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Sample records for additional screw fixation

  1. Stereotactic atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Laherty, R W; Kahler, R J; Walker, D G; Tomlinson, F H

    2005-01-01

    Atlantoaxial stabilisation can be performed using a variety of surgical techniques. Developments in spinal instrumentation and stereotactic technology have been incorporated into these procedures. We have recently adopted frameless stereotaxy to assist in such operations. A retrospective study of patients treated by the authors and using frameless stereotaxy from 2001 to 2002 was performed. Each patient underwent pre-operative fine-cut CT in the position of fixation. Using these images, screw trajectory was planned. Stereotaxis and fluoroscopy was utilised during fixation. A post-operative CT was performed. There were nine patients. Bilateral screw placement was achieved in eight. In the remaining case stereotactic planning predicted the single screw fixation. There were no post-operative complications. Post-operative CT showed screw placement corresponding to the planned trajectory in all 17 screws. Stabilisation was achieved in all. Stereotactic atlantoaxial screw fixation is an accessible, safe and accurate method for the management of C1-2 instability. PMID:15639416

  2. Mechanical Comparison of Headless Screw Fixation and Locking Plate Fixation for Talar Neck Fractures.

    PubMed

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Hapa, Onur; Erduran, Mehmet; Dincer, Cemal; Cecen, Berivan; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    For talar neck fractures, open reduction and internal fixation have been thought to facilitate revascularization and prevent osteonecrosis. Newer screw systems allow for placement of cannulated headless screws, which provide compression by virtue of a variable pitch thread. The present study compared the biomechanical fixation strength of cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation and locking plate fixation. A reproducible talar neck fracture was created in 14 fresh cadaver talar necks. Talar head fixation was then performed using 2 cannulated headless variable-pitch 4-mm/5-mm diameter (4/5) screws (Acutrak; Acumed, Hillsboro, OR) and locking plate fixation. Headless variable-pitch screw fixation had lower failure displacement than did locking plate fixation. No statistically significant differences were found in failure stiffness, yield stiffness (p = .655), yield load (p = .142), or ultimate load between the 2 fixation techniques. Cannulated headless variable-pitch screw fixation resulted in better failure displacement than locking plate fixation in a cadaveric talus model and could be considered a viable option for talus fracture fixation. Headless, fully threaded, variable-pitch screw fixation has inherent advantages compared with locking plate fixation, because it might cause less damage to the articular surface and can compress the fracture for improved reduction. Additionally, plate fixation can increase the risk of avascular necrosis owing to the wider incision and dissection of soft tissues.

  3. No effect of additional screw fixation of a cementless, all-polyethylene press-fit socket on migration, wear, and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Minten, Michiel J M; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; Spruit, Maarten

    2016-08-01

    Background and purpose - Additional screw fixation of the all-polyethylene press-fit RM cup (Mathys) has no additional value for migration, in the first 2 years after surgery. However, the medium-term and long-term effects of screw fixation remain unclear. We therefore evaluated the influence of screw fixation on migration, wear, and clinical outcome at 6.5 years using radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients and methods - This study involved prolonged follow-up from a previous randomized controlled trial (RCT). We analyzed RSA radiographs taken at baseline and at 1-, 2-, and 6.5-year follow-up. Cup migration and wear were assessed using model-based RSA software. Wear was calculated as translation of the femoral head model in relation to the cup model. Total translation, rotation, and wear were calculated mathematically from results of the orthogonal components. Results - 27 patients (15 with screw fixation and 12 without) were available for follow-up at 6.5 (5.6-7.2) years. Total translation (0.50 mm vs. 0.56 mm) and rotation (1.01 degrees vs. 1.33 degrees) of the cup was low, and was not significantly different between the 2 groups. Wear increased over time, and was similar between the 2 groups (0.58 mm vs. 0.53 mm). Wear rate (0.08 mm/year vs. 0.09 mm/year) and clinical outcomes were also similar. Interpretation - Our results indicate that additional screw fixation of all-polyethylene press-fit RM cups has no additional value regarding medium-term migration and clinical outcome. The wear rate was low in both groups. PMID:27299418

  4. An injectable cementing screw for fixation in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    McKoy, B E; An, Y H

    2000-01-01

    With the aging population, osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures are becoming more prevalent. Adequate screw fixation in this type of bone is difficult. Screws are often cemented in bone to help obtain purchase. However, current cementing techniques do not ensure implant stability. Here we present a new cannulated screw with side ports that can be injected with polymethylmethacylate (PMMA) for fixation in osteoporotic bone. We compared the ultimate holding power of this cannulated screw injected with PMMA to a solid screw with the same dimensions secured with PMMA by the standard technique. Both screws were placed into embalmed and fresh frozen lumbar vertebral bodies and pulled out using a mechanical testing system. The cannulated screw had a 278% greater holding power compared to the standard screw (p < 0.006). The cannulated screw provided a significant increase in holding power in osteoporotic bone. This novel screw is promising for fixation in osteoporotic bone and warrants clinical evaluation.

  5. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing.

    PubMed

    Le Cann, Sophie; Cachon, Thibaut; Viguier, Eric; Miladi, Lotfi; Odent, Thierry; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Chabrand, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age) of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic) and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical) on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old) tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level), the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout.

  6. Use of polymethylmethacrylate to enhance screw fixation in bone.

    PubMed

    Cameron, H U; Jacob, R; Macnab, I; Pilliar, R M

    1975-07-01

    Pull-out testing of screws inserted into cement and bone under various conditions showed that the cement-screw complex was significantly stronger when the screw was placed in soft cement and the cement was allowed to polymerize without further manipulation. When screw fixation in osteoporotic bone was reinforced with cement, the bone was the weakest component in the system. Fixation under these conditions should be enhanced by increasing the area of contact between the cement and bone. By cooling the cement to prolong its working time, it could be injected with a syringe in such a way that maximum endosteal and periosteal contact was provided. PMID:1150708

  7. Mechanical evaluation of a soft tissue interference screw in free tendon anterior cruciate ligament graft fixation.

    PubMed

    Nagarkatti, D G; McKeon, B P; Donahue, B S; Fulkerson, J P

    2001-01-01

    In this study of bioabsorbable screw fixation of free tendon grafts used in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, we performed load-to-failure and cyclic loading of tendon fixation in porcine bone. Bone density measurements from dual photon absorptometry scans were obtained to correlate bone density with fixation failure. The average density of porcine bone (1.42 g/cm2) was similar to that of young human bone (1.30 g/cm2) and significantly higher than that of elderly human cadaveric bone specimens (0.30 g/cm2). Cyclic loading was performed on free tendon grafts fixed with a bioabsorbable screw alone and on grafts fixed with a bioabsorbable screw and an anchor (polylactic acid ball or cortical bone disk). Stiffness of fixation increased substantially with the addition of a cortical bone disk anchor or polylactic acid ball compared with the interference screw alone. Tensile fixation strength of central quadriceps free tendon and hamstring tendon grafts were significantly superior in porcine bone of density similar to young human bone than in elderly human cadaveric bone. The bioabsorbable interference screw yielded loads at failure comparable with traditional bone-tendon-bone and hamstring tendon fixation when controlled for bone density. The addition of a cortical bone disk anchor provided the most optimal fixation of free tendon with the bioabsorbable screw and reduced slippage with cyclic loading to a very low level.

  8. Cortical bone screw fixation in ionically modified apatite cements.

    PubMed

    Barralet, J E; Duncan, C O; Dover, M S; Bassett, D C; Nishikawa, H; Monaghan, A; Gbureck, U

    2005-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite cements are used in reconstruction of the face; usually in well-defined cavities where the cement can be stabilized without the need for internal fixation. A hydroxyapatite cement that could enable screw fixation and some loading therefore has considerable potential in maxillofacial reconstruction. It has been demonstrated recently that water demand of calcium phosphate cements can be reduced by ionically modifying the liquid component. This study investigated the capacity of an ionically modified precompacted apatite cement to retain self-tapping cortical bone screws. Screw pullout forces were determined in the direction of the screw long axis and perpendicular to it, using cortical bone and polymethylmethacrylate cement as a control. In bending pullout tests, measured forces to remove screws from ionically modified precompacted cement were insignificantly different from cortical bone. However, pullout forces of bone screws from hydroxyapatite cement decreased with aging time in vitro.

  9. Sacroiliac screw fixation: A mini review of surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Farid-Escorcia, Hector; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The sacral percutaneous fixation has many advantages but can be associated with a significant exposure to X-ray radiation. Currently, sacroiliac screw fixation represents the only minimally invasive technique to stabilize the posterior pelvic ring. It is a technique that should be used by experienced surgeons. We present a practical review of important aspects of this technique. PMID:25336831

  10. Robot-assisted Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Wang, Han; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Anterior odontoid screw fixation has been proved to be effective but technically challenging because the difficult approach is associated with high risks of screw malposition and damage to surrounding vital structures. Navigation techniques are therefore increasingly being used to improve safety and accuracy. However, no robot-assisted odontoid screw fixation has yet been reported. We here report a 61-year-old woman with a type II dens fracture on whom anterior odontoid screw fixation was performed under the guidance of a newly developed robotic system (TiRobot, co-designed by Beijing Jishuitan Hospital and TINAVI Medical Technologies). One odontoid screw was safely and accurately placed, the calculated deviation between the planned and actual positions being 0.9 mm. No intraoperative complications were identified and the patient was discharged on Day 5. Follow-up studies after 2 weeks showed good clinical and radiological results. We believe this is the first reported case of robot-assisted anterior odontoid screw fixation. We consider that complicated procedures can become feasible, safe and accurate using TiRobot systems.

  11. Robot-assisted Anterior Odontoid Screw Fixation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Wang, Han; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Anterior odontoid screw fixation has been proved to be effective but technically challenging because the difficult approach is associated with high risks of screw malposition and damage to surrounding vital structures. Navigation techniques are therefore increasingly being used to improve safety and accuracy. However, no robot-assisted odontoid screw fixation has yet been reported. We here report a 61-year-old woman with a type II dens fracture on whom anterior odontoid screw fixation was performed under the guidance of a newly developed robotic system (TiRobot, co-designed by Beijing Jishuitan Hospital and TINAVI Medical Technologies). One odontoid screw was safely and accurately placed, the calculated deviation between the planned and actual positions being 0.9 mm. No intraoperative complications were identified and the patient was discharged on Day 5. Follow-up studies after 2 weeks showed good clinical and radiological results. We believe this is the first reported case of robot-assisted anterior odontoid screw fixation. We consider that complicated procedures can become feasible, safe and accurate using TiRobot systems. PMID:27627725

  12. Cyclic pull-out strength of hamstring tendon graft fixation with soft tissue interference screws. Influence of screw length.

    PubMed

    Stadelmaier, D M; Lowe, W R; Ilahi, O A; Noble, P C; Kohl, H W

    1999-01-01

    Blunt-threaded interference screws used for fixation of hamstring tendons in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions provide aperture fixation and may provide a biomechanically more stable graft than a graft fixed further from the articular surface. It is unknown if soft tissue fixation strength using interference screws is affected by screw length. We compared the cyclic and time-zero pull-out forces of 7 x 25 mm and 7 x 40 mm blunt-threaded metal interference screws for hamstring graft tibial fixation in eight paired human cadaveric specimens. A four-stranded autologous hamstring tendon graft was secured by a blunt-threaded interference screw into a proximal tibial tunnel with a diameter corresponding to the graft width. Eight grafts were secured with a 25-mm length screw while the other eight paired grafts were secured with a 40-mm length screw. During cyclic testing, slippage of the graft occurred as the force of pull became greater with each cycle until the graft-screw complex ultimately failed. All grafts failed at the fixation site, with the tendon being pulled past the screw. There were no measurable differences in the mean cyclic failure strength, pull-out strength, or stiffness between the two sizes of screws. Although use of the longer screw would make removal technically easier should revision surgery be necessary, it did not provide stronger fixation strength than the shorter, standard screw as had been postulated. PMID:10569365

  13. Evaluation of the Effect of Fixation Angle between Polyaxial Pedicle Screw Head and Rod on the Failure of Screw-Rod Connection.

    PubMed

    Çetin, Engin; Özkaya, Mustafa; Güler, Ümit Özgür; Acaroğlu, Emre; Demir, Teyfik

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Polyaxial screws had been only tested according to the ASTM standards (when they were perpendicularly positioned to the rod). In this study, effects of the pedicle screws angled fixation to the rod on the mechanical properties of fixation were investigated. Materials and Method. 30 vertically fixed screws and 30 screws fixed with angle were used in the study. Screws were used in three different diameters which were 6.5 mm, 7.0 mm, and 7.5 mm, in equal numbers. Axial pull-out and flexion moment tests were performed. Test results compared with each other using appropriate statistical methods. Results. In pull-out test, vertically fixed screws, in 6.5 mm and 7.0 mm diameter, had significantly higher maximum load values than angled fixed screws with the same diameters (P < 0.01). Additionally, vertically fixed screws, in all diameters, had significantly greater stiffness according to corresponding size fixed with angle (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Fixing the pedicle screw to the rod with angle significantly decreased the pull-out stiffness in all diameters. Similarly, pedicle screw instrumentation fixed with angle decreased the minimum sagittal angle between the rod and the screw in all diameters for flexion moment test but the differences were not significant.

  14. Evaluation of the Effect of Fixation Angle between Polyaxial Pedicle Screw Head and Rod on the Failure of Screw-Rod Connection

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, Engin; Özkaya, Mustafa; Güler, Ümit Özgür; Acaroğlu, Emre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Polyaxial screws had been only tested according to the ASTM standards (when they were perpendicularly positioned to the rod). In this study, effects of the pedicle screws angled fixation to the rod on the mechanical properties of fixation were investigated. Materials and Method. 30 vertically fixed screws and 30 screws fixed with angle were used in the study. Screws were used in three different diameters which were 6.5 mm, 7.0 mm, and 7.5 mm, in equal numbers. Axial pull-out and flexion moment tests were performed. Test results compared with each other using appropriate statistical methods. Results. In pull-out test, vertically fixed screws, in 6.5 mm and 7.0 mm diameter, had significantly higher maximum load values than angled fixed screws with the same diameters (P < 0.01). Additionally, vertically fixed screws, in all diameters, had significantly greater stiffness according to corresponding size fixed with angle (P < 0.005). Conclusion. Fixing the pedicle screw to the rod with angle significantly decreased the pull-out stiffness in all diameters. Similarly, pedicle screw instrumentation fixed with angle decreased the minimum sagittal angle between the rod and the screw in all diameters for flexion moment test but the differences were not significant. PMID:27019578

  15. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Young; Chung, Woo Chull; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  16. Arthroscopic Reduction and Transportal Screw Fixation of Acetabular Posterior Wall Fracture: Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin young; Kim, Che Keun; Huh, Soon Ho; Kim, Se Jin; Jung, Bo Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Acetabular fractures can be treated with variable method. In this study, acetabular posterior wall fracture was treated with arthroscopic reduction and fixation using cannulated screw. The patient recovered immediately and had a satisfactory outcome. In some case of acetabular fracture could be good indication with additional advantages of joint debridement and loose body removal. So, we report our case with technical note. PMID:27536654

  17. Tibiofibular screw fixation for syndesmotic ruptures: a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Stein, G; Eichler, C; Ettmann, L; Koebke, J; Müller, L P; Thelen, U; Skouras, E

    2012-09-01

    The mechanisms of injuries to the tibiofibular syndesmosis include isolated rupture and rupture in combination with ankle fractures. Current concepts of surgical treatment are fixation using bioabsorbable screws, syndesmotic stapling, syndesmotic hooks, and the widely used screw fixation. Postoperative care utilises passive motion of the ankle joint either with or without axial weight-bearing. The aim of our investigation was to quantify the motion of the mortise during axial load. Therefore, photoelastic tests, on the one hand, and biomechanical tests of cadaveric specimens, on the other, using axial loads of up to 2,000 N were used. Our photoelastic investigations showed force distribution through the screw into the cranial and caudal parts of the distal fibula. Biomechanical testing showed a progressive dehiscence in both ruptured and fixated specimens up to 2.89 (ruptured) and 2.42 mm (despite screw). Our findings strongly suggest a concept of partial weight-bearing at most to support regeneration of scar tissue and to prevent the appearance of instability in the ankle joint. PMID:22415030

  18. Fixation Strength of Caudal Pedicle Screws after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with the Modified Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw Method

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Clinical case series. Purpose In the posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure in our institute, the cephalad screw trajectory follows a mediolateral and caudocephalad directed path according to the original cortical bone trajectory (CBT) method. However, the starting point of the caudal screw is at the medial border of the pedicle on an articular surface of the superior articular process, and the trajectory takes a mediolateral path parallel to the cephalad endplate. The incidence of caudal screw loosening after PLIF with this modified CBT screw method was investigated, and significant risk factors for caudal screw loosening were evaluated. Overview of Literature A biomechanical study of this modified caudal screw trajectory using the finite element method reported about a 20% increase in uniaxial yield pullout load compared with the traditional trajectory. However, there has been no clinical study concerning the fixation strength of this modified caudal screw trajectory. Methods The subjects were 193 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF with modified CBT screw fixation. Caudal screw loosening was checked in computed tomography at 6 months after surgery, and screw loosening was defined as a radiolucency of 1 mm or more at the bone-screw interface. Results The incidence of caudal screw loosening after lumbosacral PLIF (46.2%) was significantly higher than that after floating PLIF (6.0%). No significant differences in sex, brand of the instruments, and diameter and length of the caudal screw were evident between patients with and without caudal screw loosening. Patients with caudal screw loosening were significantly older at the time of surgery than patients without caudal screw loosening. Conclusions Fixation strength of the caudal screw after floating PLIF with this modified CBT screw technique was sufficiently acceptable. Fixation strength after the lumbosacral procedure was not. PMID:27559442

  19. Additional Drive Circuitry for Piezoelectric Screw Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, Robert; Palmer, Dean; Gursel, Yekta; Reder, Leonard; Savedra, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    Modules of additional drive circuitry have been developed to enhance the functionality of a family of commercially available positioning motors (Picomotor . or equivalent) that provide linear motion controllable, in principle, to within increments .30 nm. A motor of this type includes a piezoelectric actuator that turns a screw. Unlike traditional piezoelectrically actuated mechanisms, a motor of this type does not rely on the piezoelectric transducer to hold position: the screw does not turn except when the drive signal is applied to the actuator.

  20. Outpatient percutaneous screw fixation of the acute Jones fracture.

    PubMed

    Mindrebo, N; Shelbourne, K D; Van Meter, C D; Rettig, A C

    1993-01-01

    Nine patients (8 men and 1 woman, ranging in age from 17 to 22 years) who sustained a Jones fracture were treated with percutaneous intramedullary screw fixation as outpatients. All of the patients were varsity athletes. Seven were Division I scholarship athletes. Beginning at 7 to 10 days after surgery, all patients were allowed weightbearing as tolerated with a CAM walker. Stationary bicycling, swimming, and Stairmaster were allowed at 2 to 3 weeks. The average return to running was 5.5 weeks (range, 3 to 10). The average return to full competition was 8.5 weeks (range, 7 to 12). No perioperative or postoperative complications occurred. Average followup was 2.5 years. All fractures attained clinical and radiographic union. We believe that outpatient percutaneous intramedullary screw fixation of the acute Jones fracture is a reasonable alternative for those active patients who would have difficulty with a non-weightbearing cast and crutches or who desire an expeditious return to activities. Time restraints are particularly critical for in-season or preseason athletes. With the outpatient screw fixation method, our patient population had predictable healing, and they returned to full sports participation within 12 weeks.

  1. An analysis of screw fixation of the femoral component in cementless hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Martin, J W; Sugiyama, H; Kaiser, A D; Van Hoech, J; Whiteside, L A

    1990-01-01

    A cementless hip stem that allows screw fixation of the collar to cortical bone in the calcar region was found to achieve enhanced rotational stability when implanted in preserved cadaveric human femora. Although the implants with screws showed less tendency for subsidence than the implants without screws, rotational micromotion was not found to be statistically different under light loading conditions. When implanted in composite bone, the addition of screws in the configuration tested was associated with significant metal-on-metal wear during combined compression and rotational cyclic loading. This finding is of concern due to potential wear particle toxicity and possible lowered fatigue life of the prosthesis. Therefore, specific design changes are recommended. PMID:2243211

  2. Intramedullary screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Massada, Marta Maria Teixeira de Oliveira; Pereira, Manuel Alexandre Negrais Pinho Gonçalves; de Sousa, Ricardo Jorge Gomes; Costa, Paulo Guimarães; Massada, José Leandro da Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to review the short- and long-term clinical and radiological results of intramedullary compression screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures in athletes. Methods Eleven male and six female active patients with fifth metatarsal zone II and zone III fractures fixed with a 4.5-mm cannulated compression screw were evaluated by chart review, review of radiographs, and clinical evaluation. Fifteen of the patients were high-level athletes (soccer: n=11; basketball: n=1; track and field: n=3) and two were recreational-level athletes. Mean follow-up from surgery to evaluation was 54 (38-70) months. Results Mean time to healing as shown on radiographs and mean time to return to full activity after surgery were 7.3 and 7.5 weeks, respectively. All patients were able to return to their previous levels of activity. There were no reports of union delay, nonunion or refracture to date. Conclusion In our patients, cannulated screw fixation of proximal fifth metatarsal fractures was a reliable procedure with low morbidity associated that provided athletes a quick return to activity. Level of Evidence I, Case Series. PMID:24453614

  3. The calcar screw in angular stable plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures - a case study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background With new minimally-invasive approaches for angular stable plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures, the need for the placement of oblique inferomedial screws ('calcar screw') has increasingly been discussed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of calcar screws on secondary loss of reduction and on the occurrence of complications. Methods Patients with a proximal humeral fracture who underwent angular stable plate fixation between 01/2007 and 07/2009 were included. On AP views of the shoulder, the difference in height between humeral head and the proximal end of the plate were determined postoperatively and at follow-up. Additionally, the occurrence of complications was documented. Patients with calcar screws were assigned to group C+, patients without to group C-. Results Follow-up was possible in 60 patients (C+ 6.7 ± 5.6 M/C- 5.0 ± 2.8 M). Humeral head necrosis occurred in 6 (C+, 15.4%) and 3 (C-, 14.3%) cases. Cut-out of the proximal screws was observed in 3 (C+, 7.7%) and 1 (C-, 4.8%) cases. In each group, 1 patient showed delayed union. Implant failure or lesions of the axillary nerve were not observed. In 44 patients, true AP and Neer views were available to measure the head-plate distance. There was a significant loss of reduction in group C- (2.56 ± 2.65 mm) compared to C+ (0.77 ± 1.44 mm; p = 0.01). Conclusions The placement of calcar screws in the angular stable plate fixation of proximal humeral fractures is associated with less secondary loss of reduction by providing inferomedial support. An increased risk for complications could not be shown. PMID:21943090

  4. Fracture fixation with two locking screws versus three non-locking screws

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, B.; Le, T.; Williamson, S.; Archdeacon, A.; Zardiackas, L.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to further evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of two locking screws versus three standard bicortical screws in synthetic models of normal and osteoporotic bone. Methods Synthetic tubular bone models representing normal bone density and osteoporotic bone density were used. Artificial fracture gaps of 1 cm were created in each specimen before fixation with one of two constructs: 1) two locking screws using a five-hole locking compression plate (LCP) plate; or 2) three non-locking screws with a seven-hole LCP plate across each side of the fracture gap. The stiffness, maximum displacement, mode of failure and number of cycles to failure were recorded under progressive cyclic torsional and eccentric axial loading. Results Locking plates in normal bone survived 10% fewer cycles to failure during cyclic axial loading, but there was no significant difference in maximum displacement or failure load. Locking plates in osteoporotic bone showed less displacement (p = 0.02), but no significant difference in number of cycles to failure or failure load during cyclic axial loading (p = 0.46 and p = 0.25, respectively). Locking plates in normal bone had lower stiffness and torque during torsion testing (both p = 0.03), but there was no significant difference in rotation (angular displacement) (p = 0.84). Locking plates in osteoporotic bone showed lower torque and rotation (p = 0.008), but there was no significant difference in stiffness during torsion testing (p = 0.69). Conclusions The mechanical performance of locking plate constructs, using only two screws, is comparable to three non-locking screw constructs in osteoporotic bone. Normal bone loaded with either an axial or torsional moment showed slightly better performance with the non-locking construct. PMID:23610681

  5. Biomechanical Evaluation of Plate Versus Lag Screw Only Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Amirhossein; Doan, Josh; Bastrom, Tracey; Pennock, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional fixation of unstable Orthopaedic Trauma Association type B/C ankle fractures consists of a lag screw and a lateral or posterolateral neutralization plate. Several studies have demonstrated the clinical success of lag screw only fixation; however, to date no biomechanical comparison of the different constructs has been performed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biomechanical strength of these different constructs. Osteotomies were created in 40 Sawbones(®) distal fibulas and reduced using 1 bicortical 3.5-mm stainless steel lag screw, 2 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, 3 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, or a single 3.5-mm lag screw coupled with a stainless steel neutralization plate with 3 proximal cortical and 3 distal cancellous screws. The constructs were tested to determine the stiffness in lateral bending and rotation and failure torque. No significant differences in lateral bending or rotational stiffness were detected between the osteotomies fixed with 3 lag screws and a plate. Constructs fixed with 1 lag screw were weaker for both lateral bending and rotational stiffness. Osteotomies fixed with 2 lag screws were weaker in lateral bending only. No significant differences were found in the failure torque. Compared with lag screw only fixation, plate fixation requires larger incisions and increased costs and is more likely to require follow-up surgery. Despite the published clinical success of treating simple Orthopaedic Trauma Association B/C fractures with lag screw only fixation, many surgeons still have concerns about stability. For noncomminuted, long oblique distal fibula fractures, lag screw only fixation techniques offer construct stiffness similar to that of traditional plate and lag screw fixation. PMID:25990534

  6. Biomechanical Evaluation of Plate Versus Lag Screw Only Fixation of Distal Fibula Fractures.

    PubMed

    Misaghi, Amirhossein; Doan, Josh; Bastrom, Tracey; Pennock, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    Traditional fixation of unstable Orthopaedic Trauma Association type B/C ankle fractures consists of a lag screw and a lateral or posterolateral neutralization plate. Several studies have demonstrated the clinical success of lag screw only fixation; however, to date no biomechanical comparison of the different constructs has been performed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the biomechanical strength of these different constructs. Osteotomies were created in 40 Sawbones(®) distal fibulas and reduced using 1 bicortical 3.5-mm stainless steel lag screw, 2 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, 3 bicortical 3.5-mm lag screws, or a single 3.5-mm lag screw coupled with a stainless steel neutralization plate with 3 proximal cortical and 3 distal cancellous screws. The constructs were tested to determine the stiffness in lateral bending and rotation and failure torque. No significant differences in lateral bending or rotational stiffness were detected between the osteotomies fixed with 3 lag screws and a plate. Constructs fixed with 1 lag screw were weaker for both lateral bending and rotational stiffness. Osteotomies fixed with 2 lag screws were weaker in lateral bending only. No significant differences were found in the failure torque. Compared with lag screw only fixation, plate fixation requires larger incisions and increased costs and is more likely to require follow-up surgery. Despite the published clinical success of treating simple Orthopaedic Trauma Association B/C fractures with lag screw only fixation, many surgeons still have concerns about stability. For noncomminuted, long oblique distal fibula fractures, lag screw only fixation techniques offer construct stiffness similar to that of traditional plate and lag screw fixation.

  7. Effectiveness of interference screw fixation in ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Carl W

    2008-07-01

    Ulnar collateral ligament disruptions of the elbow are increasingly common for athletes involved in overhead sports. One newer reconstructive technique combines the use of a biotenodesis screw for ulnar fixation with the docking procedure for humeral fixation referred to as the DANE procedure. Biomechanical evaluations have determined that the combined procedure has properties similar to previous methods, but few comparative clinical studies have been performed. The current study compares the DANE procedure to a traditional method of ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction with a medium range follow-up. Twelve ulnar collateral ligament reconstructions were observed for a minimum of 21 months. Six reconstructions were performed using bone tunnels on the ulna. The other 6 used a biotenodesis interference screw on the ulna. Both groups used the docking procedure on the humerus. Identical rehabilitation phases were followed by both groups. Attention was paid not only to the time to return to play and the level able to be returned to but also to interoperative differences, including tourniquet time. We concluded that the DANE reconstruction is an appropriate and effective method. Results are similar to those achieved with a traditional reconstructive method. The study also demonstrates that tourniquet time and, therefore, operative time is less for the DANE procedure.

  8. Tips of the trade #38. The Herbert screw in closed reduction and internal fixation of the Jones fracture.

    PubMed

    Traina, S M; McElhinney, J P

    1991-08-01

    A technique of using a cannulated Herbert screw is presented for addressing the troublesome Jones fracture. This closed intramedullary fixation technique allows early healing without many of the screw head problems encountered in the more traditional AO screw techniques.

  9. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    PubMed

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Osteosynthesis Screw Fixation in the Bone Stock: An Appropriate Method for Automatic Screw Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  11. Comparison of two-transsacral-screw fixation versus triangular osteosynthesis for transforaminal sacral fractures.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyong S; Zamorano, David P; Wahba, George M; Garcia, Ivan; Bhatia, Nitin; Lee, Thay Q

    2014-09-01

    Transforaminal pelvic fractures are high-energy injuries that are translationally and rotationally unstable. This study compared the biomechanical stability of triangular osteosynthesis vs 2-transsacral-screw fixation in the repair of a transforaminal pelvic fracture model. A transforaminal fracture model was created in 10 cadaveric lumbopelvic specimens. Five of the specimens were stabilized with triangular osteosynthesis, which consisted of unilateral L5-to-ilium lumbopelvic fixation and ipsilateral iliosacral screw fixation. The remaining 5 were stabilized with a 2-transsacral-screw fixation technique that consisted of 2 transsacral screws inserted across S1. All specimens were loaded cyclically and then loaded to failure. Translation and rotation were measured using the MicroScribe 3D digitizing system (Revware Inc, Raleigh, North Carolina). The 2-transsacral-screw group showed significantly greater stiffness than the triangular osteosynthesis group (2-transsacral-screw group, 248.7 N/mm [standard deviation, 73.9]; triangular osteosynthesis group, 125.0 N/mm [standard deviation, 66.9]; P=.02); however, ultimate load and rotational stiffness were not statistically significant. Compared with triangular osteosynthesis fixation, the use of 2 transsacral screws provides a comparable biomechanical stability profile in both translation and rotation. This newly revised 2-transsacral-screw construct offers the traumatologist an alternative method of repair for vertical shear fractures that provides biplanar stability. It also offers the advantage of percutaneous placement in either the prone or supine position.

  12. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury. Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation. Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but <17.1 mm (disc depth). Except the axial screw length, increase in all the measurements was seen with level up to C5–C6 segment. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimens demonstrated that ATAS fixation could be successfully performed at C2–C3, C3–C4, C4–C5, and C5–C6 levels, but impossible at C6–C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens. The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning. PMID:27495016

  13. Laminar screw fixation in the subaxial cervical spine: A report on three cases

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Hironori; Aota, Yoichi; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although laminar screw fixation is often used at the C2 and C7 levels, only few previous case reports have presented the use of laminar screws at the C3-C6 levels. Here, we report a novel fixation method involving the use of practical laminar screws in the subaxial spine. We used laminar screws in the subaxial cervical spine in two cases to prevent vertebral artery injury and in one case to minimize exposure of the lamina. This laminar screw technique was successful in all three cases with adequate spinal rigidity, which was achieved without complications. The use of laminar screws in the subaxial cervical spine is a useful option for posterior fusion of the cervical spine. PMID:27795952

  14. Polymethylmethacrylate-augmented screw fixation for stabilization in metastatic spinal tumors. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jee Soo; Lee, Sang Ho; Rhee, Chang Hun; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2002-01-01

    Screw fixation augmented with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or some other biocompatible bone cement has been used in patients with osteoporosis requiring spinal fusion. No clinical studies have been conducted on PMMA-augmented screw fixation for stabilization of the vertebral column in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether screw fixation augmented with PMMA might be suitable in patients treated for multilevel metastatic spinal tumors. Ten patients with metastatic spinal tumors involving multiple vertebral levels underwent stabilization procedures in which PMMA was used to augment screw fixation after decompression of the spinal cord. Within 15 days, partial or complete relief from pain was obtained in all patients postoperatively. Two of four patients in whom neurological deficits caused them to be nonambulatory before surgery were able to ambulate postoperatively. Neither collapse of the injected vertebral bodies nor failure of the screw fixation was observed during the mean follow-up period of 6.7 months. Screw fixation augmented with PMMA may offer stronger stabilization and facilitate the instrumentation across short segments in the treatment of multilevel metastatic spinal tumors. PMID:11795702

  15. Monoaxial pedicle screws are superior to polyaxial pedicle screws and the two pin external fixator for subcutaneous anterior pelvic fixation in a biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Rahul; Onwudiwe, Ndidi; Roth, Matthew; Sethi, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Comparison of monoaxial and polyaxial screws with the use of subcutaneous anterior pelvic fixation. Methods. Four different groups each having 5 constructs were tested in distraction within the elastic range. Once that was completed, 3 components were tested in torsion within the elastic range, 2 to torsional failure and 3 in distraction until failure. Results. The pedicle screw systems showed higher stiffness (4.008 ± 0.113 Nmm monoaxial, 3.638 ± 0.108 Nmm Click-x; 3.634 ± 0.147 Nmm Pangea) than the exfix system (2.882 ± 0.054 Nmm) in distraction. In failure testing, monoaxial pedicle screw system was stronger (360 N) than exfixes (160 N) and polyaxial devices which failed if distracted greater than 4 cm (157 N Click-x or 138 N Pangea). The exfix had higher peak torque and torsional stiffness than all pedicle systems. In torsion, the yield strengths were the same for all constructs. Conclusion. The infix device constructed with polyaxial or monoaxial pedicle screws is stiffer than the 2 pin external fixator in distraction testing. In extreme cases, the use of reinforcement or monoaxial systems which do not fail even at 360 N is a better option. In torsional testing, the 2 pin external fixator is stiffer than the pedicle screw systems.

  16. Refracture of proximal fifth metatarsal (Jones) fracture after intramedullary screw fixation in athletes.

    PubMed

    Wright, R W; Fischer, D A; Shively, R A; Heidt, R S; Nuber, G W

    2000-01-01

    This study details six instances of refracture of clinically and radiographically healed fractures of the base of the fifth metatarsal after intramedullary screw fixation. Four professional football players, one college basketball player, and one recreational athlete underwent intramedullary screw fixation of fifth metatarsal fractures. The athletes were released to full activities an average of 8.5 weeks (range, 5.5 to 12) after fixation, when healing was clinically and radiographically documented. Three football players developed refracture within 1 day of return to full activity. The other three athletes refractured at 2.5, 4, and 4.5 months after return to activity. Two football players underwent repeat fixation with larger screws and returned to play in the same season. The college basketball player underwent bone grafting and returned to play in subsequent seasons. The other three athletes underwent nonoperative management and healed uneventfully over 6 to 8 weeks. On the basis of this series, we recommend that 1) screw fixation using a large-diameter screw should be given careful consideration for patients with large body mass for whom early return to activity is important; 2) functional bracing, shoe modification, or an orthosis should be considered for return to play; 3) if refracture occurs, exchange to a larger screw may allow return to play in the same season; and 4) alternative imaging should be considered to help document complete healing.

  17. A new material (single crystal sapphire screw) for internal fixation of the mandibular ramus.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, T; Fujimoto, H; Ono, T

    1987-02-01

    A new single crystal sapphire bone screw which has favourable properties such as chemical stability, mechanical strength and biocompatibility, was applied for rigid internal fixation of the sagittal split osteotomies in 86 cases since 1982. Radiographic findings supported the excellent biocompatibility of the material; there was no noticeable bone loss around the screw and the excellent bone adaptation to the threaded portion was observed. The screws can mechanically support the split mandibular rami until bone union occurs. Complications due to the screw were not encountered in follow-up periods of 0.5-3.5 years.

  18. Atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation and posterior fusion using ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene cable.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Ikuho; Arai, Yasuhisa; Tsuji, Takaaki; Takahashi, Masaki; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2005-10-01

    This article attempts to evaluate the effectiveness of the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) cable system in atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation and posterior fusion through the clinical results of 10 postoperative patients with atlantoaxial subluxation secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. Among them, one patient with only one screw placed owing to an anomalous vertebral artery had the correction loss of the 3-mm atlas-dens interval after surgery. Another patient had a second operation to remove the screw and cable after 2 years 11 months because a unilateral transarticular screw had come to protrude through the lateral mass of the atlas ventrally. All patients had achieved C1-C2 osseous fusion without any complications associated with this cable system. The UHMW-PE cable is a very useful material as sublaminar wiring in atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation and posterior fusion. PMID:16189448

  19. Comparison of Surgical Outcomes Between Short-Segment Open and Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques for Thoracolumbar Fractures.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Yaohua; Dong, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes between open pedicle screw fixation (OPSF) and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPSF) for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures, which has received scant research attention to date. MATERIAL AND METHODS Eight-four patients with acute and subacute thoracolumbar fractures who were treated with SSPSF from January 2013 to June 2014 at the Changzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Changzhou, China) were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 4 groups: the OPSF with 4 basic screws (OPSF-4) group, the OPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (OPSF-6) group, the PPSF with 4 basic screws (PPSF-4) group, and the PPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (PPSF-6) group. The intraoperative, immediate postoperative, and over 1-year follow-up outcomes were evaluated and compared among these groups. RESULTS Blood loss in the PPSF-4 group and the PPSF-6 group was significantly less than in the OPSF-4 group and the OPSF-6 group (P<0.05). The OPSF-6 group exhibited significantly higher immediate postoperative correction percentage of anterior column height of fractured vertebra than the other 3 groups (P<0.05), and higher correction of sagittal regional Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of injured vertebra than in the PPSF-4 and -6 groups (P<0.05). In addition, there was no significant difference in the correction loss of percentage of anterior column height, and loss of sagittal Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of fractured vertebrae at final follow-up among the 4 groups (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS OPSF with 6 screws had an advantage in the correction of injured vertebral height and kyphosis, and PPSF reduced the intraoperative blood loss of patients. PMID:27602557

  20. Comparison of Surgical Outcomes Between Short-Segment Open and Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques for Thoracolumbar Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Yaohua; Dong, Qirong

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare the surgical outcomes between open pedicle screw fixation (OPSF) and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation (PPSF) for the treatment of thoracolumbar fractures, which has received scant research attention to date. Material/Methods Eight-four patients with acute and subacute thoracolumbar fractures who were treated with SSPSF from January 2013 to June 2014 at the Changzhou Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Changzhou, China) were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were divided into 4 groups: the OPSF with 4 basic screws (OPSF-4) group, the OPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (OPSF-6) group, the PPSF with 4 basic screws (PPSF-4) group, and the PPSF with 4 basic and 2 additional screws (PPSF-6) group. The intraoperative, immediate postoperative, and over 1-year follow-up outcomes were evaluated and compared among these groups. Results Blood loss in the PPSF-4 group and the PPSF-6 group was significantly less than in the OPSF-4 group and the OPSF-6 group (P<0.05). The OPSF-6 group exhibited significantly higher immediate postoperative correction percentage of anterior column height of fractured vertebra than the other 3 groups (P<0.05), and higher correction of sagittal regional Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of injured vertebra than in the PPSF-4 and -6 groups (P<0.05). In addition, there was no significant difference in the correction loss of percentage of anterior column height, and loss of sagittal Cobb angle and kyphotic angle of fractured vertebrae at final follow-up among the 4 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions OPSF with 6 screws had an advantage in the correction of injured vertebral height and kyphosis, and PPSF reduced the intraoperative blood loss of patients. PMID:27602557

  1. Simulation-based particle swarm optimization and mechanical validation of screw position and number for the fixation stability of a femoral locking compression plate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chian-Her; Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Cho, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Locking compression plates (LCPs) have been used to fix femoral shaft fractures. Previous studies have attempted to identify the best LCP screw positions and numbers to achieve the fixation stability. However, the determined screw positions and numbers were mainly based on the surgeons' experiences. The aim of this study was to discover the best number and positions of LCP screws to achieve acceptable fixation stability. Three-dimensional numerical models of a fractured femur with the LCP were first developed. Then, the best screw position and number of LCPs were determined by using a simulation-based particle swarm optimization algorithm. Finally, the results of the numerical study were validated by conducting biomechanical tests. The results showed that the LCP with six locking screws resulted in the necessary fixation stability, and the best combination of positions of locking screws inserted into the LCP was 1-5-6-7-8-12 (three locking screws on either side of the bone fragment with two locking screws as close as practicable to the fracture site). In addition, the numerical models and algorithms developed in this study were validated by the biomechanical tests. Both the numerical and experimental results can provide clinical suggestions to surgeons and help them to understand the biomechanics of LCP systems.

  2. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. RESULTS All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. CONCLUSIONS Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  3. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. Material/Methods We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. Results All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. Conclusions Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement. PMID:26681388

  4. Clinical Use of 3D Printing Guide Plate in Posterior Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongliang; Wu, Dongying; Yang, Huilin; Guo, Kaijin

    2015-12-18

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of use of a 3D printing guide plate in posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 43 patients receiving posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. The experimental group underwent 3D printing guide plate-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation, while the control group underwent traditional x-ray-assisted posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation. After surgery, CT scanning was done to evaluate the accuracy of screw placement according to the Richter standard. RESULTS All patients were followed up for 1 month. The mean time of placement for each screw and the amount of hemorrhage was 4.9±2.1 min and 8.0±11.1 mL in the experimental group while 6.5±2.2 min and 59.9±13.0 mL in the control group, respectively, with significant differences (p<0.05). The fluoroscopy times of each screw placement was 0.5±0.4 in the experimental group, which was significantly lower than that in the control group 1.2±0.7 (p<0.05). The excellent and good screw placement rate was 100% in the experimental group and 98.4% in the control group, without any statistical difference (P>0.05). No obvious complications were reported in either group. CONCLUSIONS Compared with the traditional treatment methods, the intra-operative application of 3D printing guide plate can shorten the operation time and reduce the amount of hemorrhage. It can also reduce the fluoroscopy times compared with the traditional fluoroscopy, which cannot improve the accuracy rate of screw placement.

  5. Evaluation of Occipitocervical Arthrodesis Rates with Screw-based Fixation and Osteoinductive Fusion Adjuncts.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jeremy G; Panczykowski, David M; Tempel, Zachary J; Tormenti, Matthew; Kanter, Adam S; Okonkwo, David O

    2015-09-01

    not significantly different between adjunct cohorts (local autograft 92%, ICBG 77%, BMP 88%, and combination of ICBG and BMP 83%; p = 0.79). This finding persisted despite adjustment for age, pathology, number of levels instrumented, and attendant procedures. Importantly, neither the presence of arthrodesis nor fusion adjunct was significantly associated with functional outcome in both univariate and adjusted regression models. Additionally, perioperative adverse events occurred in 23% of cases and did not vary significantly in incidence or severity between fusion adjunct cohorts. We present a large series of patients treated for OC instability with rigid fixation utilizing modern segmental screw-based constructs. The use of adjuvant osteoinductive agents (BMP, ICBG, or a combination) produced equivalent rates of arthrodesis, functional outcome, and adverse events compared with use of local autograft alone.

  6. The effect of screw length and position on fixation of four-stranded hamstring grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Harvey, A R; Thomas, N P; Amis, A A

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine interference screw fixation of four strand hamstring grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in vitro. Bovine tibiae and cannon tendons were used. Screws were introduced from 'outside-in'. The tendons were loaded cyclically to 150 N to simulate walking and 450 N to simulate jogging. Slippage of the tendon from the anchorage was recorded after 100, 300 and 1000 cycles. Cortico-cancellous and cancellous only fixations were compared using a 7-mm screw in an 8-mm tunnel with a 7-mm graft. The effect of screw length was studied by comparing 8 x 25 and 8 x 45 mm screws. Graft slippage with cancellous only fixation was significantly greater than with cortico-cancellous screw fixation (Pscrew than with a 45-mm screw but, while this difference was not significant (P>0.105), the longer screws gave more consistent behaviour. We concluded that the screw should be placed so that its head engages the cortex, while increasing screw length within cancellous bone did not significantly improve graft fixation. Cyclical load testing reflects the repetitive forces imposed in the early post-operative period following hamstring anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and is important for the evaluation of graft fixations. PMID:12649035

  7. COMPLICATIONS OF THE SCREW/WASHER TIBIAL FIXATION TECHNIQUE FOR KNEE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Roveda, Gilberto; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Sartor, Vanderlei; Alves, Soraya Melina

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of pain at the site of the surgical incision and the need to remove the tibial fixation screw in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, in relation to sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A group of 265 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral flexor tendon grafts from the thigh in which the tibial fixation technique consisted of using a cortical screw and metal washer, between July 2000 and November 2007, were evaluated. Results: 176 patients were evaluated for an average of 33.3 ± 19.5 months; median of 29.5 months; IIQ: 17-45 months; minimum of 8 and maximum of 87 months. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.272) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.633) between sexes. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.08) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.379) according to BMI. Conclusion: The pain complaint rate at the screw site from the screw and metal washer method used for tibial fixation in ACL reconstruction was of the order of 25%, and the screw had to be removed in 10.8% of the cases. There was no predominance of pain complaints at the surgical wound between the sexes. There was a greater tendency to complain about pain among patients with BMI < 25. There was no predominance of screw and washer removal between the sexes or between individuals with different BMIs. PMID:27022587

  8. Hydroxyapatite composite resin cement augmentation of pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Turner, Alexander W L; Gillies, R Mark; Svehla, Martin J; Saito, Masanobu; Walsh, William R

    2003-01-01

    Pedicle screw stability is poor in osteopenic vertebrae attributable, in part, to low screw-bone interface strength. The current authors examined cement augmentation using a low curing temperature hydroxyapatite and bis-phenol-A glycidol methacrylate-based composite resin. This cement may stiffen the screw-bone interface and reduce the harmful effects associated with polymethylmethacrylate regarding temperature and toxic monomer. Thirty-five lumbar vertebrae from human cadavers were instrumented with pedicle screws, with one pedicle previously injected with cement and the other as the control. Caudocephalad toggling of +/- 1 mm for 1600 cycles was applied to the pedicle screws, and the resulting forces supported by the implant-bone interface were captured by a load cell. A curve was constructed from the peak caudal load for each cycle and three mechanical measures parameterized this curve: (1) initial load; (2) rate of load decay during the first 400 cycles; and (3) final load. The initial load increased by 16% as a result of cement augmentation, the final load increased by 65%, and the rate of load decay decreased by 59%. Cement augmentation of pedicle screws increased the stiffness and stability of the screw-bone interface. PMID:12579026

  9. Cortical and Standard Trajectory Pedicle Screw Fixation Techniques in Stabilizing Multisegment Lumbar Spine with Low Grade Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    İnceoğlu, Serkan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cortical screw (CS) fixation has been recently proposed as an alternative to the standard pedicle screw (PS) fixation technique. Biomechanical studies involving individual screw pullout and single level motion segment stabilization showed comparable performance of both techniques. However, whether this new fixation technique can be applied to the stabilization of multilevel lumbar segments with significant destabilization has been unclear. Purpose To compare stability of CS fixation to the traditional PS fixation in an unstable 3 level spondylolisthesis model. Study Design This is a biomechanical study comparing cortical trajectory pedicle screw fixation to traditional trajectory pedicle screw fixation in an unstable cadaveric model using nondestructive flexibility test. Methods Eight fresh frozen cadaveric lumbar spines (T12- S1) were obtained. After intact baseline testing, a 3-level lowgrade spondylolisthesis was simulated at the L1-4. Each specimen was instrumented with the PS and CS fixation systems. Standard nondestructive flexibility test was performed. Range of motion at each level was compared between the constructs during flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Results The destabilization model significantly increased the ROM in all planes (P<0.05). Both fixation techniques provided significant reduction in the ROM (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in ROM between the PS and CS groups in any of planes (P>0.05). Conclusions Cortical trajectory pedicle screw fixation provided stabilization to multilevel lumbar segment with low-grade spondylolisthesis comparable to the standard trajectory pedicle screw construct. PMID:26484009

  10. Fully Threaded Versus Partially Threaded Screws: Determining Shear in Cancellous Bone Fixation.

    PubMed

    Downey, Michael W; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Carpenter, Brian B

    2015-01-01

    Many researchers have studied and compared various forms of intraosseous fixation. No studies have examined the effects of shear through stiffness and failure strength of a fully threaded versus a partially threaded screw. Our hypothesis was that the fully threaded lag screw technique would provide greater shear strength and resistance. Thirty-six synthetic sawbone blocks were used to test screw fixation. In group 1 (n = 9), 2 blocks were fixed together using a fully threaded 4.0-mm stainless steel cancellous bone screw and the lag technique. In group 2 (n = 8), 2 blocks were fixed together using the standard manufacturer-recommended method for inserting 4.0-mm partially threaded stainless steel cancellous bone screws. The constructs were then mechanically tested. Shear was applied by compressing each construct at an axial displacement rate of 0.5 mm/s until failure. The fully threaded screw had a significantly greater (p = .026) initial stiffness (106.4 ± 15.8 N/mm) than the partially threaded screw (80.1 ± 27.5 N/mm). The yield load and displacement for the fully threaded group (429.4 ± 11.7 N and 7.2 ± 0.35 mm) were 64% and 67% greater than those for the partially threaded screw group (261.4 ± 26.1 N and 4.3 ± 1.03 mm), respectively. The results of the present study have demonstrated the importance of a full-thread construct to prevent shear and to decrease strain at the fracture. The confirmation of our hypothesis questions the future need and use of partially threaded screws for cancellous bone fixation. PMID:26210079

  11. C2 nerve dysfunction associated with C1 lateral mass screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Da-geng; Hao, Ding-jun; Li, Guang-lin; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Yu-chen; He, Bao-rong

    2014-11-01

    The C1 lateral mass screw technique is widely used for atlantoaxial fixation. However, C2 nerve dysfunction may occur as a complication of this procedure, compromising the quality of life of affected patients. This is a review of the topic of C2 nerve dysfunction associated with C1 lateral mass screw fixation and related research developments. The C2 nerve root is located in the space bordered superiorly by the posterior arch of C1 , inferiorly by the C2 lamina, anteriorly by the lateral atlantoaxial joint capsule, and posteriorly by the anterior edge of the ligamentum flavum. Some surgeons suggest cutting the C2 nerve root during C1 lateral mass screw placement, whereas others prefer to preserve it. The incidence, clinical manifestations, causes, management, and prevention of C2 nerve dysfunction associated with C(1) lateral mass screw fixation are reviewed. Sacrifice of the C2 nerve root carries a high risk of postoperative numbness, whereas postoperative nerve dysfunction can occur when it has been preserved. Many surgeons have been working hard on minimizing the risk of postoperative C2 nerve dysfunction associated with C1 lateral mass screw fixation. PMID:25430709

  12. Interference screw fixation of hamstring vs patellar tendon grafts for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Aune, A K; Ekeland, A; Cawley, P W

    1998-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the fixation strength of a quadruple semitendinosus-gracilis graft compared with a middle-third bone-patellar tendon-bone graft using a new interference screw developed to fix hamstrings grafts for ACL reconstructions (RCL Smith & Nephew Donjoy). Five pairs of human cadaveric knees from donors with a mean age of 43 (range 33-52) years were used. One knee of each pair was randomly allocated to be reconstructed on the femoral side with a semitendinosus-gracilis graft from the same donor using RCL screw fixation. As the control, the contralateral knee was correspondingly reconstructed with a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft using the same interference screw. The grafts were pulled out at a velocity of 30 mm/s by an axially applied load using a MTS machine. The mean (SD) failure load for the bone-patellar tendon-bone graft fixations was 505 (25) N, 110% stronger than the mean failure load for the semitendinosus-gracilis graft fixations, which was 240 (47) N (P = 0.003). The stiffness for the patellar tendon-bone graft fixations was 46 (11) N/mm, 120% stiffer than the semitendinosus-gracilis graft fixations, which was 22 (11) N/mm (P = 0.01). This study shows that the interference screw principle used for ACL reconstructions with hamstrings tendons is inferior to that for bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstructions although the screw was developed especially for soft-tissue fixation in bone tunnels. PMID:9604194

  13. Augmentation of screw fixation with injectable calcium sulfate bone cement in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Xie, Xin-Hui; Yu, Zhi-Feng; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of augmenting screw fixation with an injectable calcium sulfate cement (CSC) in the osteoporotic bone of ovariectomized rats. The influence of the calcium sulfate (CS) on bone remodeling and screw anchorage in osteoporotic cancellous bone was systematically investigated using histomorphometric and biomechanical analyses. The femoral condyles of 55 Sprague-Dawley ovariectomized rats were implanted with screw augmented with CS, while the contralateral limb received a nonaugmented screw. At time intervals of 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks, 11 rats were euthanized. Six pair-matched samples were used for histological analysis, while five pair-matched samples were preserved for biomechanical testing. Histomorphometric data showed that CS augmented screws activated cancellous bone formation, evidenced by a statistically higher (p < 0.05) percentage of osteoid surface at 2, 4, and 8 weeks and a higher rate of bone mineral apposition at 12 weeks compared with nonaugmented screws. The amount of the bone-screw contact at 2, 8, and 12 weeks and of bone ingrowth on the threads at 4 and 8 weeks was greater in the CS group than in the nonaugmented group (p < 0.05), although these parameters increased concomitantly with time for both groups. The CS was resorbed completely at 8 weeks without stimulating fibrous encapsulation on the screw surface. Also, the cement significantly increased the screw pull-out force and the energy to failure at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after implantation, when compared with the control group (p < 0.05). These results imply that augmentation of screw fixation with CS may have the potential to decrease the risk of implant failure in osteoporotic bone.

  14. Biplane double-supported screw fixation (F-technique): a method of screw fixation at osteoporotic fractures of the femoral neck.

    PubMed

    Filipov, Orlin

    2011-10-01

    The present work introduces a method of screw fixation of femoral neck fractures in the presence of osteoporosis, according to an original concept of the establishment of two supporting points for the implants and their biplane positioning in the femoral neck and head. The provision of two steady supporting points for the implants and the highly increased (obtuse) angle at which they are positioned allow the body weight to be transferred successfully from the head fragment onto the diaphysis, thanks to the strength of the screws, with the patient's bone quality being of least importance. The position of the screws allows them to slide under stress with a minimal risk of displacement. The method was developed in search of a solution for those patients for whom primary arthroplasty is contraindicated. The method has been analysed in relation to biomechanics and statics. For the first time, a new function is applied to a screw fixation-the implant is presented as a simple beam with an overhanging end.

  15. Combining of small fragment screws and large fragment plates for open reduction and internal fixation of periprosthetic humeral fractures.

    PubMed

    Seybold, Dominik; Citak, Mustafa; Königshausen, Matthias; Gessmann, Jan; Schildhauer, Thomas A

    2011-10-01

    Operative treatment of periprosthetic humeral fractures in elderly patients with osteoporotic bone requires a stable fixations technique. The combination of 3.5 cortical screws with washers in a 4.5 Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen, Limited-contact dynamic compression plate or Locking plate, allows a stable periprosthetic fixation with the small 3.5 screws and 4.5 screws above and below the prosthesis, respectively. This combination is a cost-effective technique to treat periprosthetic humeral fractures.

  16. Biomechanical evaluation of four different posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the treatment of the odontoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Liu, Wen-Fei; Jiang, Hong-Kun; Li, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Problems that screw cannot be inserted may occur in screw-rod fixation techniques such as Harms technique. We compared the biomechanical stability imparted to the C-2 vertebrae by four designed posterior screw and rod fixation techniques for the management of odontoid fractures. A three-dimensional finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established by subtracting several unit structures from the normal model from a healthy male volunteer. 4 different fixation techniques, shown as follows: ① C-1 lateral mass and C-2 pedicle screw fixation (Harms technique); ② C-1 lateral mass and unilateral C-2 pedicle screw fixation combined with ipsilateral laminar screw fixation; ③ Unilateral C-1lateral mass combined with ipsilateral C-1 posterior arch, and C-2 pedicle screw fixation; and ④ Unilateral C1 lateral mass screw connected with bilateral C2 pedicle screw fixation was performed on the odontoid fracture model. The model was validated for axial rotation, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and tension for 1.5 Nm. Changes in motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation were calculated. The finite element model of the odontoid fracture was established in this paper. All of the four screw-rod techniques significantly decreased motion in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, as compared with the destabilized odontoid fracture complex (P<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in stability among the four screw techniques. We concluded that the first three fixation techniques are recommended to be used as surgical intervention for odontoid fracture, while the last can be used as supplementary for the former three methods. PMID:26309508

  17. Biomechanical Comparison of Spinal Fusion Methods Using Interspinous Process Compressor and Pedicle Screw Fixation System Based on Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jisoo; Kim, Sohee

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biomechanical effects of a newly proposed Interspinous Process Compressor (IPC) and compare with pedicle screw fixation at surgical and adjacent levels of lumbar spine. Methods A three dimensional finite element model of intact lumbar spine was constructed and two spinal fusion models using pedicle screw fixation system and a new type of interspinous devices, IPC, were developed. The biomechanical effects such as range of motion (ROM) and facet contact force were analyzed at surgical level (L3/4) and adjacent levels (L2/3, L4/5). In addition, the stress in adjacent intervertebral discs (D2, D4) was investigated. Results The entire results show biomechanical parameters such as ROM, facet contact force, and stress in adjacent intervertebral discs were similar between PLIF and IPC models in all motions based on the assumption that the implants were perfectly fused with the spine. Conclusion The newly proposed fusion device, IPC, had similar fusion effect at surgical level, and biomechanical effects at adjacent levels were also similar with those of pedicle screw fixation system. However, for clinical applications, real fusion effect between spinous process and hooks, duration of fusion, and influence on spinous process need to be investigated through clinical study. PMID:26962413

  18. The Mechanical Effect of Rod Contouring on Rod-Screw System Strength in Spine Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Ozcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Ertem, Fatih; Erduran, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rod-screw fixation systems are widely used for spinal instrumentation. Although many biomechanical studies on rod-screw systems have been carried out, but the effects of rod contouring on the construct strength is still not very well defined in the literature. This work examines the mechanical impact of straight, 20° kyphotic, and 20° lordotic rod contouring on rod-screw fixation systems, by forming a corpectomy model. Methods The corpectomy groups were prepared using ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples. Non-destructive loads were applied during flexion/extension and torsion testing. Spine-loading conditions were simulated by load subjections of 100 N with a velocity of 5 mm min-1, to ensure 8.4-Nm moment. For torsional loading, the corpectomy models were subjected to rotational displacement of 0.5° s-1 to an end point of 5.0°, in a torsion testing machine. Results Under both flexion and extension loading conditions the stiffness values for the lordotic rod-screw system were the highest. Under torsional loading conditions, the lordotic rod-screw system exhibited the highest torsional rigidity. Conclusion We concluded that the lordotic rod-screw system was the most rigid among the systems tested and the risk of rod and screw failure is much higher in the kyphotic rod-screw systems. Further biomechanical studies should be attempted to compare between different rod kyphotic angles to minimize the kyphotic rod failure rate and to offer a more stable and rigid rod-screw construct models for surgical application in the kyphotic vertebrae. PMID:27651858

  19. The Mechanical Effect of Rod Contouring on Rod-Screw System Strength in Spine Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Karakasli, Ahmet; Karaarslan, Ahmet A.; Ozcanhan, Mehmet Hilal; Ertem, Fatih; Erduran, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rod-screw fixation systems are widely used for spinal instrumentation. Although many biomechanical studies on rod-screw systems have been carried out, but the effects of rod contouring on the construct strength is still not very well defined in the literature. This work examines the mechanical impact of straight, 20° kyphotic, and 20° lordotic rod contouring on rod-screw fixation systems, by forming a corpectomy model. Methods The corpectomy groups were prepared using ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene samples. Non-destructive loads were applied during flexion/extension and torsion testing. Spine-loading conditions were simulated by load subjections of 100 N with a velocity of 5 mm min-1, to ensure 8.4-Nm moment. For torsional loading, the corpectomy models were subjected to rotational displacement of 0.5° s-1 to an end point of 5.0°, in a torsion testing machine. Results Under both flexion and extension loading conditions the stiffness values for the lordotic rod-screw system were the highest. Under torsional loading conditions, the lordotic rod-screw system exhibited the highest torsional rigidity. Conclusion We concluded that the lordotic rod-screw system was the most rigid among the systems tested and the risk of rod and screw failure is much higher in the kyphotic rod-screw systems. Further biomechanical studies should be attempted to compare between different rod kyphotic angles to minimize the kyphotic rod failure rate and to offer a more stable and rigid rod-screw construct models for surgical application in the kyphotic vertebrae.

  20. Biomechanical comparison of locking plate and crossing metallic and absorbable screws fixations for intra-articular calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ming; Wong, Duo Wai-Chi; Mei, Jiong; Niu, Wenxin; Zhang, Ming

    2016-09-01

    The locking plate and percutaneous crossing metallic screws and crossing absorbable screws have been used clinically to treat intra-articular calcaneal fractures, but little is known about the biomechanical differences between them. This study compared the biomechanical stability of calcaneal fractures fixed using a locking plate and crossing screws. Three-dimensional finite-element models of intact and fractured calcanei were developed based on the CT images of a cadaveric sample. Surgeries were simulated on models of Sanders type III calcaneal fractures to produce accurate postoperative models fixed by the three implants. A vertical force was applied to the superior surface of the subtalar joint to simulate the stance phase of a walking gait. This model was validated by an in vitro experiment using the same calcaneal sample. The intact calcaneus showed greater stiffness than the fixation models. Of the three fixations, the locking plate produced the greatest stiffness and the highest von Mises stress peak. The micromotion of the fracture fixated with the locking plate was similar to that of the fracture fixated with the metallic screws but smaller than that fixated with the absorbable screws. Fixation with both plate and crossing screws can be used to treat intra-articular calcaneal fractures. In general, fixation with crossing metallic screws is preferable because it provides sufficient stability with less stress shielding.

  1. Biomechanical study of the sacroiliac fracture fixation with titanium rods and pedicle screws

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Fabrício Hidetoshi; Pisani, Marina Justi; Machado, André Nunes; Rodrigues, Fábio Lucas; Fujiki, Edison Noburo; Rodrigues, Luciano Miller Reis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess biomechanically different fixations means of the sacroiliac joint with pedicle screws and to compare the traditional head height with reduced ones. METHODS: We used a polyethylene model representing the pelvic ring and simulated a unilateral sacroiliac dislocation. We set up three different constructions: 1) two screws attached to a rod; 2) two rods connected to two small head screws each; and 3) two rods connected to two average headed screws each. We conducted tests in a biomechanical testing and a mechanized processing laboratory. RESULTS: Group 1 supported an average maximum load of 99.70 N. Group 2 supported an average maximum load of 362.46 N. Group 3 endured an average maximum load of 404.15 N. In the assembly with one rod, the resistance decreased as compared with the one with two bars: 72.5 % compared to small-headed screws and 75.3 % to the traditional screw. CONCLUSION: The assembly with a single bar presented inferior results when compared to the double bar assembly. There was no statistical difference in the results between the screws used. Experimental Study. PMID:26207094

  2. Metacarpophalangeal and interphalangeal joint arthrodesis: a comparative study between tension band and compression screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Breyer, J M; Vergara, P; Parra, L; Sotelo, P; Bifani, A; Andrade, F

    2015-05-01

    A retrospective, comparative cohort study was performed of metacarpophalangeal or proximal interphalangeal joint arthrodesis with either tension band (n = 28) or compression (Acutrak Mini) screw (n = 29) methods. We compared rate of union, healing time, complications, and re-operation rate. Union was achieved in 26/28 (92.8%) of the tension band group (9.4 weeks) and 24/28 (85.7%) of the compression screw group (9.8 weeks). Only 28 patients in the screw group were assessed for union as one patient in the screw group sustained a fracture at the time of insertion and was converted to tension band fixation. The complication rate was 8/28 (28.6%) in the tension band group and 8/29 (27.6%) in the compression screw group. Re-operation rate was 9/28 (32.1%) in the tension band group and 1/29 (3.6%) in the compression screw group. Our findings indicate that bone healing, healing time, and complications are similar in both groups. The tension band technique had a significantly higher re-operation rate (hardware removal), but was the technique for salvage following failure of the screw technique.

