Science.gov

Sample records for additional sensitivity analyses

  1. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

  2. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  3. Making sense of global sensitivity analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainwright, Haruko M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Jung, Yoojin; Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2014-04-01

    This study presents improved understanding of sensitivity analysis methods through a comparison of the local sensitivity and two global sensitivity analysis methods: the Morris and Sobol‧/Saltelli methods. We re-interpret the variance-based sensitivity indices from the Sobol‧/Saltelli method as difference-based measures. It suggests that the difference-based local and Morris methods provide the effect of each parameter including its interaction with others, similar to the total sensitivity index from the Sobol‧/Saltelli method. We also develop an alternative approximation method to efficiently compute the Sobol‧ index, using one-dimensional fitting of system responses from a Monte-Carlo simulation. For illustration, we conduct a sensitivity analysis of pressure propagation induced by fluid injection and leakage in a reservoir-aquitard-aquifer system. The results show that the three methods provide consistent parameter importance rankings in this system. Our study also reveals that the three methods can provide additional information to improve system understanding.

  4. Addition of docetaxel or bisphosphonates to standard of care in men with localised or metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analyses of aggregate data

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Claire L; Burdett, Sarah; Rydzewska, Larysa H M; Albiges, Laurence; Clarke, Noel W; Fisher, David; Fizazi, Karim; Gravis, Gwenaelle; James, Nicholas D; Mason, Malcolm D; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Sweeney, Christopher J; Sydes, Matthew R; Tombal, Bertrand; Tierney, Jayne F

    2016-01-01

    docetaxel for men with locally advanced disease (M0). Survival results from three (GETUG-12, RTOG 0521, STAMPEDE) of these trials (2121 [53%] of 3978 men) showed no evidence of a benefit from the addition of docetaxel (HR 0·87 [95% CI 0·69–1·09]; p=0·218), whereas failure-free survival data from four (GETUG-12, RTOG 0521, STAMPEDE, TAX 3501) of these trials (2348 [59%] of 3978 men) showed that docetaxel improved failure-free survival (0·70 [0·61–0·81]; p<0·0001), which translates into a reduced absolute 4-year failure rate of 8% (5–10). We identified seven eligible randomised controlled trials of bisphosphonates for men with M1 disease. Survival results from three of these trials (2740 [88%] of 3109 men) showed that addition of bisphosphonates improved survival (0·88 [0·79–0·98]; p=0·025), which translates to 5% (1–8) absolute improvement, but this result was influenced by the positive result of one trial of sodium clodronate, and we found no evidence of a benefit from the addition of zoledronic acid (0·94 [0·83–1·07]; p=0·323), which translates to an absolute improvement in survival of 2% (−3 to 7). Of 17 trials of bisphosphonates for men with M0 disease, survival results from four trials (4079 [66%] of 6220 men) showed no evidence of benefit from the addition of bisphosphonates (1·03 [0·89–1·18]; p=0·724) or zoledronic acid (0·98 [0·82–1·16]; p=0·782). Failure-free survival definitions were too inconsistent for formal meta-analyses for the bisphosphonate trials. Interpretation The addition of docetaxel to standard of care should be considered standard care for men with M1 hormone-sensitive prostate cancer who are starting treatment for the first time. More evidence on the effects of docetaxel on survival is needed in the M0 disease setting. No evidence exists to suggest that zoledronic acid improves survival in men with

  5. In situ sulfur isotopes (δ(34)S and δ(33)S) analyses in sulfides and elemental sulfur using high sensitivity cones combined with the addition of nitrogen by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiali; Hu, Zhaochu; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Lu; Liu, Yongsheng; Li, Ming; Zong, Keqing; Gao, Shan; Hu, Shenghong

    2016-03-10

    The sulfur isotope is an important geochemical tracer in diverse fields of geosciences. In this study, the effects of three different cone combinations with the addition of N2 on the performance of in situ S isotope analyses were investigated in detail. The signal intensities of S isotopes were improved by a factor of 2.3 and 3.6 using the X skimmer cone combined with the standard sample cone or the Jet sample cone, respectively, compared with the standard arrangement (H skimmer cone combined with the standard sample cone). This signal enhancement is important for the improvement of the precision and accuracy of in situ S isotope analysis at high spatial resolution. Different cone combinations have a significant effect on the mass bias and mass bias stability for S isotopes. Poor precisions of S isotope ratios were obtained using the Jet and X cones combination at their corresponding optimum makeup gas flow when using Ar plasma only. The addition of 4-8 ml min(-1) nitrogen to the central gas flow in laser ablation MC-ICP-MS was found to significantly enlarge the mass bias stability zone at their corresponding optimum makeup gas flow in these three different cone combinations. The polyatomic interferences of OO, SH, OOH were also significantly reduced, and the interference free plateaus of sulfur isotopes became broader and flatter in the nitrogen mode (N2 = 4 ml min(-1)). However, the signal intensity of S was not increased by the addition of nitrogen in this study. The laser fluence and ablation mode had significant effects on sulfur isotope fractionation during the analysis of sulfides and elemental sulfur by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS. The matrix effect among different sulfides and elemental sulfur was observed, but could be significantly reduced by line scan ablation in preference to single spot ablation under the optimized fluence. It is recommended that the d90 values of the particles in pressed powder pellets for accurate and precise S isotope analysis

