repeatability and the within-laboratory reproducibility at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 CCbeta levels were smaller than 10%. Accuracy was in the 97-101% range. The robustness was evaluated using the Youden robustness test. This method was applied to the analysis of steroids in different kinds of FS with satisfactory results.

  9. The beauty of being (label)-free: sample preparation methods for SWATH-MS and next-generation targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kate; Deery, Michael J.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Ralser, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The combination of qualitative analysis with label-free quantification has greatly facilitated the throughput and flexibility of novel proteomic techniques. However, such methods rely heavily on robust and reproducible sample preparation procedures. Here, we benchmark a selection of in gel, on filter, and in solution digestion workflows for their application in label-free proteomics. Each procedure was associated with differing advantages and disadvantages. The in gel methods interrogated were cost effective, but were limited in throughput and digest efficiency. Filter-aided sample preparations facilitated reasonable processing times and yielded a balanced representation of membrane proteins, but led to a high signal variation in quantification experiments. Two in solution digest protocols, however, gave optimal performance for label-free proteomics. A protocol based on the detergent RapiGest led to the highest number of detected proteins at second-best signal stability, while a protocol based on acetonitrile-digestion, RapidACN, scored best in throughput and signal stability but came second in protein identification. In addition, we compared label-free data dependent (DDA) and data independent (SWATH) acquisition on a TripleTOF 5600 instrument. While largely similar in protein detection, SWATH outperformed DDA in quantification, reducing signal variation and markedly increasing the number of precisely quantified peptides. PMID:24741437

  10. SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-07-28

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and

  11. Recent developments on field gas extraction and sample preparation methods for radiokrypton dating of groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokochi, Reika

    2016-09-01

    Current and foreseen population growths will lead to an increased demand in freshwater, large quantities of which is stored as groundwater. The ventilation age is crucial to the assessment of groundwater resources, complementing the hydrological model approach based on hydrogeological parameters. Ultra-trace radioactive isotopes of Kr (81 Kr and 85 Kr) possess the ideal physical and chemical properties for groundwater dating. The recent advent of atom trap trace analyses (ATTA) has enabled determination of ultra-trace noble gas radioisotope abundances using 5-10 μ L of pure Kr. Anticipated developments will enable ATTA to analyze radiokrypton isotope abundances at high sample throughput, which necessitates simple and efficient sample preparation techniques that are adaptable to various sample chemistries. Recent developments of field gas extraction devices and simple and rapid Kr separation method at the University of Chicago are presented herein. Two field gas extraction devices optimized for different sampling conditions were recently designed and constructed, aiming at operational simplicity and portability. A newly developed Kr purification system enriches Kr by flowing a sample gas through a moderately cooled (138 K) activated charcoal column, followed by a gentle fractionating desorption. This simple process uses a single adsorbent and separates 99% of the bulk atmospheric gases from Kr without significant loss. The subsequent two stages of gas chromatographic separation and a hot Ti sponge getter further purify the Kr-enriched gas. Abundant CH4 necessitates multiple passages through one of the gas chromatographic separation columns. The presented Kr separation system has a demonstrated capability of extracting Kr with > 90% yield and 99% purity within 75 min from 1.2 to 26.8 L STP of atmospheric air with various concentrations of CH4. The apparatuses have successfully been deployed for sampling in the field and purification of groundwater samples.

  12. Lead biomonitoring in different organs of lead intoxicated rats employing GF AAS and different sample preparations.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Rafael Arromba; Sabarense, Céphora Maria; Prado, Gustavo L P; Metze, Konradin; Cadore, Solange

    2013-01-30

    An analytical procedure was developed for the determination of lead in different tissues from Wistar Hanover rats, previously intoxicated with lead acetate during a toxicological study. About 25 mg of dried sample (bone, liver, kidney, heart, lung and spleen) were mixed with 8.0 mL of 7.00 mol L(-1) nitric acid and digested using microwave radiation in closed vessel. Except for the bone samples, the other tissues could also be analyzed after alkaline solubilization with TMAH. All the digested or solubilized samples were analyzed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Good accuracy and precision were attained when analyzing reference standard materials (for bone, liver and kidney) and also from addition to recovery experiments (for heart, lung and spleen tissues). The method was applied to samples from nine animals and the results suggested that there is a profile for lead bioaccumulation in these animals, which seemed to adapt themselves to continuous lead exposure.

  13. [Preparation technique of S2OF10 gas standard sample and determination method of the trace S2OF10 in SF6].

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wang, J

    1999-09-01

    In this paper a series of methods and techniques for the S2OF10 standard sample preparation and quantitative determination are presented. They are, the preparation of S2OF10 by preparative chromatography with adsorption/thermal desorption, the standard sample of S2OF10 gas prepared by exponential dilution and the gas chromatography/flame photometric detector(GC/FPD) determination of trace S2OF10 from an SF6 sample with quantitative calibration factor. Especially, the S2OF10 gas from a used SF6 sample was directly separated and concentrated through a U-adsorbent-tube packed with 300 mg of Porasil A in a cold trap (-63 degrees C) with liquid-nitrogen and chloroform. Then it was purified by preparative-GC and to be injected into a preparative system of standard gas sample. In the meantime, the S2OF10 gas obtained was confirmed by the methods of GC/FPD, infrared spectrophotometer(IR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer(GC/MS) separately. The sub-ppm(by volume) level of the S2OF10 and SF6 mixture samples were prepared by use of the exponential dilution system. The GC/FPD experimental results showed that the detection linear range of S2OF10 gas concentration was 0.80 x 10(-6)-2.60 x 10(-4) (volume fraction) and the quantitative calibration factor of the S2OF10 was 0.197 based on SF6. The determination errors of quantitative calibration factor were 1.8%-20% and S2OF10 recovery of the adsorption/thermal desorption was 98.2% (n = 9) and its relative standard deviation was 6.2%. In addition, the results also showed that it is a simple and rapid method with good linearity and reproducibility.

  14. Synchrotron-based FTIR microspectroscopy for the mapping of photo-oxidation and additives in acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene model samples and historical objects.

    PubMed

    Saviello, Daniela; Pouyet, Emeline; Toniolo, Lucia; Cotte, Marine; Nevin, Austin

    2014-09-16

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (SR-μFTIR) was used to map photo-oxidative degradation of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and to investigate the presence and the migration of additives in historical samples from important Italian design objects. High resolution (3×3 μm(2)) molecular maps were obtained by FTIR microspectroscopy in transmission mode, using a new method for the preparation of polymer thin sections. The depth of photo-oxidation in samples was evaluated and accompanied by the formation of ketones, aldehydes, esters, and unsaturated carbonyl compounds. This study demonstrates selective surface oxidation and a probable passivation of material against further degradation. In polymer fragments from design objects made of ABS from the 1960s, UV-stabilizers were detected and mapped, and microscopic inclusions of proteinaceous material were identified and mapped for the first time.

  15. Preparation and ageing-resistant properties of polyester composites modified with functional nanoscale additives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated ageing-resistant properties of carboxyl-terminated polyester (polyethylene glycol terephthalate) composites modified with nanoscale titanium dioxide particles (nano-TiO2). The nano-TiO2 was pretreated by a dry coating method, with aluminate coupling agent as a functional grafting additive. The agglomeration resistance was evaluated, which exhibited significant improvement for the modified nanoparticles. Then, the effects of the modified nano-TiO2 on the crosslinking and ageing-resistant properties of the composites were studied. With a real-time Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) measurement, the nano-TiO2 displayed promoting effect on the crosslinking of polyester resin with triglycidyl isocyanurate (TGIC) as crosslinking agent. Moreover, the gloss retention, colour aberration and the surface morphologies of the composites during accelerated UV ageing (1500 hours) were investigated. The results demonstrated much less degree of ageing degradation for the nanocomposites, indicating an important role of the nano-TiO2 in improving the ageing-resistant properties of synthetic polymer composites. PMID:24872802

  16. Review of online coupling of sample preparation techniques with liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jialiang; Zhang, Chengjiang; Zhang, Zhuomin; Li, Gongke

    2014-03-07

    Sample preparation is still considered as the bottleneck of the whole analytical procedure, and efforts has been conducted towards the automation, improvement of sensitivity and accuracy, and low comsuption of organic solvents. Development of online sample preparation techniques (SP) coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) is a promising way to achieve these goals, which has attracted great attention. This article reviews the recent advances on the online SP-LC techniques. Various online SP techniques have been described and summarized, including solid-phase-based extraction, liquid-phase-based extraction assisted with membrane, microwave assisted extraction, ultrasonic assisted extraction, accelerated solvent extraction and supercritical fluids extraction. Specially, the coupling approaches of online SP-LC systems and the corresponding interfaces have been discussed and reviewed in detail, such as online injector, autosampler combined with transport unit, desorption chamber and column switching. Typical applications of the online SP-LC techniques have been summarized. Then the problems and expected trends in this field are attempted to be discussed and proposed in order to encourage the further development of online SP-LC techniques.

  17. Preparation of an immunoaffinity column and its application in sample cleanup for methandrostenolone residues detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Xun; Wang, Enlan; Dong, Ying

    2011-07-15

    Methandrostenolone (MA) is a steroid used as veterinary medicine on stockbreeding to promote animal growth. The use of MA has been strictly regulated because of its harmful effect on consumers. This paper describes the production of polyclonal antibody (pAb) against MA, the preparation of immunoaffinity column (IAC) and its potential application to the selective extraction of MA residues from animal tissue and feed samples. The produced pAb exhibited good sensitivity to MA with an IC(50) value of 5.6 ng/mL. The cross-reactivity values of the antibody with MA structurally related compounds of testosterone propionate (TP) and trenbolone (TR) were lower than 0.6%. By coupling the produced antibody with CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, an IAC was prepared. 2% methanol and 80% methanol were selected as loading and eluting solution by optimization. The maximum capacity of the column for MA was approximately 334 ng/mL gel. The average recovery of 20, 40 and 60 ng/mL MA standard solutions from IACs was 97.9% with the relative standard deviation (RSD) among columns of 6.7%. After 3 times of repeated usage, the column capacity and recovery rate still remained 82.0% and 92.6% respectively. The IACs were then challenged with MA-fortified animal tissue and feed samples, recoveries of MA were found to be in the range of 83.5-99.7%.

  18. Semiautomated Sample Preparation for Protein Stability and Formulation Screening via Buffer Exchange.

    PubMed

    Ying, William; Levons, Jaquan K; Carney, Andrea; Gandhi, Rajesh; Vydra, Vicky; Rubin, A Erik

    2016-06-01

    A novel semiautomated buffer exchange process workflow was developed to enable efficient early protein formulation screening. An antibody fragment protein, BMSdab, was used to demonstrate the workflow. The process afforded 60% to 80% cycle time and scientist time savings and significant material efficiencies. These efficiencies ultimately facilitated execution of this stability work earlier in the drug development process, allowing this tool to inform the developability of potential candidates for development from a formulation perspective. To overcome the key technical challenges, the protein solution was buffer-exchanged by centrifuge filtration into formulations for stability screening in a 96-well plate with an ultrafiltration membrane, leveraging automated liquid handling and acoustic volume measurements to allow several cycles of exchanges. The formulations were transferred into a vacuum manifold and sterile filtered into a rack holding 96 glass vials. The vials were sealed with a capmat of individual caps and placed in stability stations. Stability of the samples prepared by this process and by the standard process was demonstrated to be comparable. This process enabled screening a number of formulations of a protein at an early pharmaceutical development stage with a short sample preparation time.

  19. The minimum information required for a glycomics experiment (MIRAGE) project: sample preparation guidelines for reliable reporting of glycomics datasets.

    PubMed

    Struwe, Weston B; Agravat, Sanjay; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Campbell, Matthew P; Costello, Catherine E; Dell, Anne; Ten Feizi; Haslam, Stuart M; Karlsson, Niclas G; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Kolarich, Daniel; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Novotny, Milos V; Packer, Nicolle H; Paulson, James C; Rapp, Erdmann; Ranzinger, Rene; Rudd, Pauline M; Smith, David F; Tiemeyer, Michael; Wells, Lance; York, William S; Zaia, Joseph; Kettner, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    The minimum information required for a glycomics experiment (MIRAGE) project was established in 2011 to provide guidelines to aid in data reporting from all types of experiments in glycomics research including mass spectrometry (MS), liquid chromatography, glycan arrays, data handling and sample preparation. MIRAGE is a concerted effort of the wider glycomics community that considers the adaptation of reporting guidelines as an important step towards critical evaluation and dissemination of datasets as well as broadening of experimental techniques worldwide. The MIRAGE Commission published reporting guidelines for MS data and here we outline guidelines for sample preparation. The sample preparation guidelines include all aspects of sample generation, purification and modification from biological and/or synthetic carbohydrate material. The application of MIRAGE sample preparation guidelines will lead to improved recording of experimental protocols and reporting of understandable and reproducible glycomics datasets.

  20. Effects of Organic Additives on the Morphology of Various Calcium Phosphates Prepared via Solution and Emulsion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, I.; Wei, T.; Kikushima, Y.; Riman, R.; Akazawa, T.

    2011-10-01

    Dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) particles were prepared through the reaction between calcium nitrate and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate in a solution and a multiple emulsion. Organic compounds were added into the phosphate solution with the aim of modifying the morphology. Large parallelogrammic particles of DCPD were obtained with no additive. By adding 2-aminoethanol, the product was changed to rhombic in shape and reduced to one-twentieth in size, and the phase was DCPA. In the multiple emulsion, microspheres composed of DCPA were prepared. They were constructed by flaky, primary particles. The crystalline phase and morphology were affected by the concentrations of surfactants in the oil and outer aqueous phases.

  1. RNA SAMPLE PREPARATION APPLIED TO GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING FOR THE HORSE BIOLOGICAL PASSPORT.

    PubMed

    Bailly-Chouriberry, Ludovic; Baudoin, Florent; Cormant, Florence; Glavieux, Yohan; Loup, Benoit; Garcia, Patrice; Popot, Marie-Agnès; Bonnaire, Yves

    2017-04-05

    The improvement of doping control is an on-going race. Techniques to fight against doping are usually based on the direct detection of drugs or their metabolites by analytical methods such as chromatography hyphenated to mass spectrometry after ad hoc sample preparation. Nowadays, omic methods constitute an attractive development and advances have been achieved particularly by application of molecular biology tools for detection of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) or to control human growth hormone misuses. These interesting results across different animal species have suggested that modification of gene expression offers promising new methods of improving the window of detection of banned substances by targeting their effects on blood cell gene expression. In this context, the present study describes the possibility of using a modified version of the dedicated Human IVD (in vitro Diagnostics) PAXgene® Blood RNA Kit for horse gene expression analysis in blood collected on PAXgene® tubes applied to the Horse Biological Passport. The commercial kit was only approved for human blood samples and has required an optimization of specific technical requirements for equine blood samples. Improvements and recommendations were achieved for sample collection, storage and RNA extraction procedure. Following these developments, RNA yield and quality were demonstrated to be suitable for downstream gene expression analysis by qPCR techniques.

  2. Preparation of Magnetic Hollow Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Detection of Triazines in Food Samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aixiang; Lu, Hongzhi; Xu, Shoufang

    2016-06-22

    Novel magnetic hollow molecularly imprinted polymers (M-H-MIPs) were proposed for highly selective recognition and fast enrichment of triazines in food samples. M-H-MIPs were prepared on the basis of multi-step swelling polymerization, followed by in situ growth of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of hollow molecularly imprinted polymers (H-MIPs). Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the successful immobilization of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the surface of H-MIPs. M-H-MIPs could be separated simply using an external magnet. The binding adsorption results indicated that M-H-MIPs displayed high binding capacity and fast mass transfer property and class selective property for triazines. Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models fitted the best adsorption models for M-H-MIPs. M-H-MIPs were used to analyze atrazine, simazine, propazine, and terbuthylazine in corn, wheat, and soybean samples. Satisfactory recoveries were in the range of 80.62-101.69%, and relative standard deviation was lower than 5.2%. Limits of detection from 0.16 to 0.39 μg L(-1) were obtained. When the method was applied to test positive samples that were contaminated with triazines, the results agree well with those obtained from an accredited method. Thus, the M-H-MIP-based dispersive solid-phase extraction method proved to be a convenient and practical platform for detection of triazines in food samples.

  3. Automated radioanalytical system incorporating microwave-assisted sample preparation, chemical separation, and online radiometric detection for the monitoring of total 99Tc in nuclear waste processing streams.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Oleg B; O'Hara, Matthew J; Grate, Jay W

    2012-04-03

    An automated fluidic instrument is described that rapidly determines the total (99)Tc content of aged nuclear waste samples, where the matrix is chemically and radiologically complex and the existing speciation of the (99)Tc is variable. The monitor links microwave-assisted sample preparation with an automated anion exchange column separation and detection using a flow-through solid scintillator detector. The sample preparation steps acidify the sample, decompose organics, and convert all Tc species to the pertechnetate anion. The column-based anion exchange procedure separates the pertechnetate from the complex sample matrix, so that radiometric detection can provide accurate measurement of (99)Tc. We developed a preprogrammed spike addition procedure to automatically determine matrix-matched calibration. The overall measurement efficiency that is determined simultaneously provides a self-diagnostic parameter for the radiochemical separation and overall instrument function. Continuous, automated operation was demonstrated over the course of 54 h, which resulted in the analysis of 215 samples plus 54 hly spike-addition samples, with consistent overall measurement efficiency for the operation of the monitor. A sample can be processed and measured automatically in just 12.5 min with a detection limit of 23.5 Bq/mL of (99)Tc in low activity waste (0.495 mL sample volume), with better than 10% RSD precision at concentrations above the quantification limit. This rapid automated analysis method was developed to support nuclear waste processing operations planned for the Hanford nuclear site.

  4. High-throughput pharmacokinetics screen of VLA-4 antagonists by LC/MS/MS coupled with automated solid-phase extraction sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xinchun S; Wang, Junying; Zheng, Song; Pivnichny, James V

    2004-06-29

    Automation of plasma sample preparation for pharmacokinetic studies on VLA-4 antagonists has been achieved by using 96-well format solid-phase extraction operated by Beckman Coulter Biomek 2000 liquid handling system. A Biomek 2000 robot is used to perform fully automated plasma sample preparation tasks that include serial dilution of standard solutions, pipetting plasma samples, addition of standard and internal standard solutions, performing solid-phase extraction (SPE) on Waters OASIS 96-well plates. This automated sample preparation process takes less than 2 h for a typical pharmacokinetic study, including 51 samples, 24 standards, 9 quality controls, and 3-6 dose checks with minimal manual intervention. Extensive validation has been made to ensure the accuracy and reliability of this method. A two-stage vacuum pressure controller has been incorporated in the program to improve SPE efficiency. This automated SPE sample preparation approach combined with liquid chromatography coupled with the high sensitivity and selectivity of tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS)/MS has been successfully applied on both individual and cassette dosing for pharmacokinetic screening of a large number of VLA-4 antagonists with a limit of quantitation in the range of 1-5 ng/ml. Consequently, a significant throughput increase has been achieved along with an elimination of tedious labor and its consequential tendency to produce errors.

  5. Array capillary in-tube solid-phase microextraction: a rapid preparation technique for water samples.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaohui; Wu, Dapeng; Peng, Hong; Ding, Kun; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2012-06-29

    A rapid sample preparation technique, namely array capillary in-tube solid-phase microextraction (ACIT-SPME) for direct extraction of organic pollutants from water samples, was developed and evaluated. The ACIT-SPME cartridge consisted of a bundle of glass capillary tubes of 0.5 mm I.D. × 30mm contained inside a quartz liner of 4 mm I.D. The high ratio of cross-section area of channel-to-wall allowed water sample flow through the cartridge just under gravity. Both the internal/external surfaces of the array capillary tubing were coated with extraction phase of 2-5 μm in thickness, which provided large extraction surface area up to 30 cm² for a cartridge containing 19 glass capillaries. The large surface area and thin extraction phase improved greatly both the mass transfer process of extraction and the thermo desorption process, leading to fast extraction and fast desorption. The extracted analytes were thermally desorbed in a homemade thermal desorption unit (TDU), which was coupled to a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization detector for analysis. By using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the extraction phase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the model analytes, the performance of the ACIT-SPME cartridge was systematically investigated. The extraction time was 2 min for 350 mL of water sample, and detection limits were between 0.8 and 1.7 ng/L with deviation of 2.8-9.7% RSD. Relative recoveries of analytes for real water samples were between 65.0% and 116%. The extraction time can even be further shortened to 10s for 250 mL sample by applying vacuum at the outlet of the cartridge, with detection limits of 2.2-5.3 ng/L and deviation of 4.0-12% RSD.

  6. Preparation of environmental samples for determination of sulfonylurea herbicides by solid-phase extraction using a polymeric sorbent.

    PubMed

    Young, M S

    1998-01-01

    An analytical procedure was developed for rapid determination of sulfonylurea herbicides in water or soil. Samples were prepared by solid-phase extraction using polymeric sorbents in cartridges and analyzed by liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. Recoveries were consistent for all sample matrixes tested and were generally > 85%, except for tribenuron methyl (75%). Detection limits were < 100 ng/L for water samples.

  7. A 96-well screen filter plate for high-throughput biological sample preparation and LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sean X; Cousineau, Martin; Juzwin, Stephen J; Ritchie, David M

    2006-01-01

    A novel 96-well screen filter plate (patent pending) has been invented to eliminate a time-consuming and labor-intensive step in preparation of in vivo study samples--to remove blood or plasma clots. These clots plug the pipet tips during a manual or automated sample-transfer step causing inaccurate pipetting or total pipetting failure. Traditionally, these blood and plasma clots are removed by picking them out manually one by one from each sample tube before any sample transfer can be made. This has significantly slowed the sample preparation process and has become a bottleneck for automated high-throughput sample preparation using robotic liquid handlers. Our novel screen filter plate was developed to solve this problem. The 96-well screen filter plate consists of 96 stainless steel wire-mesh screen tubes connected to the 96 openings of a top plate so that the screen filter plate can be readily inserted into a 96-well sample storage plate. Upon insertion, the blood and plasma clots are excluded from entering the screen tube while clear sample solutions flow freely into it. In this way, sample transfer can be easily completed by either manual or automated pipetting methods. In this report, three structurally diverse compounds were selected to evaluate and validate the use of the screen filter plate. The plasma samples of these compounds were transferred and processed in the presence and absence of the screen filter plate and then analyzed by LC-MS/MS methods. Our results showed a good agreement between the samples prepared with and without the screen filter plate, demonstrating the utility and efficiency of this novel device for preparation of blood and plasma samples. The device is simple, easy to use, and reusable. It can be employed for sample preparation of other biological fluids that contain floating particulates or aggregates.

  8. Preparation and characterization of new dental porcelains, using K-feldspar and quartz raw materials. Effect of B2O3 additions on sintering and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Harabi, Abdelhamid; Guerfa, Fatiha; Harabi, Esma; Benhassine, Mohamed-Tayeb; Foughali, Lazhar; Zaiou, Soumia

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the effect of temperature and boric oxide (B2O3) addition on sintering and mechanical properties of a newly developed dental porcelain (DP) prepared from local Algerian raw materials. Based on a preliminary work, the new selected composition was 75wt.% feldspar, 20wt.% quartz and 5wt.% kaolin. It was prepared by sintering the mixture at different temperatures (1100-1250°C). The optimum sintering conditions gave a relatively higher density (2.47g/cm(3)) and excellent mechanical properties. The three point flexural strength (3PFS) and Martens micro-hardness of dental porcelains were 149MPa and 2600MPa, respectively. This obtained 3PFS value is more than four times greater than that of hydroxyapatite (HA) value (about 37MPa) sintered under the same conditions. However, the sintering temperature was lowered by about 25 and 50°C for 3 and 5wt.% B2O3 additions, respectively. But, it did not improve furthermore the samples density and their mechanical properties. It has also been found that B2O3 additions provoke a glass matrix composition variation which delays the leucite formation during sintering.

  9. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR COLLECTION OF FOOD PREPARATION SURFACE WIPE SAMPLES FOR PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-2.17)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the method for collection of the food preparation surface wipe samples for the measurement of persistent organic pollutants (POP). This method uses a wipe to collect POP residues from a surface where a study participant prepares food the most often (i.e., kitch...