  3. Root contact with maxillomandibular fixation screws in orthognathic surgery: incidence and consequences.

    PubMed

    Camargo, I B; Van Sickels, J E; Laureano Filho, J R; Cunningham, L L

    2016-08-01

    The use of maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) screws in orthognathic surgery has become common in recent years. The risk of injury to adjacent roots with their placement in this population has not been studied extensively. The aim of this study was to review the incidence and consequences of root contact/injury in patients undergoing orthognathic surgery. A retrospective analysis of the treatment and radiographic records of patients who underwent orthognathic surgery between January 2013 and September 2014 at a university in Kentucky, USA was performed. The mean number of screws used was correlated to the mean number of roots affected using Spearman's test, set to a level of significance of 5%. Of 125 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery, 15 (12%) had evidence of root contact. Subsequent radiographs showed resolution of the bone defects. There was no clinical evidence of pulpal necrosis or pain during follow-up. The average number of screws used was 3.14±0.35 per patient, with an average of 0.17±0.52 root contacts per patient. There was no correlation between the number of screws used and the number of roots injured (P=0.279). Based on these results, MMF screws can safely be used to establish interim fixation during orthognathic surgery. Caution should be taken during placement to avoid direct injury to the roots of teeth.

  4. Screw fixation diameter for fifth metatarsal jones fracture: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ryan T; Hyer, Christopher F; DeMill, Shyler L

    2015-01-01

    The fifth metatarsal Jones fracture is a well-documented injury occurring at the proximal diaphyseal-metaphyseal junction. Conservative versus surgical intervention has been discussed in published studies for the management of Jones fractures. Solid intramedullary fixation relies on accurate matching of the screw diameter to the intraosseous diameter. The purpose of the present cadaveric study was to determine the average intraosseous diameter of the proximal fifth metatarsal as it relates to screw size selection for Jones fracture stabilization. Twenty fresh-frozen cadaver legs were used for examination. The fifth metatarsal was completely dissected. A transverse osteotomy was performed from laterally to medially along the midline of the metatarsal. A digital caliper was used to measure the diameter of the medullary canal of the fifth metatarsal. The measurement was taken at the narrowest portion of the medullary canal just distal to the proximal metaphysis. The mean dorsal to plantar diameter of the fifth metatarsal was 6.475 ± 1.54 (range 4 to 12) mm and the mean medial to lateral diameter was 4.6 ± 0.85 (range 3 to 6) mm. Intramedullary screw fixation has shown beneficial results in the treatment protocol of fifth metatarsal Jones fractures. Our study has demonstrated that a 4.5-mm cannulated screw is the narrowest diameter screw that can be used in the average fifth metatarsal and still obtain adequate intraosseous purchase. When selecting the appropriate screw, the surgeon must be comfortable selecting the largest screw that will achieve the maximal interface with the dense cortical bone in both the medial to lateral and dorsal to plantar plane.

  5. Application of bioabsorbable screw fixation for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Qiu, Xiaowen; Wang, Dong; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the application of bioabsorbable screws for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting fixation and to study their clinical effects in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. METHODS: From March 2007 to September 2012, 56 patients, 36 males and 20 females (38-79 years old, average 58.3±9.47 years), underwent a novel operation. Grafts were fixed by bioabsorbable screws (PLLA, 2.7 mm in diameter) after anterior decompression. The bioabsorbable screws were inserted from the midline of the graft bone to the bone surface of the upper and lower vertebrae at 45 degree angles. Patients were evaluated post-operatively to observe the improvement of symptoms and evaluate the fusion of the bone. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was used to evaluate the recovery of neurological functions. RESULTS: All screws were successfully inserted, with no broken screws. The rate of symptom improvement was 87.5%. All of the grafts fused well with no extrusion. The average time for graft fusion was 3.8±0.55 months (range 3-5 months). Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT scans demonstrated that the grafts fused with adjacent vertebrae well and that the screws were absorbed as predicted. The MRI findings showed that the cerebrospinal fluid was unobstructed. No obvious complications appeared in any of the follow-up evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical spondylosis with one- or two-level involvement can be effectively treated by anterior decompression and bone grafting with bioabsorbable screw fixation. This operative method is safe and can avoid the complications induced by metal implants. PMID:27438565

  6. Posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation for lumbar stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Xiaoqing; Yao, Yu

    2011-03-01

    Few reports have described the combined use of unilateral pedicle screw fixation and interbody fusion for lumbar stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed 79 patients with lumbar stenosis. The rationale and effectiveness of unilateral pedicle screw fixation were studied from biomechanical and clinical perspectives, aiming to reduce stiffness of the implant. All patients were operated with posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage in combination with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation and had reached the 3-year follow-up interval after operation. The mean operating time was 115 minutes (range=95-150 min) and the mean estimated blood loss was 150 mL (range=100-200 mL). The mean duration of hospital stay was 10 days (range=7-15 days). Clinical outcomes were assessed prior to surgery and reassessed at intervals using Denis' pain and work scales. Fusion status was determined from X-rays and CT scans. At the final follow-up, the clinical results were satisfactory and patients showed significantly improved scores (p<0.01) either on the pain or the work scale. Successful fusion was achieved in all patients. There were no new postoperative radiculopathies, or instances of malpositioned or fractured hardware. Posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular fixation is an effective treatment for decompressive surgery for lumbar stenosis.

  7. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation Using Cortical Bone Trajectory – A Prospective Cohort Study on Postoperative Pain Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Sayantan; Pham, Lan; Singh, Harminder

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to evaluate the clinical outcomes of cortical screws in regards to postoperative pain. Background: Pedicle screw fixation is the current mainstay technique for posterior spinal fusion. Over the past decade, a new technique called cortical screw fixation has been developed, which allows for medialized screw placement through stronger cortical bone. There have been several studies that showed either biomechanical equivalence or superiority of cortical screws. However, there is currently only a single study in the literature looking at clinical outcomes of cortical screw fixation in patients who have had no prior spine surgery. Methods: We prospectively looked at the senior author’s patients who underwent cortical versus pedicle lumbar screw fixation surgeries between 2013 and 2015 for lumbar degenerative disease. Eighteen patients underwent cortical screw fixation, and 15 patients underwent traditional pedicle screw fixation. We looked at immediate postoperative pain, changes in short-term pain (six to 12 weeks post-surgery), and changes in long-term pain (six to eight months). All pain outcomes were measured using a visual analog scale ranging from 1 to 10. Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to measure continuous data, and the Fisher Exact test was used to measure categorical data as appropriate. Results: Our results showed that the cortical screw cohort showed a trend towards having less peak postoperative pain (p = 0.09). The average postoperative pain was similar between the two cohorts (p = 0.93). There was also no difference in pain six to 12 weeks after surgery (p = 0.8). However, at six to eight months, the cortical screw cohort had worse pain compared to the pedicle screw cohort (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The cortical screw patients showed a trend towards less peak pain in the short-term (one to three days post-surgery) and more pain in the long-term (six to eight months post-surgery) compared to pedicle screw patients

  8. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Pedicle Screw Fixation Using Cortical Bone Trajectory – A Prospective Cohort Study on Postoperative Pain Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Sayantan; Pham, Lan; Singh, Harminder

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to evaluate the clinical outcomes of cortical screws in regards to postoperative pain. Background: Pedicle screw fixation is the current mainstay technique for posterior spinal fusion. Over the past decade, a new technique called cortical screw fixation has been developed, which allows for medialized screw placement through stronger cortical bone. There have been several studies that showed either biomechanical equivalence or superiority of cortical screws. However, there is currently only a single study in the literature looking at clinical outcomes of cortical screw fixation in patients who have had no prior spine surgery. Methods: We prospectively looked at the senior author’s patients who underwent cortical versus pedicle lumbar screw fixation surgeries between 2013 and 2015 for lumbar degenerative disease. Eighteen patients underwent cortical screw fixation, and 15 patients underwent traditional pedicle screw fixation. We looked at immediate postoperative pain, changes in short-term pain (six to 12 weeks post-surgery), and changes in long-term pain (six to eight months). All pain outcomes were measured using a visual analog scale ranging from 1 to 10. Mann-Whitney or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to measure continuous data, and the Fisher Exact test was used to measure categorical data as appropriate. Results: Our results showed that the cortical screw cohort showed a trend towards having less peak postoperative pain (p = 0.09). The average postoperative pain was similar between the two cohorts (p = 0.93). There was also no difference in pain six to 12 weeks after surgery (p = 0.8). However, at six to eight months, the cortical screw cohort had worse pain compared to the pedicle screw cohort (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The cortical screw patients showed a trend towards less peak pain in the short-term (one to three days post-surgery) and more pain in the long-term (six to eight months post-surgery) compared to pedicle screw patients

  9. Interference screw fixation and short harvest using flexor digitorum longus (FDL) transfer for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction: a technique.

    PubMed

    Bussewitz, Bradly W; Hyer, Christopher F

    2010-01-01

    Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction is a common clinical entity treated by foot and ankle specialists, and numerous surgical treatments are available to the modern foot and ankle surgeon. Fixation methods are constantly evolving as new products are developed and new uses for existing products are attempted. Interference screw fixation is the gold standard fixation for tendon autograft and allograft in orthopedic sports medicine. The technique that we describe in this article uses a less extensive harvest of the flexor digitorum longus tendon and a sound fixation method using an interference screw positioned in the tarsal navicular. PMID:20797592

  10. Endovascular Treatment of a Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Posterior C1-C2 Transarticular Screw Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, Jose C. Gonzalez-Llanos, Francisco

    2005-01-15

    We present a case of vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm after a posterior C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation procedure that was effectively treated with endovascular coil occlusion. Vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm complicating posterior C1-C2 transarticular fixation is extremely rare, with only one previous case having been reported previously. Endovascular occlusion is better achieved in the subacute phase of the pseudoaneurysm, when the wall of the pseudoaneurysm has matured and stabilized. Further follow-up angiographies are mandatory in order to confirm that there is no recurrence of the lesion.

  11. Technique and nuances of an S-2 alar iliac screw for lumbosacral fixation in patients with transitional and normal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Junichi; Vogel, Todd D; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berven, Sigurd; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    S-2 alar iliac (S2AI) screw fixation has recently been recognized as a useful technique for pelvic fixation. The authors demonstrate two cases where S2AI fixation was indicated: one case was a sacral insufficiency fracture following a long-segment fusion in a patient with a transitional S-1 vertebra; the other case involved pseudarthrosis following lumbosacral fixation. S2AI screws offer rigid fixation, low profile, and allow easy connection to the lumbosacral rod. The authors describe and demonstrate the surgical technique and nuances for the S2AI screw in a case with transitional S-1 anatomy and in a case with normal S-1 anatomy. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/Sj21lk13_aw . PMID:27364429

  12. Combining of small fragment screws and large fragment plates for open reduction and internal fixation of periprosthetic humeral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Seybold, Dominik; Citak, Mustafa; Königshausen, Matthias; Gessmann, Jan; Schildhauer, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Operative treatment of periprosthetic humeral fractures in elderly patients with osteoporotic bone requires a stable fixations technique. The combination of 3.5 cortical screws with washers in a 4.5 Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen, Limited-contact dynamic compression plate or Locking plate, allows a stable periprosthetic fixation with the small 3.5 screws and 4.5 screws above and below the prosthesis, respectively. This combination is a cost-effective technique to treat periprosthetic humeral fractures. PMID:22223961

  13. Combined Percutaneous Iliosacral Screw Fixation With Sacroplasty Using Resorbable Calcium Phosphate Cement for Osteoporotic Pelvic Fractures Requiring Surgery.

    PubMed

    Collinge, Cory A; Crist, Brett D

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporotic sacral fractures, including acute and chronic insufficiency fractures, are increasing in frequency and present a number of management problem. Many of these patients are treated nonoperatively with relative immobility (eg, bedrest, wheelchair, or weight-bearing restrictions) and analgesics, which likely make the osteoporotic component worse. Surgery in this patient population may be desirable in some cases with the goals of improving mobility, relieving pain, and healing in an aligned position while minimizing deformity progression. However, internal fixation of the osteoporotic pelvis can be difficult. Large unicortical lag screws are the workhorse of posterior pelvic fixation, and yet fixation in cancellous bone corridors of an osteoporotic sacrum seems unlikely to achieve optimal fixation. As a result, the operative management and clinical results of these difficult injuries may not be uniformly successful. The authors present a technique for treating osteoporotic patients with a sacral fracture when operative treatment is indicated using percutaneous screw fixation combined with screw augmentation using a resorbable calcium phosphate bone substitute or "cement." The guide wire for a 7.3-mm or other large cannulated lag screw is fully inserted along the desired bony sacral corridor as is standard. The lag screw is then inserted over the wire to the depth where cement is desired. The guide wire is removed, and the aqueous calcium phosphate is injected through the screw's cannulation. For acute fractures, cement was applied to the areas distant to the fracture; whereas in insufficiency fractures, the cement was inserted along most of the screw path. The guide wire then can be reinserted and the lag screw fully inserted. The rationale for using these 2 modalities is their synergistic effect: the cannulated screw provides typical screw fixation and also a conduit for cement application. The cement augments the lag screw's purchase in osteoporotic bone

  14. Biomechanical Evaluation of Supplemental Percutaneous Lumbo-Sacro-iliac Screws For Spino-pelvic Fixation Following Total Sacrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Le, Vu H.; Heckmann, Nathanael; Jain, Nickul; Wang, Lawrence; Turner, Alexander W. L.; Lee, Thay Q.; Bederman, S. Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design This is a cadaveric biomechanical study evaluating the biomechanical properties of a novel spino-pelvic fixation technique with percutaneous lumbo-sacro-iliac (LSI) screws in an unstable total sacrectomy model. Objective To compare standard posterior dual rod spino-pelvic fixation alone with dual rod fixation supplemented with LSI screw fixation. Summary of Background Data Primary or metastatic tumors of the sacrum requiring a total sacrectomy can result in spino-pelvic instability if inadequate fixation is achieved. Many fixation techniques have been proposed to address this instability. However, to date, an optimal fixation technique has not been established. Methods Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric spino-pelvic specimens were randomized according to bone mineral density (BMD) to either posterior rod fixation (control group) or posterior rod fixation with supplemental LSI screws (LSI group). Following fixation, a total sacrectomy of each specimen was performed. Specimens where then potted and axially loaded in a caudal direction. Stiffness, yield load, energy absorbed at yield load, ultimate load, and energy absorbed at ultimate load were computed. A students t-test was used for statistical analysis with significance set at p<0.05. Results The average age and BMD were not significantly different between the control and LSI groups (age, p=0.255; BMD, p=0.810). After normalizing for BMD, there were no significant differences detected for any of the biomechanical parameters measured between the two fixation techniques: stiffness (p=0.857), yield load (p=0.219), energy at yield load (p=0.293), ultimate load (p=0.407), and energy at ultimate load (p=0.773). However, both fixation techniques were able to withstand physiological loads. Conclusions Our study did not demonstrate any biomechanical advantage for supplemental LSI screw fixation in our axial loading model. However, given the theoretical advantage of this percutaneous technique, further studies are

  15. C1-c2 pedicle screw fixation for treatment of old odontoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Li, Mu; Zhang, Shuai; Si, Haipeng; Xue, Jingsong

    2015-02-01

    Nonunion and C1-C2 instability of odontoid fractures usually result from delayed diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. However, the available treatment options for odontoid fractures remain controversial. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of internal screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle in cases of old odontoid fractures. This retrospective study included 21 patients with old odontoid fractures (13 men and 8 women; mean age, 46.5 years; range, 24-69 years). Internal screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle was performed in all patients. Fracture reduction and C1-C2 fusion were assessed with imaging. The neck pain visual analog scale score and cervical spinal cord functional Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (for those who had cervical spinal cord injury) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. Postoperative complications were recorded. Postoperative imaging showed that the C1-C2 dislocation was satisfactorily repositioned in all patients. Bone fusion was observed 1 year after surgery in all patients. No loosening or breaking of internal fixation occurred. The preoperative neck pain visual analog scale score was 5.9±1.5 and improved significantly to 1.8±0.8 after surgery (P<.001). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association score in patients with cervical spinal injury (n=14) was 9.2±1.9 and also significantly improved to 13.8±1.9 at the last follow-up examination (P<.001), with an average improvement rate of 61.0%. No iatrogenic vertebral artery injury or severe spinal cord injury occurred. Screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle was found to be an effective and safe surgical approach for the treatment of old odontoid fractures with C1-C2 dislocation or instability. PMID:25665108

  16. Minimally Invasive Mini Open Split-Muscular Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation of the Thoracolumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ulutaş, Murat; Seçer, Mehmet; Çelik, Suat Erol

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively assessed the feasibility and safety of a new percutaneous pedicle screw (PPS) fixation technique for instrumentation of the thoracic and lumbar spine in this study. All patients were operated in the prone position under general anesthesia. A 6 to 8 cm midline skin incision was made and wide subcutaneous dissection was performed. The paravertebral muscles were first dissected subperiosteally into the midline incision of the fascia for lumbar microdiscectomy with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cage implantation. After the secondary paramedian incisions on the fascia, the PPSs were inserted via cleavage of the multifidus muscles directly into the pedicles under fluoroscopy visualization. A total of 35 patients underwent surgery with this new surgical technique. The control group for operative time, blood loss and analgesic usage consisted of 35 randomly selected cases from our department. The control group underwent surgery via conventional pedicle screw instrumentation with paramedian fusion. All patients in the minimal invasive surgery series were ambulatory with minimal pain on the first postoperative day. The operation time and blood loss and the postoperative analgesic consumption were significantly less with this new technique. In conclusion, the minimal invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation technique is safe and feasible. It can be performed via a short midline skin incision and can also be combined with interbody fusion, causing minimal pain without severe muscle damage. PMID:25874062

  17. Effects of Lateral Mass Screw Rod Fixation to the Stability of Cervical Spine after Laminectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Ruwaida; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    There are many cases of injury in the cervical spine due to degenerative disorder, trauma or instability. This condition may produce pressure on the spinal cord or on the nerve coming from the spine. The aim of this study was, to analyze the stabilization of the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy via computational simulation. For that purpose, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the multilevel cervical spine segment (C1-C7) was developed using computed tomography (CT) data. There are various decompression techniques that can be applied to overcome the injury. Usually, decompression procedures will create an unstable spine. Therefore, in these situations, the spine is often surgically restabilized by using fusion and instrumentation. In this study, a lateral mass screw-rod fixation was created to stabilize the cervical spine after laminectomy. Material properties of the titanium alloy were assigned on the implants. The requirements moments and boundary conditions were applied on simulated implanted bone. Result showed that the bone without implant has a higher flexion and extension angle in comparison to the bone with implant under applied 1Nm moment. The bone without implant has maximum stress distribution at the vertebrae and ligaments. However, the bone with implant has maximum stress distribution at the screws and rods. Overall, the lateral mass screw-rod fixation provides stability to the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy.

  18. Minimally invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation of the thoracolumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Ulutaş, Murat; Seçer, Mehmet; Çelik, Suat Erol

    2015-03-01

    We prospectively assessed the feasibility and safety of a new percutaneous pedicle screw (PPS) fixation technique for instrumentation of the thoracic and lumbar spine in this study. All patients were operated in the prone position under general anesthesia. A 6 to 8 cm midline skin incision was made and wide subcutaneous dissection was performed. The paravertebral muscles were first dissected subperiosteally into the midline incision of the fascia for lumbar microdiscectomy with transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion cage implantation. After the secondary paramedian incisions on the fascia, the PPSs were inserted via cleavage of the multifidus muscles directly into the pedicles under fluoroscopy visualization. A total of 35 patients underwent surgery with this new surgical technique. The control group for operative time, blood loss and analgesic usage consisted of 35 randomly selected cases from our department. The control group underwent surgery via conventional pedicle screw instrumentation with paramedian fusion. All patients in the minimal invasive surgery series were ambulatory with minimal pain on the first postoperative day. The operation time and blood loss and the postoperative analgesic consumption were significantly less with this new technique. In conclusion, the minimal invasive mini open split-muscular percutaneous pedicle screw fixation technique is safe and feasible. It can be performed via a short midline skin incision and can also be combined with interbody fusion, causing minimal pain without severe muscle damage. PMID:25874062

  19. Lumbosacral fixation using the diagonal S2 screw for long fusion in degenerative lumbar deformity: technical note involving 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Park, Ye-Soo; Kim, Hong-Sik; Baek, Seung-Wook; Lee, Sang-Hyun

    2013-09-01

    Placing instrumentation into the ilium has been shown to increase the biomechanical stability and the fusion rates, but it has some disadvantages. The diagonal S2 screw technique is an attractive surgical procedure for degenerative lumbar deformity. Between 2008 and 2010, we carried out long fusion across the lumbosacral junction in 13 patients with a degenerative lumbar deformity using the diagonal S2 screws. In 12 of these 13 patients, the lumbosacral fusion was graded as solid fusion with obvious bridging bone (92%). One patient had a rod dislodge at one S2 screw and breakage of one S1 screw and underwent revision nine months postoperatively. So, we present alternative method of lumbopelvic fixation for long fusion in degenerative lumbar deformity using diagonal S2 screw instead of iliac screw.

  20. Delayed Union of a Sacral Fracture: Percutaneous Navigated Autologous Cancellous Bone Grafting and Screw Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Huegli, R. W. Messmer, P.; Jacob, A. L.; Regazzoni, P.; Styger, S.; Gross, T.

    2003-09-15

    Delayed or non-union of a sacral fracture is a serious clinical condition that may include chronic pain, sitting discomfort, gait disturbances, neurological problems, and inability to work. It is also a difficult reconstruction problem. Late correction of the deformity is technically more demanding than the primary treatment of acute pelvic injuries. Open reduction, internal fixation (ORIF), excision of scar tissue, and bone grafting often in a multi-step approach are considered to be the treatment of choice in delayed unions of the pelvic ring. This procedure implies the risk of neurological and vascular injuries, infection, repeated failure of union, incomplete correction of the deformity, and incomplete pain relief as the most important complications. We report a new approach for minimally invasive treatment of a delayed union of the sacrum without vertical displacement. A patient who suffered a Malgaigne fracture (Tile C1.3) was initially treated with closed reduction and percutaneous screw fixation (CRPF) of the posterior pelvic ring under CT navigation and plating of the anterior pelvic ring. Three months after surgery he presented with increasing hip pain caused by a delayed union of the sacral fracture. The lesion was successfully treated percutaneously in a single step procedure using CT navigation for drilling of the delayed union, autologous bone grafting, and screw fixation.

  1. Intermaxillary fixation screws versus Erich arch bars in mandibular fractures: A comparative study and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Ahtesham Ahmad; Reddy, Umesh K.; Warad, N. M.; Badal, Sheeraz; Jamadar, Amjad Ali; Qurishi, Nilofar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Various techniques have been employed from time to time to achieve maxillomamdibular fixation. Although arch bars provide an effective and versatile means of maxillomandibular fixation, their use is not without shortcomings. However the introduction of intermaxillary fixation screws (IMF) has eliminated many of these issues of arch bars. The aim of the present study was to compare the advantages and disadvantages of intermaxillary fixation screws over the Erich arch bars in mandibular fractures. Materials and Methods: Sixty dentulous patients who reported to Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Al-Ameen Dental College and Hospital, Bijapur with mandibular fractures and required intermaxillary fixation as a part of treatment plan followd by open reduction and internal fixation under GA were selected and randomly divided into 2 groups of 30 patients each that is Group A and Group B. Group A included patients who received intermaxillary fixation with Erich arch bars. Group B includes patients who received intermaxillary fixation with IMF Screws. The parameters compared in both the groups included, surgical time taken, gloves perforation, post-operative occlusion, IMF stability, oral hygiene, patient acceptance and comfort and non-vitality characteristics. Results: The average surgical time taken and gloves perforations were more in Group A,the patient acceptance and oral hygiene was better in Group B, there was not much statistically significant difference in postoperative occlusion and IMF stability in both groups. Accidental root perforation was the only limitation of IMF screws. Conclusion: Intermaxillary fixation with IMF screws is more efficacious compared to Erich arch bars in the treatment of mandibular fractures. PMID:27563602

  2. Balancing Rigidity and Safety of Pedicle Screw Fixation via a Novel Expansion Mechanism in a Severely Osteoporotic Model

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Thomas M.; Doulgeris, James J.; Gonzalez-Blohm, Sabrina A.; Lee, William E.; Vrionis, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    Many successful attempts to increase pullout strength of pedicle screws in osteoporotic bone have been accompanied with an increased risk of catastrophic damage to the patient. To avoid this, a single-armed expansive pedicle screw was designed to increase fixation strength while controlling postfailure damage away from the nerves surrounding the pedicle. The screw was then subsequently tested in two severely osteoporotic models: one representing trabecular bone (with and without the presence of polymethylmethacrylate) and the other representing a combination of trabecular and cortical bone. Maximum pullout strength, stiffness, energy to failure, energy to removal, and size of the resulting block damage were statistically compared among conditions. While expandable pedicle screws produced maximum pullout forces less than or comparable to standard screws, they required a higher amount of energy to be fully removed from both models. Furthermore, damage to the cortical layer in the composite test blocks was smaller in all measured directions for tests involving expandable pedicle screws than those involving standard pedicle screws. This indicates that while initial fixation may not differ in the presence of cortical bone, the expandable pedicle screw offers an increased level of postfailure stability and safety to patients awaiting revision surgery. PMID:25705655

  3. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Screw Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizari, Mahmoud; Wang, Bin; Snow, Martyn; Barrett, Mel

    2008-09-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental and finite element analysis of tibial screw fixation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The mechanical properties of the bone and tendon graft are obtained from experiments using porcine bone and bovine tendon. The results of the numerical study are compared with those from mechanical testing. Analysis shows that the model may be used to establish the optimum placement of the tunnel in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction by predicting mechanical parameters such as stress, strain and displacement at regions in the tunnel wall.

  4. A novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Wenhai; Xu, Hui; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Xin-Dong; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate a novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its potential use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation. Methods. We have used the reverse engineering software (image-processing software and computer-aided design software) to create the approximate and optimal digital interarticular channel of atlas for 60 participants. Angles of channels, diameters of inscribed circles, long and short axes of ellipses were measured and recorded, and gender-specific analysis was also performed. Results. The channels provided sufficient space for one or two screws, and the parameters of channels are described. While the channels of females were smaller than that of males, no significant difference of angles between males and females were observed. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates the radiological features of approximate digital interarticular channels, optimal digital interarticular channels of atlas, and provides the reference trajectory of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. Additionally, we provide a protocol that can help make a pre-operative plan for accurate placement of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. PMID:26925345

  5. Improving fixation strength of pedicle screw by microarc oxidation treatment: an experimental study of osteoporotic spine in sheep.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Zheng; Wu, Zi-xiang; Liu, Da; Gao, Ming-xuan; Chen, Huan; Fu, Suo-chao; Lei, Wei

    2012-08-01

    Failure of fixation caused by loosening of pedicle screws in osteoporosis is a problem in spinal surgery. We compared the in vivo fixation strength between pedicle screws treated with microarc oxidation (MAO) and untreated screws in an osteoporotic model of ovariectomized sheep. The MAO treated and untreated screws were placed in lumbar vertebral bodies. After 3 months of implantation, biomechanical tests, micro-CT analysis, and histological observations were conducted to examine the performance of the two groups. At time 0, no significant difference was found between the two groups in biomechanical tests (p > 0.05); 3 months later, higher pull-out strength and load with less displacement were detected in the MAO-treated group (p < 0.05). Micro-CT analysis showed that the tissue mineral density, bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, and trabecular number in the MAO-treated group were all higher than those in untreated group (p < 0.05), and trabecular spacing was smaller (p < 0.05). Histologically, the bone-implant interface in the MAO-treated group was better than that in untreated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, pedicle screws with a bioactive surface treated by MAO can improve screw fixation strength in osteoporotic spines in sheep.

  6. Ipsilateral Intracapsular Hip Fracture 2 Years after Fixation of Extracapsular Fracture by Dynamic Hip Screw

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Farhan; Nunag, Perrico; Mustafa, Abubakar; Pillai, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sustaining an intracapsular fracture in a hip which was previously fixed with dynamic hip screw for extracapsular fracture, is a very rarely reported occurrence. We present one such case in order to discuss the presentation and management of this fracture. We have also reviewed the literature and pooled the previously reported cases to look at potential cause & risk factors. Case Report: A 92 year old female, presented with new onset hip pain following a trivial injury. Couple of years back, she had sustained an extracapsular fracture on same side which was treated by DHS fixation. Further investigations confirmed a de-novo fracture which was treated by removal of DHS and cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty. Conclusion: This complication might not be as rare as earlier thought to be. All patients, especially elderly females who present with new onset hip pain following DHS fixation of their hip fracture previously must be evaluated for a de-novo intracapsular fracture. On confirmation of diagnosis, they can be treated by removal of dynamic hip screw and hemiarthroplasty as most of these are low demand elderly patients. PMID:27299034

  7. Odontoid balloon kyphoplasty associated with screw fixation for Type II fracture in 2 elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Terreaux, Luc; Loubersac, Thomas; Hamel, Olivier; Bord, Eric; Robert, Roger; Buffenoir, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Anterior screw fixation is a well-recognized technique that is used to stabilize Type IIB fractures of the odontoid process in the elderly. However, advanced age and osteoporosis are 2 risk factors for pseudarthrosis. Kyphoplasty has been described in the treatment of lytic lesions in C-2. The authors decided to combine these 2 techniques in the treatment of unstable fractures of the odontoid. Two approximately 90-year-old patients were treated for this type of fracture. Instability was demonstrated on dynamic radiography in one patient, and the fracture was seen on static radiography in the other. Clinical parameters, pain, range of motion, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) score (for the first patient), and radiological examinations (CT scans and dynamic radiographs) were studied both before and after surgery. After inflating the balloon both above and below the fracture line, the authors applied a high-viscosity polymethylmethacrylate cement. Some minor leakage of cement was noted in both cases but proved to be harmless. The screws were correctly positioned. The clinical result was excellent, both in terms of pain relief and in the fact that there was no reduction in the SF-36 score. The range of motion remained the same. A follow-up CT scan obtained 1 year later in one of the patients showed no evidence of change in the materials used, and the dynamic radiographs showed no instability. This combination of kyphoplasty and anterior screw fixation of the odontoid seems to be an interesting technique in osteoporotic Type IIB fractures of the odontoid process in the elderly, with good results both clinically and radiologically.

  8. Arthroscopic Fixation of Comminuted Glenoid Fractures Using Cannulated Screws and Suture Anchors

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Feng; Yuan, Bangtuo; Qi, Wei; Li, Chunbao; Shen, Xuezhen; Guo, Qi; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Jiangtao; Li, Hongliang; Lu, Xi; Liu, Yujie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We investigate the feasibility of arthroscopic fixation of comminuted glenoid fractures using cannulated screws and suture anchors. We retrospectively review 11 cases of closed comminuted glenoid fractures treated at our institution from August 2010 to May 2013. The 11 patients, 8 males and 3 females, had a mean age of 41 years (range: 27–55 years). The mechanisms of injury were traffic accidents in 9 cases and falls from height in 2 cases. The mean time from injury to surgery was 12 days (range: 3–28 days). All glenoid fractures were confirmed on x-ray and computed tomography. The major fracture fragments were fixed with cannulated screws and the small fragments were fixed with suture anchors. All surgical wounds healed with primary closure and no complications including infection and neurovascular damage were observed. All 11 patients were followed up for a mean of 21 months (range: 14–29 months). Bone union was achieved in all patients with a mean time of 10 months. At the last follow-up, range of motion of the shoulder joint was significantly improved (P < 0.05). Both ASES scores (41.4 ± 24.9, 87.3 ± 13.8) and Rowe scores (28.2 ± 18.6, 93.2 ± 11.2) were significantly increased after the surgery (P < 0.01), indicating significantly improved function and stability of the shoulder joint. Arthroscopic fixation using cannulated screws and suture anchors is feasible for the treatment of comminuted glenoid fractures. This method is minimally invasive and provides good functional recovery with a lower risk of complications. PMID:26656324

  9. Biomechanical Comparison Between Bashti Bone Plug Technique and Biodegradable Screw for Fixation of Grafts in Ligament surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashti, Kaveh; Tahmasebi, Mohammad N; Kaseb, Hasan; Farahmand, Farzam; Akbar, Mohammad; Mobini, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ligament reconstruction is a common procedure in orthopedic surgery. Although several popular techniques are currently in use, new methods are proposed for secure fixation of the tendon graft into the bone tunnel. Purposes: We sought to introduce our new technique of Bashti bone plug for fixation of soft tissue graft in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and to compare its biomechanical features with conventional absorbable interference screw technique in a bovine model. Methods: Twenty pairs of bovine knees were harvested after death. Soft tissue was removed and the Achilles tendon was harvested to be used as an ACL graft. It was secured into the bone tunnel on the tibial side via two different methods: Bashti Bone Plug technique and conventional screw method. Biomechanical strength was measured using 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading on the graft. Pull out strength was also tested until the graft fails. Results: No graft failure was observed after 200 N and 300 N cyclic loading in either fixation methods. When testing for pull out failure, 21 tendons (53%) were torn and 19 tendons (48%) slipped out. No fixation failure occurred, which did not reveal a significant difference between the bone plug or interference screw group (P=0.11). The mean pull out force until failure of the graft was 496±66 N in the screw group and 503±67 N in the bone plug group (P=0.76). Conclusions: Our suggested fixation technique of Bashti bone plug is a native, cheap, and feasible method that provides comparable biomechanical strength with interference screw when soft tissue fixation was attempted in bovine model. PMID:25692166

  10. Enhanced Lapidus arthrodesis: crossed screw technique with middle cuneiform fixation further reduces sagittal mobility.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Berlet, Gregory C; Hyer, Christopher F

    2015-01-01

    Persistent medial column sagittal mobility can be encountered despite successful first tarsometatarsal stabilization if fixation has been limited to the first tarsometatarsal joint. The purpose of the present cadaveric research was to quantify the effect of a third point of fixation from the base of the first metatarsal to the middle cuneiform compared with the traditional isolated first tarsometatarsal fixation. Ten matched pairs of below-the-knee specimens, with a known cause of death, sex, ethnicity, and age, height, weight, and body mass index at death, were used for our examination. Portable fluoroscopy aided with the accurate placement of all points of fixation. Measurements of movement were obtained using the validated Klaue device. The 20 matched below-the-knee specimens were from 10 cadavers (2 female and 8 male donors, aged 72.8 ± 9.3 years, body mass index 21.1 ± 4.2 kg/m(2)). The sagittal plane motion of the first ray was 7.45 ± 1.82 mm before fixation. With isolated first tarsometatarsal fixation, the sagittal motion decreased to 4.41 ± 1.51 mm and decreased further to 3.12 ± 1.06 mm, with the addition of middle cuneiform fixation. Statistically significant enhancement of the stability of sagittal first ray motion was noted with the addition of the first metatarsal to middle cuneiform pin, even after simulated Lapidus fixation. Our findings suggest that first metatarsal to middle cuneiform fixation can be beneficial if excessive sagittal motion is present after standard 2-point fixation and can play a role in the prevention of recurrence and complications. PMID:25456344

  11. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with transpedicular screw/rod fixation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Hou, Tiesheng; Wang, Xinwei; Ma, Shengzhong

    2003-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using threaded cages has gained wide popularity for lumbosacral spinal disease. Our biomechanical tests showed that PLIF using a single diagonal cage with unilateral facetectomy does add a little to spinal stability and provides equal or even higher postoperative stability than PLIF using two posterior cages with bilateral facetectomy. Studies also demonstrated that cages placed using a posterior approach did not cause the same increase in spinal stiffness seen with pedicle screw instrumentation, and we concluded that cages should not be used posteriorly without other forms of fixation. On the other hand, placement of two cages using a posterior approach does have the disadvantage of risk to the bilateral nerve roots. We therefore performed a prospective study to determine whether PLIF can be accomplished by utilizing a single diagonal fusion cage with the application of supplemental transpedicular screw/rod instrumentation. Twenty-seven patients underwent a PLIF using one single fusion cage (BAK, Sulzer Spine-Tech, Minneapolis, MN, USA) inserted posterolaterally and oriented anteromedially on the symptomatic side with unilateral facetectomy and at the same level supplemental fixation with a transpedicular screw/rod system. The internal fixation systems included 12 SOCON spinal systems (Aesculap AG, Germany) and 15 TSRH spinal systems (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, USA). The inclusion criteria were grade 1 to 2 lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis, lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and recurrent lumbar disc herniations with instability. Patients had at least 1 year of low back pain and/or unilateral sciatica and a severely restricted functional ability in individuals aged 28-55 years. Patients with more than grade 2 spondylolisthesis or adjacent-level degeneration were excluded from the study. Patients were clinically assessed prior to surgery by an independent assessor; they were then reassessed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24

  12. Trans-sacral screw fixation in the treatment of high dyplastic developmental spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Alessandro; Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Tarantino, Roberto; Delfini, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of a 67-year-old woman with L5-S1 ontogenetic spondylolisthesis treated with pedicle fixation associated with interbody arthrodesis performed with S1-L5 trans-sacral screwing according to the technique of Bartolozzi. The procedure was followed by a wide decompressive laminectomy. The patient had a progressive improvement of the symptoms which gradually disappeared in 12 mo. The radiograph at 6 and 12 mo showed complete fusion system. The choice of treatment in L5-S1 ontogenetic spondylolithesis is related to a correct clinical and diagnostic planning (X-ray, computer tomography magnetic resonance imaging, Measurement). In particular, the severity index and the square of unstable zone, and the standard measurements already described in the literature, are important to understand and to plane the correct surgical strategy, that require, in most of the times, fusion and interbody artrodesis. PMID:24303480

  13. Trans-sacral screw fixation in the treatment of high dyplastic developmental spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Landi, Alessandro; Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Tarantino, Roberto; Delfini, Roberto

    2013-06-16

    We describe the case of a 67-year-old woman with L5-S1 ontogenetic spondylolisthesis treated with pedicle fixation associated with interbody arthrodesis performed with S1-L5 trans-sacral screwing according to the technique of Bartolozzi. The procedure was followed by a wide decompressive laminectomy. The patient had a progressive improvement of the symptoms which gradually disappeared in 12 mo. The radiograph at 6 and 12 mo showed complete fusion system. The choice of treatment in L5-S1 ontogenetic spondylolithesis is related to a correct clinical and diagnostic planning (X-ray, computer tomography magnetic resonance imaging, Measurement). In particular, the severity index and the square of unstable zone, and the standard measurements already described in the literature, are important to understand and to plane the correct surgical strategy, that require, in most of the times, fusion and interbody artrodesis.

  14. Polymer cable/grip-plate system with locking screws for stable fixation to promote healing of trochanteric osteotomies or fractures in revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berend, Keith R; Willen, Jacob L; Morris, Michael J; Adams, Joanne B; Lombardi, Adolph V

    2014-11-01

    Multiple methods have been proposed to establish stable fixation to promote healing of trochanteric osteotomies or fractures in revision total hip arthroplasty (revTHA), from wiring techniques through cable-plate systems with or without supplemental locking screws. The purpose of this study is to report the clinical results of a single cable-plate system with locked screw fixation in revTHA. Between 2009 and 2012, 27 grip-plates (Supercable® System, Kinamed Inc., Camarillo, CA) were used in 26 patients in 27 revTHA procedures. Utilization was 12 1-hole (50 mm) grip-plates, 10 2-hole (135 mm) grip-plates, four 4-hole (190 mm) grip-plates, and one 6-hole (245 mm) grip-plate. There were 14 women and 12 men. Age averaged 63.2 years and BMI averaged 29.4 kg/m2. At average 2.5 year follow-up, grip-plate fixation was considered successful in 22 hips (81%) with five failures. Three failures consisted of 50 mm/short grip-plates used in one trochanteric slide, and two intraoperative trochanteric fractures during revTHA. The two additional failures were related to pre-revision trochanteric avulsion from bony necrosis of the proximal femur. An additional three grip-plates were removed electively for soft-tissue irritation and pain but with successful fixation and bony healing. Thus 70% of hips were free of reoperation related to the grip-plate. All other hips had successful fixation and the grip-plate was not symptomatic. In this study, the cable-grip system and isoelastic Supercables provided reliable fixation for adequate healing of difficult ETO and trochanteric fractures with an 81% rate of mechanical success with radiographic and clinical healing observed.

  15. The effect of screws and pegs on the initial fixation stability of an uncemented unicondylar knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A D; Whiteside, L A

    1990-10-01

    Two uncemented unicompartmental tibial components were examined for initial fixation stability. A conventional design that employed a single posteriorly angled peg was compared with a new design that was held in place by cancellous bone screws. The components were implanted into the medial condyles of 12 preserved human tibiae, and a cyclic load was first applied anteromedially and then posteromedially. The screwed implants failed at significantly higher loads (1634.8 +/- 121.6 N, mean +/- standard error of the mean) than the pegged implants (1103.3 +/- 152.0 N). On application of a 19.6-N preload, the screwed implants moved significantly less than the pegged implants. Although the differences in micromotion and subsidence were not always significant, there were definite trends. The screwed implants had much lower levels of temporary and permanent displacement compared with the pegged implants for all load levels from the initial load of 245.2 N up to and including the failure load. When the motion that resulted from moving the load from the anterior position to the posterior position was examined, the screwed implant's average total motion was less than 10 microns compared with almost 135 microns for the pegged implant after the 245.2-N load cycle. For the cycle before failure, the screwed implant's average motion increased to less than 29 microns, whereas the pegged implant's average total motion was almost 354 microns. From this information it appears clear that screws provide better initial fixation stability than angled pegs for uncemented unicondylar tibial components. PMID:2208852

  16. Clinical outcome of posterior C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation and fusion for atlantoaxial instability: A retrospective study of 86 patients.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yonghong; Hao, Dingjun; Wang, Biao; He, Baorong; Hu, Huimin; Zhang, Haiping

    2016-10-01

    We retrospectively studied the clinical results of posterior C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation and fusion for 86 patients diagnosed with atlantoaxial instability from January 2002 to January 2013. The study population included 48 men and 38 women, with an average age of 42.6 (range, 16-69years old). The causes of atlantoaxial instability could be divided into traumatic fracture (44 patients), congenital malformation (17 patients), rheumatoid arthritis (15 patients), and other causes (nine patients). The mean follow-up duration was 33.9months (range, 13-72months). The average operative time was 133.0min (range, 90-290min), and the mean blood loss during the operation was 185.7ml (range, 110-750ml). No patient experienced neurological function worsening related to the surgical procedure. In addition, 63% of the patients who presented with neurological symptoms reported improvement after surgery. Screw placement and reduction was achieved satisfactorily in all the patients and their neck pain was greatly relieved. Plain radiography and CT scans indicated solid fusion after 12months in all the patients. We suggest that C1-C2 pedicle screw internal fixation is a reliable method for treating atlantoaxial instability. PMID:27544229

  17. Posterior Wall Blowout During Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Suspensory Cortical Fixation With a Screw and Washer Post.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Justin J; Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Menge, Travis J; Vap, Alexander R; Cram, Tyler R; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Posterior wall blowout can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This loss of osseous containment can cause difficulty with graft fixation and can potentially lead to early graft failure if unrecognized and left untreated. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the local anatomy and surgical salvage options is paramount to ensure positive patient outcomes. This article highlights our preferred salvage technique using suspensory cortical fixation with a screw and washer construct. PMID:27656377

  18. Biomechanical stability of a volar locking-screw plate versus fragment-specific fixation in a distal radius fracture model.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Ellis O; Segalman, Keith A; Parks, Brent G; Sharma, Krishna M; Nguyen, Augustine

    2007-04-01

    Eight matched pairs of cadaveric radii were osteotomized by removing a 4-mm dorsal wedge of bone at the level of the sigmoid notch designed to simulate dorsal comminution. They were then fixed with either a volar locking-screw plate or fragment-specific fixation. All constructs underwent biomechanical testing in a custom-designed, custom-fabricated 4-point bending device. No statistically significant difference in stiffness was noted between the groups. Linear displacement and angulation at the osteotomy site were significantly less in the group with fragment-specific fixation at loads expected to be encountered during postoperative rehabilitation. Angulation at the osteotomy site was significantly less in the locking-screw plate group at higher loads.

  19. Percutaneous Facet Screw Fixation in the Treatment of Symptomatic Recurrent Lumbar Facet Joint Cyst: A New Technique.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Gallo, Giacomo; Bertrand, Anne-Sophie; Bard, Robert L; Kelekis, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of percutaneous treatment of symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst resistant to all medical treatments including facet joint steroid injection. Percutaneous transfacet fixation was then performed at L4-L5 level with a cannulated screw using CT and fluoroscopy guidance. The procedure time was 30 min. Using the visual analog scale (VAS), pain decreased from 9.5, preoperatively, to 0 after the procedure. At 6-month follow-up, an asymptomatic cystic recurrence was observed, which further reduced at the 1-year follow-up. Pain remained stable (VAS at 0) during all follow-ups. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous cyst rupture associated with facet screw fixation could be an alternative to surgery in patients suffering from a symptomatic recurrent lumbar facet joint cyst.

  20. Treatment of Unstable Posterior Pelvic Ring Fracture with Pedicle Screw-Rod Fixator Versus Locking Compression Plate: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Chun; Wang, Qiugen; Nagelli, Christopher; Wu, Jianhong; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the clinical results of treatment for unstable posterior pelvic fractures using a pedicle screw-rod fixator compared to use of a locking compression plate. Material/Methods A retrospective study was performed between June 2010 and May 2014 and the data were collected from 46 patients with unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures. All patients were treated using either a pedicle screw-rod fixator (study group, 24 patients) or locking compression plate (control group, 22 patients). In these patients, causes of injury included traffic accidents (n=27), fall from height (n=12), and crushing accidents (n=7). The quality of reduction and radiological grading were assessed. Clinical assessments included the operation time, times of X-ray exposures, bleeding volume during operation, incision length, and Majeed postoperative functional evaluation. Results No iatrogenic neurovascular injuries occurred during the operations in these 2 groups. The average follow-up time was 24.5 months. All fractures were healed. The significant differences (P<0.05) between the 2 groups were operation duration, size of incision, and intraoperative bleeding volume. Statistically significant differences in the Majeed postoperative functional evaluation and times of X-ray exposures were not found between the 2 groups. Conclusions Similar clinical effects were achieved in treating the posterior pelvic ring fractures using the pedicle screw-rod fixator and the locking compression plate. However, the pedicle screw-rod fixator has the advantages of smaller incision, shorter duration of the operation, and less bleeding volume compared to using the locking compression plate. PMID:27748355

  1. A comparative study of pedicle screw fixation in dorsolumbar spine by freehand versus image-assisted technique: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Archit; Chauhan, Vijendra; Singh, Deepa; Shailendra, Raghuvanshi; Maheshwari, Rajesh; Juyal, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Background: New and expensive technology such as three-dimensional computer assisted surgery is being used for pedicle screw fixation in dorsolumbar spine. Their availability, expenses and amount of radiation exposure are issues in a developing country. On the contrary, freehand technique of pedicle screw placement utilizes anatomic landmarks and tactile palpation without fluoroscopy or navigation to place pedicle screws. The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare the accuracy of freehand and image-assisted technique to place pedicle screws in the dorsolumbar spine of cadavers by an experienced surgeon and a resident. Evaluation was done using dissection of pedicle and computed tomography (CT) imaging. Materials and Methods: Ten cadaveric dorsolumbar spines were exposed by a posterior approach. Titanium pedicle screws were inserted from D5 to L5 vertebrae by freehand and image-assisted technique on either side by an experienced surgeon and a resident. CT was obtained. A blinded radiologist reviewed the imaging. The spines were then dissected to do a macroscopic examination. Screws, having evidence of cortical perforation of more than 2 mm on CT, were considered to be a significant breach. Results: A total of 260 pedicle screws were placed. The surgeon and the resident placed 130 screws each. Out of 130 screws, both of them placed 65 screws each by freehand and image- assisted technique each. The resident had a rate of 7.69% significant medial and 10.76% significant lateral breach with freehand technique while with image-assisted had a rate of 3.07% significant medial and 9.23% significant lateral breach. The expert surgeon had a rate of 6.15% significant medial and 1.53% significant lateral breach with freehand technique while with image-assisted had a rate of 3.07% significant medial and 6.15% significant lateral breach on CT evaluation. Conclusion: Freehand technique is as good as the image-assisted technique. Under appropriate supervision, residents

  2. When Planning Screw Fracture Fixation Why the 5.5 mm Screw is the Goldilocks Screw. An Observational Computer Tomographic Study of Fifth Metatarsal Bone Anatomy in a Sample of Patients.

    PubMed

    Iselin, Lukas D; Ramawat, Sunil; Hanratty, Brian; Klammer, Georg; Stavrou, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We wanted to verify our clinical experience that the 5.5 mm screw was ideal in the majority of fifth metatarsal fracture fixation. The size of a screw is important for the successful surgical treatment of these fractures in order to obtain the maximal stability while reducing the risk for iatrogenic fracture.A sample of patients undergoing computer tomographic imaging of the foot for investigation other than fifth metatarsal pathology were recruited. The parameters of the fifth metatarsal bone anatomy were measured.These parameters of the 5.5 mm screw were correlated with this data. The upper parameter (the diameter of the threads) was 5.5 and the lower parameter (the diameter of the shank) was 4.0 mm.Twenty seven patients were recruited.The proximal third internal diameter ranged from 3.6 to 7.0 mm with a mean of 5.0 mm. 93% of the metatarsals could easily accommodate the 5.5 mm screw. Two of the metatarsals had an internal diameter of < 4 mm (7%).It is our belief that the 5.5 mm screw may be used safely in the majority of patients with fifth metatarsal fractures.

  3. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation with Polymethylmethacrylate Augmentation for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Intravertebral Pseudoarthrosis Associated with Kummell's Osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeun-Sung; Heo, Dong-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of short-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture with osteonecrosis. Methods. Osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fractures with avascular necrosis were treated by short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation. Eighteen were followed up for more than 2 years. The kyphotic angle, compression ratio, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were analyzed. In addition, radiologic and clinical parameters of PPF group were compared with percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) group. Results. Vertebral height and kyphotic angle of the compressed vertebral bodies were significantly corrected after the operation (P < 0.05). Further, restored vertebral height was maintained during the 2 or more years of postoperative follow-up. Compared to the PVP group the postoperative compression ratio and kyphotic angle were significantly lower in the PPF group (P < 0.05). The postoperative ODI and VAS of the PVP group were significantly higher than the PPF (P < 0.05). Conclusions. According to our results, short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation may be an effective minimally invasive treatment for osteoporosis in cases of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with Kummell's osteonecrosis. PMID:27595101

  4. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation with Polymethylmethacrylate Augmentation for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Intravertebral Pseudoarthrosis Associated with Kummell's Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of short-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture with osteonecrosis. Methods. Osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fractures with avascular necrosis were treated by short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation. Eighteen were followed up for more than 2 years. The kyphotic angle, compression ratio, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were analyzed. In addition, radiologic and clinical parameters of PPF group were compared with percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) group. Results. Vertebral height and kyphotic angle of the compressed vertebral bodies were significantly corrected after the operation (P < 0.05). Further, restored vertebral height was maintained during the 2 or more years of postoperative follow-up. Compared to the PVP group the postoperative compression ratio and kyphotic angle were significantly lower in the PPF group (P < 0.05). The postoperative ODI and VAS of the PVP group were significantly higher than the PPF (P < 0.05). Conclusions. According to our results, short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation may be an effective minimally invasive treatment for osteoporosis in cases of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with Kummell's osteonecrosis.

  5. Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Fixation with Polymethylmethacrylate Augmentation for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Intravertebral Pseudoarthrosis Associated with Kummell's Osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of short-segment percutaneous pedicle screw fixation with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation for the treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fracture with osteonecrosis. Methods. Osteoporotic thoracolumbar compression fractures with avascular necrosis were treated by short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation. Eighteen were followed up for more than 2 years. The kyphotic angle, compression ratio, visual analog scale (VAS) score for back pain, and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were analyzed. In addition, radiologic and clinical parameters of PPF group were compared with percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) group. Results. Vertebral height and kyphotic angle of the compressed vertebral bodies were significantly corrected after the operation (P < 0.05). Further, restored vertebral height was maintained during the 2 or more years of postoperative follow-up. Compared to the PVP group the postoperative compression ratio and kyphotic angle were significantly lower in the PPF group (P < 0.05). The postoperative ODI and VAS of the PVP group were significantly higher than the PPF (P < 0.05). Conclusions. According to our results, short-segment PPF with PMMA augmentation may be an effective minimally invasive treatment for osteoporosis in cases of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with Kummell's osteonecrosis. PMID:27595101

  6. Is Loss of Fixation Following Locked Plating of Proximal Humeral Fractures Related to the Number of Screws and Their Positions in the Humeral Head?

    PubMed Central

    Maddah, Mohammad; Prall, Wolf C.; Geyer, Lucas; Wirth, Stefan; Mutschler, Wolf; Ockert, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between the chosen position of screws and the complications observed in patients who underwent locked plating of proximal humeral fractures. We evaluated radiographs of 367 patients treated by locked-plating for proximal humeral fractures. Radiographs were taken at one day, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months after surgery, and were analyzed for secondary fracture displacement, loss of fixation, cutting out of screws and necrosis of the humeral head. Secondary loss of fixation occurred in 58 cases (15.8%) and among those cutting out of screws was observed in 25 cases (6.8%). In cases of secondary loss of fixation a mean of 6.7 screws were used to fix the fracture (vs 6.6, P=0.425). There was neither significant correlation between position of screws and the occurrence of postoperative loss of fixation in Spearman correlation nor relationship from backward logistic regression analysis. Loss of fixation following locked plating of proximal humeral fractures does not relate to the number of screws and their positions in the humeral head. In consequence, anatomic fracture reduction and restoration of the humeral head-shaft angle are still important factors and should not be disregarded. PMID:25002940

  7. The biomechanical advantages of bilateral lumbo-iliac fixation in unilateral comminuted sacral fractures without sacroiliac screw safe channel

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenhao; Zhou, Dongsheng; He, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics between bilateral and unilateral lumbo-iliac fixation in unilateral comminuted sacral fractures (USF) by finite element analysis. Methods: A 3-dimensional finite element model of unilateral sacral fractures was simulated. Three kinds of implants were instrumented into the model, including the unilateral lumbopelvic fixation (ULF), bilateral lumbopelvic fixation (BLF), and unilateral iliac fixation with bilateral lumbar pedicle screws (UBF). Loads of compression and rotation were distributed to the superior endplate of L3. To evaluate the biomechanical properties, the construct stiffness, the micromotion of the fractures, the stress distribution of implants, and the balance of hemilumbar vertebra are recorded and analyzed. Results: The highest construct stiffness was provided by BLF. In BLF model, the displacement between iliums was only 0.009 mm (compressional) and 0.001 mm (rotational), which was less than that under normal condition (0.02 mm). The maximum von Misses stress of implants appeared on the UBF. By using unilateral fixation, the L4 endured obvious imbalance on bilateral hemivertebra. A marked difference was exposed in BLF and UBF models, and the equilibrium of stress and activity was shown. Conclusion: From the finite element view, the stability of ULF is insufficient to reconstruct the posterior pelvic ring. Furthermore, the unilateral fixation may lead to imbalance of lumbar vertebra and pelvis. On the contrary, the BLF can provide satisfied stability and lumbar balance. PMID:27749563

  8. CT-based morphometric analysis of C1 laminar dimensions: C1 translaminar screw fixation is a feasible technique for salvage of atlantoaxial fusions

    PubMed Central

    Yew, Andrew; Lu, Derek; Lu, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Translaminar screw fixation has become an alternative in the fixation of the axial and subaxial cervical spine. We report utilization of this approach in the atlas as a salvage technique for atlantoaxial stabilization when C1 lateral mass screws are precluded. To assess the feasibility of translaminar fixation at the atlas, we have characterized the dimensions of the C1 lamina in the general adult population using computed tomography (CT)-based morphometry. Methods: A 46-year-old male with symptomatic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum underwent bilateral C1 and C2 translaminar screw/rod fixation as C1 lateral mass fixation was precluded by an anomalous vertebral artery. The follow-up evaluation 2½ years postoperatively revealed an asymptomatic patient without recurrent neck/shoulder pain or clinical signs of instability. To better assess the feasibility of utilizing this approach in the general population, we retrospectively analyzed 502 consecutive cervical CT scans performed over a 3-month period in patients aged over 18 years at a single institution. Measurements of C1 bicortical diameter, bilateral laminar length, height, and angulation were performed. Laminar and screw dimensions were compared to assess instrumentation feasibility. Results: Review of CT imaging found that 75.9% of C1 lamina had a sufficient bicortical diameter, and 63.7% of C1 lamina had sufficient height to accept bilateral translaminar screw placement. Conclusions: CT-based measurement of atlas morphology in the general population revealed that a majority of C1 lamina had sufficient dimensions to accept translaminar screw placement. Although these screws appear to be a feasible alternative when lateral mass screws are precluded, further research is required to determine if they provide comparable fixation strength versus traditional instrumentation methods. PMID:26005585

  9. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation: Comparison between Primary and Revision Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Moo Sung; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery with a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) is an important minimally invasive fusion technique for the lumbar spine. Lumbar spine reoperation is challenging and is thought to have greater complication risks. The purpose of this study was to compare MIS TLIF with unilateral screw fixation perioperative results between primary and revision surgeries. This was a prospective study that included 46 patients who underwent MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw. The patients were divided into two groups, primary and revision MIS TLIF, to compare perioperative results and complications. The two groups were similar in age, sex, and level of operation, and were not significantly different in the length of follow-up or clinical results. Although dural tears were more common with the revision group (primary 1; revision 4), operation time, blood loss, total perioperative complication, and fusion rates were not significantly different between the two groups. Both groups showed substantial improvements in VAS and ODI scores one year after surgical treatment. Revision MIS TLIF performed by an experienced surgeon does not necessarily increase the risk of perioperative complication compared with primary surgery. MIS TLIF with unilateral pedicle screw fixation is a valuable option for revision lumbar surgery. PMID:24949483

  10. Cervical anterior transpedicular screw fixation (ATPS)—Part II. Accuracy of manual insertion and pull-out strength of ATPS

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Fox, Michael; Martin, Hudelmaier; Forstner, Rosmarie; Augat, Peter; Penzkofer, Rainer; Pirich, Christian; Kässmann, H.; Resch, Herbert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction after multilevel decompression of the cervical spine, especially in the weakened osteoporotic, neoplastic or infectious spine often requires circumferential stabilization and fusion. To avoid the additional posterior surgery in these cases while increasing rigidity of anterior-only screw-plate constructs, the authors introduce the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility as well as its indications in a previous study in Part I of our project. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to assess the ex vivo accuracy of placing ATPS into the cervical vertebra as well as the biomechanical performance of ATPS in comparison to traditional vertebral body screws (VBS) in terms of pull-out strength (POS). Twenty-three ATPS were inserted alternately to two screws into the pedicles and vertebral bodies, respectively, of six cadaveric specimens from C3–T1. For insertion of ATPS, a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique was used. Pre- and post insertional CT-scans were used to assess accuracy of ATPS insertion in the axial and sagittal planes. A newly designed grading system and accuracy score were used to delineate accuracy of ATPS insertion. Following insertion of screws, 23 ATPS and 22 VBS were subjected to pull-out testing (POT). The bone mineral density (BMD) of each specimen was assessed prior to POT. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of correctly placed screws and non-critical pedicles breaches in axial plane was 78.3%, and 95.7% in sagittal plane. Hence, according to our definition of “critical” pedicle breach that exposes neurovascular structures at risk, 21.7% (n = 5) of all ATPS inserted showed a critical pedicle breach in axial plane. Notably, no critical pedicle perforation occurred at the C6 to T1 levels. Pull-out testing of ATPS and VBS revealed that pull-out resistance of ATPS was 2.5-fold that of VBS. Mean POS of 23 ATPS with a mean BMD of 0.566

  11. Intraoperative computed tomography navigation for transpedicular screw fixation to treat unstable thoracic and lumbar spine fractures: clinical analysis of a case series (CARE-compliant).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures.From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C.In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2-3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws.The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  12. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Liu, Zhong-Jun; Wang, Shao-Bo; Pan, Sheng-Fa; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Feng-Shan; Sun, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Although several studies report various treatment solutions for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy, long-term follow-up studies are very rare. None of the reported treatment solutions represent a gold standard for this disease owing to the small number of cases and lack of long-term follow-up. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation to treat cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy from a single center.This retrospective study included 15 patients (9 male patients and 6 female patients) with athetoid cerebral palsy who underwent laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation for cervical spondylotic myelopathy at our hospital between March 2006 and June 2010. Demographic variables, radiographic parameters, and pre- and postoperative clinical outcomes determined by the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and visual analog scale (VAS) scores were assessed.The mean follow-up time was 80.5 months. Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis (P = 0.02) and cervical lordosis (P = 0.04) were significantly correlated with lower preoperative modified JOA scores. The mean modified JOA scores increased from 7.97 preoperatively to 12.1 postoperatively (P < 0.01). The mean VAS score decreased from 5.30 to 3.13 (P < 0.01), and the mean NDI score decreased from 31.73 to 19.93 (P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis and recovery rate of the modified JOA score (P = 0.01).Developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis is significantly related to neurological function in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy. Laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fixation is an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic myelopathy in patients with athetoid cerebral palsy and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. PMID:27684879

  13. Scar due to skin incision for screw fixation through the transbuccal approach after sagittal split ramus osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Muto, Toshitaka

    2012-05-01

    Most rigid fixation techniques after sagittal split ramus osteotomies of the mandible involve the transbuccal approach. A skin incision in the cheek carries with it possible undesirable sequelae, such as noticeable scarring. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is scarring in the face after this technique. For screw insertion, a 5-mm stab incision was performed on 40 Japanese patients (20 men and 20 women) with class III occlusion. After surgery, gross examination (via the naked eyes) of the skin incision was performed monthly for 1 year by the same oral surgeon. In all cases, the skin incision had disappeared by 1 year after the surgery. PMID:22627425

  14. Biomechanical evaluation of lumbar pedicle screws in spondylolytic vertebrae: comparison of fixation strength between the traditional trajectory and a cortical bone trajectory.