  6. Photovoltaic System Modeling. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Clifford W.; Martin, Curtis E.

    2015-08-01

    We report an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for modeling AC energy from ph otovoltaic systems . Output from a PV system is predicted by a sequence of models. We quantify u ncertainty i n the output of each model using empirical distribution s of each model's residuals. We propagate uncertainty through the sequence of models by sampli ng these distributions to obtain a n empirical distribution of a PV system's output. We consider models that: (1) translate measured global horizontal, direct and global diffuse irradiance to plane - of - array irradiance; (2) estimate effective irradiance; (3) predict cell temperature; (4) estimate DC voltage, current and power ; (5) reduce DC power for losses due to inefficient maximum power point tracking or mismatch among modules; and (6) convert DC to AC power . O ur analysis consider s a notional PV system com prising an array of FirstSolar FS - 387 modules and a 250 kW AC inverter ; we use measured irradiance and weather at Albuquerque, NM. We found the uncertainty in PV syste m output to be relatively small, on the order of 1% for daily energy. We found that unce rtainty in the models for POA irradiance and effective irradiance to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty in predicted daily energy. Our analysis indicates that efforts to reduce the uncertainty in PV system output predictions may yield the greatest improvements by focusing on the POA and effective irradiance models.

  7. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT COLUMN DEGRADATION ANALYSES

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.

    2014-10-28

    PORFLOW related analyses supporting a Sensitivity Analysis for Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) column degradation were performed. Previous analyses, Flach and Taylor 2014, used a model in which the SDU columns degraded in a piecewise manner from the top and bottom simultaneously. The current analyses employs a model in which all pieces of the column degrade at the same time. Information was extracted from the analyses which may be useful in determining the distribution of Tc-99 in the various SDUs throughout time and in determining flow balances for the SDUs.

  8. Calibration and Sensitivity Analyses of LEACHM Simulation Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calibration and sensitivity analyses are essential processes in evaluation and application of computer simulation models. Calibration is a process of adjusting model inputs within expected values to minimize the differences between simulated and measured data. The objective of this study was to cali...

  9. Sensitivity of Assimilated Tropical Tropospheric Ozone to the Meteorological Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, Hiroo; Stajner, Ivanka; Pawson, Steven; Thompson, Anne M.

    2002-01-01

    Tropical tropospheric ozone fields from two different experiments performed with an off-line ozone assimilation system developed in NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO) are examined. Assimilated ozone fields from the two experiments are compared with the collocated ozone profiles from the Southern Hemispheric Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) network. Results are presented for 1998. The ozone assimilation system includes a chemistry-transport model, which uses analyzed winds from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS). The two experiments use wind fields from different versions of GEOS DAS: an operational version of the GEOS-2 system and a prototype of the GEOS-4 system. While both versions of the DAS utilize the Physical-space Statistical Analysis System and use comparable observations, they use entirely different general circulation models and data insertion techniques. The shape of the annual-mean vertical profile of the assimilated ozone fields is sensitive to the meteorological analyses, with the GEOS-4-based ozone being closest to the observations. This indicates that the resolved transport in GEOS-4 is more realistic than in GEOS-2. Remaining uncertainties include quantification of the representation of sub-grid-scale processes in the transport calculations, which plays an important role in the locations and seasons where convection dominates the transport.

  10. Cucumis monosomic alien addition lines: morphological, cytological, and genotypic analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Feng; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Qian, Chun-Tao; Jahn, Molly M; Staub, Jack E; Zhuang, Fei-Yun; Lou, Qun-Feng; Ren, Gang