  10. Modular approach to customise sample preparation procedures for viral metagenomics: a reproducible protocol for virome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Lefrère, Hanne; De Bruyn, Pieter; Beller, Leen; Deboutte, Ward; Yinda, Claude Kwe; Lavigne, Rob; Maes, Piet; Ranst, Marc Van; Heylen, Elisabeth; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    A major limitation for better understanding the role of the human gut virome in health and disease is the lack of validated methods that allow high throughput virome analysis. To overcome this, we evaluated the quantitative effect of homogenisation, centrifugation, filtration, chloroform treatment and random amplification on a mock-virome (containing nine highly diverse viruses) and a bacterial mock-community (containing four faecal bacterial species) using quantitative PCR and next-generation sequencing. This resulted in an optimised protocol that was able to recover all viruses present in the mock-virome and strongly alters the ratio of viral versus bacterial and 16S rRNA genetic material in favour of viruses (from 43.2% to 96.7% viral reads and from 47.6% to 0.19% bacterial reads). Furthermore, our study indicated that most of the currently used virome protocols, using small filter pores and/or stringent centrifugation conditions may have largely overlooked large viruses present in viromes. We propose NetoVIR (Novel enrichment technique of VIRomes), which allows for a fast, reproducible and high throughput sample preparation for viral metagenomics studies, introducing minimal bias. This procedure is optimised mainly for faecal samples, but with appropriate concentration steps can also be used for other sample types with lower initial viral loads. PMID:26559140

  11. Development of automated preparation system for isotopocule analysis of N2O in various air samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Sakae; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2016-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), an increasingly abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, is the most important stratospheric ozone-depleting gas of this century. Natural abundance ratios of isotopocules of N2O, NNO molecules substituted with stable isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen, are a promising index of various sources or production pathways of N2O and of its sink or decomposition pathways. Several automated methods have been reported to improve the analytical precision for the isotopocule ratio of atmospheric N2O and to reduce the labor necessary for complicated sample preparation procedures related to mass spectrometric analysis. However, no method accommodates flask samples with limited volume or pressure. Here we present an automated preconcentration system which offers flexibility with respect to the available gas volume, pressure, and N2O concentration. The shortest processing time for a single analysis of typical atmospheric sample is 40 min. Precision values of isotopocule ratio analysis are < 0.1 ‰ for δ15Nbulk (average abundances of 14N15N16O and 15N14N16O relative to 14N14N16O), < 0.2 ‰ for δ18O (relative abundance of 14N14N18O), and < 0.5 ‰ for site preference (SP; difference between relative abundance of 14N15N16O and 15N14N16O). This precision is comparable to that of other automated systems, but better than that of our previously reported manual measurement system.

  12. Using Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP) to Reduce Viral Load Assay Cost.

    PubMed

    Berry, Scott M; Pezzi, Hannah M; Williams, Eram D; Loeb, Jennifer M; Guckenberger, David J; Lavanway, Alex J; Puchalski, Alice A; Kityo, Cissy M; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Graziano, Franklin M; Beebe, David J

    2015-01-01

    Viral load (VL) measurements are critical to the proper management of HIV in developing countries. However, access to VL assays is limited by the high cost and complexity of existing assays. While there is a need for low cost VL assays, performance must not be compromised. Thus, new assays must be validated on metrics of limit of detection (LOD), accuracy, and dynamic range. Patient plasma samples from the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda were de-identified and measured using both an existing VL assay (Abbott RealTime HIV-1) and our assay, which combines low cost reagents with a simplified method of RNA isolation termed Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP).71 patient samples with VLs ranging from <40 to >3,000,000 copies/mL were used to compare the two methods. We demonstrated equivalent LOD (~50 copies/mL) and high accuracy (average difference between methods of 0.08 log, R2 = 0.97). Using expenditures from this trial, we estimate that the cost of the reagents and consumables for this assay to be approximately $5 USD. As cost is a significant barrier to implementation of VL testing, we anticipate that our assay will enhance access to this critical monitoring test in developing countries.

  13. Urine sample preparation in 96-well filter plates for quantitative clinical proteomics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanbao; Suh, Moo-Jin; Sikorski, Patricia; Kwon, Keehwan; Nelson, Karen E; Pieper, Rembert

    2014-06-03

    Urine is an important, noninvasively collected body fluid source for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based shotgun proteomics has evolved as a sensitive and informative technique to discover candidate disease biomarkers from urine specimens. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) generates peptide samples from protein mixtures of cell lysate or body fluid origin. Here, we describe a FASP method adapted to 96-well filter plates, named 96FASP. Soluble urine concentrates containing ~10 μg of total protein were processed by 96FASP and LC-MS resulting in 700-900 protein identifications at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR). The experimental repeatability, as assessed by label-free quantification and Pearson correlation analysis for shared proteins among replicates, was high (R ≥ 0.97). Application to urinary pellet lysates which is of particular interest in the context of urinary tract infection analysis was also demonstrated. On average, 1700 proteins (±398) were identified in five experiments. In a pilot study using 96FASP for analysis of eight soluble urine samples, we demonstrated that protein profiles of technical replicates invariably clustered; the protein profiles for distinct urine donors were very different from each other. Robust, highly parallel methods to generate peptide mixtures from urine and other body fluids are critical to increase cost-effectiveness in clinical proteomics projects. This 96FASP method has potential to become a gold standard for high-throughput quantitative clinical proteomics.

  14. Microwave Processing for Sample Preparation to Evaluate Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Damage in Hemorrhagic Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephsen, Gary D.; Josephsen, Kelly A.; Beilman, Greg J.; Taylor, Jodie H.; Muiler, Kristine E.

    2005-12-01

    This is a report of the adaptation of microwave processing in the preparation of liver biopsies for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to examine ultrastructural damage of mitochondria in the setting of metabolic stress. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in pigs via 35% total blood volume bleed and a 90-min period of shock followed by resuscitation. Hepatic biopsies were collected before shock and after resuscitation. Following collection, biopsies were processed for TEM by a rapid method involving microwave irradiation (Giberson, 2001). Samples pre- and postshock of each of two animals were viewed and scored using the mitochondrial ultrastructure scoring system (Crouser et al., 2002), a system used to quantify the severity of ultrastructural damage during shock. Results showed evidence of increased ultrastructural damage in the postshock samples, which scored 4.00 and 3.42, versus their preshock controls, which scored 1.18 and 1.27. The results of this analysis were similar to those obtained in another model of shock (Crouser et al., 2002). However, the amount of time used to process the samples was significantly shortened with methods involving microwave irradiation.

  15. Urine Sample Preparation in 96-Well Filter Plates for Quantitative Clinical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Urine is an important, noninvasively collected body fluid source for the diagnosis and prognosis of human diseases. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based shotgun proteomics has evolved as a sensitive and informative technique to discover candidate disease biomarkers from urine specimens. Filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) generates peptide samples from protein mixtures of cell lysate or body fluid origin. Here, we describe a FASP method adapted to 96-well filter plates, named 96FASP. Soluble urine concentrates containing ∼10 μg of total protein were processed by 96FASP and LC-MS resulting in 700–900 protein identifications at a 1% false discovery rate (FDR). The experimental repeatability, as assessed by label-free quantification and Pearson correlation analysis for shared proteins among replicates, was high (R ≥ 0.97). Application to urinary pellet lysates which is of particular interest in the context of urinary tract infection analysis was also demonstrated. On average, 1700 proteins (±398) were identified in five experiments. In a pilot study using 96FASP for analysis of eight soluble urine samples, we demonstrated that protein profiles of technical replicates invariably clustered; the protein profiles for distinct urine donors were very different from each other. Robust, highly parallel methods to generate peptide mixtures from urine and other body fluids are critical to increase cost-effectiveness in clinical proteomics projects. This 96FASP method has potential to become a gold standard for high-throughput quantitative clinical proteomics. PMID:24797144

  16. Sample data processing in an additive and reproducible taxonomic workflow by using character data persistently linked to preserved individual specimens

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Norbert; Henning, Tilo; Plitzner, Patrick; Müller, Andreas; Güntsch, Anton; Stöver, Ben C.; Müller, Kai F.; Berendsohn, Walter G.; Borsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We present the model and implementation of a workflow that blazes a trail in systematic biology for the re-usability of character data (data on any kind of characters of pheno- and genotypes of organisms) and their additivity from specimen to taxon level. We take into account that any taxon characterization is based on a limited set of sampled individuals and characters, and that consequently any new individual and any new character may affect the recognition of biological entities and/or the subsequent delimitation and characterization of a taxon. Taxon concepts thus frequently change during the knowledge generation process in systematic biology. Structured character data are therefore not only needed for the knowledge generation process but also for easily adapting characterizations of taxa. We aim to facilitate the construction and reproducibility of taxon characterizations from structured character data of changing sample sets by establishing a stable and unambiguous association between each sampled individual and the data processed from it. Our workflow implementation uses the European Distributed Institute of Taxonomy Platform, a comprehensive taxonomic data management and publication environment to: (i) establish a reproducible connection between sampled individuals and all samples derived from them; (ii) stably link sample-based character data with the metadata of the respective samples; (iii) record and store structured specimen-based character data in formats allowing data exchange; (iv) reversibly assign sample metadata and character datasets to taxa in an editable classification and display them and (v) organize data exchange via standard exchange formats and enable the link between the character datasets and samples in research collections, ensuring high visibility and instant re-usability of the data. The workflow implemented will contribute to organizing the interface between phylogenetic analysis and revisionary taxonomic or monographic work

  17. Improvement of microtome cutting process of carbon nanotube composite sample preparation for TEM analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trayner, Sarah

    As research progresses towards nanoscale materials, there has become a need for a more efficient and effective way to obtain ultra-thin samples for imaging under transmission electron microscope (TEM) for atomic resolution analysis. There are various methods used to obtain thin samples (<50 nm in thickness). However, most of the resultant TEM images of soft materials, such as CNT/epoxy composites, are of poor quality due to the sample cutting difficulties. Such poor quality samples are characterized by uneven sample thicknesses, objective overlapping, overall darkness due to large thickness, and defects such as cutting scratches. This research is a continuous effort to study and improve the ultra-microtome cutting technique to provide an effective and reliable approach of obtaining an ultra-thin (25-50 nm) cross section of a CNT/polymer composite for high resolution TEM analysis. Improvements were achieved by studying the relationships between the chosen cutting parameters, sample characteristics and TEM image quality. From this information, a cutting protocol was established so that ultra-thin sample slices can be achieved by different microtome operators for high resolution TEM analysis. In addition, a custom tool was created to aid in the sample collection process. In this research, three composite samples were studied for both microtome cutting and TEM analysis: 1) Unidirectional (UD) IM7/BMI composite; 2) Single-layer CNT buckypaper (BP)/epoxy nanocomposite; 3) 3-layer CNT BP/BMI nanocomposite. The resultant TEM images revealed a clear microstructure consisting of amorphous resin and graphite crystalline packing. UD IM7/BMI composite TEM results did not reveal an interfacial region resulting in a need for even thinner sliced cross sections. TEM results for the single-layer CNT BP/epoxy nanocomposite revealed the alignment direction of the nanotubes and numerous stacks of CNT bundles. In addition, there was visible flattening of CNT packing into dumbbell shapes

  18. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karreman, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope (FM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a single set-up. The region of interest in the specimen is labeled or tagged with a fluorescent probe and can easily be identified within a large field of view with the FM. Next, this same area is retraced in the TEM and can be studied at high resolution. The iLEM demands samples that can be imaged with both FM and TEM. Biological specimen, typically composed of light elements, generate low image contrast in the TEM. Therefore, these samples are often ‘contrasted’ with heavy metal stains. FM, on the other hand, images fluorescent samples. Sample preparation for correlative microscopy, and iLEM in particular, is complicated by the fact that the heavy metals stains employed for TEM quench the fluorescent signal of the probe that is imaged with FM. The first part of this thesis outlines preparation procedures for biological material yielding specimen that can be imaged with the iLEM. Here, approaches for the contrasting of thin sections of cells and tissue are introduced that do not affect the fluorescence signal of the probe that marks the region of interest. Furthermore, two novel procedures, VIS2FIXH and VIS2FIX­FS are described that allow for the chemical fixation of thin sections of cryo-immobilized material. These procedures greatly expedite the sample preparation process, and open up novel possibilities for the immuno-labeling of difficult antigens, eg. proteins and lipids that are challenging to preserve. The second part of this thesis describes applications of iLEM in research in the field of life and material science. The iLEM was employed in the study of UVC induced apoptosis (programmed cell death) of

  19. Sample Preparation Strategies for the Effective Quantitation of Hydrophilic Metabolites in Serum by Multi-Targeted HILIC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tsakelidou, Elisavet; Virgiliou, Christina; Valianou, Lemonia; Gika, Helen G; Raikos, Nikolaos; Theodoridis, Georgios

    2017-03-30

    The effect of endogenous interferences of serum in multi-targeted metabolite profiling HILIC-MS/MS analysis was investigated by studying different sample preparation procedures. A modified QuEChERS dispersive SPE protocol, a HybridSPE protocol, and a combination of liquid extraction with protein precipitation were compared to a simple protein precipitation. Evaluation of extraction efficiency and sample clean-up was performed for all methods. SPE sorbent materials tested were found to retain hydrophilic analytes together with endogenous interferences, thus additional elution steps were needed. Liquid extraction was not shown to minimise matrix effects. In general, it was observed that a balance should be reached in terms of recovery, efficient clean-up, and sample treatment time when a wide range of metabolites are analysed. A quick step for removing phospholipids prior to the determination of hydrophilic endogenous metabolites is required, however, based on the results from the applied methods, further studies are needed to achieve high recoveries for all metabolites.

  20. Effects of sample preparation on the optical properties of breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Fay A.

    1996-04-01

    The optical properties of biological tissue should be determined in vivo whenever possible. However, for those instances when in vivo studies are impractical, too expensive or inappropriate, and when blood flow is not an issue, the ability to perform in vitro studies then becomes invaluable. Optical absorption spectroscopy shows that it may be possible to obtain meaningful information about the optical properties of human breast tissue from in vitro samples if strict preparation and measuring protocols are used. That a strict protocol for storing and handling tissue is critical can be seen from our observations of changes in the optical absorption spectra that occur in response to formalin fixation, the passage of time, application of stains and dyes, and storage in growth medium of the excised tissue. In vivo optical absorption spectroscopy measurements have been made on human breast cancer xenografts and compared with in vitro measurements on breast biopsies prepared according to precise collection and treatment protocols. There is a 'window of opportunity' before time dependent changes in the UV optical absorption spectra of the excised tissue specimens occur. This time window of opportunity widens at longer wavelengths with the least changes occurring in the optical spectra in the NIR.

  1. Ultrastructure of Plant Leaf Cuticles in relation to Sample Preparation as Observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Paula; Fernández, Victoria; García, María Luisa; Fernández, Agustín; Gil, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The leaf cuticular ultrastructure of some plant species has been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in only few studies. Attending to the different cuticle layers and inner structure, plant cuticles have been grouped into six general morphological types. With the aim of critically examining the effect of cuticle isolation and preparation for TEM analysis on cuticular ultrastructure, adaxial leaf cuticles of blue-gum eucalypt, grey poplar, and European pear were assessed, following a membrane science approach. The embedding and staining protocols affected the ultrastructure of the cuticles analysed. The solubility parameter, surface tension, and contact angles with water of pure Spurr's and LR-White resins were within a similar range. Differences were however estimated for resin : solvent mixtures, since Spurr's resin is combined with acetone and LR-White resin is mixed with ethanol. Given the composite hydrophilic and lipophilic nature of plant cuticles, the particular TEM tissue embedding and staining procedures employed may affect sample ultrastructure and the interpretation of the results in physicochemical and biological terms. It is concluded that tissue preparation procedures may be optimised to facilitate the observation of the micro- and nanostructure of cuticular layers and components with different degrees of polarity and hydrophobicity. PMID:24895682

  2. Recent developments in sample preparation techniques for chromatography analysis of traditional Chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunhui; Liu, Ning; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2007-06-15

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) have a long history dating back thousands of years. Recently, there has been increasing interest worldwide in the use of TCMs for the prevention and treatment of various illnesses. In China, a large number of analytical tools, especially chromatographic techniques have been used to analyze the constituents of TCMs in order to control their quality and discover new bioactive compounds. In this paper, recent developments in sample preparation techniques for the extraction, clean-up, and concentration of analytes from TCMs are compared. These techniques include headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME), headspace liquid-phase microextraction (HS-LPME), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), supercritical-fluid extraction (SFE), pressurized-liquid extraction (PLE), and microwave distillation (MD).

  3. Polymer-coated fibrous extraction medium for sample preparation coupled to microcolumn liquid-phase separations.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Motohiro; Saito, Yoshihiro; Hayashida, Makiko; Takeichi, Tsutomu; Wada, Hiroo; Jinno, Kiyokatsu

    2003-01-15

    Polymer-coated fibrous material has been introduced as the extraction medium for a miniaturized sample preparation method being coupled with microcolumn liquid chromatography. The preconcentration and the subsequent liquid chromatographic separation of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) drugs, amitriptyline, imipramine, nortriptyline and desipramine, was carried out with the hyphenated system. Several basic experimental parameters, such as extraction and separation conditions, were investigated along with the applicability of the method for the analysis of biological fluids. The results clearly showed that the on-line coupled system could be a powerful tool for the analysis of complex mixtures in biological matrix without a large solvent consumption and specially designed instruments. The lowest limit of quantification was quite acceptable for the analysis of TCAs in clinical and forensic situations.

  4. NGSI FY15 Final Report. Innovative Sample Preparation for in-Field Uranium Isotopic Determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Thomas M.; Meyers, Lisa

    2015-11-10

    Our FY14 Final Report included an introduction to the project, background, literature search of uranium dissolution methods, assessment of commercial off the shelf (COTS) automated sample preparation systems, as well as data and results for dissolution of bulk quantities of uranium oxides, and dissolution of uranium oxides from swipe filter materials using ammonium bifluoride (ABF). Also, discussed were reaction studies of solid ABF with uranium oxide that provided a basis for determining the ABF/uranium oxide dissolution mechanism. This report details the final experiments for optimizing dissolution of U3O8 and UO2 using ABF and steps leading to development of a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for dissolution of uranium oxides on swipe filters.

  5. Sample processing and cDNA preparation for microbial metatranscriptomics in complex soil communities.

    PubMed

    Carvalhais, Lilia C; Schenk, Peer M

    2013-01-01

    Soil presents one of the most complex environments for microbial communities as it provides many microhabitats that allow coexistence of thousands of species with important ecosystem functions. These include biomass and nutrient cycling, mineralization, and detoxification. Culture-independent DNA-based methods, such as metagenomics, have revealed operational taxonomic units that suggest a high diversity of microbial species and associated functions in soil. An emerging but technically challenging area to profile the functions of microorganisms and their activities is mRNA-based metatranscriptomics. Here, we describe issues and important considerations of soil sample processing and cDNA preparation for metatranscriptomics from bacteria and archaea and provide a set of methods that can be used in the required experimental steps.

  6. Diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy: new technique of sample preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrebičík, M.; Budínová, G.; Godarská, T.; Vláčil, D.; Vogenseh, Stine B.; Volka, K.

    1997-06-01

    A new technique of measurement of the diffuse-reflectance infrared FT spectra, based on the preparation of a cylinder from the mixture of the sample and powdered KBr under pressure of about 5.85 MPa, has been tested. During the measurement, the axis of the formed cylinder is perpendicular to the direction of the incident light. A repeatability of the measurement of selected bands and also of the background was investigated for hydroquinone, nicotinamide, silica gel, rice, tea and also lyophilized human aqueous humour. The relative standard deviations of log( {1}/{R}) showed a dependence on the character of the measured compound, but in general were comparable or slightly better than those obtained by the standard method of loosely packed cups. The values were better than 1.5% in the most cases. The main advantage of the proposed technique lies in its simplicity and rapidity of obtaining statistically significant data.

  7. Investigating how fundamental parameters of XRF sample preparation and analysis affect the observed elemental concentration: an experiment using fluvial sediment from Sabah, Borneo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higton, Sam; Walsh, Rory

    2015-04-01

    X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) is an important technique for measuring the concentrations of geochemical elements and inorganic contaminants adsorbed to sediments as an input to sediment tracing methods used to evaluate sediment transport dynamics in river catchments. In addition to traditional laboratory-based XRF instruments, the advent of increasingly advanced portable handheld XRF devices now mean that samples of fluvial sediment can be analysed in the field or in the laboratory following appropriate sample preparation procedures. There are limitations and sources of error associated with XRF sample preparation and analysis, however. It is therefore important to understand how fundamental parameters involved in sample preparation and analysis, such as sample compression and measurement exposure duration, affect observed variability in measurement results. Such considerations become important if the resulting measurement variability is high relative to the natural variability in element concentrations at a sample site. This paper deployed a simple experimental design to assess the impacts of varying a number of sample preparation and XRF analysis parameters on recorded measurements of elemental concentrations of the fine fraction (<63um) of bed-sediment samples. Specifically the study compared observed elemental concentrations measured using a Rigaku NEX-CG laboratory machine versus a handheld Niton XL3t-900 XRF elemental analyser. Helium purging was used on both machines to enable measurement of lighter geochemical elements. Sediment sub-samples were taken from a larger homogenised sample from a sediment core taken from an in-channel lateral bench deposit of the Brantian river in Sabah, Borneo; the core site is being used for research into multi-proxy sediment fingerprinting as part of the Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystems (SAFE) project. Some fundamental sample preparation procedures consistent with US EPA Method 6200 were applied to all sediment samples in

  8. In-line TEM sample preparation and wafer return strategy for rapid yield learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicaïs-Lépinay, N.; André, F.; Brevers, S.; Guyader, P.; Trouiller, C.; Kwakman, L. F. Tz.; Pokrant, S.; Verkleij, D.; Schampers, R.; Ithier, L.; Sicurani, E.; Wyon, C.

    2006-03-01

    Full wafer dual beam FIB-SEM systems have received a lot of industrial interest in the last years and by now are operational in several 200mm and 300mm fabs. These tools offer a 3D-physical characterization capability of defects and device structures and as such allow for more rapid yield learning and increased process control. Moreover, if SEM resolution is insufficient to reveal defect origin or the necessary process details, it is now also possible to prepare TEM samples using a controlled, easy to learn in-situ process and to efficiently continue the characterization with a high resolution TEM inspection. Thanks to latest hardware developments and the high degree of automation of this TEM sample preparation process, wafers no longer need to be broken and remain essentially free from contamination. Hence, the TEM lamella process can be considered as non-destructive and wafers may continue the fabrication process flow. In this paper we examine the SEM and TEM application capabilities offered by in-line dual beam systems. To qualify the wafer return strategy, the particle contamination generated by the system hardware as well as the process-induced contamination have been investigated. The particle levels measured are fully acceptable to adopt the wafer return strategy. Ga-contamination does exist but is sufficiently low and localized so that the wafer return strategy can be applied safely in the back-end of line process. Yield analysis has confirmed that there is no measurable impact on device yield. Although yet to be proven for the frond-end of line processes, the wafer return strategy has been demonstrated as a valuable one already in the backend of line processes. The as developed non-destructive 3-D SEM-TEM characterization capability does offer value added data that allow to determine the root cause of critical process defects in almost real-time and this for both standard (SEM) and more advanced (TEM) technologies.

  9. Standardization of a sample preparation and analytical workflow for proteomics of archival endometrial cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Alkhas, Addie; Hood, Brian L; Oliver, Kate; Teng, Pang-Ning; Oliver, Julie; Mitchell, David; Hamilton, Chad A; Maxwell, G Larry; Conrads, Thomas P

    2011-11-04

    The goal of the present study was to establish a standard operating procedure for mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic analysis of laser microdissected (LMD) formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) uterine tissue. High resolution bioimage analysis of a large endometrial cancer tissue microarray immunostained for the breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein enabled precise counting of cells to establish that there is an average of 600 cells/nL of endometrial cancer tissue. We sought to characterize the peptide recovery from various volumes of tissue gathered by LMD and processed/digested using the present methodology. We observed a nearly linear increase in peptide recovery amount with increasing tissue volume dissected. There was little discernible difference in the peptide recovery from stromal versus malignant epithelium, and there was no apparent difference in the day-to-day recovery. This methodology reproducibly results in 100 ng of digested peptides per nL of endometrial tissue, or ∼25 pg peptides/endometrial cancer cell. Results from liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS experiments to assess the impact of total peptide load on column on the total number of peptides and proteins identified from FFPE tissue digests prepared with the present methodology indicate a demonstrable increase in the total number of peptides identified up to 1000 ng, beyond which diminishing returns were observed. Furthermore, we observed no impact on the peptide identification rates from analyses of equivalent peptide amounts derived from lower volume LMD samples. These results show that this single-tube collection-to-injection proteomics (CTIP) workflow represents a straightforward, scalable, and highly reliable methodology for sample preparation to enable high throughput LMD-MS analysis of tissues derived from biopsy or surgery.