    PubMed

    Matsukawa, Keitaro; Yato, Yoshiyuki; Imabayashi, Hideaki; Hosogane, Naobumi; Asazuma, Takashi; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In the management of isthmic spondylolisthesis, the pedicle screw system is widely accepted surgical strategy; however, there are few reports on the biomechanical behavior of pedicle screws in spondylolytic vertebrae. The purpose of the present study was to compare fixation strength between pedicle screws inserted through the traditional trajectory (TT) and those inserted through a cortical bone trajectory (CBT) in spondylolytic vertebrae by computational simulation. METHODS Finite element models of spondylolytic and normal vertebrae were created from CT scans of 17 patients with adult isthmic spondylolisthesis (mean age 54.6 years, 10 men and 7 women). Each vertebral model was implanted with pedicle screws using TT and CBT techniques and compared between two groups. First, fixation strength of a single screw was evaluated by measuring axial pullout strength. Next, vertebral fixation strength of a paired-screw construct was examined by applying forces simulating flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation to vertebrae. RESULTS Fixation strengths of TT screws showed a nonsignificant difference between the spondylolytic and the normal vertebrae (p = 0.31-0.81). Fixation strength of CBT screws in the spondylolytic vertebrae demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in pullout strength (21.4%, p < 0.01), flexion (44.1%, p < 0.01), extension (40.9%, p < 0.01), lateral bending (38.3%, p < 0.01), and axial rotation (28.1%, p < 0.05) compared with those in the normal vertebrae. In the spondylolytic vertebrae, no statistically significant difference was observed for pullout strength between TT and CBT (p = 0.90); however, the CBT construct showed lower vertebral fixation strength in flexion (39.0%, p < 0.01), extension (35.6%, p < 0.01), lateral bending (50.7%, p < 0.01), and axial rotation (59.3%, p < 0.01) compared with the TT construct. CONCLUSIONS CBT screws are less optimal for stabilizing the spondylolytic vertebra due to their lower

  15. 3D Mapping of Safe and Danger Zones in the Maxilla and Mandible for the Placement of Intermaxillary Fixation Screws

    PubMed Central

    Purmal, Kathiravan; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Pohchi, Abdullah; Abdul Razak, Noor Hayati

    2013-01-01

    Intermaxillary (IMF) screws feature several advantages over other devices used for intermaxillary fixation, but using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans to determine the safe and danger zones to place these devices for all patients can be expensive. This study aimed to determine the optimal interradicular and buccopalatal/buccolingual spaces for IMF screw placement in the maxilla and mandible. The CBCT volumetric data of 193 patients was used to generate transaxial slices between the second molar on the right to the second molar on the left in both arches. The mean interradicular and buccopalatal/buccolingual distances and standard deviation values were obtained at heights of 2, 5, 8 and 11 mm from the alveolar bone crest. An IMF screw with a diameter of 1.0 mm and length of 7 mm can be placed distal to the canines (2 - 11 mm from the alveolar crest) and less than 8 mm between the molars in the maxilla. In the mandible, the safest position is distal to the first premolar (more than 5 mm) and distal to the second premolar (more than 2 mm). There was a significant difference (p<0.05) between the right and left quadrants. The colour coding 3D template showed the safe and danger zones based on the mesiodistal, buccopalatal and buccolingual distances in the maxilla and mandible.The safest sites for IMF screw insertion in the maxilla were between the canines and first premolars and between the first and second molars. In the mandible, the safest sites were between the first and second premolars and between the second premolar and first molar. However, the IMF screw should not exceed 1.0 mm in diameter and 7 mm in length. PMID:24367643

  16. Posterior Titanium Screw Fixation without Debridement of Infected Tissue for the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spontaneous Pyogenic Spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Nasi, Davide; Nocchi, Niccolo; Di Rienzo, Alessandro; di Somma, Lucia; Colasanti, Roberto; Vaira, Carmela; Benigni, Roberta; Liverotti, Valentina; Scerrati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose The aim of our study was to analyze the safety and effectiveness of posterior pedicle screw fixation for treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis (PSD) without formal debridement of the infected tissue. Overview of Literature Posterior titanium screw fixation without formal debridement of the infected tissue and anterior column reconstruction for the treatment of PSD is still controversial. Methods From March 2008 to June 2013, 18 patients with PSD underwent posterior titanium fixation with or without decompression, according to their neurological deficit. Postero-lateral fusion with allograft transplantation alone or bone graft with both the allogenic bone and the autologous bone was also performed. The outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and the Frankel grading system for neurological status. Normalization both of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was adopted as criterion for discontinuation of antibiotic therapy and infection healing. Segmental instability and fusion were also analyzed. Results At the mean follow-up time of 30.16 months (range, 24–53 months), resolution of spinal infection was achieved in all patients. The mean CRP before surgery was 14.32±7.9 mg/dL, and at the final follow-up, the mean CRP decreased to 0.5±0.33 mg/dL (p <0.005). Follow-up computed tomography scan at 12 months after surgery revealed solid fusion in all patients. The VAS before surgery was 9.16±1.29 and at the final follow-up, it improved to 1.38±2.03, which was statistically significant (p <0.05). Eleven patients out of eighteen (61.11%) with initial neurological impairment had an average improvement of 1.27 grades at the final follow-up documented with the Frankel grading system. Conclusions Posterior screw fixation with titanium instrumentation was safe and effective in terms of stability and restoration of neurological impairment. Fixation also rapidly reduced back pain

  17. Biomechanical testing of titanium self-tapping versus pretapped lag screw fixation of spiral metacarpal fractures.

    PubMed

    Prevel, C D; Morgan, R; Molnar, J; Eppley, B L; Moore, K

    1996-07-01

    Biomechanical tests of torsional loading and cantilevered bending were used to study the effects of varying screw size design of five different titanium miniscrews and microscrews in a metacarpal spiral oblique fracture model. Sixty-six fresh frozen human cadaveric metacarpal bones were subjected to torsional loading until failure, producing a spiral oblique fracture. The randomized fractured metacarpal bones were then repaired utilizing two 1.2-mm, 1.7-mm, or 2.3-mm self-tapping Leibinger lag screws; and 1.5-mm or 2.0-mm pretapped Synthes lag screws. Following repair, the specimens were then subjected to cantilevered bending or torsional loading. Failure torque and bending loads were then used to calculate failure stresses at the midshaft for torsional loading or at the proximal screw for cantilevered bending. Analysis of variance statistical analysis revealed that within the cortical thickness of bone studied, no significant difference in shear stress or axial stress was observed with increasing screw diameter and screw design. PMID:8826590

  18. Correlation Between Residual Displacement and Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head Following Cannulated Screw Fixation of Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Xu, Gui-Jun; Han, Zhe; Jiang, Xuan; Zhang, Cheng-Bao; Dong, Qiang; Ma, Jian-Xiong; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to introduce a new method for measuring the residual displacement of the femoral head after internal fixation and explore the relationship between residual displacement and osteonecrosis with femoral head, and to evaluate the risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with femoral neck fractures treated by closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw fixation. One hundred and fifty patients who sustained intracapsular femoral neck fractures between January 2011 and April 2013 were enrolled in the study. All were treated with closed reduction and percutaneous cannulated screw internal fixation. The residual displacement of the femoral head after surgery was measured by 3-dimensional reconstruction that evaluated the quality of the reduction. Other data that might affect prognosis were also obtained from outpatient follow-up, telephone calls, or case reviews. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to assess the intrinsic relationship between the risk factors and the osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head occurred in 27 patients (18%). Significant differences were observed regarding the residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification. Moreover, we found more or less residual displacement of femoral head in all patients with high quality of reduction based on x-ray by the new technique. There was a close relationship between residual displacement and ONFH. There exists limitation to evaluate the quality of reduction by x-ray. Three-dimensional reconstruction and digital measurement, as a new method, is a more accurate method to assess the quality of reduction. Residual displacement of the femoral head and the preoperative Garden classification were risk factors for osteonecrosis of the femoral head. High-quality reduction was necessary to avoid complications. PMID:26632739

  19. The Retroacetabular Angle Determines the Safe Angle for Screw Placement in Posterior Acetabular Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Ayman M. A.; Oxland, Thomas R.; O'Brien, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. A method for the determination of safe angles for screws placed in the posterior acetabular wall based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) is described. It defines a retroacetabular angle and determines its variation in the population. Methods. The retroacetabular angle is the angle between the retroacetabular surface and the tangent to the posterior acetabular articular surface. Screws placed through the marginal posterior wall at an angle equal to the retroacetabular angle are extraarticular. Medial screws can be placed at larger angles whose difference from the retroacetabular angle is defined as the allowance angles. CT scans of all patients with acetabular fractures treated in our institute between September 2002 to July 2007 were used to measure the retroacetabular angle and tangent. Results. Two hundred thirty one patients were included. The average (range) age was 42 (15–74) years. The average (range) retroacetabular angle was 39 (30–47) degrees. The average (range) retroacetabular tangent was 36 (30–45) mm. Conclusions. Placing the screws at an average (range) angle of 39 (33–47) degrees of anterior inclination with the retroacetabular surface makes them extraarticular. Angles for medial screws are larger. Safe angles can be calculated preoperatively with a computer program. PMID:24959359

  20. Miniarthrotomy assisted percutaneous screw fixation for displaced medial malleolus fractures – A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Pramod; Aggrawal, Abhinav; Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Mittal, Samarth

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe here a technique of miniarthrotomy assisted percutaneous screw insertion for displaced Herscovici type B and C medial malleolar fractures. Method Incision was made centred over the superomedial angle of the ankle mortise, about half a cm medial to tibialis anterior. Arthrotomy was done and reduction obtained. Percuntaneously, two 4 mm cancellous cannulated screws were inserted through medial malleolus. Results and conclusion This approach allows direct visualization of reduction, removal of entrapped soft tissue and preservation of saphenous vein and nerve. PMID:25983507

  1. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous navigated guidewireless lumbosacral pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin S; Park, Paul

    2016-07-01

    This video details the minimally invasive approach for treatment of a symptomatic Grade II lytic spondylolisthesis with high-grade foraminal stenosis. In this procedure, the use of a navigated, guidewireless technique for percutaneous pedicle screw placement at the lumbosacral junction is highlighted following initial decompression and transforaminal interbody fusion. Key steps of the procedure are delineated that include positioning, exposure, technique for interbody fusion, intraoperative image acquisition, and use of a concise 2-step process for navigated screw placement without using guidewires. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/2u6H4Pc_8To . PMID:27364422

  2. Open screw fixation of large anterior glenoid rim fractures: mid- and long-term results in 29 patients.

    PubMed

    Raiss, Patric; Baumann, Florian; Akbar, Michael; Rickert, Markus; Loew, Markus

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the clinical, functional and radiographic outcomes of patients sustaining traumatic anterior dislocations of the shoulder in combination with large anterior glenoid rim fractures, treated by open reduction and internal screw fixation (ORIF). Twenty-nine patients with a mean follow-up of 6.5 years (2.5-12 years) were evaluated clinically using the Constant and DASH scores, radiographs in two planes and isokinetic muscle strength measurement (Biodex 3 PRO). Mean age was 41.6 years (17-68 years). There was no case of postoperative re-dislocation. Eight out of 29 patients (27.5%) underwent revision surgery to remove the screws. The mean age- and gender-adjusted Constant score was 93.3% (range 64-102%), and the mean DASH score was 10.1 points (range 0-71 points). On radiological examination, 6 patients had signs of osteoarthritis: Samilson type I (n = 3) and II (n = 3). Significant differences for maximal strength in external rotation and muscular endurance compared to the unaffected side were found (P < 0.035). Twenty-seven patients (93%) were satisfied or very satisfied with the result after surgery. ORIF seems to be a good treatment option in cases of large glenoid rim fractures to avoid re-dislocation in the mid-term. Prospective randomised studies are necessary to compare these findings with those after non-operative or arthroscopic treatment of these injuries. PMID:19039575

  3. Feasibility study of patient-specific surgical templates for the fixation of pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Salako, F; Aubin, C-E; Fortin, C; Labelle, H

    2002-01-01

    Surgery for scoliosis, as well as other posterior spinal surgeries, frequently uses pedicle screws to fix an instrumentation on the spine. Misplacement of a screw can lead to intra- and post-operative complications. The objective of this study is to design patient-specific surgical templates to guide the drilling operation. From the CT-scan of a vertebra, the optimal drilling direction and limit angles are computed from an inverse projection of the pedicle limits. The first template design uses a surface-to-surface registration method and was constructed in a CAD system by subtracting the vertebra from a rectangular prism and a cylinder with the optimal orientation. This template and the vertebra were built using rapid prototyping. The second design uses a point-to-surface registration method and has 6 adjustable screws to adjust the orientation and length of the drilling support device. A mechanism was designed to hold it in place on the spinal process. A virtual prototype was build with CATIA software. During the operation, the surgeon places either template on patient's vertebra until a perfect match is obtained before drilling. The second design seems better than the first one because it can be reused on different vertebra and is less sensible to registration errors. The next step is to build the second design and make experimental and simulations tests to evaluate the benefits of this template during a scoliosis operation.

  4. Radiological Evaluation of the Initial Fixation between Cortical Bone Trajectory and Conventional Pedicle Screw Technique for Lumbar Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique versus conventional pedicle screws (PS) in radiographs of postsurgical lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Overview of Literature Few reports have documented the holding strength of CBT technique for spondylolisthesis cases. Methods From October 2009 to June 2014, 21 cases of degenerative spondylolisthesis were surgically treated in our institution. Ten were treated with conventional PS technique and 11 of with CBT technique. Mean lumbar lordosis and percent slippage were evaluated preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and 6 months and 1 year postoperatively using radiographs. We also investigated percent loss of slip reduction. Results There were statistically significant differences between preoperative percent slippage and postoperative slippage in both PS and CBT procedures over 1 year, and both techniques showed good slip reduction. On the other hand, lumbar lordosis did not change significantly in either the PS or CBT groups over 1 year. Conclusions CBT technique showed similarly good initial fixation compared with the PS procedure in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. PMID:27114765

  5. Supra-acetabular fixation and sacroiliac screws for treating unstable pelvic ring injuries: preliminary results from 20 patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Rodrigo Pereira; de Góes Ribeiro, Arthur; Ulson, Oliver; de Ávila, Ricardo Bertozzi; Ono, Nelson Keiske; Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the treatment results from 20 patients who underwent an alternative osteosynthesis method as definitive treatment for pelvic ring fractures. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted on a series of 20 patients with pelvic ring fractures (Tile type C) and a high risk of postoperative infection, who were treated at Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo between August 2004 and December 2012. The patients underwent percutaneous supra-acetabular external fixation in association with cannulated 7.0 mm iliosacral screws. Results The patients’ mean age was 40 years (range 22–77 years) and the mean length of follow-up was 18.5 months (range 3–69 months). At the end of the treatment, ten patients (50%) were classified as having good results, nine patients (45%) had fair results and one patient (5%) did not have any improvement. Six patients presented complications, and paresthesia of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was the most frequent of these (two patients). Conclusion Supra-acetabular external fixation in association with iliosacral percutaneous osteosynthesis is a good definitive treatment method for patients with a high risk of postoperative infection. PMID:27069879

  6. Free Hand Insertion Technique of S2 Sacral Alar-Iliac Screws for Spino-Pelvic Fixation: Technical Note, Acadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn

    2015-12-01

    A rigid spino-pelvic fixation to anchor long constructs is crucial to maintain the stability of long fusion in spinal deformity surgery. Besides obtaining immediate stability and proper biomechanical strength of constructs, the S2 alar-iliac (S2AI) screws have some more advantages. Four Korean fresh-frozen human cadavers were procured. Free hand S2AI screw placement is performed using anatomic landmarks. The starting point of the S2AI screw is located at the midpoint between the S1 and S2 foramen and 2 mm medial to the lateral sacral crest. Gearshift was advanced from the desired starting point toward the sacro-iliac joint directing approximately 20° angulation caudally in sagittal plane and 30° angulation horizontally in the coronal plane connecting the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS). We made a S2AI screw trajectory through the cancellous channel using the gearshift. We measured caudal angle in the sagittal plane and horizontal angle in the coronal plane. A total of eight S2AI screws were inserted in four cadavers. All screws inserted into the iliac crest were evaluated by C-arm and naked eye examination by two spine surgeons. Among 8 S2AI screws, all screws were accurately placed (100%). The average caudal angle in the sagittal plane was 17.3±5.4°. The average horizontal angle in the coronal plane connecting the PSIS was 32.0±1.8°. The placement of S2AI screws using the free hand technique without any radiographic guidance appears to an acceptable method of insertion without more radiation or time consuming. PMID:26819698

  7. Double threaded screw fixation for bilateral stress fracture of the medial malleolus.

    PubMed

    Kanto, Ryo; Fukunishi, Shigeo; Morooka, Takatoshi; Seino, Daisuke; Takashima, Takayuki; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Tanaka, Juichi

    2014-01-01

    An 18-year-old college basketball player presented with continued ankle pain. A radiographic examination showed bilateral medial malleolus stress fractures. Considering the prolonged history and refractory nature of this injury, surgery was adopted as a treatment option. At surgery, the fracture site was percutaneously fixed using two cannulated double threaded screws. Surgery for each side was sequentially performed two months apart. Prompt bony healing was attained after surgery, and the patient could return to his previous sports level six months after the first surgery without subsequent recurrence.

  8. A laboratory investigation to assess the influence of cement augmentation of screw and plate fixation in a simulation of distal femoral fracture of osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Wähnert, D; Lange, J H; Schulze, M; Gehweiler, D; Kösters, C; Raschke, M J

    2013-10-01

    The augmentation of fixation with bone cement is increasingly being used in the treatment of severe osteoporotic fractures. We investigated the influence of bone quality on the mechanics of augmentation of plate fixation in a distal femoral fracture model (AO 33 A3 type). Eight osteoporotic and eight non-osteoporotic femoral models were randomly assigned to either an augmented or a non-augmented group. Fixation was performed using a locking compression plate. In the augmented group additionally 1 ml of bone cement was injected into the screw hole before insertion of the screw. Biomechanical testing was performed in axial sinusoidal loading. Augmentation significantly reduced the cut-out distance in the osteoporotic models by about 67% (non-augmented mean 0.30 mm (sd 0.08) vs augmented 0.13 mm (sd 0.06); p = 0.017). There was no statistical reduction in this distance following augmentation in the non-osteoporotic models (non-augmented mean 0.15 mm (sd 0.02) vs augmented 0.15 mm (sd 0.07); p = 0.915). In the osteoporotic models, augmentation significantly increased stability (p = 0.017). PMID:24078541

  9. Challenges of Transarticular Screw Fixation in Young Children: Report of Surgical Treatment of a 5-Year-Old Patient's Unstable Os-Odontoideum

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Inaba, Yuji; Kosho, Tomoki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Surgical procedures for atlantoaxial (C1–C2) fusion in young children are relatively uncommon. The purpose of this study was to report on a surgical treatment for a case of atlantoaxial instability caused by os-odontoideum in association with quadriparesis and respiratory paralysis in a 5-year-old girl. We present the patient's history, physical examination, and radiographic findings, describe the surgical treatment and a five year follow-up, and provide a literature review. The instability was treated by halo immobilization, followed by C1–C2 transarticular screw fixation using a computed tomography-based navigation system. At the five year follow-up, the patient had made a complete recovery with solid union. The authors conclude that C1–2 transarticular screw fixation is technically possible as in a case of atlantoaxial instability in a five-year-old child. PMID:27790327

  10. The influence of sacral morphology on the existence of secure S1 and S2 transverse bone corridors for iliosacroiliac screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Mendel, T; Noser, H; Kuervers, J; Goehre, F; Hofmann, G O; Radetzki, F

    2013-12-01

    Sacroiliac (SI) screw fixation for unstable pelvic fractures stands out as the only minimally invasive method among all other ORIF procedures. A strictly transverse screw trajectory is needed for central or bilateral fracture patterns up to a complete iliosacroiliac fixation. However, secure screw insertion is aggravated by a narrow sacroiliac bone stock. This study investigates the influence of a highly variable sacral morphology to the existence of S1 and S2 transverse corridors. The analysis contained in this study is based on 125 CT datasets of intact human pelvises. First, sacral dysplasia was identified using the "lateral sacral triangle" method in a lateral 3-D semi-transparent pelvic view. Second, 3-D corridors for a 7.3mm screw in the upper two sacral levels were visualised using a proprietary IT workflow of custom-made programme scripts based on the Amira(®)-software. Shape-describing measurement variables were calculated as output variables. The results show a significant linear correlation between ratioT and the screw-limiting S1 isthmus height (Pearson coefficient of 0.84). A boundary ratio of 1.5 represented a positive predictive value of 96% for the existence of a transverse S1-corridor for at least one 7.3mm screw. In 100 out of 125 pelvises (80%), a sufficient S1 corridor existed, whereas in 124 specimens (99%), an S2 corridor was found. Statistics revealed significantly larger S1 and S2 corridors in males compared to females (p<0.05). However, no gender-related differences were observed for clinically relevant numbers of up to 3 screws in S1 and 1 screw in S2. The expanse of the S1 corridor is highly influenced by the dimensions of the dysplastic elevated upper sacrum, whereas the S2 corridor is not affected. Hence, in dysplastic pelvises, sacroiliac screw insertion should be recommended into the 2nd sacral segment. Our IT workflow for the automatic computation of 3-D corridors may assist in surgical pre-operative planning. Furthermore, the

  11. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Pedicle Screw Fixation for Traumatic Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;05:CD009073].

    PubMed

    Linhares, Daniela; Neves, Nuno; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel; Almeida Fonseca, João

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine are common causes of spine surgery. Pedicle screw fixation is usually chosen, using monosegmentar, short or long segment instrumentations, with or without bone graft. This review aims to evaluate the effect of transpedicular fixation in traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. A systematic search on controlled, randomized or quasi-randomized trials comparing different methods of surgical treatment of this fractures was performed, followed by a process of article selection, data extraction and bias assessment by 3 independent authors. Eight articles were included in a total of 5 comparisons, between different transpedicular fixation techniques. No significant differences on function or quality of life, neurologic status or limitation of motion were found. Only instrumentation with fracture level screw incorporation showed significant decrease of pain when compared with instrumentation alone. Several techniques resulted in significant improvements of different radiological parameters. Significantly, surgeries with smaller duration were associated with lesser blood loss. Bone graft use caused a significant raise in post-operative complications, namely donor site pain. So, this paper showed that significative improvements in radiological parameters do not associate with correspondent clinical benefits, and only instrumentation with level screw incorporation is associated with a clear benefit on pain. Moreover, the need for bone graft is questioned, since it leads to no clinic-radiological improvement with a raise of complications. However, a small number of controlled studies is available on this topic. PMID:27649012

  12. [Analysis of the Cochrane Review: Pedicle Screw Fixation for Traumatic Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013;05:CD009073].

    PubMed

    Linhares, Daniela; Neves, Nuno; Ribeiro da Silva, Manuel; Almeida Fonseca, João

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine are common causes of spine surgery. Pedicle screw fixation is usually chosen, using monosegmentar, short or long segment instrumentations, with or without bone graft. This review aims to evaluate the effect of transpedicular fixation in traumatic fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. A systematic search on controlled, randomized or quasi-randomized trials comparing different methods of surgical treatment of this fractures was performed, followed by a process of article selection, data extraction and bias assessment by 3 independent authors. Eight articles were included in a total of 5 comparisons, between different transpedicular fixation techniques. No significant differences on function or quality of life, neurologic status or limitation of motion were found. Only instrumentation with fracture level screw incorporation showed significant decrease of pain when compared with instrumentation alone. Several techniques resulted in significant improvements of different radiological parameters. Significantly, surgeries with smaller duration were associated with lesser blood loss. Bone graft use caused a significant raise in post-operative complications, namely donor site pain. So, this paper showed that significative improvements in radiological parameters do not associate with correspondent clinical benefits, and only instrumentation with level screw incorporation is associated with a clear benefit on pain. Moreover, the need for bone graft is questioned, since it leads to no clinic-radiological improvement with a raise of complications. However, a small number of controlled studies is available on this topic.

  13. A cementless, elastic press-fit socket with and without screws

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The acetabular component has remained the weakest link in hip arthroplasty regarding achievement of long-term survival. Primary fixation is a prerequisite for long-term performance. For this reason, we investigated the stability of a unique cementless titanium-coated elastic monoblock socket and the influence of supplementary screw fixation. Patient and methods During 2006–2008, we performed a randomized controlled trial on 37 patients (mean age 63 years (SD 7), 22 females) in whom we implanted a cementless press-fit socket. The socket was implanted with additional screw fixation (group A, n = 19) and without additional screw fixation (group B, n = 18). Using radiostereometric analysis with a 2-year follow-up, we determined the stability of the socket. Clinically relevant migration was defined as > 1 mm translation and > 2º rotation. Clinical scores were determined. Results The sockets without screw fixation showed a statistically significantly higher proximal translation compared to the socket with additional screw fixation. However, this higher migration was below the clinically relevant threshold. The numbers of migratory sockets were not significantly different between groups. After the 2-year follow-up, there were no clinically relevant differences between groups A and B regarding the clinical scores. 1 patient dropped out of the study. In the others, no sockets were revised. Interpretation We found that additional screw fixation is not necessary to achieve stability of the cementless press-fit elastic RM socket. We saw no postoperative benefit or clinical effect of additional screw fixation. PMID:23083434

  14. Stability of anterior vertebral body screws after kyphoplasty augmentation. An experimental study to compare anterior vertebral body screw fixation in soft and cured kyphoplasty cement.

    PubMed

    Linhardt, O; Lüring, C; Matussek, J; Hamberger, C; Herold, T; Plitz, W; Grifka, J

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this cadaver study was to compare the stability of anterior vertebral body screws after implantation in soft or cured kyphoplasty cement. Anterior vertebral body screws were inserted in a total of 30 thoracolumbar vertebrae of ten different human specimens: ten screws were implanted in non-augmented vertebrae (group 1), ten screws were placed in soft cement (group 2), and ten screws were placed in cured cement (group 3). The screws were then tested for biomechanical axial pullout resistance. Mean axial pullout strength was 192 N (range: 10-430 N) in group 1, 364 N (range: 65-875 N) in group 2, and 271 N (range: 35-625 N) in group 3. The paired Student's t-test demonstrated a significant difference between pullout strength of groups 1 and 2 (p= 0.0475). No significant difference was seen between pullout strength of groups 1 and 3 (p= 0.2646) and between groups 2 and 3 (p= 0.3863). We achieved a 1.9 times higher pullout strength with kyphoplasty augmentation of osteoporotic vertebrae compared with the pullout strength of non-augmented vertebrae. Implantation of anterior vertebral body screws in cured cement is a satisfactory method. With this method we found a 1.4 times higher pullout strength than non-augmented vertebrae.

  15. Vertebroplasty plus short segment pedicle screw fixation in a burst fracture model in cadaveric spines.

    PubMed

    Grossbach, Andrew J; Viljoen, Stephanus V; Hitchon, Patrick W; DeVries Watson, Nicole A; Grosland, Nicole M; Torner, James

    2015-05-01

    The current project investigates the role of vertebroplasty in supplementing short segment (SS) posterior instrumentation, only one level above and below a fracture. In the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures, long segment (LS) posterior instrumentation two levels above and below the fracture level has been used. In our study, burst fractures were produced at L1 in eight fresh frozen human cadaveric spines. The spines were then tested in three conditions: 1) intact, 2) after LS (T11-L3), 3) SS (T12-L2) instrumentation with pedicle screws and rods, and 4) short segment instrumentation plus cement augmentation of the fracture level (SSC). LS instrumentation was found to significantly reduce the motion at the instrumented level (T12-L2) as well as the levels immediately adjacent in flexion, extension and lateral bending. Similarly, SSC augmentation was found to significantly reduce the motion compared to intact at T12-L2 but still maintained the adjacent level motion. However, SS instrumentation alone did not significantly reduce the motion at T12-L2 except for left lateral bending. While LS instrumentation remains the most stable construct, SS instrumentation augmented with vertebroplasty at the fracture level increases rigidity in flexion, extension and right lateral bending beyond SS instrumentation alone. PMID:25769251

  16. The use of rigid internal fixation in the surgical management of cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Grauer, Jonathan N; Beiner, John M

    2007-01-01

    In the surgical management of cervical spondylosis, the application of rigid internal fixation can enhance the immediate stability of the cervical spine. The sophistication of such internal fixation systems and the indications for their use are continuously evolving. A sound understanding of regional anatomy, biomechanics, and kinematics within the cervical spine is essential for the safe and effective application of internal fixation. Numerous options currently exist for anterior cervical plating systems; some lock the screws to the plate rigidly (constrained), whereas others allow for some rotational or translational motion between the screw and plate (semiconstrained). The role of anterior fixation in single and multilevel fusions is still the subject of some controversy. Long anterior cervical reconstructions may require additional posterior fixation to reliably promote fusion. Rigid fixation in the posterior cervical spine can be achieved with lateral mass screws or pedicle screws. Although lateral mass screws provide excellent fixation within the subaxial cervical spine, the regional anatomy of C2 and C7 often make it difficult to place such screws, and pedicle screws at these levels are advocated. Pedicle screws achieve fixation into both the anterior and posterior column and are arguably the most stable form of rigid internal fixation within the cervical spine. Familiarity with these internal fixation techniques can be an extremely valuable tool for the spine surgeon managing these degenerative disorders of the cervical spine.

  17. New Technique for C1 Double-Door Laminoplasty Using Allograft Spacers and Titanium Miniplate Screw Fixation: Technical Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok Woo; Lee, Jae-Hoo; Lee, Ho-Won; Oh, Jae-Keun; Kwak, Yoon-Hae

    2016-03-01

    Although conventional C1 laminectomy is the gold standard for decompression at the atlas, it provides little space for the bone graft to fuse. The fusion area can be extended cranially up to the occipital bone, but it requires sacrificing the function of the craniocervical junction. To date, no reports have focused on surgical techniques for successful decompression and fusion without disruption of the posterior C1 arch while providing enough room for the bone graft to fuse. This study introduces a new technique for C1-C2 fusion and C1 double-door laminoplasty in patients with C1-C2 instability, canal stenosis, and cervical spondylotic myelopathy. A 66-year-old man who had undergone C1-C2 fusion at a local clinic 2 years earlier visited our hospital due to progressive myelopathy. A preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan showed the tip of the odontoid process, extending into the spinal canal. On the axial view of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, the tip of the odontoid process significantly compressed the spinal cord on the left side. The atlantodental interval was 7 mm on radiography; however, C1-C2 instability was not evident on flexion-extension X-rays due to the previous screw fixation. The patient underwent C1-C2 decompression and fusion surgery with our new surgical technique. The segmental screws were repositioned at C1 and C2, and we performed C1 double-door laminoplasty augmented with an allograft spacer and a titanium miniplate. A marked reduction was seen at postoperative radiograph and CT scan. Neurologic symptoms were relieved dramatically after surgery without any discomfort. No complications were noted. We introduced a new surgical technique that allows bone grafting, decompression, and fusion to be performed without disruption of the posterior C1 arch in the event of C1-C2 canal stenosis combined with instability. This technique may be indicated for other conditions that cause instability and stenosis at the C1-C2 area. PMID:26689563

  18. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. MATERIAL AND METHODS A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. RESULTS There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  19. A Novel Guidewire Aiming Device to Improve the Accuracy of Guidewire Insertion in Femoral Neck Fracture Surgery Using Cannulated Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjing; Xu, Haitao; Xu, Peijun; Hu, Tu; An, Zhiquan; Zhang, Changqing; Sheng, Jiagen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of guidewire insertion in the femoral neck fracture surgery using cannulated screw fixation. Material/Methods A novel aiming device was designed and manufactured. Between January 2010 and June 2012, 64 femoral neck fracture patients were included into the study. All 64 patients were divided into 2 groups randomly. The aiming device was used during the operation for patients in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Results There were no statistically significant differences in operative time or bleed volume between the groups (P>0.05). The frequency of guidewire drilling was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). The angle between the first cannulated screw and the central axis of the femoral neck in coronal plane and sagittal plane, and the distance between the bottom cannulated screw and the medial calcar femorale rim, were significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions The aiming device is simple in structure and easy to use. It could help surgeons to accurately insert cannulated screw guidewires. The aiming device is suitable for broad clinical use. PMID:27529374

  20. C7 intralaminar screw placement, an alternative to lateral mass or pedicle fixation for treatment of cervical spondylytic myelopathy, kyphotic deformity, and trauma: A case report and technical note

    PubMed Central

    Koltz, Michael T.; Maulucci, Christopher M.; Sansur, Charles A.; Hamilton, D. Kojo

    2014-01-01

    Background: The authors present a case to illustrate the necessity and technical feasibility of C7 laminar screw placement for treatment of sub-axial cervical spondylitic myelopathy. The indications for C7 lateral mass screw placement was required internal fixation, with small lateral masses (8 mm) and pedicles (4 mm). Case Description: A 67-year-old female with compressive myelopathy after a fall from standing is presented. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the cervical spine showed severe C3-6 spondylosis with canal and foraminal compromise. Computed tomography of the cervical spine confirmed the MR imaging findings as well as showed suboptimal lateral mass and pedicles for screw placement. The patient underwent a C3-6 laminectomy, C3-6 lateral mass, and C7 laminar screw placement. Postoperatively, the patient recovered without complication. Conclusion: Internal fixation of the cervical spine after iatrogenic destabilization by decompression of neural elements secondary to advanced spondylosis can be technically challenging. Anatomical landmarks needed for safe placement of lateral mass or pedicle instrumentation are often distorted by the patients’ advanced pathology or Inherent biology. The C7 screw is a key structural element to a long construct and therefore necessitates large lateral masses or pedicles to safely place a functional screw. C7 laminar screws may be placed safely without fluoroscopic guidance when sufficient C7 lateral mass or pedicle screws are not possible or with undue risk. PMID:24575319

  1. The curative effect comparison between prolonged third generation of gamma nail and prolonged dynamic hip screw internal fixation in treating femoral intertrochanteric fracture and the effect on infection.

    PubMed

    He, Wenye; Zhang, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The objective was to explore the curative effect of prolonged third generation of gamma nail (pTGN) and prolonged dynamic hip screw (pDHS) internal fixation in treating femoral intertrochanteric fracture, and analyze the incidence rate of infection for better clinical diagnosis and treatment. Sixty five patients with femoral intertrochanteric fracture during February, 2011-February, 2013 were selected and divided into two groups, with one receiving pTGN (control group) and the other one receiving pDHS internal fixation (observation group). The clinical effects of two groups were compared. In control group, the excellent and good rate was 78.13 %, the total effective rate was 87.5 %, and the total complication rate was 6.24 %; in observation group, the excellent and good rate was 78.79 %, the total effective rate was 90.91 %, the total complication rate was 6.06 %; there was no statistical difference between two groups (p > 0.05). The operation time, the intraoperative fluoroscopy time, and the total blood loss had statistically significant difference between two groups (p < 0.05); however, the differences of the total length of incision, the length of preoperative hospitalization, postoperative ambulatory episode, and the length of stay between two groups were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Both pTGN and pDHS internal fixation were effective on femoral intertrochanteric fracture, with pDHS internal fixation having better overall efficiency.

  2. The biomechanics of plate fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures near the tip of a total hip implant: cables, screws, or both?

    PubMed

    Shah, S; Kim, S Y R; Dubov, A; Schemitsch, E H; Bougherara, H; Zdero, R

    2011-09-01

    Femoral shaft fractures after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remain a serious problem, since there is no optimal surgical repair method. Virtually all studies that examined surgical repair methods have done so clinically or experimentally. The present study assessed injury patterns computationally by developing three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models that were validated experimentally. The investigation evaluated three different constructs for the fixation of Vancouver B1 periprosthetic femoral shaft fractures following THA. Experimentally, three bone plate repair methods were applied to a synthetic femur with a 5 mm fracture gap near the tip of a total hip implant. Repair methods were identical distal to the fracture gap, but used cables only (construct A), screws only (construct B), or cables plus screws (construct C) proximal to the fracture gap. Specimens were oriented in 15 degrees adduction to simulate the single-legged stance phase of walking, subjected to 1000 N of axial force, and instrumented with strain gauges. Computationally, a linearly elastic and isotropic 3D FE model was developed to mimic experiments. Results showed excellent agreement between experimental and FE strains, yielding a Pearson linearity coefficient, R2, of 0.92 and a slope for the line of best data fit of 1.06. FE-computed axial stiffnesses were 768 N/mm (construct A), 1023 N/mm (construct B), and 1102 N/mm (construct C). FE surfaces stress maps for cortical bone showed Von Mises stresses, excluding peaks, of 0-8 MPa (construct A), 0-15 MPa (construct B), and 0-20 MPa (construct C). Cables absorbed the majority of load, followed by the plates and then the screws. Construct A yielded peak stress at one of the empty holes in the plate. Constructs B and C had similar bone stress patterns, and can achieve optimal fixation. PMID:22070022

  3. Biomechanical and finite element analyses of bone cement-Injectable cannulated pedicle screw fixation in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoyao; Xu, Jianzhong; Sun, Dong; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Zehua; Dai, Fei

    2016-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the safety and biomechanical stability of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-augmented bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screw (CICPS) in cancellous bone model, and to analyze the stress distribution at the screw-cement-bone interface. The OMEGA cannulated pedicle screw (OPS) and conventional pedicle screw (CPS) were used as control groups. Safety of the CICPS was evaluated by the static bending and bending fatigue tests. Biomechanical stability was analyzed by the maximum axial pullout strength and maximum torque tests. Stress distribution at the screw-cement-bone interface was analyzed by the finite element (FE) method. The CICPS and CPS produced statistically similar values for bending stiffness, bending structural stiffness, and bending yield moment. The maximum pullout force was 53.47 ± 8.65 N in CPS group, compared to 130.82 ± 7.32 N and 175.45 ± 43.01 N in the PMMA-augmented OPS and CICPS groups, respectively (p < 0.05). The CICPS had a significantly greater torque than the OPS and CPS. The FE model did not reveal excessive stress at the screw-cement-bone interface in the CICPS group. In conclusion, PMMA-augmentation with CICPS may be a potentially useful method to increase the stability of pedicle screws in patients with osteoporosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 960-967, 2016. PMID:25976272

  4. A Prospective Study on Radiological and Functional Outcome of Displaced Tongue Type Intra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures Treated by Percutaneous Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Anoop; Mathias, Lawrence John; Shetty, Vikram; Shetty, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calcaneal fractures have posed a challenge to orthopaedic surgeon for many years. The major problem is to reconstruct the fracture and improve healing of the fracture and also the surrounding tissues. Anatomic restoration of the three-dimensional anatomy of the calcaneum is the goal of surgical management of calcaneal fractures. Over the years, various techniques have been developed to accomplish this goal. Aim To determine the functional outcome in displaced tongue-type calcaneal fracture treated by percutaneous screw fixation. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted from October 2012 and September 2014. A total of 23 patients with intra-articular ‘tongue type’ calcaneal fractures were included in the study. Complete clinical and radiological evaluation was done. The surgical procedure encompassed closed reduction and fixation with two criss-cross 6.5 mm cannulated cancellous across the fracture site under fluoroscopic guidance. Postoperatively, on day three ankle and toe mobilization was begun. Non-weight bearing crutch mobilization was begun on postoperative day three. Reviews were done at 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 24 weeks postoperatively. At 6 weeks partial weight bearing mobilization was started. Full weight bearing was begun at 12 weeks. The patient was finally reviewed at 24 weeks and assessment of ankle function was done as per the Maryland foot scoring system. Radiographs were compared and preoperative and postoperative Gissane’s and Bohler’s angles were also compared. The results were analysed as per descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage). The complications noted were documented. Results Of the 23 patients under the study, three had excellent results with mean score of 90, 17 had good results with mean score of 82.94 and three had fair results with mean score of 74. Only one patient had subtalar arthritis as a complication. No other complications were seen. Conclusion Percutaneous screw fixation of tongue type

  5. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with unilateral pedicle screw fixation for treatment of massive lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chang-Qing; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Large lumbar or lumbosacral (LS) disc herniations usually expand from the paramedian space to the neuroforamen and compress both the transversing (lower) and the exiting (upper) nerve roots, thus leading to bi-radicular symptoms. Bi-radicular involvement is a statistically significant risk factor for poor outcome in patients presenting with far lateral or foraminal disc herniation after facet preserving microdecompression. There is evidence showing that patients suffering from large lumbar disc herniations treated with interbody fusion have significant superior results in comparison with those who received a simple discectomy. We report our experiences on managing large LS disc herniation with bi-radicular symptoms by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using one diagonal fusion cage with unilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three patients who suffered from single level lumbar or LS disc herniation with bi-radicular symptoms treated with unilateral decompression and TLIF using one diagonal fusion cage with ipsilateral pedicle screw/rod fixation operated between January 2005 and December 2009, were included in this study. Operation time and blood loss were recorded. The pain and disability status were pre- and postoperatively evaluated by the visual analog score (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Interbody bony fusion was detected by routine radiographs and computed tomography scan. Adjacent segment degeneration was detected by routine radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging examination. Overall outcomes were categorized according to modified Macnab classification. Results: The patients were followed up for an average of 44.7 months. Pain relief in the VAS and improvement of the ODI were significant after surgery and at final followup. No severe complications occurred during hospital stay. Interbody bony fusion was achieved in every case. No cage retropulsion was observed, while 3 cases experienced

  6. Comparison of Head Center Position and Screw Fixation Options Between a Jumbo Cup and an Offset Center of Rotation Cup in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Computer Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Faizan, Ahmad; Black, Brandon J; Fay, Brian D; Heffernan, Christopher D; Ries, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Jumbo acetabular cups are commonly used in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A straightforward reaming technique is used which is similar to primary THA. However, jumbo cups may also be associated with hip center elevation, limited screw fixation options, and anterior soft tissue impingement. A partially truncated hemispherical shell was designed with an offset center of rotation, thick superior rim, and beveled anterior and superior rims as an alternative to a conventional jumbo cup. A three dimensional computer simulation was used to assess head center position and safe screw trajectories. Results of this in vitro study indicate that a modified hemispherical implant geometry can reduce head center elevation while permitting favorable screw fixation trajectories into the pelvis in comparison to a conventional jumbo cup.

  7. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  8. Comparison of stability of 2.0 mm standard and 2.0 mm locking miniplate/screws for the fixation of sagittal split ramus osteotomy on sheep mandibles.

    PubMed

    Oguz, Yener; Saglam, Haci; Dolanmaz, Dogan; Uckan, Sina

    2011-03-01

    Ten unembalmed adult sheep mandibles were used. The mandibles were sectioned in the midline, followed by sagittal split ramus osteotomies to obtain 20 hemimandibles. Each distal segment was advanced 5mm on each hemimandible. Ten of the specimens were fixed with 4-hole extended 2.0 mm titanium miniplates and screws and the other 10 were fixed with 4-hole extended 2.0 mm locking miniplates/screws. Each fixed specimen was mounted on a servo-hydraulic testing unit with the fixation device, and was tested to a range of forces of 0-140 N. The displacement values (mm) under 20, 60, 120, and 140 N were compared with the help of the Mann-Whitney U-test, and there were no significant differences between them at any force tested. Locking miniplate/screws and standard miniplate/screws showed similar displacement values at the range of forces tested. PMID:20226575

  9. Minimally Invasive Unilateral vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation and Lumbar Interbody Fusion in Treatment of Multi-Segment Lumbar Degenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Guangrun; Wang, Jiefeng; Zhang, Heqing

    2015-01-01

    Background The choice for instrumentation with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in treatment of degenerative lumbar disorders (DLD) remains controversial. The goal of this study was to investigate clinical outcomes in consecutive patients with multi-segment DLD treated with unilateral pedicle screw (UPS) vs. bilateral pedicle screw (BPS) instrumented TLIF. Material/Methods Eighty-four consecutive patients who had multi-level MIS-TLIF were retrospectively reviewed. All data were collected to compare the clinical outcomes between the 2 groups. Results Both groups showed similar clinical function scores in VAS and ODI. The two groups differed significantly in operative time (P<0.001), blood loss (P<0.001), and fusion rate (P=0.043), respectively. Conclusions This study demonstrated similar clinical outcomes between UPS fixation and BPS procedure after MIS-TLIF for multi-level DLD. Moreover, UPS technique was superior in operative time and blood loss, but represented lower fusion rate than the BPS construct did. PMID:26603050

  10. Latarjet Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Alvi, Hasham M.; Monroe, Emily J.; Muriuki, Muturi; Verma, Rajat N.; Marra, Guido; Saltzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Attritional bone loss in patients with recurrent anterior instability has successfully been treated with a bone block procedure such as the Latarjet. It has not been previously demonstrated whether cortical or cancellous screws are superior when used for this procedure. Purpose: To assess the strength of stainless steel cortical screws versus stainless steel cannulated cancellous screws in the Latarjet procedure. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Ten fresh-frozen matched-pair shoulder specimens were randomized into 2 separate fixation groups: (1) 3.5-mm stainless steel cortical screws and (2) 4.0-mm stainless steel partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Shoulder specimens were dissected free of all soft tissue and a 25% glenoid defect was created. The coracoid process was osteomized, placed at the site of the glenoid defect, and fixed in place with 2 parallel screws. Results: All 10 specimens failed by screw cutout. Nine of 10 specimens failed by progressive displacement with an increased number of cycles. One specimen in the 4.0-mm screw group failed by catastrophic failure on initiation of the testing protocol. The 3.5-mm screws had a mean of 274 cycles (SD, ±171 cycles; range, 10-443 cycles) to failure. The 4.0-mm screws had a mean of 135 cycles (SD, ±141 cycles; range, 0-284 cycles) to failure. There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 types of screws for cycles required to cause failure (P = .144). Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference in energy or cycles to failure when comparing the stainless steel cortical screws versus partially threaded cannulated cancellous screws. Clinical Relevance: Latarjet may be performed using cortical or cancellous screws without a clear advantage of either option. PMID:27158630

  11. Corrective osteotomy through fracture site and internal fixation with headless screws for type I (Hahn-Steinthal) capitellar malunion

    PubMed Central

    Jeevannavar, Santosh Somayya; Shenoy, Keshav Someshwar; Daddimani, Ravi M

    2013-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman presented 6 months after an initial injury to her left elbow with pain and restricted movements. She was diagnosed with a type I malunited (Hahn-Steinthal) type of capitellum fracture through radiographic studies. Classically, the treatment has been excision of the fragment, which carries a risk of valgus instability of the elbow and late osteoarthrosis. We report a case of malunited type I capitellum fracture, for which corrective osteotomy through fracture site, open reduction and internal fixation was done 6 months following missed trauma. At 24 months follow-up the capitellum fracture had united and the patient has a stable elbow and excellent range of motion. Our case demonstrates that for type I malunited capitellum fractures corrective osteotomy through fracture site and internal fixation rather than excision of the fragment in young can result in successful union and stable elbow. PMID:23709538

  12. Dynamic Hip Screw with Trochanteric Stablization Plate Fixation of Unstable Inter-Trochanteric Fractures: A Prospective Study of Functional and Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ashwin; Sadasivan, Anand Kumar; Hegde, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Management of unstable intertrochanteric fractures have posed a unique challenge to orthopaedicians over years. Several surgical techniques and implants have been developed for the same. Fractures of the lateral wall have been considered as the major cause of femoral medialization after fixation by Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS). Studies have shown that supplementation of trochanteric stabilization plate reduces the incidence of femoral medialization. Aim To assess the radiological union and hip function after fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures with DHS and Trochanteric Stabilization Plate (TSP). Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted with a total of 32 patients between age groups of 30-70 years with Evan Jensen unstable and very unstable type of intertrochanteric fractures, between August 2013 to March 2015 in the Department of Orthopaedics ARS Hospital, Tirupur, Tamil Nadu, India. They underwent open reduction and DHS and TSP fixation. They were started on full weight bearing mobilization on post op day three. They were reviewed at post-op weeks 3,6,12 and 24. Hip mobilization and rehabilitation exercises were instituted during course of reviews. Radiographs were taken to assess fracture union and hip function was evaluated during follow-ups. At the end of 24 weeks, degree of radiographic union was scored as per Radiological Union Score for Hip (RUSH). Hip function was scored with Harris hip score. Analyses were done using frequency and proportions. Chi-square tests were used to assess the test of association. Results Fifteen patients had RUSH scores between 10-20 and 17 patients had scores between 20-30 points. RUSH score had mean of 21.03+/- 2.132 points. 9 of 32 patients had excellent results as per Harris hip score, 10 had good, nine had fair and four had poor. On comparison of Harris hip score with RUSH score: Interval between 10-20 points, of 15 patients; two had excellent results, five had good, five had fair and three

  13. [Comparison of the Ender's nailing and Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) fixation in the treatment of trochanteric fractures in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Sliwka, Andrzej; Zgoda, Marcin; Górski, Radosław; Purski, Karol; Wasilewski, Piotr; Górecki, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was an evaluation which operative method of treatment: stabilisation with the Dynamic Hip Screw or with Ender's nails is less invasive procedure in elderly patients with trochanteric fractures. 100 consecutive patients with trochanteric fracture were enrolled into the study, of which 53 patients (49 women, 4 men; mean age 89 years) were stabilised intramedullarily with the use of Ender's nails and 47 patients (26 women, 21 men; mean age 76 years) were treated operatively with the use of Dynamic Hip Screw. The factors compared the mean length of hospital stay, the mean duration of the surgery, post-operative blood loss, early local and general complication rate and mortality in both groups. We took into account their general health and coexisting illnesses according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, type of fracture according to AO and Evan's classifications and the surgeon's experience. The mean duration of the surgery was 27 minutes longer in the case of DHS stabilisation. The complication rate was higher and the mean length of postoperative hospital stay was longer after Ender nailing. The mean blood loss: the drop in Red Blood Cells (RBC), Haematocrit (Ht) and the Mean Haemoglobin Concentration (Hb) was also higher in patients treated with the use of Ender nails. The mean rate of blood units that had to be transfused postoperatively was also higher in "Ender" group. The difference was statistically significant, especially in the group of patients treated as emergency procedure at the day of admission (p < 0.05). The operative treatment of trochanteric fractures in elderly patients with the use of DHS device showed to be a less invasive procedure in comparison to Ender nailing. In conclusion, the indications for this method of trochanteric fractures' treatment should be expanded, especially in the case of unstable fractures. PMID:17455526

  14. Coracoid bone graft osteolysis after Latarjet procedure: A comparison study between two screws standard technique vs mini-plate fixation

    PubMed Central

    Giacomo, Giovanni Di; Costantini, Alberto; de Gasperis, Nicola; De Vita, Andrea; Lin, Bernard K. H.; Francone, Marco; Beccaglia, Mario A. Rojas; Mastantuono, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Aims: One of the reason for Latarjet procedure failure may be coracoid graft osteolysis. In this study, we aimed to understand if a better compression between the coracoid process and the glenoid, using a mini-plate fixation during the Latarjet procedure, could reduce the amount of coracoid graft osteolysis. Materials and Methods: A computed tomography scan analysis of 26 prospectively followed-up patients was conducted after modified Latarjet procedure using mini-plate fixation technique to determine both the location and the amount of coracoid graft osteolysis in them. We then compared our current results with results from that of our previous study without using mini-plate fixation to determine if there is any statistical significant difference in terms of corcacoid bone graft osteolysis between the two surgical techniques. Results: The most relevant osteolysis was represented by the superficial part of the proximal coracoid, whereas the deep part of the proximal coracoid graft is least involved in osteolysis and has best bone healing. The current study showed a significant difference only for the deep part of the distal coracoid with our previous study (P < 0.01). Discussion: To our knowledge, there are no studies in literature that show the causes of coracoid bone graft osteolysis after Latarjet procedure. Conclusion: Our study suggests that there is a significant difference only for the deep part of the distal coracoid in terms of osteolysis. At clinical examination, this difference did not correspond with any clinical findings. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Clinical Relevance: Prospective case series, Treatment study. PMID:23858288

  15. One-stage partial vertebrectomy, titanium mesh implantation and pedicle screw fixation in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures through a posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueju; Li, Guangbin; Dong, Tianhua; Zhang, Yingze; Li, Heng

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical results of a partial vertebrectomy with titanium mesh implantation and pedicle screw fixation using a posterior approach to reconstruct the spine in the treatment of thoracolumbar burst fractures. METHOD: From January 2006 to August 2008, 20 patients with severe thoracolumbar fractures were treated.For vertebral bodies associated with one injured intervertebral disk, subtotal vertebrectomy surgery and single-segment fusion were performed. For vertebral bodies with two injured adjacent intervertebral disks, partial vertebrectomy surgery and two-segment fusion were performed. RESULTS: All 20 patients were followed up for 12 to 24 months (average of 18 months). There were no complications such as wound infections, hemopneumothorax or abdominal infections in any of the patients. The neurological status of all of the patients was improved by at least one American Spinal Injury Association grade by the last follow-up. The anterior vertebral body height was an average of 50.77% before surgery, 88.51% after surgery and 87.86% at the last follow up; the sagittal Cobb angle was improved, on average, from 26.15° to 5.39° and was 5.90° at the last follow up. The percentage of spinal stenosis was improved, on average, from 26.07% to 4.93%° and was 6.15% at the last follow up. There were significant differences in the anterior vertebral body height pre- and post-surgery and in the sagittal Cobb angle and the percentage of spinal stenosis (p<0) in all patients. CONCLUSIONS: This surgical procedure is simple and can accomplish decompression, reduction, fixation and fusion of the spine in one stage. This approach could be widely used in orthopedics. PMID:25627991

  16. Transpedicular vertebral body augmentation reinforced with pedicle screw fixation in fresh traumatic A2 and A3 lumbar fractures: comparison between two devices and two bone cements.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective study compares efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty (BK) with calcium phosphate (Group A) versus KIVA implant with PMMA (Group B) reinforced with three vertebrae pedicle screw constructs for A2 and A3 single fresh non-osteoporotic lumbar (L1-L4) fractures in 38 consecutive age- and diagnosis-matched patient populations. Extracanal leakage of both low-viscosity PMMA and calcium phosphate (CP) as well as the following roentgenographic parameters: segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior (PVBHr) vertebral body height ratio, spinal canal encroachment (SCE) clearance, and functional outcome measures: VAS and SF-36, were recorded and compared between the two groups. All patients in both groups were followed for a minimum 26 (Group A) and 25 (Group B) months. Extracanal CP and PMMA leakage was observed in four (18 %) and three (15 %) vertebrae/patients of group A and B, respectively. Hybrid fixation improved AVBHr, SKA, SCE, but PVBHr only in group B. VAS and SF-36 improved postoperatively in the patients of both groups. Short-segment construct with the novel KIVA implant restored better than BK-fractured lumbar vertebral body, but this had no impact in functional outcome. Since there was no leakage difference between PMMA and calcium phosphate and no short-term adverse related to PMMA use were observed, we advice the use of PMMA in fresh traumatic lumbar fractures.

  17. Fixation using alternative implants for the treatment of hip fractures (FAITH): design and rationale for a multi-centre randomized trial comparing sliding hip screws and cancellous screws on revision surgery rates and quality of life in the treatment of femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are a common type of fragility fracture that afflict 293,000 Americans (over 5,000 per week) and 35,000 Canadians (over 670 per week) annually. Despite the large population impact the optimal fixation technique for low energy femoral neck fractures remains controversial. The primary objective of the FAITH study is to assess the impact of cancellous screw fixation versus sliding hip screws on rates of revision surgery at 24 months in individuals with femoral neck fractures. The secondary objective is to determine the impact on health-related quality of life, functional outcomes, health state utilities, fracture healing, mortality and fracture-related adverse events. Methods/Design FAITH is a multi-centre, multi-national randomized controlled trial utilizing minimization to determine patient allocation. Surgeons in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit a total of at least 1,000 patients with low-energy femoral neck fractures. Using central randomization, patients will be allocated to receive surgical treatment with cancellous screws or a sliding hip screw. Patient outcomes will be assessed at one week (baseline), 10 weeks, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post initial fixation. We will independently adjudicate revision surgery and complications within 24 months of the initial fixation. Outcome analysis will be performed using a Cox proportional hazards model and likelihood ratio test. Discussion This study represents major international efforts to definitively resolve the treatment of low-energy femoral neck fractures. This trial will not only change current Orthopaedic practice, but will also set a benchmark for the conduct of future Orthopaedic trials. Trial registration The FAITH trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT00761813). PMID:24965132

  18. Biomechanical analyses of static and dynamic fixation techniques of retrograde interlocking femoral nailing using nonlinear finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hsu, Tzu-Pin; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2014-02-01

    Femoral shaft fractures can be treated using retrograde interlocking nailing systems; however, fracture nonunion still occurs. Dynamic fixation techniques, which remove either the proximal or distal locking screws, have been used to solve the problem of nonunion. In addition, a surgical rule for dynamic fixation techniques has been defined based on past clinical reports. However, the biomechanical performance of the retrograde interlocking nailing systems with either the traditional static fixation technique or the dynamic fixation techniques has not been investigated by using nonlinear numerical modeling. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models were developed, and the implant strength, fixation stability, and contact area of the fracture surfaces were evaluated. Three types of femoral shaft fractures (a proximal femoral shaft fracture, a middle femoral shaft fracture, and a distal femoral shaft fracture) fixed by three fixation techniques (insertion of all the locking screws, removal of the proximal locking screws, or removal of the distal locking screws) were analyzed. The results showed that the static fixation technique resulted in sufficient fixation stability and that the dynamic fixation techniques decreased the failure risk of the implant and produced a larger contact area of the fracture surfaces. The outcomes of the current study could assist orthopedic surgeons in comprehending the biomechanical performances of both static and dynamic fixation techniques. In addition, the surgeons could also select a fixation technique based on the specific patient situation using the numerical outcomes of this study.

  19. Responses of soil nitrogen fixation to Spartina alterniflora invasion and nitrogen addition in a Chinese salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingxin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Min; Nie, Ming; Qiu, Shiyun; Wang, Qing; Quan, Zhexue; Xiao, Ming; Li, Bo

    2016-02-12

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the major natural process of nitrogen (N) input to ecosystems. To understand how plant invasion and N enrichment affect BNF, we compared soil N-fixation rates and N-fixing microbes (NFM) of an invasive Spartina alterniflora community and a native Phragmites australis community in the Yangtze River estuary, with and without N addition. Our results indicated that plant invasion relative to N enrichment had a greater influence on BNF. At each N level, the S. alterniflora community had a higher soil N-fixation rate but a lower diversity of the nifH gene in comparison with the native community. The S. alterniflora community with N addition had the highest soil N-fixation rate and the nifH gene abundance across all treatments. Our results suggest that S. alterniflora invasion can increase soil N fixation in the high N-loading estuarine ecosystem, and thus may further mediate soil N availability.

  20. Responses of soil nitrogen fixation to Spartina alterniflora invasion and nitrogen addition in a Chinese salt marsh

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingxin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Min; Nie, Ming; Qiu, Shiyun; Wang, Qing; Quan, Zhexue; Xiao, Ming; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is the major natural process of nitrogen (N) input to ecosystems. To understand how plant invasion and N enrichment affect BNF, we compared soil N-fixation rates and N-fixing microbes (NFM) of an invasive Spartina alterniflora community and a native Phragmites australis community in the Yangtze River estuary, with and without N addition. Our results indicated that plant invasion relative to N enrichment had a greater influence on BNF. At each N level, the S. alterniflora community had a higher soil N-fixation rate but a lower diversity of the nifH gene in comparison with the native community. The S. alterniflora community with N addition had the highest soil N-fixation rate and the nifH gene abundance across all treatments. Our results suggest that S. alterniflora invasion can increase soil N fixation in the high N-loading estuarine ecosystem, and thus may further mediate soil N availability. PMID:26869197

  1. Anterograde Fixation Module for Posterior Acetabular Column Fracture: Computer-Assisted Determination of Optimal Entry Point, Angle, and Length for Screw Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongqiang; Lin, Chuangxin; Zhang, Lifeng; Lin, Miaoxiong; Lai, Jianqiang; Cao, Shenglu; Peng, Geng; Feng, Kai; Yan, Ge; Cai, Daozhang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to provide valid data for a plate-screw fixation model for fractured posterior-anterior columns of the acetabulum. Material/Methods Nineteen cadaveric bony hemi-pelvis specimens were obtained and 50 healthy adults were enrolled. The modified Stoppa approach and computed tomography (CT) imaging were used to collect the measured parameter data of the module. Results The measured parameter data were as follows: OP, 0.96±0.32 cm in females and 0.92±0.16 cm in males (P>0.05); PI, 0.98±0.28 cm in females, and 0.75±0.23 cm in males (P>0.05); ∠θ, 59.68°±6.28° in females and 56.75°±3.22° in males (P>0.05); and ∠ϕ, 41.27°±2.76° in females and 34.31°±2.78° in males (P<0.05). The corresponding CT image data were as follows: PI, 1.08±0.22 cm in females and 0.85±0.27 cm in males (P>0.05); OP, 1.06±0.29 cm in females and 1.12±0.24 cm in males (P>0.05); ∠θ, 55.33°±4.00° in females and 55. 50°±3.43° in males (P>0.05); and ∠ϕ was 39.21°±2.45°in females and 35.58°±2.31°in males (P<0.05). No significant difference with respect to sex and side existed between specimens and healthy adults (P>0.05). Conclusions The measured parameter data obtained in healthy adults and cadaveric specimens provided an anatomic basis for the designation of the guide module, and thus confirmed the accuracy and safety of screw placement in fractured columns of the acetabulum. PMID:27584820

  2. Anterograde Fixation Module for Posterior Acetabular Column Fracture: Computer-Assisted Determination of Optimal Entry Point, Angle, and Length for Screw Insertion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongqiang; Lin, Chuangxin; Zhang, Lifeng; Lin, Miaoxiong; Lai, Jianqiang; Cao, Shenglu; Peng, Geng; Feng, Kai; Yan, Ge; Cai, Daozhang; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to provide valid data for a plate-screw fixation model for fractured posterior-anterior columns of the acetabulum. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nineteen cadaveric bony hemi-pelvis specimens were obtained and 50 healthy adults were enrolled. The modified Stoppa approach and computed tomography (CT) imaging were used to collect the measured parameter data of the module. RESULTS The measured parameter data were as follows: OP, 0.96±0.32 cm in females and 0.92±0.16 cm in males (P>0.05); PI, 0.98±0.28 cm in females, and 0.75±0.23 cm in males (P>0.05); Ðϴ, 59.68°±6.28° in females and 56.75°±3.22° in males (P>0.05); and Ðφ, 41.27°±2.76° in females and 34.31°±2.78° in males (P<0.05). The corresponding CT image data were as follows: PI, 1.08±0.22 cm in females and 0.85±0.27 cm in males (P>0.05); OP, 1.06±0.29 cm in females and 1.12±0.24 cm in males (P>0.05); Ðϴ, 55.33°±4.00° in females and 55. 50°±3.43° in males (P>0.05); and Ðφ was 39.21°±2.45°in females and 35.58°±2.31°in males (P<0.05). No significant difference with respect to sex and side existed between specimens and healthy adults (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS The measured parameter data obtained in healthy adults and cadaveric specimens provided an anatomic basis for the designation of the guide module, and thus confirmed the accuracy and safety of screw placement in fractured columns of the acetabulum. PMID:27584820

  3. EFFECT OF NITROGEN AND METAL ADDITIONS ON NITROGEN FIXATION ACTIVITY IN BIOLOGICAL SOIL CRUSTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, K.; Lui, D.; Anbar, A. D.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Hartnett, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSCs) are diverse consortia of microorganisms that live in intimate association with soils in arid environments. Also called cryptogamic or microbiotic crusts, these communities can include cyanobacteria, algae, heterotrophic bacteria, fungi, lichens, and mosses. Together, these organisms provide many services to their surrounding ecosystems, including reduction of water runoff, promotion of water infiltration, and prevention of soil erosion. The cyanobacteria and algae also provide fixed carbon (C) to the soil through photosynthesis, and because atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) in arid environments is low, the major input of biologically available N comes from cyanobacteria capable of converting nitrogen gas (N2) to ammonium (NH4+). Biological soil crusts are easily destroyed by livestock grazing, motor vehicle travel, and many forms of recreational and agricultural land use. Loss of BSC cover can leave the soil vulnerable to intense erosion that can remove the nutrients necessary to sustain plant and animal life, thus accelerating the process of desertification. In order to preserve existing crusts and encourage the development of new crusts, it is crucial to understand the nutrient requirements of metabolism and growth in these microbial communities. This study investigated the affect of nitrogen and metal additions on N2-fixation activity in cyanobacterially-dominated crusts from the Colorado Plateau near Moab, Utah. Although N2-fixation has been studied in this system before, the affect of nutrient additions on N2-fixation activity has not been documented. The goal of this work was to understand how N and metal supplementation affects crust N metabolism. Three experiments were conducted to observe how N2-fixation activity changed with the addition of N, molybdenum (Mo), and vanadium (V). Molybdenum and vanadium were chosen because they are most commonly found at the active site of the enzyme nitrogenase, the molecule responsible

  4. Fixation strength analysis of cup to bone material using finite element simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Iwan Budiwan; Saputra, Eko; Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.; van der Heide, Emile

    2016-04-01

    Fixation of acetabular cup to bone material is an important initial stability for artificial hip joint. In general, the fixation in cement less-type acetabular cup uses press-fit and screw methods. These methods can be applied alone or together. Based on literature survey, the additional screw inside of cup is effective; however, it has little effect in whole fixation. Therefore, an acetabular cup with good fixation, easy manufacture and easy installation is required. This paper is aiming at evaluating and proposing a new cup fixation design. To prove the strength of the present cup fixation design, the finite element simulation of three dimensional cup with new fixation design was performed. The present cup design was examined with twist axial and radial rotation. Results showed that the proposed cup design was better than the general version.