    2004-05-01

    Cucumis hystrix Chakr. (HH, 2n=24), a wild relative of the cultivated cucumber, possesses several potentially valuable disease-resistance and abiotic stress-tolerance traits for cucumber ( C. sativus L., CC, 2n=14) improvement. Numerous attempts have been made to transfer desirable traits since the successful interspecific hybridization between C. hystrix and C. sativus, one of which resulted in the production of an allotriploid (HCC, 2n=26: one genome of C. hystrix and two of C. sativus). When this genotype was treated with colchicine to induce polyploidy, two monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) (plant nos. 87 and 517: 14 CC+1 H, 2n=15) were recovered among 252 viable plants. Each of these plants was morphologically distinct from allotriploids and cultivated cucumbers. Cytogenetic and molecular marker analyses were performed to confirm the genetic constitution and further characterize these two MAALs. Chromosome counts made from at least 30 meristematic cells from each plant confirmed 15 nuclear chromosomes. In pollen mother cells of plant nos. 87 and 517, seven bivalents and one univalent were observed at diakinesis and metaphase I; the frequency of trivalent formation was low (about 4-5%). At anaphase I and II, stochastic and asymmetric division led to the formation of two gamete classes: n=7 and n=8; however, pollen fertility was relatively high. Pollen stainability in plant no. 87 was 86.7% and in plant no. 517 was 93.2%. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was performed using 100 random 10-base primers. Genotypes obtained with eight primers (A-9, A-11, AH-13, AI-19, AJ-18, AJ-20, E-19, and N-20) showed a band common to the two MAAL plants and C. hystrix that was absent in C. sativus, confirming that the alien chromosomes present in the MAALs were derived from C. hystrix. Morphological differences and differences in banding patterns were also observed between plant nos. 87 and 517 after amplification with primers AI-5, AJ-13, N-12, and N-20

  11. Balancing data sharing requirements for analyses with data sensitivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarnevich, C.S.; Graham, J.J.; Newman, G.J.; Crall, A.W.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    Data sensitivity can pose a formidable barrier to data sharing. Knowledge of species current distributions from data sharing is critical for the creation of watch lists and an early warning/rapid response system and for model generation for the spread of invasive species. We have created an on-line system to synthesize disparate datasets of non-native species locations that includes a mechanism to account for data sensitivity. Data contributors are able to mark their data as sensitive. This data is then 'fuzzed' in mapping applications and downloaded files to quarter-quadrangle grid cells, but the actual locations are available for analyses. We propose that this system overcomes the hurdles to data sharing posed by sensitive data. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. Sensitivity analyses for parametric causal mediation effect estimation.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jeffrey M; Wang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Causal mediation analysis uses a potential outcomes framework to estimate the direct effect of an exposure on an outcome and its indirect effect through an intermediate variable (or mediator). Causal interpretations of these effects typically rely on sequential ignorability. Because this assumption is not empirically testable, it is important to conduct sensitivity analyses. Sensitivity analyses so far offered for this situation have either focused on the case where the outcome follows a linear model or involve nonparametric or semiparametric models. We propose alternative approaches that are suitable for responses following generalized linear models. The first approach uses a Gaussian copula model involving latent versions of the mediator and the final outcome. The second approach uses a so-called hybrid causal-observational model that extends the association model for the final outcome, providing a novel sensitivity parameter. These models, while still assuming a randomized exposure, allow for unobserved (as well as observed) mediator-outcome confounders that are not affected by exposure. The methods are applied to data from a study of the effect of mother education on dental caries in adolescence. PMID:25395683

  13. Sensitivity analyses for parametric causal mediation effect estimation

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Causal mediation analysis uses a potential outcomes framework to estimate the direct effect of an exposure on an outcome and its indirect effect through an intermediate variable (or mediator). Causal interpretations of these effects typically rely on sequential ignorability. Because this assumption is not empirically testable, it is important to conduct sensitivity analyses. Sensitivity analyses so far offered for this situation have either focused on the case where the outcome follows a linear model or involve nonparametric or semiparametric models. We propose alternative approaches that are suitable for responses following generalized linear models. The first approach uses a Gaussian copula model involving latent versions of the mediator and the final outcome. The second approach uses a so-called hybrid causal-observational model that extends the association model for the final outcome, providing a novel sensitivity parameter. These models, while still assuming a randomized exposure, allow for unobserved (as well as observed) mediator-outcome confounders that are not affected by exposure. The methods are applied to data from a study of the effect of mother education on dental caries in adolescence. PMID:25395683