  10. Automated sample preparation facilitated by PhyNexus MEA purification system for oligosaccharide mapping of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Prater, Bradley D; Anumula, Kalyan R; Hutchins, Jeff T

    2007-10-15

    A reproducible high-throughput sample cleanup method for fluorescent oligosaccharide mapping of glycoproteins is described. Oligosaccharides are released from glycoproteins using PNGase F and labeled with 2-aminobenzoic acid (anthranilic acid, AA). A PhyNexus MEA system was adapted for automated isolation of the fluorescently labeled oligosaccharides from the reaction mixture prior to mapping by HPLC. The oligosaccharide purification uses a normal-phase polyamide resin (DPA-6S) in custom-made pipette tips. The resin volume, wash, and elution steps involved were optimized to obtain high recovery of oligosaccharides with the least amount of contaminating free fluorescent dye in the shortest amount of time. The automated protocol for sample cleanup eliminated all manual manipulations with a recycle time of 23 min. We have reduced the amount of excess AA by 150-fold, allowing quantitative oligosaccharide mapping from as little as 500 ng digested recombinant immunoglobulin G (rIgG). This low sample requirement allows early selection of a cell line with desired characteristics (e.g., oligosaccharide profile and high specific productivity) for the production of glycoprotein drugs. In addition, the use of Tecan or another robotic platform in conjunction with this method should allow the cleanup of 96 samples in 23 min, a significant decrease in the amount of time currently required to process such a large number of samples.

  11. Cytokine assays: an assessment of the preparation and treatment of blood and tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Keustermans, Genoveva C E; Hoeks, Sanne B E; Meerding, Jenny M; Prakken, Berent J; de Jager, Wilco

    2013-05-15

    Cytokines are key components of the innate and adaptive immune system. As pivotal players in the progression or regression of a pathological process, these molecules provide a window through which diseases can be monitored and can thus act as biomarkers. In order to measure cytokine levels, a plethora of protocols can be applied. These methods include bioassays, protein microarrays, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) electrochemiluminescence and bead based multiplex immunoassays (MIA). Due to the interaction and activity of cytokines, multiplex immunoassays are at the forefront of cytokine analysis by allowing multiple cytokines to be measured in parallel. However, even with optimized protocols, sample standardization needs to occur before these proteins can optimally act as biomarkers. This review describes various factors influencing the levels of cytokines measured in plasma, serum, dried blood spots and tissue biopsies, focusing on sample collection and handling, long term storage and the repetitive use of samples. By analyzing how each of these factors influences protein levels, it is concluded that samples should be stored at low temperatures in order to maintain cytokine stability. In addition, within a study, sample manipulations should be kept the same, with measurement protocols being chosen for their compatibility with the research in question. By having a clear understanding of what factors influence cytokine levels and how to overcome these technical issues, minimally confounded data can be obtained and cytokines can achieve optimal biomarker activity.

  12. Preparation of water and ice samples for 39Ar dating by atom trap trace analysis (ATTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, R.; Reichel, T.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.; Wagenbach, D.

    2012-04-01

    Atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) is a new and promising method to measure very rare noble gas radioisotopes in the environment. The applicability of this method for the dating of very old groundwater with 81Kr has already been demonstrated [1]. Recent developments now show its feasibility also for the analysis of 39Ar [2,3], which is an ideal dating tracer for the age range between 50 and 1000 years. This range is of interest in the fields of hydro(geo)logy, oceanography, and glaciology. We present preparation (gas extraction and Ar separation) methods for groundwater and ice samples for later analysis by the ATTA technique. For groundwater, the sample size is less of a limitation than for applications in oceanography or glaciology. Large samples are furthermore needed to enable a comparison with the classical method of 39Ar detection by low-level counting. Therefore, a system was built that enables gas extraction from several thousand liters of water using membrane contactors. This system provides degassing efficiencies greater than 80 % and has successfully been tested in the field. Gas samples are further processed to separate a pure Ar fraction by a gas-chromatographic method based on Li-LSX zeolite as selective adsorber material at very low temperatures. The gas separation achieved by this system is controlled by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It has successfully been tested and used on real samples. The separation efficiency was found to be strongly temperature dependent in the range of -118 to -130 °C. Since ATTA should enable the analysis of 39Ar on samples of less than 1 ccSTP of Ar (corresponding to about 100 ml of air, 2.5 l of water or 1 kg of ice), a method to separate Ar from small amounts of gas was developed. Titanium sponge was found to absorb 60 ccSTP of reactive gases per g of the getter material with reasonably high absorption rates at high operating temperatures (~ 800 ° C). Good separation (higher than 92 % Ar content in residual gas) was

  13. Advanced sample preparation for the molecular quantification of Staphylococcus aureus in artificially and naturally contaminated milk.

    PubMed

    Aprodu, Iuliana; Walcher, Georg; Schelin, Jenny; Hein, Ingeborg; Norling, Börje; Rådström, Peter; Nicolau, Anca; Wagner, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Sample treatment is an essential element when using real-time PCR for quantification of pathogens directly on food samples. This study comparatively evaluated three different principles of sample treatment, i.e. immunomagnetic separation based on phage-derived cell wall binding molecules, matrix solubilization and flotation, in order to establish their suitability for quantifying low numbers of Staphylococcus aureus in milk. All three procedures succeeded to remove S. aureus from the milk matrix, either raw or pasteurized, and, as a result of the concentration of the target cells, minimized the effect of milk associated PCR inhibitors. Sample preparation based on immunomagnetic separation albeit of being user friendly, specific and rapid, failed to allow quantification of low and medium numbers (<10(4)CFU) of S. aureus. In a mastitic milk model cell wall binding domain (CBD)-based target cell extraction revealed results most closely matching those derived from culture-based quantification. Both matrix lysis and flotation allowed quantification of S. aureus at a level of 1-10 cells per ml. Both methods resulted in higher numbers of bacterial cell equivalents (bce) than plating could reveal. Since both methods harvest cells that have been subjected to either mechanical and chemical stresses before quantification, we concluded that the higher bce numbers resulted from a disaggregation of S. aureus clusters initially present in the inoculum. Conclusively, since likely each S. aureus cell of a toxigenic strain contributes to enterotoxin production, molecular quantification could provide an even more realistic impact assessment in outbreak investigations than plating does.

  14. Second generation laser-heated microfurnace for the preparation of microgram-sized graphite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Smith, A. M.; Long, S.

    2015-10-01

    We present construction details and test results for two second-generation laser-heated microfurnaces (LHF-II) used to prepare graphite samples for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at ANSTO. Based on systematic studies aimed at optimising the performance of our prototype laser-heated microfurnace (LHF-I) (Smith et al., 2007 [1]; Smith et al., 2010 [2,3]; Yang et al., 2014 [4]), we have designed the LHF-II to have the following features: (i) it has a small reactor volume of 0.25 mL allowing us to completely graphitise carbon dioxide samples containing as little as 2 μg of C, (ii) it can operate over a large pressure range (0-3 bar) and so has the capacity to graphitise CO2 samples containing up to 100 μg of C; (iii) it is compact, with three valves integrated into the microfurnace body, (iv) it is compatible with our new miniaturised conventional graphitisation furnaces (MCF), also designed for small samples, and shares a common vacuum system. Early tests have shown that the extraneous carbon added during graphitisation in each LHF-II is of the order of 0.05 μg, assuming 100 pMC activity, similar to that of the prototype unit. We use a 'budget' fibre packaged array for the diode laser with custom built focusing optics. The use of a new infrared (IR) thermometer with a short focal length has allowed us to decrease the height of the light-proof safety enclosure. These innovations have produced a cheaper and more compact device. As with the LHF-I, feedback control of the catalyst temperature and logging of the reaction parameters is managed by a LabVIEW interface.

  15. Study of ion beam damage in magnetic tunnel junction on FIB prepared samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangho; Yang, Cheolwoong; Kim, Kyuchul; Nam, Dongwoo; Hwang, Kyuman; Bae, Junsoo; Ahn, Juhyeon; Choi, Jin; Park, Soonoh; Jeong, Sangsup; Cho, Hanku; Jeong, Eunseung

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic Random Access Memory (MRAM) has emerged as the leading candidate for future universal memory due to its non-volatility, excellent endurance and read/write performance. The magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) is a data storage element in MRAM and is basically composed of two ferromagnetic layers separated by the magnesium oxide (MgO) tunnel barrier. MgO between two ferromagnetic layers was adopted to enlarge the resistance difference between two kinds of magnetic arrangements by tunneling current through MgO. Like this, it is important to understand characterization of MgO for developing Mram. Due to thin thickness of MgO, FIB milling should be used for the preparation of TEM specimens in Mram. The major problem in MgO sampling by FIB milling is the transform of MgO between two ferromagnetic due to FIB induced damage, which leads to high tunnel current through MgO and high resistance difference between two kinds of magnetic arrangements. An understanding of FIB generated artifact on MgO is important to analysis Mram and to optimize the sample preparation process. The normal ion beam damage are compared with low-keV FIB ion beam damage on blanket MgO wafer. Experiments were performed using Helios 450 FIB(FEI) and XV-200TBs(SII) with gallium ion sources operated at 30 keV to 2 keV, respectively. As a preliminary, the thicknesses of all specimens were fixed at 100nm for the final ion beam milling currents of 210 pA(30 keV) by Helios 450 FIB(FEI). Specimens of 100nm were transferred to low-keV FIB (Helios 450/XV-200TBs) to do the low-keV ion milling. Then each specimen had a 2 keV cleaned surface and a 30 keV FIB prepared surface. In this paper, we understand the normal ion beam damage on blanket MgO through changing beam current and beam voltage. Then we present the optimized recipe and which equipment is better to analysis.

  16. Investigation into Alternative Sample Preparation Techniques for the Determination of Heavy Metals in Stationary Source Emission Samples Collected on Quartz Filters

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Sharon L.; Brown, Richard J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring stationary source emissions for heavy metals generally requires the use of quartz filters to collect samples because of the high temperature and high moisture sampling environment. The documentary standard method sample preparation technique in Europe, EN 14385, uses digestion in hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid (HF/HNO3) followed by complexing with boric acid (H3BO3) prior to analysis. However, the use of this method presents a number of problems, including significant instrumental drift during analysis caused by the matrix components, often leading to instrument breakdown and downtime for repairs, as well as posing significant health and safety risks. The aim of this work was to develop an alternative sample preparation technique for emissions samples on quartz filters. The alternative techniques considered were: (i) acid digestion in a fluoroboric acid (HBF4) and HNO3 mixture and (ii) acid extraction in an aqua regia (AR) mixture (HCl and HNO3). Assessment of the effectiveness of these options included determination of interferences and signal drift, as well as validating the different methods by measurement of matrix certified reference materials (CRMs), and comparing the results obtained from real test samples and sample blanks to determine limits of detection. The results showed that the HBF4/HNO3 mixture provides the most viable alternative to the documentary standard preparation technique. PMID:25407906

  17. Optical biosensor system with integrated microfluidic sample preparation and TIRF based detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, Eduard; Scheicher, Sylvia R.; Suppan, Michael; Pichler, Heinz; Rumpler, Markus; Satzinger, Valentin; Palfinger, Christian; Reil, Frank; Hajnsek, Martin; Köstler, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    There is a steadily growing demand for miniaturized bioanalytical devices allowing for on-site or point-of-care detection of biomolecules or pathogens in applications like diagnostics, food testing, or environmental monitoring. These, so called labs-on-a-chip or micro-total analysis systems (μ-TAS) should ideally enable convenient sample-in - result-out type operation. Therefore, the entire process from sample preparation, metering, reagent incubation, etc. to detection should be performed on a single disposable device (on-chip). In the early days such devices were mainly fabricated using glass or silicon substrates and adapting established fabrication technologies from the electronics and semiconductor industry. More recently, the development focuses on the use of thermoplastic polymers as they allow for low-cost high volume fabrication of disposables. One of the most promising materials for the development of plastic based lab-on-achip systems are cyclic olefin polymers and copolymers (COP/COC) due to their excellent optical properties (high transparency and low autofluorescence) and ease of processing. We present a bioanalytical system for whole blood samples comprising a disposable plastic chip based on TIRF (total internal reflection fluorescence) optical detection. The chips were fabricated by compression moulding of COP and microfluidic channels were structured by hot embossing. These microfluidic structures integrate several sample pretreatment steps. These are the separation of erythrocytes, metering of sample volume using passive valves, and reagent incubation for competitive bioassays. The surface of the following optical detection zone is functionalized with specific capture probes in an array format. The plastic chips comprise dedicated structures for simple and effective coupling of excitation light from low-cost laser diodes. This enables TIRF excitation of fluorescently labeled probes selectively bound to detection spots at the microchannel surface

  18. Proteomic tools for environmental microbiology--a roadmap from sample preparation to protein identification and quantification.

    PubMed

    Wöhlbrand, Lars; Trautwein, Kathleen; Rabus, Ralf

    2013-10-01

    The steadily increasing amount of (meta-)genomic sequence information of diverse organisms and habitats has a strong impact on research in microbial physiology and ecology. In-depth functional understanding of metabolic processes and overall physiological adaptation to environmental changes, however, requires application of proteomics, as the context specific proteome constitutes the true functional output of a cell. Considering the enormous structural and functional diversity of proteins, only rational combinations of various analytical approaches allow a holistic view on the overall state of the cell. Within the past decade, proteomic methods became increasingly accessible to microbiologists mainly due to the robustness of analytical methods (e.g. 2DE), and affordability of mass spectrometers and their relative ease of use. This review provides an overview on the complex portfolio of state-of-the-art proteomics and highlights the basic principles of key methods, ranging from sample preparation of laboratory or environmental samples, via protein/peptide separation (gel-based or gel-free) and different types of mass spectrometric protein/peptide analyses, to protein identification and abundance determination.

  19. SIMPLE, SENSITIVE AND SELECTIVE SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ASSAY OF NAPROXEN IN PURE, PHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATION AND HUMAN SERUM SAMPLES.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Nina; Keyhanian, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Two simple, rapid and sensitive spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of naproxen in pure, pharmaceutical preparation and human serum samples. These methods are based on the formation of yellow ion-pair complexes between naproxen and two sulfophthalein acid dyes, namely bromocresol green (BCG method) and bromothymol blue (BTB method). The resulting complexes were measured at 424 nm (BCG method) and at 422 nm (BTB method). The effects of variables such as reagent concentration and reaction time were investigated to optimize the procedure. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range of 10-105 µg/mL and 5-85 µg/mL and the detection limits were found to be 0.347 and 0.31 µg/mL for BCG and BTB methods, respectively. The developed methods have been successfully applied for the determination of naproxen in bulk drugs, pharmaceutical formulations and human serum samples with good accuracy and precision. The results are comparable to those of reference methods, and hence are recommended for quality control and routine analysis.

  20. Site-Specific Cryo-focused Ion Beam Sample Preparation Guided by 3D Correlative Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jan; Mahamid, Julia; Lucic, Vladan; de Marco, Alex; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus; Laugks, Tim; Mayer, Tobias; Hyman, Anthony A.; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of cryo-focused ion beam (cryo-FIB) for the thinning of frozen-hydrated biological specimens enabled cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) analysis in unperturbed cells and tissues. However, the volume represented within a typical FIB lamella constitutes a small fraction of the biological specimen. Retaining low-abundance and dynamic subcellular structures or macromolecular assemblies within such limited volumes requires precise targeting of the FIB milling process. In this study, we present the development of a cryo-stage allowing for spinning-disk confocal light microscopy at cryogenic temperatures and describe the incorporation of the new hardware into existing workflows for cellular sample preparation by cryo-FIB. Introduction of fiducial markers and subsequent computation of three-dimensional coordinate transformations provide correlation between light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy/FIB. The correlative approach is employed to guide the FIB milling process of vitrified cellular samples and to capture specific structures, namely fluorescently labeled lipid droplets, in lamellas that are 300 nm thick. The correlation procedure is then applied to localize the fluorescently labeled structures in the transmission electron microscopy image of the lamella. This approach can be employed to navigate the acquisition of cryo-ET data within FIB-lamellas at specific locations, unambiguously identified by fluorescence microscopy. PMID:26769364

  1. Preparation of higher-actinide burnup and cross section samples. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.; Quinby, T.C.; Thomas, D.K.; Dailey, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was instigated about four years ago for the purpose of studying burnup of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the burnup and cross section samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the burnup study were /sup 241/Am and /sup 244/Cm in the forms of Am/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Am/sub 6/ Cm(RE)/sub 7/O/sub 21/, where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanide sesquioxides. It is the purpose of this paper to describe technology development and its application in the preparation of the fuel specimens and the cross section specimens that are being used in this cooperative program.

  2. Sample preparation for metalloprotein analysis: A case study using horse chestnuts.

    PubMed

    de Magalhães, Cristiana Schmidt; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2007-03-30

    In the present work, 11 different procedures for protein and metalloprotein extraction from horse chestnuts (Aescullus hippocastanum L.) in natura were tested. After each extraction, total protein was determined and, after protein separation through sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), those metals belonging to the protein structure were mapped by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF). After mapping the elements (Cr, Fe and Mn) in the protein bands (ca. 33 and 23.7kDa), their concentrations were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS). Good results were obtained for protein extraction using a combination of grinding and sonication. However, this strategy was not suitable to preserve metal ions in the protein structure. In fact, there was 42% decrease on Mn concentration using this procedure, compared to that performed with sample agitation in water (taken as reference). On the other hand, when grinding and agitation with an extracting buffer was used, there was a 530% increase of Mn concentration, when compared to the reference procedure. These results indicate agreement between metal identification and determination in proteins as well as the great influence of the extraction procedure (i.e., the sample preparation step) for preserving metals in the protein structures.

  3. A cost-effective plate-based sample preparation for antibody N-glycan analysis.

    PubMed

    Burnina, Irina; Hoyt, Erik; Lynaugh, Heather; Li, Huijuan; Gong, Bing

    2013-09-13

    During early cell line and process development of therapeutic antibodies, a cost-effective high-throughput approach to characterize the N-linked glycans is highly desired given that a large number of samples need to be analyzed. Using commercially available, low cost 96-well plates, we developed a practical procedure to prepare fluorescently labeled N-linked glycans for both qualitative and quantitative analysis by mass spectrometry (MS) and ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UPLC). Antibody samples were continuously denatured, reduced, and deglycosylated in a single 96-well hydrophobic membrane filter plate. Subsequently, released glycans were fluorescently labeled in a collection plate, and cleaned-up using a hydrophilic membrane filter plate. Carried out entirely in ready-to-use 96-well plates with simple buffer systems, this procedure requires less than 90min to finish. We applied the optimized procedure to examine the N-linked glycosylation of trastuzumab and were able to quantify ten major N-linked glycans. The results from different amounts of starting materials (10-200μg) were highly similar and showed the robustness of this procedure. Compared to other methods, this new procedure is simple to implement, economically more affordable, and could be very valuable for early screenings of antibody development.

  4. Influence of the Addition of Minced Fish on the Preparation of Fish Sausage: Effects on Sensory Properties.

    PubMed

    Lago, Amanda M T; Vidal, Ana C C; Schiassi, Maria C E V; Reis, Tatiana; Pimenta, Carlos; Pimenta, Maria E S G

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of minced fish (MF) inclusion on the acceptance of tilapia sausages. One hundred consumers participated in the sensory acceptance test in relation to the attributes appearance, color, aroma, flavor, texture, overall impression, and purchase intent. The tests were conducted using the same composition of ingredients, varying only the raw material (MF and fillet), resulting in 5 different formulations. To represent the results of the sensory attributes, we generated internal preference maps through principal component analysis and parallel factor analysis, as well as frequency histograms. The data showed greater acceptability for the sample produced with 50% MF, although all had shown satisfactory results. We conclude that inclusion of MF can be suitable in the preparation of fish sausage due to high consumer acceptance.

  5. Effect of organic additives in catalyst preparation on the growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes prepared by catalyst-assisted chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaobin; Li, Yu; Yang, Xiaofang; Luo, Junhang; Xu, Guoliang

    2004-03-01

    The effect of organic additives, including citric acid, PEG (2000) and PEG (200), on the yield and quality of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) synthesized by a Fe-Mo catalyst dispersed on an alumina matrix prepared by the sol-gel process in assisted chemical vapour deposition (CVD) has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Raman spectroscopy. Different morphologies of catalyst including big flakes, spherical particles and porous supporting materials were obtained using citric acid, PEG (2000) and PEG (200) as dispersant, respectively. SWNT yields of 10 wt%, 16 wt% and 33 wt% were obtained using citric acid, PEG (2000) and PEG (200) as the dispersants, respectively, which implies that the PEG (200) is the most effective at improving the yield of SWNTs due to the effect of additives on the specific surface area of the catalyst. The as-grown SWNTs are mostly in large bundles with diameters of 0.5-2 nm, but in some cases, isolated tubes with much larger diameters can also be found. Finally a preliminary explanation for the increased SWNT yield using PEG (200) is presented.

  6. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING AIR SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF POLAR PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.13)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method for extracting and preparing indoor and outdoor air samples for analysis of polar persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this SOP. It covers the preparation of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  7. Novel Sample Preparation Method for Safe and Rapid Detection of Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Powders and Nasal Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Vicki A.; King, Debra; Davis, Carisa; Rycerz, Tony; Ewert, Matthew; Cannons, Andrew; Amuso, Philip; Cattani, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis spores have been used as a biological weapon in the United States. We wanted to develop a safe, rapid method of sample preparation that provided safe DNA for the detection of spores in environmental and clinical specimens. Our method reproducibly detects B. anthracis in samples containing <10 spores. PMID:12624060

  8. Preparation and tribological properties of fluorosilane surface-modified lanthanum trifluoride nanoparticles as additive of fluoro silicone oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiao; He, Jie; Yu, Laigui; Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Pingyu

    2014-10-01

    LaF3 nanoparticles surface-modified with fluorosilane were synthesized by surface modification technology. The size, morphology and phase structure of as-prepared surface-modified LaF3 nanoparticles were analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The tribological properties of surface-modified LaF3 nanoparticles as additive of fluoro silicone oil were evaluated with a four-ball machine, and the morphology and elemental composition of worn steel surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. Results show that 3-(heptafluoroisopropoxy)propyltriethoxysilane as the modifier is able to improve the dispersibility of LaF3 nanoparticles in fluoro silicone oil. Moreover, when the optimum concentration, 0.08 wt.% of fluorosilane surface-modified LaF3 is added into fluoro silicone oil, as-synthesized fluorosilane surface-modified LaF3 nanoparticles exhibit excellent anti-wear as additive in fluoro silicone oil. The wear scar diameter under the optimum concentration is always smaller than that under the lubrication of fluoro silicone oil alone. Especially, when the load is 500 N, 600 N and 700 N, the wear scar diameter is reduced by 17%, 43% and 42%, respectively. In addition, during the friction process, LaF3 nanoparticles are deposited on the rubbed steel surface to form LaF3 deposition layer which functions jointly with the boundary lubricating film thereby resulting in improved tribological properties.

  9. Preparation and characterization of ceramic products by thermal treatment of sewage sludge ashes mixed with different additives.

    PubMed

    Merino, Ignacio; Arévalo, Luis F; Romero, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The study of the ceramic characteristics of sludge ashes, alone or mixed with additives (kaolin, montmorillonite, illitic clay, powdered flat glass) includes characterization of additives, preparation of probes (dry or wet mixed), thermal treatment (up to 1200 degrees C, except melting or deformation) and control (densities, compressive strengths and water absorption). Thermal treatment increases the density and compressive strength of probes (both parameters go through maxima, with later decreases) and decreases the absorption of water. The densification is also revealed by the evolution of the ratio of decrease of volume/loss of mass. The maximum values of compressive strengths were obtained for 25% of illitic clay, montmorillonite and glass powder. Densification concerning probes with sludge ashes alone does not occur with kaolin. Experimental data were adjusted to exponential relationships between compressive strengths and densities for every composition, and also to a general equation for all probes. The apparent density obtained was adjusted to a non-linear dependence with temperature, leading to a maximum in density and permitting calculating the temperature of occurrence of this maximum. The adjustment was not possible for probes containing kaolin, requiring presumably higher temperatures to densify. Water absorption has low values for ashes or kaolin probes, intermediate values for illite and powdered flat glass probes and high values for montmorillonite probes. Excepting with kaolin, ceramic materials with better characteristics than sludge ashes without additives were obtained at lower treatment temperatures.

  10. A sample preparation protocol for quantification of radiolabeled nucleoside incorporation into DNA by accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hah, Sang Soo; Mundt, Janna M.; Ubick, Esther A.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Gregg, Jeff P.; Henderson, Paul T.

    2007-06-01

    A general protocol is described for measuring the incorporation of radiocarbon-labeled 2‧-deoxynucleosides into DNA using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This technology provides attomole (10-18 mol) sensitivity, with detection limits for DNA analysis in the range of one 14C atom per 1011-1012 total carbons. In practice this corresponds to approximately 1 labeled nucleoside per 1011 normal bases. A key aspect of the method is the use of precautions aimed at prevention of artifactual DNA oxidation during the sample preparation by the use of antioxidants and chaotropic salts during the DNA isolation. In principle, any type of appropriately labeled nucleoside derivative can be studied using the described protocol, provided that there is incorporation of the deoxynucleoside into DNA. We demonstrated this protocol using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and a mouse model for mammary carcinoma, which we dosed with 14C-labeled 2‧-deoxyguanosine (dG) and 14C-labeled 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2‧-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). The nucleoside 8-oxodG is a ubiquitous compound that forms in cells by the reaction of dG with reactive oxygen species which has been associated with numerous disease, carcinogenesis and aging. DNA from cells treated with 14C-labeled nucleosides was isolated and prepared for analysis by AMS in order to measure the DNA-bound radioactivity. The method allows the generation of reliable and sufficient yields of pure DNA from human cells and animal tissues for analysis of radiocarbon levels. Ultimately, this protocol will be applied to understanding the role of modified nucleoside incorporation into DNA in cancer initiation and progression, but could also be used to study any DNA metabolism process where 14C-labeled nucleosides are used.