  5. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Yi-Lu; Liu, Mu-Yi; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p < 0.001). For screws without cement augmentation, solid screws exhibited the lowest pullout strength compared to the four expansive groups (p < 0.01). No significant differences in pullout strength were observed between the expansive screws with different designs (p > 0.05). Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength. PMID:26720724

  6. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Yi-Lu; Liu, Mu-Yi; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p < 0.001). For screws without cement augmentation, solid screws exhibited the lowest pullout strength compared to the four expansive groups (p < 0.01). No significant differences in pullout strength were observed between the expansive screws with different designs (p > 0.05). Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength. PMID:26720724

  7. Percutaneous Transpedicular Fixation: Technical tips and Pitfalls of Sextant and Pathfinder Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed Salah Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design The efficacy of the operative techniques, possible benefits as well as pitfalls and limitations of the techniques are discussed. Potential drawbacks are also detected. Purpose This study aims to report indications, techniques, and our experience with the use of the Sextant and PathFinder percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation systems. Overview of Literature Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion is a novel technique. Successful percutaneous placement of pedicle screws requires surgical skill and experience because of lack of anatomic surface landmarks. Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous placement of pedicle screws is effective. Many systems are now available. Methods We conducted a prospective operative and postoperative analysis of 40 patients with absolute indication for thoracic or lumbar instability between January 2009 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with the Sextant (group A) and PathFinder (group B) systems under fluoroscopic guidance. Operative techniques are discussed and the results compared. Results Percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation minimizes the morbidity associated with open techniques without compromising the quality of fixation. A total of 190 screws were inserted. There was no additional morbidity. Postoperative computed tomography images and plain X-rays were analyzed. Reduction of visual analog scale scores of back pain was evident. Conclusions Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous pedicular screws are feasible and can be safely done. Current systems allow multi-segmental fixation with significantly less difficulties. The described techniques have acceptable intra- and postoperative complication rates, and overall sufficient pain control with early mobilization of patients. PMID:26949466

  8. Comparison of the bending performance of solid and cannulated spinal pedicle screws using finite element analyses and biomechanical tests.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Yu, Shan-Chuen; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2015-09-01

    Spinal pedicle screw fixations have been used extensively to treat fracture, tumor, infection, or degeneration of the spine. Cannulated spinal pedicle screws with bone cement augmentation might be a useful method to ameliorate screw loosening. However, cannulated spinal pedicle screws might also increase the risk of screw breakage. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the bending performance of different spinal pedicle screws with either solid design or cannulated design. Three-dimensional finite element models, which consisted of the spinal pedicle screw and the screw's hosting material, were first constructed. Next, monotonic and cyclic cantilever bending tests were both applied to validate the results of the finite element analyses. Finally, both the numerical and experimental approaches were evaluated and compared. The results indicated that the cylindrical spinal pedicle screws with a cannulated design had significantly poorer bending performance. In addition, conical spinal pedicle screws maintained the original bending performance, whether they were solid or of cannulated design. This study may provide useful recommendations to orthopedic surgeons before surgery, and it may also provide design rationales to biomechanical engineers during the development of spinal pedicle screws. PMID:26208430

  9. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective.

  10. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective

  11. Strontium-impregnated bioabsorbable composite for osteoporotic fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Kuo, Chih-Lin; Fan, Fang-Yu; Yang, Kai-Chiang

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis impairs the bone-healing process as well as bone fracture fixation. The intervention of osteoporosis is considered to be one part of bone fracture treatment. Thus, orthopedic fixators impregnated with antiosteoporosis regimens will improve fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone. In this study, the strontium (Sr) and calcium phosphate ceramic (CPC) were mixed first and then mixed with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to fabricate a bioactive and bioabsorbable bone fixators. The prepared Sr-CPC/PCL screws were implanted into the distal femur of ovariectomized rabbits. The results showed that Sr-CPC/PCL composite had the appropriate mechanical properties, good biocompatibility, and radio-opacity. The Sr addition created a porous structure and accelerated the degradation of bone screws, but the degradation products did not acidify the surrounding environment. For osteoporotic animals, favorable osteointegration around the Sr-CPC/PCL screws was found, and the total porosity of trabecular bone was decreased under the inspections of micro-computerized tomography. Compared with PCL or CPC/PCL screw, animals which received Sr-CPC/PCL were found to have better results in terms of trabecular number, thickness, and separation. This study reveals that the Sr-impregnated bone fixator improves osseointegration in osteoporotic animals. Sr-CPC/PCL composite is a good candidate material for osteofixation in osteoporotic patients.

  12. Strontium-impregnated bioabsorbable composite for osteoporotic fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Kuo, Chih-Lin; Fan, Fang-Yu; Yang, Kai-Chiang

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis impairs the bone-healing process as well as bone fracture fixation. The intervention of osteoporosis is considered to be one part of bone fracture treatment. Thus, orthopedic fixators impregnated with antiosteoporosis regimens will improve fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone. In this study, the strontium (Sr) and calcium phosphate ceramic (CPC) were mixed first and then mixed with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) to fabricate a bioactive and bioabsorbable bone fixators. The prepared Sr-CPC/PCL screws were implanted into the distal femur of ovariectomized rabbits. The results showed that Sr-CPC/PCL composite had the appropriate mechanical properties, good biocompatibility, and radio-opacity. The Sr addition created a porous structure and accelerated the degradation of bone screws, but the degradation products did not acidify the surrounding environment. For osteoporotic animals, favorable osteointegration around the Sr-CPC/PCL screws was found, and the total porosity of trabecular bone was decreased under the inspections of micro-computerized tomography. Compared with PCL or CPC/PCL screw, animals which received Sr-CPC/PCL were found to have better results in terms of trabecular number, thickness, and separation. This study reveals that the Sr-impregnated bone fixator improves osseointegration in osteoporotic animals. Sr-CPC/PCL composite is a good candidate material for osteofixation in osteoporotic patients. PMID:25847487

  13. Cancellous Screws Are Biomechanically Superior to Cortical Screws in Metaphyseal Bone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Boone, Christopher; Behn, Anthony W; Ledesma, Justin B; Bishop, Julius A

    2016-09-01

    Cancellous screws are designed to optimize fixation in metaphyseal bone environments; however, certain clinical situations may require the substitution of cortical screws for use in cancellous bone, such as anatomic constraints, fragment size, or available instrumentation. This study compares the biomechanical properties of commercially available cortical and cancellous screw designs in a synthetic model representing various bone densities. Commercially available, fully threaded, 4.0-mm outer-diameter cortical and cancellous screws were tested in terms of pullout strength and maximum insertion torque in standard-density and osteoporotic cancellous bone models. Pullout strength and maximum insertion torque were both found to be greater for cancellous screws than cortical screws in all synthetic densities tested. The magnitude of difference in pullout strength between cortical and cancellous screws increased with decreasing synthetic bone density. Screw displacement prior to failure and total energy absorbed during pullout strength testing were also significantly greater for cancellous screws in osteoporotic models. Stiffness was greater for cancellous screws in standard and osteoporotic models. Cancellous screws have biomechanical advantages over cortical screws when used in metaphyseal bone, implying the ability to both achieve greater compression and resist displacement at the screw-plate interface. Surgeons should preferentially use cancellous over cortical screws in metaphyseal environments where cortical bone is insufficient for fixation. [Orthopedics.2016; 39(5):e828-e832.].

  14. Early clinical results with cortically based pedicle screw trajectory for fusion of the degenerative lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Glennie, R Andrew; Dea, Nicolas; Kwon, Brian K; Street, John T

    2015-06-01

    This study reviews the outcomes and revision rates of degenerative lumbar fusion surgery using cortical trajectory pedicle screws in lieu of traditional pedicle screw instrumentation. Pedicle screw fixation can be a challenge in patients with low bone mineral density. Wide posterior approaches to the lumbar spine exposing lateral to the facet joints and onto transverse processes causes an additional degree of muscular damage and blood loss not present with a simple laminectomy. A cortical bone trajectory pedicle screw has been proposed as an alternative to prevent screw pullout and decrease the morbidity associated with the wide posterior approach to the spine. We present a series of eight consecutive patients using a cortical bone trajectory instead of traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. A retrospective review of our institutional registry data identified eight patients who had cortical screws placed with the assistance of O-arm Stealth navigation (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) from 2010-2013. We analyzed the need for revision, the maintenance of reduction and the incidence of screw pullout or breakage. Our review demonstrated that two of eight patients were revised at an average of 12months. The reasons for these revisions were pseudarthrosis and caudal adjacent segment failure. All patients who were revised had frank screw loosening. We present early clinical results of a new technique that has been shown to have a better fixation profile in laboratory testing. Our less than favorable early clinical results should be interpreted with caution and highlight important technical issues which should be considered.

  15. Changes in the radiological measurements of the tibiofibular syndesmal area in patients with Weber C ankle fractures who were treated with open reduction, internal fixation, and transyndesmal screw.

    PubMed

    Jasqui-Remba, S; Torres-Gómez, A; Salas-Morales, G A; Hernández-Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    The tibiofibular syndesmosis provides stability to the ankle mortise. The ankle syndesmosis is compromised in all Weber C type injuries. The radiographic method described by Merle DAubigné considers the bony relationships as a measure of syndesmotic widening. We sought to investigate whether the patients with a C type ankle fracture treated with ORIF and placement of a transyndesmal screw have an increment of the tibiofibular space and decrease of the tibiofibular overlap after the transyndesmal screw is removed. Our sample included 52 patients with Weber C ankle fractures treated by ORIF and transyndesmal screw at a level II trauma center. We measured the tibiofibular clear space and tibiofibular overlap in each phase of the treatment. The transyndesmal screw was removed at day 55.56 (± 21.83). We found an increase of the tibiofibular overlap of 0.20 mm (± 2.29, p = 0.532); and 0.21 mm (± 0.97, p = 0.146) in the tibiofibular clear space. The changes of 2.38% in the tibiofibular overlap and 5.29% in the tibiofibular clear space between the postoperative and post-removal periods were not statistically significant. After removal of the syndesmal screw, there is a slight radiographic broadening of the syndesmosis; however, it is small and statistically not significant. PMID:27403518

  16. Changes in the radiological measurements of the tibiofibular syndesmal area in patients with Weber C ankle fractures who were treated with open reduction, internal fixation, and transyndesmal screw.

    PubMed

    Jasqui-Remba, S; Torres-Gómez, A; Salas-Morales, G A; Hernández-Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    The tibiofibular syndesmosis provides stability to the ankle mortise. The ankle syndesmosis is compromised in all Weber C type injuries. The radiographic method described by Merle DAubigné considers the bony relationships as a measure of syndesmotic widening. We sought to investigate whether the patients with a C type ankle fracture treated with ORIF and placement of a transyndesmal screw have an increment of the tibiofibular space and decrease of the tibiofibular overlap after the transyndesmal screw is removed. Our sample included 52 patients with Weber C ankle fractures treated by ORIF and transyndesmal screw at a level II trauma center. We measured the tibiofibular clear space and tibiofibular overlap in each phase of the treatment. The transyndesmal screw was removed at day 55.56 (± 21.83). We found an increase of the tibiofibular overlap of 0.20 mm (± 2.29, p = 0.532); and 0.21 mm (± 0.97, p = 0.146) in the tibiofibular clear space. The changes of 2.38% in the tibiofibular overlap and 5.29% in the tibiofibular clear space between the postoperative and post-removal periods were not statistically significant. After removal of the syndesmal screw, there is a slight radiographic broadening of the syndesmosis; however, it is small and statistically not significant.

  17. Surgical treatment of the osteoporotic spine with bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screw fixation: technical description and preliminary application in 43 patients

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Fei; Liu, Yaoyao; Zhang, Fei; Sun, Dong; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Zehua; Xu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe a new approach for the application of polymethylmethacrylate augmentation of bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws. METHODS: Between June 2010 and February 2013, 43 patients with degenerative spinal disease and osteoporosis (T-score <-2.5) underwent lumbar fusion using cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale and the Oswestry Disability Index. Patients were given radiographic follow-up examinations after 3, 6, and 12 months and once per year thereafter. RESULTS: All patients were followed for a mean of 15.7±5.6 months (range, 6 to 35 months). The Visual Analog Scale and Oswestry Disability Index scores showed a significant reduction in back pain (p = 0.018) and an improvement in lower extremity function (p = 0.025) in patients who underwent lumbar fusion using the novel screw. Intraoperative cement leakage occurred in four patients, but no neurological complications were observed. Radiological observation indicated no loosening or pulling out of the novel screw, and bone fusion was excellent. CONCLUSIONS: The described polymethylmethacrylate augmentation technique using bone cement-injectable cannulated pedicle screws can reduce pain and improve spinal dysfunction in osteoporotic patients undergoing osteoporotic spine surgery. PMID:25789520

  18. A 10-year follow-up of transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or intervertebral B-Twin system in failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The spine surgeons have been combining anterior and posterolateral fusion (circumferential fusion) as the final solution to treat spinal disorders and many have been using it to treat failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). In present study, we analyzed and compared the clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral B-Twin system for FBSS with a follow-up period of 10 years after the surgery. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective case study performed on 55 patients with FBSS. Clinical and radiological changes were compared between the two groups of patients on the basis of improvement of back pain, radicular pain, and work capacity. Outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year from before surgery until 2012. We analyzed the evolution of 55 cases of FBSS those underwent segmental circumferential posterior fusions from June 2001 to February 2003, operated by a single surgeon and followed up during 10 years until February 2012. The patients were divided into 2 groups: In 25 patients, posterolateral fusions with Legacy™ (Medtronic, Inc. NYSE: MDT) screws and intersomatic autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft was performed, and, in 30 patients, posterolateral fusions with the same screws and intersomatic fusion B-Twin (Biomet Spain Orthopaedics, S.L.) system was performed. In all cases, we used posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) approach for intervertebral graft, and the artrodesis was supplemented at intertransverse level with Autologus Growth Factor (AGF-MBA INCORPORADO, S.A.). The outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year and compared

  19. Effect of immersion in simulated body environment on mechanical properties of twist-oriented poly(lactic acid) screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Masato; Kobayashi, Satoshi; composite engineering lab Collaboration

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) has been applied to bone fixation devices, since it has high biocompatibility. In order to apply PLA device to a higher loaded part, mechanical properties of PLA have been improved by uniaxial drawing. However, mechanical properties along the other loading direction than the drawing direction such as torsion were not improved. Therefore, surgeon should be carefully conducted not to brake the reinforced PLA screw when tightening. In this study, screw is focused on as a bone fixation device. In order to improve torsional strength of a PLA screw, twist-orientation method was developed. PLA screw is prepared through a series of routes including casting, extrusion drawing, twist-orientation and forging. This screw was immersed in the phosphate buffered solution for 0, 8, 16 and 24 weeks, then shear strength, orientation function, crystallinity and molecular weight were measured. As a result, twist-orientation improves the initial torsional strength of PLA screw without the decrease in initial shear strength. In addition, the shear strength on twist-oriented screw is equivalent that of non-twist oriented screw during immersion until 24 weeks. This result shown that the twist-orientation does not decrease shear strength after immersion.

  20. Posterior Fixation Techniques in the Subaxial Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Makanji, Heeren; Cha, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the historical context, indications, techniques, and complications of four posterior fixation techniques to stabilize the subaxial cervical spine. Specifically, posterior wiring, laminar screw fixation, lateral mass fixation, and pedicle screw fixation are among the common methods of operative fixation of the subaxial cervical spine. While wiring and laminar screw fixation are now rarely used, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation are technically challenging and present the risk of significant complications if performed incorrectly. With a sound understanding of anatomy and rigorous preoperative evaluation of bony structures, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation provide a safe and reliable method for subaxial cervical spine fixation. PMID:26594602

  1. Geometric accuracy of 3D coordinates of the Leksell stereotactic skull frame in 1.5 Tesla- and 3.0 Tesla-magnetic resonance imaging: a comparison of three different fixation screw materials.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Hisato; Mori, Yoshimasa; Yamamuro, Osamu; Komori, Masataka; Shibamoto, Yuta; Uchiyama, Yukio; Tsugawa, Takahiko; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    We assessed the geometric distortion of 1.5-Tesla (T) and 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) images with the Leksell skull frame system using three types of cranial quick fixation screws (QFSs) of different materials-aluminum, aluminum with tungsten tip, and titanium-for skull frame fixation. Two kinds of acrylic phantoms were placed on a Leksell skull frame using the three types of screws, and were scanned with computed tomography (CT), 1.5-T MR imaging and 3.0-T MR imaging. The 3D coordinates for both strengths of MR imaging were compared with those for CT. The deviations of the measured coordinates at selected points (x = 50, 100 and 150; y = 50, 100 and 150) were indicated on different axial planes (z = 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150). The errors of coordinates with QFSs of aluminum, tungsten-tipped aluminum, and titanium were <1.0, 1.0 and 2.0 mm in the entire treatable area, respectively, with 1.5 T. In the 3.0-T field, the errors with aluminum QFSs were <1.0 mm only around the center, while the errors with tungsten-tipped aluminum and titanium were >2.0 mm in most positions. The geometric accuracy of the Leksell skull frame system with 1.5-T MR imaging was high and valid for clinical use. However, the geometric errors with 3.0-T MR imaging were larger than those of 1.5-T MR imaging and were acceptable only with aluminum QFSs, and then only around the central region.

  2. Biomechanical optimization of different fixation modes for a proximal femoral L-osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Chen, Weng-Pin; Chen, Hsih-Hao; Lin, Chien-Yu; Lee, Mel S

    2009-01-01

    Background Numerous proposed surgical techniques have had minimal success in managing greater trochanter overgrowth secondary to retarded growth of the femoral capital epiphysis. For reconstruction of residual hip deformities, a novel type of proximal femur L-osteotomy was performed with satisfactory results. Although the clinical outcome was good, the biomechanical characteristics of the femur after such an osteotomy have not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, this study presents a three dimensional finite element analysis designed to understand the mechanical characteristics of the femur after the L-osteotomy. Methods A patient with left hip dysplasia was recruited as the study model for L-osteotomy. The normal right hip was used as a reference for performing the corrective surgery. Four FEA models were constructed using different numbers of fixation screws but the same osteotomy lengths together with four FEA models with the same number of fixation screws but different osteotomy lengths. The von Mises stress distributions and femoral head displacements were analyzed and compared. Results The results revealed the following: 1). The fixation devices (plate and screws) sustained most of the external loading, and the peak value of von Mises stress on the fixation screws decreased with an increasing number of screws. 2). Additional screws are more beneficial on the proximal segment than on the distal segment for improving the stability of the postoperative femur. 3). The extent of osteotomy should be limited because local stress might be concentrated in the femoral neck region with increasing length of the L-osteotomy. Conclusion Additional screw placement on the proximal segment improves stability in the postoperative femur. The cobra-type plate with additional screw holes in the proximal area might improve the effectiveness of L-osteotomies. PMID:19744345

  3. Torsional moment to failure for carbon fibre polysulphone expandable rivets as compared with stainless steel screws for carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy fracture plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Sell, P J; Prakash, R; Hastings, G W

    1989-04-01

    A method of securing carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates with carbon fibre polysulphone expanding rivets was investigated. Six carbon fibre-reinforced epoxy bone plates were secured to rods with carbon fibre polysulphone rivets and six were secured with standard cortical stainless steel screws. These constructions were then subjected to pure torsional load to failure. The carbon fibre expandable rivets failed at a greater torsional moment.

  4. Bilateral Pedicle and Crossed Translaminar Screws in C2.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Daniel; Dea, Nicolas; Lee, Robert; Boyd, Michael C

    2015-10-01

    Multiple techniques exist for the fixation of C2, including axial pedicle screws and bilateral translaminar screws. We describe a novel method of incorporating both the translaminar and pedicle screws within C2 to improve fixation to the subaxial spine in patients requiring posterior cervical instrumentation for deformity correction or instability. We report three cases of patients with cervical spinal instability, who underwent cervical spine instrumentation for stabilization and/or deformity correction. Bilateral C2 pedicle screws were inserted, followed by bilateral crossed laminar screws. The instrumentation method successfully achieved fixation in all three patients. There were no immediate postoperative complications, and hardware positioning was satisfactory. Instrumenting C2 with translaminar and pedicle screws is technically feasible, and it may improve fixation to the subaxial spine in patients with poor bone quality or severe subaxial deformity, which require a stronger instrumentation construct.

  5. Comparison of Hallux Interphalangeal Joint Arthrodesis Fixation Techniques: A Retrospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Thorud, Jakob C; Jolley, Tyler; Shibuya, Naohiro; Lew, Eric; Britt, Matthew; Butterfield, Ted; Boike, Alan; Hardy, Mark; Brancheau, Steven P; Motley, Travis; Jupiter, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the complications that occur after hallux interphalangeal joint arthrodesis. The present study evaluated complications in 152 patients aged 18 to 80 years from 2005 to 2012 from 4 different academic institutions after hallux interphalangeal joint arthrodesis. Overall, 65.8% of the patients had ≥1 complication. Infections occurred in 16.5%, dehiscence in 12.5%, and reoperations in 27.0%. The clinical nonunion rate was ≥17.8%, and the radiographic nonunion rate was ≥13.8%. After logistic regression analysis, only the study site and peripheral neuropathy were associated with having ≥1 complication (p < .01 and p < .05, respectively). Single screw fixation compared with other fixation did not have a statistically significant influence on the postoperative complications. However, when fixation was expanded to 4 categories, single screw fixation had lower infection and reoperation rates than either crossed Kirschner wires or other fixation category but not compared with crossed screws on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Although additional studies are warranted, the findings from the present study might aid in both the prognosis of complications and the support of the use of a single screw over crossed Kirchner wire fixation in hallux interphalangeal joint arthrodesis.

  6. Percutaneous thoracolumbar decompression combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation and fusion: a method for treating spinal degenerative pain in a biplane angiography suite with the avoidance of general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Spondylytic degeneration of the axial lumbar spine is a major cause of pain and disability. Recent advances in spinal surgical instrumentation, including percutaneous access and fusion techniques, have made possible the performance of instrumented fusion through small incisions. By blending strategies of interventional pain management, neuroradiology, and conventional spine surgery, it is now feasible to treat spinal axial pain using permanent fixation techniques and local anesthesia in the setting of a fluoroscopy suite using mild sedation and local anesthesia. Methods The author presents a series of percutaneous thoracolumbar fusion procedures performed in a biplane neuroangiographic suite and without general anesthesia for the treatment of spondylytic pain. All procedures utilized pedicle screw fixation, harvesting of local bone autograft, and application of bone fusion material. Results In this series of 13 patients, a statistically significant reduction of pain was seen at both the 2-week post-operative timepoint, as well as at the time of longest follow-up (mean 40 weeks). Discussion The advanced and rapid imaging capabilities afforded by a neuroangiographic suite can be safely combined with percutaneous fusion techniques so as to allow for fusion therapies to be applied to patients where the avoidance of general anesthesia is desirable.

  7. Percutaneous thoracolumbar decompression combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation and fusion: a method for treating spinal degenerative pain in a biplane angiography suite with the avoidance of general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Spondylytic degeneration of the axial lumbar spine is a major cause of pain and disability. Recent advances in spinal surgical instrumentation, including percutaneous access and fusion techniques, have made possible the performance of instrumented fusion through small incisions. By blending strategies of interventional pain management, neuroradiology, and conventional spine surgery, it is now feasible to treat spinal axial pain using permanent fixation techniques and local anesthesia in the setting of a fluoroscopy suite using mild sedation and local anesthesia. Methods The author presents a series of percutaneous thoracolumbar fusion procedures performed in a biplane neuroangiographic suite and without general anesthesia for the treatment of spondylytic pain. All procedures utilized pedicle screw fixation, harvesting of local bone autograft, and application of bone fusion material. Results In this series of 13 patients, a statistically significant reduction of pain was seen at both the 2-week post-operative timepoint, as well as at the time of longest follow-up (mean 40 weeks). Discussion The advanced and rapid imaging capabilities afforded by a neuroangiographic suite can be safely combined with percutaneous fusion techniques so as to allow for fusion therapies to be applied to patients where the avoidance of general anesthesia is desirable. PMID:27683708

  8. Management of Postoperative Spondylodiscitis with and without Internal Fixation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Tao, Hairong; Zhu, Yanhui; Lu, Xiongwei; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spondylodiscitis is relatively uncommon. This complication is associated with increased cost, and long-term of inability to work, and even morbidity. Although the majority of postoperative spondylodiscitis cases can be well managed by conservative treatment, postoperative spondylodiscitis after internal fixation and those cases that are unresponsive to the conservative treatment present challenges to the surgeon. Here, a review was done to analyze the treatment of postoperative spondylodiscitis with/without internal fixation. This review article suggested that majority of postoperative spondylodiscitis without internal fixation could be cured by conservative treatment. Either posterior or anterior debridement can be used to treat postoperative spondylodiscitis without internal fixation when conservative treatment fails. In addition, minimally invasive debridement and drainage may also be an alternative treatment. In case of postoperative spondylodiscitis after internal fixation, surgical treatment was required. In the cervical spine, it can be well managed by anterior debridement, removal of internal fixation, and reconstruction of the spinal stability by using bone grafting/cage/anterior plate. Postoperative spondylodiscitis after internal fixation is successfully managed by combined anterior debridement, fusion with posterior approach and removal of pedicle screw or extension of pedicle screw beyond the lesion site, in the thoracic and lumbar spine. PMID:26242325

  9. Effect of twist-orientation on mechanical properties of self-reinforced poly(lactic acid) screws in simulated body environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Masato; Kobayashi, Satoshi; composite engineering lab Team

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) attracts much attention as a typical biodegradable polymer, and has been applied as a bone fixation device. As one of the methods to improve mechanical properties of PLA bone fixation device, orientations of molecular chains have been investigated. However, conventional uniaxial drawing could not improve mechanical properties along the other loading direction than the drawing direction, such as torsion. In this study, screw is treated as a bone fixation device. In order to improve torsional strength of a bioabsorbable PLA screw, twist-orientation method has been developed. PLA screw is prepared through a series of routes including extrusion molding, extrusion drawing, twist-orientation and forging. This screw was immersed in the phosphate buffer solution for 0, 8, 16 and 24 weeks, then shear strength, orientation function, crystallinity and molecular weight were measured. As a result, twist-orientation improves the initial torsional strength of PLA screw without the decrease in initial shear strength. In addition, the shear strength on twist-oriented screw is equivalent that of non-twist oriented screw during immersion until 24 weeks. This result shown that the twist-orientation does not decrease shear strength after immersion.

  10. The Use of MMF Screws: Surgical Technique, Indications, Contraindications, and Common Problems in Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Ehrenfeld, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mandibulo-maxillary fixation (MMF) screws are inserted into the bony base of both jaws in the process of fracture realignment and immobilisation. The screw heads act as anchor points to fasten wire loops or rubber bands connecting the mandible to the maxilla. Traditional interdental chain-linked wiring or arch bar techniques provide the anchorage by attached cleats, hooks, or eyelets. In comparison to these tooth-borne appliances MMF screws facilitate and shorten the way to achieve intermaxillary fixation considerably. In addition, MMF screws help to reduce the hazards of glove perforation and wire stick injuries. On the downside, MMF screws are attributed with the risk of tooth root damage and a lack of versatility beyond the pure maintenance of occlusion such as stabilizing loose teeth or splinting fragments of the alveolar process. The surgical technique of MMF screws as well as the pros and cons of the clinical application are reviewed. The adequate screw placement to prevent serious tooth root injuries is still an issue to rethink and modify conceptual guidelines. PMID:22110819

  11. Biomechanical analysis and clinical effects of bridge combined fixation system for femoral fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-xing; Xiong, Ying; Deng, Hong; Jia, Fu; Gu, Shao; Liu, Bai-lian; Li, Qun-hui; Pu, Qi; Zhang, Zhong-Zi

    2014-09-01

    This work aimed to compare the stress distribution and mechanical properties of our bridge combined fixation system and commonly used metal locking plate screw system by finite element analysis and by using the Zwick/Z100 testing machine. In addition, we also investigated the clinical outcome of our bridge combined fixation system for femoral fractures in 59 patients from June 2005 to January 2013. As a result, the stress distribution in the bone plate and screws of metal locking plate screw system during walking and climbing stairs was significantly lower than that of metal locking plate screw system. No significant difference in the displacement was observed between two systems. The equivalent bending stiffness of bridge combined fixation system was significantly lower than that of metal locking plate screw system. There were no significant differences in the bending strength, yield load, and maximum force between two systems. All the cases were followed up for 12-24 months (average 18 months). The X-ray showed bone callus was formed in most patients after 3 months, and the fracture line was faint and disappeared at 6-9 months postoperatively. No serious complications, such as implant breakage and wound infection, occurred postoperatively. According to self-developed standard for bone healing, clinical outcomes were rated as excellent or good in 55 out of 59 patients (success rate: 93.2%). Therefore, our findings suggest that our bridge combined fixation system may be a promising approach for treatment of long-bone fractures.

  12. Pull-out strength comparison of a novel expanding fastener against an orthopaedic screw in an ovine vertebral body: an ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Oldakowski, Matthew; Oldakowska, Intan; Kirk, Thomas B; Ford, Chris T; Sercombe, Tim B; Hardcastle, Philip; Day, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to mechanically test a novel Unthreaded Expandable Fastener (UEF), manufactured using Selective Laser Melting, which was designed for fixation in the cervical lateral mass. The pull-out strength and stiffness of the prototype UEFs was evaluated in a non-osteoporotic ovine bone model against equivalent screws. The prototype UEF demonstrated a 41% increase in failure force and a 60% reduction in failure force standard deviation compared to the screws. All bone samples were micro CT-scanned and no significant differences in bone microstructural properties was found between the screw and UEF sample sets, indicating that the UEFs may be less sensitive to bone quality variation. This increased performance can potentially translate into improved surgical outcome and reduced surgical risk for lateral mass fixation. With further design optimisation, additional improvement in performance over screws may be possible in future studies.

  13. Pull-out strength comparison of a novel expanding fastener against an orthopaedic screw in an ovine vertebral body: an ex-vivo study.

    PubMed

    Oldakowski, Matthew; Oldakowska, Intan; Kirk, Thomas B; Ford, Chris T; Sercombe, Tim B; Hardcastle, Philip; Day, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to mechanically test a novel Unthreaded Expandable Fastener (UEF), manufactured using Selective Laser Melting, which was designed for fixation in the cervical lateral mass. The pull-out strength and stiffness of the prototype UEFs was evaluated in a non-osteoporotic ovine bone model against equivalent screws. The prototype UEF demonstrated a 41% increase in failure force and a 60% reduction in failure force standard deviation compared to the screws. All bone samples were micro CT-scanned and no significant differences in bone microstructural properties was found between the screw and UEF sample sets, indicating that the UEFs may be less sensitive to bone quality variation. This increased performance can potentially translate into improved surgical outcome and reduced surgical risk for lateral mass fixation. With further design optimisation, additional improvement in performance over screws may be possible in future studies. PMID:26758778

  14. The Effects of Spinopelvic Parameters and Paraspinal Muscle Degeneration on S1 Screw Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Bum; Lee, Young-Seok; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Park, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for S1 screw loosening after lumbosacral fusion, including spinopelvic parameters and paraspinal muscles. Methods We studied with 156 patients with degenerative lumbar disease who underwent lumbosacral interbody fusion and pedicle screw fixation including the level of L5-S1 between 2005 and 2012. The patients were divided into loosening and non-loosening groups. Screw loosening was defined as a halo sign larger than 1 mm around a screw. We checked cross sectional area of paraspinal muscles, mean signal intensity of the muscles on T2 weight MRI as a degree of fatty degeneration, spinopelvic parameters, bone mineral density, number of fusion level, and the characteristic of S1 screw. Results Twenty seven patients showed S1 screw loosening, which is 24.4% of total. The mean duration for S1 screw loosening was 7.3±4.1 months after surgery. Statistically significant risk factors were increased age, poor BMD, 3 or more fusion levels (p<0.05). Among spinopelvic parameters, a high pelvic incidence (p<0.01), a greater difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordotic angle preoperatively (p<0.01) and postoperatively (p<0.05). Smaller cross-sectional area and high T2 signal intensity in both multifidus and erector spinae muscles were also significant muscular risk factors (p<0.05). Small converging angle (p<0.001) and short intraosseous length (p<0.05) of S1 screw were significant screw related risk factors (p<0.05). Conclusion In addition to well known risk factors, spinopelvic parameters and the degeneration of paraspinal muscles also showed significant effects on the S1 screw loosening. PMID:26587190

  15. Clear Zone Formation around Screws in the Early Postoperative Stages after Posterior Lumbar Fusion Using the Cortical Bone Trajectory Technique

    PubMed Central

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the initial fixation using the cortical bone trajectory (CBT) technique for posterior lumbar fusion through assessment of the clear zones around the screws and the risk factors involved. Overview of Literature Postoperative radiolucent zones (clear zones) are an indicator of poor conventional pedicle screw fixation. Methods Between January 2013 and April 2014, 19 patients (8 men and 11 women) underwent posterior lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar fusion using the CBT technique. A total of 109 screws were used for evaluation with measurement of the maximum insertional torque of last two screw rotations. Clear zone-positivity on plain radiographs was investigated 6 months after surgery. The relation between intraoperative insertional torque and clear zone-positivity was investigated by one-way analysis of variance. In addition, the correlation between clear zone-positivity and gender, age (<75 years old or >75 years old), or operative stabilization level (<2 or >3 vertebral levels) was evaluated using the chi-square test. Results Clear zones were observed around six screws (5.50%) in five patients (26.3%). The mean insertional torque (4.00±2.09 inlbs) of clear zone-positive screws was lower than that of clear zone-negative screws (8.12±0.50 in-lbs), but the difference was not significant. There was a significant correlation between clear zone-positivity and operative level of stabilization. Conclusions The low incidence of clear zone-positive screws indicates good initial fixation using the CBT technique. Multilevel fusions may be risk factors for clear zone generation. PMID:26713120

  16. Traumatic C6-7 subluxation with anomalous course of vertebral arteries treated with pedicle screw/rod fixation. Case report.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masashi; Koshi, Takana; Mannoji, Chikato; Okawa, Akihiko; Koda, Masao

    2007-07-01

    The authors report the case of a 62-year-old woman who suffered an accidental fall and complained of severe neck pain and right C-7 radiculopathy. A right C6-7 facet fracture-subluxation was diagnosed. Bone fragments impinged on the right C-7 nerve root at the neural foramen. The bilateral vertebral arteries (VAs) ascended at the anterior aspect of C-6 and C-5 and entered the transverse foramen at the C-4 level. Based on findings of anomalous VAs, the authors applied a pedicle screw (PS)/rod system to effect surgical correction of the deformity. Intraoperatively, they successfully performed reduction of the subluxation, decompression of the impinged nerve root, and minimum single-segment fusion involving the placement of a PS/rod system. After surgery, the patient's neurological deficit dramatically improved and spinal fusion was completed without any loss of deformity correction. Prior to surgery for cervical injuries, the possible presence of an abnormal VA course should be considered. Preoperative detection of anomalous VAs will affect decisions on the appropriate corrective surgery option in cases of cervical spine injuries. PMID:17633490

  17. Assessment of different screw augmentation techniques and screw designs in osteoporotic spines

    PubMed Central

    Chavanne, A.; Spitaler, R.; Kropik, K.; Aigner, N.; Ogon, M.; Redl, H.

    2008-01-01

    This is an experimental study on human cadaver spines. The objective of this study is to compare the pullout forces between three screw augmentation methods and two different screw designs. Surgical interventions of patients with osteoporosis increase following the epidemiological development. Biomechanically the pedicle provides the strongest screw fixation in healthy bone, whereas in osteoporosis all areas of the vertebra are affected by the disease. This explains the high screw failure rates in those patients. Therefore PMMA augmentation of screws is often mandatory. This study involved investigation of the pullout forces of augmented transpedicular screws in five human lumbar spines (L1–L4). Each spine was treated with four different methods: non-augmented unperforated (solid) screw, perforated screw with vertebroplasty augmentation, solid screw with vertebroplasty augmentation and solid screw with balloon kyphoplasty augmentation. Screws were augmented with Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The pullout forces were measured for each treatment with an Instron testing device. The bone mineral density was measured for each vertebra with Micro-CT. The statistical analysis was performed with a two-sided independent student t test. Forty screws (10 per group and level) were inserted. The vertebroplasty-augmented screws showed a significant higher pullout force (mean 918.5 N, P = 0.001) than control (mean 51 N), the balloon kyphoplasty group did not improve the pullout force significantly (mean 781 N, P > 0.05). However, leakage occurred in some cases treated with perforated screws. All spines showed osteoporosis on Micro-CT. Vertebroplasty-augmented screws, augmentation of perforated screws and balloon kyphoplasty augmented screws show higher pullout resistance than non-augmented screws. Significant higher pullout forces were only reached in the vertebroplasty augmented vertebra. The perforated screw design led to epidural leakage due to the position of the

  18. Loosening torque of Universal Abutment screws after cyclic loading: influence of tightening technique and screw coating

    PubMed Central

    Regalin, Alexandre; Bhering, Claudia Lopes Brilhante; Alessandretti, Rodrigo; Spazzin, Aloisio Oro

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of tightening technique and the screw coating on the loosening torque of screws used for Universal Abutment fixation after cyclic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implants (Titamax Ti Cortical, HE, Neodent) (n=10) were submerged in acrylic resin and four tightening techniques for Universal Abutment fixation were evaluated: A - torque with 32 Ncm (control); B - torque with 32 Ncm holding the torque meter for 20 seconds; C - torque with 32 Ncm and retorque after 10 minutes; D - torque (32 Ncm) holding the torque meter for 20 seconds and retorque after 10 minutes as initially. Samples were divided into subgroups according to the screw used: conventional titanium screw or diamond like carbon-coated (DLC) screw. Metallic crowns were fabricated for each abutment. Samples were submitted to cyclic loading at 106 cycles and 130 N of force. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). RESULTS The tightening technique did not show significant influence on the loosening torque of screws (P=.509). Conventional titanium screws showed significant higher loosening torque values than DLC (P=.000). CONCLUSION The use of conventional titanium screw is more important than the tightening techniques employed in this study to provide long-term stability to Universal Abutment screws. PMID:26576253

  19. Extra-articular extraosseous migration of a bioabsorbable femoral interference screw after ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Curtis, Christine; Micheli, Lyle

    2008-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is quite commonly used to treat anterior knee instability. Surgeon preference and patient functional goals determine graft selection and graft fixation techniques. Interference screws are considered a safe and effective device for graft fixation in surgical ACL reconstruction. Poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) bioabsorbable interference screws are becoming increasingly popular in ACL reconstruction surgery. There are several reasons why they may be more advantageous than metallic screws, including reduced graft laceration during insertion, ease of performance of revision procedures, avoidance of graft injury encountered with aperture fixation using metallic screws, and fewer artifacts on magnetic resonance images (MRI). Few studies describe complications associated with PLLA bioabsorbable screws, particularly extra-articular screw migration. This article presents a case of an extra-articular extraosseous migration of the femoral bioabsorbable interference screw. This case further demonstrates the problem of the femoral bioabsorbable interference screw.

  20. Early outcomes of proximal humerus fracture fixation with locking plate and intramedullary fibular strut graft.

    PubMed

    Tan, Edwin; Lie, Denny; Wong, M K

    2014-09-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are commonly encountered in elderly patients. Surgical treatment demonstrates high complication rates, including varus construct collapse and screw cutout. In this study, the authors evaluate the clinical outcome of locking plate fixation with intramedullary fibular strut graft augmentation as a primary surgical treatment in the prevention of early collapse and screw cutout. A total of 9 patients were evaluated. Surgery was performed for displaced proximal humerus fractures between April and December 2011. Patients were either class 2, 3, or 4, according to Neer classification. Mean patient age was 75.4 years. Preoperative and immediate, 6-week, and 3-month postoperative radiographs were evaluated. Head-shaft angles were measured to assess for varus collapse and displacement. Range of motion, complication rates, and functional recovery were also evaluated. Patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation with placement of an intramedullary fibular strut graft. Fixation was achieved with a Philos plate (Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland). Reduction and fixation were evaluated with radiographs. Passive exercises and range of motion were allowed immediately postoperatively, and all patients achieved active abduction and forward flexion 6 weeks postoperatively. Shoulder radiographs taken 12 weeks postoperatively revealed no loss of reduction or screw cutout. The introduction of the locking plate has improved outcomes. The addition of an intramedullary strut graft has shown improved preliminary results. Maintained reduction was observed in all 9 patients in the early postoperative period, and good functional motion was achieved. No incidence of screw cutout was recorded.

  1. Periprosthetic fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Mark; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Wähnert, Dirk

    2016-06-01

    Fixation techniques of periprosthetic fractures are far from ideal although the number of this entity is rising. The presence of an intramedullary implant generates its own fracture characteristics since stiffness is altered along the bone shaft and certain implant combinations affect load resistance of the bone. Influencing factors are cement fixation of the implant, intramedullary locking and extramedullary or intramedullary localization of the implant and the cortical thickness of the surrounding bone. Cerclage wires are ideally suited to fix radially displaced fragments around an intramedullary implant but they are susceptible to axial and torsional load. Screws should be added if these forces have to be neutralized. Stability of the screw fixation itself can be enhanced by embracement configuration around the intramedullary implant. Poor bone stock quality, often being present in metaphyseal areas limits screw fixation. Cement augmentation is an attractive option in this field to enhance screw purchase. PMID:27338227

  2. Control of Pedicle Screw Placement with an Electrical Conductivity Measurement Device: Initial Evaluation in the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Schomacher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Transpedicular screw fixation is widely used in spinal surgery. But the insertion of pedicle screws can sometimes be challenging because of the variability in pedicle size and the proximity of nerve roots. Methods. We detected intraoperatively the sensitivity for iatrogenic pedicel perforation with a hand-held electronic conductivity measurement device (ECD) that measures electrical conductivity of tissue-medium surrounding the instrument tip. ECD was used to guide the placement of 84 pedicle screws in 15 patients undergoing surgery for tumor or degenerative spinal disease at various spinal levels from T8 to L5. Additionally a CT-scan controlled screw positioning postoperatively. Results. The placement was “correct” (no mediocaudal pedicle wall penetration) for 78 of 84 (92,8%) screws, “suboptimal but acceptable” (0–2 mm penetration) for 4 of 84 (4,8%) screws, and “misplaced” (penetration > 2 mm) for 2 of 84 (2,4%) screws. Conclusion. Although this study was not designed to compare electronic conductivity technique to other guidance methods, such as fluoroscopy or navigation, a convincing “proof of concept” for ECD use in spinal instrumentation could be demonstrated. Advantages include easy handling without time-consuming setup and reduced X-ray exposure. However, further investigations are necessary to evaluate i.a. the economic aspects for this single-use developed instrument. PMID:27699203

  3. Control of Pedicle Screw Placement with an Electrical Conductivity Measurement Device: Initial Evaluation in the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Schomacher, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Transpedicular screw fixation is widely used in spinal surgery. But the insertion of pedicle screws can sometimes be challenging because of the variability in pedicle size and the proximity of nerve roots. Methods. We detected intraoperatively the sensitivity for iatrogenic pedicel perforation with a hand-held electronic conductivity measurement device (ECD) that measures electrical conductivity of tissue-medium surrounding the instrument tip. ECD was used to guide the placement of 84 pedicle screws in 15 patients undergoing surgery for tumor or degenerative spinal disease at various spinal levels from T8 to L5. Additionally a CT-scan controlled screw positioning postoperatively. Results. The placement was “correct” (no mediocaudal pedicle wall penetration) for 78 of 84 (92,8%) screws, “suboptimal but acceptable” (0–2 mm penetration) for 4 of 84 (4,8%) screws, and “misplaced” (penetration > 2 mm) for 2 of 84 (2,4%) screws. Conclusion. Although this study was not designed to compare electronic conductivity technique to other guidance methods, such as fluoroscopy or navigation, a convincing “proof of concept” for ECD use in spinal instrumentation could be demonstrated. Advantages include easy handling without time-consuming setup and reduced X-ray exposure. However, further investigations are necessary to evaluate i.a. the economic aspects for this single-use developed instrument.

  4. Pull-out strength of screws from polymethylmethacrylate cement.

    PubMed

    Motzkin, N E; Chao, E Y; An, K N; Wikenheiser, M A; Lewallen, D G

    1994-03-01

    We aimed to determine the optimal method of inserting a screw into polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement to enhance fixation. We performed six groups of ten axial pull-out tests with two sizes of screw (3.5 and 4.5 mm AO cortical) and three methods of insertion. Screws were placed into 'fluid' PMMA, into 'solid' PMMA by drilling and tapping, or into 'curing' PMMA with quarter-revolution turns every 30 seconds until the PMMA had hardened. After full hardening, we measured the maximum load to failure for each screw-PMMA construct. We found no significant difference in the pull-out strengths between screw sizes or between screws placed in fluid or solid PMMA. Screws placed in curing PMMA were significantly weaker: the relative strengths of solid, fluid and curing groups were 100%, 97% and 71%, respectively. We recommend the use of either solid or fluid insertion according to the circumstances and the preference of the surgeon. PMID:8113302

  5. Cortical screw support in femoral neck fractures. A radiographic analysis of 87 fractures with a new mensuration technique.

    PubMed

    Lindequist, S

    1993-06-01

    In 87 femoral neck fractures, operated on with 2 von Bahr screws and followed for up to 2 years, the positions of the fixating screws were determined with a new mensuration technique which compensates for the variations in hip rotation in routine radiographs. The union rate of the fractures was related to the position of the screws. A posterior placement of the proximal screw and an inferior placement of the distal screw in both the femoral head and neck improved the outcome substantially.

  6. A comparative study of fixation techniques for type II fractures of the odontoid process.

    PubMed

    Graziano, G; Jaggers, C; Lee, M; Lynch, W

    1993-12-01

    Primary screw fixation of a Type II odontoid fracture or non-union is an attractive alternative to posterior atlanto-axial arthrodesis in that normal cervical motion can be maintained. Eight cervical cadaver spines, ranging in age from 17-90 years, were used for study. Type II fractures of the dens were created using an osteotome. Simulated fractures were fixed using one or two 3.5-mm bone screws. After testing each screw fixation technique, the screws were removed and a posterior C1-C2 brooks sublaminar wiring was performed using four 18-gauge wires with wooden blocks to simulate bone graft. No significant differences were found between bending and torsional stiffnesses for the one-screw and two-screw specimens. No significant differences were found between one- and two-screw fixation when compared with primary C1-C2 wiring in torsion. One- or two-screw fixation was as stiff as primary C1-C2 wiring in bending. One or two screws offers similar stability for fixation for a dens fracture. One- and two-screw fixation is at least as stiff as primary C1-C2 wiring in torsion and one- or two-screw fixation is stiffer than primary C1-C2 wiring in bending. PMID:8303437

  7. Surgical Treatment of Calcaneal Avulsion Fracture in Elderly Patients Using Cannulated Cancellous Screws and Titanium Wire.

    PubMed

    Miyamura, Satoshi; Ota, Haruka; Okamoto, Michio; Namba, Jiro; Yamamoto, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the calcaneus are relatively uncommon and are seen most frequently in elderly or osteoporotic patients. A surgical method that avoids displacement of the avulsed fragment after fixation has not been developed. We report the cases of 3 patients (a 73-year-old male, an 85-year-old male, and an 81-year-old female) treated by open reduction and internal fixation using titanium wire and cannulated cancellous screws. The posterior approach was used by way of a vertical midline incision. The fracture was fixed with 2 screws, and then a titanium wire was passed through the holes of the cannulated screws. A small incision on the lateral side of planter was added for the exit and return of the wire. The wire knot was bent inside the proximal Achilles tendon bursa in 2 patients and was directed to the plantar side in 1 to avoid irritation. Bony union was achieved without repeat displacement of the fragment in all 3 patients. Normal ankle function was restored, and the patients recovered the activities of daily living almost to the original level. Although an additional plantar incision is required, this surgical technique provides strong internal fixation.

  8. Evaluation of 3 Fixation Devices for Tibial-Sided Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Backup Fixation.

    PubMed

    Verioti, Christopher A; Sardelli, Matthew C; Nguyen, Tony

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a study to biomechanically evaluate 3 methods of tibial-sided fixation for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: fully threaded interference screw only, interference screw backed with 4.75-mm SwiveLock anchor, and fully threaded bio-interference screw backed with 4.5-mm bicortical screw (all Arthrex). Thirty skeletally mature porcine tibiae were used. The first group was prepared by graft fixation within the tibial tunnel using only an interference screw. The second and third groups included an interference screw with 2 types of secondary fixation: 4.5-mm bicortical post and SwiveLock anchor. Mechanical testing consisted of 500 cycles between 50 and 250 N at 1 Hz, followed by a pull to failure conducted at 20 mm per minute. Ultimate load-to-failure testing demonstrated the largest mean (SD) load tolerated in the post/washer group, 1148 (186) N, versus the SwiveLock group, 1007 (176) N, and the screw-only group, 778 (139) N. There was no statistical difference between the 2 backup fixation groups. Use of a SwiveLock anchor as backup fixation at the tibial side in soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a safe, effective alternative to a bicortical post and provides statistically equivalent pullout strength with unlikely requirement for future hardware removal.

  9. Cell-specific CO2 fixation rates of two distinct groups of plastidic protists in the Atlantic Ocean remain unchanged after nutrient addition.

    PubMed

    Grob, Carolina; Jardillier, Ludwig; Hartmann, Manuela; Ostrowski, Martin; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Scanlan, David J

    2015-04-01

    To assess the role of open-ocean ecosystems in global CO2 fixation, we investigated how picophytoplankton, which dominate primary production, responded to episodic increases in nutrient availability. Previous experiments have shown nitrogen alone, or in combination with phosphorus or iron, to be the proximate limiting nutrient(s) for total phytoplankton grown over several days. Much less is known about how nutrient upshift affects picophytoplankton CO2 fixation over the duration of the light period. To address this issue, we performed a series of small volume (8-60 ml) - short term (10-11 h) nutrient addition experiments in different regions of the Atlantic Ocean using NH4 Cl, FeCl3 , K medium, dust and nutrient-rich water from 300 m depth. We found no significant nutrient stimulation of group-specific CO2 fixation rates of two taxonomically and size-distinct groups of plastidic protists. The above was true regardless of the region sampled or nutrient added, suggesting that this is a generic phenomenon. Our findings show that at least in the short term (i.e. daylight period), nutrient availability does not limit CO2 fixation by the smallest plastidic protists, while their taxonomic composition does not determine their response to nutrient addition. PMID:25345650

  10. Cell-specific CO2 fixation rates of two distinct groups of plastidic protists in the Atlantic Ocean remain unchanged after nutrient addition.

    PubMed

    Grob, Carolina; Jardillier, Ludwig; Hartmann, Manuela; Ostrowski, Martin; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Scanlan, David J

    2015-04-01

    To assess the role of open-ocean ecosystems in global CO2 fixation, we investigated how picophytoplankton, which dominate primary production, responded to episodic increases in nutrient availability. Previous experiments have shown nitrogen alone, or in combination with phosphorus or iron, to be the proximate limiting nutrient(s) for total phytoplankton grown over several days. Much less is known about how nutrient upshift affects picophytoplankton CO2 fixation over the duration of the light period. To address this issue, we performed a series of small volume (8-60 ml) - short term (10-11 h) nutrient addition experiments in different regions of the Atlantic Ocean using NH4 Cl, FeCl3 , K medium, dust and nutrient-rich water from 300 m depth. We found no significant nutrient stimulation of group-specific CO2 fixation rates of two taxonomically and size-distinct groups of plastidic protists. The above was true regardless of the region sampled or nutrient added, suggesting that this is a generic phenomenon. Our findings show that at least in the short term (i.e. daylight period), nutrient availability does not limit CO2 fixation by the smallest plastidic protists, while their taxonomic composition does not determine their response to nutrient addition.

  11. Reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement.

    PubMed

    Van Landuyt, P; Peter, B; Beluze, L; Lemaître, J

    1999-08-01

    The fixation of osteosynthesis screws remains a severe problem for fracture repair among osteoporotic patients. Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) is routinely used to improve screw fixation, but this material has well-known drawbacks such as monomer toxicity, exothermic polymerization, and nonresorbability. Calcium phosphate cements have been developed for several years. Among these new bone substitution materials, brushite cements have the advantage of being injectable and resorbable. The aim of this study is to assess the reinforcement of osteosynthesis screws with brushite cement. Polyurethane foams, whose density is close to that of cancellous bone, were used as bone model. A hole was tapped in a foam sample, then brushite cement was injected. Trabecular osteosynthesis screws were inserted. After 24 h of aging in water, the stripping force was measured by a pull-out test. Screws (4.0 and 6.5 mm diameter) and two foam densities (0.14 and 0.28 g/cm3) were compared. Cements with varying solid/liquid ratios and xanthan contents were used in order to obtain the best screw reinforcement. During the pull-out test, the stripping force first increases to a maximum, then drops to a steady-state value until complete screw extraction. Both maximum force and plateau value increase drastically in the presence of cement. The highest stripping force is observed for 6.5-mm screws reinforced with cement in low-density foams. In this case, the stripping force is multiplied by 3.3 in the presence of cement. In a second experiment, cements with solid/liquid ratio ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 g/mL were used with 6.5-mm diameter screws. In some compositions, xanthan was added to improve injectability. The best results were obtained with 2.5 g/mL cement containing xanthan and with 3.0 g/mL cements without xanthan. A 0.9-kN maximal stripping force was observed with nonreinforced screws, while 1.9 kN was reached with reinforced screws. These first results are very promising regarding screw

  12. Surgical screw segmentation for mobile C-arm CT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Joseph; Brehler, Michael; Franke, Jochen; Wolf, Ivo; Vetter, Sven Y.; Grützner, Paul A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Nabers, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Calcaneal fractures are commonly treated by open reduction and internal fixation. An anatomical reconstruction of involved joints is mandatory to prevent cartilage damage and premature arthritis. In order to avoid intraarticular screw placements, the use of mobile C-arm CT devices is required. However, for analyzing the screw placement in detail, a time-consuming human-computer interaction is necessary to navigate through 3D images and therefore to view a single screw in detail. Established interaction procedures of repeatedly positioning and rotating sectional planes are inconvenient and impede the intraoperative assessment of the screw positioning. To simplify the interaction with 3D images, we propose an automatic screw segmentation that allows for an immediate selection of relevant sectional planes. Our algorithm consists of three major steps. At first, cylindrical characteristics are determined from local gradient structures with the help of RANSAC. In a second step, a DBScan clustering algorithm is applied to group similar cylinder characteristics. Each detected cluster represents a screw, whose determined location is then refined by a cylinder-to-image registration in a third step. Our evaluation with 309 screws in 50 images shows robust and precise results. The algorithm detected 98% (303) of the screws correctly. Thirteen clusters led to falsely identified screws. The mean distance error for the screw tip was 0.8 +/- 0.8 mm and for the screw head 1.2 +/- 1 mm. The mean orientation error was 1.4 +/- 1.2 degrees.

  13. Polypyrrole coating on poly-(lactide/glycolide)-β-tricalcium phosphate screws enhances new bone formation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Dong; Björninen, Miina; Cao, Lu; Wang, Hui-Ren; Pelto, Jani; Li, Xiang-Qian; Hyttinen, Jari; Jiang, Yun-Qi; Kellomäki, Minna; Miettinen, Susanna; Sándor, George K; Seppänen, Riitta; Haimi, Suvi; Dong, Jian

    2015-11-27

    Polypyrrole (PPy) has gained interest as an implant material due to its multifunctional properties and its high compatibility with several cell and tissue types. For the first time, the biocompatibility and osteointegration of PPy coating, incorporated with chondroitin sulfate (CS), were studied in vivo by implanting PPy-coated bioabsorbable bone fixation composite screws of poly-(lactide/glycolide) copolymer (PLGA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) into New Zealand white rabbits. Uncoated bioabsorbable polymer composite screws and commercially available stainless steel cortical screws were used as reference implants. The rabbits were euthanized 12 and 26 weeks after the implantation. The systemic effects were evaluated from food and water consumption, body weight, body temperature, clinical signs, blood samples, internal organ weights, and histological examination. Local effects were studied from bone tissue and surrounding soft tissue histology. New bone formation was evaluated by micro-computed tomography, tetracycline labeling and torsion tests. Torsion tests were performed in order to capture the peak value of the torsion force during the course of the screw's loosening. The coated screws induced significantly more bone formation than the uncoated screws. In addition, none of the implants induced any systemic or local toxicity. The results suggest that PPy is biocompatible with bone tissue and is a potential coating for enhancing osteointegration in orthopedic implants.

  14. Polypyrrole coating on poly-(lactide/glycolide)-β-tricalcium phosphate screws enhances new bone formation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Dong; Björninen, Miina; Cao, Lu; Wang, Hui-Ren; Pelto, Jani; Li, Xiang-Qian; Hyttinen, Jari; Jiang, Yun-Qi; Kellomäki, Minna; Miettinen, Susanna; Sándor, George K; Seppänen, Riitta; Haimi, Suvi; Dong, Jian

    2015-12-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) has gained interest as an implant material due to its multifunctional properties and its high compatibility with several cell and tissue types. For the first time, the biocompatibility and osteointegration of PPy coating, incorporated with chondroitin sulfate (CS), were studied in vivo by implanting PPy-coated bioabsorbable bone fixation composite screws of poly-(lactide/glycolide) copolymer (PLGA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) into New Zealand white rabbits. Uncoated bioabsorbable polymer composite screws and commercially available stainless steel cortical screws were used as reference implants. The rabbits were euthanized 12 and 26 weeks after the implantation. The systemic effects were evaluated from food and water consumption, body weight, body temperature, clinical signs, blood samples, internal organ weights, and histological examination. Local effects were studied from bone tissue and surrounding soft tissue histology. New bone formation was evaluated by micro-computed tomography, tetracycline labeling and torsion tests. Torsion tests were performed in order to capture the peak value of the torsion force during the course of the screw's loosening. The coated screws induced significantly more bone formation than the uncoated screws. In addition, none of the implants induced any systemic or local toxicity. The results suggest that PPy is biocompatible with bone tissue and is a potential coating for enhancing osteointegration in orthopedic implants. PMID:26610717

  15. Cement leakage in pedicle screw augmentation: a prospective analysis of 98 patients and 474 augmented pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jan U; Baldauf, Joerg; Marx, Sascha; Kirsch, Michael; Schroeder, Henry W S; Pillich, Dirk T

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Loosening and pullout of pedicle screws are well-known problems in pedicle screw fixation surgery. Augmentation of pedicle screws with bone cement, first described as early as 1975, increases the pedicle-screw interface and pullout force in osteoporotic vertebrae. The aim of the present study was to identify cement leakage and pulmonary embolism rates in a large prospective single-center series of pedicle screw augmentations. METHODS All patients who underwent cement-augmented pedicle screw placement between May 2006 and October 2010 at the authors' institution were included in this prospective cohort study. Perivertebral cement leakage and pulmonary cement embolism were evaluated with a CT scan of the area of operation and with a radiograph of the chest, respectively. RESULTS A total of 98 patients underwent placement of cement-augmented pedicle screws; 474 augmented screws were inserted in 237 vertebrae. No symptomatic perivertebral cement leakage or symptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was observed, but asymptomatic perivertebral cement leakage was seen in 88 patients (93.6%) and in 165 augmented vertebrae (73.3%). Cement leakage most often occurred in the perivertebral venous system. Clinically asymptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was found in 4 patients (4.1%). CONCLUSIONS Perivertebral cement leakage often occurs in pedicle screw augmentation, but in most cases, it is clinically asymptomatic. Cement augmentation should be performed under continuous fluoroscopy to avoid high-volume leakage. Alternative strategies, such as use of expandable screws, should be examined in more detail for patients at high risk of screw loosening.

  16. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: Fixation Technique Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Russo, Franco; Doan, Joshua; Chase, Derek C; Farnsworth, Christine L; Pennock, Andrew T

    2016-05-01

    Introduction The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the primary soft-tissue stabilizer of the patella and it is often reconstructed in patients with recurrent patella instability. This biomechanical analysis evaluates the integrity of four methods of MPFL reconstruction subjected to cyclic loading using a porcine model. Methods Four techniques of MPFL reconstruction were analyzed using a 4 mm flexor tendon graft, all with two points of patellar fixation to best recreate the native MPFL anatomy. The four techniques were: (1) interference screw technique, (2) suture anchor technique, (3) converging tunnel technique, and (4) two bone tunnel technique. Maximum load, yield load, and stiffness of the graft fixation/bone complex were analyzed, and statistics were performed with SPSS and significance set at a p-value of < 0.05. Results The converging tunnel technique demonstrated the highest maximum load and yield load, significantly higher than the interference screw or suture anchor groups (p = 0.007). In addition, the converging tunnel technique demonstrated the greatest stiffness with significantly greater stiffness than the two bone tunnel techniques (p = 0.016). Conclusion The combination of strength and stiffness, the avoidance of patella implants, and the creation of a single transosseous tunnel make the converging tunnel technique a desirable technique for MPFL reconstructions. PMID:26190788

  17. Quantitative Anatomy of C7 Vertebra in Southern Chinese for Insertion of Lateral Mass Screws and Pedicle Screws

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chi Hin; Wong, Kam Kwong; Wong, Wing Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To analyze the quantitative anatomy of C7 vertebra for insertion of lateral mass screws and pedicle screws in Southern Chinese patients. Overview of Literature C7 lateral mass is smaller when compared to other subaxial cervical levels, which limits the length of lateral mass screws that can be used. Some studies have suggested pedicle screws for better fixation. But, this option is limited by the narrow pedicle width. Methods We have obtained computed tomography (CT) cervical spine data in 0.625 mm slices from our radiology department. The patients were adults. CTs were from May to August, 2015. The lateral mass screw length was measured using Margerl's technique and pedicle width and pedicle screw trajectory were determined in three-dimensional reformated images. Results CT scans of cervical spines of 94 patients were obtained and 188 lateral masses and pedicles of C7 vertebrae were measured. The mean lateral mass screw length was 13.2 mm (standard deviation [SD] 1.6 mm), mean outer pedicle width was 5.9 mm (SD 1.0 mm) and mean pedicle screw trajectory was 29.4 degrees (SD 3.6 degrees). Most (91.0%) of the pedicles had an outer diameter ≥4.5 mm. Conclusions The mean lateral mass screw length was longer when compared with other similar studies, while the mean outer pedicle width was narrower. Nearly 10% of the pedicles were unable to accommodate 3.5 mm screws. These findings favor the use of lateral mass screws to provide a safe and stable fixation for C7 vertebrae in Southern Chinese patients, while the final choice of fixation method should only be confirmed after careful preoperative planning with CT scan. PMID:27559451

  18. Comparison Study between Conventional Sequence and Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) in the Diagnosis of Postoperative Complications in Patients Receiving Lumbar Inter-Body Fusion and Pedicle Screw Fixation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sol Bee; Kwon, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) sequence is one of the metal artifact reduction techniques of anatomical structure, but there has been no report about evaluation of post-operative complications. The purpose of this article is to compare the anatomical visibility between fast spin echo (FSE) and FSE-SEMAC and to evaluate the additional value of FSE-SEMAC in diagnostic confidence of the complications. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective study with 54 patients who received lumbar spinal surgery and MR images including FSE-SEMAC. For the semi-quantitative evaluation, the visibility of anatomical structures (neural foramen, bone-inter-body cage interface, central canal, nerve root in epidural space, back muscle, and bone-pedicle screw interface) was evaluated. For qualitative evaluation, we evaluated FSE and FSE with FSE-SEMAC independently, and recorded the diagnostic confidence level of post-operative complications. Generalized estimating equation regression analysis was used for statistical analysis, and a weighted kappa was used for inter-observer agreement. Results Scores of 6 imaging findings with FSE-SEMAC were significantly higher than that of FSE (P-value < .0001). Inter-observer agreements show good reliability (weighted kappa = 0.45–0.75). Both reviewers deemed 37 (reviewer 1) or 19 more (reviewer 2) post-operative complications with FSE plus FSE-SEMAC, compared to FSE only. Except for central canal stenosis (P-value = .2408), diagnostic confidence level for other post-operative complications were significantly higher with FSE plus FSE-SEMAC (P-value = .0000) than FSE. Conclusions FSE-SEMAC significantly reduces image distortion, compared to FSE sequence in 3.0-T MR. Also, diagnostic confidence for post-operative complications was higher when FSE with additional FSE-SEMAC compared to FSE only. PMID:27711137

  19. Enhancement of biodegradation and osseointegration of poly(ε-caprolactone)/calcium phosphate ceramic composite screws for osteofixation using calcium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Hsu, Li-Ho; Tsai, Yuh-Feng; Sumi, Shoichiro; Yang, Kai-Chiang

    2016-04-01

    Internal fixation devices, which can stabilize and realign fractured bone, are widely used in fracture management. In this paper, a biodegradable composite fixator, composed of poly(ε-caprolactone), calcium phosphate ceramic and calcium sulfate (PCL/CPC/CS), is developed. The composition of CS, which has a high dissolution rate, was expected to create a porous structure to improve osteofixation to the composite fixator. PCL, PCL/CPC, and PCL/CPC/CS samples were prepared and their physical properties were characterized in vitro. In vivo performance of the composite screws was verified in the distal femurs of rabbits. Results showed that the PCL/CPC/CS composite had a higher compressive strength (28.55 ± 3.32 MPa) in comparison with that of PCL (20.64 ± 1.81 MPa) (p < 0.05). A larger amount of apatite was formed on PCL/CPC/CS than on PCL/CPC, while no apatite was found on PCL after simulated body fluid immersion. In addition, PCL/CPC/CS composites also had a faster in vitro degradation rate (13.05 ± 3.42% in weight loss) relative to PCL (1.79 ± 0.23%) and PCL/CPC (4.32 ± 2.18%) (p < 0.001). In animal studies, PCL/CPC/CS screws showed a greater volume loss than that of PCL or PCL/CPC at 24 weeks post-implantation. Under micro-computerized tomography observation, animals with PCL/CPC/CS implants had better osseointegration in terms of the structural parameters of the distal metaphysis, including trabecular number, trabecular spacing, and connectivity density, than the PCL screw. This study reveals that the addition of CS accelerates the biodegradation and enhanced apatite formation of the PCL/CPC composite screw. This osteoconductive PCL/CPC/CS is a good candidate material for internal fixation devices. PMID:27041468

  20. Pedicle screw placement in the lumbar spine: effect of trajectory and screw design on acute biomechanical purchase.

    PubMed

    Wray, Steven; Mimran, Ronnie; Vadapalli, Sasidhar; Shetye, Snehal S; McGilvray, Kirk C; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2015-05-01

    -quality bone group. These significant differences were also found in the lowquality bone cohort. All mechanical parameter comparisons (screw type and trajectory) between high-quality and lowquality samples were significant (p < 0.01), and these data were all linearly correlated (r ≥ 0.65) to bone mineral density. Not all mechanical parameters determined from pullout and toggle testing were statistically significant between the 3 screw/trajectory combinations. The incidence of cortical wall breach with the cortical or traditional pedicle screw trajectories was not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS The data demonstrated that the cortical trajectory provides denser bone that allows for utilization of smaller screws to obtain mechanical purchase that is equivalent to long pedicle screws placed in traditional pedicle screw trajectories for both normal- and low-quality bone. Overall, this biomechanical study in cadavers provides evidence that the cortical screw trajectory represents a good option to obtain fixation for the lumbar spine with low-quality bone.