  11. Automated sample preparation techniques for the determination of drug enantiomers in biological fluids using liquid chromatography with chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ceccato, A; Toussaint, B; Chiap, P; Hubert, P; Crommen, J

    1999-01-01

    The determination of drug enantiomers has become of prime importance in the field of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis. Liquid chromatography (LC) is one of the most frequently used techniques for achieving the separation and quantitation of the enantiomers of drug compounds. In the bioanalytical field, the integrated systems present an interesting alternative to time-consuming sample preparation techniques such as liquid-liquid extraction. Solid phase extraction (SPE) on disposable cartridges, dialysis or column switching are sample preparation techniques that can be fully automated and applied to enantioselective analysis in biological fluids. The selection of the most appropriate LC mode and chiral stationary phase for enantioseparations in bioanalysis is discussed and some aspects of these automated sample preparation procedures are compared, such as selectivity, detectability, elution of the analytes from the extraction sorbent, sample volume and analyte stability.

  12. Carprofen-imprinted monolith prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ban, Lu; Han, Xu; Wang, Xian-Hua; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    To obtain fast separation, ionic liquids were used as porogens first in combination with reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization to prepare a new type of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolith. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized using a mixture of carprofen (template), 4-vinylpyridine, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, [BMIM]BF4, and chain transfer agent (CTA). Some polymerization factors, such as template-monomer molar ratio, the degree of crosslinking, the composition of the porogen, and the content of CTA, on the column efficiency and imprinting effect of the resulting MIP monolith were systematically investigated. Affinity screening of structurally similar compounds with the template can be achieved in 200 s on the MIP monolith due to high column efficiency (up to 12,070 plates/m) and good column permeability. Recognition mechanism of the imprinted monolith was also investigated.

  13. Design of Selective Gas Sensors Using Additive-Loaded In2O3 Hollow Spheres Prepared by Combinatorial Hydrothermal Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Jung; Hwang, In-Sung; Kang, Yun Chan; Lee, Jong-Heun

    2011-01-01

    A combinatorial hydrothermal reaction has been used to prepare pure and additive (Sb, Cu, Nb, Pd, and Ni)-loaded In2O3 hollow spheres for gas sensor applications. The operation of Pd- and Cu-loaded In2O3 sensors at 371 °C leads to selective H2S detection. Selective detection of CO and NH3 was achieved by the Ni-In2O3 sensor at sensing temperatures of 371 and 440 °C, respectively. The gas responses of six different sensors to NH3, H2S, H2, CO and CH4 produced unique gas sensing patterns that can be used for the artificial recognition of these gases. PMID:22346661

  14. FT-Raman and chemometric tools for rapid determination of quality parameters in milk powder: Classification of samples for the presence of lactose and fraud detection by addition of maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Júnior, Paulo Henrique; de Sá Oliveira, Kamila; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Rocha; De Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa; Stephani, Rodrigo; Pinto, Michele da Silva; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler

    2016-04-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy has been explored as a quick screening method to evaluate the presence of lactose and identify milk powder samples adulterated with maltodextrin (2.5-50% w/w). Raman measurements can easily differentiate samples of milk powder, without the need for sample preparation, while traditional quality control methods, including high performance liquid chromatography, are cumbersome and slow. FT-Raman spectra were obtained from samples of whole lactose and low-lactose milk powder, both without and with addition of maltodextrin. Differences were observed between the spectra involved in identifying samples with low lactose content, as well as adulterated samples. Exploratory data analysis using Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis was also developed to classify samples with PCA and PLS-DA. The PLS-DA models obtained allowed to correctly classify all samples. These results demonstrate the utility of FT-Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics to infer about the quality of milk powder.

  15. Additional variability at the D12S391 STR locus in an Austrian population sample: sequencing data and allele distribution.

    PubMed

    Glock, B; Dauber, E M; Schwartz, D W; Mayr, W R

    1997-12-01

    The highly polymorphic STR locus D12S391 was investigated in an Austrian population sample (N = 150) by PCR-amplification, comparative detection on native and denaturing polyacrylamide gels and solid phase single stranded sequencing of three size variant alleles and several additional alleles. A total of 15 alleles, distinguishable by size under denaturing conditions, could be detected. No deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were observed in the population investigated (P = 0.52). Sequencing of size variants designated 17.3 and 18.3 showed an incomplete (GAT) repeat unit at position two of the tandem region. Additional new sequence variants due to varying compositions of the number of (AGAT) and (AGAC) repeats could be identified. Due to distinct electrophoretical mobilities of alleles of the same size but different sequence structures, denaturing detection conditions should be employed when the aim is standardization.

  16. Biological validation of a sample preparation method for ER-CALUX bioanalysis of estrogenic activity in sediment using mixtures of xeno-estrogens.

    PubMed

    Houtman, Corine J; Van Houten, Yoni K; Leonards, Pim E G; Brouwer, Abraham; Lamoree, Marja H; Legler, Juliette

    2006-04-01

    The combined estrogenic effects of mixtures of environmental pollutants in the in vitro ER-CALUX (chemical activated luciferase gene expression) bioassaywere examined to biologically validate a sample preparation method for the analysis of estrogenic compounds in sediment. The method used accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and was validated with respect to recovery of biological response taking mixture effects into account. Four mixtures of three to six xenoestrogenic compounds (bisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol, (4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)trichloroethane, (2,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)trichloroethane, dieldrin, 4-n-octylphenol, alpha-chlordane, dibutylphthalate, (4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)dichloroethylene, and 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl) were prepared. Experimentally determined mixture effects were well described by the concept of concentration addition (CA), as expected for similarly acting compounds. Observed estradiol equivalence factors of the mixtures (on average 1.2 +/- 0.3) agreed very well with the value predicted according to CA. The sample preparation method was then applied to pure mixtures of standards and to sediment spiked with one of the mixtures. Recoveries of estrogenic compounds were estimated by determination of their mixture potencies in ER-CALUX and compared to the mixture effects predicted by CA. Recoveries of estrogenic activity were between 80 and 129%, indicating that the additive behavior of mixtures of xeno-estrogens is well conserved during sample preparation. Together with an average repeatability of 18.3%, low average limit of detection (2.6 +/- 1.8 pg of EEQ/ g), and coefficient of variance (3.5 +/- 3.3%),this demonstrated the suitability of the sample preparation method for the analysis of mixtures of (xeno-)estrogenic compounds in sediment with the ER-CALUX assay.

  17. Humidity-controlled preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2012-05-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM) has the potential to visualize the structures of micro- to sub-micrometer-sized biological particles, such as cells and organelles, at high resolution. Toward advancing structural studies on the functional states of such particles, here, we developed a system for the preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments. The system, which comprised a moist air generator, microscope, micro-injector mounted on a micromanipulator, custom-made sample preparation chamber, and flash-cooling device, allowed for the manipulation of sample particles in the relative humidity range of 20%-94%rh at 293 K to maintain their hydrated and functional states. Here, we report the details of the system and the operation procedure, including its application to the preparation of a frozen-hydrated chloroplast sample. Sample quality was evaluated through a cryogenic CXDM experiment conducted at BL29XUL of SPring-8. Taking the performance of the system and the quality of the sample, the system was suitable to prepare frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments.

  18. IPUMS-International Statistical Disclosure Controls: 159 Census Microdata Samples in Dissemination, 100+ in Preparation

    PubMed Central

    McCaa, Robert; Ruggles, Steven; Sobek, Matt

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, a revolution has occurred in access to census microdata for social and behavioral research. More than 325 million person records (55 countries, 159 samples) representing two-thirds of the world’s population are now readily available to bona fide researchers from the IPUMS-International website: www.ipums.org/international hosted by the Minnesota Population Center. Confidentialized extracts are disseminated on a restricted access basis at no cost to bona fide researchers. Over the next five years, from the microdata already entrusted by National Statistical Office-owners, the database will encompass more than 80 percent of the world’s population (85 countries, ~100 additional datasets) with priority given to samples from the 2010 round of censuses. A profile of the most frequently used samples and variables is described from 64,248 requests for microdata extracts. The development of privacy protection standards by National Statistical Offices, international organizations and academic experts is fundamental to eliciting world-wide cooperation and, thus, to the success of the IPUMS initiative. This paper summarizes the legal, administrative and technical underpinnings of the project, including statistical disclosure controls, as well as the conclusions of a lengthy on-site review by the former Australian Statistician, Mr. Dennis Trewin.

  19. Effect of surfactant addition on ultrasonic leaching of trace elements from plant samples in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowska-Burnecka, Jolanta; Jankowiak, Urszula; Zyrnicki, Wieslaw; Anna Wilk, Kazimiera

    2004-04-01

    The applicability of surfactants in sample preparation of plant materials followed by analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry has been examined. Reference materials (INCT-MPH-2-Mixed Polish Herbs, INCT-TL-1 black tea leaves and CTA-VTL-2 -Virginia tobacco leaves) and commercially available tea leaves were analyzed. Effects of addition surfactants (Triton X-100, didodecyldimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) on efficiency of ultrasonic leaching of elements from the plant samples and on plasma parameters were investigated. Low concentrations of the surfactants in solutions did not affect, in practice, analytical line intensities and the nebulization process. Quantitative recovery of some elements could be obtained by ultrasonic diluted acid leaching with the aid of surfactants. However, the element recovery depended on type of surfactant, as well as element and sample material. Plasma parameters, i.e. the excitation temperatures of Ar I, Fe II and Ca II as well as the electron number density and the Mg II/Mg I intensity ratio did not vary significantly due to the surfactants in solutions.

  20. Surface Cleaning Techniques: Ultra-Trace ICP-MS Sample Preparation and Assay of HDPE

    SciTech Connect

    Overman, Nicole R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2013-06-01

    The world’s most sensitive radiation detection and assay systems depend upon ultra-low background (ULB) materials to reduce unwanted radiological backgrounds. Herein, we evaluate methods to clean HDPE, a material of interest to ULB systems and the means to provide rapid assay of surface and bulk contamination. ULB level material and ultra-trace level detection of actinide elements is difficult to attain, due to the introduction of contamination from sample preparation equipment such as pipette tips, sample vials, forceps, etc. and airborne particulate. To date, literature available on the cleaning of such polymeric materials and equipment for ULB applications and ultra-trace analyses is limited. For these reasons, a study has been performed to identify an effective way to remove surface contamination from polymers in an effort to provide improved instrumental detection limits. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was utilized to assess the effectiveness of a variety of leachate solutions for removal of inorganic uranium and thorium surface contamination from polymers, specifically high density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE leaching procedures were tested to optimize contaminant removal of thorium and uranium. Calibration curves for thorium and uranium ranged from 15 ppq (fg/mL) to 1 ppt (pg/mL). Detection limits were calculated at 6 ppq for uranium and 7 ppq for thorium. Results showed the most effective leaching reagent to be clean 6 M nitric acid for 72 hour exposures. Contamination levels for uranium and thorium found in the leachate solutions were significant for ultralow level radiation detection applications.

  1. Quality analysis of salmon calcitonin in a polymeric bioadhesive pharmaceutical formulation: sample preparation optimization by DOE.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Van Dorpe, Sylvia; Mehuys, Els; Deforce, Dieter; DeSpiegeleer, Bart

    2010-12-01

    A sensitive and selective HPLC method for the assay and degradation of salmon calcitonin, a 32-amino acid peptide drug, formulated at low concentrations (400 ppm m/m) in a bioadhesive nasal powder containing polymers, was developed and validated. The sample preparation step was optimized using Plackett-Burman and Onion experimental designs. The response functions evaluated were calcitonin recovery and analytical stability. The best results were obtained by treating the sample with 0.45% (v/v) trifluoroacetic acid at 60 degrees C for 40 min. These extraction conditions did not yield any observable degradation, while a maximum recovery for salmon calcitonin of 99.6% was obtained. The HPLC-UV/MS methods used a reversed-phase C(18) Vydac Everest column, with a gradient system based on aqueous acid and acetonitrile. UV detection, using trifluoroacetic acid in the mobile phase, was used for the assay of calcitonin and related degradants. Electrospray ionization (ESI) ion trap mass spectrometry, using formic acid in the mobile phase, was implemented for the confirmatory identification of degradation products. Validation results showed that the methodology was fit for the intended use, with accuracy of 97.4+/-4.3% for the assay and detection limits for degradants ranging between 0.5 and 2.4%. Pilot stability tests of the bioadhesive powder under different storage conditions showed a temperature-dependent decrease in salmon calcitonin assay value, with no equivalent increase in degradation products, explained by the chemical interaction between salmon calcitonin and the carbomer polymer.

  2. Methodologies and Perspectives of Proteomics Applied to Filamentous Fungi: From Sample Preparation to Secretome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Linda; Perrotta, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous fungi possess the extraordinary ability to digest complex biomasses and mineralize numerous xenobiotics, as consequence of their aptitude to sensing the environment and regulating their intra and extra cellular proteins, producing drastic changes in proteome and secretome composition. Recent advancement in proteomic technologies offers an exciting opportunity to reveal the fluctuations of fungal proteins and enzymes, responsible for their metabolic adaptation to a large variety of environmental conditions. Here, an overview of the most commonly used proteomic strategies will be provided; this paper will range from sample preparation to gel-free and gel-based proteomics, discussing pros and cons of each mentioned state-of-the-art technique. The main focus will be kept on filamentous fungi. Due to the biotechnological relevance of lignocellulose degrading fungi, special attention will be finally given to their extracellular proteome, or secretome. Secreted proteins and enzymes will be discussed in relation to their involvement in bio-based processes, such as biomass deconstruction and mycoremediation. PMID:25775160

  3. Glass sample preparation and performance investigations. [solar x-ray imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1992-01-01

    This final report details the work performed under this delivery order from April 1991 through April 1992. The currently available capabilities for integrated optical performance modeling at MSFC for large and complex systems such as AXAF were investigated. The Integrated Structural Modeling (ISM) program developed by Boeing for the U.S. Air Force was obtained and installed on two DECstations 5000 at MSFC. The structural, thermal and optical analysis programs available in ISM were evaluated. As part of the optomechanical engineering activities, technical support was provided in the design of support structure, mirror assembly, filter wheel assembly and material selection for the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program. As part of the fabrication activities, a large number of zerodur glass samples were prepared in different sizes and shapes for acid etching, coating and polishing experiments to characterize the subsurface damage and stresses produced by the grinding and polishing operations. Various optical components for AXAF video microscope and the x-ray test facility were also fabricated. A number of glass fabrication and test instruments such as a scatter plate interferometer, a gravity feed saw and some phenolic cutting blades were fabricated, integrated and tested.

  4. Adjustable virtual pore-size filter for automated sample preparation using acoustic radiation force

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K; Mariella, R

    2008-05-22

    We present a rapid and robust size-based separation method for high throughput microfluidic devices using acoustic radiation force. We developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices. Here we compare the results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. With optimized design of our microfluidic flow system we were able to achieve yields of > 90% for the MS2 with > 80% of the S. cerevisiae being removed in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  5. A novel visible spectrophotometric method for the determination of ethamsylate in pharmaceutical preparations and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiyun; Zhang, Yan; Li, Quanmin

    2010-03-01

    A highly sensitive visible spectrophotometric method has been developed to determine ethamsylate in this paper, which is based on using Cu(II) as spectroscopic probe reagent. The study indicates that in the presence of SCN(-) and KNO(3), Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) by ethamsylate at pH 5.0, and the in situ formed Cu(I) reacts with SCN(-) to form into the white emulsion CuSCN that could be stayed upon the surface of water. According to the amount of residual Cu(II), the amount of ethamsylate can be indirectly determined. Under the optimal conditions, Beer's law is applicable in the range of 0.2-9.0 microg/mL (7.60x10(-7)-3.42x10(-5)mol/L) for aqueous standard solution of ethamsylate with linear correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The detection limit and relative standard deviation are 0.12 microg/mL and 1.5%, respectively. And the molar absorption coefficient of the indirect determination of ethamsylate is 1.0x10(5)L/mol cm. The method is successfully applied to determine ethamsylate in pharmaceutical preparations and biological samples.

  6. Dynamic simulation tools for the analysis and optimization of novel collection, filtration and sample preparation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clague, D; Weisgraber, T; Rockway, J; McBride, K

    2006-02-12

    The focus of research effort described here is to develop novel simulation tools to address design and optimization needs in the general class of problems that involve species and fluid (liquid and gas phases) transport through sieving media. This was primarily motivated by the heightened attention on Chem/Bio early detection systems, which among other needs, have a need for high efficiency filtration, collection and sample preparation systems. Hence, the said goal was to develop the computational analysis tools necessary to optimize these critical operations. This new capability is designed to characterize system efficiencies based on the details of the microstructure and environmental effects. To accomplish this, new lattice Boltzmann simulation capabilities where developed to include detailed microstructure descriptions, the relevant surface forces that mediate species capture and release, and temperature effects for both liquid and gas phase systems. While developing the capability, actual demonstration and model systems (and subsystems) of national and programmatic interest were targeted to demonstrate the capability. As a result, where possible, experimental verification of the computational capability was performed either directly using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry or published results.

  7. Atmospheric pressure microwave sample preparation procedure for the combined analysis of total phosphorus and kjeldahl nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Collins, L W; Chalk, S J; Kingston, H M

    1996-08-01

    An atmospheric pressure microwave digestion method has been developed for the combined analysis of total phosphorus and Kjeldahl nitrogen in complex matrices. In comparison to the digestion steps in EPA Methods 365.4 (total phosphorus) and 351.x (Kjeldahl nitrogen), this method requires less time, eliminates the need for a catalyst, and reduces the toxicity of the waste significantly. It employs a microwave-assisted digestion step, using refluxing borosilicate glass vessels at atmospheric pressure. Traditionally, this method has a time-consuming sample preparation step and generates toxic waste through the use of heavy metal catalysts. These advantages are gained by the combination of a high boiling point acid (sulfuric acid) and the application of focused microwave irradiation, which enhances the digestion process by direct energy coupling. NIST standard reference materials 1572 (citrus leaves), 1577a (bovine liver), and 1566 (oyster tissue) and tryptophan were analyzed to validate the method. Phosphorus concentrations were determined by the colorimetric ascorbic acid method outlined in EPA Method 365.3. Kjeldahl nitrogen concentrations were determined using EPA Method 351.1. The results of the analyses showed good precision and are in excellent agreement with the NIST published values for both elements.

  8. A one-step preparation method of monolithic enzyme reactor for highly efficient sample preparation coupled to mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Zhang, Zichuan; Li, Lingjun

    2015-09-18

    Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to sample preparation and separation techniques has become a primary tool for proteomics studies. However, due to sample complexity, it is often challenging to achieve fast and efficient sample preparation prior to MS analysis. In recent decades, monolithic materials have been developed not only as chromatographic media, but also as efficient solid supports for immobilizing multiple types of affinity reagents. Herein, the N-acryloxysuccinimide-co-acrylamide-co-N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (NAS-AAm-Bis) monolith was fabricated within silanized 200 μm i.d. fused-silica capillaries and was used as an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). The column was conjugated with trypsin/Lys-C and Lys-N enzymes to allow enzymatic digestions to occur while protein mixture was loaded onto the IMER column followed by MS-based proteomics analysis. Similar MS signal and protein sequence coverage were observed using protein standard bovine serum albumin (BSA) compared to in-solution digestion. Furthermore, mouse serum, yeast, and human cell lysate samples were also subjected to enzymatic digestion by both IMER (in seconds to minutes) and conventional in solution digestion (overnight) for comparison in large-scale proteomics studies. Comparable protein identification results obtained by the two methods highlighted the potential of employing NAS-based IMER column for fast and highly efficient sample preparation for MS analysis in proteomics studies.

  9. A One-Step Preparation Method of Monolithic Enzyme Reactor for Highly Efficient Sample Preparation Coupled to Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shan; Zhang, Zichuan; Li, Lingjun

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to sample preparation and separation techniques has become a primary tool for proteomics studies. However, due to sample complexity, it is often challenging to achieve fast and efficient sample preparation prior to MS analysis. In recent decades, monolithic materials have been developed not only as chromatographic media, but also as efficient solid supports for immobilizing multiple types of affinity reagents. Herein, the N-acryloxysuccinimide-co-acrylamide-co-N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (NAS-AAm-Bis) monolith was fabricated within silanized 200 μm i.d. fused-silica capillaries and was used as an immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). The column was conjugated with trypsin/Lys-C and Lys-N enzymes to allow enzymatic digestions to occur while protein mixture was loaded onto the IMER column followed by MS-based proteomics analysis. Similar MS signal and protein sequence coverage were observed using protein standard bovine serum albumin (BSA) compared to in-solution digestion. Furthermore, mouse serum, yeast, and human cell lysate samples were also subjected to enzymatic digestion by both IMER (in seconds to minutes) and conventional in solution digestion (overnight) for comparison in large-scale proteomics studies. Comparable protein identification results obtained by the two methods highlighted the potential of employing NAS-based IMER column for fast and highly efficient sample preparation for MS analysis in proteomics studies. PMID:26300481

  10. Automated Sample Preparation for Radiogenic and Non-Traditional Metal Isotopes: Removing an Analytical Barrier for High Sample Throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, M. Paul; Romaniello, Stephen; Gordon, Gwyneth W.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Herrmann, Achim; Martinez-Boti, Miguel A.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Foster, Gavin L.

    2014-05-01

    MC-ICP-MS has dramatically improved the analytical throughput for high-precision radiogenic and non-traditional isotope ratio measurements, compared to TIMS. The generation of large data sets, however, remains hampered by tedious manual drip chromatography required for sample purification. A new, automated chromatography system reduces the laboratory bottle neck and expands the utility of high-precision isotope analyses in applications where large data sets are required: geochemistry, forensic anthropology, nuclear forensics, medical research and food authentication. We have developed protocols to automate ion exchange purification for several isotopic systems (B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb and U) using the new prepFAST-MC™ (ESI, Nebraska, Omaha). The system is not only inert (all-flouropolymer flow paths), but is also very flexible and can easily facilitate different resins, samples, and reagent types. When programmed, precise and accurate user defined volumes and flow rates are implemented to automatically load samples, wash the column, condition the column and elute fractions. Unattended, the automated, low-pressure ion exchange chromatography system can process up to 60 samples overnight. Excellent reproducibility, reliability, recovery, with low blank and carry over for samples in a variety of different matrices, have been demonstrated to give accurate and precise isotopic ratios within analytical error for several isotopic systems (B, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd, Pb and U). This illustrates the potential of the new prepFAST-MC™ (ESI, Nebraska, Omaha) as a powerful tool in radiogenic and non-traditional isotope research.

  11. An automated method of sample preparation of biofluids using pierceable caps to eliminate the uncapping of the sample tubes during sample transfer.

    PubMed

    Teitz, D S; Khan, S; Powell, M L; Jemal, M

    2000-09-11

    Biological samples are normally collected and stored frozen in capped tubes until analysis. To obtain aliquots of biological samples for analysis, the sample tubes have to be thawed, uncapped, samples removed and then recapped for further storage. In this paper, we report an automated method of sample transfer devised to eliminate the uncapping and recapping process. This sampling method was incorporated into an automated liquid-liquid extraction procedure of plasma samples. Using a robotic system, the plasma samples were transferred directly from pierceable capped tubes into microtubes contained in a 96-position block. The aliquoted samples were extracted with methyl-tert-butyl ether in the same microtubes. The supernatant organic layers were transferred to a 96-well collection plate and evaporated to dryness. The dried extracts were reconstituted and injected from the same plate for analysis by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

  12. Comparison of several supervised pattern recognition techniques for detecting additive methamidophos in rotenone preparation by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guo; Tian, Kuangda; Song, Xiangzhong; Xiong, Yanmei; Min, Shungeng

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, different supervised pattern recognition methods have been applied to detect the manually additive methamidophos in rotenone preparation. The aim of this paper was to examine the performances of different supervised pattern recognition techniques: soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), artificial neutral networks (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM). The results obtained show that SVM is the most effective techniques with 100.0% classification accuracy followed by ANN, PLS-DA and with the accuracy of 97.5% and 93.3% respectively while SIMCA yields the poorest result of 85.8%. We hope that the results obtained in this study will help both further chemometric investigations and investigations in the sphere of applied vibrational spectroscopy of sophisticated multicomponent systems. Furthermore, the use of portable instrument and satisfactory classification also indicated the possibility of detecting illicit-addition at scene by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy which makes a great sense in pesticide quality control.

  13. Alginate-based pellets prepared by extrusion/spheronization: a preliminary study on the effect of additive in granulating liquid.