  1. Biomechanical testing of the LCP--how can stability in locked internal fixators be controlled?

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Karl; Dieter, Ulrich; Stachowiak, Gwidon; Gächter, André; Kuster, Markus S

    2003-11-01

    New plating techniques, such as non-contact plates, have been introduced in acknowledgment of the importance of biological factors in internal fixation. Knowledge of the fixation stability provided by these new plates is very limited and clarification is still necessary to determine how the mechanical stability, e.g. fracture motion, and the risk of implant failure can best be controlled. The results of a study based on in vitro experiments with composite bone cylinders and finite element analysis using the Locking Compression Plate (LCP) for diaphyseal fractures are presented and recommendations for clinical practice are given. Several factors were shown to influence stability both in compression and torsion. Axial stiffness and torsional rigidity was mainly influenced by the working length, e.g. the distance of the first screw to the fracture site. By omitting one screw hole on either side of the fracture, the construct became almost twice as flexible in both compression and torsion. The number of screws also significantly affected the stability, however, more than three screws per fragment did little to increase axial stiffness; nor did four screws increase torsional rigidity. The position of the third screw in the fragment significantly affected axial stiffness, but not torsional rigidity. The closer an additional screw is positioned towards the fracture gap, the stiffer the construct becomes under compression. The rigidity under torsional load was determined by the number of screws only. Another factor affecting construct stability was the distance of the plate to the bone. Increasing this distance resulted in decreased construct stability. Finally, a shorter plate with an equal number of screws caused a reduction in axial stiffness but not in torsional rigidity. Static compression tests showed that increasing the working length, e.g. omitting the screws immediately adjacent to the fracture on both sides, significantly diminished the load causing plastic

  2. [Mechanical behavior of Ilizarov ring fixators. Effect of frame parameters on stiffness and consequences for clinical use].

    PubMed

    Duda, G N; Kassi, J P; Hoffmann, J E; Riedt, R; Khodadadyan, C; Raschke, M

    2000-10-01

    Using a mechanical testing procedure, various fixator constructs were tested in vitro. In addition, the influence of the passive soft tissue structures on the fixation stiffness was determined. An increased number of Schanz' screws or Kirschner wires led to a comparable increase in stiffness than that observed with an increasing screw or wire diameter. In consequence, larger diameters should be preferred over an additional screw or wire where clinically applicable. With diaphyseal telescoping rods only the axial stiffness decreased. As expected, large ring diameters as well as titanium wires reduced stiffness components. Bracing the outer rings caused a reduction of the overall stiffness. Asymmetric pre-tensioning of the K-wires resulted in a significant reduction of tension in the neighboring wire. Removal of the soft tissues reduced stiffness to a similar extend as experienced in a fibula defect situation. The study demonstrates the correlation between design parameters, passive soft tissues and fixation stiffness and presents guidelines for an optimized fixator design. PMID:11098743

  3. Proximal migration of hardware in patients undergoing midcarpal fusion with headless compression screws.

    PubMed

    Shifflett, Grant D; Athanasian, Edward A; Lee, Steve K; Weiland, Andrew J; Wolfe, Scott W

    2014-11-01

    Background Scaphoid excision and limited intercarpal fusion is a common surgical procedure performed for degenerative disorders of the wrist including scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist deformities. Postoperative screw migration is a rare but devastating complication that can result in severe degenerative changes in the radiocarpal joint. Questions/Purposes The purpose of this study is to report on a series of patients who developed proximal migration of their hardware following limited intercarpal fusions with headless compression screws. Patients and Methods Four patients were identified between 2001 and 2012 who were indicated for and underwent scaphoid excision and midcarpal fusions with headless compression screw fixation and subsequently developed hardware migration with screw protrusion into the radiocarpal joint. Detailed chart review was performed. Results Mean age at surgery was 64 years (57-69 years). All patients had the diagnosis of SLAC wrist. Mean time to detection of failure was 6 months (4-8 months). All patients demonstrated radiographic union prior to failure based on plain films. Radiographs revealed screw backout with erosion of the radial lunate facet in all patients. Calculated carpal height ratios demonstrated a drop from an average 44.2% to 39.5% at the time of hardware migration. All four patients underwent hardware removal. One patient was not indicated for any further surgery, and two patients underwent further revision surgery. All three patients reported complete pain relief. One patient refused a salvage procedure and had subsequent persistent pain. Conclusions This study reports a serious complication of scaphoid excision and midcarpal fusion performed with headless compression screws. We advise surgeons to be aware of this potential complication and consider employing methods to reduce the risk of hardware migration. Additionally, we recommend at least 8 months of

  4. Proximal Migration of Hardware in Patients Undergoing Midcarpal Fusion with Headless Compression Screws

    PubMed Central

    Shifflett, Grant D.; Athanasian, Edward A.; Lee, Steve K.; Weiland, Andrew J.; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Scaphoid excision and limited intercarpal fusion is a common surgical procedure performed for degenerative disorders of the wrist including scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC) and scaphoid nonunion advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist deformities. Postoperative screw migration is a rare but devastating complication that can result in severe degenerative changes in the radiocarpal joint. Questions/Purposes The purpose of this study is to report on a series of patients who developed proximal migration of their hardware following limited intercarpal fusions with headless compression screws. Patients and Methods Four patients were identified between 2001 and 2012 who were indicated for and underwent scaphoid excision and midcarpal fusions with headless compression screw fixation and subsequently developed hardware migration with screw protrusion into the radiocarpal joint. Detailed chart review was performed. Results Mean age at surgery was 64 years (57–69 years). All patients had the diagnosis of SLAC wrist. Mean time to detection of failure was 6 months (4–8 months). All patients demonstrated radiographic union prior to failure based on plain films. Radiographs revealed screw backout with erosion of the radial lunate facet in all patients. Calculated carpal height ratios demonstrated a drop from an average 44.2% to 39.5% at the time of hardware migration. All four patients underwent hardware removal. One patient was not indicated for any further surgery, and two patients underwent further revision surgery. All three patients reported complete pain relief. One patient refused a salvage procedure and had subsequent persistent pain. Conclusions This study reports a serious complication of scaphoid excision and midcarpal fusion performed with headless compression screws. We advise surgeons to be aware of this potential complication and consider employing methods to reduce the risk of hardware migration. Additionally, we recommend at least 8 months of

  5. Quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knez, Dejan; Mohar, Janez; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    Spinal deformity correction with vertebral fixation is nowadays the preferred surgical treatment, where pedicle screws are inserted through pedicles into corresponding vertebral bodies and afterwards connected with rods. In clinical practice, the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique are currently being used for pedicle screw placement surgery. However, it is difficult to quantitatively compare both techniques and determine which technique is more adequate for each planned pedicle screw before surgery (i.e. preoperatively). In this paper, we therefore describe a framework for quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement surgery by evaluating the screw fastening strength. Quantitative comparisons were performed on computed tomography images of 11 patients with 74 manually planned pedicle screws, who underwent the vertebral fixation procedure. The first quantitative comparison was performed between the straight-forward and anatomical pedicle screw insertion technique, which resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.0mm in screw diameter, 2.9mm in screw length, 1.2mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.5° in screw inclinations. The second quantitative comparison was performed between the best resulting pedicle screw insertion technique and manually obtained pedicle screw plans, which again resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.5mm in screw diameter, 4.7mm in screw length, 2.4mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.0° in screw inclinations. Both the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique proved approximately equal in terms of the screw fastening strength.

  6. True anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jia-yue; Zhang, Wei; An, Ji-long; Sun, Ya-peng; Ding, Wen-yuan; Shen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background The wide use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) surgery in the treatment of degenerative disc disease of lumbar spine in spinal surgery highlights the gradual decrease in the use of traditional pedicle screw insertion technology. This study aims to analyze the accuracy of the true anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique in MIS-TLIF surgery, compare it with conventional pedicle screw insertion technology, and discuss its clinical application value. Methods Fifty-two patients undergoing true anteroposterior view (group A) and 87 patients undergoing conventional pedicle screw insertion (group B) were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation or lumbar spinal stenosis. Time for screw placement, intraoperative irradiation exposure, accuracy rate of pedicle screw insertion, and incidence of neurovascular injury were compared between the two groups. Results The time for screw placement and intraoperative irradiation exposure was significantly less in group A. Penetration rates of the paries lateralis of vertebral pedicle, medial wall of vertebral pedicle, and anterior vertebral wall were 1.44%, 0%, and 2.40%, respectively, all of which were significantly lower than that in group B. No additional serious complications caused by the placement of screw were observed during the follow-up period in patients in group A, but two patients with medial penetration underwent revision for unbearable radicular pain. Conclusion The application of true anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique in MIS-TLIF surgery shortens time for screw placement and reduces the intraoperative irradiation exposure along with a higher accuracy rate of screw placement, which makes it a safe, accurate, and efficient technique. PMID:27418828

  7. COMPARISON OF VOLUMES OCCUPIED BY DIFFERENT INTERNAL FIXATION DEVICES FOR FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Lauxen, Daniel; Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Silva, Marcelo Faria; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Strohaecker, Telmo Roberto; Souza, Ralf Wellis de; Zimmer, Cinthia Gabriely; Boschin, Leonardo Carbonera; Gonçalves, Ramiro Zilles; Yépez, Anthony Kerbes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to measure the volume occupied by the most widely used internal fixation devices for treating femoral neck fractures, using the first 30, 40 and 50 mm of insertion of each screw as an approximation. The study aimed to observe which of these implants caused least bone aggression. Methods: Five types of cannulated screws and four types of dynamic hip screws (DHS) available on the Brazilian market were evaluated in terms of volume differences through water displacement. Results: Fixation with two cannulated screws presented significantly less volume than shown by DHS, for insertions of 30, 40 and 50 mm (p=0.01, 0.012 and 0.013, respectively), fixation with three screws did not show any statistically significant difference (p= 0.123, 0.08 and 0.381, respectively) and fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes than shown by DHS (p=0.072, 0.161 and 0.033). Conclusions: Fixation of the femoral neck with two cannulated screws occupied less volume than DHS, with a statistically significant difference. The majority of screw combinations did not reach statistical significance, although fixation with four cannulated screws presented larger volumes on average than those occupied by DHS. PMID:27047886

  8. Interference screw position and hamstring graft location for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Simonian, P T; Sussmann, P S; Baldini, T H; Crockett, H C; Wickiewicz, T L

    1998-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft and interference screw fixation has recently been considered. Concerns for the use of interference screws with soft tissue grafts include damage to the graft during screw insertion, decreased fixation strength, and a decrease in the bone-tendon contact area for healing within the tunnel when the screw is placed in an eccentric position. This last concern could be addressed by placing the interference screw centrally between the four limbs of the hamstring graft. The purpose of this study was to determine the mode of failure, the pullout force, and graft slippage before graft fixation failure of hamstring tendons fixed with an interference screw positioned eccentrically in relation to the hamstring tendons verses an interference screw positioned centrally between the four graft limbs. The semitendinosus and gracilis tendons were harvested from six, fresh cadaveric specimens. Each tendon was divided into two segments of equal length. Both the semitendinosus and gracilis tendon segments were looped to form four strands. The specimens were then fixed with a bioabsorbable interference screw in the two different positions and pulled from a standardized polyurethane foam. All tendons in both groups failed by pulling out from between the interference screw and tunnel, regardless of the screw position. No tendon was cut by the screw in either group. There was no significant difference between the forces required to produce specific amounts of graft slippage between the two fixation techniques tested. There was no significant difference between the average total slippage at maximum pullout, 11.8 mm for the screw placed in the eccentric position and 13.7 mm for the screw placed in the central position. The maximum pullout force averaged 265.3 N for the screw placed in the eccentric position, and 244.7 N for the screw placed in the central position; these values were not significantly different. Placement of

  9. Treatment of fractures of the condylar head with resorbable pins or titanium screws: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Matthias; Loukota, Richard; Kuchta, Anne; Stadlinger, Bernd; Jung, Roland; Speckl, Katrin; Schmiedekampf, Robert; Eckelt, Uwe

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to compare in vivo the stability of fixation of condylar fractures in sheep using sonic bone welding and standard titanium screws. We assessed stability of the osteosynthesis and maintenance of the height of the mandibular ramus. Height decreased slightly in both groups compared with the opposite side. The volume of the condyle increased considerably in both groups mainly because callus had formed. The results showed no significant disadvantages for pin fixation compared with osteosynthesis using titanium screws. PMID:22901526

  10. Editorial Commentary: Are Larger Screws the Answer When Anatomic Reconstruction of an Acromioclavicular Separation Fails?

    PubMed

    Denard, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    Although fixation methods have improved, failure after fixation of an acromioclavicular joint separation is not uncommon. This biomechanical study shows that in the setting of graft slippage through previously well-placed clavicular tunnels, a revision anatomic reconstruction is feasible with larger tenodesis screws. Although the risk of clavicular fracture increases with larger tunnels, anatomic revision with larger screws is an option in select cases. PMID:27495861

  11. Treatment of fractures of the condylar head with resorbable pins or titanium screws: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Matthias; Loukota, Richard; Kuchta, Anne; Stadlinger, Bernd; Jung, Roland; Speckl, Katrin; Schmiedekampf, Robert; Eckelt, Uwe

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to compare in vivo the stability of fixation of condylar fractures in sheep using sonic bone welding and standard titanium screws. We assessed stability of the osteosynthesis and maintenance of the height of the mandibular ramus. Height decreased slightly in both groups compared with the opposite side. The volume of the condyle increased considerably in both groups mainly because callus had formed. The results showed no significant disadvantages for pin fixation compared with osteosynthesis using titanium screws.

  12. Lateral Mass Fixation in the Subaxial Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Kurd, Mark F; Millhouse, Paul W; Schroeder, Gregory D; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-08-01

    The use of lateral mass screws and rods in the subaxial spine has become the standard method of fixation for posterior cervical spine fusions. Multiple techniques have been described for the placement of lateral mass screws, including the Magerl, the Anderson, and the An techniques. While these techniques are all slightly different, the overall goal is to obtain solid bony fixation while avoiding the neurovascular structures. The use of lateral mass screws has been shown to be a safe and effective technique for achieving a posterior cervical fusion.

  13. Increasing pedicle screw anchoring in the osteoporotic spine by cement injection through the implant. Technical note and report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Patrick

    2007-09-01

    Instrumented spinal fusion in patients with osteoporosis is challenging because of the poor bone quality and is complicated by an elevated risk of delayed hardware failure. The author treated two patients presenting with severe osteoporosis, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis. He performed decompressive laminectomy, posterolateral fusion, and pedicle screw (PS) fixation involving screws with side openings that allow cement to be injected through the implant. The cement injection was conducted under fluoroscopic control without complications. Although this technique needs validation in a larger population of patients, the author believes that the injection of cement through these PSs can be performed safely in carefully selected patients. This technique creates not only a vertebroplasty-like effect that strengthens the vertebral body but also provides the additional stability afforded by the immediate anchoring of the screw, which may allow a shorter-length construct, save mobile segments, and finally reduce the risk of hardware failure. PMID:17877276

  14. A Biomechanical Comparison of Three Different Posterior Fixation Constructs Used for C6–C7 Cervical Spine Immobilization: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    HONG, Jae Taek; QASIM, Muhammad; ESPINOZA ORÍAS, Alejandro A.; NATARAJAN, Raghu N.; AN, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    The intralaminar screw construct has been recently introduced in C6–C7 fixation. The aim of the study is to compare the stability afforded by three different C7 posterior fixation techniques using a three-dimensional finite element model of a C6–C7 cervical spine motion segment. Finite element models representing three different cervical anchor types (C7 intralaminar screw, C7 lateral mass screw, and C7 pedicle screw) were developed. Range of motion (ROM) and maximum von Mises stresses in the vertebra for the three screw techniques were compared under pure moments in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. ROM for pedicle screw construct was less than the lateral mass screw construct and intralaminar screw construct in the three principal directions. The maximum von Misses stress was observed in the C7 vertebra around the pedicle in all the three screw constructs. Maximum von Mises stress in pedicle screw construct was less than the lateral mass screw construct and intralaminar screw construct in all loading modes. This study demonstrated that the pedicle screw fixation is the strongest instrumentation method for C6–C7 fixation. Pedicle screw fixation resulted in least stresses around the C7 pedicle-vertebral body complex. However, if pedicle fixation is not favorable, the laminar screw can be a better option compared to the lateral mass screw because the stress around the pedicle-vertebral body complex and ROM predicted for laminar screw construct was smaller than those of lateral mass screw construct. PMID:24418790

  15. Biomechanical Concepts for Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Bottlang, Michael; Schemitsch, Christine E; Nauth, Aaron; Routt, Milton; Egol, Kenneth A; Cook, Gillian E; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2015-12-01

    Application of the correct fixation construct is critical for fracture healing and long-term stability; however, it is a complex issue with numerous significant factors. This review describes a number of common fracture types and evaluates their currently available fracture fixation constructs. In the setting of complex elbow instability, stable fixation or radial head replacement with an appropriately sized implant in conjunction with ligamentous repair is required to restore stability. For unstable sacral fractures with vertical or multiplanar instabilities, "standard" iliosacral screw fixation is not sufficient. Periprosthetic femur fractures, in particular Vancouver B1 fractures, have increased stability when using 90/90 fixation versus a single locking plate. Far cortical locking combines the concept of dynamization with locked plating to achieve superior healing of a distal femur fracture. Finally, there is no ideal construct for syndesmotic fracture stabilization; however, these fractures should be fixed using a device that allows for sufficient motion in the syndesmosis. In general, orthopaedic surgeons should select a fracture fixation construct that restores stability and promotes healing at the fracture site, while reducing the potential for fixation failure.

  16. Bone impregnated hip screw in femoral neck fracture: Clinicoradiological results

    PubMed Central

    Sundar Raj, PK; Nuuman, Jiju A; Pattathil, Amish Sunder

    2015-01-01

    Background: Femoral neck fractures are treated either by internal fixation or arthroplasty. Usually, cannulated cancellous screws are used for osteosynthesis of fracture neck of femur. The bone impregnated hip screw (BIHS) is an alternative implant, where osteosyntehsis is required in femoral neck fracture. Materials and Methods: The BIHS is a hollow screw with thread diameter 8.3 mm, shank diameter 6.5 mm and wall thickness 2.2 mm and holes in the shaft of the screw with diameter 2 mm, placed in a staggered fashion. Biomechanical and animal experimental studies were done. Clinical study was done in two phases: Phase 1 in a group of volunteers, only with BIHS was used in a pilot study and phase 2 comparative study was done in a group with AO cannulated screws and the other group treated with BIHS. Results: In the phase 1 study, out of 15 patients, only one patient had delayed union. In phase 2, there were 78 patients, 44 patients in BIHS showed early union, compared to the rest 34 cases of AO cannulated screws Out of 44 patients with BIHS, 41 patients had an excellent outcome, 2 had nonunions and one implant breakage was noted. Conclusions: Bone impregnated hip screw has shown to provide early solid union since it incorporates the biomechanical principles and also increases the osteogenic potential and hence, found superior to conventional cannulated cancellous screw. PMID:26015608

  17. The effect of screw pullout rate on screw purchase in synthetic cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Zdero, Rad; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2009-02-01

    Clinically, orthopaedic fracture fixation constructs are mounted using screws inserted into cancellous bone, while biomechanical studies are increasingly using commercially available synthetic bones. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of screw pullout rate on cancellous bone screw purchase strength in synthetic cancellous bone. Sixty synthetic cancellous bone cubes (40x40x40 mm(3)) each had one orthopaedic cancellous bone screw (major diameter=6.5 mm) inserted to a depth of 30 mm. Screws were extracted to obtain outcome measures of failure force, failure shear stress, failure energy, failure displacement, resistance force, and removal energy. The ten test groups (n=6 cubes per group) had screws extracted at pullout rates of 1 mmmin, 2.5 mmmin, 5 mmmin, 7.5 mmmin, 10 mmmin, 20 mmmin, 30 mmmin, 40 mmmin, 50 mmmin, and 60 mmmin. The aggregate average results for failure force, failure stress, failure energy, failure displacement, resistance force, and postfailure removal energy for combined pullout rates were, respectively, 984.8+/-63.9 N, 3.5+/-0.2 MPa, 298.3+/-41.7 J, 0.53+/-0.08 mm, 453.8+/-19.6 N, and 5420.1+/-489.7 J. Most statistical differences (40 of 47) involved either the 5 mmmin or the 60 mmmin rates being compared to other rates. Failure force, failure stress, and resistance force increased and were highly linearly correlated with pullout rate (R(2)=0.78, 0.76, and 0.74, respectively). Failure energy, failure displacement, and removal energy were relatively unchanged over the pullout range tested, yielding low correlation coefficients (R(2)<0.05). Failure force, failure stress, and resistance force were affected by bone screw pullout rate in synthetic cancellous bone, while failure energy, failure displacement, and removal energy remained unchanged. This is the first study to perform an extensive investigation of cancellous bone screw pullout rate in synthetic cancellous bone.

  18. Vertical-Screw-Auger Conveyer Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Vollmer, Hubert J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A conical feeder is attached to a vertically conveying screw auger. The feeder is equipped with scoops and rotated from the surface to force-feed regolith the auger. Additional scoops are possible by adding a cylindrical section above the conical funnel section. Such then allows the unit to collect material from swaths larger in diameter than the enclosing casing pipe of the screw auger. A third element includes a flexible screw auger. All three can be used in combination in microgravity and zero atmosphere environments to drill and recover a wide area of subsurface regolith and entrained volatiles through a single access point on the surface.

  19. Posterior cervical spine arthrodesis with laminar screws: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2007-04-01

    We performed fixation using laminar screws in 2 patients in whom lateral mass screws, pedicle screws or transarticular screws could not be inserted. One was a 56-year-old woman who had anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS). When a guide wire was inserted using an imaging guide, the hole bled massively. We thought the re-insertion of a guide wire or screw would thus increase the risk of vascular injury, so we used laminar screws. The other case was an 18-year-old man who had a hangman fracture. Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the left vertebral artery. A laminar screw was inserted into the patent side (i.e., the right side of C2). Cervical pedicle screws are the most biomechanically stable screws. However, their use carries a high risk of neurovascular complications during screw insertion, because the cervical pedicle is small and is adjacent laterally to the vertebral artery, medially to the spinal cord, and vertically to the nerve roots. Lateral mass screws are also reported to involve a risk of neurovascular injuries. The laminar screw method was thus thought to be useful, since arterial injuries could thus be avoided and it could also be used as a salvage modality for the previous misinsertion. PMID:17471313

  20. A Complication of Posterior Malleolar Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ankit; Charles, Loren; Ritchie, James

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of tibial nerve impingement by an anteroposterior screw inserted for stabilization of a posterior malleolar fracture. This specific complication has not previously been described in published studies, although numerous reports have described various forms of peripheral nerve entrapment. We discuss the merits of fixation of these fractures using a posterolateral approach.

  1. Cement leakage in pedicle screw augmentation: a prospective analysis of 98 patients and 474 augmented pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Jan U; Baldauf, Joerg; Marx, Sascha; Kirsch, Michael; Schroeder, Henry W S; Pillich, Dirk T

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Loosening and pullout of pedicle screws are well-known problems in pedicle screw fixation surgery. Augmentation of pedicle screws with bone cement, first described as early as 1975, increases the pedicle-screw interface and pullout force in osteoporotic vertebrae. The aim of the present study was to identify cement leakage and pulmonary embolism rates in a large prospective single-center series of pedicle screw augmentations. METHODS All patients who underwent cement-augmented pedicle screw placement between May 2006 and October 2010 at the authors' institution were included in this prospective cohort study. Perivertebral cement leakage and pulmonary cement embolism were evaluated with a CT scan of the area of operation and with a radiograph of the chest, respectively. RESULTS A total of 98 patients underwent placement of cement-augmented pedicle screws; 474 augmented screws were inserted in 237 vertebrae. No symptomatic perivertebral cement leakage or symptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was observed, but asymptomatic perivertebral cement leakage was seen in 88 patients (93.6%) and in 165 augmented vertebrae (73.3%). Cement leakage most often occurred in the perivertebral venous system. Clinically asymptomatic pulmonary cement embolism was found in 4 patients (4.1%). CONCLUSIONS Perivertebral cement leakage often occurs in pedicle screw augmentation, but in most cases, it is clinically asymptomatic. Cement augmentation should be performed under continuous fluoroscopy to avoid high-volume leakage. Alternative strategies, such as use of expandable screws, should be examined in more detail for patients at high risk of screw loosening. PMID:26943258

  2. Biomechanical analysis on transverse tibial fixation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions☆

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edmar Stieven; Mendes, Mariane Henseler Damaceno; Claudino, Stephanie; Baracho, Filipe; Borges, Paulo César; da Cunha, Luiz Antonio Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective To verify whether the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw fixation presents biomechanical advantages when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw fixation for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Methods Thirty-eight porcine knees and bovine extensor digitorum tendons were used as the graft materials. The tests were performed in three groups: (1) standard, used fourteen knees, and the grafts were fixated with the combination of femoral cross pin and a tibial screw; (2) inverted, used fourteen knees with an inverted combination of tibial cross pin and a femoral screw; (3) control, ten control tests performed with intact ACL. After the grafts fixation, all the knees were subjected to tensile testing to determine yield strength and ultimate strength. Results There was no statistically significant difference in survival techniques in regard to strength, yield load and tension. There was a higher survival compared in the standard curves of yield stress (p < 0.05). Conclusion There is no biomechanical advantage, observed in animal models testing, in the combination of tibial cross pin fixation and femoral screw when compared to femoral cross pin fixation and tibial screw. PMID:26229913

  3. Hamate hook non-union treated with a break-away screw: a case report.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kiyohito; Yoshikawa, Kei; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Hamate hook non-union is a relatively rare, but on the increase. We encountered a 25-year-old male baseball instructor with hamate hook non-union, and treated it with debridement of the fractured region and osteosynthesis using a break-away screw. Splint fixation was applied for three weeks after surgery, and active/passive range of motion exercises were actively performed thereafter. Bone union was noted three months after surgery. Transient ulnar paralysis resolved, and the patient could return to the same sports activity as that before injury six months after surgery. Since break-away screws are capable of loading a strong pressure on the fractured region and these screws can be inserted by preparing only a surgical field for guide wire insertion, requiring no soft tissue dissection to prepare a region for applying fixation materials, break-away screws are useful for the fixation of small bone fragments and osteosynthesis in a deep surgical field.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of Sacroiliac Joint Fixation under Compression Loads

    PubMed Central

    Bruna-Rosso, Claire; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Bianco, Rohan-Jean; Godio-Raboutet, Yves; Fradet, Léo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a known chronic pain-generator. The last resort of treatment is the arthrodesis. Different implants allow fixation of the joint, but to date there is no tool to analyze their influence on the SIJ biomechanics under physiological loads. The objective was to develop a computational model to biomechanically analyze different parameters of the stable SIJ fixation instrumentation. Methods A comprehensive finite element model (FEM) of the pelvis was built with detailed SIJ representation. Bone and sacroiliac joint ligament material properties were calibrated against experimentally acquired load-displacement data of the SIJ. Model evaluation was performed with experimental load-displacement measurements of instrumented cadaveric SIJ. Then six fixation scenarios with one or two implants on one side with two different trajectories (proximal, distal) were simulated and assessed with the FEM under vertical compression loads. Results The simulated S1 endplate displacement reduction achieved with the fixation devices was within 3% of the experimentally measured data. Under compression loads, the uninstrumented sacrum exhibited mainly a rotation motion (nutation) of 1.38° and 2.80° respectively at 600 N and 1000 N, with a combined relative translation (0.3 mm). The instrumentation with one screw reduced the local displacement within the SIJ by up to 62.5% for the proximal trajectory vs. 15.6% for the distal trajectory. Adding a second implant had no significant additional effect. Conclusion A comprehensive finite element model was developed to assess the biomechanics of SIJ fixation. SIJ devices enable to reduce the motion, mainly rotational, between the sacrum and ilium. Positioning the implant farther from the SIJ instantaneous rotation center was an important factor to reduce the intra-articular displacement. Clinical relevance Knowledge provided by this biomechanical study enables improvement of SIJ fixation through optimal implant

  5. Experimental study in order to assess the effects of limited periosteum stripping on the fracture healing and to compare osteosynthesis using plates and screws with intramedullary Kirschner wire fixation.

    PubMed

    Neagu, Tiberiu Paul; Enache, Valentin; Cocoloş, Ion; Ţigliş, Mirela; Cobilinschi, Cristian; Ţincu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    There are many studies that investigate indirect and direct fracture healing but few mention the effect of periosteum stripping on consolidation of fractures. Most of these studies use only one method of osteosynthesis for each group. Therefore, we reported a new developed murine model in order to assess if limited periosteum stripping influence significantly the quality of the fracture healing process by comparing two different osteosynthesis methods to reduce simultaneously bilateral femur fractures. We applied the experimental protocol for a number of 12 rats. We used plates and screws to reduce femoral osteotomy for the right hind limb and intramedullary Kirschner wire for the left hind limb. Clinical, radiological and histological assessments were made for a period of eight weeks. The absence of a healthy hind limb led to a slower healing process based on the histological findings and to implant failure based on radiological findings. In summary, complete fracture healing was not achieved during this experimental study. Therefore, we consider that future studies are needed for a better understanding of the effects of periosteum removal on the fracture healing process. PMID:27516016

  6. Ankle fusion stability: a biomechanical comparison of external versus internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Justin R; Santrock, Robert D; James, William C

    2011-04-11

    This biomechanical study compares bimalleolar external fixation to conventional crossed-screw construct in terms of stability and compression for ankle arthrodesis. The goals of the study were to determine which construct is more stable with bending and torsional forces, and to determine which construct achieves more compression.Fourth-generation bone composite tibia and talocalcaneal models were made to 50th percentile anatomic specifications. Fourteen ankle fusion constructs were created with bimalleolar external fixators and 14 with crossed-screw constructs. Ultimate bend, torque, and compression testing were completed on the external fixator and crossed-screw constructs using a multidirectional Materials Testing Machine (MTS Systems Corp, Eden Prairie, Minnesota). Ultimate bend testing revealed a statistically significant difference (P=.0022) with the mean peak load to failure for the external fixator constructs of 973.2 N compared to 612.5 N for the crossed-screw constructs. Ultimate torque testing revealed the mean peak torque to failure for the external fixator construct was 80.2 Nm and 28.1 Nm for the crossed-screw construct, also a statistically significant difference (P=.0001). The compression testing yielded no statistically significant difference (P=.9268) between the average failure force of the external fixator construct (81.6 kg) and the crossed-screw construct (81.2 kg).With increased stiffness in both bending and torsion and comparable compressive strengths, bimalleolar external fixation is an excellent option for tibiotalar ankle arthrodesis.

  7. The Mechanics of External Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Rozbruch, S. Robert

    2006-01-01

    External fixation has evolved from being used primarily as a last resort fixation method to becoming a main stream technique used to treat a myriad of bone and soft tissue pathologies. Techniques in limb reconstruction continue to advance largely as a result of the use of these external devices. A thorough understanding of the biomechanical principles of external fixation is useful for all orthopedic surgeons as most will have to occasionally mount a fixator throughout their career. In this review, various types of external fixators and their common clinical applications are described with a focus on unilateral and circular frames. The biomechanical principles that govern bony and fixator stability are reviewed as well as the recommended techniques for applying external fixators to maximize stability. Additionally, we have illustrated methods for managing patients while they are in the external frames to facilitate function and shorten treatment duration. PMID:18751766

  8. Prediction of Deformity Correction by Pedicle Screw Instrumentation in Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Nagura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    In segmental pedicle screw instrumentation, the relationship between the combinations of pedicle screw placements and the degree of deformity correction was investigated with a three-dimensional rigid body and spring model. The virtual thoracolumbar scoliosis (Cobb’s angle of 47 deg.) was corrected using six different combinations of pedicle-screw placements. As a result, better correction in the axial rotation was obtained with the pedicle screws placed at or close to the apical vertebra than with the screws placed close to the end vertebrae, while the correction in the frontal plane was better with the screws close to the end vertebrae than with those close to the apical vertebra. Additionally, two screws placed in the convex side above and below the apical vertebra provided better correction than two screws placed in the concave side. Effective deformity corrections of scoliosis were obtained with the proper combinations of pedicle screw placements.

  9. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  10. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures that..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures that..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures that..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures that..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3030 - Single/multiple component metallic bone fixation appliances and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., supracondylar, or condylar fractures of the femur; for fusion of a joint; or for surgical procedures that..., such as screws and nails, or bolts, nuts, and washers. These devices are used for fixation of...

  15. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting. PMID:25562758

  16. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting.

  17. Introduction to Lumbosacral and Sacropelvic Fixation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Patrick C; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    We are pleased to present this Neurosurgical Focus video supplement on lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation strategies. Despite advancement in surgical techniques and technologies in spine, achieving consistent solid fusion across the lumbosacral junction remains a major challenge. The anatomy of the lumbosacral junction allows for a higher range of motion compared to other areas of the thoracolumbar spine. The L5-S1 interspace is exposed to significant shear forces. As a result, complications such as pseudoarthrosis, screw pull-out, implant fracture, or sacral fractures can occur. Complications are particularly seen in long fusion constructs ending across the lumbosacral junction. To reduce these complications, various lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation techniques have been developed and utilized. The current supplement is intended to provide instructional videos that illustrate several current techniques for lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation. The collection includes techniques for anterior L5-S1 interbody fusion, minimally invasive L5-S1 interbody fusions, lumbosacral pedicle screw placement, sacroiliac fusion, and sacro-alar-iliac screw placement. The authors of the videos in the supplement have provided detailed narration and video illustration to describe the nuances of the various open and minimally invasive techniques for lumbosacral and sacral-pelvic fixation. We are pleased to have such a collection of quality video illustration from experts in the field. It's been our privilege to serve as guest editors for this supplement and we believe that you will enjoy the contents of this supplement. PMID:27364425

  18. Comparative Analysis of Interval, Skipped, and Key-vertebral Pedicle Screw Strategies for Correction in Patients With Lenke Type 1 Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Xi-Ming; Lu, Yanghu; Wei, Xian-Zhao; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pedicle screw constructs have become the mainstay for surgical correction in patients with spinal deformities. To reduce or avoid the risk of pedicle screw-based complications and to decrease the costs associated with pedicle screw instrumentation, some authors have introduced interval, skipped, and key-vertebral pedicle screw strategies for correction. However, there have been no comparisons of outcomes among these 3 pedicle screw-placement strategies. The aim of this study was to compare the correlative clinical outcomes of posterior correction and fusion with pedicle screw fixation using these 3 surgical strategies. Fifty-six consecutive patients with Lenke type 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were included in this study. Twenty patients were treated with the interval pedicle screw strategy (IPSS), 20 with the skipped pedicle screw strategy (SPSS), and 16 with the key-vertebral pedicle screw strategy (KVPSS). Coronal and sagittal radiographs were analyzed before surgery, at 1 week after surgery, and at the last follow-up after surgery. There were no significant differences among the 3 groups regarding preoperative radiographic parameters. No significant difference was found between the IPSS and SPSS groups in correction of the main thoracic curve (70.8% vs 70.0%; P = 0.524). However, there were statistically significant differences between the IPSS and KVPSS groups (70.8% vs 64.9%) and between the SPSS and KVPSS groups (70.0% vs 64.9%) in correction of the main thoracic curve (P < 0.001 for both). Additionally, there were no significant differences among the 3 strategies for sagittal parameters at the immediate postoperative and last postoperative follow-up periods, though there were significant differences in the Cobb angle between the preoperative and immediate postoperative periods among the 3 groups, but not between the immediate postoperative and last follow-up periods. The amount of hospital charges in the SPSS group was significantly

  19. Comparative Analysis of Interval, Skipped, and Key-vertebral Pedicle Screw Strategies for Correction in Patients With Lenke Type 1 Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Xi-Ming; Lu, Yanghu; Wei, Xian-Zhao; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Li, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Pedicle screw constructs have become the mainstay for surgical correction in patients with spinal deformities. To reduce or avoid the risk of pedicle screw-based complications and to decrease the costs associated with pedicle screw instrumentation, some authors have introduced interval, skipped, and key-vertebral pedicle screw strategies for correction. However, there have been no comparisons of outcomes among these 3 pedicle screw-placement strategies.The aim of this study was to compare the correlative clinical outcomes of posterior correction and fusion with pedicle screw fixation using these 3 surgical strategies.Fifty-six consecutive patients with Lenke type 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were included in this study. Twenty patients were treated with the interval pedicle screw strategy (IPSS), 20 with the skipped pedicle screw strategy (SPSS), and 16 with the key-vertebral pedicle screw strategy (KVPSS). Coronal and sagittal radiographs were analyzed before surgery, at 1 week after surgery, and at the last follow-up after surgery.There were no significant differences among the 3 groups regarding preoperative radiographic parameters. No significant difference was found between the IPSS and SPSS groups in correction of the main thoracic curve (70.8% vs 70.0%; P = 0.524). However, there were statistically significant differences between the IPSS and KVPSS groups (70.8% vs 64.9%) and between the SPSS and KVPSS groups (70.0% vs 64.9%) in correction of the main thoracic curve (P < 0.001 for both). Additionally, there were no significant differences among the 3 strategies for sagittal parameters at the immediate postoperative and last postoperative follow-up periods, though there were significant differences in the Cobb angle between the preoperative and immediate postoperative periods among the 3 groups, but not between the immediate postoperative and last follow-up periods. The amount of hospital charges in the SPSS group was significantly higher than

  20. Comparative Analysis of Interval, Skipped, and Key-vertebral Pedicle Screw Strategies for Correction in Patients With Lenke Type 1 Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Xi-Ming; Lu, Yanghu; Wei, Xian-Zhao; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Li, Ming

    2016-03-01

    Pedicle screw constructs have become the mainstay for surgical correction in patients with spinal deformities. To reduce or avoid the risk of pedicle screw-based complications and to decrease the costs associated with pedicle screw instrumentation, some authors have introduced interval, skipped, and key-vertebral pedicle screw strategies for correction. However, there have been no comparisons of outcomes among these 3 pedicle screw-placement strategies.The aim of this study was to compare the correlative clinical outcomes of posterior correction and fusion with pedicle screw fixation using these 3 surgical strategies.Fifty-six consecutive patients with Lenke type 1 adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were included in this study. Twenty patients were treated with the interval pedicle screw strategy (IPSS), 20 with the skipped pedicle screw strategy (SPSS), and 16 with the key-vertebral pedicle screw strategy (KVPSS). Coronal and sagittal radiographs were analyzed before surgery, at 1 week after surgery, and at the last follow-up after surgery.There were no significant differences among the 3 groups regarding preoperative radiographic parameters. No significant difference was found between the IPSS and SPSS groups in correction of the main thoracic curve (70.8% vs 70.0%; P = 0.524). However, there were statistically significant differences between the IPSS and KVPSS groups (70.8% vs 64.9%) and between the SPSS and KVPSS groups (70.0% vs 64.9%) in correction of the main thoracic curve (P < 0.001 for both). Additionally, there were no significant differences among the 3 strategies for sagittal parameters at the immediate postoperative and last postoperative follow-up periods, though there were significant differences in the Cobb angle between the preoperative and immediate postoperative periods among the 3 groups, but not between the immediate postoperative and last follow-up periods. The amount of hospital charges in the SPSS group was significantly higher than

  1. Effect of different radial hole designs on pullout and structural strength of cannulated pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chang; Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chen, Jou-Wen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Yi-Long; Wang, Shih-Tien; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2015-08-01

    Cannulated pedicle screws are designed for bone cement injection to enhance fixation strength in severely osteoporotic spines. However, the screws commonly fracture during insertion. This study aims to evaluate how different positions/designs of radial holes may affect the pullout and structural strength of cannulated pedicle screws using finite element analysis. Three different screw hole designs were evaluated under torsion and bending conditions. The pullout strength for each screw was determined by axial pullout failure testing. The results showed that when the Von Mises stress reached the yield stress of titanium alloy the screw with four radial holes required a greater torque or bending moment than the nine and twelve hole screws. In the pullout test, the strength and stiffness of each screw with cement augmentation showed no significant differences, but the screw with four radial holes had a greater average pullout strength, which probably resulted from the significantly greater mean maximum lengths of cement augmentation. Superior biomechanical responses, with lower stress around the radial holes and greater pullout strength, represented by cannulated pedicle screw with four radial holes may worth recommending for clinical application. PMID:26054806

  2. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Jen; Pan, Yu-Hwa; Tzeng, Jy-Jiunn; Wu, Ting-Lin; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA) to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide. PMID:26466309

  3. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Jy-Jiunn; Wu, Ting-Lin; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA) to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide. PMID:26466309

  4. Retrospective comparison of percutaneous fixation and volar internal fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Calderón, Santiago A; Doornberg, Job N; Ring, David

    2008-06-01

    A change in the practice of a single surgeon provided an opportunity for retrospective comparison of comparable cohorts treated with percutaneous fixation (17 patients) or a volar plate and screws (23 patients) an average of 30 months after surgery. The final evaluation was performed according to the Gartland and Werley and Mayo rating systems and the DASH questionnaire. There were no significant differences on the average scores for the percutaneous and volar plating groups, respectively: Gartland and Werley, 4 vs 5; Mayo, 82 vs 83; and DASH score 13 for both cohorts. Motion, grip, and radiographical parameters were likewise comparable. Volar internal plate and screw fixation can achieve results comparable to percutaneous fixation techniques in the treatment of fractures of the distal radius.

  5. Biodegradable implant materials in fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Illi, O E; Weigum, H; Misteli, F

    1992-01-01

    Based on our experiences in paediatric traumatology treated conservatively or with metallic implants, we looked for alternative fixation possibilities in the field of biodegradables. We designed a new driving system for screws consisting of an indwelling screw driver which transduces the torque force over the whole length of the thread. With this technical approach, the head and the neck of the screw as the most friable point for the fracture of the implant could be avoided. In 48 calves aged 6 weeks we performed a comparative study with either conservative treatment (repositioning and casting) or osteosynthesis with biodegradable screws made from polylactate acid or metallic screws (AO type) after an oblique osteotomy at a 45 degrees angle to the axis of the right metacarpal bone. Results from 1 to 6 weeks postoperatively were compared and good to excellent results obtained in equal amounts for PLA and steel screw osteosynthesis, whereas conservative treatment was only successful in one third of the cases. Clinical, radiological and histological follow-up proved the feasibility of biodegradable osteosynthesis in the growing skeleton. For clinical evaluation in children, the resorption time of biodegradable materials has to be lowered to 3 to 6 months. PMID:10149979

  6. Cannulated screw with solid core insert: stronger than cannulated screws.

    PubMed

    Dundon, John M; Gould, Gregory C; Herbenick, Michael A; Hamilton, J Adam

    2014-09-01

    We conducted a study to determine if there is a significant difference in ultimate load, yield strength, and fatigue strength between solid core screws and cannulated screws and if a solid core insert placed inside a cannulated screw would have biomechanical effects similar to those of a solid core screw. Five screw designs were tested: Synthes 4.5-mm solid core and 4.5-mm cannulated and our prototype 4.0-mm solid core, 4.0-mm cannulated, and 4.0-mm cannulated with solid core insert. Biomechanical testing with 3-point bending was used to determine ultimate load, yield strength, and cycles to failure for 6 screws of each design. Ultimate load, yield strength, and cycles to failure were significantly (P < .05) lower in the Synthes 4.5-mm cannulated screws than in the Synthes solid core screws and significantly lower in the prototype cannulated screws than in the prototype solid core screws (P < .05) and prototype cannulated screws with solid core inserts (P < .05). There was no significant difference (P > .05) in ultimate load, yield strength, or cycles to failure between the prototype cannulated screws with solid core inserts and the prototype solid core screws.

  7. Bicondylar tibial fractures: Internal or external fixation?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gunasekaran; Peterson, Nicholas; Narayan, Badri

    2011-03-01

    Bicondylar fractures of the tibia, representing the Schatzker V and VI fractures represent a challenging problem. Any treatment protocol should aim at restoring articular congruity and the metaphyseo-diaphsyeal dissociation (MDD)-both of these are equally important to long-term outcome. Both internal and external fixations have their proponents, and each method of treatment is associated with its unique features and complications. We review the initial and definitive management of these injuries, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method of definitive fixation. We suggest the use of a protocol for definitive management, using either internal or external fixation as deemed appropriate. This protocol is based on the fracture configuration, local soft tissue status and patient condition. In a nutshell, if the fracture pattern and soft tissue status are amenable plate fixation (single or double) is performed, otherwise limited open reduction and articular surface reconstruction with screws and circular frame is performed. PMID:21430865

  8. Tibial Fixation Properties of a Continuous-Loop ACL Hamstring Graft Construct with Suspensory Fixation in Porcine Bone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick A; DeBerardino, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to compare tibial fixation strength of suspensory fixation for a quadrupled semitendinosus continuous loop all-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) construct versus a doubled semitendinosus and gracilis graft fixated with an interference screw. Biomechanical testing was conducted using human hamstring allografts and porcine tibias. Constructs were cycled from 50 to 250 N for 500 cycles followed by a pull to failure. The average load to failure of tibial suspensory fixation of the all-inside continuous loop construct (1,012 N) was statistically different compared with the tibial interference screw group (612 N) (p < 0.001). The cyclic displacement of the continuous loop construct (2.5 mm) was not statistically different from the interference screw construct (1.9 mm). For both the groups, approximately half the overall cyclic displacement occurred with the first cycle. Tibial side suspensory fixation of a novel all-inside continuous loop hamstring graft provided suitable strength for tibial fixation for ACL reconstruction. The continuous loop construct had a significantly higher load to failure compared with the use of an interference screw, and cyclic loading was comparable. Use of hamstring soft tissue grafts is very common for ACL reconstruction. An all-inside ACL reconstruction is based on a continuous loop construct utilizing a single semitendinosus graft that is quadrupled employing suspensory fixation on both the femoral and tibial side. Suspensory fixation on the femoral side been previously reported, but this is the first report of strength of this method of suspensory fixation on the tibia. PMID:25347056

  9. Biomechanical Analysis of the Fixation System for T-Shaped Acetabular Fracture.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Lei, Jianyin; Zhu, Feng; Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Weiyi; Liu, Ximing

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical mechanism of fixation systems in the most frequent T-shaped acetabular fracture using finite element method. The treatment of acetabular fractures was based on extensive clinical experience. Three commonly accepted rigid fixation methods (double column reconstruction plates (P × 2), anterior column plate combined with posterior column screws (P + PS), and anterior column plate combined with quadrilateral area screws (P + QS)) were chosen for evaluation. On the basis of the finite element model, the biomechanics of these fixation systems were assessed through effective stiffness levels, stress distributions, force transfers, and displacements along the fracture lines. All three fixation systems can be used to obtain effective functional outcomes. The third fixation system (P + QS) was the optimal method for T-shaped acetabular fracture. This fixation system may reduce many of the risks and limitations associated with other fixation systems.

  10. Weber C ankle fractures: a retrospective audit of screw number, size, complications, and retrieval rates.

    PubMed

    Walker, Logan; Willis, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Tibiofibular transfixation of Weber C injuries using a diastasis screw is the current method of fixation. However, controversy remains regarding the screw size and number, number of cortices engaged, and the interval to screw removal. The present study reviewed the current practice in the Wellington Region. A retrospective audit of patients with documented Weber C injuries in the Capital & Coast District Health Board from June 2012 to December 2013 was performed. The clinical medical records and radiographs were reviewed, and the patient demographics, surgeon details, screw number, size, cortices engaged, screw removal period, and documented complications were recorded. A total of 36 operations were documented, of which 27 (75%) cases also required fibula plating. Of the 36 cases, 25 (69.44%) used a single diastasis screw, 33 (91.67%) used 4.5-mm screws, and 18 (50%) engaged 3 cortices. Surgical practice did not vary with the experience level. Of the 36 patients, 29 (80.56%) underwent routine screw removal at a median of 20 (25th to 75th quartile range 16 to 22) weeks. Also, 9 (25%) cases of screw fracture occurred, with a median documented interval to fracture of 18 (25th to 75th quartile range 15 to 20) weeks. The surgical management of Weber C injuries is consistent with current practice. The routine removal of diastasis screws by 20 weeks postoperatively was not different from the documented interval of screw removal when screw fractures had occurred. The timing of screw removal needs to be weighed against the fracture risk, patient symptoms, and the risk of secondary procedure complications.

  11. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  12. C2 Pedicle Screw Placement: A Novel Teaching Aid

    PubMed Central

    Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    The C2 pedicle screw is more biomechanically stable and provides patients with increased postoperative range of motion in comparison to other methods of C2 fixation. However, as a result of the proximity of the C2 pedicle to the transverse foramen, there is a considerable risk of intraoperative morbidity due to vertebral artery injury laterally or vertebral canal breach medially. Other than the use of cadavers for the demonstration and practice of C2 pedicle screw placement, there are currently few other readily available teaching aids for the training of residents and fellows. Herein, we describe a simple and cost effective modality for the demonstration, evaluation, and practice of C2 pedicle screw placement in a laboratory setting. PMID:27433409

  13. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  14. Complications of rigid internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Chris A; Lin, Kant Y

    2009-03-01

    Over the past 20 years, there have been many advances in the development of bone fixation systems used in the practice of craniomaxillofacial surgery. As surgical practices have evolved, the complications of each technologic advance have changed accordingly. Interfragmentary instability of interosseous wiring has been replaced by the risk of exposure, infection, and palpability of plate and screw fixation systems. The improved rigidity of plate fixation requires anatomic alignment of fracture fragments. Failure to obtain proper alignment has led to the phenomenon known as "open internal fixation" of fracture fragments without proper reduction. The size of the plates has decreased to minimize palpability and exposure. However limitations in their application have been encountered due to the physiologic forces of the muscles of mastication and bone healing. In the pediatric population, the long-standing presence of plates in the cranial vault resulted in reports of transcranial migration and growth restriction. These findings led to the development of resorbable plating systems, which are associated with self-limited plate palpability and soft tissue inflammatory reactions. Any rigid system including these produces growth restriction in varying amounts. In this discussion, we review the reported complication rates of miniplating and microplating systems as well as absorptive plating systems in elective and traumatic craniofacial surgery.

  15. Innovative approach in the development of computer assisted algorithm for spine pedicle screw placement.

    PubMed

    Solitro, Giovanni F; Amirouche, Farid

    2016-04-01

    Pedicle screws are typically used for fusion, percutaneous fixation, and means of gripping a spinal segment. The screws act as a rigid and stable anchor points to bridge and connect with a rod as part of a construct. The foundation of the fusion is directly related to the placement of these screws. Malposition of pedicle screws causes intraoperative complications such as pedicle fractures and dural lesions and is a contributing factor to fusion failure. Computer assisted spine surgery (CASS) and patient-specific drill templates were developed to reduce this failure rate, but the trajectory of the screws remains a decision driven by anatomical landmarks often not easily defined. Current data shows the need of a robust and reliable technique that prevents screw misplacement. Furthermore, there is a need to enhance screw insertion guides to overcome the distortion of anatomical landmarks, which is viewed as a limiting factor by current techniques. The objective of this study is to develop a method and mathematical lemmas that are fundamental to the development of computer algorithms for pedicle screw placement. Using the proposed methodology, we show how we can generate automated optimal safe screw insertion trajectories based on the identification of a set of intrinsic parameters. The results, obtained from the validation of the proposed method on two full thoracic segments, are similar to previous morphological studies. The simplicity of the method, being pedicle arch based, is applicable to vertebrae where landmarks are either not well defined, altered or distorted. PMID:26922675

  16. Transgluteal posterior column screw stabilization for fractures of the acetabulum: a technical trick.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Camille L; Archdeacon, Michael T

    2012-10-01

    The traditional exposure of high posterior column or transverse acetabular fractures can pose a challenge for lag screw stabilization. The authors describe an adjunctive percutaneous transgluteal lag screw technique for the internal fixation of the high posterior column. In the senior author's experience, this technique has been helpful to achieve the optimal trajectory for a stable perpendicular lag screw to maintain an anatomical reduction. In our experience, this technique has been used in conjunction with the standard Kocher-Langenbeck exposure and posterior column plating techniques.

  17. Subtrochanteric femur fracture after removal of screws for femoral neck fracture in a child.

    PubMed

    Song, Kwang Soon; Lee, Si Wook

    2015-01-01

    Displaced femoral neck fractures are rare in children and are associated with a high rate of complications. Subtrochanteric fractures after cannulated screw fixation of femoral neck fractures in adults are well recognized, and there are several reports on the topic. However, there are no reports on complications related to hardware or subtrochanteric fractures after removal of the screws in the treatment of femoral neck fractures in children. Here we report the case of a 10-year-old boy who sustained a subtrochanteric fracture after the screw removal and healing that followed a femoral neck fracture. PMID:25566556

  18. In vitro biomechanical study of pedicle screw pull-out strength based on different screw path preparation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moldavsky, Mark; Salloum, Kanaan; Bucklen, Brandon; Khalil, Saif; Mehta, Jwalant S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor screw-to-bone fixation is a clinical problem that can lead to screw loosening. Under-tapping (UT) the pedicle screw has been evaluated biomechanically in the past. The objective of the study was to determine if pedicle preparation with a sequential tapping technique will alter the screw-to-bone fixation strength using a stress relaxation testing loading protocol. Materials and Methods: Three thoracolumbar calf spines were instrumented with pedicle screws that were either probed, UT, standard-tapped (ST), or sequential tapped to prepare the pedicle screw track and a stress relaxation protocol was used to determine pull-out strength. The maximum torque required for pedicle screw insertion and pull-out strength was reported. A one-way ANOVA and Tukeys post-hoc test were used to determine statistical significance. Results: The pedicle screw insertion torques for the probed, UT, ST and sequentially tapped (SQT) techniques were 5.09 (±1.08) Nm, 5.39 (±1.61) Nm, 2.93 (±0.43) Nm, and 3.54 (±0.67) Nm, respectively. There is a significant difference between probed compared to ST (P ≤ 0.05), as well as UT compared to both ST and SQT (P ≤ 0.05). The pull-out strength for pedicle screws for the probed, UT, ST and SQT techniques was 2443 (±782) N, 2353(±918) N, 2474 (±521) N, and 2146 (±582) N, respectively, with no significant difference (P ≥ 0.05) between techniques. Conclusions: The ST technique resulted in the highest pull-out strength while the SQT technique resulted in the lowest. However, there was no significant difference in the pull-out strength for the various preparation techniques and there was no correlation between insertion torque and pull-out strength. This suggests that other factors such as bone density may have a greater influence on pull-out strength. PMID:27053808

  19. The Utility of the Fluoroscopic Skyline View During Volar Locking Plate Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Vaiss, Lucile; Ichihara, Satoshi; Hendriks, Sarah; Taleb, Chihab; Liverneaux, Philippe; Facca, Sybille

    2014-01-01

    Background Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) using a volar locking plate is a common method for treating displaced distal radius fractures. There is, however, the risk of extensor tendon rupture due to protrusion of the screw tips past the dorsal cortex, which cannot always be adequately seen on a lateral fluoroscopic view. We therefore wished to compare the sensitivity of an intraoperative fluoroscopic skyline view to a lateral fluorosocopic view in detecting past pointing of these screws. Material and Methods Our series included 75 patients with an average age of 59 years who underwent volar locked plate fixation of a displaced distal radius fracture. Intraoperative anteroposterior (AP), lateral, and skyline fluoroscopic views were performed in each case. The number of screws that were seen to protrude past the dorsal cortex of the distal fracture fragment were recorded for both the lateral and skyline views. The number of screws that required exchange was also documented. Results No screws were seen to protrude past the dorsal cortical bone on the lateral fluroscopic views. 15 of 300 screws (5%) were seen to protrude past the dorsal cortex by an average of 0.8 mm (range, 0.5 to 2 mm) and were exchanged for shorter screws in 11/75 patients. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the skyline is more sensitive than a lateral fluoroscopic view at demonstrating protrusion of the screws in the distal fracture fragment following volar locked plate fixation. Level of Evidence IV PMID:25364637

  20. A Novel Blasted and Grooved Low Profile Pedicle Screw Able to Resist High Compression Bending Loads

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Sung; Choi, Hong-June; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Jeong, Hyun-Yong; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Yoon, Young-Sul; Lee, Yoon-Chul; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Polyaxial pedicle screws are a safe, useful adjunct to transpedicular fixation. However, the large screw head size can cause soft tissue irritation, high rod positioning, and facet joint injury. However, the mechanical resistance provided by small and low profile pedicle screws is very limited. We therefore developed a novel, low profile pedicle screw using grooving and blasting treatment that is able to resist a high compression bending load. Methods We evaluated the compression bending force to displacement and yield loads for seven different screw head types that differed with regard to their groove intervals and whether or not they had been blasted. Results The rank order of screw types that had the greatest compression bending force to displacement was as follows: (1) universal polyaxial, (2) low polyaxial with 0.1mm grooves and blasting, (3) low polyaxial with blasting, (4) low polyaxial with 0.15mm grooves and blasting, (5) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves and blasting, (6) low polyaxial with 0.05mm grooves, (7) and low polyaxial. Low polyaxial screws with 0.1mm grooves and blasting had the maximum yield load and highest compression bending force to displacement of all seven polyaxial screw head systems evaluated. Conclusion Blasting and grooving treatment of pedicle screw heads resulted in screw heads with a high yield load and compression bending force relative to displacement because of increased friction. Low polyaxial pedicle screws with 0.1 mm grooves treated by blasting have mechanical characteristics similar to those of universal polyaxial pedicle screws. PMID:25983790

  1. Clinical Results of Internal Fixation of Subcapital Femoral Neck Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Ho; Shin, Joong Sup; Shin, Eun Ho; Ahn, Chi Hoon; Choi, Geon Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background Subcapital femoral neck is known to cause many complications, such as avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head or nonunion, compared with other femoral neck fractures. The purpose of this study was to analyze the incidence of AVN and fixation failures in patients treated with internal fixation using cannulated screws for the subcapital femoral neck fractures. Methods This study targeted a total of 84 cases of subcapital femoral neck fractures that underwent internal fixation using cannulated screws. The average follow-up time after surgery was 36.8 months (range, 24 to 148 months). Results Nine hips (10.7%) showing AVN of the femoral head and 6 hips (7.1%) showing fixation failures were observed. The factors affecting the incidence of AVN of the femoral head after sustaining fractures correlated well with fracture types in the Garden classification (p = 0.030). The factors affecting fixation failure were the degree of reduction (p = 0.001) measured by the Garden alignment index and firm fixation (p = 0.009) assessed using the technique of 3-point fixation through the inferomedial cortical bone of the femoral neck. Conclusions The complication rates for subcapital femoral neck fractures were lower than those previously reported; hence, internal fixation could be a primary treatment option for these fractures. PMID:27247738

  2. Distal Locking Screws for Intramedullary Nailing of Tibial Fractures.

    PubMed

    Agathangelidis, Filon; Petsatodis, Georgios; Kirkos, John; Papadopoulos, Pericles; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Christodoulou, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Recently introduced tibial intramedullary nails allow a number of distal screws to be used to reduce the incidence of malalignment and loss of fixation of distal metaphyseal fractures. However, the number of screws and the type of screw configuration to be used remains obscure. This biomechanical study was performed to address this question. Thirty-six Expert tibial nails (Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland) were introduced in composite bone models. The models were divided into 4 groups with different distal locking configurations ranging from 2 to 4 screws. A 7-mm gap osteotomy was performed 72 mm from the tibial plafond to simulate a 42-C3 unstable distal tibial fracture. Each group was divided in 3 subgroups and underwent nondestructive biomechanical testing in axial compression, coronal bending, and axial torsion. The passive construct stiffness was measured and statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance. Although some differences were noted between the stiffness of each group, these were not statistically significant in compression (P=.105), bending (P=.801), external rotation (P=.246), and internal rotation (P=.370). This in vitro study showed that, when using the Expert tibial nail for unstable distal tibial fractures, the classic configuration of 2 parallel distal screws could provide the necessary stability under partial weight-bearing conditions. PMID:26840700

  3. Fractured facial bone reduction and resorbable plate fixation using tapper.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Yeon; Kim, Kee Woong

    2011-07-01

    A resorbable fixation system has many advantages, but there are complicated procedures to be accomplished to fix a resorbable plate. The complicated procedures in the fixation of a resorbable plate make the operation for facial fractures more difficult and can result in extended operation time and incomplete reduction or fixation. For these reasons, we suggest a new way of using a tapper that can make the surgery more simple and accurate than before. After the resorbable plate is properly located above the fractured site, a hole on the fracture fragment is made by drill, and the tapper is inserted into the hole. When the tapper is inserted at the proper depth, the fracture fragment can be reduced to right place by handling the inserted tapper. Then, the tapper is inserted to the end, and the handle is split. While the inserted tapper acting as a temporary metal screw is placed, another hole is made at nearby site and the screw is inserted. Next, the inserted tapper acting as a temporary metal screw is removed, and another screw is inserted into the hole from which the tapper was removed. From October 2006 to April 2008, we applied this procedure to 106 facial bone fractures in 68 patients, and no major complications were noted. In conclusion, we tried to make the operation more simple and accurate by using the tapper as an instrument for reduction and fixation of fracture fragment.

  4. Finite Element Analysis of a New Pedicle Screw-Plate System for Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue; Li, Changqing; Liu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) is increasingly popular for the surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar disc diseases. The constructs intended for segmental stability are varied in MI-TLIF. We adopted finite element (FE) analysis to compare the stability after different construct fixations using interbody cage with posterior pedicle screw-rod or pedicle screw-plate instrumentation system. Methods A L3–S1 FE model was modified to simulate decompression and fusion at L4–L5 segment. Fixation modes included unilateral plate (UP), unilateral rod (UR), bilateral plate (BP), bilateral rod (BR) and UP+UR fixation. The inferior surface of the S1 vertebra remained immobilized throughout the load simulation, and a bending moment of 7.5 Nm with 400N pre-load was applied on the L3 vertebra to recreate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Range of motion (ROM) and Von Mises stress were evaluated for intact and instrumentation models in all loading planes. Results All reconstructive conditions displayed decreased motion at L4–L5. The pedicle screw-plate system offered equal ROM to pedicle screw-rod system in unilateral or bilateral fixation modes respectively. Pedicle screw stresses for plate system were 2.2 times greater than those for rod system in left lateral bending under unilateral fixation. Stresses for plate were 3.1 times greater than those for rod in right axial rotation under bilateral fixation. Stresses on intervertebral graft for plate system were similar to rod system in unilateral and bilateral fixation modes respectively. Increased ROM and posterior instrumentation stresses were observed in all loading modes with unilateral fixation compared with bilateral fixation in both systems. Conclusions Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion augmentation with pedicle screw-plate system fixation increases fusion construct stability equally to the pedicle screw-rod system. Increased posterior

  5. Variation of plate fixation for mandibular advancement with intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy using endoscopically assisted intraoral rigid or semi-rigid internal fixation: Case series study: Postoperative condylar seating control for mandibular advancement.