    PubMed

    Sriamornsak, Pornsak; Nunthanid, Jurairat; Luangtana-anan, Manee; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of producing alginate-based pellets by extrusion/spheronization and also to improve the formation of spherical alginate-based pellets by investigating the effect of additive in granulating liquid on characteristics and drug release from resulting pellets. Two types of sodium alginate (30%) were evaluated in combination with theophylline (20%), microcrystalline cellulose (50%) and different granulation liquids. The pellets were then prepared in a basket extruder, then spheronized and dried. The final products were characterized by morphological examination and drug release study. Different additives in the granulating liquid influenced the ability of the extruded mass to form pellets (the processability) with this technique. However, different sodium alginate types responded to shape modifications to a different extent. Long, dumbbell-shaped pellets were obtained with viscous granulating liquids. However, short, nearly spherical pellets were obtained with watery granulation liquid with calcium chloride that reduced the swelling ability of sodium alginate. Improvements in the pellet characteristics were also dependent on the sodium alginate type employed. Most of pellet formulations released about 75-85% drug within 60min and showed a good fit into both Higuchi and Korsmeyer-Peppas equations. Higher amount of 3% calcium chloride, as a granulating liquid, in the formulation showed higher mean dissolution time resulting from the cross-linking properties of calcium ions to the negative charges of alginate molecules.

  14. Automated Gel Size Selection to Improve the Quality of Next-generation Sequencing Libraries Prepared from Environmental Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Uyaguari-Diaz, Miguel I; Slobodan, Jared R; Nesbitt, Matthew J; Croxen, Matthew A; Isaac-Renton, Judith; Prystajecky, Natalie A; Tang, Patrick

    2015-04-17

    Next-generation sequencing of environmental samples can be challenging because of the variable DNA quantity and quality in these samples. High quality DNA libraries are needed for optimal results from next-generation sequencing. Environmental samples such as water may have low quality and quantities of DNA as well as contaminants that co-precipitate with DNA. The mechanical and enzymatic processes involved in extraction and library preparation may further damage the DNA. Gel size selection enables purification and recovery of DNA fragments of a defined size for sequencing applications. Nevertheless, this task is one of the most time-consuming steps in the DNA library preparation workflow. The protocol described here enables complete automation of agarose gel loading, electrophoretic analysis, and recovery of targeted DNA fragments. In this study, we describe a high-throughput approach to prepare high quality DNA libraries from freshwater samples that can be applied also to other environmental samples. We used an indirect approach to concentrate bacterial cells from environmental freshwater samples; DNA was extracted using a commercially available DNA extraction kit, and DNA libraries were prepared using a commercial transposon-based protocol. DNA fragments of 500 to 800 bp were gel size selected using Ranger Technology, an automated electrophoresis workstation. Sequencing of the size-selected DNA libraries demonstrated significant improvements to read length and quality of the sequencing reads.

  15. Inverse supercritical fluid extraction as a sample preparation method for the analysis of the nanoparticle content in sunscreen agents.

    PubMed

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Vries, Tjerk; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Antonio, Diana C; Cascio, Claudia; Calzolai, Luigi; Gilliland, Douglas; de Mello, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of inverse supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) extraction as a novel method of sample preparation for the analysis of complex nanoparticle-containing samples, in our case a model sunscreen agent with titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The sample was prepared for analysis in a simplified process using a lab scale supercritical fluid extraction system. The residual material was easily dispersed in an aqueous solution and analyzed by Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) hyphenated with UV- and Multi-Angle Light Scattering detection. The obtained results allowed an unambiguous determination of the presence of nanoparticles within the sample, with almost no background from the matrix itself, and showed that the size distribution of the nanoparticles is essentially maintained. These results are especially relevant in view of recently introduced regulatory requirements concerning the labeling of nanoparticle-containing products. The novel sample preparation method is potentially applicable to commercial sunscreens or other emulsion-based cosmetic products and has important ecological advantages over currently used sample preparation techniques involving organic solvents.

  16. Reduction of hazardous organic solvent in sample preparation for hydrophilic pesticide residues in agricultural products with conventional liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eiki; Kobara, Yuso; Baba, Koji; Eun, Heesoo

    2013-05-22

    An original extraction method using water as an extractant has been established for environmentally friendly sample preparation procedures for hydrophilic pesticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, flonicamid, imidacloprid, methomyl, pymetrozine, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) in agricultural samples with conventional HPLC. Water-based extraction and cleanup with two solid-phase extraction cartridges can recover target hydrophilic pesticides quantitatively. The matrix effects of tested samples on the proposed method developed herein were negligibly small. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of almost all tested pesticides were 70-120% with satisfactory precision (%CV < 20%). The analytical data are in good accordance with Japanese or European Union guidelines for pesticide residue analysis. The reduction rate of hazardous organic solvents used for the proposed method and by reducing the sample size for extraction was about 70% compared with the Japanese authorized reference method used in this work. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed sample preparation procedures for hydrophilic pesticides.

  17. Final Report Nucleic Acid System - PCR, Multiplex Assays and Sample Preparation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, R.P.; Langlois, R.G.; Nasarabadi, S.; Benett, W.J.; Richards, J.B.; Hadley, D.R.; Miles, R.R.; Brown, S.B.; Stratton, P.L.; Milanovich, F.P.

    2001-04-20

    The objective of this project was to reduce to practice the detection and identification of biological warfare pathogens by the nucleic acid recognition technique of PCR (polymerase chain reaction). This entailed not only building operationally functional instrumentation but also developing the chemical assays for detection of priority pathogens. This project had two principal deliverables: (1) design, construct, test and deliver a 24 chamber, multiplex capable suitcase sized PCR instrument, and (2) develop and reduce to practice a multiplex assay for the detection of PCR product by flow cytometry. In addition, significant resources were allocated to test and evaluation of the Hand-held Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA). This project helps provide the signature and intelligence gathering community the ability to perform, on-site or remote, rapid analysis of environmental or like samples for the presence of a suite of biological warfare pathogens.

  18. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Sample Preparation of Si(1-x)Gex in c-Plane Sapphire Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Sang H.; Bae, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Tae Woo

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-invented X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, including the total defect density measurement method and the spatial wafer mapping method, have confirmed super hetero epitaxy growth for rhombohedral single crystalline silicon germanium (Si1-xGex) on a c-plane sapphire substrate. However, the XRD method cannot observe the surface morphology or roughness because of the method s limited resolution. Therefore the authors used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with samples prepared in two ways, the focused ion beam (FIB) method and the tripod method to study the structure between Si1-xGex and sapphire substrate and Si1?xGex itself. The sample preparation for TEM should be as fast as possible so that the sample should contain few or no artifacts induced by the preparation. The standard sample preparation method of mechanical polishing often requires a relatively long ion milling time (several hours), which increases the probability of inducing defects into the sample. The TEM sampling of the Si1-xGex on sapphire is also difficult because of the sapphire s high hardness and mechanical instability. The FIB method and the tripod method eliminate both problems when performing a cross-section TEM sampling of Si1-xGex on c-plane sapphire, which shows the surface morphology, the interface between film and substrate, and the crystal structure of the film. This paper explains the FIB sampling method and the tripod sampling method, and why sampling Si1-xGex, on a sapphire substrate with TEM, is necessary.

  19. Surface protein imprinted core-shell particles for high selective lysozyme recognition prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinran; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Jianxi; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-12-24

    A novel kind of lysozyme (Lys) surface imprinted core-shell particles was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) strategy. With controllable polymer shell chain length, such particles showed obviously improved selectivity for protein recognition. After the RAFT initial agent and template protein was absorbed on silica particles, the prepolymerization solution, with methacrylic acid and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate as the monomers, and N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) as the cross-linker, was mixed with the silica particles, and the polymerization was performed at 40 °C in aqueous phase through the oxidation-reduction initiation. Ater polymerization, with the template protein removal and destroying dithioester groups with hexylamine, the surface Lyz imprinted particles were obtained with controllable polymer chain length. The binding capacity of the Lys imprinted particles could reach 5.6 mg protein/g material, with the imprinting factor (IF) as 3.7, whereas the IF of the control material prepared without RAFT strategy was only 1.6. The absorption equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min. Moreover, Lys could be selectively recognized by the imprinted particles from both a four-proteins mixture and egg white sample. All these results demonstrated that these particles prepared by RAFT strategy are promising to achieve the protein recognition with high selectivity.

  20. Preparation of surface-modified lanthanum fluoride-graphene oxide nanohybrids and evaluation of their tribological properties as lubricant additive in liquid paraffin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cuizhen; Hou, Xiao; Li, Zhiwei; Li, Xiaohong; Yu, Laigui; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-12-01

    Oleic acid surface-modified Lanthanum trifluoride-graphene oxide (OA-LaF3-GO) nanohybrids were successfully prepared by surface modification technology. The morphology and phase structure of as-prepared samples were analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, Raman spectrometry and thermogravimetry. The results revealed that OA were bonded onto the surface of LaF3-GO nanohybrids. Subsequently, the tribological properties of OA-LaF3-GO nanohybrids as lubricant additive in liquid paraffin were evaluated with a four-ball machine, and the morphology and elemental composition of worn steel surfaces were examined on a scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive spectrometer. Tribological results showed that OA-LaF3-GO nanohybrids had excellent friction reduction and antiwear ability at the loading of 0.5 wt.% OA-LaF3-GO nanohybrids, compared to liquid paraffin alone. The results of energy dispersive spectrometer revealed that improved tribological properties resulted from OA-LaF3-GO could transfer to the rubbed steel surface and decompose to form protective layers, which help to improve tribological properties.

  1. Dynamic three-phase microextraction as a sample preparation technique prior to capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Li; Lee, Hian Kee

    2003-06-01

    Dynamic three-phase (liquid-liquid-liquid) microextraction was developed for capillary electrophoresis. Four aromatic amines as model compounds were extracted from 4-mL aqueous samples adjusted to basic condition (donor solution) through a small volume of organic solvent impregnated in a hollow fiber, which was held by the needle of a conventional syringe, and retracted into a 5-microL acidic acceptor solution inside the syringe. A renewable organic film and aqueous sample plug were formed inside the hollow fiber with the repeated movement of the syringe plunger enabled by a programmable syringe pump. This is believed to be the first reported instance of a semiautomated dynamic liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (LLLME) procedure. Following this microextraction, the 5-microL acceptor solution was analyzed by capillary zone electrophoresis (CE). This new technique provided approximately 140-fold enrichment in 20 min. Utilizing 4-chloroaniline as internal standard, dynamic LLLME could provide good reproducibility (<4.0%). In addition, this method allowed the direct transfer of extracted analytes to a CE system for analysis.

  2. Evaluation of Electrospray as a Sample Preparation Tool for Electron Microscopic Investigations: Toward Quantitative Evaluation of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mielke, Johannes; Dohányosová, Pavla; Müller, Philipp; López-Vidal, Silvia; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan

    2017-02-01

    The potential of electrospray deposition, for the controlled preparation of particles for imaging in electron microscopes, is evaluated on various materials: from mono-modal suspensions of spherical particles to multimodal suspensions and to real-world industrial materials. It is shown that agglomeration is reduced substantially on the sample carrier, compared with conventional sample preparation techniques. For the first time, it is possible to assess the number concentration of a tri-modal polystyrene suspension by electron microscopy, due to the high deposition efficiency of the electrospray. We discovered that some suspension stabilizing surfactants form artifact particles during electrospraying. These can be avoided by optimizing the sprayed suspension.

  3. Phosphite determination in fertilizers after online sequential sample preparation in a flow injection system.

    PubMed

    Dametto, Patrícia Roberta; Franzini, Vanessa Pezza; Gomes Neto, José Anchieta

    2007-07-25

    A flow injection spectrophotometric system is proposed for phosphite determination in fertilizers by the molybdenum blue method after the processing of each sample two times on-line without and with an oxidizing step. The flow system was designed to add sulfuric acid or permanganate solutions alternately into the system by simply displacing the injector-commutator from one resting position to another, allowing the determination of phosphate and total phosphate, respectively. The concentration of phosphite is obtained then by difference between the two measurents. The influence of flow rates, sample volume, and dimension of flow line connecting the injector-commutator to the main analytical channel was evaluated. The proposed method was applied to phosphite determination in commercial liquid fertilizers. Results obtained with the proposed FIA system were not statistically different from those obtained by titrimetry at the 95% confidence level. In addition, recoveries within 94 and 100% of spiked fertilizers were found. The relative standard deviation (n = 12) related to the phosphite-converted-phosphate peak alone was sampling rate was calculated as 15 determinations per hour, and the reagent consumption was about 6.3 mg of KMnO4, 200 mg of (NH4)6Mo7O24.4H2O, and 40 mg of ascorbic acid per measurement.

  4. Characterization of low molecular weight hydrocarbon oligomers by laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry using a solvent-free sample preparation method.

    PubMed

    Pruns, Julia K; Vietzke, Jens-Peter; Strassner, Manfred; Rapp, Claudius; Hintze, Ulrich; König, Wilfried A

    2002-01-01

    A new solvent-free sample preparation method using silver trifluoroacetate (AgTFA) was developed for the analysis of low molecular weight paraffins and microcrystalline waxes by laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI-TOFMS). Experiments show that spectral quality can be enhanced by dispersing AgTFA directly in liquid paraffins without the use of additional solvents. This preparation mixture is applied directly to the MALDI probe. Solid waxes could be examined by melting prior to analysis. The method also provides sufficiently reproducible spectra that peak area ratios between mono- and bicyclic alkane peaks indicated variations in the cycloalkane content of paraffin samples. Dehydrogenation of hydrocarbons observed during the desorption/ionization process was studied by analysis of alkane standards.

  5. Preparation of Polyethylene Composites Containing Silver(I) Acylpyrazolonato Additives and SAR Investigation of their Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Fabio; Palmucci, Jessica; Pettinari, Claudio; Pettinari, Riccardo; Marangoni, Mirko; Ferraro, Stefano; Giovannetti, Rita; Scuri, Stefania; Grappasonni, Iolanda; Cocchioni, Mario; Maldonado Hodar, Francisco José; Gunnella, Roberto

    2016-11-02

    Novel composite materials PEn (n = 1-9) have been prepared by an easily up-scalable embedding procedure of three different families of Ag(I) acylpyrazolonato complexes in polyethylene (PE) matrix. In details, PE1-PE3 composites contain polynuclear [Ag(Q(R))]n complexes, PE4-PE6 contain mononuclear [Ag(Q(R))(L)m] complexes and PE7-PE9 are loaded with mononuclear [Ag(Q(R)) (PPh3)2] complexes, respectively (where L = 1-methylimidazole or 2-ethylimidazole, m = 1 or 2, and HQ(R) = 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-RC(═O)-5-pyrazolone, where in detail HQ(fb), R = -CF2CF2CF3; HQ(cy), R = -cyclo-C6H11; HQ(be), R = -C(H)═C(CH3)2). The PEn composites, prepared by using a 1:1000 w/w silver additive/polyethylene ratio, have been characterized in bulk by IR spectroscopy and TGA analyses, which confirmed that the properties of polyethylene matrix are essentially unchanged. AFM, SEM, and EDX surface techniques show that silver additives form agglomerates with dimensions 10-100 μm on the polyethylene surface, with a slight increment of surface roughness of pristine plastic within 50 nm. However, the elastic properties of the composites are essentially the same of PE. The antibacterial activity of all composites has been tested against three bacterial strains (E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus) and results show that two classes of composites, PE1-PE3 and PE4-PE6, display high and persistent bactericidal and bacteriostatic activity, comparable to PE embedded with AgNO3. By contrast, composites PE7-PE9 exhibit a reduced antibacterial action. Contact and release tests in several conditions for specific migration of Ag(+) from plastics, indicate a very limited but time persistent release of silver ions from PE1-PE6 composites, thus suggesting that they are potential antibacterial materials for future applications. Instead, PE7-PE9 almost do not release silver, only trace levels of silver ions being detected, in accordance with their reduced antibacterial action. None of the composites is

  6. An Integrated Solution-Based Rapid Sample Preparation Procedure for the Analysis of N-Glycans From Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aich, Udayanath; Liu, Aston; Lakbub, Jude; Mozdzanowski, Jacek; Byrne, Michael; Shah, Nilesh; Galosy, Sybille; Patel, Pramthesh; Bam, Narendra

    2016-03-01

    Consistent glycosylation in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is a major concern in the biopharmaceutical industry as it impacts the drug's safety and efficacy and manufacturing processes. Large numbers of samples are created for the analysis of glycans during various stages of recombinant proteins drug development. Profiling and quantifying protein N-glycosylation is important but extremely challenging due to its microheterogeneity and more importantly the limitations of existing time-consuming sample preparation methods. Thus, a quantitative method with fast sample preparation is crucial for understanding, controlling, and modifying the glycoform variance in therapeutic monoclonal antibody development. Presented here is a rapid and highly quantitative method for the analysis of N-glycans from monoclonal antibodies. The method comprises a simple and fast solution-based sample preparation method that uses nontoxic reducing reagents for direct labeling of N-glycans. The complete work flow for the preparation of fluorescently labeled N-glycans takes a total of 3 h with less than 30 min needed for the release of N-glycans from monoclonal antibody samples.

  7. Audit of the Union Valley sample preparation facility at Oak Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-07

    This audit was initiated to determine if the US DOE`s acquisition of the Union Valley Sample Preparation Facility (UVSPF) was necessary and cost effective. To accomplish the audit objective, four actions were taken: (1) review of applicable laws and regulations, (2) analysis of procurement files for the lease and interviews of Department and contractor officials, (3) evaluation of facility justifications, and (4) assessment of workload and staffing requirements of Lockheed Martin Energy Systems` Analytical Services Organization. The audit found that Energy Systems did not base the acquisition of the UVSPF on valid mission requirements. This occurred because Energy Systems did not follow Department procedures in planning and developing the lease, and the Department approved the lease without adequate justification. It was recommended that the Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office: (1) direct Energy Systems to follow Department policies and procedures and base acquisitions of property on valid mission requirements and an analysis of all viable alternatives; (2) direct project managers to follow Department orders and require approvals of construction projects and property leases to include (a) verification that projects are essential to meet mission requirements and (b) analysis of all viable alternatives; and (3) direct Energy Systems to give the required 365-day notice and discontinue the lease. The audit also found that Energy Systems restricted the location of the UVSPF without establishing a programmatic need for the restriction. The restriction gave an Energy Systems subcontractor a competitive advantage and may have caused the Department to pay more than necessary for the facility. It was recommended that the Manager, Oak Ridge Operations Office, direct Energy Systems to discontinue the practice of restricting facility locations unless they are justified to meet mission requirements. The audit concluded that the UVSPF was not necessary.

  8. Efficient DNP NMR of Membrane Proteins: Sample Preparation Protocols, Sensitivity, and Radical Location

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shu Y.; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Tuo; Sergeyev, Ivan V.; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Although dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has dramatically enhanced solid-state NMR spectral sensitivities of many synthetic materials and some biological macromolecules, recent studies of membrane-protein DNP using exogenously doped paramagnetic radicals as polarizing agents have reported varied and sometimes surprisingly limited enhancement factors. This motivated us to carry out a systematic evaluation of sample preparation protocols for optimizing the sensitivity of DNP NMR spectra of membrane-bound peptides and proteins at cryogenic temperatures of ~110 K. We show that mixing the radical with the membrane by direct titration instead of centrifugation gives a significant boost to DNP enhancement. We quantify the relative sensitivity enhancement between AMUPol and TOTAPOL, two commonly used radicals, and between deuterated and protonated lipid membranes. AMUPol shows ~4 fold higher sensitivity enhancement than TOTAPOL, while deuterated lipid membrane does not give net higher sensitivity for the membrane peptides than protonated membrane. Overall, a ~100 fold enhancement between the microwave-on and microwave-off spectra can be achieved on lipid-rich membranes containing conformationally disordered peptides, and absolute sensitivity gains of 105–160 can be obtained between low-temperature DNP spectra and high-temperature non-DNP spectra. We also measured the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of lipid signals by TOTAPOL and AMUPol, to determine the depths of these two radicals in the lipid bilayer. Our data indicate a bimodal distribution of both radicals, a surface-bound fraction and a membrane-bound fraction where the nitroxides lie at ~10 Å from the membrane surface. TOTAPOL appears to have a higher membrane-embedded fraction than AMUPol. These results should be useful for membrane-protein solid-state NMR studies under DNP conditions and provide insights into how biradicals interact with phospholipid membranes. PMID:26873390

  9. Towards a phylogenetic generic classification of Thelypteridaceae: Additional sampling suggests alterations of neotropical taxa and further study of paleotropical genera.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Thaís Elias; Hennequin, Sabine; Schneider, Harald; Smith, Alan R; Batista, João Aguiar Nogueira; Ramalho, Aline Joseph; Proite, Karina; Salino, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Thelypteridaceae is one of the largest fern families, having about 950 species and a cosmopolitan distribution but with most species occurring in tropical and subtropical regions. Its generic classification remains controversial, with different authors recognizing from one up to 32 genera. Phylogenetic relationships within the family have not been exhaustively studied, but previous studies have confirmed the monophyly of the lineage. Thus far, sampling has been inadequate for establishing a robust hypothesis of infrafamilial relationships within the family. In order to understand phylogenetic relationships within Thelypteridaceae and thus to improve generic reclassification, we expand the molecular sampling, including new samples of Old World taxa and, especially, many additional neotropical representatives. We also explore the monophyly of exclusively or mostly neotropical genera Amauropelta, Goniopteris, Meniscium, and Steiropteris. Our sampling includes 68 taxa and 134 newly generated sequences from two plastid genomic regions (rps4-trnS and trnL-trnF), plus 73 rps4 and 72 trnL-trnF sequences from GenBank. These data resulted in a concatenated matrix of 1980 molecular characters for 149 taxa. The combined data set was analyzed using maximum parsimony and bayesian inference of phylogeny. Our results are consistent with the general topological structure found in previous studies, including two main lineages within the family: phegopteroid and thelypteroid. The thelypteroid lineage comprises two clades; one of these included the segregates Metathelypteris, Coryphopteris, and Amauropelta (including part of Parathelypteris), whereas the other comprises all segregates of Cyclosorus s.l., such as Goniopteris, Meniscium, and Steiropteris (including Thelypteris polypodioides, previously incertae sedis). The three mainly neotropical segregates were found to be monophyletic but nested in a broadly defined Cyclosorus. The fourth mainly neotropical segregate, Amauropelta

  10. Preparation of polysulfone materials on nickel foam for solid-phase microextraction of floxacin in water and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiujuan; Cheng, Ting; Wang, Shuxia; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Haixia

    2017-03-01

    Solid-phase microextraction with polysulfone and molecularly imprinted polymers as coating on nickel foam were used to adsorb and enrich floxacin drugs. The preparation method is simple and reproducible to obtain the materials with controlled thickness. After evaluation by scanning electron microscope and various adsorption experiments, the materials were used to adsorb analytes in water samples and biological samples. Coupling with chromatographic analysis, the method recoveries are satisfactory with 90.0-104.8% and 79.31-107.1% for water and biological samples. The method repeatability by intra- and interday experiments shows that the RSD values for water and biological samples were 1.0-9.9% and 1.7-10.3%, with the quantitative limits of three floxacin drugs as 3.0-6.2 μg L(-1). Graphical Abstract Preparation diagram of polysulfone material.

  11. Sample preparation and direct electrospray ionization on a tip column for rapid mass spectrometry analysis of complex samples.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Qing; You, Jin-Qing; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2012-10-07

    A handheld pipette tip column electrospray ionization source (PTC-ESI source) was developed for rapid mass spectrometry analysis at ambient pressure. The PTC-ESI source was made up of three main component parts including a micro DC high voltage (HV) power supply, a micropipette and a disposable micropipette tip filled with a plug of adsorbent. A DC high voltage was applied to the sharp point of the micropipette tip column to induce electrospray ionization. The PTC-ESI source was successfully used for direct analysis of basic organic compounds, organic acids and peptides in a simple matrix. In the case of complex samples, micro-extraction based on the adsorbent phase filled in the pipette tip was used to remove impurities and concentrate target analytes prior to ionization. The eluting solution was not pipetted out, but directly dispersed in the form of electrospray from the pipette tip for ionization. The effectiveness of the PTC-ESI source has been further demonstrated by fast analysis of therapeutic compounds and endogenous bioactive chemicals in complex biological samples.

  12. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization sample preparation optimization for structural characterization of poly(styrene-co-pentafluorostyrene) copolymers.

    PubMed

    Tisdale, Evgenia; Kennedy, Devin; Xu, Xiaodong; Wilkins, Charles

    2014-01-15

    The influence of the sample preparation parameters (the choice of the matrix, matrix:analyte ratio, salt:analyte ratio) was investigated and optimal conditions were established for the MALDI time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis of the poly(styrene-co-pentafluorostyrene) copolymers. These were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization. Use of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as matrix resulted in spectra with consistently high ion yields for all matrix:analyte:salt ratios tested. The optimized MALDI procedure was successfully applied to the characterization of three copolymers obtained by varying the conditions of polymerization reaction. It was possible to establish the nature of the end groups, calculate molecular weight distributions, and determine the individual length distributions for styrene and pentafluorostyrene monomers, contained in the resulting copolymers. Based on the data obtained, it was concluded that individual styrene chain length distributions are more sensitive to the change in the composition of the catalyst (the addition of small amount of CuBr2) than is the pentafluorostyrene component distribution.