    PubMed

    Hara, Shingo; Mitsugi, Masaharu; Tatemoto, Yukihiro

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy associated with mandibular advancement by intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy (IVRO) with endoscopically assisted intraoral rigid or semi-rigid internal fixation. The study sample included all patients who had undergone an mandibular advancement by IVRO procedure with endoscopically assisted intraoral plate fixation from September 2008 to May 2012. An mandibular advancement by IVRO with endoscopically assisted intraoral rigid or semi-rigid internal fixation was used for mandibular advancement. The patients were analyzed prospectively, with more than 2 years of follow-up, and were evaluated in terms of functional results, postoperative complications, and skeletal stability. A total of 14 patients (bilateral, 7 patients with class II; unilateral, 7 patients with asymmetry) were included in the present study. The average degree of mandibular advancement was 5.5 ± 1.9 mm (range, 3-9 mm). Both the occlusal relationship and facial appearance in all patients were significantly improved by the surgical-orthodontic treatment, with no major harmful clinical symptoms. In addition, one-screw semi-rigid fixation could control postoperative passive condylar seating. This study showed that mandibular advancement by IVRO with endoscopically assisted, intraoral semi-rigid internal fixation offers a promising treatment alternative for patients with skeletal class II malocclusion or facial asymmetry. PMID:26610634

  6. Missing nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasmund, Norbert; Struck, Ulrich; Hansen, Anja; Flohr, Anita; Nausch, Günther; Grüttmüller, Annett; Voss, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Opposing opinions on the importance of nitrogen fixation in the northern Benguela upwelling region provoked us to investigate the magnitude of nitrogen fixation in front of northern Namibia and southern Angola. Measurements of nitrogen fixation rates using the 15N method at 66 stations during seven cruises from 2008 to 2014 showed that, in general, the 15N content in the biomass did not increase after tracer incubation with 15N2, indicating that no nitrogen fixation occurred. Correspondingly, the filamentous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium was almost not present. The abundant picocyanobacteria did obviously not perform nitrogen fixation to a significant degree. The artificial improvement of conditions for nitrogen fixation in mesocosm experiments, including phosphate and iron additions and a warmer temperature, failed to induce nitrogen fixation. A plausible explanation of these findings is a lack of conditioned cells for nitrogen fixation in the Benguela region.

  7. NUT SCREW MECHANISMS

    DOEpatents

    Glass, J.A.F.

    1958-07-01

    A reactor control mechanism is described wherein the control is achieved by the partial or total withdrawal of the fissile material which is in the form of a fuel rod. The fuel rod is designed to be raised and lowered from the reactor core area by means of two concentric ball nut and screw assemblies that may telescope one within the other. These screw mechanisms are connected through a magnetic clutch to a speed reduction gear and an accurately controllable prime motive source. With the clutch energized, the fuel rod may be moved into the reactor core area, and fine adjustments may be made through the reduction gearing. However, in the event of a power failure or an emergency signal, the magnetic clutch will become deenergized, and the fuel rod will drop out of the core area by the force of gravity, thus shutting down the operation of the reactor.

  8. Low noise lead screw positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A very precise and low noise lead screw positioner, for positioning a retroreflector in an interferometer is described. A gas source supplies inert pressurized gas, that flows through narrow holes into the clearance space between a nut and the lead screw. The pressurized gas keeps the nut out of contact with the screw. The gas flows axially along the clearance space, into the environment. The small amount of inert gas flowing into the environment minimizes pollution. By allowing such flow into the environment, no seals are required between the end of the nut and the screw.

  9. Lagged Syndesmotic Fixation: Our Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Kwaadu, Kwasi Yiadom; Fleming, Justin James; Salmon, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    Ankle fractures are very common, and although algorithms are in place for osseous management, consensus has not been reached regarding treatment of associated ligamentous injuries. Although tibiofibular syndesmotic stabilization can be done using different forms of fixation, the biomedical literature has long emphasized the risk of long-term restriction of ankle mobility with the use of lagged transfixation. However, when reduction cannot be maintained with positional fixation, we found that lagging the syndesmotic screw helped to maintain the reduction without causing functional restriction. In this report, we describe our experience with patients who had undergone lagged tibiofibular transfixation and were available for short- to intermediate-term follow-up to assess ankle function. A total of 31 patients (32.63% of 95 consecutive patients) were available at a mean of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months to complete the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot questionnaire. The mean score was 88.38 (range 42 to 100) points at a mean follow-up interval of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months. Of 31 patients, 19 had an AOFAS score of 90 points, 9 an AOFAS score of 80 to 89 points, 2 an AOFAS score of 60 to 69 points, and 1 an AOFAS score of <60 points. Because all syndesmotic screws were placed using the lag technique, unrestricted motion compared with the uninjured limb was used as the endpoint. All subjects had unrestricted motion compared with the uninjured limb, refuting the assertion that lagged syndesmotic screw fixation confers more restriction in ankle kinematics than positional syndesmotic fixation. PMID:25736445

  10. Lagged Syndesmotic Fixation: Our Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Kwaadu, Kwasi Yiadom; Fleming, Justin James; Salmon, Trudy

    2015-01-01

    Ankle fractures are very common, and although algorithms are in place for osseous management, consensus has not been reached regarding treatment of associated ligamentous injuries. Although tibiofibular syndesmotic stabilization can be done using different forms of fixation, the biomedical literature has long emphasized the risk of long-term restriction of ankle mobility with the use of lagged transfixation. However, when reduction cannot be maintained with positional fixation, we found that lagging the syndesmotic screw helped to maintain the reduction without causing functional restriction. In this report, we describe our experience with patients who had undergone lagged tibiofibular transfixation and were available for short- to intermediate-term follow-up to assess ankle function. A total of 31 patients (32.63% of 95 consecutive patients) were available at a mean of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months to complete the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot questionnaire. The mean score was 88.38 (range 42 to 100) points at a mean follow-up interval of 34.87 (range 18 to 52) months. Of 31 patients, 19 had an AOFAS score of 90 points, 9 an AOFAS score of 80 to 89 points, 2 an AOFAS score of 60 to 69 points, and 1 an AOFAS score of <60 points. Because all syndesmotic screws were placed using the lag technique, unrestricted motion compared with the uninjured limb was used as the endpoint. All subjects had unrestricted motion compared with the uninjured limb, refuting the assertion that lagged syndesmotic screw fixation confers more restriction in ankle kinematics than positional syndesmotic fixation.

  11. The use of silk-based devices for fracture fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, Gabriel S.; Leisk, Gary G.; Lo, Tim J.; Moreau, Jodie E.; Haas, Dylan S.; Papenburg, Bernke J.; Golden, Ethan B.; Partlow, Benjamin P.; Fox, Sharon E.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Lin, Samuel J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2014-03-01

    Metallic fixation systems are currently the gold standard for fracture fixation but have problems including stress shielding, palpability and temperature sensitivity. Recently, resorbable systems have gained interest because they avoid removal and may improve bone remodelling due to the lack of stress shielding. However, their use is limited to paediatric craniofacial procedures mainly due to the laborious implantation requirements. Here we prepare and characterize a new family of resorbable screws prepared from silk fibroin for craniofacial fracture repair. In vivo assessment in rat femurs shows the screws to be self-tapping, remain fixed in the bone for 4 and 8 weeks, exhibit biocompatibility and promote bone remodelling. The silk-based devices compare favourably with current poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid fixation systems, however, silk-based devices offer numerous advantages including ease of implantation, conformal fit to the repair site, sterilization by autoclaving and minimal inflammatory response.

  12. Strength analysis of clavicle fracture fixation devices and fixation techniques using finite element analysis with musculoskeletal force input.

    PubMed

    Marie, Cronskär

    2015-08-01

    In the cases, when clavicle fractures are treated with a fixation plate, opinions are divided about the best position of the plate, type of plate and type of screw units. Results from biomechanical studies of clavicle fixation devices are contradictory, probably partly because of simplified and varying load cases used in different studies. The anatomy of the shoulder region is complex, which makes it difficult and expensive to perform realistic experimental tests; hence, reliable simulation is an important complement to experimental tests. In this study, a method for finite element simulations of stresses in the clavicle plate and bone is used, in which muscle and ligament force data are imported from a multibody musculoskeletal model. The stress distribution in two different commercial plates, superior and anterior plating position and fixation including using a lag screw in the fracture gap or not, was compared. Looking at the clavicle fixation from a mechanical point of view, the results indicate that it is a major benefit to use a lag screw to fixate the fracture. The anterior plating position resulted in lower stresses in the plate, and the anatomically shaped plate is more stress resistant and stable than a regular reconstruction plate.

  13. A Pitfall in Fixation of Distal Humeral Fractures with Pre-Contoured Locking Compression Plate

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Ring, David

    2015-01-01

    Anatomically precontoured locking plates are intended to facilitate the fixation of articular fractures and particularly those associated with osteoporosis. Fractures of the distal humerus are relatively uncommon injuries where operative intervention can be exceptionally challenging. The distal humeral trochlea provides a very narrow anatomical window through which to pass a fixed-angle locking screw, which must also avoid the olecranon, coronoid, and radial fossae. We describe 3 patients (ages 27, 49, and 73 years) with a bicolumnar fracture of the distal humerus where very short distal locking screws were used. Intra-articular screw placement was avoided but loss of fixation occurred in two patients and a third was treated with a prolonged period of immobilization. We postulate that fixed-angle screw trajectories may make it difficult for the surgeon to place screws of adequate length in this anatomically confined region, and may lead to insufficient distal fixation. Surgical tactics should include placement of as many screws as possible into the distal fragment, as long as possible and that each screw passes through a plate without necessarily locking in. PMID:26110181

  14. Tibial Tunnel Cyst Formation after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Non-Bioabsorbable Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Yogesh V; Bhaskar, Deepu; Phaltankar, Padmanabh M; Charalambous, Charalambos P

    2015-12-01

    Tibial cyst formation following the use of bioabsorbable interference screws in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is well-described; however, cyst formation after the use of metallic interference screws is not well-documented. We describe a case of osteolytic lesion of the proximal tibia presenting to us 20 years after ACL reconstruction using an autologous bone-tendon-bone graft. The original graft fixation technique was interference fixation with a metal screw in the tibial and femoral tunnels. A two-stage revision reconstruction of the ACL was undertaken with curettage and bone grafting of the tibial lesion in the first stage and reconstruction using a four-strand hamstring tendon in the second stage. The patient recovered satisfactorily with complete healing of the cyst and returned to pre-injury level of activities. We have reviewed case reports and case series that describe the aetiology of intra-osseous cyst formation following ACL reconstruction. PMID:26673117

  15. Comparison of Biomechanical Characteristics and Pelvic Ring Stability Using Different Fixation Methods to Treat Pubic Symphysis Diastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Feng; He, Yu; Qian, Hebu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Li, Qinghu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The intention of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics using 5 internal fixation methods used clinically to stabilize a pubic symphysis diastasis (PSD, Tile type B1). A 3-dimensional finite element model of PSD was simulated using 5 implants, including single superior plate (Single-Plate), superior and anterior plate (Dual-Plate), single cannulated screw (Single-Screw), crossed dual cannulated screws (Cross-Screw), and parallel dual cannulated screws (Para-Screw). Three loads were distributed in all models, including dual-leg standing, single-leg stance, and rotation. To evaluate the biomechanical properties, the construct stiffness, the stress distribution, and the von Misses stress were recorded and analyzed. To evaluate pelvic ring stability, the micromotion of the pubic symphysis and iliosacral joint was analyzed. Disruption of pubic symphysis dramatically decreased the pelvic ring stability. Cross-screw and Para-Screw showed higher stiffness than other methods. All implants endured the maximum von Misses stress under single-leg stance. For Plate-Screw system, the maximum stress occurred at a place where it strides over pubic symphysis and adjacent Plate-Screw interface. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. Para-Screw showed the best fixation effect under dual-leg conditions. Cross-screw showed superior antishearing force capacity under single-leg stance. Dual-Plate provided maximum antihorizontal rotation. Para-Screw provided the maximum stabilization for the posterior pelvic ring. This study showed the biomechanical advantages of dual-implant for PSD only from the finite element view. The Para-Screw provided high construct stiffness under 3 load conditions. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. The better anterior and posterior pelvic stabilization were obtained by the dual-implant fixation than other methods. Therefore, the Cross-Screw and Dual-Plate fixation methods should be preferred

  16. A Novel Fixation System for Acetabular Quadrilateral Plate Fracture: A Comparative Biomechanical Study

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Guo-Chun; Sun, Jun-Ying; Dong, Sheng-Jie; Zhang, Wen; Luo, Zong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess the biomechanical properties of a novel fixation system (named AFRIF) and to compare it with other five different fixation techniques for quadrilateral plate fractures. This in vitro biomechanical experiment has shown that the multidirectional titanium fixation (MTF) and pelvic brim long screws fixation (PBSF) provided the strongest fixation for quadrilateral plate fracture; the better biomechanical performance of the AFRIF compared with the T-shaped plate fixation (TPF), L-shaped plate fixation (LPF), and H-shaped plate fixation (HPF); AFRIF gives reasonable stability of treatment for quadrilateral plate fracture and may offer a better solution for comminuted quadrilateral plate fractures or free floating medial wall fracture and be reliable in preventing protrusion of femoral head. PMID:25802849

  17. Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screw and Polymethylmethacrylate-Augmented Pedicle Screw in Osteoporotic Sheep Lumbar Vertebrae: Biomechanical and Interfacial Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Xie, Qing-yun; Wang, Cai-ru; Liu, Jin-biao; Liao, Dong-fa; Jiang, Kai; Lei, Wei; Pan, Xian-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background It was reported that expansive pedicle screw (EPS) and polymethylmethacrylate-augmented pedicle screw (PMMA-PS) could be used to increase screw stability in osteoporosis. However, there are no studies comparing the two kinds of screws in vivo. Thus, we aimed to compare biomechanical and interfacial performances of EPS and PMMA-PS in osteoporotic sheep spine. Methodology/Principal Findings After successful induction of osteoporotic sheep, lumbar vertebrae in each sheep were randomly divided into three groups. The conventional pedicle screw (CPS) was inserted directly into vertebrae in CPS group; PMMA was injected prior to insertion of CPS in PMMA-PS group; and the EPS was inserted in EPS group. Sheep were killed and biomechanical tests, micro-CT analysis and histological observation were performed at both 6 and 12 weeks post-operation. At 6-week and 12-week, screw stabilities in EPS and PMMA-PS groups were significantly higher than that in CPS group, but there were no significant differences between EPS and PMMA-PS groups at two study periods. The screw stability in EPS group at 12-week was significantly higher than that at 6-week. The bone trabeculae around the expanding anterior part of EPS were more and denser than that in CPS group at 6-week and 12-week. PMMA was found without any degradation and absorption forming non-biological “screw-PMMA-bone” interface in PMMA-PS group, however, more and more bone trabeculae surrounded anterior part of EPS improving local bone quality and formed biological “screw-bone” interface. Conclusions/Significance EPS can markedly enhance screw stability with a similar effect to the traditional method of screw augmentation with PMMA in initial surgery in osteoporosis. EPS can form better biological interface between screw and bone than PMMA-PS. In addition, EPS have no risk of thermal injury, leakage and compression caused by PMMA. We propose EPS has a great application potential in augmentation of screw stability

  18. Screw/stud removal tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, K.; Herrick, D. E.; Rothermel, L.

    1980-01-01

    Tool removes stubborn panheaded screws or studs where conventional tools would be either too weak or inconvenient to use. Screws with damaged heads or slots can also be removed this way. Tool can be worked with one hand and easily fits limited-access and blind areas. It can be made in various sizes to fit different screwheads.

  19. Biomechanical Properties of a Novel Biodegradable Magnesium-Based Interference Screw.

    PubMed

    Ezechieli, Marco; Meyer, Hanna; Lucas, Arne; Helmecke, Patrick; Becher, Christoph; Calliess, Tilman; Windhagen, Henning; Ettinger, Max

    2016-06-27

    Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA) were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57). Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05). Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesium-based screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32). MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future. PMID:27433303

  20. Biomechanical Properties of a Novel Biodegradable Magnesium-Based Interference Screw

    PubMed Central

    Ezechieli, Marco; Meyer, Hanna; Lucas, Arne; Helmecke, Patrick; Becher, Christoph; Calliess, Tilman; Windhagen, Henning; Ettinger, Max

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium-based interference screws may be an alternative in anterior/posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The well-known osteoconductive effects of biodegradable magnesium alloys may be useful. It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the biomechanical properties of a magnesium based interference screw and compare it to a standard implant. A MgYREZr-alloy interference screw and a standard implant (Milagro®; De Puy Mitek, Raynham, MA, USA) were used for graft fixation. Specimens were placed into a tensile loading fixation of a servohydraulic testing machine. Biomechanical analysis included pretensioning of the constructs at 20 N for 1 min following cyclic pretensioning of 20 cycles between 20 and 60 N. Biomechanical elongation was evaluated with cyclic loading of 1000 cycles between 50 and 200 N at 0.5 Hz. Maximum load to failure was 511.3±66.5 N for the Milagro® screw and 529.0±63.3 N for magnesium-based screw (ns, P=0.57). Elongations after preload, during cyclical loading and during failure load were not different between the groups (ns, P>0.05). Stiffness was 121.1±13.8 N/mm for the magnesium-based screw and 144.1±18.4 for the Milagro® screw (ns, P=0.32). MgYREZr alloy interference screws show comparable results in biomechanical testing to standard implants and may be an alternative for anterior cruciate reconstruction in the future. PMID:27433303

  1. Novel posterior fixation keratoprosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacombe, Emmanuel

    1992-08-01

    The keratoprosthesis is the last solution for corneally blind patients that cannot benefit from corneal transplants. Keratoprostheses that have been designed to be affixed anteriorly usually necessitate multi-step surgical procedures and are continuously subjected to the extrusion forces generated by the positive intraocular pressure; therefore, clinical results in patients prove inconsistent. We proposed a novel keratoprosthesis concept that utilizes posterior corneal fixation which `a priori' minimizes the risk of aqueous leakage and expulsion. This prosthesis is implanted in a single procedure thereby reducing the number of surgical complications normally associated with anterior fixation devices. In addition, its novel design makes this keratoprosthesis implantable in phakic eyes. With an average follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 25 months), our results on 21 cases are encouraging. Half of the keratoprostheses were implanted in severe burn cases, with the remainder in cases of pseudo- pemphigus. Good visual results and cosmetic appearance were obtained in 14 of 21 eyes.

  2. Better Axial Stiffness of a Bicortical Screw Construct Compared to a Cable Construct for Comminuted Vancouver B1 Proximal Femoral Fractures.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Jamie T; Taheri, Arash; Day, Robert E; Yates, Piers J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to biomechanically evaluate the Locking attachment plate (LAP) construct in comparison to a Cable plate construct, for the fixation of periprosthetic femoral fractures after cemented total hip arthroplasty. Each construct incorporated a locking compression plate with bi-cortical locking screws for distal fixation. In the Cable construct, 2 cables and 2 uni-cortical locking screws were used for proximal fixation. In the LAP construct, the cables were replaced by a LAP with 4 bi-cortical locking screws. The LAP construct was significantly stiffer than the cable construct under axial load with a bone gap (P=0.01). The LAP construct offers better axial stiffness compared to the cable construct in the fixation of comminuted Vancouver B1 proximal femoral fractures.

  3. The screw propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1980-07-01

    Marine and air screw propellers are considered in terms of theoretical hydrodynamics as developed by Joukowsky, Prandtl, and Betz. Attention is given to the flow around wings of finite span where spanwise flow exists and where lift and the bound vorticity must all go smoothly to zero at the wing tips. The concept of a trailing vortex sheet made up of infinitesimal line vortexes roughly aligned with the direction of flight is discussed in this regard. Also considered is induced velocity, which tends to convect the sheet downward at every stage in the roll-up process, the vortex theory of propellers and the Betz-Prandtl circulation distribution. The performance of the Gossamer Albatross and of a pedal-driven biplane called the Chrysalis are also discussed.

  4. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    PubMed

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  5. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure. PMID:26258041

  6. Arthroscopic Fixation of Glenoid Rim Fractures After Reduction by Labral Repair.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Pramod B; Camp, Christopher L; Sinatro, Alec L; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-04-01

    Surgical fixation of displaced, intra-articular glenoid fractures represents a clinical challenge. These fractures have traditionally been treated through open approaches to the glenohumeral joint; however, the morbidity associated with open surgery may be reduced with arthroscopic techniques. Previously described arthroscopic methods commonly use clamps and/or Kirschner wires to obtain and maintain provisional fixation. We describe our technique for minimally invasive, arthroscopic fixation of glenoid rim fractures using labral repair as an indirect reduction maneuver, followed by final fixation with an extra-articular screw. This method is safe, efficient, and reliable, and it can be used to approach a variety of intra-articular glenoid fractures. PMID:27462537

  7. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure.

  8. A Technique of Superficial Medial Collateral Ligament Reconstruction Using an Adjustable-Loop Suspensory Fixation Device

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Shaneel; Getgood, Alan

    2015-01-01

    This report describes superficial medial collateral ligament reconstruction of the knee using a novel method of graft fixation with the ACL Tightrope RT (Arthrex, Naples, FL). After tibial fixation with either a standard interference screw or staple, femoral fixation of the semitendinosus tendon is performed with the adjustable-loop suspensory fixation device, which allows for both initial graft tensioning and re-tensioning after cyclical knee range of motion. This provides the ability for the graft to accommodate for resultant soft-tissue creep and stress relaxation, thereby allowing for optimal soft-tissue tension and reduction in laxity at the end of the procedure. PMID:26258041

  9. Percutaneous Lumbopelvic Fixation for Reduction and Stabilization of Sacral Fractures With Spinopelvic Dissociation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Quinnan, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Sacral fractures that result in spinopelvic dissociation are unstable injuries that are often treated surgically, with iliosacral screw fixation and/or lumbopelvic fixation from L4 to the pelvis. Open lumbopelvic fixation allows for direct fracture reduction and immediate postoperative weight bearing, but is associated with a relatively high wound complication rate. Open surgery often takes several hours and can be associated with significant blood loss, and therefore may not be well tolerated physiologically in these patients who often have multiple injuries. We developed a percutaneous lumbopelvic reduction and fixation technique to address these issues. PMID:26894767

  10. Rotational Stability of Scaphoid Osteosyntheses: An In Vitro Comparison of Small Fragment Cannulated Screws to Novel Bone Screw Sets

    PubMed Central

    Erhart, Jochen; Unger, Ewald; Schefzig, Philip; Varga, Peter; Trulson, Inga; Gormasz, Anna; Trulson, Alexander; Reschl, Martin; Hagmann, Michael; Vecsei, Vilmos; Mayr, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background The current standard of care for operative repair of scaphoid fractures involves reduction and internal fixation with a single headless compression screw. However, a compression screw in isolation does not necessarily control rotational stability at a fracture or nonunion site. The single screw provides rotational control through friction and bone interdigitation from compression at the fracture site. We hypothesize that osteosyntheses with novel bone screw sets (BSS) equipped with anti-rotational elements provide improved rotational stability. Methods Stability of osteosynthesis under increasing cyclic torsional loading was investigated on osteotomized cadaveric scaphoids. Two novel prototype BSS, oblique type (BSS-obl.) and longitudinal type (BSS-long.) were compared to three conventional screws: Acutrak2®mini, HCS®3.0 and Twinfix®. Biomechanical tests were performed on scaphoids from single donors in paired comparison and analyzed by balanced incomplete random block design. Loading was increased by 50 mNm increments with 1,000 cycles per torque level and repeated until a rotational clearance of 10°. Primary outcome measure was the number of cycles to 10° clearance, secondary outcome measure was the maximum rotational clearance for each torque level. Findings BSS-obl. performed significantly better than Acutrak2®mini and HCS® (p = 0.015, p<0.0001). BSS-long. performed significantly better than HCS® (p = 0.010). No significant difference in performance between BSS-obl. and BSS-long. (p = 0.361), between BSS obl. and Twinfix® (p = 0.50) and BSS long. and Twinfix® (p = 0.667) was detected. Within the torque range up to 200 mNm, four of 21 (19%) BSS-long. and four of 21 (19%) BSS-obl. preparations showed early failure. The same loading led to early failure in four (29%) Twinfix®, seven (50%) Acutrak2®mini and 10 (71%) HCS® of 14 screw samples, respectively. Conclusions For both BSS and to a lesser extent for Twinfix® (as dual-component screw

  11. [Observations on optimizing the mechanical properties of osteosynthesis screws].

    PubMed

    Zitter, H

    1988-06-01

    According to two agreeing standards, the mechanical requirements for bone screws consist of a minimum breaking torque and of the minimum angle of rotation to failure of 180 degrees. Apparently it has been overlooked that these requirements admit austenitic steels with a very low yield strength, which reach the required torque at fracture only by the work-hardening brought about during the torsion test. As a high yield strength is a prerequisite of a stable fixation, a formulation is proposed which guarantees not only a high elastic torque but also an adequate work of deformation in the plastic state as an insurance against embrittlement. PMID:3407018

  12. Simple Coating with Fibronectin Fragment Enhances Stainless Steel Screw Osseointegration in Healthy and Osteoporotic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rachit; González-García, Cristina; Torstrick, Brennan; Guldberg, Robert E.; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel; García, Andrés J.

    2015-01-01

    Metal implants are widely used to provide structural support and stability in current surgical treatments for bone fractures, spinal fusions, and joint arthroplasties as well as craniofacial and dental applications. Early implant-bone mechanical fixation is an important requirement for the successful performance of such implants. However, adequate osseointegration has been difficult to achieve especially in challenging disease states like osteoporosis due to reduced bone mass and strength. Here, we present a simple coating strategy based on passive adsorption of FN7-10, a recombinant fragment of human fibronectin encompassing the major cell adhesive, integrin-binding site, onto 316-grade stainless steel (SS). FN7-10 coating on SS surfaces promoted α5β1 integrin-dependent adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. FN7-10-coated SS screws increased bone-implant mechanical fixation compared to uncoated screws by 30% and 45% at 1 and 3 months, respectively, in healthy rats. Importantly, FN7-10 coating significantly enhanced bone-screw fixation by 57% and 32% at 1 and 3 months, respectively, and bone-implant ingrowth by 30% at 3 months compared to uncoated screws in osteoporotic rats. These coatings are easy to apply intra-operatively, even to implants with complex geometries and structures, facilitating the potential for rapid translation to clinical settings. PMID:26100343

  13. Simple coating with fibronectin fragment enhances stainless steel screw osseointegration in healthy and osteoporotic rats.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rachit; González-García, Cristina; Torstrick, Brennan; Guldberg, Robert E; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel; García, Andrés J

    2015-09-01

    Metal implants are widely used to provide structural support and stability in current surgical treatments for bone fractures, spinal fusions, and joint arthroplasties as well as craniofacial and dental applications. Early implant-bone mechanical fixation is an important requirement for the successful performance of such implants. However, adequate osseointegration has been difficult to achieve especially in challenging disease states like osteoporosis due to reduced bone mass and strength. Here, we present a simple coating strategy based on passive adsorption of FN7-10, a recombinant fragment of human fibronectin encompassing the major cell adhesive, integrin-binding site, onto 316-grade stainless steel (SS). FN7-10 coating on SS surfaces promoted α5β1 integrin-dependent adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. FN7-10-coated SS screws increased bone-implant mechanical fixation compared to uncoated screws by 30% and 45% at 1 and 3 months, respectively, in healthy rats. Importantly, FN7-10 coating significantly enhanced bone-screw fixation by 57% and 32% at 1 and 3 months, respectively, and bone-implant ingrowth by 30% at 3 months compared to uncoated screws in osteoporotic rats. These coatings are easy to apply intra-operatively, even to implants with complex geometries and structures, facilitating the potential for rapid translation to clinical settings. PMID:26100343

  14. A Simple and Reliable Method of Narrowing Genioplasty Using Biodegradable Screws.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Sung

    2016-01-01

    The T-osteotomy technique is widely performed to improve lower face aesthetics. During this narrowing genioplasty procedure, metal fixtures are required to rigidly fix the bone segments. Specifically, the use of biodegradable osteofixations has become a viable surgical option as more patients now have the desire to surreptitiously undergo aesthetic surgery. The present report describes a narrowing genioplasty procedure with the use of biodegradable screws only. When the T-osteotomy technique was performed to narrow the chin, the bone segments were first temporarily fixed with a 4-hole titanium plate and screws. Later during the operation, the plate and screws were replaced with 4 biodegradable screws with bicortical fixation. Completion of bone healing can be confirmed by follow-up radiographs taken 6 months after the surgery. Despite increasing demand for the use of absorbable materials in aesthetic surgeries, biodegradable fixation systems have not been widely used for aesthetic surgeries due to a perception of high cost, inconvenient manipulation, prolonged operative time, and suspicions on long-term stability. Our novel method of using only biodegradable screws allows such limitations to be easily overcome by surgeons.

  15. BIOMECHANICAL STUDY OF TRANSCORTICAL OR TRANSTRABECULAR BONE FIXATION OF PATELLAR TENDON GRAFT WITH BIOABSORBABLE PINS IN ACL RECONSTRUCTION IN SHEEP

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Mauro Batista; Borges, Paulo César; Namba, Mario Massatomo; da Silva, João Luiz Vieira; de Assis Pereira Filho, Francisco; Filho, Edmar Stieven; Matias, Jorge Eduardo Fouto

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the initial resistance of fixation using the Rigid Fix® system, and compare it with traditional fixation methods using metal interference screws; and to evaluate the resistance of the fixation with the rigid fix system when the rotational position of the bone block is altered in the interior of the femoral tunnel. Methods: forty ovine knee specimens (stifle joints) were submitted to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL) using a bone-tendon-bone graft. In twenty specimens, the Rigid Fix method was used; this group was subdivided into two groups: ten knees the pins transfixed only the spongious area of the bone block, and ten for fixation passing through the layer of cortical bone. In the twenty remaining specimens, the graft was fixed with 9mm metal interference screws. Results: comparison of the RIGIDFIX® method with the metal interference screw fixation method did not show any statistically significant differences in terms of maximum load and rigidity; also, there were no statistically significant differences when the rotational position of the bone block was altered inside the femoral tunnel. For these evaluations, a level of significance of p < 0.017 was considered. Conclusion: fixation of the bone-tendon-bone graft with 2 bioabsorbable pines, regardless of the rotational position inside the femoral tunnel, gave a comparable fixation in terms of initial resistance to the metal interference screw, in this experimental model. PMID:27027081

  16. A new technique for retaining double crowns on implants via custom-positioned vertical screws.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ziebolz, Dirk; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Rinke, Sven

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the use of custom-positioned vertical screws (CVS) to attach primary telescopic crowns to implant abutments. In a private practice setting, 37 patients with 40 double crown-retained implant overdentures (IODs) with a clearance fit (Marburg double crowns) were followed. All primary crowns on the 120 implant abutments were retained using CVS. After a mean followup period of 3.55 ± 1.37 years (range: 1.5 to 6.3 years), one abutment screwloosening incident was reported (incidence: 0.08%). No loosening of any of the screw-retained primary crowns occurred. CVS may represent a viable fixation concept for IODs.

  17. Clival Screw Placement in Patient with atlas assimilation: A CT-based feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan; Wu, Zenghui

    2016-01-01

    Clival screw and plate fixation technique is an alternative or supplement to the occipitocervical instrumentation. However, no report has clarified the applied anatomy of clivus in patients with atlas assimilation (C1A), especially for clival screw fixation. Therefore, we measured the parameters of clival lengths, widths, putative screw lengths, clival-cervical angel and foramen magnum diameters on CT images in a cohort of 81 C1A patients and patients without C1A. The clivus showed a rectangular shape in 96.3% (78/81) of C1A patients, and a normal-like triangle shape in 3.7% (3/81) of C1A patients. The intracranial clival length decreased 13% (37 mm) in C1A patients, the extracranial clival length 14.8% (24.1 mm), the clival-cervical angle 6.2% (122.3°) and the superior screw length 11.3% (14.1 mm), the sagittal diameter of foramen magnum 16% (28.0 mm), respectively. There was no significant difference in the widest or narrowest clival width, or the middle screw length, or the transverse diameter of foramen magnum between groups. The inferior clivus was feasible for an average 9.7-mm-length screw placement in C1A patients, while not in patients without C1A. The present study characterizes clivus of C1A patients with an unnormal-like rectangular shape, and confirmes a screw placement at the inferior clivus. PMID:27539005

  18. Clival Screw Placement in Patient with atlas assimilation: A CT-based feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan; Wu, Zenghui

    2016-01-01

    Clival screw and plate fixation technique is an alternative or supplement to the occipitocervical instrumentation. However, no report has clarified the applied anatomy of clivus in patients with atlas assimilation (C1A), especially for clival screw fixation. Therefore, we measured the parameters of clival lengths, widths, putative screw lengths, clival-cervical angel and foramen magnum diameters on CT images in a cohort of 81 C1A patients and patients without C1A. The clivus showed a rectangular shape in 96.3% (78/81) of C1A patients, and a normal-like triangle shape in 3.7% (3/81) of C1A patients. The intracranial clival length decreased 13% (37 mm) in C1A patients, the extracranial clival length 14.8% (24.1 mm), the clival-cervical angle 6.2% (122.3°) and the superior screw length 11.3% (14.1 mm), the sagittal diameter of foramen magnum 16% (28.0 mm), respectively. There was no significant difference in the widest or narrowest clival width, or the middle screw length, or the transverse diameter of foramen magnum between groups. The inferior clivus was feasible for an average 9.7-mm-length screw placement in C1A patients, while not in patients without C1A. The present study characterizes clivus of C1A patients with an unnormal-like rectangular shape, and confirmes a screw placement at the inferior clivus. PMID:27539005

  19. First metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis: a biomechanical comparison of three fixation constructs.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kristopher M; Teasdall, Robert D; Tanaka, Martin L; Scott, Aaron T

    2012-01-01

    First metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis is utilized in the treatment of severe arthritis and hallux valgus. Successful fusion relies on limiting motion at the fusion site and may be achieved through numerous methods. Use of locking plates has recently generated considerable interest, but whether they provide any biomechanical advantage over other available constructs is unclear. Utilizing cyclic loading intended to mimic early weight bearing, the stiffness of three fixation methods for first metatarsophalangeal arthrodesis was compared using Sawbones. The one-third tubular plate completed 1.8 and 2.4 times more cycles before failure than the X-type locking plate or crossed screws, respectively. No difference was detected in cycles to failure between the X-type locking plate and crossed screws. One-third tubular plate mean stiffness was 49% greater than crossed screws at all cycles and greater than X-type locking plate by an average of 25%, beginning at cycle 50.

  20. Arthroscopic Fixation of Tibial Spine Avulsion Fracture in Open Physis

    PubMed Central

    Chouhan, Varun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Arthroscopic fixation of tibial spine fracture in patients with open physis without damaging the growth plate is very important. We have described a very simple and effective technique for the first time in this article. Case report: A 16-year-old boy sustained avulsion fractures of tibial spine while playing. He was treated arthroscopically with excellent results. Conclusion: Arthroscopic fixation of tibial spine fracture in patients with open physis with two cannulated screws perpendicular to each other is a very simple technique providing strong construct, and allowing early mobilization without risk of damage to the growth plate. PMID:27703945

  1. Treatment of Palatal Fractures by Osteosynthesis with 2.0-mm Locking Plates as External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Cienfuegos, Ricardo; Sierra, Eduardo; Ortiz, Benjamin; Fernández, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    Treatment options for palatal fractures range from orthodontic braces, acrylic bars, and arch bars for maxillomandibular fixation to internal fixation, with plates and screws placed under the palate mucosa and periosteum, together with pyriform aperture or alveolar plating plus buttress reconstruction. Forty-five patients, ages 4 to 56, were treated using medium- or high-profile locking plates placed over the palatal mucosa as an external fixator for palatal fractures, together with treatment for other associated facial fractures. In open fractures, plates were placed after approximating the edges of the mucosal wounds. Plates and screws for palate fixation were removed at 12 weeks, when computed tomography scans provided evidence of fracture healing. All palatal fractures healed by 12 weeks, with no cases of mucosal necrosis, bone exposure, fistulae, or infections. This approach achieves adequate stability, reduces the risk of bone and mucosal necrosis, and promotes healing of mucosal wounds in case of open fractures. PMID:22132261

  2. Iso-C3D navigation assisted pedicle screw placement in deformities of the cervical and thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vinod V; Kamath, Vijay; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Rajasekaran, S

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pedicle screw instrumentation of the deformed cervical and thoracic spine is challenging to even the most experienced surgeon and associated with increased incidence of screw misplacement. Iso-C3D based navigation has been reported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement, however, there are very few studies assessing its efficacy in the presence of deformity. We conducted a study to evaluate the accuracy of Iso-C3D based navigation in pedicle screw fixation in the deformed cervical and thoracic spine. Materials and Methods: We inserted 98 cervical pedicle screws (18 patients) and 242 thoracic pedicle screws (17 patients) using Iso-C3D based navigation for deformities of spine due to scoliosis, ankylosing spondylitis, post traumatic and degenerative disorders. Two independent observers determined and graded the accuracy of screw placement from postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Results: Postoperative CT scans of the cervical spine showed 90.8% perfectly placed screws with 7 (7%) grade I pedicle breaches, 2 (2%) grade II pedicle breaches and one anterior cortex penetration (< 2mm). Five lateral pedicle breaches violated the vertebral artery foramen and three medial pedicle breaches penetrated the spinal canal; however, no patient had any neurovascular complications. In the thoracic spine there were 92.2% perfectly placed screws with only six (2%) grade II pedicle breaches, eight (3%) grade I pedicle breaches and five screws (2%) penetrating the anterior or lateral cortex. No neuro-vascular complications were encountered. Conclusion: Iso-C3D based navigation improves the accuracy of pedicle screw placement in deformities of the cervical and thoracic spine. The low incidence of pedicle breach implies increased safety for the patient. PMID:20419003

  3. Biomechanical analysis of different types of pedicle screw augmentation: a cadaveric and synthetic bone sample study of instrumented vertebral specimens.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kuo-Hua; Lai, Yu-Shu; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Ming; McClean, Colin J; Fan, Chang-Yuan; Chang, Chia-Hao; Lin, Leou-Chyr; Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2013-10-01

    This study aims to determine the pull-out strength, stiffness and failure pull-out energy of cement-augmented, cannulated-fenestrated pedicle screws in an osteoporotic cadaveric thoracolumbar model, and to determine, using synthetic bone samples, the extraction torques of screws pre-filled with cement and those with cement injected through perforations. Radiographs and bone mineral density measurements from 32 fresh thoracolumbar vertebrae were used to define specimen quality. Axial pull-out strength of screws was determined through mechanical testing. Mechanical pull-out strength, stiffness and energy-to-failure ratio were recorded for cement-augmented and non-cement-augmented screws. Synthetic bone simulating a human spinal bone with severe osteoporosis was used to measure the maximum extraction torque. The pull-out strength and stiffness-to-failure ratio of cement pre-filled and cement-injected screws were significantly higher than the non-cement-augmented control group. However, the cement pre-filled and cement-injected groups did not differ significantly across these values (p=0.07). The cement pre-filled group had the highest failure pull-out energy, approximately 2.8 times greater than that of the cement-injected (p<0.001), and approximately 11.5 times greater than that of the control groups (p<0.001). In the axial pull-out test, the cement-injected group had a greater maximum extraction torque than the cement pre-filled group, but was statistically insignificant (p=0.17). The initial fixation strength of cannulated screws pre-filled with cement is similar to that of cannulated screws injected with cement through perforations. This comparable strength, along with the heightened pull-out energy and reduced extraction torque, indicates that pedicle screws pre-filled with cement are superior for bone fixation over pedicle screws injected with cement. PMID:23669371

  4. Comparison of Biomechanical Characteristics and Pelvic Ring Stability Using Different Fixation Methods to Treat Pubic Symphysis Diastasis: A Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Yao, Feng; He, Yu; Qian, Hebu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Li, Qinghu

    2015-12-01

    The intention of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics using 5 internal fixation methods used clinically to stabilize a pubic symphysis diastasis (PSD, Tile type B1).A 3-dimensional finite element model of PSD was simulated using 5 implants, including single superior plate (Single-Plate), superior and anterior plate (Dual-Plate), single cannulated screw (Single-Screw), crossed dual cannulated screws (Cross-Screw), and parallel dual cannulated screws (Para-Screw). Three loads were distributed in all models, including dual-leg standing, single-leg stance, and rotation. To evaluate the biomechanical properties, the construct stiffness, the stress distribution, and the von Misses stress were recorded and analyzed. To evaluate pelvic ring stability, the micromotion of the pubic symphysis and iliosacral joint was analyzed.Disruption of pubic symphysis dramatically decreased the pelvic ring stability. Cross-screw and Para-Screw showed higher stiffness than other methods. All implants endured the maximum von Misses stress under single-leg stance. For Plate-Screw system, the maximum stress occurred at a place where it strides over pubic symphysis and adjacent Plate-Screw interface. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. Para-Screw showed the best fixation effect under dual-leg conditions. Cross-screw showed superior antishearing force capacity under single-leg stance. Dual-Plate provided maximum antihorizontal rotation. Para-Screw provided the maximum stabilization for the posterior pelvic ring.This study showed the biomechanical advantages of dual-implant for PSD only from the finite element view. The Para-Screw provided high construct stiffness under 3 load conditions. The single implant and Para-Screw had a tendency to fail. The better anterior and posterior pelvic stabilization were obtained by the dual-implant fixation than other methods. Therefore, the Cross-Screw and Dual-Plate fixation methods should be preferred in the

  5. Comparative analysis of pedicle screw versus hybrid instrumentation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Sohail; Munshi, Naseem; Abbas, Asad; Shaikh, Rabia Hassan; Hashmi, Imtiaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the most common type of scoliosis. A Cobb angle of 50° will progress beyond the age of spinal maturity. Surgery over bracing is advised at a Cobb angle above or equal to 50°. The aim of surgery is to bring the Cobb angle down below 50° to prevent reprogression as well as improve the quality of life. The objective of the study is to analyze the efficacy and significance in lifestyle improvement of pedicle screw-only fixation system versus the more common hybrid instrumentation system used for the surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted involving two groups of patients were included in the study. One group was operated with pedicle screw-only method while the other with hybrid instrumentation system. The pre- and post-operative Cobb's angles were taken across a follow-up of 4 years. An SRS-30 questionnaire was given in a yearly follow-up to assess the lifestyle improvement of the patient. Results: Pedicle screw-only method was significantly more effective in reducing Cobb's angle (P = 0.0487). It was showed less loss of correction (P = 0.009) pedicle screw-only surgery was also better at reducing thoracic curves (P = 0.001). There seemed a better recovery time with pedicle screw surgery (P = 0.003). Conclusion: Pedicle screws are more effective and durable than hybrid systems at when treating adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

  6. Comparative analysis of pedicle screw versus hybrid instrumentation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Sohail; Munshi, Naseem; Abbas, Asad; Shaikh, Rabia Hassan; Hashmi, Imtiaz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the most common type of scoliosis. A Cobb angle of 50° will progress beyond the age of spinal maturity. Surgery over bracing is advised at a Cobb angle above or equal to 50°. The aim of surgery is to bring the Cobb angle down below 50° to prevent reprogression as well as improve the quality of life. The objective of the study is to analyze the efficacy and significance in lifestyle improvement of pedicle screw-only fixation system versus the more common hybrid instrumentation system used for the surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study was conducted involving two groups of patients were included in the study. One group was operated with pedicle screw-only method while the other with hybrid instrumentation system. The pre- and post-operative Cobb's angles were taken across a follow-up of 4 years. An SRS-30 questionnaire was given in a yearly follow-up to assess the lifestyle improvement of the patient. Results: Pedicle screw-only method was significantly more effective in reducing Cobb's angle (P = 0.0487). It was showed less loss of correction (P = 0.009) pedicle screw-only surgery was also better at reducing thoracic curves (P = 0.001). There seemed a better recovery time with pedicle screw surgery (P = 0.003). Conclusion: Pedicle screws are more effective and durable than hybrid systems at when treating adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. PMID:27695235

  7. Comparison of the Mechanical Characteristics of a Universal Small Biplane Plating Technique Without Compression Screw and Single Anatomic Plate With Compression Screw.

    PubMed

    Dayton, Paul; Ferguson, Joe; Hatch, Daniel; Santrock, Robert; Scanlan, Sean; Smith, Bret

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the mechanical characteristics of biplane locked plating in small bone fixation, the present study compared the stability under cyclic cantilever loading of a 2-plate locked biplane (BPP) construct without interfragmentary compression with that of a single-plate locked construct with an additional interfragmentary screw (SPS) using surrogate bone models simulating Lapidus arthrodesis. In static ultimate plantar bending, the BPP construct failed at significantly greater load than did the SPS construct (556.2 ± 37.1 N versus 241.6 ± 6.3 N, p = .007). For cyclic failure testing in plantar bending at a 180-N starting load, the BPP construct failed at a significantly greater number of cycles (158,322 ± 50,609 versus 13,718 ± 10,471 cycles) and failure load (242.5 ± 25.0 N versus 180.0 ± 0.0 N) than the SPS construct (p = .002). For cyclic failure testing in plantar bending at a 120-N starting load, the results were not significantly different between the BPP and SPS constructs for the number of cycles (207,646 ± 45,253 versus 159,334 ± 69,430) or failure load (205.0 ± 22.4 N versus 185.0 ± 33.5 N; p = .300). For cyclic testing with 90° offset loading (i.e., medial to lateral bending) at a 120-N starting load, all 5 BPP constructs (tension side) and 2 of the 5 SPS constructs reached 250,000 cycles without failure. Overall, the present study found the BPP construct to have superior or equivalent stability in multiplanar orientations of force application in both static and fatigue testing. Thus, the concept of biplane locked plating, using 2 low profile plates and unicortical screw insertion, shows promise in small bone fixation, because it provides consistent stability in multiplanar orientations, making it universally adaptable to many clinical situations.

  8. A Fluoroscopy-Free Technique for Percutaneous Screw Positioning During Arthroscopic Treatment of Depression Tibial Plateau Fractures.

    PubMed

    Thaunat, Mathieu; Camelo Barbosa, Nuno; Tuteja, Sanesh; Jan, Nicolas; Fayard, Jean Marie; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    This article aims to describe a simple and reliable technique that helps in positioning the cannulated percutaneous screws during fixation of depression-type tibial plateau fractures. After fracture reduction under arthroscopic control, an outside-in anterior cruciate ligament femoral guide is introduced through the tibial cortical metaphyseal window and positioned under endoscopic control just underneath the elevated fragment. When proper height is achieved, a guide pin is drilled from lateral to medial through the sleeve, 1 to 2 cm distal to the articular surface of the depressed fragment. The cannulated screw can then be introduced under endoscopic control, without fluoroscopic assistance, just under the previously elevated joint surface. This technique ensures optimal placement of the cannulated screw in the middle of the bony tunnel to obtain optimal subchondral bone support during fixation of the depressed tibial plateau fracture. PMID:27656370

  9. Accuracy and safety of pedicle screw placement in neuromuscular scoliosis with free-hand technique

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Hitesh N.; Fernandez, Harry; Yang, Jae Hyuk; Song, Hae-Ryong

    2008-01-01

    It is a retrospective analytic study of 1,009 transpedicular screws (689 thoracic and 320 lumbosacral), inserted with free-hand technique in neuromuscular scoliosis using postoperative CT scan. The aim of paper was to determine the accuracy and safety of transpedicular screw placement with free-hand technique in neuromuscular scoliosis and to compare the accuracy at different levels in such population. All studies regarding accuracy and safety of pedicle screw in scoliosis represent idiopathic scoliosis using various techniques such as free-hand, navigation, image intensifier, etc., for screw insertion. Anatomies of vertebrae and pedicle are distorted in scoliosis, hence accurate and safe placement of pedicle screw is prerequisite for surgery. Between 2004 and 2006, 37 consecutive patients, average age 20 years (9–44 years), of neuromuscular scoliosis were operated with posterior pedicle screw fixation using free-hand technique. Accuracy of pedicle screws was studied on postoperative CT scan. Placement up to 2 mm medial side and 4 mm lateral side was considered within-safe zone. Of the 1,009 screws, 273 screws were displaced medially, laterally or on the anterior side showing that 73% screws (68% in thoracic and 82.5% in lumbar spine) were accurately placed within pedicle. Considering the safe zone, 93.3% (942/1009, 92.4% in thoracic and 95.3% in lumbar spine) of the screws were within the safe zone. Comparing accuracy according to severity of curve, accuracy was 75% in group 1 (curve <90°) and 69% in group 2 (curve >90°) with a safety of 94.8 and 91.2%, respectively (P = 0.35). Comparing the accuracy at different thoracic levels, it showed 67, 64 and 72% accuracy in upper, middle and lower thoracic levels with safety of 96.6, 89.2 and 93.1%, respectively, exhibiting no statistical significant difference (P = 0.17). Pedicle screw placement in neuromuscular scoliosis with free-hand technique is accurate and safe as other conditions. PMID:18830636

  10. Mechanical testing of a device for subcutaneous internal anterior pelvic ring fixation versus external pelvic ring fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although useful in the emergency treatment of pelvic ring injuries, external fixation is associated with pin tract infections, the patient’s limited mobility and a restricted surgical accessibility to the lower abdomen. In this study, the mechanical stability of a subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) system is investigated. Methods A standard external fixation and a SIAF system were tested on pairs of Polyoxymethylene testing cylinders using a universal testing machine. Each specimen was subjected to a total of 2000 consecutive cyclic loadings at 1 Hz with sinusoidal lateral compression/distraction (+/−50 N) and torque (+/− 0.5 Nm) loading alternating every 200 cycles. Translational and rotational stiffness were determined at 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 cycles. Results There was no significant difference in translational stiffness between the SIAF and the standard external fixation when compared at 500 (p = .089), 700 (p = .081), and 900 (p = .266) cycles. Rotational stiffness observed for the SIAF was about 50 percent higher than the standard external fixation at 300 (p = .005), 500 (p = .020), and 900 (p = .005) cycles. No loosening or failure of the rod-pin/rod-screw interfaces was seen. Conclusions In comparison with the standard external fixation system, the tested device for subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) in vitro has similar translational and superior rotational stiffness. PMID:24684828

  11. Metallic Fixation of Mandibular Segmental Defects: Graft Immobilization and Orofacial Functional Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Jahadakbar, Ahmadreza; Amerinatanzi, Amirhesam; Elahinia, Mohammad; Miller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the behavior of the healthy mandible under maximum molar bite force to demonstrate the problems associated with the current standard of care procedures for mandibular segmental defect reconstruction (ie, use of Ti–6Al–4V hardware and either a single- or double-barrel fibular graft). With current Ti–6Al–4V mandibular reconstruction hardware, there is a significant stiffness mismatch among the hardware, graft, and the remaining host anatomy. How the distribution of mechanical forces through the mandible is altered after a segmental bone loss and reconstruction is incompletely understood. Methods: We studied a healthy adult mandible for stress, strain, and reaction force distribution during normal mastication. Stress distribution of this model was then used to study problems encountered after mandibular segmental defect reconstructive surgery. We model the use of both single- and double-barrel fibular grafts to repair the loss of the left M1–3 containing segment of the mandible. These simulations were done using 2 sets of plates with different thicknesses. Results: We found that the stiffness mismatching between the fixation hardware and the graft and host bone causes stress shielding of that bone and stress concentrations in the fixation hardware and screws. These effects are expected, especially during the bone healing period. However, long term, this abnormal stress–strain distribution may lead to either the hardware’s failure due to stress concentration or graft failure due to bone resorption as a result of stress shielding. We found that the stress–strain distribution is more normal with a double-barrel fibular graft. Additionally, we found that thinner fixation plates can reduce stress shielding. Conclusion: The proposed model can be used to evaluate the performance and optimization of the fixation device. PMID:27757323

  12. In vivo degradation of a new concept of magnesium-based rivet-screws in the minipig mandibular bone.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Benoit; Saulacic, Nikola; Beck, Stefan; Imwinkelried, Thomas; Goh, Bee Tin; Nakahara, Ken; Hofstetter, Willy; Iizuka, Tateyuki

    2016-12-01

    Self-tapping of magnesium screws in hard bone may be a challenge due to the limited torsional strength of magnesium alloys in comparison with titanium. To avoid screw failure upon implantation, the new concept of a rivet-screw was applied to a WE43 magnesium alloy. Hollow cylinders with threads on the outside were expanded inside drill holes of minipig mandibles. During the expansion with a hexagonal mandrel, the threads engaged the surrounding bone and the inside of the screw transformed into a hexagonal screw drive to allow further screwing in or out of the implant. The in vivo degradation of the magnesium implants and the performance of the used coating were studied in a human standard-sized animal model. Four magnesium alloy rivet-screws were implanted in each mandible of 12 minipigs. Six animals received the plasmaelectrolytically coated magnesium alloy implants; another six received the uncoated magnesium alloy rivet-screws. Two further animals received one titanium rivet-screw each as control. In vivo radiologic examination was performed at one, four, and eight weeks. Euthanasia was performed for one group of seven animals (three animals with coated, three with uncoated magnesium alloy implants and one with titanium implant) at 12weeks and for the remaining seven animals at 24weeks. After euthanasia, micro-computed tomography and histological examination with histomorphometry were performed. Significantly less void formation as well as higher bone volume density (BV/TV) and bone-implant contact area (BIC) were measured around the coated implants compared to the uncoated ones. The surface coating was effective in delaying degradation despite plastic deformation. The results showed potential for further development of magnesium hollow coated screws for bone fixation.

  13. In vivo degradation of a new concept of magnesium-based rivet-screws in the minipig mandibular bone.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Benoit; Saulacic, Nikola; Beck, Stefan; Imwinkelried, Thomas; Goh, Bee Tin; Nakahara, Ken; Hofstetter, Willy; Iizuka, Tateyuki

    2016-12-01

    Self-tapping of magnesium screws in hard bone may be a challenge due to the limited torsional strength of magnesium alloys in comparison with titanium. To avoid screw failure upon implantation, the new concept of a rivet-screw was applied to a WE43 magnesium alloy. Hollow cylinders with threads on the outside were expanded inside drill holes of minipig mandibles. During the expansion with a hexagonal mandrel, the threads engaged the surrounding bone and the inside of the screw transformed into a hexagonal screw drive to allow further screwing in or out of the implant. The in vivo degradation of the magnesium implants and the performance of the used coating were studied in a human standard-sized animal model. Four magnesium alloy rivet-screws were implanted in each mandible of 12 minipigs. Six animals received the plasmaelectrolytically coated magnesium alloy implants; another six received the uncoated magnesium alloy rivet-screws. Two further animals received one titanium rivet-screw each as control. In vivo radiologic examination was performed at one, four, and eight weeks. Euthanasia was performed for one group of seven animals (three animals with coated, three with uncoated magnesium alloy implants and one with titanium implant) at 12weeks and for the remaining seven animals at 24weeks. After euthanasia, micro-computed tomography and histological examination with histomorphometry were performed. Significantly less void formation as well as higher bone volume density (BV/TV) and bone-implant contact area (BIC) were measured around the coated implants compared to the uncoated ones. The surface coating was effective in delaying degradation despite plastic deformation. The results showed potential for further development of magnesium hollow coated screws for bone fixation. PMID:27612710

  14. Parallel analysis of finite element model controlled trial and retrospective case control study on percutaneous internal fixation for vertical sacral fractures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although percutaneous posterior-ring tension-band metallic plate and percutaneous iliosacral screws are used to fix unstable posterior pelvic ring fractures, the biomechanical stability and compatibility of both internal fixation techniques for the treatment of Denis I, II and III type vertical sacral fractures remain unclear. Methods Using CT and MR images of the second generation of Chinese Digitized Human “male No. 23”, two groups of finite element models were developed for Denis I, II and III type vertical sacral fractures with ipsilateral superior and inferior pubic ramus fractures treated with either a percutaneous metallic plate or a percutaneous screw. Accordingly, two groups of clinical cases that were fixed using the above-mentioned two internal fixation techniques were retrospectively evaluated to compare postoperative effect and function. Parallel analysis was performed with a finite element model controlled trial and a case control study. Results The difference of the postoperative Majeed standards and outcome rates between two case groups was no statistically significant (P > 0.05). Accordingly, the high values of the maximum displacements/stresses of the plate-fixation model group approximated those of the screw-fixation model group. However, further simulation of Denis I, II and III type fractures in each group of models found that the biomechanics of the plate-fixation models became increasingly stable and compatible, whereas the biomechanics of the screw-fixation models maintained tiny fluctuations. When treating Denis III fractures, the biomechanical effects of the pelvic ring of the plate-fixation model were better than the screw-fixation model. Conclusions Percutaneous plate and screw fixations are both appropriate for the treatment of Denis I and II type vertical sacral fractures; whereas percutaneous plate fixation appears be superior to percutaneous screw fixation for Denis III type vertical sacral fracture. Biomechanical

  15. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture. A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups. There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture. The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy. PMID:26765448

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluations of Nano-Hydroxyapatite/Polyamide 66/Glass Fibre (n-HA/PA66/GF) as a Novel Bioactive Bone Screw

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bao; Peng, Xiaohua; Jiang, Dianming; Wu, Jun; Qiao, Bo; Li, Weichao; Qi, Xiaotong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we prepared nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66/glass fibre (n-HA/PA66/GF) bioactive bone screws. The microstructure, morphology and coating of the screws were characterised, and the adhesion, proliferation and viability of MC3T3-E1 cells on n-HA/PA66/GF scaffolds were determined using scanning electron microscope, CCK-8 assays and cellular immunofluorescence analysis. The results confirmed that n-HA/PA66/GF scaffolds were biocompatible and had no negative effect on MC3T3-E1 cells in vitro. To investigate the in vivo biocompatibility, internal fixation properties and osteogenesis of the bioactive screws, both n-HA/PA66/GF screws and metallic screws were used to repair intercondylar femur fractures in dogs. General photography, CT examination, micro-CT examination, histological staining and biomechanical assays were performed at 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after operation. The n-HA/PA66/GF screws exhibited good biocompatibility, high mechanical strength and extensive osteogenesis in the host bone. Moreover, 24 weeks after implantation, the maximum push-out load of the bioactive screws was greater than that of the metallic screws. As shown by their good cytocompatibility, excellent biomechanical strength and fast formation and ingrowth of new bone, n-HA/PA66/GF screws are thus suitable for orthopaedic clinical applications. PMID:23861888

  17. Comparison of Isocentric C-Arm 3-Dimensional Navigation and Conventional Fluoroscopy for Percutaneous Retrograde Screwing for Anterior Column Fracture of Acetabulum: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    He, Jiliang; Tan, Guoqing; Zhou, Dongsheng; Sun, Liang; Li, Qinghu; Yang, Yongliang; Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous screw insertion for minimally displaced or reducible acetabular fracture using x-ray fluoroscopy and computer-assisted navigation system has been advocated by some authors. The purpose of this study was to compare intraoperative conditions and clinical results between isocentric C-arm 3-dimensional (Iso-C 3D) fluoroscopy and conventional fluoroscopy for percutaneous retrograde screwing of acetabular anterior column fracture.A prospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 22 patients were assigned to 2 different groups: 10 patients in the Iso-C 3D navigation group and 12 patients in the conventional group. The operative time, fluoroscopic time, time of screw insertion, blood loss, and accuracy were analyzed between the 2 groups.There were significant differences in operative time, screw insertion time, fluoroscopy time, and mean blood loss between the 2 groups. Totally 2 of 12 (16.7%) screws were misplaced in the conventional fluoroscopy group, and all 10 screws were in safe zones in the navigation group. Percutaneous screw fixation using the Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system significantly reduced the intraoperative fluoroscopy time and blood loss in percutaneous screwing for acetabular anterior column fracture.The Iso-C 3D computer-assisted navigation system provided a reliable and effective method for percutaneous screw insertion in acetabular anterior column fractures compared to conventional fluoroscopy.

  18. Technique tip: percutaneous fixation of partial incongruous Lisfranc injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Bleazey, Scott T; Brigido, Stephen A; Protzman, Nicole M

    2013-06-01

    Open reduction with screw fixation is considered the standard surgical approach for injuries of the Lisfranc complex in athletes. However, multiple incisions are required, which increase the risk for postoperative complications. We present a novel percutaneous reduction and solid screw fixation technique that may be a viable option to address partial incongruous injuries of the Lisfranc complex in athletes. At our institution, no intraoperative or postoperative complications have been encountered. Screw breakage did not occur. Reduction of the second metatarsal was considered anatomic across all patients. All patients have returned to their respective sport without limitation. The percutaneous approach appears to decrease complications while the targeting-reduction guide appears to precisely reduce the injury. Consequently, outcomes have been more consistent and predictable. The authors note that this percutaneous approach is specific to partial incongruous injuries of the Lisfranc complex. When presented with more extensive injuries, the authors advocate an open approach.

  19. Computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation: concepts and evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, Erin J; Ellis, Randy E; Pichora, David R

    2013-11-01

    Background The treatment for undisplaced scaphoid waist fractures has evolved from conventional cast immobilization to percutaneous screw insertion. Percutaneous fixation reduces some of the risks of open surgery, but can be technically demanding and carries the risk of radiation exposure. Recently, computer-assisted percutaneous scaphoid fixation (CAPSF) has been gaining interest. Materials and Methods Conventional percutaneous scaphoid fixation is performed under fluoroscopic guidance and involves insertion of a guide wire along the length of the scaphoid to facilitate placement of a cannulated screw. Adapting computer-assisted techniques for scaphoid fixation poses several unique challenges including patient tracking and registration. Results To date, five groups have successfully implemented systems for CAPSF. These systems have implemented wrist immobilization strategies to resolve the issue of patient tracking and have developed unique guidance techniques incorporating 2D fluoroscope, cone-beam CT, and ultrasound, to circumvent patient-based registration. Conclusions Computer-aided percutaneous pinning of scaphoid waist fractures can significantly reduce radiation exposure and has the potential to improve the accuracy of this procedure. This article reviews the rationale for, and the evolution of, CAPSF and describes the key principles of computer-assisted technology.