  13. Preparation of porous n-type silicon sample plates for desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS).

    PubMed

    Tuomikoski, S; Huikko, K; Grigoras, K; Ostman, P; Kostiainen, R; Baumann, M; Abian, J; Kotiaho, T; Franssila, S

    2002-11-01

    This study focuses on porous silicon (pSi) fabrication methods and properties for desorption ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS). PSi was prepared using electrochemical etching of n-type silicon in HF-ethanol solution. Porous areas were defined by a double-sided illumination arrangement: front-side porous areas were masked by a stencil mask, eliminating the need for standard photolithography, and backside illumination was used for the backside ohmic contact. Backside illumination improved the uniformity of the porosified areas. Porosification conditions, surface derivatizations and storage conditions were explored to optimize pSi area, pore size and pore depth. Chemical derivatization of the pSi surfaces improved the DIOS-MS performance providing better ionization efficiency and signal stability with lower laser energy. Droplet spreading and drying patterns on pSi were also examined. Pore sizes of 50-200 nm were found to be optimal for droplet evaporation and pore filling with the sample liquid, as measured by DIOS efficiency. With DIOS, significantly better detection sensitivity was obtained (e.g. 150 fmol for midazolam) than with desorption ionization from a standard MALDI steel plate without matrix addition (30 pmol for midazolam). Also the noise that disturbs the detection of low-molecular weight compounds at m/z < 500 with MALDI could be clearly reduced with DIOS. Low background MS spectra and good detection sensitivity at the 100-150 fmol level for pharmaceutical compounds were achieved with DIOS-MS.

  14. Electromechanical cell lysis using a portable audio device: enabling challenging sample preparation at the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Buser, J R; Wollen, A; Heiniger, E K; Byrnes, S A; Kauffman, P C; Ladd, P D; Yager, P

    2015-05-07

    Audio sources are ubiquitously available on portable electronic devices, including cell phones. Here we demonstrate lysis of Mycobacterium marinum and Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria utilizing a portable audio device coupled with a simple and inexpensive electromagnetic coil. The resulting alternating magnetic field rotates a magnet in a tube with the sample and glass beads, lysing the cells and enabling sample preparation for these bacteria anywhere there is a cell phone, mp3 player, laptop, or other device with a headphone jack.

  15. PIXE as an analytical tool: An external-beam system in helium and the role of sample preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, E.T.; Finston, H.L.

    1981-04-01

    A PIXE system in which samples in a helium-filled target chamber are irradiated by an external proton beam is described. The system is well suited for study of a wide range of materials, some merely calling for qualitative analysis, and others requiring quantitative measurements. This variety mandates a flexible approach to sample preparation in order to obtain full sensitivity of the system. Some examples taken from our work are given.

  16. Preparation of TiO2 Anatase Nanocrystals by TiCl4 Hydrolysis with Additive H2SO4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenbing; Zeng, Tingying

    2011-01-01

    A new methodology was developed to synthesize uniform titania anatase nanocrystals by the hydrolysis of titanium chloride in sulfuric acid aqueous solutions at 0–90°C. The samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), and an Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The effects of the reaction temperature, mole ratio of SO42− to Ti4+, and the calcinations temperature on the particle size and crystal phase were investigated. Depending on the acidity, the hydrolysis temperature, and the calcination temperature, rhombic anatase nanocrystals sizes in the range of 10 nm to 50 nm were obtained. In the additive of sulfuric acid, Raman spectra and electron diffraction confirmed that the nanoparticles are composed of anatase TiO2. No other titania phases, such as rutile or brookite, were detected. PMID:21698263

  17. Development of a Novel Self-Enclosed Sample Preparation Device for DNA/RNA Isolation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Mehta, Satish K.; Pensinger, Stuart J.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2011-01-01

    Modern biology techniques present potentials for a wide range of molecular, cellular, and biochemistry applications in space, including detection of infectious pathogens and environmental contaminations, monitoring of drug-resistant microbial and dangerous mutations, identification of new phenotypes of microbial and new life species. However, one of the major technological blockades in enabling these technologies in space is a lack of devices for sample preparation in the space environment. To overcome such an obstacle, we constructed a prototype of a DNA/RNA isolation device based on our novel designs documented in the NASA New Technology Reporting System (MSC-24811-1/3-1). This device is self-enclosed and pipette free, purposely designed for use in the absence of gravity. Our design can also be modified easily for preparing samples in space for other applications, such as flowcytometry, immunostaining, cell separation, sample purification and separation according to its size and charges, sample chemical labeling, and sample purification. The prototype of our DNA/RNA isolation device was tested for efficiencies of DNA and RNA isolation from various cell types for PCR analysis. The purity and integrity of purified DNA and RNA were determined as well. Results showed that our developed DNA/RNA isolation device offers similar efficiency and quality in comparison to the samples prepared using the standard protocol in the laboratory.

  18. Effort versus reward: preparing samples for fungal community characterization in high-throughput sequencing surveys of soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation fungal amplicon sequencing is being used with increasing frequency to study fungal diversity in various ecosystems; however, the influence of sample preparation on the characterization of fungal community is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of four procedural modificati...

  19. Sludge batch 9 (SB9) accepance evaluation: Radionuclide concentrations in tank 51 SB9 qualification sample prepared at SRNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C.; Diprete, D.; Pareizs, J.

    2016-03-01

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB9 material is currently in Tank 51 and has been washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF processing and is currently being processed as Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB9 Washed Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from a three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-15-81) taken on July 23, 2015. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of Savannah River Remediation (SRR) it was then adjusted per the Tank Farm washing strategy as of October 20, 2015. This final slurry now has a compositioniv expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40.

  20. Sludge batch 9 (SB9) acceptance evaluation. Radionuclide concentrations in tank 51 SB9 qualification sample prepared at SRNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bannochie, C. J.; Diprete, D. P.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2016-02-10

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB9 material is currently in Tank 51 and has been washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF processing and is currently being processed as Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB9 Washed Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from a three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-15-81) taken on July 23, 2015. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of Savannah River Remediation (SRR) it was then adjusted per the Tank Farm washing strategy as of October 20, 2015. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40.

  1. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kamfai; Coen, Mauricio; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Wong, Kah-Yat; Smith, Clayton; Wilson, Scott A; Vayugundla, Siva Praneeth; Wong, Season

    2016-01-01

    Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target's nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer's heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers.

  2. Low-Cost 3D Printers Enable High-Quality and Automated Sample Preparation and Molecular Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kamfai; Coen, Mauricio; Hardick, Justin; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Wong, Kah-Yat; Smith, Clayton; Wilson, Scott A.; Vayugundla, Siva Praneeth; Wong, Season

    2016-01-01

    Most molecular diagnostic assays require upfront sample preparation steps to isolate the target’s nucleic acids, followed by its amplification and detection using various nucleic acid amplification techniques. Because molecular diagnostic methods are generally rather difficult to perform manually without highly trained users, automated and integrated systems are highly desirable but too costly for use at point-of-care or low-resource settings. Here, we showcase the development of a low-cost and rapid nucleic acid isolation and amplification platform by modifying entry-level 3D printers that cost between $400 and $750. Our modifications consisted of replacing the extruder with a tip-comb attachment that houses magnets to conduct magnetic particle-based nucleic acid extraction. We then programmed the 3D printer to conduct motions that can perform high-quality extraction protocols. Up to 12 samples can be processed simultaneously in under 13 minutes and the efficiency of nucleic acid isolation matches well against gold-standard spin-column-based extraction technology. Additionally, we used the 3D printer’s heated bed to supply heat to perform water bath-based polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Using another attachment to hold PCR tubes, the 3D printer was programmed to automate the process of shuttling PCR tubes between water baths. By eliminating the temperature ramping needed in most commercial thermal cyclers, the run time of a 35-cycle PCR protocol was shortened by 33%. This article demonstrates that for applications in resource-limited settings, expensive nucleic acid extraction devices and thermal cyclers that are used in many central laboratories can be potentially replaced by a device modified from inexpensive entry-level 3D printers. PMID:27362424

  3. Trimethylsilyl speciations of cathine, cathinone and norephedrine followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry: Direct sample preparation and analysis of khatamines.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Borbála; Fodor, Blanka; Boldizsár, Imre; Molnár-Perl, Ibolya

    2016-04-01

    directly derivatized, in the presence of the matrix. Reproducibility (in average 2.07 RSD% varying between 0.15 and 5.5 RSD%), linearity (0.9990-0.9994) and recovery (95.7-99.1%) values of the new sample preparation protocol was confirmed by the standard addition method for CAT, NE and CTN equally. From plant leaf, 0.061w/w% CAT and 0.014w/w% NE contents were obtained. In this tissue CTN was not found. Very likely attributable to the unfavorable climate for the plant: grown in Hungary of temperate zone and naturalized in the tropical Africa.

  4. Effect of sample preparation on contaminant leaching from copper smelting slag.

    PubMed

    Vítková, Martina; Ettler, Vojtěch; Mihaljevič, Martin; Sebek, Ondřej

    2011-12-15

    Currently standardised leaching tests require grain size reduction, which for large fragments of slags could overestimate the leaching results. To assess the effect of the fine-grained fraction generated by sample crushing, a set of leaching experiments was performed on copper smelting slag from the Zambian Copperbelt: (i) EN 12457-2 batch tests (standardised grain size <4 mm; modified procedure with grain size of 4-0.5 mm simulating exposure of larger fragments on the dumps) and (ii) CEN/TS 14997 pH-static tests (standardised grain size <1 mm simulating the possible wind dispersion scenario near the slag crushing facilities or disposal of fine-grained granulated slag; additional grain sizes <5 mm, 5-0.5 mm and 5-0.5 mm after ultrasonic cleaning). A higher proportion of the fine-grained fraction generally led to greater leaching of Cu, Co and Zn. The metal levels in the leachates under circum-neutral conditions were all below the EU limits for non-hazardous waste. However, at pH 4, the presence of fine dust particles dramatically increased the concentrations of metals in the slag leachates. The greater leachability of Cu and Co from slag particles under acidic conditions suggests a risk of their mobilisation in acidic soils in the Copperbelt area.

  5. Sample preparation and determination of biomass content in solid recovered fuels: a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Schnöller, Johannes; Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Hahn, Manuel; Fellner, Johann

    2014-10-01

    The biomass content of material from pulp and paper production (a mixture of waste and paper and thin layer packaging plastics) is determined by the adapted balance method. This novel approach is a combination of combustion elemental analysis (CHNSO) and a data reconciliation algorithm based on successive linearisation for evaluation of the analysis results. It also involves less effort and expense than conventional procedures. However, the CHNSO technique only handles small mass amounts (few hundred milligrams), so cryogenic impact milling was applied for particle size reduction below 200 µm in order to generate homogeneous, representative analysis samples. The investigation focuses on the parameters biogenic content as a percentage of the total mass xB and xB (TC), which is the biomass stated as a fraction of the total carbon value. The results are within 1%-5% of the data obtained by the reference methods, namely the selective dissolution method and (14)C- method. Additionally, advantages and drawbacks of the adapted balance method in comparison with standard methods are discussed, showing that the adapted balance method is a method to be considered for the determination of biomass content in solid recovered fuels or similar materials.

  6. Portable sample preparation and analysis system for micron and sub-micron particle characterization using light scattering and absorption spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Stark, Peter C.; Zurek, Eduardo; Wheat, Jeffrey V.; Dunbar, John M.; Olivares, Jose A.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.; Ward, Michael D.

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method and device for remote sampling, preparation and optical interrogation of a sample using light scattering and light absorption methods. The portable device is a filtration-based device that removes interfering background particle material from the sample matrix by segregating or filtering the chosen analyte from the sample solution or matrix while allowing the interfering background particles to be pumped out of the device. The segregated analyte is then suspended in a diluent for analysis. The device is capable of calculating an initial concentration of the analyte, as well as diluting the analyte such that reliable optical measurements can be made. Suitable analytes include cells, microorganisms, bioparticles, pathogens and diseases. Sample matrixes include biological fluids such as blood and urine, as well as environmental samples including waste water.

  7. 40 CFR 270.140 - What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? 270.140 Section 270.140 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) Getting A Rap Approved § 270.140 What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? Once the Director...

  8. 40 CFR 270.140 - What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? 270.140 Section 270.140 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) Getting A Rap Approved § 270.140 What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? Once the Director...

  9. 40 CFR 270.140 - What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? 270.140 Section 270.140 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) Getting A Rap Approved § 270.140 What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? Once the Director...

  10. 40 CFR 270.140 - What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? 270.140 Section 270.140 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) Getting A Rap Approved § 270.140 What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? Once the Director...

  11. 40 CFR 270.140 - What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? 270.140 Section 270.140 Protection of Environment... HAZARDOUS WASTE PERMIT PROGRAM Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) Getting A Rap Approved § 270.140 What else must the Director prepare in addition to the draft RAP or notice of intent to deny? Once the Director...

  12. Preparation and validation of gross alpha/beta samples used in EML`s quality assessment program

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpitta, S.C.

    1997-10-01

    A set of water and filter samples have been incorporated into the existing Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s (EML) Quality Assessment Program (QAP) for gross alpha/beta determinations by participating DOE laboratories. The participating laboratories are evaluated by comparing their results with the EML value. The preferred EML method for measuring water and filter samples, described in this report, uses gas flow proportional counters with 2 in. detectors. Procedures for sample preparation, quality control and instrument calibration are presented. Liquid scintillation (LS) counting is an alternative technique that is suitable for quantifying both the alpha ({sup 241}Am, {sup 230}Th and {sup 238}Pu) and beta ({sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y) activity concentrations in the solutions used to prepare the QAP water and air filter samples. Three LS counting techniques (Cerenkov, dual dpm and full spectrum analysis) are compared. These techniques may be used to validate the activity concentrations of each component in the alpha/beta solution before the QAP samples are actually prepared.

  13. Applications of Experimental Design to the Optimization of Microextraction Sample Preparation Parameters for the Analysis of Pesticide Residues in Fruits and Vegetables.

    PubMed

    Abdulra'uf, Lukman Bola; Sirhan, Ala Yahya; Tan, Guan Huat

    2015-01-01

    Sample preparation has been identified as the most important step in analytical chemistry and has been tagged as the bottleneck of analytical methodology. The current trend is aimed at developing cost-effective, miniaturized, simplified, and environmentally friendly sample preparation techniques. The fundamentals and applications of multivariate statistical techniques for the optimization of microextraction sample preparation and chromatographic analysis of pesticide residues are described in this review. The use of Placket-Burman, Doehlert matrix, and Box-Behnken designs are discussed. As observed in this review, a number of analytical chemists have combined chemometrics and microextraction techniques, which has helped to streamline sample preparation and improve sample throughput.

  14. Predictors of victim disclosure in child sexual abuse: Additional evidence from a sample of incarcerated adult sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Benoit; Wortley, Richard

    2015-05-01

    The under-reporting of child sexual abuse by victims is a serious problem that may prolong the suffering of victims and leave perpetrators free to continue offending. Yet empirical evidence indicates that victim disclosure rates are low. In this study, we perform regression analysis with a sample of 369 adult child sexual offenders to examine potential predictors of victim disclosure. Specifically, we extend the range of previously examined potential predictors of victim disclosure and investigate interaction effects in order to better capture under which circumstances victim disclosure is more likely. The current study differs from previous studies in that it examines the impact of victim and offense variables on victim disclosure from the perspective of the offender. In line with previous studies, we found that disclosure increased with the age of the victim and if penetration had occurred. In addition, we found that disclosure increased when the victim came from a non-dysfunctional family and resisted the abuse. The presence of an interaction effect highlighted the impact of the situation on victim disclosure. This effect indicated that as victims get older, they are more likely to disclose the abuse when they are not living with the offender at the time of abuse, but less likely to do so when they are living with the offender at the time of abuse. These findings are discussed in relation to previous studies and the need to facilitate victim disclosure.

  15. Sample preparation and high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in individual rat embryos.

    PubMed

    Mole, M L; Hunter, D L; Gao, P; Lau, C

    1998-06-01

    A rapid, robust, and sensitive method has been developed to measure concentrations of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in individual, day 14 rat embryos by modifying and optimizing existing methods for cellular extracts. Significant changes include: (i) oxidative degradation of ribonucleoside triphosphates using methylamine at lower pH (decreased from 6.5 to 4.0) to improve poor HPLC peak shape of early eluting nucleotides; (ii) glass fiber disc solid-phase extraction of the reaction mixture, which dramatically reduces impurities that interfere with nucleotide measurement, eliminates the necessity of column regeneration, and allows mobile phase recycling; and (iii) lower ionic strength (reduced from 0.4 to 0.26 or 0.12 M ammonium phosphate) and higher pH (increased from 3.25 to 5.55 or 6.98, respectively) mobile phase, conditions which are less destructive to the column's bonded phase and silica support, thereby contributing to longer column life. Enhancements include: (i) filtration of the sample prior to HPLC injection and addition of an in-line filter, guard column, and saturating precolumn of silica in the mobile phase flow, which aids substantially in extending column life and improves chromatographic stability, and (ii) inclusion of an internal standard to correct for mechanical losses. Limits of determination at a signal to noise ratio of 6:1 range from 5.5 to 12 pmol on-column or 0.41 to 0.87 pmol/mg of embryonic tissue depending on the specific nucleotide. Recoveries are quantitative for all nucleotides, and interassay variabilities are between 5 and 7% when quantified by peak height. The method has also been applied successfully to analysis of murine erythroleukemic cell cultures and this, when coupled with the embryo results, suggests its general utility.

  16. Preparation of layered double hydroxides and their applications as additives in polymers, as precursors to magnetic materials and in biology and medicine.

    PubMed

    Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2006-02-07

    In recent years layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also known as hydrotalcite-like materials, have attracted considerable interest from both industry and academia. In this article, we discuss methods of preparing LDHs with an emphasis on the way in which particle size and morphology can be controlled with regard to specific target applications; scale-up of one such preparation procedure is also described. In addition, we review selected applications of LDHs developed by our own and other laboratories.

  17. A portable cryo-plunger for on-site intact cryogenic microscopy sample preparation in natural environments.

    PubMed

    Comolli, Luis R; Duarte, Robert; Baum, Dennis; Luef, Birgit; Downing, Kenneth H; Larson, David M; Csencsits, Roseann; Banfield, Jillian F

    2012-06-01

    We present a modern, light portable device specifically designed for environmental samples for cryogenic transmission-electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) by on-site cryo-plunging. The power of cryo-TEM comes from preparation of artifact-free samples. However, in many studies, the samples must be collected at remote field locations, and the time involved in transporting samples back to the laboratory for cryogenic preservation can lead to severe degradation artifacts. Thus, going back to the basics, we developed a simple mechanical device that is light and easy to transport on foot yet effective. With the system design presented here we are able to obtain cryo-samples of microbes and microbial communities not possible to culture, in their near-intact environmental conditions as well as in routine laboratory work, and in real time. This methodology thus enables us to bring the power of cryo-TEM to microbial ecology.

  18. A portable cryo-plunger for on-site intact cryogenic microscopy sample preparation in natural environments

    PubMed Central

    Comolli, Luis R.; Duarte, Robert; Baum, Dennis; Luef, Birgit; Downing, Kenneth H.; Larson, David M.; Csencsits, Roseann; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2014-01-01

    We present a modern, light portable device specifically designed for environmental samples for cryo-electron microscopy by on-site cryo-plunging. The power of cryogenic EM comes from preparation of artifact-free samples. However, in many studies the samples must be collected at remote field locations, and the time involved in transporting samples back to the laboratory for cryogenic preservation can lead to severe degradation artifacts. Thus, going back to the basics, we developed a simple mechanical device that is light and easy to transport on foot yet effective. With the system design presented here we are able to obtain cryo-samples of microbes and microbial communities not possible to culture, in their near-intact environmental conditions as well as in routine laboratory work, and in real time. This methodology thus enables us to bring the power of cryo-TEM to microbial ecology. PMID:22213355

  19. Study of sample preparation for quantitative analysis of amino acids in human sweat by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Povedano, M M; Calderón-Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2016-01-01

    The determination of physiological levels of amino acids is important to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases and nutritional status of individuals. Amino acids are frequently determined in biofluids such as blood (serum or plasma) and urine; however, there are less common biofluids with different concentration profiles of amino acids that could be of interest. One of these biofluids is sweat that can be obtained in a non-invasive manner and is characterized by low complex composition. The analysis of amino acids in human sweat requires the development of sample preparation strategies according to the sample matrix and small collected volume. The influence of sample preparation on the quantitative analysis of amino acids in sweat by LC-MS/MS has been assessed through a comparison between two strategies: dilution of sweat and centrifugal microsolid-phase extraction (c-μSPE). In both cases, several dilution factors were assayed for in-depth knowledge of the matrix effects, and the use of c-μSPE provided the best results in terms of accuracy. The behavior of the target analytes was a function of the dilution factor, thus providing a pattern for sample preparation that depended on the amino acid to be determined. The concentration of amino acids in sweat ranges between 6.20 ng mL(-1) (for homocysteine) and 259.77 µg mL(-1) (for serine) with precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, within 1.1-21.4%.

  20. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J; Grune, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples.

  1. Comparison of slurry mixing and dry milling in laboratory sample preparation for determination of ochratoxin A and deoxynivalenol in wheat.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Vincenzo; Pascale, Michelangelo; Valenzano, Stefania; Visconti, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    The significance of laboratory sample preparation for the determination of two important mycotoxins, ochratoxin A (OTA) and deoxynivalenol (DON), in wheat was investigated by comparing water-slurry mixing and dry-milling procedures. The distribution of OTA and DON in 10 kg samples of naturally contaminated wheat was established by analyzing one hundred 100 g subsamples of each sample. A normal distribution and a good repeatability of DON measurements was observed for both water-slurry mixing (mean 2290 microg/kg, CV 4.6%, median 2290 microg/kg) and dry milling (mean 2310 microg/kg, CV 6.4%, median 2290 microg/kg) procedures. For OTA determinations, reliable results could be obtained only by slurry mixing sample preparation (mean 2.62 microg/kg, CV 4.0%, median 2.62 microg/kg), whereas dry-milling comminution resulted in an inhomogeneous distribution with a high variability (mean 0.83 microg/kg, CV 75.2%, median 0.60 microg/kg) and a positive skewness (2.12). Ad hoc experiments were performed on different size portions of the same sample (10 kg) to assess accuracy and precision of the comminution/homogenization procedures (slurry mixing and dry milling). Very good results were obtained for DON determination with both procedures in terms of accuracy (>98.7% of the "weighted value") and precision (CV <3%). For OTA determination good results were only obtained by slurry mixing (99.4% of the "weighted value," CV 10%), whereas dry milling provided results with low accuracy (43.2% of the "weighted value") and high variability (CV 110%). This study clearly demonstrated that sample preparation by slurry mixing is strictly necessary to obtain reliable laboratory samples for OTA determination in wheat to minimize misclassification of acceptable/rejectable lots, mainly within official control.

  2. Increasing the efficiency of pharmacokinetic sample procurement, preparation and analysis by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Villa, Josephine S; Cass, Robert T; Karr, Dane E; Adams, Stacy M; Shaw, Jeng-Pyng; Schmidt, Donald E

    2004-01-01

    The movement towards a 96-well format has greatly increased productivity and throughput in bioanalytical laboratories. Improvements in automated sample preparation and analytical methods have further contributed to increased productivity. We have focused on sample collection and transfer to the bioanalyst and have found improvements to the current available methods. The problem of manual transfers and plasma clotting issues can be overcome with the use of microtainers. Specifically, for illustrative purposes, three proprietary Theravance compounds were tested for stability, non-specific binding, and electrospray ion suppression in microtainers. There were no issues with stability, non-specific binding or ion suppression for the above compounds even after leaving plasma samples in the microtainers over long periods of time. The microtainers are robot-compatible and the resulting plasma can be transferred without clotting issues. To date, all in-house compounds successfully analyzed and tested using the microtainers have mass ranges between 200 and 1800 Da, pK(a) ranges between 3.8 and 10.3, and logD ranges between -1.7 and 4.2. Once samples are transferred into 96-well plates, flexibility in preparation and analysis is available. Together with automated sample preparation and the use of liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) as an analytical tool, the use of microtainers as sample collection tubes and for sample storage saved considerable time, cost and effort in both of our pharmacokinetic (PK) and bioanalytical groups. This in turn has led to an increased efficiency and overall throughput in support of our drug discovery effort.