  20. Biomechanical measurements of cortical screw purchase in five types of human and artificial humeri.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Mina S R; Nicayenzi, Bruce; Crookshank, Meghan C; Bougherara, Habiba; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Radovan

    2014-02-01

    Humerus shaft fracture fixation is largely dependent on cortical screw purchase in host bone. Only 2 prior studies assessed cortical screw purchase in human humeral shafts, but were of very limited scope and did not fully assess humerus material properties. Also, no studies evaluated the human dried or artificial humeri both commercially available from Sawbones. Vashon, WA, USA. Therefore, present authors measured cortical screw purchase in human fresh-frozen (FF) (n=19), human embalmed (EM) (n=18), human dried (DR) (n=14), artificial "normal" (AN) (n=13), and artificial "osteoporotic" (AO) (n=13) humeri. Each humerus had 2 bicortical screws of 3.5-mm diameter inserted 20mm apart through the shaft's anterior and posterior cortices. Absolute force, displacement, and energy for screw-bone interface failure were measured by screw pullout tests, afterwhich data were normalized by total surface area engaged at the screw-bone interface. For absolute force, AN humeri reached a higher load than EM (p=0.001) and AO (p<0.001) humeri, whilst AN humeri achieved lower normalized force than DR humeri (p=0.018). For absolute displacement, AO humeri achieved a lower level than FF humeri (p=0.013), whilst for normalized displacement AN humeri had lower levels than all other groups (p≤0.005) and AO humeri had lower values than EM humeri (p=0.029). For absolute and normalized energy, there were no statistical differences (p≥0.066). Human bone mineral density (BMD) ranged from 0.7 to 1.8g/cm(2) and was linearly correlated to screw pullout parameters in 14 of 18 cases (R=0.61 to 0.96), whilst humerus age was not. Consequently, it is recommended that human fresh-frozen, human embalmed, and human dried humeri can be used interchangeably for cortical screw purchase, since they were statistically equivalent for all comparisons. However, artificial humeri were involved in all statistical differences observed and, thus, may not replicate cortical screw purchase in human humeri. To date

  1. CT-based 3-D visualisation of secure bone corridors and optimal trajectories for sacroiliac screws.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Thomas; Radetzki, Florian; Wohlrab, David; Stock, Karsten; Hofmann, Gunther Olaf; Noser, Hansrudi

    2013-07-01

    Sacroiliac screw (SI) fixation represents the only minimally invasive method to stabilise unstable injuries of the posterior pelvic ring. However, it is technically demanding. The narrow sacral proportions and a high inter-individual shape variability places adjacent neurovascular structures at potential risk. In this study a CT-based virtual analysis of the iliosacral anatomy in the human pelvis was performed to visualise and analyse 3-D bone corridors for the safe placement of SI-screws in the first sacral segment. Computer-aided calculation of 3-D transverse and general SI-corridors as a sum of all inner-bony 7.3-mm screw positions was done with custom-made software algorithms based on CT-scans of intact human pelvises. Radiomorphometric analysis of 11 CT-DICOM datasets using the software Amira 4.2. Optimal screw tracks allowing the greatest safety distance to the cortex were computed. Corridor geometry and optimal tracks were visualised; measurement data were calculated. A transverse corridor existed in 10 pelvises. In one dysmorphic pelvis, the pedicular height at the level of the 1st neural foramina came below the critical distance of 7.3mm defined by the outer screw diameter. The mean corridor volume was 45.2 cm3, with a length of 14.9cm. The oval cross-section measured 2.8 cm2. The diameter of the optimal screw pathway with the greatest safety distance was 14.2mm. A double cone-shaped general corridor for screw penetration up to the centre of the S1-body was calculated bilaterally for every pelvis. The mean volume was 120.6 cm3 for the left side and 115.8 cm3 for the right side. The iliac entry area measured 49.1 versus 46.0 cm2. Optimal screw tracks were calculated in terms of projected inlet and outlet angles. Multiple optimal screw positions existed for each pelvis. The described method allows an automated 3-D analysis with regard to secure SI-screw corridors even with a high number of CT-datasets. Corridor visualisation and calculation of optimal screw

  2. 30 CFR 18.32 - Fastenings-additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Design Requirements § 18.32 Fastenings—additional requirements. (a) Bolts, screws, or studs shall...) Lockwashers shall be provided for all bolts, screws, and studs that secure parts of explosion-proof enclosures... conduct explosion tests with standard bolts, nuts, cap screws, or studs substituted for any special...

  3. 30 CFR 18.32 - Fastenings-additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Design Requirements § 18.32 Fastenings—additional requirements. (a) Bolts, screws, or studs shall...) Lockwashers shall be provided for all bolts, screws, and studs that secure parts of explosion-proof enclosures... conduct explosion tests with standard bolts, nuts, cap screws, or studs substituted for any special...

  4. 30 CFR 18.32 - Fastenings-additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Design Requirements § 18.32 Fastenings—additional requirements. (a) Bolts, screws, or studs shall...) Lockwashers shall be provided for all bolts, screws, and studs that secure parts of explosion-proof enclosures... conduct explosion tests with standard bolts, nuts, cap screws, or studs substituted for any special...

  5. 30 CFR 18.32 - Fastenings-additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Design Requirements § 18.32 Fastenings—additional requirements. (a) Bolts, screws, or studs shall...) Lockwashers shall be provided for all bolts, screws, and studs that secure parts of explosion-proof enclosures... conduct explosion tests with standard bolts, nuts, cap screws, or studs substituted for any special...

  6. 30 CFR 18.32 - Fastenings-additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and Design Requirements § 18.32 Fastenings—additional requirements. (a) Bolts, screws, or studs shall...) Lockwashers shall be provided for all bolts, screws, and studs that secure parts of explosion-proof enclosures... conduct explosion tests with standard bolts, nuts, cap screws, or studs substituted for any special...

  7. Primary stability of inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Chae, Soo-Won; Lee, Haea; Kim, Soo Min; Lee, Juneyoung; Han, Seung-Ho; Kim, Soung-Yon

    2016-06-01

    Glenoid component fixation with inferior tilt has been suggested as one of the surgical methods to decrease scapular notching and improve stability, but its clinically beneficial effect remains a concern. We evaluated the influence of inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component on primary stability in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty by finite element analysis. Finite element models were constructed from cadaveric scapulae of females over the age of 60 years and glenoid components from reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The relative micromotion at the bone-glenoid component interface, distribution of bone stress under the glenoid component and around the screws, contact area between the bone and screws, and cut surface area of the cancellous bone exposed after glenoid reaming were analyzed and compared between a neutral and 10° inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component. The 10° inferior tilt fixation demonstrated greater relative micromotion and higher bone stress than the neutral tilt fixation. Eccentric reaming, which is done to produce the inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component, increased glenoid cancellous bone exposure and decreased bone-screws contact area. Inferior tilt fixation of the glenoid component may adversely affect primary stability and longevity after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1061-1068, 2016.

  8. Are allogenic or xenogenic screws and plates a reasonable alternative to alloplastic material for osteosynthesis--a histomorphological analysis in a dynamic system.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, C; Obwegeser, J A

    2010-12-01

    Despite invention of titanium and resorbable screws and plates, still, one of the main challenges in bone fixation is the search for an ideal osteosynthetic material. Biomechanical properties, biocompatibility, and also cost effectiveness and clinical practicability are factors for the selection of a particular material. A promising alternative seems to be screws and plates made of bone. Recently, xenogenic bone pins and screws have been invented for use in joint surgery. In this study, screws made of allogenic sheep and xenogenic human bone were analyzed in a vital and dynamic sheep-model and compared to conventional titanium screws over a standard period of bone healing of 56 days with a constant applied extrusion force. Biomechanical analysis and histomorphological evaluation were performed. After 56 days of insertion xenogenic screws made of human bone showed significantly larger distance of extrusion of on average 173.8 μm compared to allogenic screws made of sheep bone of on average 27.8 and 29.95 μm of the titanium control group. Severe resorption processes with connective tissue interposition were found in the histomorphological analysis of the xenogenic screws in contrast to new bone formation and centripetal vascularization of the allogenic bone screw, as well as in processes of incorporation of the titanium control group. The study showed allogenic cortical bone screws as a substantial alternative to titanium screws with good biomechanical properties. In contrast to other reports a different result was shown for the xenogenic bone screws. They showed insufficient holding strength with confirmative histomorphological signs of degradation and insufficient osseointegration. Before common clinical use of xenogenic osteosynthetic material, further evaluation should be performed. PMID:20813368

  9. Pedicle screw piercer with warning device - A technique to increase accuracy of pedicle screw placement

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Lin; Yong, He; Yang, Xu; Bi, Zhang; Mo, Sha; Zhi-Min, Guo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pedicle screw fixation has achieved significant popularity amongst spinal surgeons for both single and multilevel spinal fusion. Suboptimal placements of pedicle screws may lead to neurological and vascular complications. There have been many advances in techniques available for navigating through the pedicle; however, these techniques are not without drawbacks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and feasibility of the pedicle piercer with warning device. Materials and Methods: Eight normal adult thoracolumbar specimens from cadavers consisting of 80 vertebras (T8–L5) were selected and randomly allocated into four groups. Each group contained 20 vertebra. Group 1 was tested for maximum pressure of the piercer within the vertebrae (F1). Group 2 was tested for maximum pressure of the warning piercer penetrating front cortex of the vertebral body (F2). Group 3 was tested for the maximum pressure of piercer penetrating vertebral body endplate (F3) and pedicle notch (F41, F42). Group 4 was tested for maximum pressure of the piercer penetrating the vertebral lateral cortex (F6), the medial and lateral cortex of pedicle (F51, F52). In the second experiment of this study, 4 normal adult specimens consisting of 40 vertebra and 80 pedicles were used for testing the alarm effects of pedicle piercer. The following indicators were adopted for the tests including true positive/negative, false positive/negative, sensitivity, specificity, availability, Youden index, and diagnostic efficiency. SPSS 16.0 was used for statistical analysis. Results: There were statistically significant differences between F1, and F2, F3, F41, F42, F51, F52 respectively (P < 0.05). F1 = 8.970 ± 0.2698, F3 = 13.055 ± 0.6718. We found that the threshold value of piercer warning was from 9.6 to 12.3 Kgf. Sensitivity was 92.31%, specificity was 95.12%, usability was 87.45%, Youden index was 87.43% and diagnostic efficiency was 92.5% respectively. Conclusion: Warning

  10. Recurrent laryngeal edema imitating angioedema caused by dislocated screw after anterior spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Piotr; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Migacz, Ewa; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis. PMID:25755901

  11. Fixation of zygomatic and mandibular fractures with biodegradable plates

    PubMed Central

    Degala, Saikrishna; Shetty, Sujeeth; Ramya, S

    2013-01-01

    Context: In this prospective study, 13 randomly selected patients underwent treatment for zygomatic–complex fractures (2 site fractures) and mandibular fractures using 1.5 / 2 / 2.5-mm INION CPS biodegradable plates and screws. Aims: To assess the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures with biodegradable copolymer osteosynthesis system. Materials and Methods: In randomly selected 13 patients, zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures were plated using resorbable plates and screws using Champy's principle. All the cases were evaluated clinically and radiologically for the type of fracture, need for the intermaxillary fixation (IMF) and its duration, duration of surgery, fixation at operation, state of reduction at operation, state of bone union after operation, anatomic reduction, paresthesia, occlusal discrepancies, soft tissue infection, immediate and late inflammatory reactions related to biodegradation process, and any need for the removal of the plates. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptives, Frequencies, and Chi-square test were used. Results: In our study, the age group range was 5 to 55 years. Road traffic accidents accounted for the majority of patients six, (46.2%). Postoperative occlusal discrepancies were found in seven patients as mild to moderate, which resolved with IMF for 1-8 weeks. There were minimal complications seen and only as soft tissue infection. Conclusions: Use of biodegradable osteosynthesis system is a reliable alternative method for the fixation of zygomatic-complex and mandibular fractures. The biodegradable system still needs to be refined in material quality and handling to match the stability achieved with metal system. Biodegradable plates and screws is an ideal system for pediatric fractures with favorable outcome. PMID:23662255

  12. Screw-fed pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Kenneth M

    2014-11-25

    A pump system includes a pump that includes a first belt and a second belt that are spaced apart from each other to provide generally straight sides of a passage there between. There is an inlet at one end of the passage and an outlet at an opposite end of the passage, with a passage length that extends between the inlet and the outlet. The passage defines a gap distance in a width direction between the straight sides at the passage inlet. A hopper includes an interior space that terminates at a mouth at the passage inlet. At least one screw is located within the interior space of the hopper and includes a screw diameter in the width direction that is less than or equal to the gap distance.

  13. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  14. Comparison of different fixation methods following sagittal split ramus osteotomies using three-dimensional finite elements analysis. Part 1: advancement surgery-posterior loading.

    PubMed

    Erkmen, E; Simşek, B; Yücel, E; Kurt, A

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical behavior of different fixation methods used in bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy (BSSRO). Part 1 comprises of the results of the analysis for mandibular advancement, four different fixation configurations of six hole fragmentation mini plates with monocortical screws and lag screws and posterior loading conditions in the molar and premolar region. The finite element analysis method (FEA) appears suitable for simulating complex mechanical stress situations in the maxillofacial region. The mechanical behavior of selected lag screws with linear or triangular configuration and double parallel or single oblique six hole mini plates with monocortical screws were compared by FEA after 5 mm BSSRO advancement procedure. Four separate three-dimensional finite element models of the mandible were created to simulate the BSSRO and corresponding fixation methods. These models consisted of 122,717 elements and 25,048 nodes. The mechanical parameters of the materials studied were adopted from the literature or were based on manufacturer's information. 500 N posterior occlusal loads were simulated on the distal segments. The commercial finite element solver MSC Marc software was utilized to calculate the stress fields on both the segments and fixative appliances. It was concluded that the use of 2.0mm lag screws placed in a triangular configuration following the BSSRO advancement surgery provides sufficient stability with any rotational movement and less stress fields at the osteotomy site, when compared with the other rigid fixation methods used in the current study. PMID:16053877

  15. Stress concentrations in screw threads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohara, G. P.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of stress concentration in screw threads was defined using the sheer transfer rate as the fundamental quantity. The stress concentration is plotted for a fixed geometry. The Heywood equation was used to generate the basic plots and NASTRAN was used to extend the analysis to the case both where flanks of an individual thread tooth are in contact. The case where a finite axial stress is superimposed is discussed.

  16. Freehand Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement: Review of Existing Strategies and a Step-by-Step Guide Using Uniform Landmarks for All Levels

    PubMed Central

    Baaj, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Pedicle screw fixation in the thoracic spine presents certain challenges due to the critical regional neurovascular anatomy as well as the narrow pedicular corridor that typically exists. With increased awareness of the dangers of intraoperative radiation, the ability to place pedicle screws with anatomic landmarks alone is paramount. In this study, we reviewed the literature from 1990 to 2015 for studies that included freehand pedicle screw placement in the thoracic spine with special emphasis on entry points and the trajectories of the screws. We excluded studies that used fluoroscopy guidance, navigation techniques, cadaveric and biomechanical articles, case reports, and experimental studies on animals. The search retrieved 40 articles, and after careful selection, seven articles were analyzed. Over 8,000 screws were placed in the different studies. The mean accuracy for placement of the thoracic screws was 93.3%. However, there is little consensus between studies in entry points, sagittal, and axial trajectories of the screws. We complete this review by presenting our step-by-step technique for the placement of freehand pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. PMID:27014535

  17. Freehand Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement: Review of Existing Strategies and a Step-by-Step Guide Using Uniform Landmarks for All Levels.

    PubMed

    Avila, Mauricio J; Baaj, Ali A

    2016-01-01

    Pedicle screw fixation in the thoracic spine presents certain challenges due to the critical regional neurovascular anatomy as well as the narrow pedicular corridor that typically exists. With increased awareness of the dangers of intraoperative radiation, the ability to place pedicle screws with anatomic landmarks alone is paramount. In this study, we reviewed the literature from 1990 to 2015 for studies that included freehand pedicle screw placement in the thoracic spine with special emphasis on entry points and the trajectories of the screws. We excluded studies that used fluoroscopy guidance, navigation techniques, cadaveric and biomechanical articles, case reports, and experimental studies on animals. The search retrieved 40 articles, and after careful selection, seven articles were analyzed. Over 8,000 screws were placed in the different studies. The mean accuracy for placement of the thoracic screws was 93.3%. However, there is little consensus between studies in entry points, sagittal, and axial trajectories of the screws. We complete this review by presenting our step-by-step technique for the placement of freehand pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. PMID:27014535

  18. Intertrochanteric fractures in elderly high risk patients treated with Ender nails and compression screw

    PubMed Central

    Gangadharan, Sidhartha; Nambiar, MR

    2010-01-01

    Background: Ender and Simon Weidner popularized the concept of closed condylocephlic nailing for intertrochanteric fractures in 1970. The clinical experience of authors revealed that Ender nailing alone cannot provide secure fixation in elderly patients with osteoporosis. Hence we conducted a study to evaluate the efficacy of a combined fixation procedure using Ender nails and a cannulated compression screw for intertrochanteric fractures. Materials and Methods: 76 patients with intertrochanteric fractures were treated using intramedullary Ender nails and cannulated compression screw from January 2004 to December 2007. The mean age of the patients was 80 years (range 70-105 years).Using the Evan’s system of classification 49 were stable and 27 unstable fractures. Inclusion criteria was high risk elderly patients (age > 70 years) with intertrochanteric fracture. The exclusion criteria included patients with pressure sores over the trochanteric region. Many patients had pre-existing co-morbidities like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, COPD, ischemic heart disease, CVA and coronary artery bypass surgery. The two Ender nails of 4.5mm each were passed across the fracture site into the proximal neck. This was reinforced with a 6.5 mm cannulated compression screw passed from the sub trochanteric region, across the fracture into the head. Results: The mean follow-up was 14 months (range 9-19 months) Average time to fracture union was 10 weeks (range 6-16 weeks). The mean knee ROM was 130° (± 5°). There was no case of nail penetration into hip joint. In five cases with advanced osteoporosis there was minimal migration of Ender nails distally. Conclusions: The Ender nailing combined with compression screw fixation in cases of intertrochanteric fractures in high risk elderly patients could achieve reliable fracture stability with minimal complications. PMID:20697482

  19. Efficacy of Osteoconductive Ceramics in Bioresorbable Screws for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Johannes; Akritopoulos, Panagiotis; Graveleau, Nicolas; Barthelemy, Renaud; Toanen, Cécile; Saffarini, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoconductive additives are used in resorbable interference screws for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to improve graft incorporation and mitigate adverse effects. There are no published studies that compare biological performances of bioresorbable and biocomposite screws without artifacts due to different follow-up times and intrinsic patient characteristics. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of osteoconductive agents in bioresorbable screws for ACL reconstruction at minimum follow-up of 2 years by intrapatient comparison. The hypothesis was that osteoconductive ceramics would result in slower resorption, improved ossification, and less tunnel widening. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 28 ACL reconstructions at 2 centers were randomly assigned into 2 comparable groups: (1) the graft was fixed in the tibia using standard bioresorbable screws and in the femur using biocomposite screws with osteoconductive agents (biphasic calcium phosphate), and (2) the graft was fixed in the femur using a standard bioresorbable screw and in the tibia using a biocomposite screw with osteoconductive agents. Results: Twenty-seven patients completed evaluations at 29.9 ± 4.0 months. Resorption was complete for more bioresorbable (81%) than biocomposite (37%) screws (P = .0029), whereas satisfactory ossification was observed in more biocomposite (52%) than bioresorbable (15%) screws (P = .0216). The tunnel shape was normal in more biocomposite (81%) than bioresorbable (48%) screws (P = .0126), and marked cortical formation was twice more frequent for biocomposite (78%) than bioresorbable (37%) screws (P = .0012). Bioresorbable screws exhibited faster resorption in the femur (P = .0202) but not in the tibia (not significant). Conversely, biocomposite screws demonstrated better ossification, less tunnel widening, and more cortical formation in the tibia (P < .0001, P = .0227, and P

  20. Absorbable scaphoid screw development: a comparative study on biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Song, Muguo; Xu, Yongqing; He, Xiaoqing; Zhu, YueLiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The scaphoid is critical for maintaining the stability and movement of the wrist joints. This study aimed to develop a new internal fixator absorbable scaphoid screw (ASS) for fixation of the scaphoid waist after fracture and to test the biomechanical characteristics of ASS. Materials and methods An ASS was prepared using polylactic acids and designed based on scaphoid measurements and anatomic features. Twenty fractured scaphoid waist specimens were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n=10/group). Reduction and internal fixation of the scaphoid were achieved with either Kirschner wires (K-wires) or ASS. A moving target simulator was used to test palmar flexion and dorsal extension, with the range of testing (waist movement) set from 5° of palmar flexion to 25° of dorsal extension. Flexion and extension were repeated 2,000 times for each specimen. Fracture gap displacements were measured with a computerized tomography scanning. Scaphoid tensile and bending strengths were measured by using a hydraulic pressure biomechanical system. Results Prior to biomechanical fatigue testing, fracture gap displacements were 0.16±0.02 mm and 0.22±0.02 mm in the ASS and K-wire groups, respectively. After fatigue testing, fracture gap displacements in the ASS and the K-wire groups were 0.21±0.03 mm and 1.52±0.07 mm, respectively. The tensile strengths for the ASS and K-wire groups were 0.95±0.02 MPa and 0.63±0.02 MPa, respectively. Conclusion Fixation using an ASS provided sufficient mechanical support for the scaphoid after fracture. PMID:27217756

  1. Hoffa nonunion, two cases treated with headless compression screws.

    PubMed

    Somford, Matthijs Paul; van Ooij, Bas; Schafroth, Matthias U; Kloen, Peter

    2013-12-01

    A coronal fracture of the distal femoral condyle is a rare entity and a nonunion even more so. The coronal fractures, also known as Hoffa fracture, more often involve the lateral than the medial condyle. Open reduction and internal fixation are the primary treatment of choice. We describe two cases of nonunion of a Hoffa fracture (one medial and one lateral). Although the nonunion fragment was not attached to any soft tissues in both cases the fragment was noted to be vital both clinically and histologically. After operative treatment, consisting of debridement, compression with use of headless screws, and liberal use of bone graft both nonunions healed. At latest follow-up, both patients had excellent function and reported no or minimal pain.

  2. Ultraprecision Positioning by Preload Change of Lead Screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Katuhiro; Tamaru, Yuuma; Takafuji, Kazuki

    Ultraprecision positioning is examined for a fine feed system utilizing the elastic deformation of lead screws accompanying the change in the preload in a double nut. The nonlinear deformation due to Hertzian contact of the ball screw can be ignored within a feed of 1μm under an dequate initial preload. No effect of table load on nanometer-order displacement is observed in the range from 10 to 50 kg. The table displacement obtained under an increase in the preload coincides well with the result under a decrease in the preload. Feed control with preload change based on a one-to-one correspondence of preload change and displacement is effective for avoiding the hysterisis phenomenon of the piezoelectric acturator adopted as a deformable spacing part in a double nut. In addition, the preload can be used as a measure to detect the table displacement in place of a position sensor which sometimes shows unreliability owing to unstable performance in the nanometer region. The minimum step feed deduced from preload change is 1nm for a sliding screw and 5nm for a ball screw.

  3. [Internal fixation of radial shaft fractures: Anatomical and biomechanical principles].

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    Radius is a critical bone for functioning of the forearm and therefore its reconstruction following fracture of its shaft must be anatomical in all planes and along all axes. The method of choice is plate fixation. However, it is still associated with a number of unnecessary complications that were not resolved even by introduction of locking plates, but rather the opposite. All the more it is surprising that discussions about anatomical and biomechanical principles of plate fixation have been reduced to minimum or even neglected in the current literature. This applies primarily to the choice of the surgical approach, type of plate, site of its placement and contouring, its working length, number of screws and their distribution in the plate. At the same time it has to be taken into account that a plate used to fix radius is exposed to both bending and torsion stress. Based on our 30-year experience and analysis of literature we present our opinions on plate fixation of radial shaft fractures:We always prefer the volar Henry approach as it allows expose almost the whole of radius, with a minimal risk of injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve.The available studies have not so far found any substantial advantage of LCP plates as compared to 3.5mm DCP or 3.5mm LC DCP plates, quite the contrary. The reason is high rigidity of the locking plates, a determined trajectory of locking screws which is often unsuitable, mainly in plates placed on the anterior surface of the shaft, and failure to respect the physiological curvature of the radius. Therefore based on our experience we prefer "classical" 3.5mm DCP plates.Volar placement of the plate, LCP in particular, is associated with a number of problems. The volar surface covered almost entirely by muscles, must be fully exposed which negatively affects blood supply to the bone. A straight plate, if longer, either lies with its central part partially off the bone and overlaps the interosseous border, or its ends

  4. Modeling flow, melting, solid conveying and global behavior in intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qibo

    Intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders are widely applied in polymer processing industry, especially in compounding and PVC profile processing. However, the design of this type of machines is generally based on experiences and error-and-try. In addition, most of the investigations on intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders were made on the melt conveying region. There is a lack of adequate study on a complete extrusion process to this type of machines. In this study, models were developed to simulate the extrusion processes, including solid conveying, melting and metering, evaluate the performance of intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders, and optimize the design of machines and operating conditions. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory modular intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruder to observe solid conveying, the melting process and the global behavior of this type of machine. The solid bed is formed in the solid conveying region. The inter-screw region plays a dominant role in the melting process. Based on our observations, models were developed to describe both the solid conveying and the melting process. Based on hydrodynamic lubrication theory, a melt conveying model was developed to characterize the pumping capacity of screw elements in intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders. The effect of screw channel aspect ratio (screw channel depth/width) was incorporated into the melt conveying model to improve the prediction of screw pumping capacity. Calculations were made to investigate the effect of geometrical parameter on screw pumping capacity. Models of solid conveying, the melting process and melt conveying were integrated together and a global composite model was developed to characterize the whole intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extrusion process. The global model is intended for both flood fed and metered starved fed conditions. This is the first composite model designed for this type

  5. External Fixation of Open Humerus Factures

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, JL; Mahoney, Craig R; Steinbronn, Dave

    1999-01-01

    Fifteen patients with open shaft of humerus fractures were treated with a monolateral external fixator. Nine patients presented with nerve palsies. Two radial nerves were disrupted and required grafting. Of the seven others, six spontaneously recovered and one brachial plexus partially improved. All fractures healed. The average duration of external fixation was 21 weeks. Four patients required additional procedures prior to healing (external fixator reapplication - 2, plating and bone grafting - 2). Two of these four experienced breakage of 4.5 mm external fixation pins. Eight patients developed pin tract infections, which all resolved with local care and antibiotics. Thirteen patients were contacted at an average of 63 months after injury. Eleven reported they were satisfied with their result, nine had no functional limits, and eight reported no pain. PMID:10847515

  6. Protein detection in gels without fixation.

    PubMed

    Joo, Won-A; Speicher, David W

    2007-05-01

    A number of alternative methods are described for detecting proteins in polyacrylamide gels that do not require fixation of the protein either prior to staining or in conjunction with staining. The primary advantage of avoiding fixation is that this makes it easier to remove proteins of interest from the gels for subsequent analysis. In general, the sensitivity of protein detection methods that avoid fixation is lower than for detection methods using fixation. For any given method, sensitivity is dependent on the volume of the protein band within the gel; hence, sensitivity is highest for sharp, narrow bands. Techniques described in this unit include protocols for protein detection in gels by SDS precipitation, preparation of contact blots, staining with imidazole-zinc, and use of the fluorescent labels IAEDANS and fluorescamine. Several additional methods, including the use of tryptophan fluorescence, guide strips, and minimal protein staining, are discussed in the Commentary.

  7. Negative pressure wound therapy and external fixation device: a simple way to seal the dressing.

    PubMed

    Bulla, Antonio; Farace, Francesco; Uzel, André-Pierre; Casoli, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Negative pressure therapy is widely applied to treat lower limb trauma. However, sealing a negative pressure dressing in the presence of an external fixation device may be difficult and time consuming. Therefore, screws, pins, wires, etc, may preclude the vacuum, preventing the plastic drape to perfectly adhere to the foam. To maintain the vacuum, we tried to prevent air leaking around the screws putting bone wax at the junction between the pins and the plastic drape. This solution, in our hands, avoids air leakage and helps maintain vacuum in a fast and inexpensive way. PMID:24296597

  8. Rigid internal fixation with titanium versus bioresorbable miniplates in the repair of mandibular fractures in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hochuli-Vieira, E; Cabrini Gabrielli, M A; Pereira-Filho, V A; Gabrielli, M F R; Padilha, J G

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare by qualitative histology the efficacy of rigid internal fixation with titanium system and the Lacto Sorb system in mandibular fractures in rabbits. Thirty male adult rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus were used. Unilateral mandibular osteotomies were performed between the canine and first premolar. The animals were divided into two groups: for Group I-rigid internal fixation was performed with titanium system 1.5 mm (Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland), with two screws of 6 mm (bicortical) on each side of the osteotomy. For Group II-rigid internal fixation was performed with PLLA/PGA system 1.5 mm (Lacto Sorb, WLorenz, Jacksonville, FL, USA). The histological analysis evaluated the presence of inflammatory reaction, degree of bone healing and degree of resorption of the Lacto Sorb screws. The results of both fixation systems were similar, only with a small difference after 15 and 30 days. In Group I a faster bony healing was noted. But after 60 days, bony healing was similar in both groups. It is concluded that both PLLA/PGA and titanium plates and screws provide sufficient strength to permit mandibular bone healing. The resorption process of PLLA/PGA osteosynthesis material did not cause acute or chronic inflammatory reaction or foreign body reaction during the studied period.

  9. Influence of the crosshead rate on the mechanical properties of fixation systems of ACL tendon grafts.

    PubMed

    Martel, Oscar; Cárdenes, Juan F; Garcés, Gerardo; Carta, José A

    2009-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most important aspects of knee surgery. For this purpose, several fixation devices have been developed, although the interference screw is the most frequently used. The most typical biomechanical test of these devices consists of placing them in a testing machine and subjecting them to a pull-out test. However, insufficient attention has been paid to the influence of the displacement test rate on the mechanical properties of the fixation system. The aim of this study is to compare the influence of the crosshead rate in the biomechanical test of two different devices for the fixation of ACL tendon grafts. One hundred in vitro tests were performed using porcine tibiae and bovine tendons. The fixation devices used were (1) an interference screw and (2) a new expansion device. All ACL reconstructions were subjected to pull-out test to failure. Five crosshead rates were employed in a range from 30 mm/min to 4000 mm/min. Statistical analyses of the results show that, for the two devices, the rate has a significant effect on both maximum force and stiffness. Moreover, the new expansion device showed lesser dependency on the crosshead rate than the interference screw.

  10. Screw Placement Accuracy and Outcomes Following O-Arm-Navigated Atlantoaxial Fusion: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacob D; Jack, Megan M; Harn, Nicholas R; Bertsch, Judson R; Arnold, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Case series of seven patients. Objective C2 stabilization can be challenging due to the complex anatomy of the upper cervical vertebrae. We describe seven cases of C1-C2 fusion using intraoperative navigation to aid in the screw placement at the atlantoaxial (C1-C2) junction. Methods Between 2011 and 2014, seven patients underwent posterior atlantoaxial fusion using intraoperative frameless stereotactic O-arm Surgical Imaging and StealthStation Surgical Navigation System (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States). Outcome measures included screw accuracy, neurologic status, radiation dosing, and surgical complications. Results Four patients had fusion at C1-C2 only, and in the remaining three, fixation extended down to C3 due to anatomical considerations for screw placement recognized on intraoperative imaging. Out of 30 screws placed, all demonstrated minimal divergence from desired placement in either C1 lateral mass, C2 pedicle, or C3 lateral mass. No neurovascular compromise was seen following the use of intraoperative guided screw placement. The average radiation dosing due to intraoperative imaging was 39.0 mGy. All patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All patients went on to solid fusion. Conclusion C1-C2 fusion using computed tomography-guided navigation is a safe and effective way to treat atlantoaxial instability. Intraoperative neuronavigation allows for high accuracy of screw placement, limits complications by sparing injury to the critical structures in the upper cervical spine, and can help surgeons make intraoperative decisions regarding complex pathology. PMID:27190736

  11. Outcome Analysis of Locking Plate Fixation in Proximal Humerus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Abhishek; Gaur, Sanjiv

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Proximal humerus fractures account for approximately 5% of all fractures. Stable minimally displaced fractures can be treated nonoperatively but the management of displaced fractures remain controversial with various modalities of treatment available. Locking plates provide stable fixation and enable early postoperative mobilization specially in osteoporotic proximal humerus fracture. Aim To evaluate the functional outcome of locking plate fixation and to compare the results of two approaches used for fixation. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted at a tertiary level hospital between September 2011 to December 2013. PHILOS plates were used for internal fixation of displaced proximal humerus fractures Neer’s type 2 part, 3 part and 4 part fractures on 26 patients (M/F ratio 1.36:1; mean age 46 years). According to Neer classification, 5,12 and 9 patients had displaced 2, 3 and 4 part fractures respectively. Deltopectoral and deltoid splitting approaches were used for fixation on 13 patients each. Functional outcome was assessed using Constant-Murley shoulder score. Graphpad software version 6.0 was used with Chi-square test and Fisher-exact test are used to compare data. The p-value< 0.05 is considered significant. Results Of the 26 patients, all fractures united radiologically and clinically and average constant score at final follow-up was 72.5. At the final follow-up 8 patients had good score, 10 patients had moderate score, 6 patients had excellent outcome and 2 patients had poor outcome according to Constant score. Mean time to union was 12.3 weeks (9 –15 weeks). Four complications (15.4%) were encountered, 2 cases of varus malunion, 1 case of wound infection which required wound debridement and 1 case of screw cut-out in which screw removal was done. Mean constant score in delto splitting approach was 70.9 and 74 in deltopectoral group (p-value= 0.54). No significant difference existed in constant score in 2 approaches

  12. Photographic fixative poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Photographic developer poisoning; Hydroquinone poisoning; Quinone poisoning; Sulfite poisoning ... Hydroquinones Quinones Sodium thiosulfate Sodium sulfite/bisulfite Boric acid Photographic fixative can also break down (decompose) to form sulfur dioxide gas.

  13. Biomechanical Evaluation of All-Polyethylene Pegged Bony Ingrowth Glenoid Fixation Techniques on Implant Micromotion.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Brett P; Moravek, James E; Kurdziel, Michael D; Baker, Kevin C; Wiater, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    Newer glenoid components that allow for hybrid cement fixation via traditional cementation of peripheral pegs and bony ingrowth into an interference-fit central peg introduce the possibility of long-term biological fixation. However, little biomechanical work has been done on the initial stability of these components and the various fixation options. We conducted a study in which all-polyethylene glenoid components with a centrally fluted peg were implanted in polyurethane blocks with interference-fit, hybrid cement, and fully cemented fixation (5 per fixation group). Biomechanical evaluation of glenoid loosening, according to ASTM Standard F-2028-12, subjected the glenoids to 50,000 cycles of rim loading, and glenoid component motion was recorded with 2 differential variable reluctance transducers fixed to each glenoid prosthesis. Fully cemented fixation exhibited significantly less mean distraction in comparison with interference-fit fixation (P < .001) and hybrid cement fixation (P < .001). Hybrid cement fixation exhibited significantly less distraction (P < .001), more compression (P < .001), and no significant difference in glenoid translation (P = .793) in comparison with interference-fit fixation. Fully cemented fixation exhibited the most resistance to glenoid motion in comparison with hybrid cement fixation and interference-fit fixation. However, hybrid cement fixation and interference-fit fixation exhibited equivocal motion. Given these results, cementation of peripheral pegs may confer no additional initial stability over that provided by uncemented interference-fit fixation. PMID:27327928

  14. Twin-Screw Extruders in Ceramic Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedmann, Werner; Hölzel, Maria

    The machines mainly used for compounding plastics, chemicals and food are co-rotating, closely intermeshing twin-screw extruders. Some 30 000 such extruders are in use worldwide, about 1/3 are ZSKs from Coperion Werner & Pfleiderer, Stuttgart. In the chemical industry more and more batch mixers are being replaced by continuous twin-screw kneaders.

  15. The development and evaluation of individualized templates to assist transoral C2 articular mass or transpedicular screw placement in TARP-IV procedures: adult cadaver specimen study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Shi; Wu, Zeng-Hui; Xia, Hong; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Ai, Fu-Zhi; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Mai, Xiao-Hong; Yin, Qing-Shui

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate system treats irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation from transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-I to transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-III. However, this system has demonstrated problems associated with screw loosening, atlantoaxial fixation and concealed or manifest neurovascular injuries. This study sought to design a set of individualized templates to improve the accuracy of anterior C2 screw placement in the transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV procedure. METHODS: A set of individualized templates was designed according to thin-slice computed tomography data obtained from 10 human cadavers. The templates contained cubic modules and drill guides to facilitate transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate positioning and anterior C2 screw placement. We performed 2 stages of cadaveric experiments with 2 cadavers in stage one and 8 in stage two. Finally, guided C2 screw placement was evaluated by reading postoperative computed tomography images and comparing the planned and inserted screw trajectories. RESULTS: There were two cortical breaching screws in stage one and three in stage two, but only the cortical breaching screws in stage one were ranked critical. In stage two, the planned entry points and the transverse angles of the anterior C2 screws could be simulated, whereas the declination angles could not be simulated due to intraoperative blockage of the drill bit and screwdriver by the upper teeth. CONCLUSIONS: It was feasible to use individualized templates to guide transoral C2 screw placement. Thus, these drill templates combined with transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV, may improve the accuracy of transoral C2 screw placement and reduce related neurovascular complications. PMID:25518033

  16. Visualization and understanding of the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Jurgen; Toiviainen, Maunu; Fonteyne, Margot; Helkimo, Niko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Juuti, Mikko; Delaet, Urbain; Van Assche, Ivo; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been increased interest in the application of twin screw granulation as a continuous wet granulation technique for pharmaceutical drug formulations. However, the mixing of granulation liquid and powder material during the short residence time inside the screw chamber and the atypical particle size distribution (PSD) of granules produced by twin screw granulation is not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study aims at visualizing the granulation liquid mixing and distribution during continuous twin screw granulation using NIR chemical imaging. In first instance, the residence time of material inside the barrel was investigated as function of screw speed and moisture content followed by the visualization of the granulation liquid distribution as function of different formulation and process parameters (liquid feed rate, liquid addition method, screw configuration, moisture content and barrel filling degree). The link between moisture uniformity and granule size distributions was also studied. For residence time analysis, increased screw speed and lower moisture content resulted to a shorter mean residence time and narrower residence time distribution. Besides, the distribution of granulation liquid was more homogenous at higher moisture content and with more kneading zones on the granulator screws. After optimization of the screw configuration, a two-level full factorial experimental design was performed to evaluate the influence of moisture content, screw speed and powder feed rate on the mixing efficiency of the powder and liquid phase. From these results, it was concluded that only increasing the moisture content significantly improved the granulation liquid distribution. This study demonstrates that NIR chemical imaging is a fast and adequate measurement tool for allowing process visualization and hence for providing better process understanding of a continuous twin screw granulation system.

  17. Femoral Condyles Tangential Views: An Effective Method to Detect the Screw Penetration of Femoral Condyles After Retrograde Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhan-Le; Yu, Xian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Yue-Ju; Yu, Kun-Lun; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative knee soft tissue irritation is a common complication after retrograde nail fixation of femoral fractures. Distal locking screw prominence is one of the causes for soft tissue irritation. This study aimed to determine whether the use of the femoral condyles tangential views improve the diagnostic accuracy compared with anteroposterior (A-P) view in detecting distal locking screw penetrations during retrograde femoral nailing. Methods: The angle between the sagittal plane and lateral aspect of the condyle and the angle between the sagittal plane and medial aspect of condyle were measured on computed tomography (CT) images. After the angles were measured and recorded, cadaveric femurs were used in a simulated surgical procedure. The retrograde femoral nail was inserted into the femur and placed distal locking screws, which were left 2, 4, and 6 mm proud of the medial and lateral condyles for each femur. A-P view, lateral condyle tangential view and medial condyle tangential view were obtained. All fluoroscopic images were recorded and sent to three observers blinded to the experimental procedure to determine whether screws penetrated the condyle cortex or not. Results: According to the results of CT scan, the lateral condyle view was 20.88 ± 0.98° and the medial condyle view was 40.46 ± 3.14°. In the A-P view, we detected 0% at 2 mm penetration, 16.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 25.0% (medial condyle screw) at 4 mm, and 41.7% (lateral condyle screw) and 58.3% (medial condyle screw) at 6 mm. In the lateral tangential view, we detected 91.7% at 2 mm penetration of the lateral condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. In the medial tangential view, we detected 66.7% at 2 mm penetration of the medial condyle and 100% at 4 mm and 6 mm. The femoral condyle tangential views provided significant improvement in detecting screw penetrations at all lengths (2, 4, and 6 mm) compared with the A-P view (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The femoral condyles tangential

  18. Arthroscopic 4-Point Suture Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tibial Avulsion Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Karataglis, Dimitrios; Agathangelidis, Filon; Ditsios, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Pericles

    2014-01-01

    Tibial eminence avulsion fractures are rare injuries occurring mainly in adolescents and young adults. When necessary, regardless of patient age, anatomic reduction and stable internal fixation are mandatory for fracture healing and accurate restoration of normal knee biomechanics. Various arthroscopically assisted fixation methods with sutures, anchors, wires, or screws have been described but can be technically demanding, thus elongating operative times. The purpose of this article is to present a technical variation of arthroscopic suture fixation of anterior cruciate ligament avulsion fractures. Using thoracic drain needles over 2.4-mm anterior cruciate ligament tibial guidewires, we recommend the safe and easy creation of four 2.9-mm tibial tunnels at different angles and at specific points. This technique uses thoracic drain needles as suture passage cannulas and offers 4-point fixation stability, avoiding potential complications of bony bridge fracture and tunnel connection. PMID:25685674

  19. Management of extra-articular fractures of the distal tibia: intramedullary nailing versus plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Casstevens, Chris; Le, Toan; Archdeacon, Michael T; Wyrick, John D

    2012-11-01

    Intramedullary nailing and plate fixation represent two viable approaches to internal fixation of extra-articular fractures of the distal tibia. Although both techniques have demonstrated success in maintaining reduction and promoting stable union, they possess distinct advantages and disadvantages that require careful consideration during surgical planning. Differences in soft-tissue health and construct stability must be considered when choosing between intramedullary nailing and plating of the distal tibia. Recent advances in intramedullary nail design and plate-and-screw fixation systems have further increased the options for management of these fractures. Current evidence supports careful consideration of the risk of soft-tissue complications, residual knee pain, and fracture malalignment in the context of patient and injury characteristics in the selection of the optimal method of fixation.

  20. Bioabsorbable plates and screws in pediatric craniofacial surgery: a review of 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A V; Staffenberg, D A; Petronio, J A; Wood, R J

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the application of bioabsorbable fixation devices in reconstructive craniofacial procedures in the pediatric population. We reviewed 22 cases in which bioabsorbable plates and screws were used in craniofacial surgery for reconstruction. The procedures were performed in a 7-month period. The patients ranged in age from 5 to 228 months at the time of surgery (mean, 76.7 months). The postoperative clinical follow-up ranged from 2 to 16 weeks. The fixation devices were evaluated with regards to satisfactory fixation at the time of procedure. The postoperative follow-up evaluated clinical wound healing, signs of infection or local inflammation, and visibility or palpability of plates through the skin. All patients except one showed satisfactory wound healing with no sign of infection or local inflammation. The plates provided satisfactory fixation and were not visible through the skin. Two patients had plates that were palpable at the 4-month follow-up period. One patient with repair of a blow-out fracture of the orbit with resorbable mesh had redness and swelling over the wound site 2 weeks postoperatively with resolution 4 weeks postoperatively. Our early experience suggests reabsorbable fixation is an attractive option in pediatric plastic and craniofacial surgery. With further experience, this technology may represent the standard of care in reconstruction of the infant calvarium. PMID:10332274

  1. Ocular Fixation Abnormality in Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Shirama, Aya; Kanai, Chieko; Kato, Nobumasa; Kashino, Makio

    2016-05-01

    We examined the factors that influence ocular fixation control in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) including sensory information, individuals' motor characteristics, and inhibitory control. The ASD group showed difficulty in maintaining fixation especially when there was no fixation target. The fixational eye movement characteristics of individuals were consistent regardless of the presence or absence of a fixation target in the controls, but not in the ASD group. Additionally, fixation stability did not correlate with an ability to suppress reflexive saccades measured by an antisaccade task. These findings suggest that ASD adults have deficits in converting alternative sensory information, such as retinal signals in the peripheral visual field or extraretinal signals, to motor commands when the foveal information is unavailable. PMID:26739354

  2. Delayed perforation of the aorta by a thoracic pedicle screw.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Bernd; Birkenmaier, Christof; Fottner, Andreas; Jansson, Volkmar; Dürr, Hans Roland

    2008-09-01

    Pedicle screw instrumentation has become increasingly popular during the past 20 years and a vast selection of products is available on the market. With rising implantation rates, reports about specific complications also have increased. The main reason for these complications is the fact that the course of the pedicle and in turn the positioning of the pedicle screw cannot be adequately controlled visually. Based on the anatomy of the surrounding structures, complications caused by malpositioning can be divided into three main groups: mechanical, neurological and vascular. Beyond mechanical limitations of spinal motion, nerve injury can lead to neurological problems while injuries to vascular structures usually cause hemorrhage. These typical problems in general become apparent intraoperatively or in the immediate postoperative course. We report on a rare delayed complication and analyze the factors that led to it. In addition, we outline our treatment strategy. The goal has to be to avoid such problems in the future by using suitable navigational aids. PMID:18622634

  3. Screw-released roller brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  4. Biomechanical Evaluation of Different Fixation Methods for Mandibular Anterior Segmental Osteotomy Using Finite Element Analysis, Part One: Superior Repositioning Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kilinç, Yeliz; Erkmen, Erkan; Kurt, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to comparatively evaluate the mechanical behavior of 3 different fixation methods following various amounts of superior repositioning of mandibular anterior segment. In this study, 3 different rigid fixation configurations comprising double right L, double left L, or double I miniplates with monocortical screws were compared under vertical, horizontal, and oblique load conditions by means of finite element analysis. A three-dimensional finite element model of a fully dentate mandible was generated. A 3 and 5 mm superior repositioning of mandibular anterior segmental osteotomy were simulated. Three different finite element models corresponding to different fixation configurations were created for each superior repositioning. The von Mises stress values on fixation appliances and principal maximum stresses (Pmax) on bony structures were predicted by finite element analysis. The results have demonstrated that double right L configuration provides better stability with less stress fields in comparison with other fixation configurations used in this study.

  5. Improving carbon fixation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Ducat, DC; Silver, PA

    2012-08-01

    A recent resurgence in basic and applied research on photosynthesis has been driven in part by recognition that fulfilling future food and energy requirements will necessitate improvements in crop carbon-fixation efficiencies. Photosynthesis in traditional terrestrial crops is being reexamined in light of molecular strategies employed by photosynthetic microbes to enhance the activity of the Calvin cycle. Synthetic biology is well-situated to provide original approaches for compartmentalizing and enhancing photosynthetic reactions in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the elucidation of alternative carbon-fixation routes distinct from the Calvin cycle raises possibilities that novel pathways and organisms can be utilized to fix atmospheric carbon dioxide into useful materials.

  6. Effect of Off-Axis Screw Insertion, Insertion Torque, and Plate Contouring on Locked Screw Strength

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Bethany; Silva, Matthew J.; Ricci, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study quantifies the effects of insertion torque, off-axis screw angulation, and plate contouring on the strength of locking plate constructs. Methods Groups of locking screws (n = 6–11 screws) were inserted at 50%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the manufacturer-recommended torque (3.2 Nm) into locking compression plates at various angles: orthogonal (control), 5-degree angle off-axis, and 10-degree angle off-axis. Screws were loaded to failure by a transverse force (parallel to the plate) either in the same (“+”) or opposite direction (“−”) of the initial screw angulation. Separately, locking plates were bent to 5 and 10-degree angles, with the bend apex at a screw hole. Locking screws inserted orthogonally into the apex hole at 100% torque were loaded to failure. Results Orthogonal insertion resulted in the highest average load to failure, 2577 ± 141 N (range, 2413–2778 N), whereas any off-axis insertion significantly weakened constructs (165–1285 N, at 100% torque) (P < 0.05). For “+” loading, torque beyond 100% did not increase strength, but 50% torque reduced screw strength (P < 0.05). Loading in the “−” direction consistently resulted in higher strengths than “+” loading (P < 0.05). Plate contouring of 5-degree angle did not significantly change screw strength compared with straight plates but contouring of 10-degree angle significantly reduced load to failure (P < 0.05). Conclusions To maximize the screw plate interface strength, locking screws should be inserted without cross-threading. The mechanical stability of locked screws is significantly compromised by loose insertion, off-axis insertion, or severe distortion of the locking mechanism. PMID:24343255

  7. A computational biomechanical investigation of posterior dynamic instrumentation: combination of dynamic rod and hinged (dynamic) screw.

    PubMed

    Erbulut, Deniz U; Kiapour, Ali; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Ozer, Ali F; Goel, Vijay K

    2014-05-01

    Currently, rigid fixation systems are the gold standard for degenerative disk disease treatment. Dynamic fixation systems have been proposed as alternatives for the treatment of a variety of spinal disorders. These systems address the main drawbacks of traditional rigid fixation systems, such as adjacent segment degeneration and instrumentation failure. Pedicle-screw-based dynamic stabilization (PDS) is one type of these alternative systems. The aim of this study was to simulate the biomechanical effect of a novel posterior dynamic stabilization system, which is comprised of dynamic (hinged) screws interconnected with a coiled, spring-based dynamic rod (DSDR), and compare it to semirigid (DSRR and RSRR) and rigid stabilization (RSRR) systems. A validated finite element (FE) model of L1-S1 was used to quantify the biomechanical parameters of the spine, such as range of motion, intradiskal pressure, stresses and facet loads after single-level instrumentation with different posterior stabilization systems. The results obtained from in vitro experimental intact and instrumented spines were used to validate the FE model, and the validated model was then used to compare the biomechanical effects of different fixation and stabilization constructs with intact under a hybrid loading protocol. The segmental motion at L4-L5 increased by 9.5% and 16.3% in flexion and left rotation, respectively, in DSDR with respect to the intact spine, whereas it was reduced by 6.4% and 10.9% in extension and left-bending loads, respectively. After instrumentation-induced intradiskal pressure at adjacent segments, L3-L4 and L5-S1 became less than the intact in dynamic rod constructs (DSDR and RSDR) except in the RSDR model in extension where the motion was higher than intact by 9.7% at L3-L4 and 11.3% at L5-S1. The facet loads were insignificant, not exceeding 12N in any of the instrumented cases in flexion. In extension, the facet load in DSDR case was similar to that in intact spine. The

  8. Use of a single miniplate to achieve intra operative intermaxillary fixation.

    PubMed

    Rai, Anshul; Arora, Aakash; Bhradwaj, Vikrant

    2015-06-01

    There are different treatment modalities mentioned in the literature for achieving intermaxillary fixation (IMF). Arch bars are time consuming, can cause damage to the periodontium, maintenance of oral hygiene is poor. Eyelets are not suitable for dentitions that carry extensive crown and bridge work. IMF screw causes root damage. To avoid all these complications we recommended the use of single miniplate for achieving IMF. PMID:26028877

  9. Coronal Acetabular Fractures: The Anterior Approach in Computed Tomography-Navigated Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig; Suhm, Norbert; Kaim, Achim; Regazzoni, Pietro; Steinbrich, Wolfgang; Messmer, Peter

    2000-09-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate the technical feasibility of the anterior approach to the coronal roof component of carefully selected acetabular fractures in computed tomography (CT)-navigated closed reduction and percutaneous fixation (CRPF).Methods: Four patients with nondisplaced or slightly displaced coronal fractures of the acetabular roof were treated with percutaneous screw fixation. Screws were implanted over guidepins placed under CT navigation. Mean clinical and radiological follow-up was 16 months.Results: All screws could be placed as intended. There were no peri- or postoperative complications. Radiological follow-up showed primary osseous union. Clinical results were excellent according to a median Merle-d'Aubigne score of 18.Conclusion: Nondisplaced or slightly displaced coronally oriented fractures of the acetabular roof can be treated by minimally invasive percutaneous CT-navigated fixation through an anterior approach that does not endanger the sciatic nerve. Early clinical results are encouraging. Close cooperation between trauma surgeons and radiologists and careful selection of cases is mandatory.

  10. Fixation produced by conflict.

    PubMed

    Karsh, E B

    1970-05-15

    All rats given a choice between a rewarded alternative and a conflict alternative (rewarded and punished) developed position fixations when the position of the alternatives was reversed. In contrast, all animals given one rewarded alternative and another nonrewarded (or punished and nonrewarded) alternative learned to choose the rewarded side during 25 successive reversals.

  11. The Fixation of Nitrogen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, S. P. S.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in the form of ammonia as one of the foundations of modern chemical industry. The article describes ammonia production and synthesis, purifying the hydrogen-nitrogen mix, nitric acid production, and its commericial plant. (HM)

  12. Update: Biological Nitrogen Fixation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Alan; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Updates knowledge on nitrogen fixation, indicating that investigation of free-living nitrogen-fixing organisms is proving useful in understanding bacterial partners and is expected to lead to development of more effective symbioses. Specific areas considered include biochemistry/genetics, synthesis control, proteins and enzymes, symbiotic systems,…

  13. Fixation produced by conflict.

    PubMed

    Karsh, E B

    1970-05-15

    All rats given a choice between a rewarded alternative and a conflict alternative (rewarded and punished) developed position fixations when the position of the alternatives was reversed. In contrast, all animals given one rewarded alternative and another nonrewarded (or punished and nonrewarded) alternative learned to choose the rewarded side during 25 successive reversals. PMID:5444066

  14. Updated Outcomes of Prophylactic Femoral Fixation.

    PubMed

    Kreul, Sarah M; Sorger, Joel I; Rajamanickam, Victoria P; Heiner, John P

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing number of patients with metastatic bone disease (MBD), minimal data exist regarding outcomes of patients undergoing prophylactic femoral fixation for MBD when compared with other frequently performed orthopedic operations, such as hemiarthroplasty of the femur. The authors performed a retrospective database review evaluating these procedures due to similar operative times and patient populations and also reviewed common comorbidities such as body mass index (BMI). The goal was to provide updated results of prophylactic femoral fixation and evaluate whether certain patient risk factors (eg, BMI) altered 30-day survival for patients with MBD. The authors reviewed 1849 patients with and without MBD treated by prophylactic fixation and hemiarthroplasty from 2006 to 2011 identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. There were no significant differences in complications between patients undergoing surgical treatment for impending or actual femoral fracture. In addition, there were no differences between the 217 patients with MBD in either the hemiarthroplasty or prophylactic fixation groups because the rate of death within 30 days postoperatively was 5.56% and 3.30%, respectively (P=.526). When comparing BMI, obese patients had higher rates of wound infection, and underweight patients were more likely to develop pneumonia or die within 30 days postoperatively. Patients with impending femur fractures benefit from prophylactic fixation and perform as well in the short term as patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty. Certain BMI categories (underweight or obese) contributed to poorer outcomes. These findings provide updated information for discussing risks and benefits with surgical candidates.

  15. Femoral neck-shaft angle in extra-capsular proximal femoral fracture fixation; does it make a TAD of difference?

    PubMed

    Walton, N P; Wynn-Jones, H; Ward, M S; Wimhurst, J A

    2005-11-01

    The effect of femoral neck-shaft angle and implant type on the accuracy of lag screw placement in extra-capsular proximal femoral fracture fixation was investigated. Radiographs of all extra-capsular proximal femoral fractures seen in one unit over 18 months were reviewed. Of 399 cases, 307 (237 female, 70 male) were included in the study as they had no contra-lateral proximal femoral metal work. Femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA) of the uninjured hip and magnification adjusted tip-apex distance (TAD) of femoral head lag screw were measured. Type of fixation implant was 135 degrees classic hip screw (CHS) (n=144) or 130 degrees intra-medullary hip screw (IMHS) (n=163). Mean contra-lateral NSA was 130.2 degrees (112.9--148 degrees ) and 64 patients (58 female, 6 male) had a NSA <125 degrees . Mean adjusted TAD was 18.7 mm (5.8--43.8mm) and 88.9% of cases had a TAD of less than 25 mm. TAD values were significantly greater using an IMHS if NSA was <125 degrees than if NSA was >125 degrees (p=0.028). This was not the case with the CHS. The use of the 130 degrees -IMHS in patients with a NSA <125 degrees leads to poorer lag screw placement than if NSA >125 degrees and caution is advocated when using this device in such cases.

  16. The Effect of Polymethyl Methacrylate Augmentation on the Primary Stability of Cannulated Bone Screws in an Anterolateral Plate in Osteoporotic Vertebrae: A Human Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Matthias; Sellei, Richard M; Stoffel, Marcus; von Rüden, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Objective Expandable anterolateral plates facilitate the reduction of posttraumatic deformities of thoracolumbar spine injuries and are commonly used in cases of unstable injuries or compromised bone quality. In this in vitro study, the craniocaudal yield load of the osseous fixation of an anterior angular stable plate fixation system and the effect of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) screw augmentation on the primary stability of the screw-bone interface during kyphosis reduction was evaluated in 12 osteoporotic human thoracolumbar vertebrae. Methods The anterolateral stabilization device used for this study is comprised of two swiveling flanges and an expandable midsection. It facilitates the controlled reduction of kyphotic deformities in situ with a geared distractor. Single flanges were attached to 12 thoracolumbar vertebrae. Six specimens were augmented with PMMA by means of cannulated bone screws. The constructs were subjected to static, displacement-controlled craniocaudal loading to failure in a servohydraulic testing machine. Results The uncemented screws cut out at a mean 393 ± 66 N, whereas the cemented screws showed significantly higher yield load of 966 ± 166 N (p < 0.02). We detected no significant correlation between bone mineral density and yield load in this setting. Conclusion Our results indicate that PMMA augmentation is an effective method to increase two- to threefold the primary stability of the screw-bone interface of an anterolateral spine stabilization system in osteoporotic bone. We recommend it in cases of severely compromised bone quality to reduce the risk of screw loosening during initial kyphosis correction and to increase long-term construct stability. PMID:26835201

  17. Stoppa Approach for Anterior Plate Fixation in Unstable Pelvic Ring Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Suk Kyu; Kim, Jung-Jae; Lee, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background The Stoppa (intrapelvic) approach has been introduced for the treatment of pelvic-acetabular fractures; it allows easy exposure of the pelvic brim, where the bone quality is optimal for screw fixation. The purpose of our study was to investigate the surgical outcomes of unstable pelvic ring injuries treated using the Stoppa approach for stable anterior ring fixation. Methods We analyzed 22 cases of unstable pelvic ring injury treated with plate fixation of the anterior ring with the Stoppa approach. We excluded cases of nondisplaced rami fracture, simple symphyseal diastasis, and parasymphyseal fractures, which can be easily treated with other techniques. The average age of the study patients was 41 years (range, 23 to 61 years). There were 10 males and 12 females. According to the Young and Burgess classification, there were 12 lateral compression, 4 anteroposterior compression, and 6 vertical shear fracture patterns. The fracture location on the anterior ring was near the iliopectineal eminence in all cases and exposure of the pelvic brim was required for plate fixation. All patients were placed in the supine position. For anterior plate fixation, all screws were applied to the anterior ramus distally and directed above the hip joint proximally. Radiologic outcomes were assessed by union time and quality of reduction by Matta method. The Merle d'Aubigne-Postel score was used to evaluate the functional results. Results The average radiologic follow-up period was 16 months (range, 10 to 51 months). All fractures united at an average of 3.5 months (range, 3 to 5 months). According to the Matta method, the quality of reduction was classified as follows: 16 anatomical (73%) and 6 nearly anatomical (27%) reductions. There were no cases of screw or implant loosening before bone healing. The functional results were classified as 7 excellent (32%), 12 good (55%), and 3 fair (13%) by the Merle d'Aubigne-Postel score. There were no wound complications

  18. [Biomechanical properties of interference screw implantation in replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament with patellar and hamstring transplants. An experimental study using roentgen stereometry analysis (RSA)].

    PubMed

    Adam, F; Pape, D; Steimer, O; Kohn, D; Rupp, S

    2001-09-01

    This experimental roentgen stereometric analysis (RSA) study was performed to measure micromotions between the graft and tunnel under submaximal load in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The aim was to evaluate the maximum load at failure, linear stiffness, and slippage of bone-patellar-tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts fixed with interference screws compared to quadrupled hamstring grafts fixed with interference screws. We used 15 porcine tibia specimens for the study. In the BPTB group, the 10 x 25-mm bone plugs were fixed in a tunnel with 10 mm in diameter using a 7 x 25-mm titanium interference screw (n = 5) or a biodegradable screw (n = 5). The five hamstring transplants were folded to a four-stranded graft and armed with a baseball stitch suture. The sutured side was fixed with a 7 x 25-mm biodegradable polylactide screw in an 8-mm tunnel. The tibial bones, tendon grafts, and interference screws were marked with tantalum beads. The grafts were mounted to a custom made load frame and loaded parallel to the axis under RSA control increasing the force in steps of 50 N. Micromotions between bone plug, screw, and tibia were measured with RSA. Accuracy of RSA for the in vitro study was evaluated as 0.05 mm. Hamstring grafts failed at significantly lower maximum loads (492 +/- 30 N) than BPTB grafts (658 +/- 98 N). Linear stiffness of the hamstring graft fixations was eight times lower compared to the BPTB grafts (403 +/- 141 N/mm vs 3500 +/- 1300 N/mm). There was no significant difference between the biodegradable and titanium screws in the BPTB group. Slippage of the graft started at 82 +/- 35 N load in the hamstring group and at 428 +/- 135 N in the BPTB group. Slippage of the graft at 75% of the maximum pull-out strength was measured as 0.36 +/- 0.25 mm in the BPTB and 2.58 +/- 1.08 mm in the hamstring group. The interference screw fixation of a quadrupled hamstring graft showed a lower linear stiffness and an earlier slippage compared to a patellar

  19. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  20. Insertion Profiles of 4 Headless Compression Screws

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J.; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. Methods The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. Results The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of −3.1 mm, −2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of −2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. Conclusions All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of −2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Clinical relevance Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws

  1. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  2. Femoral Aperture Fixation Improves Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Function When Added to Cortical Suspensory Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mark D.; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recommendations for bone tunnel placement during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have become more precise. However, these recommendations differ neither with the choice of graft nor with the method of fixation used. The influence of the method of femoral fixation used on the biomechanical function of a soft tissue ACL graft remains unknown. Hypothesis: Our null hypothesis was that adding femoral aperture fixation to femoral cortical fixation, using the same bone tunnels, will not alter the control of anterior translation (AT) and internal rotation (IR) during ACL reconstruction using a hamstring graft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 22 patients with an acute isolated ACL rupture underwent reconstruction using a single-bundle autologous hamstring graft. Computer navigation was used intraoperatively to plot the AT and IR during the pivot-shift test before reconstruction, after ACL reconstruction using cortical suspensory fixation, and after the addition of femoral aperture fixation. Statistical analysis (analysis of variance) was used to compare the AT and IR during the pivot shift at each stage in the procedure. Results: Before ACL reconstruction, the mean (±SD) AT was 14.2 ± 7.3 mm and mean IR was 17.2° ± 5.5°. After reconstruction using femoral cortical suspension, these figures were significantly reduced to 6.2 ± 3.5 mm and 12.5° ± 3.20°, respectively (P < .001). The addition of the aperture fixation was associated with a further significant reduction to 4.6 ± 3.2 mm and 10.4° ± 2.7°, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion: The addition of femoral aperture fixation to suspensory fixation results in a significant reduction in both the AT and IR that occurs during the pivot-shift assessment immediately after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring graft. Clinical Relevance: The most precise positioning of bone tunnels during soft tissue ACL reconstruction needs to take into consideration

  3. Femoral Aperture Fixation Improves Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Function When Added to Cortical Suspensory Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mark D.; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recommendations for bone tunnel placement during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have become more precise. However, these recommendations differ neither with the choice of graft nor with the method of fixation used. The influence of the method of femoral fixation used on the biomechanical function of a soft tissue ACL graft remains unknown. Hypothesis: Our null hypothesis was that adding femoral aperture fixation to femoral cortical fixation, using the same bone tunnels, will not alter the control of anterior translation (AT) and internal rotation (IR) during ACL reconstruction using a hamstring graft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 22 patients with an acute isolated ACL rupture underwent reconstruction using a single-bundle autologous hamstring graft. Computer navigation was used intraoperatively to plot the AT and IR during the pivot-shift test before reconstruction, after ACL reconstruction using cortical suspensory fixation, and after the addition of femoral aperture fixation. Statistical analysis (analysis of variance) was used to compare the AT and IR during the pivot shift at each stage in the procedure. Results: Before ACL reconstruction, the mean (±SD) AT was 14.2 ± 7.3 mm and mean IR was 17.2° ± 5.5°. After reconstruction using femoral cortical suspension, these figures were significantly reduced to 6.2 ± 3.5 mm and 12.5° ± 3.20°, respectively (P < .001). The addition of the aperture fixation was associated with a further significant reduction to 4.6 ± 3.2 mm and 10.4° ± 2.7°, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion: The addition of femoral aperture fixation to suspensory fixation results in a significant reduction in both the AT and IR that occurs during the pivot-shift assessment immediately after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring graft. Clinical Relevance: The most precise positioning of bone tunnels during soft tissue ACL reconstruction needs to take into consideration

  4. The Role of Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis in Rib Fixation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Bemelman, Michael; van Baal, Mark; Yuan, Jian Zhang; Leenen, Luke

    2016-02-01

    More than a century ago, the first scientific report was published about fracture fixation with plates. During the 1950's, open reduction and plate fixation for fractures were standardized by the founders of Arbeitsgemeinschaft für osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation. Since the introduction of plate fixation for fractures, several plates and screws have been developed, all with their own characteristics. To accomplice more fracture stability, it was thought the bigger the plate, the better. The counter side was a compromised blood supply of the bone, often resulting in bone necrosis and ultimately delayed or non-union. With the search and development of new materials and techniques for fracture fixation, less invasive procedures have become increasingly popular. This resulted in the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) technique for fracture fixation. With the MIPO technique, procedures could be performed with smaller incisions and thus with less soft tissue damage and a better preserved blood supply. The last 5 years rib fixation has become increasingly popular, rising evidence has become available suggesting that surgical rib fixation improves outcome of patients with a flail chest or isolated rib fractures. Many surgical approaches for rib fixation have been described in the old literature, however, most of these techniques are obscure nowadays. Currently mostly large incisions with considerable surgical insult are used to stabilize rib fractures. We think that MIPO deserves a place in the surgical treatment of rib fractures. We present the aspects of diagnosis, preoperative planning and operative techniques in regard to MIPO rib fixation.

  5. The Role of Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis in Rib Fixation: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bemelman, Michael; van Baal, Mark; Yuan, Jian Zhang; Leenen, Luke

    2016-01-01

    More than a century ago, the first scientific report was published about fracture fixation with plates. During the 1950’s, open reduction and plate fixation for fractures were standardized by the founders of Arbeitsgemeinschaft für osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation. Since the introduction of plate fixation for fractures, several plates and screws have been developed, all with their own characteristics. To accomplice more fracture stability, it was thought the bigger the plate, the better. The counter side was a compromised blood supply of the bone, often resulting in bone necrosis and ultimately delayed or non-union. With the search and development of new materials and techniques for fracture fixation, less invasive procedures have become increasingly popular. This resulted in the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) technique for fracture fixation. With the MIPO technique, procedures could be performed with smaller incisions and thus with less soft tissue damage and a better preserved blood supply. The last 5 years rib fixation has become increasingly popular, rising evidence has become available suggesting that surgical rib fixation improves outcome of patients with a flail chest or isolated rib fractures. Many surgical approaches for rib fixation have been described in the old literature, however, most of these techniques are obscure nowadays. Currently mostly large incisions with considerable surgical insult are used to stabilize rib fractures. We think that MIPO deserves a place in the surgical treatment of rib fractures. We present the aspects of diagnosis, preoperative planning and operative techniques in regard to MIPO rib fixation. PMID:26889439

  6. Resistance and Stress Finite Element Analysis of Different Types of Fixation for Mandibular Orthognathic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Stringhini, Diego José; Sommerfeld, Ricardo; Uetanabaro, Lucas Caetano; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Araújo, Melissa Rodrigues; Rebellato, Nelson Luís Barbosa; Costa, Delson João da; Scariot, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress and dislodgement resistance by finite element analysis of different types of fixation in mandibular orthognathic surgery. A 3D solid finite element model of a hemi-mandible was obtained. A bilateral sagittal split osteotomy was simulated and the distal segment was advanced 5 mm forward. After the adjustment and superimposing of segments, 9 different types of osteosynthesis with 2.0 miniplates and screws were simulated: A, one 4-hole conventional straight miniplate; B, one 4-hole locking straight miniplate; C, one 4-hole conventional miniplate and one bicortical screw; D, one 4-hole locking miniplate and 1 bicortical screws; E, one 6-hole conventional straight miniplate; F, one 6-hole locking miniplate; G, two 4-hole conventional straight miniplates; H, two 4-hole locking straight miniplates; and I, 3 bicortical screws in an inverted-L pattern. In each model, forces simulating the masticatory muscles were applied. The values of stress in the plates and screws were checked. The dislodgement resistance was checked at the proximal segment since the distal segment was stable because of the screen at the occlusal tooth. The regions with the lowest and highest displacement were measured. The offset between the osteotomized segments was verified by millimeter intervals. Inverted-L with bicortical screws was the model that had the lowest dislodgment and the model with the lowest tension was the one with two conventional plates. The results suggest that the tension was better distributed in the locking miniplates, but the locking screws presented higher concentration of tension.

  7. Resistance and Stress Finite Element Analysis of Different Types of Fixation for Mandibular Orthognathic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Stringhini, Diego José; Sommerfeld, Ricardo; Uetanabaro, Lucas Caetano; Leonardi, Denise Piotto; Araújo, Melissa Rodrigues; Rebellato, Nelson Luís Barbosa; Costa, Delson João da; Scariot, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the stress and dislodgement resistance by finite element analysis of different types of fixation in mandibular orthognathic surgery. A 3D solid finite element model of a hemi-mandible was obtained. A bilateral sagittal split osteotomy was simulated and the distal segment was advanced 5 mm forward. After the adjustment and superimposing of segments, 9 different types of osteosynthesis with 2.0 miniplates and screws were simulated: A, one 4-hole conventional straight miniplate; B, one 4-hole locking straight miniplate; C, one 4-hole conventional miniplate and one bicortical screw; D, one 4-hole locking miniplate and 1 bicortical screws; E, one 6-hole conventional straight miniplate; F, one 6-hole locking miniplate; G, two 4-hole conventional straight miniplates; H, two 4-hole locking straight miniplates; and I, 3 bicortical screws in an inverted-L pattern. In each model, forces simulating the masticatory muscles were applied. The values of stress in the plates and screws were checked. The dislodgement resistance was checked at the proximal segment since the distal segment was stable because of the screen at the occlusal tooth. The regions with the lowest and highest displacement were measured. The offset between the osteotomized segments was verified by millimeter intervals. Inverted-L with bicortical screws was the model that had the lowest dislodgment and the model with the lowest tension was the one with two conventional plates. The results suggest that the tension was better distributed in the locking miniplates, but the locking screws presented higher concentration of tension. PMID:27224561

  8. External Fixation: Principles and Applications.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; Mir, Hassan R

    2015-11-01

    The modularity and ease of application of modern external fixation has expanded its potential use in the management of fractures and other musculoskeletal conditions. In fracture care, it can be used for provisional and definitive fixation. Short-term provisional applications include "damage control" and periarticular fracture fixation. The risk:benefit ratio of added stability needs to be assessed with each fixator. Soft-tissue management is critical during pin insertion to lessen the risk of loosening and infection. Although provisional fixation is safe for early conversion to definitive fixation, several factors affect the timing of definitive surgery, including the initial injury, external fixator stability, infection, and the physiologic state of the patient. PMID:26306568

  9. CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.

    SciTech Connect

    FUJITA,E.

    2000-01-12

    Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

  10. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    of kneading discs was found to be critical for achieving a uniform distribution of the granulation liquid, the granulation performance was hampered due to insufficient solid-liquid mixing capacity of the current kneading discs which is essential for wet granulation. Thus, a balance between material throughput and screw speed should be strived for in order to achieve a specific granulation time and solid-liquid mixing for high granulation yield. Additionally, more efforts are needed both in modification of the screw configuration as well as the geometry of the mixing elements to improve the mixing capacity of the twin-screw granulator. The results from the current experimental study improved the understanding regarding the interplay between granulation time and the axial and solid-liquid mixing responsible for the granulation performance in twin-screw wet granulation. PMID:26709082

  11. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    of kneading discs was found to be critical for achieving a uniform distribution of the granulation liquid, the granulation performance was hampered due to insufficient solid-liquid mixing capacity of the current kneading discs which is essential for wet granulation. Thus, a balance between material throughput and screw speed should be strived for in order to achieve a specific granulation time and solid-liquid mixing for high granulation yield. Additionally, more efforts are needed both in modification of the screw configuration as well as the geometry of the mixing elements to improve the mixing capacity of the twin-screw granulator. The results from the current experimental study improved the understanding regarding the interplay between granulation time and the axial and solid-liquid mixing responsible for the granulation performance in twin-screw wet granulation.

  12. Fixation techniques for the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: early follow-up. A systematic review of level I and II therapeutic studies.

    PubMed

    Speziali, Andrea; Delcogliano, Marco; Tei, Matteo; Placella, Giacomo; Bartoli, Matteo; Menghi, Amerigo; Cerulli, Giuliano

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of our study was that to systematically review the fixation techniques for the ACL reconstruction and associated clinical outcomes at the early follow-up. Systematic search on three electronic databases (Cochrane register, Medline and Embase) of fixation devices used for primary ACL reconstruction with doubled semitendinosus and gracilis and bone-patellar tendon-bone autografts in randomized clinical trials of level I and II of evidence published from January 2001 to December 2011. Therapeutic studies collected were with a minimum 12-month follow-up, and the clinical outcomes were evaluated by at least one of International Knee Documentation Committee, Lysholm and Tegner functional scales and at least one of the following knee stability tests: arthrometric AP tibial translation, Lachman test and pivot-shift test. Nineteen articles met the inclusion criteria. At the femoral side cross-pin, metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable interference screw, and suspensory device were used in 32.3, 27.3, 24.8, 15.5% of patients, respectively. At the tibial side fixation was achieved with metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable interference screw, screw and plastic sheath, screw post and cross-pin in 38.7, 31, 15.7, 12.8, and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Side-to-side anterior-posterior tibial translation was 1.9 ± 0.9, 1.5 ± 0.9, 1.5 ± 0.8, 2.2 ± 0.4 mm for metallic interference screw, bioabsorbable screw, cross-pin and suspensory device, respectively. At least two-third of all the patients achieved good-to-excellent clinical outcomes. Rate of failure was 6.1, 3.3, 1.7 and 1.2% for bioabsorbable interference screw, metallic interference screw, cross-pin and suspensory device, respectively. Clinical outcomes are good to excellent in almost two-third of the patients but several pitfalls that affect the current fixation techniques as graft tensioning such as graft-tunnel motion are still unaddressed. PMID:25269758

  13. Basic Study for Ultrasound-Based Navigation for Pedicle Screw Insertion Using Transmission and Backscattered Methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ziqiang; Wu, Bing; Zhai, Xiao; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Luo, Beier; Chen, Xiao; Li, Chao; Yang, Mingyuan; Xu, Kailiang; Liu, Chengcheng; Wang, Chuanfeng; Zhao, Yingchuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Chen, Kai; Yang, Wu; Ta, Dean; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the acoustic properties of human vertebral cancellous bone and to study the feasibility of ultrasound-based navigation for posterior pedicle screw fixation in spinal fusion surgery. Fourteen human vertebral specimens were disarticulated from seven un-embalmed cadavers (four males, three females, 73.14 ± 9.87 years, two specimens from each cadaver). Seven specimens were used to measure the transmission, including tests of attenuation and phase velocity, while the other seven specimens were used for backscattered measurements to inspect the depth of penetration and A-Mode signals. Five pairs of unfocused broadband ultrasonic transducers were used for the detection, with center frequencies of 0.5 MHz, 1 MHz, 1.5 MHz, 2.25 MHz, and 3.5 MHz. As a result, good and stable results were documented. With increased frequency, the attenuation increased (P<0.05), stability of the speed of sound improved (P<0.05), and penetration distance decreased (P>0.05). At about 0.6 cm away from the cortical bone, warning signals were easily observed from the backscattered measurements. In conclusion, the ultrasonic system proved to be an effective, moveable, and real-time imaging navigation system. However, how ultrasonic navigation will benefit pedicle screw insertion in spinal surgery needs to be determined. Therefore, ultrasound-guided pedicle screw implantation is theoretically effective and promising. PMID:25861053

  14. Cheek drooping in 2 patients with maxillary fractures after rigid fixation with bioabsorbable mesh.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Hyun; Kim, Chung Hun; Choi, Hyun Gon; Hwang, Euna

    2014-03-01

    Bioabsorbable plate-screw systems are commonly used for the internal fixation of facial bone fractures. The anterior maxilla has a unique curved shape, and fractured bony fragments tend to be small and fragile; therefore, more effective rigid fixation can be achieved using a molded bioabsorbable mesh rather than a bioabsorbable plate. Herein, we describe 2 patients with cheek drooping after a rigid fixation of comminuted maxillary fracture using bioabsorbable meshes and screws.The postoperative courses were uneventful, but both showed soft tissue bulging in the cheek area of the operation site for 12 to 13 months after the operation. No other symptom or sign related to inflammation or foreign body reaction was noted.In comminuted maxillary fractures, bone fragments are more conveniently fixed with a 1-piece molded bioabsorbable mesh. However, it is believed that a single large mesh may interfere with adhesion between the maxillary surface and the overlying soft tissue. Therefore, we recommend using the least amount of mesh to fixate maxillary bone fragments.

  15. Effect of pin location on stability of pelvic external fixation.

    PubMed

    Kim, W Y; Hearn, T C; Seleem, O; Mahalingam, E; Stephen, D; Tile, M

    1999-04-01

    Pelvic external fixators allow two locations of pin purchase: anterosuperior (into the iliac crest) and anteroinferior (into the supraacetabular dense bone, between the anterior superior and anterior inferior iliac spine). The purpose of this study was to compare the stability of these two methods of fixation on Tile Type B1 (open book) and C (unstable) pelvic injuries. Five unembalmed cadaveric pelves (mean age, 68 years; four males and one female) were loaded vertically in a servohydraulic testing machine in a standing posture. The AO tubular system and Orthofix were used. On each pelvis, a Type B1 injury was simulated. Each external fixator was applied in each location in random order. Cyclic loads were applied through the sacral body to a maximum of approximately 200 N while force and displacement of the pelvic ring were recorded digitally. Sacroiliac joint motion was quantified tridimensionally with displacement transducers, mounted on the sacrum and contacting a target fixed to the posterior superior iliac spine. A Type C injury was created and augmented with two iliosacral lag screws, and the tests were repeated. For the Type B1 injuries with anteroinferior pin purchase, the mean stiffness was 201.2 N/mm for the AO frame and 203.2 N/mm for the Orthofix. For the anterosuperior frames the mean stiffness was 143.9 N/mm for the AO frame and 163.3 N/mm for the Orthofix. For Type B1 and Type C injuries, the anteroinferior location of pin purchase resulted in significantly reduced sacroiliac joint separation. There were no significant differences between the frame types. Dissection of the preinserted anatomic specimen revealed no evidence of injury to the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve after blunt dissection and drilling with protective drill sleeves. It is concluded that the anteroinferior location of external fixation pins is a safe technique with the potential for increased stability of fixation.

  16. Re-evaluating split-fovea processing in word recognition: effects of fixation location within words.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Timothy R; Paterson, Kevin B; Kurtev, Stoyan; Xu, Mengyun

    2010-03-01

    It has been claimed that word recognition is affected fundamentally by the precise location at which a word is fixated because a precise split in hemispheric processing at the point of fixation causes all letters to the left and right of fixation to project to different, contralateral hemispheres. To assess this claim, 5-letter words (and nonwords) were presented for lexical decision when participants fixated the space immediately to the left (location 1) or right (location 6) of each stimulus, or one of the four possible inter-letter spaces (locations 2-5). Fixation location was controlled using an eye-tracker linked to a fixation-contingent display and all stimuli were presented entirely within foveal vision to avoid confounding influences of extrafoveal hemispheric projections. Performance was equally poorest when fixating locations 1 and 6 (when words were shown entirely to either the right and left of fixation), intermediate for location 5, and equally superior for locations 2, 3, and 4. Additional word-specific analyses also showed no evidence of the effects of fixation location on optimal word recognition predicted by split-fovea processing. These findings suggest that, while fixation location influences word recognition, word recognition is apparently not affected by a split in hemispheric processing at the point of fixation and does not depend critically on the precise location at which a word is fixated. Implications of these findings for the role of fixation location in word recognition are discussed.

  17. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. PMID:25869451

  18. Outcome of intertrochanteric fractures treated by intramedullary nail with two integrated lag screws: A study in Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Tae-Young; Ha, Yong-Chan; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of intertrochanteric fracture has increased during recent years as life expectancy has also increased. Currently, orthopedic surgeons use various fixation methods for intertrochanteric fractures like, intramedullary (IM) nailing or dynamic hip screws and plates. The intramedullary (IM) nail with two integrated lag screws has been used recently in intertrochanteric fractures to overcome Z-affect phenomenon. However, no study is available in an Asian population. This prospective study was undertaken to document the clinical and radiologic outcomes of the IM nail with two integrated lag screws and its limitations in Asian patients. Materials and Methods: Osteosynthesis was performed using InterTAN nail in 100 patients with an intertrochanteric fractures followed up for at least 1 year after surgery. We evaluated the recovery rates to prefracture status, time to bony union and the incidence of complications. Results: Seventy four patients were available for at least 1 year followup examinations. Forty-five patients (60.8%) recovered prefracture status. Mean time to bony union was 18.3 ± 8.6 weeks. Intraoperative technical problems related to an unavoidable superior positioning of the lag screw occurred in five cases. Postoperative complications requiring reoperation occurred in three patients; two cases of varus collapse with cut out and one case of periprosthetic fracture. Conclusions: The IM nail with two integrated lag screws showed favorable outcomes in Asian patients with an intertrochanteric fracture even though several complications that were not previously reported with this nail were found. The proper selection of patients and careful insertion of two lag screws should be mandatory in Asian patients. PMID:26229165

  19. Acrylic Resin Molding Based Head Fixation Technique in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Roh, Mootaek; Lee, Kyungmin; Jang, Il-Sung; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, Maan-Gee

    2016-01-12

    Head fixation is a technique of immobilizing animal's head by attaching a head-post on the skull for rigid clamping. Traditional head fixation requires surgical attachment of metallic frames on the skull. The attached frames are then clamped to a stationary platform resulting in immobilization of the head. However, metallic frames for head fixation have been technically difficult to design and implement in general laboratory environment. In this study, we provide a novel head fixation method. Using a custom-made head fixation bar, head mounter is constructed during implantation surgery. After the application of acrylic resin for affixing implants such as electrodes and cannula on the skull, additional resins applied on top of that to build a mold matching to the port of the fixation bar. The molded head mounter serves as a guide rails, investigators conveniently fixate the animal's head by inserting the head mounter into the port of the fixation bar. This method could be easily applicable if implantation surgery using dental acrylics is necessary and might be useful for laboratories that cannot easily fabricate CNC machined metal head-posts.

  20. Delayed fixation of displaced bilateral, atraumatic, femoral neck fractures in a patient with pregnancy related osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Docker, Charles; Starks, Ian; Wade, Roger; Wynn-Jones, Charles

    2011-06-01

    We present the case of a woman diagnosed with simultaneous displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures following the birth of her second child. No traumatic event was identified. Diagnosis was delayed as the cause of her pain was thought to be non-skeletal in origin. Radiological and serological investigations were diagnostic of osteomalacia. Surgical fixation of her fractures was further delayed due to profound hypocalcaemia. Despite the delays, fixation with bilateral dynamic hip screws resulted in union with no evidence of avascular necrosis at 2 years follow-up. We believe this to be the first report of atraumatic bilateral femoral neck fractures and it shows that a good result can be achieved even in the presence of delayed fixation.

  1. Technique for reduction and percutaneous fixation of U- and H-shaped sacral fractures.

    PubMed

    Ruatti, S; Kerschbaumer, G; Gay, E; Milaire, M; Merloz, P; Tonetti, J

    2013-09-01

    We describe an early reduction and percutaneous fixation technique for isolated sacral fractures. Strong manual traction combined with manual counter-traction on the torso is used to disimpact the fracture. Transcondylar traction is then applied bilaterally and two ilio-sacral screws are inserted percutaneously on each side. Open reduction and fixation, with sacral laminectomy in patients with neurological abnormalities, remains the reference standard. Early reduction and percutaneous fixation ensures restoration of the pelvic parameters while minimising soft-tissue damage and the risk of infection. Decompression procedures can be performed either during the same surgical procedure after changing the installation or after a few days. These complex fractures warrant patient referral to specialised reference centres.

  2. [Cement augmentation of pedicle screws : Pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Blattert, T R; Liljenqvist, U

    2016-09-01

    Cement augmentation of pedicle screws biomechanically increases screw purchase in the bone. However, clinical complications may occur. The pros and cons of the technique are discussed from different clinical perspectives. PMID:27514827

  3. Screw expander for light duty diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary selection and sizing of a positive displacement screw compressor-expander subsystem for a light-duty adiabatic diesel engine; development of a mathematical model to describe overall efficiencies for the screw compressor and expander; simulation of operation to establish overall efficiency for a range of design parameters and at given engine operating points; simulation to establish potential net power output at light-duty diesel operating points; analytical determination of mass moments of inertia for the rotors and inertia of the compressor-expander subsystem; and preparation of engineering layout drawings of the compressor and expander are discussed. As a result of this work, it was concluded that the screw compressor and expander designed for light-duty diesel engine applications are viable alternatives to turbo-compound systems, with acceptable efficiencies for both units, and only a moderate effect on the transient response.

  4. Low energy high pressure miniature screw valve

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Gary J.; Spletzer, Barry L.

    2006-12-12

    A low energy high pressure screw valve having a valve body having an upper portion and a lower portion, said lower portion of said valve body defining an inlet flow passage and an outlet flow passage traversing said valve body to a valve seat, said upper portion of said valve body defining a cavity at said valve seat, a diaphragm restricting flow between said upper portion of said valve body and said lower portion, said diaphragm capable of engaging said valve seat to restrict fluid communication between said inlet passage and said outlet passage, a plunger within said cavity supporting said diaphragm, said plunger being capable of engaging said diaphragm with said valve seat at said inlet and outlet fluid passages, said plunger being in point contact with a drive screw having threads engaged with opposing threads within said upper portion of said valve body such engagement allowing motion of said drive screw within said valve body.

  5. [Implant materials for the internal fixation of midfacial fractures].

    PubMed

    Stuck, B A; Heller, T

    2011-11-01

    The material used for osteosynthesis plays a crucial role in the management of facial fractures. Plates need to be flexible enough to be bent and should not be palpable through the skin, while ensuring stable fixation und adequate biocompatibility. Although stainless steel was initially the material of choice, titanium has become the standard material due to its superior biocompatibility. While the explantation of titanium plates and screws appears unnecessary in general, it should be considered in cases of dislocation, cosmetic concerns, pain and infection. Due to their limited initial stability and a potential increase in local complications, resorbable materials based on polymeric lactose are used with caution in midfacial fractures in adults. Our own retrospective study comparing the postoperative complications after fixation of lateral midfacial fractures with titanium and resorbable systems demonstrated a low complication rate for both systems (7-8%) and no statistically significant difference between the two. The appropriate material for fixation should be selected based on the localization and severity of the fracture, the experience of the surgeon as well as on the age and overall condition of the patient.

  6. Bacterial alternative nitrogen fixation systems.

    PubMed

    Joerger, R D; Bishop, P E

    1988-01-01

    The introduction briefly reviews some of the salient features of the well-characterized conventional molybdo-enzyme system for N2 fixation. This is followed by a brief account of the discovery of an alternative N2 fixation system that does not require molybdenum in the N2-fixing bacterum Azotobacter vinelandii. The next section cites observations from the early literature on N2 fixation suggesting may not always require molybdenum. Next, recent evidence for an alternative N2 fixation system in A. vinelandii is discussed. A brief description of our discovery of an alternative nitrogenase which is not a molybdenum or vanadium enzyme is presented, followed by a summary of recent papers describing an alternative vanadium-containing nitrogenase. Available information on the genetics and regulation of alternative N2 fixation systems is discussed. Finally, the possible/probable presence of alternative N2 fixation systems in bacteria other than Azotobacter species is covered.

  7. Displaced avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament: Treated by stellate steel plate fixation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lijun; Tian, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: The open reduction with internal fixation is an effective approach for treatment of avulsion fracture of posterior cruciate ligament. The previously used internal fixation materials including hollow screws, absorbable screw, tension bands and sutures have great defects such as insufficient fixation strength, susceptibility to re-fracture, etc. Stellate steel plate is novel material for internal fixation which has unique gear-like structure design. We used stellate steel plate for treatment of displaced avulsion fractures of posterior cruciate ligament in this study. Materials and Methods: 14 patients (9 men, 5 women; aged, 19–35 years; mean age, 28 years) with displaced avulsion fractures of the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament were retrospectively analyzed between June 2009 and June 2011. The mean duration from injury to the operation was 8.3 days (range 6–15 days). All the patients were treated with open reduction and internal fixation of a stellate steel plate (DePuy, Raynham, MA 02767, USA). The Lysholm-Tegner knee function score criteria were used to analyze results. Results: The mean followup was 24.6 months (range 18–32 months). After 6 months, all the fractures healed and knee joint activity was normal, with no knee stiffness or instability. The Lysholm-Tegner scores were 97.1 ± 1.7 points at the final followup. Conclusion: Owing to its unique gear structure, the stellate steel plate design can effectively fix an avulsion fracture block and it is a simple operation with short postoperative rehabilitation time and firm fixation. PMID:26015605

  8. Suture Button Fixation Treatment of Chronic Lisfranc Injury in Professional Dancers and High-Level Athletes.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Timothy; Boe, Chelsea; Thordarson, David B

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Lisfranc injury is a subtle and severe injury in high-level athletes, including dancers. This patient population is generally intolerant of intra-articular screw fixation and can develop significant post-traumatic arthritis with potentially career ending complications. Flexible fixation with suture-button devices provides potential restoration of physiologic motion at the joint, with appropriate support for healing that may facilitate return to en pointe activities for dancers. We hypothesized that the suture-button device would restore motion at the Lisfranc joint and allow for return to activities in this particular population without the limitations and complications of rigid fixation. We operated on seven dancers and high-level athletes with diagnosed Lisfranc injuries by installing a suture-button device. All patients had failed conservative management after late presentation. They were allowed to return to sport in 6 months, preoperative and postoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Score (AOFAS) foot scores were obtained, and patients were followed for a minimum of 15 months. All seven returned to full activities in 6 months, with radiographic evidence of fixation and no complications to date. AOFAS foot scores improved from an average of 65 preoperatively to an average of 97 postoperatively at latest follow-up. It is concluded that flexible fixation with suture-button type device represents a viable alternative to screw fixation or fusion that may allow dancers and athletes to return to previous levels of activity after Lisfranc injury. This case series represents to our knowledge the first application of this device to a unique population that requires flexibility at the Lisfranc joint for performance.

  9. Screw dislocation in functionally graded magnetoelectroelastic solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Ze; Kuna, Meinhard

    2014-02-01

    A screw dislocation in a functionally graded magnetoelectroelastic material is investigated. The material properties exponentially changing along both x and y directions are considered and the mechanical-electric-magnetic coupling is discussed. Closed-form expressions for the mechanical, electric and magnetic components are derived using the general stress function method. The solutions can be applied as a fundamental result and reduced into the classic and piezoelectric cases. The study puts forth a direct way for screw dislocation analysis in inhomogeneous structures with multifield coupling.

  10. Spline-Screw Multiple-Rotation Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism functions like combined robotic gripper and nut runner. Spline-screw multiple-rotation mechanism related to spline-screw payload-fastening system described in (GSC-13454). Incorporated as subsystem in alternative version of system. Mechanism functions like combination of robotic gripper and nut runner; provides both secure grip and rotary actuation of other parts of system. Used in system in which no need to make or break electrical connections to payload during robotic installation or removal of payload. More complicated version needed to make and break electrical connections. Mechanism mounted in payload.

  11. Tibial press-fit fixation of the hamstring tendons for ACL-reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jagodzinski, M; Scheunemann, K; Knobloch, K; Albrecht, K; Krettek, C; Hurschler, C; Zeichen, J

    2006-12-01

    Press-fit fixation of patellar tendon bone anterior cruciate ligament autografts is an interesting technique because no hardware is necessary to achieve fixation. Up till the present point, there is no biomechanical data available for the tibial press-fit fixation of the hamstring tendons. Hamstring tendons of 21 human cadavers (age: 41.9 +/- 13.1 years) were used. A press-fit fixation with looped semitendinosus and gracilis tendons secured by a tape (T) over a bone bridge, or by a baseball-stitched suture (S), was compared with degradable interference screw fixation (I) in 21 porcine tibiae. The constructs were cyclically strained and subsequently loaded to failure. The maximum load to failure, stiffness, and elongation during cyclical loading were measured. The maximum load to failure was highest for the T-fixation at 970 +/- 83 N, followed by the I-fixation with 544 +/- 109 N, and the S-fixation with 402 +/- 78 N (P < 0.03). Stiffness of the constructs averaged 78 +/- 13 N/mm for T, 108 +/- 18 N/mm for S, and 162 +/- 27 N/mm for I (P < 0.03). Elongation during initial cyclical loading was 2.0 +/- 0.6 mm for T, 3.3 +/- 1.1 mm for S, and 1.4 +/- 0.5 mm for I (S inferior to I and T, P<0.05). Elongation between the 20th and 1,500th loading cycle was lower for T (2.2 +/- 0.7 mm) compared with I (4.1 +/- 2.7 mm) and S (4.8 +/- 0.7 mm; P < 0.001). The T-fixation technique exhibited a significantly higher failure load than the S-, and I- techniques. All techniques exhibited larger elongation during initial cyclical loading than is reported in the literature for grafts with bone blocks. Only one technique (T) showed satisfactory elongation behavior during long-term cyclic loading. Interference screw fixation demonstrated significantly higher stiffness. Only one of the investigated techniques (T) seemed to exhibit adequate mechanical properties necessary for early aggressive rehabilitation programs.

  12. Comparisons of Anterior Plate Screw Pullout Strength Between Polyurethane Foams and Thoracolumbar Cadaveric Vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, Srinidhi; Palepu, Vivek

    2016-10-01

    Synthetic polyurethane foams are frequently used in biomechanical testing of spinal medical devices. However, it is unclear what types of foam are most representative of human vertebral trabecular bone behavior, particularly for testing the bone-implant interface. Therefore, a study was conducted to compare polyurethane foam microstructure and screw pullout properties to human vertebrae. Cadaveric thoracolumbar vertebrae underwent microcomputed tomography to assess trabecular bone microstructure. Spine plate screws were implanted into the vertebral body and pullout testing was performed. The same procedure was followed for eight different densities (grades 5-30) of commercially available closed cell (CCF) and open cell foams (OCF). The results indicated that foam microstructural parameters such as volume fraction, strut thickness, strut spacing, and material density rarely matched that of trabecular bone. However, certain foams provided mechanical properties that were comparable to the cadavers tested. Pullout force and work to pullout for screws implanted into CCF grade 5 were similar to osteoporotic female cadavers. In addition, screw pullout forces and work to pullout in CCF grade 8, grade 10, and OCF grade 30 were similar to osteopenic male cadavers. All other OCF and CCF foams possessed pullout properties that were either significantly lower or higher than the cadavers tested. This study elucidated the types and densities of polyurethane foams that can represent screw pullout strength in human vertebral bone. Synthetic bone surrogates used for biomechanical testing should be selected based on bone quantity and quality of patients who may undergo device implantation. PMID:27536905

  13. Anatomical study of anterior column screw tunnels through virtual three-dimensional models of the pelvis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Tang, Peifu; Yao, Yimin; She, Fei; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We created 66 male and 74 female virtual three-dimensional models of the pelvis based on computed tomography data from 140 patients. Virtual cylindrical bolts (VCBs) were placed in the anterior column (AC), which was then resliced serially along the bolt's long axis. AC screw tunnel mainly comprises two long, narrow triangular prisms [zone III (acetabular fossa) and zone V (obturator foramen)]--forming the III/V angle--linked by a larger, shorter cylinder [zone IV (acetabular notch)]. VCBs' mean length and maximum diameter were 111.13 ± 7.33 and 7.37 ± 1.90 mm, respectively. The models' anatomical zone lengths were similar between the sexes. Zone V's narrowest diameters and the III/V angles were significantly different. VCBs >6.5 mm were accommodated in 65 of 66 male models and 31 of 74 female models. VCBs >5.0 and <6.5 mm were accommodated in one male and 30 female models. Eleven female models accommodated only VCBs >3.5 and <5.0 mm. However, to 13 female pelvic models with maximum VCB accommodation of <5 mm for the anterior column, the maximum diameter of the VCBs was 8.23 ± 1.22 mm in medial passage and 10.3 ± 1.91 mm in lateral passage, respectively. Percutaneous fixation of the AC with screws is a safe technique, even though in Chinese female patients. The narrowest diameters in zone V and the III/V angles are the key factors for application of AC screws. Female patients with a smaller interosseous space at zone V and a large III/V angle can accommodate segmental passage screws.

  14. Nitrogen fixation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Hao-Lin

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving nitrogen fixation includes a volumetric electric discharge chamber. The volumetric discharge chamber provides an even distribution of an electron beam, and enables the chamber to be maintained at a controlled energy to pressure (E/p) ratio. An E/p ratio of from 5 to 15 kV/atm of O.sub.2 /cm promotes the formation of vibrationally excited N.sub.2. Atomic oxygen interacts with vibrationally excited N.sub.2 at a much quicker rate than unexcited N.sub.2, greatly improving the rate at which NO is formed.

  15. Feasibility of C2 Vertebra Screws Placement in Patient With Occipitalization of Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Li, Xueshi; Chen, Jianting; Wu, Zenghui; Zhu, Qingan

    2015-01-01

    significantly smaller than normal. Anatomically, translaminar screw is a more viable option in comparison with pedicle screw for C2 fixation in OA. Nevertheless, the suitability should be fully assessed prior to surgery. PMID:26376390

  16. Fixational saccades during grating detection and discrimination.

    PubMed

    Spotorno, Sara; Masson, Guillaume S; Montagnini, Anna

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the patterns of fixational saccades in human observers performing two classical perceptual tasks: grating detection and discrimination. First, participants were asked to detect a vertical or tilted grating with one of three spatial frequencies and one of four luminance contrast levels. In the second experiment, participants had to discriminate the spatial frequency of two supra-threshold gratings. The gratings were always embedded in additive, high- or low-contrast pink noise. We observed that the patterns of fixational saccades were highly idiosyncratic among participants. Moreover, during the grating detection task, the amplitude and the number of saccades were inversely correlated with stimulus visibility. We did not find a systematic relationship between saccade parameters and grating frequency, apart from a slight decrease of saccade amplitude during grating discrimination with higher spatial frequencies. No consistent changes in the number and amplitude of fixational saccades with performance accuracy were reported. Surprisingly, during grating detection, saccade number and amplitude were similar in grating-with-noise and noise-only displays. Grating orientation did not affect substantially saccade direction in either task. The results challenge the idea that, when analyzing low-level spatial properties of visual stimuli, fixational saccades can be adapted in order to extract task-relevant information optimally. Rather, saccadic patterns seem to be overall modulated by task context, stimulus visibility and individual variability.

  17. Double calcaneal osteotomy with percutaneous Steinmann pin fixation as part of treatment for flexible flatfoot deformity: a review of consecutive cases highlighting our experience with pin fixation.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Abben, Kyle W

    2015-01-01

    Surgical correction of flexible flatfoot deformity and posterior tibial tendon dysfunction has been extensively reported in published studies. When appropriate, calcaneal osteotomies for flatfoot correction have been a favorite of foot and ankle surgeons because of the corrective power achieved without the need to fuse any rearfoot joints. The medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy and Evans calcaneal osteotomy, together termed the double calcaneal osteotomy, have been reported several times by various investigators with a wide variety of fixation options. We undertook an institutional review board-approved retrospective review of 9 consecutive patients (11 feet), who had undergone double calcaneal osteotomy with 2 percutaneous Steinmann pin fixation for the correction of flexible flatfoot deformity, with or without posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. All patients had radiographic evidence of bone healing of the posterior calcaneal osteotomy and incorporation of the Evans osteotomy bone graft at 6 weeks and demonstrated clinical healing at 6 weeks. All patients had 2 percutaneous Steinmann pins placed through both osteotomies, and these were removed an average of 6 weeks postoperatively. No patient developed pin site complications. The only complication noted was sural neuritis, which was likely incision related. No patients had delayed union or nonunion, and we did not identify any graft shifting postoperatively. The present retrospective series highlights our experience with 2 percutaneous Steinmann pin fixation, demonstrating equal or better results than many previous published fixation methods for double calcaneal osteotomy. It is cost-effective and minimizes the potential risk of iatrogenic Achilles pathologic features associated with screw fixation.

  18. Short segment pedicle screw instrumentation and augmentation vertebroplasty in lumbar burst fractures: an experience

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Saleem; Dhar, Shabir A.

    2008-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and feasibility of vertebroplasty and posterior short-segment pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of traumatic lumbar burst fractures. Short-segment pedicle screw instrumentation is a well described technique to reduce and stabilize thoracic and lumbar spine fractures. It is relatively a easy procedure but can only indirectly reduce a fractured vertebral body, and the means of augmenting the anterior column are limited. Hardware failure and a loss of reduction are recognized complications caused by insufficient anterior column support. Patients with traumatic lumbar burst fractures without neurologic deficits were included. After a short segment posterior reduction and fixation, bilateral transpedicular reduction of the endplate was performed using a balloon, and polymethyl methacrylate cement was injected. Pre-operative and post-operative central and anterior heights were assessed with radiographs and MRI. Sixteen patients underwent this procedure, and a substantial reduction of the endplates could be achieved with the technique. All patients recovered uneventfully, and the neurologic examination revealed no deficits. The post-operative radiographs and magnetic resonance images demonstrated a good fracture reduction and filling of the bone defect without unwarranted bone displacement. The central and anterior height of the vertebral body could be restored to 72 and 82% of the estimated intact height, respectively. Complications were cement leakage in three cases without clinical implications and one superficial wound infection. Posterior short-segment pedicle fixation in conjunction with balloon vertebroplasty seems to be a feasible option in the management of lumbar burst fractures, thereby addressing all the three columns through a single approach. Although cement leakage occurred but had no clinical consequences or neurological deficit. PMID:18193300

  19. Short segment pedicle screw instrumentation and augmentation vertebroplasty in lumbar burst fractures: an experience.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Suhail; Akbar, Saleem; Dhar, Shabir A

    2008-03-01

    To assess the efficacy and feasibility of vertebroplasty and posterior short-segment pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of traumatic lumbar burst fractures. Short-segment pedicle screw instrumentation is a well described technique to reduce and stabilize thoracic and lumbar spine fractures. It is relatively a easy procedure but can only indirectly reduce a fractured vertebral body, and the means of augmenting the anterior column are limited. Hardware failure and a loss of reduction are recognized complications caused by insufficient anterior column support. Patients with traumatic lumbar burst fractures without neurologic deficits were included. After a short segment posterior reduction and fixation, bilateral transpedicular reduction of the endplate was performed using a balloon, and polymethyl methacrylate cement was injected. Pre-operative and post-operative central and anterior heights were assessed with radiographs and MRI. Sixteen patients underwent this procedure, and a substantial reduction of the endplates could be achieved with the technique. All patients recovered uneventfully, and the neurologic examination revealed no deficits. The post-operative radiographs and magnetic resonance images demonstrated a good fracture reduction and filling of the bone defect without unwarranted bone displacement. The central and anterior height of the vertebral body could be restored to 72 and 82% of the estimated intact height, respectively. Complications were cement leakage in three cases without clinical implications and one superficial wound infection. Posterior short-segment pedicle fixation in conjunction with balloon vertebroplasty seems to be a feasible option in the management of lumbar burst fractures, thereby addressing all the three columns through a single approach. Although cement leakage occurred but had no clinical consequences or neurological deficit. PMID:18193300

  20. The treatment of metastasis to the femoral neck using percutaneous hollow perforated screws with cement augmentation.

    PubMed

    Kang, H G; Roh, Y W; Kim, H S

    2009-08-01

    We have developed a hollow perforated cannulated screw. One or more of these was implanted percutaneously in 11 patients with an osteolytic metastasis in the femoral neck and multiple metastases elsewhere. They were supplemented by one or two additional standard 6.5 mm cannulated screws in nine patients. Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement was injected through the screw into the neck of the femur using small syringes, as in vertebroplasty. The mean amount of cement injected was 23.2 ml (17 to 30). Radiotherapy was started on the fourth post-operative day and chemotherapy, on average, was resumed a day later. Good structural stability and satisfactory relief from pain were achieved in all the patients. This technique may be useful in the palliation of metastases in the femoral neck. PMID:19651838

  1. Treatment of Midshaft Clavicle Fractures: Application of Local Autograft With Concurrent Plate Fixation.

    PubMed

    Slette, Erik L; Mikula, Jacob D; Turnbull, Travis Lee; Hackett, Thomas R

    2016-06-01

    Currently, open reduction-internal fixation using contoured plates or intramedullary nails is considered the standard operative treatment for midshaft clavicle fractures because of the immediate rigid stability provided by the fixation device. In addition, autologous iliac crest bone graft has proved to augment osteosynthesis during internal fixation of nonunion fractures through the release of osteogenic factors. The purpose of this article is to describe a surgical technique developed to reduce donor-site morbidity and improve functional and objective outcomes after open reduction-internal fixation with autologous bone graft placement through local autograft harvesting and concurrent plate fixation. PMID:27656378

  2. Treatment of stress fracture of the olecranon in throwing athletes with internal fixation through a small incision.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Kenjiro; Takagi, Yohei; Tanaka, Juichi

    2012-01-01

    The present study is a report of retrospective case series of stress fracture of the olecranon. Six patients presented posterior elbow pain in throwing in baseball and softball, but fracture was not diagnosed in radiographs. We detected stress fracture of the olecranon using computed tomographic (CT) scan and treated the patient with internal fixation with a headless cannulated double threaded screw through a small skin incision. All patients returned to competitive level without elbow complaints after the operation.When throwing athletes present with unusual posterior elbow pain and no significant findings on radiographs, a CT scan examination should be performed. We recommend surgical treatment of internal fixation with a screw through a small skin incision, as a good option for stress fracture of the olecranon in order to allow early return to sports activity in competitive athletes.

  3. Pedicle screw placement with O-arm and stealth navigation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Suresh; Lindley, Emily M; Burger, Evalina L; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki; Patel, Vikas V

    2012-01-16

    Various navigation systems are available to aid pedicle screw placement. The O-arm replaces the need for fluoroscopy and generates a 3-dimensional volumetric dataset that can be viewed as transverse, coronal, and sagittal images of the spine, similar to computed tomography (CT) scanning. The dataset can be downloaded to the Stealth system (Medtronic Navigation, Louisville, Colorado) for real-time intraoperative navigation.The main objectives of the current study were to assess (1) accuracy of pedicle screw placement using the O-arm/Stealth system, and (2) time for draping, positioning of the O-arm, and screw placement. Of 188 screws (25 patients), 116 had adequate images for analysis. The average time for O-arm draping was 3.5 minutes. Initial O-arm positioning was 6.1 minutes, and final positioning was 4.9 minutes. Mean time for screw placement, including O-arm draping and positioning and array attachment, was 8.1 minutes per screw. Mean time for screw placement alone was 5.9 minutes per screw. Screw placements on final O-arm images were on average 3.14 mm deeper than on the snapshot navigation images. Three screws (2.6%) breached the medial cortex, and 3 screws (2.6%) were misaligned and did not follow the pilot hole trajectory.The use of the O-arm/Stealth system was associated with a low rate of pedicle screw misalignment. The time to place screws was less than previously reported with CT navigation, but longer than conventional techniques. It is important to be aware of the potential discrepancy between snapshot navigation images and actual screw placement on final O-arm images. Our findings suggest that final screw positions may be deeper than awl positions appear on navigation images.

  4. Salvage of failed osteosynthesis of an intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck using two cannulated compression screws and a vascularised iliac crest bone graft.

    PubMed

    Xiaobing, Y; Dewei, Z

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the outcome of treatment of nonunion of an intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck in young patients using two cannulated screws and a vascularised bone graft. A total of 32 patients (15 women and 17 men, with a mean age of 36.5 years; 20 to 50) with failed internal fixation of an intracapsular fracture were included in the study. Following removal of the primary fixation, two cannulated compression screws were inserted with a vascularised iliac crest bone graft based on the ascending branch of the lateral femoral circumflex artery. At a mean follow-up of 6.8 years (4 to 10), union was achieved in 27 hips (84%). A total of five patients with a mean age of 40.5 years (35 to 50) had a persistent nonunion and underwent total hip arthroplasty as also did two patients whose fracture united but who developed osteonecrosis of the femoral head two years post-operatively. Statistical analysis showed that younger patients achieved earlier and more reliable union (p < 0.001). The functional outcome, as assessed by the Harris Hip score, was better in patients aged < 45 years compared with those aged > 45 years (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that further fixation using two cannulated compression screws and a vascularised iliac crest bone graft is an effective salvage treatment in patients aged < 45 years, in whom osteosynthesis of a displaced intracapsular fractures of the femoral neck has failed.

  5. Biomechanical in vitro evaluation of three stable internal fixation techniques used in sagittal osteotomy of the mandibular ramus: a study in sheep mandibles

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVERA, Leandro Benetti; SANT'ANA, Eduardo; MANZATO, Antonio José; GUERRA, Fábio Luis Bunemer; ARNETT, G. William

    2012-01-01

    Among the osteotomies performed in orthognathic surgery, the sagittal osteotomy of the mandibular ramus (SOMR) is the most common, allowing a great range of movements and stable internal fixation (SIF), therefore eliminating the need of maxillomandibular block in the postoperative period. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical resistance of three national systems used for SIF in SOMR in sheep mandibles. Material and methods: The study was performed in 30 sheep hemi-mandibles randomly divided into 3 experimental groups, each containing 10 hemi-mandibles. The samples were measured to avoid discrepancies and then subjected to SOMR with 5-mm advancement. In group I, 2.0x12 mm screws were used for fixation, inserted in an inverted "L" pattern (inverted "L" group). In group II, fixation was performed with two 2.0x12 mm screws, positioned in a linear pattern and a 4-hole straight miniplate and four 2.0x6.0 mm monocortical screws (hybrid group). In group III, fixation was performed with two 4-hole straight miniplates and eight 2.0x6.0 mm monocortical screws (mini plate group). All materials used for SIF were supplied by Osteosin - SIN. The hemimandibles were subjected to vertical linear load test by Kratos K2000MP mechanical testing unit for loading registration and displacement. Results: All groups showed similar resistance during mechanical test for loading and displacement, with no statistically significant differences between groups according to analysis of variance. Conclusion: These results indicate that the three techniques of fixation are equally effective for clinical fixation of SOMR. PMID:23032203

  6. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  7. Improvements to the single screw extruder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiemenz, C.; Ziegmann, G.; Franzkoch, B.; Hoffmanns, W.; Michaeli, W.

    1977-01-01

    The extrusion on a single screw extruder is examined. The process is divided into several steps: the dosage of the materials to be conveyed; the modification of the shape of the feeding opening which influences the feeding process and consequently the throughput of the extruder; optimizing the shape of the feeding zone to meet the specific material requirements; and plasticizing and homogenizing.

  8. Understanding Nitrogen Fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul J. Chirik

    2012-05-25

    The purpose of our program is to explore fundamental chemistry relevant to the discovery of energy efficient methods for the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen (N{sub 2}) into more value-added nitrogen-containing organic molecules. Such transformations are key for domestic energy security and the reduction of fossil fuel dependencies. With DOE support, we have synthesized families of zirconium and hafnium dinitrogen complexes with elongated and activated N-N bonds that exhibit rich N{sub 2} functionalization chemistry. Having elucidated new methods for N-H bond formation from dihydrogen, C-H bonds and Broensted acids, we have since turned our attention to N-C bond construction. These reactions are particularly important for the synthesis of amines, heterocycles and hydrazines with a range of applications in the fine and commodity chemicals industries and as fuels. One recent highlight was the discovery of a new N{sub 2} cleavage reaction upon addition of carbon monoxide which resulted in the synthesis of an important fertilizer, oxamide, from the diatomics with the two strongest bonds in chemistry. Nitrogen-carbon bonds form the backbone of many important organic molecules, especially those used in the fertilizer and pharamaceutical industries. During the past year, we have continued our work in the synthesis of hydrazines of various substitution patterns, many of which are important precursors for heterocycles. In most instances, the direct functionalization of N{sub 2} offers a more efficient synthetic route than traditional organic methods. In addition, we have also discovered a unique CO-induced N{sub 2} bond cleavage reaction that simultaneously cleaves the N-N bond of the metal dinitrogen compound and assembles new C-C bond and two new N-C bonds. Treatment of the CO-functionalized core with weak Broensted acids liberated oxamide, H{sub 2}NC(O)C(O)NH{sub 2}, an important slow release fertilizer that is of interest to replace urea in many applications. The

  9. Biomechanical study in polyurethane mandibles of different metal plates and internal fixation techniques, employed in mandibular angle fractures.

    PubMed

    Semeghini Guastaldi, Fernando Pozzi; Hochuli-Vieira, Eduardo; Guastaldi, Antonio Carlos

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a physicochemical and morphological characterization and compare the mechanical behavior of an experimental Ti-Mo alloy to the analogous metallic Ti-based fixation system, for mandibular angle fractures. Twenty-eight polyurethane mandibles were uniformly sectioned on the left angle. These were divided into 4 groups: group Eng 1P, one 2.0-mm plate and 4 screws 6 mm long; group Eng 2P, two 2.0-mm plates, the first fixed with 4 screws 6 mm long and the second with 4 screws 12 mm long. The same groups were created for the Ti-15Mo alloy. Each group was subjected to linear vertical loading at the first molar on the plated side in a mechanical testing unit. Means and standard deviations were compared with respect to statistical significance using ANOVA. The chemical composition of the Ti-15Mo alloy was close to the nominal value. The mapping of Mo and Ti showed a homogeneous distribution. SEM of the screw revealed machining debris. For the plates, only the cpTi plate undergoes a surface treatment. The metallographic analysis reveals granular microstructure, from the thermomechanical trials. A statistically significant difference was found (P < 0.05) when the comparison between both internal fixation techniques was performed. The 2P technique showed better mechanical behavior than 1P. PMID:25340696

  10. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    PubMed

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for

  11. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    PubMed

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for

  12. Three-dimensional stabilization provided by the external spinal fixator compared to two internal fixation devices: a biomechanical in vitro flexibility study.

    PubMed

    Lund, Teija; Nydegger, Thomas; Rathonyi, Gabor; Nolte, Lutz-Peter; Schlenzka, Dietrich; Oxland, Thomas R

    2003-10-01

    We performed an in vitro study to investigate the stabilization (i.e. motion reduction) provided by the external spinal fixator (ESF), and to compare the three configurations of the ESF with two internal fixation techniques. Six human cadaveric lumbar spine specimens (L3-S1) were subjected to multidirectional flexibility testing in six configurations: (1) intact, (2) ESF in neutral, (3) ESF in distraction, (4) ESF in compression, (5) translaminar facet screw fixation, and (6) internal transpedicular fixation. Both the ESF and the internal fixation systems stabilized the specimens from L4 to S1. In each testing configuration, pure bending moments of flexion-extension, bilateral axial rotation, and bilateral lateral bending were applied to the uppermost vertebra stepwise to a maximum of 10 Nm. The rigid body motion between the vertebrae was measured using an optoelectronic camera system, and custom software was used to calculate the intervertebral rotations. For each applied motion in all testing configurations, the total range of motion (ROM) of L4-S1 is reported. All three ESF configurations stabilized the spine significantly when compared to the intact specimen. The ESF in compression provided significantly more stabilization in flexion-extension than the two other ESF configurations, but no other significant differences were found between the three ESF modes. In flexion-extension the ESF stabilized the spine significantly when compared with the two internal fixation devices. Only in bilateral lateral bending was the ESF inferior to internal transpedicular fixation in providing stabilization. The results of the present study suggest that the ESF provides a high degree of stabilization for preoperative assessment of selected low back pain patients. Whether other non-mechanical factors affect the pain relief experienced by the patients remains unknown.

  13. Eighth international congress on nitrogen fixation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Eighth International Congress on Nitrogen Fixation held May 20--26, 1990 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The volume contains abstracts of individual presentations. Sessions were entitled Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nitrogen Fixation, Plant-microbe Interactions, Limiting Factors of Nitrogen Fixation, Nitrogen Fixation and the Environment, Bacterial Systems, Nitrogen Fixation in Agriculture and Industry, Plant Function, and Nitrogen Fixation and Evolution.

  14. Long-term outcomes and prognostic analysis of modified open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Li, Dong; Li, Jinjun; Meng, Hai; Yang, Yong; Guo, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to explore and analyze the long-term outcomes and factors that affect the prognosis of expansive open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 49 patients with multilevel CSM who had undergone expansive open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screws fixation and fusion in our hospital between February 2008 and February 2012. The average follow-up period was 4.6 years. The clinical data of patients, including age, sex, operation records, pre- and postoperation Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, cervical spine canal stenosis, and cervical curvature, were collected. Increased signal intensity (ISI) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament were also observed. Paired t-test was used to analyze the treatment effectiveness and recovery of neuronal function. The prognostic factors were analyzed with multivariable linear regression model. Results Forty-nine patients with CSM with a mean age of 59.44 years were enrolled in this study. The average of preoperative JOA score was 9.14±2.25, and postoperative JOA score was 15.31±1.73. There was significant difference between the pre- and postoperative JOA scores. The clinical improvement rate was 80.27%. On follow-up, five patients had complaints of neck and shoulder pain, but no evidence of C5 nerve palsy was found. Developmental cervical spine canal stenosis was present in all patients before surgery. Before surgery, ISI was observed in eight patients, while ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament was found in 12 patients. The average of preoperative cervical curvature was 21.27°±8.37° and postoperative cervical curvature was 20.09°±1.29°, and there was no significant difference between the pre- and postoperative cervical curvatures. Multivariable linear regression analysis results showed that

  15. Long-term outcomes and prognostic analysis of modified open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nan; Fei, Qi; Wang, Bingqiang; Li, Dong; Li, Jinjun; Meng, Hai; Yang, Yong; Guo, Ai

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the present study was to explore and analyze the long-term outcomes and factors that affect the prognosis of expansive open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screw fusion in treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 49 patients with multilevel CSM who had undergone expansive open-door laminoplasty with lateral mass screws fixation and fusion in our hospital between February 2008 and February 2012. The average follow-up period was 4.6 years. The clinical data of patients, including age, sex, operation records, pre- and postoperation Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, cervical spine canal stenosis, and cervical curvature, were collected. Increased signal intensity (ISI) on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament were also observed. Paired t-test was used to analyze the treatment effectiveness and recovery of neuronal function. The prognostic factors were analyzed with multivariable linear regression model. Results Forty-nine patients with CSM with a mean age of 59.44 years were enrolled in this study. The average of preoperative JOA score was 9.14±2.25, and postoperative JOA score was 15.31±1.73. There was significant difference between the pre- and postoperative JOA scores. The clinical improvement rate was 80.27%. On follow-up, five patients had complaints of neck and shoulder pain, but no evidence of C5 nerve palsy was found. Developmental cervical spine canal stenosis was present in all patients before surgery. Before surgery, ISI was observed in eight patients, while ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament was found in 12 patients. The average of preoperative cervical curvature was 21.27°±8.37° and postoperative cervical curvature was 20.09°±1.29°, and there was no significant difference between the pre- and postoperative cervical curvatures. Multivariable linear regression analysis results showed that

  16. "False" migration of rigid fixation appliances in pediatric craniofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Papay, F A; Hardy, S; Morales, L; Walker, M; Enlow, D

    1995-07-01

    Osseous fixation techniques have been widely used to provide rigid stabilization in the craniofacial skeleton. Reported sequelae of its usage has been limited to palpation of the screw-plate system and radiological imaging artifacts. Over the past 3 years we have identified miniplates, microplates, and wire sutures on the inner cranial table of the growing child. The observation of "false" migration of these appliances has provided the impetus to review these patients in more detail. Twenty patients underwent secondary cranial remodeling within a two-year period; 7 of these patients were seen to have "false" migration. There were no untoward sequelae in removal of these appliances, and no adverse neurological symptoms were seen.

  17. Less invasive surgery using external fixator for the treatment of subtrochanteric femur fracture in a high-risk geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Atik, O Şahap; Can, Fatih I; Şenol, M Selçuk; Eren, Toygun K

    2016-08-01

    A 90-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic complaining of pain in her left hip which occurred due to fall from a chair. Her medical history included memory loss and mental changes associated with Alzheimer's disease and depression. Patient's cooperation and orientation were weak. Range of motion of the left hip was restricted and painful. Radiographs of the left hip demonstrated subtrochanteric comminuted fracture of femur. Laboratory tests revealed anemia and liver insufficiency. Departments of internal medicine and anesthesiology reported high risk for surgery. Surgery was performed under spinal anesthesia on radiolucent table and in supine position. Using fluoroscopy, subtrochanteric comminuted fracture of femur was reduced. Proximally, two Schanz screws were placed through femoral neck and head in axial plane, and distally, three Schanz screws were placed through femoral shaft in coronal plane. Finally, fixation of the screws was achieved with an external fixator which was made of carbon fiber rods. Patient was allowed to sit in the bed and move around with a wheelchair as of the day of surgery. No infection or loosening of fixator occurred. PMID:27499322

  18. A Biomechanical Comparison of Intralaminar C7 Screw Constructs with and without Offset Connector Used for C6-7 Cervical Spine Immobilization : A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N.; An, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The offset connector can allow medial and lateral variability and facilitate intralaminar screw incorporation into the construct. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of C7 intralaminar screw constructs with and without offset connector using a three dimensional finite element model of a C6-7 cervical spine segment. Methods Finite element models representing C7 intralaminar screw constructs with and without the offset connector were developed. Range of motion (ROM) and maximum von Mises stresses in the vertebra for the two techniques were compared under pure moments in flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. Results ROM for intralaminar screw construct with offset connector was less than the construct without the offset connector in the three principal directions. The maximum von Misses stress was observed in the C7 vertebra around the pedicle in both constructs. Maximum von Mises stress in the construct without offset connector was found to be 12-30% higher than the corresponding stresses in the construct with offset connector in the three principal directions. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the intralaminar screw fixation with offset connector is better than the construct without offset connector in terms of biomechanical stability. Construct with the offset connector reduces the ROM of C6-7 segment more significantly compared to the construct without the offset connector and causes lower stresses around the C7 pedicle-vertebral body complex. PMID:24003366

  19. Cortical screw trajectory for instrumentation and fusion in the setting of osteopathic compression fracture allows for percutaneous kyphoplasty for adjacent level compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Pacione, Donato; Kim, Irene; Wilson, Taylor A; Frempong-Boadu, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    Spinal fixation in the osteoporotic patient can be challenging due to the poor trabecular bone quality of the vertebral body. Patients with osteoporotic vertebral body compression fractures are at risk for future compression fractures at adjacent levels, especially after cement augmentation. The purpose of this technical report is to describe the utilization of a cortical screw trajectory along with kyphoplasty for a patient with an osteoporotic compression fracture as well as degenerative spinal disease. This trajectory allows for the possibility of percutaneous pedicle access in the event of future compression fractures. Our patient underwent a decompressive laminectomy and kyphoplasty at the level of an osteoporotic compression fracture. The fracture was stabilized with cortical screw instrumentation and fusion at a level above and a level below the fracture. Subsequently the patient developed an adjacent level fracture within the fusion construct. Due to the utilization of a cortical screw trajectory for the initial fusion, the traditional pedicle trajectory was still accessible. As a result, the new fracture was treated with a percutaneous kyphoplasty through a standard pedicle trajectory. In conclusion, the use of a cortical screw trajectory for stabilization of osteoporotic compression fractures provides for a stronger bone screw interface and avoids osteoporotic trabecular vertebral body bone. At the same time this trajectory allows for future percutaneous pedicular access in the event that the patient suffers future compression fractures.

  20. Response properties of axion insulators and Weyl semimetals driven by screw dislocations and dynamical axion strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Yizhi; Cho, Gil Young; Hughes, Taylor L.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate the theory of dynamical axion strings emerging from chiral symmetry breaking in three-dimensional Weyl semimetals. The chiral symmetry is spontaneously broken by a charge density wave (CDW) order which opens an energy gap and converts the Weyl semimetal into an axion insulator. Indeed, the phase fluctuations of the CDW order parameter act as a dynamical axion field θ (x ⃗,t ) and couple to electromagnetic field via Lθ=θ/(x ⃗,t ) 32 π2 ɛσ τ ν μFσ τFν μ. Additionally, when the axion insulator is coupled to deformations of the background geometry/strain fields via torsional defects, e.g., screw dislocations, there is interesting interplay between the crystal dislocations and dynamical axion strings. For example, the screw dislocation traps axial charge, and there is a Berry phase accumulation when an axion string (which carries axial flux) is braided with a screw dislocation. In addition, a cubic coupling between the axial current and the geometry fields is nonvanishing and indicates a Berry phase accumulation during a particular three-loop braiding procedure where a dislocation loop is braided with another dislocation and they are both threaded by an axion string. We also observe a chiral magnetic effect induced by a screw dislocation density in the absence of a nodal energy imbalance between Weyl points and describe an additional chiral geometric effect and a geometric Witten effect.

  1. Applying Cross-Pin System in Both Femoral and Tibial Fixation in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using Hamstring Tendons.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Yujie; Xue, Jing; Li, Haifeng; Wang, Junliang; Qu, Feng

    2015-10-01

    Use of the RigidFix Cross Pin System (DePuy Mitek, Raynham, MA) is a popular technique for femoral fixation of grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). However, tibial fixation is still limited to the use of interference screws and post fixation, and few surgeons apply the femoral RigidFix system in tibial fixation. Meanwhile, tunnel enlargement is still a problem that affects the outcome of ACLR with hamstring grafts. We have used the femoral RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. The rod top of the guide frame should be placed under the level of the subchondral bone at the proximal end of the tibial tunnel to ensure that the pins will not be inserted into the joint. The pins are inserted through the center of the lateral tibia. Using our technique, the fixation points of the femur and tibia are close to the anterior cruciate ligament insertions, and full contact of the graft with the tunnel wall can be accomplished. On the basis of our preliminary observations and investigation, we are optimistic about the prospect of performing ACLR using the RigidFix system in femoral and tibial fixation. PMID:26697293

  2. Anterior Debridement and Strut Graft with Pedicle Screw Fixation for Pyogenic Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Sun; Ahn, Chang-Soo; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Soon-Chul

    2007-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose We evaluated the results of the use of anterior debridement and interbody fusion followed by posterior spinal instrumentation. Overview of Literature An early diagnosis of pyogenic spondylitis is difficult to obtain. The disease can be treated with various surgical methods (such as anterior debridement and bone graft, anterior instrumentation, and posterior instrumentation). Methods This study included 20 patients who received anterior debridement and interbody fusion with strut bone graft followed by posterior spinal fusion for pyogenic spondylitis between 1996 and 2005. We analyzed the culture studies, the correction of the kyphotic angle, blood chemistry, the bony union period, and the amount of symptom relief. Results In terms of clinical symptoms relief, eight patients were grouped as "excellent", eleven patients as "good", and one patient as "fair". The vertebral body cultures were positive in 14 patients showing coagulase (-) streptococcus and S. aureus. The average times for normalization of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level were 3.3 and 1.9 months, respectively. Four months was required for bony union. For complications, meralgia paresthetica was found in two cases. Conclusions Due to early ambulation and the correction of the kyphotic angle, anterior interbody fusion with strut bone graft and posterior instrumentation could be another favorable method for the treatment of pyogenic spondyulitis. PMID:20411131

  3. Fixation of a severely resorbed mandible for complete arch screw-retained rehabilitation: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Vinicius; Bacchi, Atais

    2016-05-01

    Severely resorbed mandibles with placed endosteal dental implants can fracture. Therefore, techniques to reduce the risk or minimize the consequences of these fractures are needed. This clinical report presents a technique for placing a titanium plate in a severely resorbed mandible subjected to complete-arch implant therapy. The titanium plate is placed in the same surgical procedure as the implants, allowing immediate implant loading. This technique provides safe implant-supported treatment for patients with severe mandibular resorption.

  4. The effect of excision of the posterior arch of C1 on C1/C2 fusion using transarticular screws.

    PubMed

    Chang, K C; Samartzis, D; Fuego, S M; Dhatt, S S; Wong, Y W; Cheung, W Y; Luk, K D K; Cheung, K M C

    2013-07-01

    Transarticular screw fixation with autograft is an established procedure for the surgical treatment of atlantoaxial instability. Removal of the posterior arch of C1 may affect the rate of fusion. This study assessed the rate of atlantoaxial fusion using transarticular screws with or without removal of the posterior arch of C1. We reviewed 30 consecutive patients who underwent atlantoaxial fusion with a minimum follow-up of two years. In 25 patients (group A) the posterior arch of C1 was not excised (group A) and in five it was (group B). Fusion was assessed on static and dynamic radiographs. In selected patients CT imaging was also used to assess fusion and the position of the screws. There were 15 men and 15 women with a mean age of 51.2 years (23 to 77) and a mean follow-up of 7.7 years (2 to 11.6). Stable union with a solid fusion or a stable fibrous union was achieved in 29 patients (97%). In Group A, 20 patients (80%) achieved a solid fusion, four (16%) a stable fibrous union and one (4%) a nonunion. In Group B, stable union was achieved in all patients, three having a solid fusion and two a stable fibrous union. There was no statistically significant difference between the status of fusion in the two groups. Complications were noted in 12 patients (40%); these were mainly related to the