  3. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Joshi, Vineet V.; Rhodes, Mark A.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  4. U-10Mo Sample Preparation and Examination using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad; Joshi, Vineet V.; Rhodes, Mark A.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines to prepare specimens of uranium alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum (U-10Mo) for optical metallography and scanning electron microscopy. This document also provides instructions to set up an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to analyze U-10Mo specimens and to obtain the required information.

  5. The influence of electrospray deposition in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry sample preparation for synthetic polymers.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Stephanie J; Guttman, Charles M; Flynn, Kathleen M

    2004-01-01

    Although electrospray sample deposition in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) sample preparation increases the repeatability of both the MALDI signal intensity and the measured molecular mass distribution (MMD), the electrospray sample deposition method may influence the apparent MMD of a synthetic polymer. The MMDs of three polymers of differing thermal stability, polystyrene (PS), poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), and poly(propylene glycol) (PPG), were studied by MALDI time-of-flight (TOF) MS as the electrospray deposition voltage was varied. The MMDs obtained using the electrospray deposition method were compared with those obtained for hand-spotted samples. No change was observed in the measured polymer MMD when the electrospray deposition voltage was varied in the analysis of PS, but those of PEG and PPG changed at higher electrospray voltages due to increased ion fragmentation. It was also shown that the fragmentation in the hand-spotted samples is dependent on the matrix used in sample preparation.

  6. An extraction technique for analytical sample preparation in aqueous solution based on controlling dispersion of ionic surfactant assemblies in isotachophoretic migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianlin; Qin, Yexin; He, Haibo; Lv, Jun; Fan, Yong

    2011-01-07

    An extraction technique for analytical sample preparation in aqueous solution has been developed based on controlling dispersion of ionic surfactant assemblies. An extraction technique was realized based on controlling dispersion of the ionic surfactant assemblies in their isotachophoretic migration during the extraction by arranging the solutions of leading electrolyte, ionic surfactant and terminating electrolyte in order and applying voltage. Potential of the technique for analytical sample preparation in aqueous solution has been demonstrated by extracting a model sample of four alkylphenones, which were analyzed by HPLC after the extraction. The extraction showed concentration effects on all the four alkylphenones of butyrophenone, valerophenone, hexanophenone and heptanophenone in the model sample. The enrichment factors were 5.29, 7.70, 7.25 and 7.49 for the four alkylphenones of butyrophenone, valerophenone, hexanophenone and heptanophenone, respectively. Linear relationship was obtained with all the four alkylphenones between their chromatographic peak areas before and after the extraction in the range of concentration from 0.05 ppm to 1.5 ppm. The RSD of the chromatographic peak areas in triplicate extractions was 7.97%, 3.75%, 2.91% and 4.45% for butyrophenone, valerophenone, hexanophenone and heptanophenone, respectively. Advantages of the extraction technique developed include ease of operation, low reagent cost, no consumption of organic solvents and no requirement for additional phase separation.

  7. Comparison of sample preparation strategies for target analysis of total thyroid hormones levels in serum by liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, E; Madrid, Y; Marazuela, M D

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes a novel method based on liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) for target analysis of total THs in serum. Several sample preparation strategies have been evaluated to reduce matrix effect (namely, HybridSPE cartridges, supported liquid extraction, SLE and solid phase extraction, SPE). Deproteinization and further clean-up with mixed-mode SPE was selected as the best strategy for sample preparation, since achieved the cleanest extracts and reduced ionization suppression effects (between -11 and -24%). Method validation was performed by the analysis of control human serum samples. Criteria for confirming THs identity in serum extracts were based on retention times, accurate masses, isotopic pattern and MS/MS fragmentation pattern. Moreover, the quantitation capabilities of the LC-QTOF-MS method were also evaluated in terms of linearity, precision, accuracy and sensitivity by the application of matrix-matched calibration. Additionally, the developed LC-QTOF-MS method successfully provides qualitative information on endogenous components responsible of ion suppression (e.g. lysophosphatidylcholines), via post acquisition data analysis. This demonstrates the significant advantage of using LC-QTOF-MS, as it allows retrospective querying of the acquired data without the need of re-injecting/re-processing the samples.

  8. Solid recovered fuels in the cement industry--semi-automated sample preparation unit as a means for facilitated practical application.

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Alexia; Sarc, Renato; Pomberger, Roland; Lorber, Karl E; Sipple, Ernst-Michael

    2016-03-01

    One of the challenges for the cement industry is the quality assurance of alternative fuel (e.g., solid recovered fuel, SRF) in co-incineration plants--especially for inhomogeneous alternative fuels with large particle sizes (d95⩾100 mm), which will gain even more importance in the substitution of conventional fuels due to low production costs. Existing standards for sampling and sample preparation do not cover the challenges resulting from these kinds of materials. A possible approach to ensure quality monitoring is shown in the present contribution. For this, a specially manufactured, automated comminution and sample divider device was installed at a cement plant in Rohožnik. In order to prove its practical suitability with methods according to current standards, the sampling and sample preparation process were validated for alternative fuel with a grain size >30 mm (i.e., d95=approximately 100 mm), so-called 'Hotdisc SRF'. Therefore, series of samples were taken and analysed. A comparison of the analysis results with the yearly average values obtained through a reference investigation route showed good accordance. Further investigations during the validation process also showed that segregation or enrichment of material throughout the comminution plant does not occur. The results also demonstrate that compliance with legal standards regarding the minimum sample amount is not sufficient for inhomogeneous and coarse particle size alternative fuels. Instead, higher sample amounts after the first particle size reduction step are strongly recommended in order to gain a representative laboratory sample.

  9. Comparison of different sample preparation techniques in TEM observation of microstructure of INCONEL alloy 783 subjected to prolonged isothermal exposure.

    PubMed

    Ma, Longzhou

    2004-01-01

    INCONEL alloy 783 was annealed and aged following the standard heat treatment procedure. One set of specimens was then isothermally exposed at 500 degrees C for 3000 h. Mechanical properties were measured at room temperature and 650 degrees C, and the results showed the prolonged exposure increased the strength and decreased elongation of alloy 783. The microstructures of as-produced and exposed material were examined using optical microscope, SEM and TEM, respectively. Three techniques, jet electro-polishing, ion milling, and focused ion beam, were employed to prepare the TEM samples to observe the variation of microstructure of alloy 783 due to isothermal exposure. TEM images of samples prepared by different methods were analyzed and compared. The results indicate that the jet electro-polishing technique allows the detail microstructure of alloy 783 subjected to different treatments to be well revealed, and thereby the TEM images can be used to explain the enhancement of strength of alloy 783 caused by isothermal exposure.

  10. Preparation and assessment of a candidate reference sample of Lake Baikal deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suturin, A. N.; Paradina, L. F.; Epov, V. N.; Semenov, A. R.; Lozhkin, V. I.; Petrov, L. L.

    2003-02-01

    The possibility of the creation of a multi-element reference sample of Lake Baikal deep-water composition is justified. This is a new type of reference sample composed of natural water with a wide range of macro- and microelements. This candidate reference sample has a matrix composition consisting of hydrocarbonate and calcium water, a composition that is typical of many rivers and lakes of the world, as well as rain water. The creation of a candidate reference sample of Lake Baikal water is possible due to the stable water composition at a depth of 500 m, and to the use of water sampling technology which results in the preservation of the initial composition of water and its absolute sterility. Trial batches of Baikal water collected annually and stored in special polyethylenetereftalate bottles for a period of 9 years remained stable and homogenous for most elements. Preliminary data for a range of elements and compounds are presented.

  11. Preparation, testing and analysis of zinc diffusion samples, NASA Skylab experiment M-558

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braski, D. N.; Kobisk, E. H.; Odonnell, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    Transport mechanisms of zinc atoms in molten zinc were investigated by radiotracer techniques in unit and in near-zero gravity environments. Each melt in the Skylab flight experiments was maintained in a thermal gradient of 420 C to 790 C. Similar tests were performed in a unit gravity environment for comparison. After melting in the gradient furnace followed by a thermal soak period (the latter was used for flight samples only), the samples were cooled and analyzed for Zn-65 distribution. All samples melted in a unit gravity environment were found to have uniform Zn-65 distribution - no concentration gradient was observed even when the sample was brought rapidly to melting and then quenched. Space-melted samples, however, showed textbook distributions, obviously the result of diffusion. It was evident that convection phenomena were the dominant factors influencing zinc transport in unit gravity experiments, while diffusion was the dominant factor in near-zero gravity experiments.

  12. XRF in waste glass analysis and vitrification process control, Part 1: Sample preparation and measurement precision

    SciTech Connect

    Resce, J.L.; Ragsdale, R.G.; Overcamp, T.J.; Jurgensen, A.; Cicero, C.; Bickford, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    The analysis of several waste glasses has been carried out by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry in an attempt to develop a simple, rapid, and consistent procedure for specimen preparation. Glass disk specimens, suitable for XRF analysis, can be prepared by casting the melt directly into a preheated graphite mold followed by annealing for 30 minutes at 500{degrees}C. With this technique specimens could be available for analysis within 45 minutes. Element x-ray intensities, measured from replicate specimens, were found to be highly reproducible, with relative standard deviations typically less than one percent. This XRF analysis is much more rapid and may afford greater accuracy than conventional wet chemical techniques in waste glass analysis. Furthermore, this XRF analysis may be used in vitrification process control by permitting on-site monitoring of glass composition. A product control strategy is discussed.

  13. Enzyme-immobilized reactors for rapid and efficient sample preparation in MS-based proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Miyazaki, Masaya

    2013-02-01

    Proteolysis is a key step in proteomic studies integrated with MS analysis but the conventional method of in-solution digestion is limited by time-consuming procedures and low sensitivity. Furthermore, obtaining reliable peptide maps and meaningful sequence data using MS analysis requires not only the separation of the digested peptides but also strictly defined proteolysis conditions. Recently, various immobilized-enzyme reactors have been developed for highly efficient proteolysis in MS-based proteomic analysis. This review focuses on the proteolysis step using protease-immobilized reactors and rapid analysis of protein sequences. We describe the preparation of enzyme reactors by several techniques and protein digestion under unusual conditions. Analysis of posttranslational modifications by enzyme reactors prepared using our immobilization method is presented as a model application. Analysis systems using immobilized-enzyme reactors are expected to become useful tools for proteomic studies and diverse applications in biotechnology.

  14. Nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: Novel sample preparation methods and nanoparticle screening for plant metabolite imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Yagnik, Gargey B.

    2016-02-19

    The main goal of the presented research is development of nanoparticle based matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). This dissertation includes the application of previously developed data acquisition methods, development of novel sample preparation methods, application and comparison of novel nanoparticle matrices, and comparison of two nanoparticle matrix application methods for MALDI-MS and MALDI-MS imaging.

  15. Polymeric integrated selective enrichment target (ISET) for solid-phase-based sample preparation in MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Simon; Wallman, Lars; Helldin, Göran; Nilsson, Johan; Marko-Varga, György; Laurell, Thomas

    2007-11-01

    A polymer microfabricated proteomic sample preparation and MALDI MS sample presentation device, the integrated selective enrichment target (ISET), comprising an array of perforated nanovials is reported. Each perforated nanovial can be filled with selective extraction media (microbeads) for purification and concentration of protein/peptides prior to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS). The main areas covered are the influence of the molding-process-induced surface roughness and how to address the lack of inherent conductivity in the polyetheretherketone (PEEK) material for optimal MALDI MS readout. Application of the disposable polymeric ISET devices for solid-phase extraction and phosphopeptide capture is also demonstrated.

  16. Rapid sample preparation for determination of iron in tissue by closed-vessel digestion and microwave energy.

    PubMed

    Van Wyck, D B; Schifman, R B; Stivelman, J C; Ruiz, J; Martin, D

    1988-06-01

    We developed a rapid acid-digestion method for preparing tissue samples for iron determination. Specimens were digested in nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide under high temperature and pressure in closed Teflon vessels, with microwave energy. Analysis for iron in 25- to 250-mg portions of digested bovine liver powder (National Bureau of Standards Certified Reference Material no. 1577a) showed excellent linearity ([predicted] = 1.007[actual] - 0.166 micrograms per sample) and analytical recovery (98%). Precision (CV) was 5.4% when iron content was 10 micrograms per sample. Assaying split samples of mouse tissues, we found a close correlation between iron concentrations obtained with closed vs open vessels ([closed] = 0.878[open] + 68 micrograms/g, r = 0.994, range 400-4600 micrograms/g dry weight). In contrast to time-consuming conventional procedures for tissue dissolution, closed-vessel digestion with microwave energy dramatically shortens time for tissue preparation, minimizes use of caustic acid, reduces risk of sample loss or contamination, and yields accurate and reproducible results.

  17. Preparation of magnetic graphene @polydopamine @Zr-MOF material for the extraction and analysis of bisphenols in water samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianying; Deng, Chunhui

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a simple method for the extraction and analysis of bisphenols in environmental samples was presented. And the prepared zirconium-based magnetic MOFs (magG@PDA@Zr-MOF) were used as the sorbents for the magnetic solid-phase extraction. With the simple solvothermal reaction and sol-gel method, the prepared material showed great characteristics of large surface area, homogeneous pore size, good magnetic responsivity and super-hydrophilicity. The large surface area provided abundant sites to extract target compounds; the magnetic property could simplify the whole extraction procedure; and the hydrophilicity improved the dispersibility of the material in matrix. Here, various extraction parameters were optimized, including amounts of sorbents, adsorption time, species of elution solvents and desorption time. The whole extraction procedure could be accomplished in 30 min. And under the optimized conditions, method validations were also studied, such as linearity, the limit of detection and recovery. Finally, the prepared material was used in real water samples. The results showed this material had good potential as the sorbent for the extraction of targets in environmental water samples.

  18. Demonstration of the ExoMars sample preparation and distribution system jointly with an optical instrument head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Wolfgang; Thiele, Hans; Hofmann, Peter; Baglioni, Pietro

    The ExoMars program will search for past and present life on Mars. ExoMars will address important scientific goals and demonstrate key in-situ enabling technologies. Among such technologies are the acquisition, preparation, distribution and analysis of samples from Mars surface rocks and from the subsurface. The 2018 mission will land an ESA rover on Mars which carries a sample preparation and distribution system (SPDS) and a suite of analytical instruments, the Pasteur Payload with its Analytical Laboratory Drawer (ALD). Kayser-Threde GmbH (Germany) will be responsible for the SPDS as a subcontractor under the mission prime Thales Alenia Space. The SPDS comprises a number of complex mechanisms and mechanical devices designed to transport drill core samples within the rover analytical laboratory, to crush them to powder with a fine grain size, to portion discrete amounts of powdered sample material, to distribute and fill the material into sample containers and to prepare flat sample surfaces for scientific analysis. Breadboards of the crushing mechanism, the dosing mechanism and a distribution carousel with sample containers and a powder sample surface flattening mechanism were built and tested. Kayser-Threde, as a member of the Spanish led ExoMars Raman Instrument team, is also responsible for development of the Raman optical head, which will be mounted inside ALD and will inspect the crushed samples, when they are presented to the instrument by the distribution carousel. Within this activity, which is performed under contract with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the University of Jena (Germany) and funded by the German DLR, Kayser-Threde can demonstrate Raman measurements with the optical head and a COTS laser and spectrometer and thus simulate the full Raman instrument optical path. An autofocus system with actuator and feedback optics is also part of this activity, which allows focusing the 50 m Raman spot on the surface of the powdered sample

  19. Preparation and characterization of single crystal samples for high-pressure experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Farber, D; Antonangeli, D; Aracne, C; Benterou, J

    2005-10-26

    To date, most research utilizing the diamond anvil cell (DAC) has been conducted with polycrystalline samples, thus the results are limited to addressing average bulk properties. However, experiments on single crystals can yield data on a range of orientation dependent properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, elasticity and plasticity. Here we report new procedures to produce extremely high-quality metallic single crystal samples of size compatible with DAC experiments in the Mbar range. So far, we have produced samples of zinc, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, cobalt, molybdenum and cerium, and have evaluated the quality of the finished samples with white-light interferometry, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and inelastic x-ray scattering.

  20. Universal nucleic acids sample preparation method for cells, spores and their mixture

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei [Darien, IL

    2011-01-18

    The present invention relates to a method for extracting nucleic acids from biological samples. More specifically the invention relates to a universal method for extracting nucleic acids from unidentified biological samples. An advantage of the presently invented method is its ability to effectively and efficiently extract nucleic acids from a variety of different cell types including but not limited to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells and/or recalcitrant organisms (i.e. spores). Unlike prior art methods which are focused on extracting nucleic acids from vegetative cell or spores, the present invention effectively extracts nucleic acids from spores, multiple cell types or mixtures thereof using a single method. Important that the invented method has demonstrated an ability to extract nucleic acids from spores and vegetative bacterial cells with similar levels effectiveness. The invented method employs a multi-step protocol which erodes the cell structure of the biological sample, isolates, labels, fragments nucleic acids and purifies labeled samples from the excess of dye.

  1. A lab-on-a-chip system with integrated sample preparation and loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid and quantitative detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Quyen, Than Linh; Hung, Tran Quang; Chin, Wai Hoe; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong

    2015-04-21

    Foodborne disease is a major public health threat worldwide. Salmonellosis, an infectious disease caused by Salmonella spp., is one of the most common foodborne diseases. Isolation and identification of Salmonella by conventional bacterial culture or molecular-based methods are time consuming and usually take a few hours to days to complete. In response to the demand for rapid on line or on site detection of pathogens, in this study, we describe for the first time an eight-chamber lab-on-a-chip (LOC) system with integrated magnetic bead-based sample preparation and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for rapid and quantitative detection of Salmonella spp. in food samples. The whole diagnostic procedures including DNA isolation, isothermal amplification, and real-time detection were accomplished in a single chamber. Up to eight samples could be handled simultaneously and the system was capable to detect Salmonella at concentration of 50 cells per test within 40 min. The simple design, together with high level of integration, isothermal amplification, and quantitative analysis of multiple samples in short time, will greatly enhance the practical applicability of the LOC system for rapid on-site screening of Salmonella for applications in food safety control, environmental surveillance, and clinical diagnostics.

  2. Sample preparation of sewage sludge and soil samples for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons based on one-pot microwave-assisted saponification and extraction.

    PubMed

    Pena, M Teresa; Pensado, Luis; Casais, M Carmen; Mejuto, M Carmen; Cela, Rafael

    2007-04-01

    A microwave-assisted sample preparation (MASP) procedure was developed for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge and soil samples. The procedure involved the simultaneous microwave-assisted extraction of PAHs with n-hexane and the hydrolysis of samples with methanolic potassium hydroxide. Because of the complex nature of the samples, the extracts were submitted to further cleaning with silica and Florisil solid-phase extraction cartridges connected in series. Naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[e]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, were considered in the study. Quantification limits obtained for all of these compounds (between 0.4 and 14.8 microg kg(-1) dry mass) were well below of the limits recommended in the USA and EU. Overall recovery values ranged from 60 to 100%, with most losses being due to evaporation in the solvent exchange stages of the procedure, although excellent extraction recoveries were obtained. Validation of the accuracy was carried out with BCR-088 (sewage sludge) and BCR-524 (contaminated industrial soil) reference materials.

  3. Effects of drying control chemical additive on properties of Li 4Ti 5O 12 negative powders prepared by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Seo Hee; Kang, Yun Chan

    High-density Li 4Ti 5O 12 powders comprising spherical particles are prepared by spray pyrolysis from a solution containing dimethylacetamide (drying control chemical additive) and citric acid and ethylene glycol (organic additives). The prepared powders have high discharge capacities and good cycle properties. The optimum concentration of dimethylacetamide is 0.5 M. The addition of dimethylacetamide to the polymeric spray solutions containing citric acid and ethylene glycol helps in the effective control of the morphology of the Li 4Ti 5O 12 powders. At a constant current density of 0.17 mA g -1, the initial discharge capacities of the powders obtained from the spray solution with and without the organic additives are 171 and 167 mAh g -1, respectively.

  4. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DRINKING WATER SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP 5.23)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method for extracting and preparing a drinking water sample for analysis of atrazine is summarized in this SOP. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry.

  5. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DUST AND SOIL SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.14)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP summarizes the method for extracting and preparing a dust or soil sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  6. Application of Radio Frequency Glow Discharge Sputtering for Nanoindentation Sample Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekido, N.; Ohmura, T.; Tsuzaki, K.

    2017-03-01

    The applicability of radio frequency glow discharge (rf-GD) sputtering to the surface finishing of nanoindentation specimens was examined for pure Al, Cu, and Ni. Comparisons were made between specimens that had been subjected to the following surface finishing: (1) rf-GD sputtering, (2) electropolishing, and (3) mechanical polishing with 0.25 µm of diamond suspension. It was suggested from the nanoindentation behavior and the quality of electron backscattered diffraction patterns that residual damage on the surface of the rf-GD sputtered samples was as small as that of electropolished samples, while some damages remained on the surface of the mechanically polished samples. The areal roughness within a 1-μm square of the rf-GD sputtered surface was comparable to that of the mechanically polished surface and slightly larger than that of the electropolished surface. Nonetheless, the difference of the roughness within the range of this study has no practical impact upon nanohardness and elastic modulus evaluation. Pop-in events occurred in the electropolished and rf-GD sputtered specimens, but not in the mechanically polished samples. The critical load for pop-in to occur was slightly smaller in rf-GD sputtered sample than in electropolished samples.

  7. Application of Radio Frequency Glow Discharge Sputtering for Nanoindentation Sample Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekido, N.; Ohmura, T.; Tsuzaki, K.

    2017-02-01

    The applicability of radio frequency glow discharge (rf-GD) sputtering to the surface finishing of nanoindentation specimens was examined for pure Al, Cu, and Ni. Comparisons were made between specimens that had been subjected to the following surface finishing: (1) rf-GD sputtering, (2) electropolishing, and (3) mechanical polishing with 0.25 µm of diamond suspension. It was suggested from the nanoindentation behavior and the quality of electron backscattered diffraction patterns that residual damage on the surface of the rf-GD sputtered samples was as small as that of electropolished samples, while some damages remained on the surface of the mechanically polished samples. The areal roughness within a 1-μm square of the rf-GD sputtered surface was comparable to that of the mechanically polished surface and slightly larger than that of the electropolished surface. Nonetheless, the difference of the roughness within the range of this study has no practical impact upon nanohardness and elastic modulus evaluation. Pop-in events occurred in the electropolished and rf-GD sputtered specimens, but not in the mechanically polished samples. The critical load for pop-in to occur was slightly smaller in rf-GD sputtered sample than in electropolished samples.

  8. Improved preparation of small biological samples for mercury analysis using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Adair, B M; Cobb, G P

    1999-05-01

    Concentrations of mercury in biological samples collected for environmental studies are often less than 0.1 microgram/g. Low mercury concentrations and small organ sizes in many wildlife species (approximately 0.1 g) increase the difficulty of mercury determination at environmentally relevant concentrations. We have developed a digestion technique to extract mercury from small (0.1 g), biological samples at these relevant concentrations. Mean recoveries (+/- standard error) from validation trials of mercury fortified tissue samples using cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy for analysis ranged from 102 +/- 4.3% (2.5 micrograms/L, n = 15) to 108 +/- 1.4% (25 micrograms/L, n = 15). Recoveries of inorganic mercury were 99 +/- 5 (n = 19) for quality assurance samples analyzed during environmental evaluations conducted during a 24 month period. This technique can be used to determine total mercury concentrations of 60 ng Hg/g sample. Samples can be analyzed in standard laboratories in a short time, at minimal cost. The technique is versatile and can be used to determine mercury concentrations in several different matrices, limiting the time and expense of method development and validation.

  9. Quantification of 4-beta-hydroxycholesterol in human plasma using automated sample preparation and LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Angela K; Onorato, Joelle M; Ouyang, Zheng; Chang, Shu; Rodrigues, A David; Kasichayanula, Sreeneeranj; Huang, Shu-Pang; Turley, Wesley; Burrell, Richard; Bifano, Marc; Jemal, Mohammed; LaCreta, Frank; Tymiak, Adrienne; Wang-Iverson, David

    2011-09-19

    It has recently been proposed that plasma levels of 4β-hydroxycholesterol (4βHC) may be indicative of cytochrome P450 3A4 (P450 3A) activity and therefore could be used to probe for P450 3A-mediated drug-drug interactions. With this in mind, we describe a highly sensitive and precise liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method for the measurement of 4βHC in human plasma with a lower limit of quantification established at 2 ng/mL using 50 μL of plasma. The entire sample preparation scheme including saponification and derivatization of 4βHC to the corresponding dipicolinyl ester (DPE) was completed in less than 8 h using an automated sample preparation scheme enabling higher-throughput capabilities. Chromatographic resolution of 4βHC from 4α-hydroxycholesterol and other endogenous isobaric species was achieved in 11-min using an isocratic gradient on a C18 column. Because of endogenous concentrations of 4βHC in plasma, a stable isotope labeled (SIL) analogue, d7-4βHC, was used as a surrogate analyte and measured in the standard curve and quality control samples prepared in plasma. A second SIL analogue, d4-4βHC, was used as the internal standard. The intraday and interday accuracy for the assay was within 6% of nominal concentrations, and the precision for these measurements was less than 5% relative standard deviation. Rigorous stability assessments demonstrated adequate stability of endogenous 4βHC in plasma and the corresponding DPE derivative for the analysis of clinical study samples. The results from clinical samples following treatment with a potent P450 3A inducer (rifampin) or inhibitor (ketoconazole) are reported and demonstrate the potential future application for this highly precise and robust analytical assay.

  10. A low cost point-of-care viscous sample preparation device for molecular diagnosis in the developing world; an example of microfluidic origami.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, A V; Ramachandran, S; Vigil, G D; Yager, P; Böhringer, K F

    2012-01-07

    The lab-on-a-chip concept has led to several point-of-care (POC) diagnostic microfluidic platforms. However, few of these can process raw samples for molecular diagnosis and fewer yet are suited for use in a resource-limited setting without permanent electrical infrastructure. We present here a very low cost paper microfluidic device for POC extraction of bacterial DNA from raw viscous samples--a challenge for conventional microfluidic platforms. This is an example of "microfluidic origami" in that the system is activated by folding; demonstrated here is room temperature cell lysis and DNA extraction from pig mucin (simulating sputum) spiked with E. coli without the use of external power. The microfluidic origami device features dry reagent storage and rehydration of the lysis buffer. We demonstrate DNA extraction from samples with a bacterial load as low as 33 CFU ml(-1). Extraction times, starting from the raw sample, have been optimized to about 1.5 h without the use of external power, or to within 1 h using an oven or a heater block. The fabrication of this paper microfluidic device can be translated into high volume production in the developing world without the need for a semiconductor clean room or a microfabrication facility. The sample preparation can be performed with the addition of just the sample, water, ethanol and elute buffer to the device, thus reducing chemical hazards during transport and handling.

  11. Sample preparation and biomass determination of SRF model mixture using cryogenic milling and the adapted balance method

    SciTech Connect

    Schnöller, Johannes Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Hahn, Manuel; Fellner, Johann; Rechberger, Helmut

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • An alternative sample comminution procedure for SRF is tested. • Proof of principle is shown on a SRF model mixture. • The biogenic content of the SRF is analyzed with the adapted balance method. • The novel method combines combustion analysis and a data reconciliation algorithm. • Factors for the variance of the analysis results are statistically quantified. - Abstract: The biogenic fraction of a simple solid recovered fuel (SRF) mixture (80 wt% printer paper/20 wt% high density polyethylene) is analyzed with the in-house developed adapted balance method (aBM). This fairly new approach is a combination of combustion elemental analysis (CHNS) and a data reconciliation algorithm based on successive linearisation for evaluation of the analysis results. This method shows a great potential as an alternative way to determine the biomass content in SRF. However, the employed analytical technique (CHNS elemental analysis) restricts the probed sample mass to low amounts in the range of a few hundred milligrams. This requires sample comminution to small grain sizes (<200 μm) to generate representative SRF specimen. This is not easily accomplished for certain material mixtures (e.g. SRF with rubber content) by conventional means of sample size reduction. This paper presents a proof of principle investigation of the sample preparation and analysis of an SRF model mixture with the use of cryogenic impact milling (final sample comminution) and the adapted balance method (determination of biomass content). The so derived sample preparation methodology (cutting mills and cryogenic impact milling) shows a better performance in accuracy and precision for the determination of the biomass content than one solely based on cutting mills. The results for the determination of the biogenic fraction are within 1–5% of the data obtained by the reference methods, selective dissolution method (SDM) and {sup 14}C-method ({sup 14}C-M)

  12. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Molecular Distributions in Cultured Neurons and Their Processes: Comparative Analysis of Sample Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Kevin R.; Li, Zhen; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-11-01

    Neurons often exhibit a complex chemical distribution and topography; therefore, sample preparation protocols that preserve structures ranging from relatively large cell somata to small neurites and growth cones are important factors in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging studies. Here, SIMS was used to investigate the subcellular localization of lipids and lipophilic species in neurons from Aplysia californica. Using individual neurons cultured on silicon wafers, we compared and optimized several SIMS sampling approaches. After an initial step to remove the high salt culturing media, formaldehyde, paraformaldehyde, and glycerol, and various combinations thereof, were tested for their ability to achieve cell stabilization during and after the removal of extracellular media. These treatments improved the preservation of cellular morphology as visualized with SIMS imaging. For analytes >250 Da, coating the cell surface with a 3.2 nm-thick gold layer increased the ion intensity; multiple analytes previously not observed or observed at low abundance were detected, including intact cholesterol and vitamin E molecular ions. However, once a sample was coated, many of the lower molecular mass (<200 Da) analyte signals were suppressed. The optimum approach depended on the analyte being studied; the approaches evaluated included rinsing with water and cell stabilization with glycerol and 4 % paraformaldehyde. The sample preparation methods described here enhance SIMS imaging of processes of individual cultured neurons over a broad mass range with enhanced image contrast.

  13. Multiple double cross-section transmission electron microscope sample preparation of specific sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire devices.

    PubMed

    Gignac, Lynne M; Mittal, Surbhi; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Cohen, Guy M; Sleight, Jeffrey W

    2011-12-01

    The ability to prepare multiple cross-section transmission electron microscope (XTEM) samples from one XTEM sample of specific sub-10 nm features was demonstrated. Sub-10 nm diameter Si nanowire (NW) devices were initially cross-sectioned using a dual-beam focused ion beam system in a direction running parallel to the device channel. From this XTEM sample, both low- and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images were obtained from six separate, specific site Si NW devices. The XTEM sample was then re-sectioned in four separate locations in a direction perpendicular to the device channel: 90° from the original XTEM sample direction. Three of the four XTEM samples were successfully sectioned in the gate region of the device. From these three samples, low- and high-resolution TEM images of the Si NW were taken and measurements of the NW diameters were obtained. This technique demonstrated the ability to obtain high-resolution TEM images in directions 90° from one another of multiple, specific sub-10 nm features that were spaced 1.1 μm apart.

  14. Determination of gross alpha, 224Ra, 226Ra, and 228Ra activities in drinking water using a single sample preparation procedure.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Bahman; Obed, Reynaldo N; Nemeth, William K; Suozzo, Gail P

    2005-12-01

    The current federal and New Jersey State regulations have greatly increased the number of gross alpha and radium tests for public and private drinking water supplies. The determination of radium isotopes in water generally involves lengthy and complicated processes. In this study, a new approach is presented for the determination of gross alpha, 224Ra, 226Ra, and 228Ra activities in water samples. The method includes a single sample preparation procedure followed by alpha counting and gamma-ray spectroscopy. The sample preparation technique incorporates an EPA-approved co-precipitation methodology for gross alpha determination with a few alterations and improvements. Using 3-L aliquots of sample, spiked with 133Ba tracer, the alpha-emitting radionuclides are isolated by a BaSO4 and Fe(OH)3 co-precipitation scheme. First the gross alpha-particle activity of the sample is measured with a low-background gas-flow proportional counter, followed by radium isotopes assay by gamma-ray spectroscopy, using the same prepared sample. Gamma-ray determination of 133Ba tracer is used to assess the radium chemical recovery. The 224Ra, 226Ra, and 228Ra activities in the sample are measured through their gamma-ray-emitting decay products, 212Pb, 214Pb/214Bi, and 228Ac, respectively. In cases where 224Ra determination is required, the gamma-ray counting should be performed within 2-4 d from sample collection. To measure 226Ra activity in the sample, the gamma-ray spectroscopy can be repeated 21 d after sample preparation to ensure that 226Ra and its progeny have reached the equilibrium state. At this point, the 228Ac equilibration with parent 228Ra is already established. Analysis of aliquots of de-ionized water spiked with NIST-traceable 230Th, 224Ra, 226Ra, and 228Ra standards demonstrated the accuracy and precision of this method. Various performance evaluation samples were also assayed for gross alpha as well as radium isotope activity determination using this procedure and the

  15. An integrated direct loop-mediated isothermal amplification microdevice incorporated with an immunochromatographic strip for bacteria detection in human whole blood and milk without a sample preparation step.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dohwan; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Jee Won; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-05-15

    We have developed an integrated direct loop-mediated isothermal amplification (Direct LAMP) microdevice incorporated with an immunochromatographic strip (ICS) to identify bacteria contaminated in real samples. The Direct LAMP is a novel isothermal DNA amplification technique which does not require thermal cycling steps as well as any sample preparation steps such as cell lysis and DNA extraction for amplifying specific target genes. In addition, the resultant amplicons were colorimetrically detected on the ICS, thereby enabling the entire genetic analysis process to be simplified. The two functional units (Direct LAMP and ICS) were integrated on a single device without use of the tedious and complicated microvalve and tubing systems. The utilization of a slidable plate allows us to manipulate the fluidic control in the microchannels manually and the sequential operation of the Direct LAMP and ICS detection could be performed by switching the slidable plate to each functional unit. Thus, the combination of the direct isothermal amplification without any sample preparation and thermal cycling steps, the ICS based amplicon detection by naked eyes, and the slidable plate to eliminate the microvalves in the integrated microdevice would be an ideal platform for point-of-care DNA diaganotics. On the integrated Direct LAMP-ICS microdevice, we could analyze Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli O157:H7) contaminated in human whole blood or milk at a single-cell level within 1h.

  16. Preparing for NEO Sample Return: Simulating the Effects of Laser Space Weathering on Macromolecular Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasda, P. J.; Gillis-Davis, J.; Bradley, J. P.; ChengYu, S.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA OSIRIS-REx mission plans to visit a B-type asteroid and return pristine regolith samples to Earth. These regolith samples, like those returned by the JAXA Hayabusa mission from Itokawa, will likely exhibit some modification by space weathering (SW). Further, these samples may contain up to ~5% organic carbon, mainly in the form of macromolecular carbon (MMC). MMC in meteorites can be studied with Raman spectroscopy; changes in its Raman spectral parameters have been shown to correlate with the petrographic grade of the meteorite. But these petrographic studies are calibrated with internal pieces of meteorite samples, so the MMC seen in meteorites has not experienced SW. Hence, it is important to determine the effects of SW may have on the MMC and its Raman spectrum. Laser pulse heating experiments that simulate the micrometeorite impact component of SW have been carried out in samples of pure graphite, and carbonaceous chondrites Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2). Pulse heating was done in vacuum (1×10-6 torr) with a 20 Hz 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser, a 6 ns pulse duration (30 mJ/pulse), and a 200 μm spot size. Raman spectra were collected on the each sample using a WITec alpha300 R confocal Raman microscope, with a 1 mW 532 nm continuous laser and a ~10 μm laser spot size. UVVIS-NIR (0.4-2.5 µm) reflectance was measured using an Analytical Spectral Devices Inc. FieldSpec 4 spectrometer. Based on its Raman spectra, the original pure graphite is modified to nanocrystalline graphite by 10 minutes (12,000 laser pulses), and further modified to glassy carbon (amorphous 3-coordinate carbon) within 20 minutes (24,000 laser pulses). Vapor deposited on the side of the sample holder has a Raman spectrum consistent with amorphous carbon glass (3- and 4-coordinate carbon). Laser SW carried out on a slab of Murchison resulted in the production of glassy carbon inside siliceous melt blobs in the laser craters. Surprisingly, the Raman spectrum for MMC in Allende powder

  17. Preparations of homeostatic thymus hormone consist predominantly of histones 2A and 2B and suggest additional histone functions.

    PubMed Central

    Reichhart, R; Zeppezauer, M; Jörnvall, H

    1985-01-01

    The two major constituents in preparations of the homeostatic thymus hormone (HTH) were purified. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that the components (HTH alpha and HTH beta) are identical to histones H2A and H2B, suggesting the possibility that histones might have hitherto unrecognized occurrence and functions. If the HTH activities are not ascribed to the two histones in the preparation, they could only be derived from minor constituents present in minimal amounts. Therefore, the histone structures were scrutinized for properties of relevance in relation to hormone activities and for similarities with thymic hormones. Similarities between COOH-terminal regions of histones H2A, H2B, and H3 were noticed, as well as some similarities between NH2-terminal regions of histones and parts of recognized thymus hormones and related proteins. Potential signals, resembling cleavage sites in prohormones, are present in the histone structures, and further correlations with recently discovered ubiquitin functions may explain molecular mechanisms for actions of the HTH preparations. None of the observations is significant by itself, but the combined results suggest the hypothesis of different relationships and functions, including hormone-like activities, for some histones. Images PMID:3860828

  18. Variability in reference point microindentation and recommendations for testing cortical bone: maximum load, sample orientation, mode of use, sample preparation and measurement spacing.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, T; Coutts, L V; Dunlop, D G; Oreffo, R O C; Cooper, C; Harvey, N C; Thurner, P J

    2015-02-01

    Reference Point Indentation (RPI) is a novel microindentation tool that has emerging clinical potential for the assessment of fracture risk as well as use as a laboratory tool for straight-forward mechanical characterisation of bone. Despite increasing use of the tool, little research is available to advise the set-up of testing protocols or optimisation of testing parameters. Here we consider five such parameters: maximum load, sample orientation, mode of use, sample preparation and measurement spacing, to investigate how they affect the Indentation Distance Increase (IDI), the most published measurement parameter associated with the RPI device. The RPI tool was applied to bovine bone; indenting in the proximal midshaft of five femora and human bone; indenting five femoral heads and five femoral neck samples. Based on the findings of these studies we recommend the following as the best practice. (1) Repeat measurements should be utilised to reduce the coefficient of variation (e.g. 8-15 repeats to achieve a 5-10% error, however the 3-5 measurements used here gives a 15-20% error). (2) IDI is dependent on maximum load (r=0.45 on the periosteal surface and r=0.94 on the machined surface, p<0.05), mode of use (i.e. comparing the device held freehand compared to fixed in its stand, p=0.04) and surface preparation (p=0.004) so these should be kept consistent throughout testing. Though sample orientation appears to have minimal influence on IDI (p>0.05), care should also be taken in combining measurements from different orientations. (3) The coefficient of variation is higher (p=0.04) when holding the device freehand, so it should ideally be kept supported in its stand. (4) Removing the periosteum (p=0.04) and machining the surface of the bone (p=0.08) reduces the coefficient of variation, so should be performed where practical. (5) There is a hyperbolic relationship between thickness and IDI (p<0.001) with a sample thickness 10 fold greater than the maximum indentation

  19. Optimization and comparison of bottom-up proteomic sample preparation for early-stage Xenopus laevis embryos.

    PubMed

    Peuchen, Elizabeth H; Sun, Liangliang; Dovichi, Norman J

    2016-07-01

    Xenopus laevis is an important model organism in developmental biology. While there is a large literature on changes in the organism's transcriptome during development, the study of its proteome is at an embryonic state. Several papers have been published recently that characterize the proteome of X. laevis eggs and early-stage embryos; however, proteomic sample preparation optimizations have not been reported. Sample preparation is challenging because a large fraction (~90 % by weight) of the egg or early-stage embryo is yolk. We compared three common protein extraction buffer systems, mammalian Cell-PE LB(TM) lysing buffer (NP40), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 8 M urea, in terms of protein extraction efficiency and protein identifications. SDS extracts contained the highest concentration of proteins, but this extract was dominated by a high concentration of yolk proteins. In contrast, NP40 extracts contained ~30 % of the protein concentration as SDS extracts, but excelled in discriminating against yolk proteins, which resulted in more protein and peptide identifications. We then compared digestion methods using both SDS and NP40 extraction methods with one-dimensional reverse-phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-MS/MS). NP40 coupled to a filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) procedure produced nearly twice the number of protein and peptide identifications compared to alternatives. When NP40-FASP samples were subjected to two-dimensional RPLC-ESI-MS/MS, a total of 5171 proteins and 38,885 peptides were identified from a single stage of embryos (stage 2), increasing the number of protein identifications by 23 % in comparison to other traditional protein extraction methods.

  20. Graphite sample preparation for AMS in a high pressure and temperature press

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, Meyer; Mysen, Bjorn O.; Polach, Henry

    1984-01-01

    A high pressure-temperature press is used to make target material for accelerator mass spectrometry. Graphite was produced from typical **1**4C samples including oxalic acid and carbonates. Beam strength of **1**2C was generally adequate, but random radioactive contamination by **1**4C made age measurements impractical.

  1. Graphite sample preparation for AMS in a high pressure and temperature press

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, M.; Mysen, B.O.; Polach, H.

    1984-01-01

    A high pressure-high temperature press is used to make target material for accelerator mass spectrometry. Graphite was produced from typical 14C samples including oxalic acid and carbonates. Beam strength of 12C was generally adequate, but random radioactive contamination by 14C made age measurements impractical. ?? 1984.

  2. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... classification U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored under § 146.23(a), § 146.33(a), and § 146.44(a) of this... egg yolk samples being tested to retain the U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored classification,...

  3. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... classification U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored under § 146.23(a), § 146.33(a), and § 146.44(a) of this... egg yolk samples being tested to retain the U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored classification,...

  4. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... classification U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored under § 146.23(a), § 146.33(a), and § 146.44(a) of this... egg yolk samples being tested to retain the U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored classification,...

  5. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... classification U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored under § 146.23(a), § 146.33(a), and § 146.44(a) of this... egg yolk samples being tested to retain the U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored classification,...

  6. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... classification U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored under § 146.23(a), § 146.33(a), and § 146.44(a) of this... egg yolk samples being tested to retain the U.S. H5/H7 Avian Influenza Monitored classification,...

  7. SOURCES OF VARIABILITY IN COLLECTION AND PREPARATION OF PAINT AND LEAD-COATING SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chronic exposure of children to lead can result in permanent physiologic impairment. Since surfaces coated with lead-containing paints and varnishes are potential sources of exposure, it is extremely important that reliable methods for sampling and analysis be available. The so...

  8. Preparation and applicability of fresh fruit samples for the identification of radiation treatment by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, Nicola D.; Aleksieva, Katerina

    2009-03-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on fresh fruits (whole pulp of pears, apples, peaches, apricots, avocado, kiwi and mango) before and after gamma-irradiation are reported using two drying procedures before EPR investigation. In order to remove water from non-irradiated and irradiated samples of the first batch, the pulp of fresh fruits is pressed, and the solid residue is washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. The fruits of the second batch are pressed and dried in a standard laboratory oven at 40 °C. The results obtained with both drying procedures are compared. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0048±0.0005 before irradiation. Irradiation gives rise to typical "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum featuring one intensive line with g=2.0048±0.0005 and two very weak satellite lines situated 3 mT at left and right of the central line. Only mango samples show a singlet line after irradiation. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signal is studied for a period of 50 days after irradiation. When the irradiated fruit samples are stored in their natural state and dried just before each EPR measurement, the satellite lines are measurable for less than 17 days of storage. Irradiated fruit samples, when stored dried, lose for 50 days ca. 40% of their radiation-induced radicals if treated with alcohol or ca. 70% if dried in an oven. The reported results unambiguously show that the presence of the satellite lines in the EPR spectra could be used for identification of radiation processing of fresh fruits, thus extending the validity of European Protocol EN 1787 (2000). Foodstuffs—Detection of Irradiated Food Containing Cellulose by EPR Spectroscopy. European Committee for Standardisation. Brussels for dry herbs.

  9. Preparation of the components of the modified method 5 (method 0010) sampling train for analysis by SW-846 method 8270. Report for December 1992-December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    McGaughey, J.F.; Merrill, R.G.; Bursey, J.T.; Wagoner, D.E.; Jackson, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In a field evaluation study for semivolatile halogenated organic compounds listed in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, dynamic spiking experiments using a liquid solution were performed in the field. Two of four quadruple sampling trains were spiked for eight sampling runs. Method 0010 train components were prepared and analyzed in three parts: filter/front halt rinse, XAD-2 resin, and condensate/condensate rinse. Because the results were at variance with results obtained for analytes spiked in laboratory studies and a previous field study, the sample preparation process was investigated in detail. Sample preparation procedures had followed Method 0010, but use of some procedures which were not specifically prohibited by Method 0010 had depressed compound recoveries. To ensure that the sample preparation procedures for Method 0010 train components were clear and unamibiguous, a new protocol to address preparation of Method 0010 train components for Method 8270 analysis was written.

  10. Pesticide residues in chicken eggs - A sample preparation methodology for analysis by gas and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hildmann, Fanny; Gottert, Christina; Frenzel, Thomas; Kempe, Guenther; Speer, Karl

    2015-07-17

    A sample preparation method was developed for the analysis of chicken eggs to determine 97 GC and 81 LC amenable residues, including organophosphates, organochlorines, pyrethroids, triazoles, carboxyl-containing compounds, and the indicator PCBs. Hereby, considerations were given to the recoveries of the analytes, the method's suitability for routine analysis, and the assessment of the clean-up effect, for which a simple thin layer chromatography was implemented to visualize the most important lipid classes. The procedure consisted of (I) the extraction by matrix solid phase dispersion, and the clean-up by means of (II) small-scale gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and (III) two different solid phase extractions (SPE) for GC and LC amenable analytes, as well as (IV) the quantification using GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS. Cyclohexane/ethyl acetate was chosen as extraction solvent due to its suitability for extracting strong non-polar but also more polar analytes. The classical GPC was scaled down to ensure a 50% lower solvent consumption. The comprehensive investigation of conventional and modern zirconium-oxide-coated SPE materials resulted in the selection of octadecyl-modified silica (C18) combined with primary secondary amine using acetonitrile as elution solvent for GC amenable analytes and pure C18 in combination with acidified methanol for LC amenable pesticides. Compared to the currently established EN 1528 method the sample preparation proposed offered a higher sample throughput and a lower solvent consumption. Furthermore, for the first time the clean-up effectiveness of the sample preparation steps was documented as shown by means of thin-layer chromatography. The validation of chicken eggs proved the fulfillment of the quality control criteria for 164 of the 178 analytes tested, mostly at the lowest validated level of 5μg/kg for pesticides and 0.5μg/kg for the single indicator PCBs. However, the analysis of strongly polar analytes was still problematic

  11. Preparation of samples for leaf architecture studies, a method for mounting cleared leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Vasco, Alejandra; Thadeo, Marcela; Conover, Margaret; Daly, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Several recent waves of interest in leaf architecture have shown an expanding range of approaches and applications across a number of disciplines. Despite this increased interest, examination of existing archives of cleared and mounted leaves shows that current methods for mounting, in particular, yield unsatisfactory results and deterioration of samples over relatively short periods. Although techniques for clearing and staining leaves are numerous, published techniques for mounting leaves are scarce. • Methods and Results: Here we present a complete protocol and recommendations for clearing, staining, and imaging leaves, and, most importantly, a method to permanently mount cleared leaves. • Conclusions: The mounting protocol is faster than other methods, inexpensive, and straightforward; moreover, it yields clear and permanent samples that can easily be imaged, scanned, and stored. Specimens mounted with this method preserve well, with leaves that were mounted more than 35 years ago showing no signs of bubbling or discoloration. PMID:25225627

  12. Comparison of sample preparation methods for reliable plutonium and neptunium urinalysis using automatic extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Xu, Yihong; Hou, Xiaolin; Miró, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes improvement and comparison of analytical methods for simultaneous determination of trace-level plutonium and neptunium in urine samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Four sample pre-concentration techniques, including calcium phosphate, iron hydroxide and manganese dioxide co-precipitation and evaporation were compared and the applicability of different techniques was discussed in order to evaluate and establish the optimal method for in vivo radioassay program. The analytical results indicate that the various sample pre-concentration approaches afford dissimilar method performances and care should be taken for specific experimental parameters for improving chemical yields. The best analytical performances in terms of turnaround time (6h) and chemical yields for plutonium (88.7 ± 11.6%) and neptunium (94.2 ± 2.0%) were achieved by manganese dioxide co-precipitation. The need of drying ashing (≥ 7h) for calcium phosphate co-precipitation and long-term aging (5d) for iron hydroxide co-precipitation, respectively, rendered time-consuming analytical protocols. Despite the fact that evaporation is also somewhat time-consuming (1.5d), it endows urinalysis methods with better reliability and repeatability compared with co-precipitation techniques. In view of the applicability of different pre-concentration techniques proposed previously in the literature, the main challenge behind relevant method development is pointed to be the release of plutonium and neptunium associated with organic compounds in real urine assays. In this work, different protocols for decomposing organic matter in urine were investigated, of which potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) treatment provided the highest chemical yield of neptunium in the iron hydroxide co-precipitation step, yet, the occurrence of sulfur compounds in the processed sample deteriorated the analytical performance of the ensuing extraction chromatographic separation with chemical

  13. Demonstration of a Sample Preparation Method for Biological Detection Based on a Novel Membrane Fractionation Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-31

    oftarget nucleic acid in the sample) Deoxyribonucleic acid kilo Dalton Leonard Wood Institute Midwest Research Institute Quantitative Polymerase...membranes. Desalination 227: 111-119. 7) Kong S, Titchener- Hoo