  14. Sensitivity analyses for partially observed recurrent event data.

    PubMed

    Akacha, Mouna; Ogundimu, Emmanuel O

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent events involve the occurrences of the same type of event repeatedly over time and are commonly encountered in longitudinal studies. Examples include seizures in epileptic studies or occurrence of cancer tumors. In such studies, interest lies in the number of events that occur over a fixed period of time. One considerable challenge in analyzing such data arises when a large proportion of patients discontinues before the end of the study, for example, because of adverse events, leading to partially observed data. In this situation, data are often modeled using a negative binomial distribution with time-in-study as offset. Such an analysis assumes that data are missing at random (MAR). As we cannot test the adequacy of MAR, sensitivity analyses that assess the robustness of conclusions across a range of different assumptions need to be performed. Sophisticated sensitivity analyses for continuous data are being frequently performed. However, this is less the case for recurrent event or count data. We will present a flexible approach to perform clinically interpretable sensitivity analyses for recurrent event data. Our approach fits into the framework of reference-based imputations, where information from reference arms can be borrowed to impute post-discontinuation data. Different assumptions about the future behavior of dropouts dependent on reasons for dropout and received treatment can be made. The imputation model is based on a flexible model that allows for time-varying baseline intensities. We assess the performance in a simulation study and provide an illustration with a clinical trial in patients who suffer from bladder cancer. PMID:26540016

  15. New method for analysing sensitivity distributions of electroencephalography measurements.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Juho; Väisänen, Outi; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Hyttinen, Jari

    2008-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new modelling related parameter called region of interest sensitivity ratio (ROISR), which describes how well the sensitivity of an electroencephalography (EEG) measurement is concentrated within the region of interest (ROI), i.e. how specific the measurement is to the sources in ROI. We demonstrate the use of the concept by analysing the sensitivity distributions of bipolar EEG measurement. We studied the effects of interelectrode distance of a bipolar EEG lead on the ROISR with cortical and non-cortical ROIs. The sensitivity distributions of EEG leads were calculated analytically by applying a three-layer spherical head model. We suggest that the developed parameter has correlation to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a measurement, and thus we studied the correlation between ROISR and SNR with 254-channel visual evoked potential (VEP) measurements of two testees. Theoretical simulations indicate that source orientation and location have major impact on the specificity and therefore they should be taken into account when the optimal bipolar electrode configuration is selected. The results also imply that the new ROISR method bears a strong correlation to the SNR of measurement and can thus be applied in the future studies to efficiently evaluate and optimize EEG measurement setups. PMID:18189153

  16. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses of Model Predictions of Solute Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaggs, T. H.; Suarez, D. L.; Goldberg, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    Soil salinity reduces crop production on about 50% of irrigated lands worldwide. One roadblock to increased use of advanced computer simulation tools for better managing irrigation water and soil salinity is that the models usually do not provide an estimate of the uncertainty in model predictions, which can be substantial. In this work, we investigate methods for putting confidence bounds on HYDRUS-1D simulations of solute leaching in soils. Uncertainties in model parameters estimated with pedotransfer functions are propagated through simulation model predictions using Monte Carlo simulation. Generalized sensitivity analyses indicate which parameters are most significant for quantifying uncertainty. The simulation results are compared with experimentally observed transport variability in a number of large, replicated lysimeters.

  17. Seeking harmony: estimands and sensitivity analyses for confirmatory clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Devan V; Hemmings, Robert J; Russek-Cohen, Estelle

    2016-08-01

    In October 2014, the Steering Committee of the International Conference on Harmonization endorsed the formation of an expert working group to develop an addendum to the International Conference on Harmonization E9 guideline ("Statistical Principles for Clinical Trials"). The addendum will focus on two topics involving randomized confirmatory clinical trials: estimands and sensitivity analyses. Both topics are motivated, in part, by the need to improve the precision with which scientific questions of interest are formulated and addressed by clinical trialists and regulators, specifically in the context of post-randomization events such as use of rescue medication or missing data resulting from dropouts. Given the importance of these topics for the statistical and medical community, we articulate the reasons for the planned addendum. The resulting "ICH E9/R1" guideline will include a framework for improved trial planning, conduct, analysis, and interpretation; a draft is expected to be ready for public comment in the second half of 2016. PMID:26908545

  18. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses of Duct Propagation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Watson, Willie R.; Jones, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses conducted to assess the relative merits of three duct propagation codes. Results from this study are intended to support identification of a "working envelope" within which to use the various approaches underlying these propagation codes. This investigation considers a segmented liner configuration that models the NASA Langley Grazing Incidence Tube, for which a large set of measured data was available. For the uncertainty analysis, the selected input parameters (source sound pressure level, average Mach number, liner impedance, exit impedance, static pressure and static temperature) are randomly varied over a range of values. Uncertainty limits (95% confidence levels) are computed for the predicted values from each code, and are compared with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals in the measured data. Generally, the mean values of the predicted attenuation are observed to track the mean values of the measured attenuation quite well and predicted confidence intervals tend to be larger in the presence of mean flow. A two-level, six factor sensitivity study is also conducted in which the six inputs are varied one at a time to assess their effect on the predicted attenuation. As expected, the results demonstrate the liner resistance and reactance to be the most important input parameters. They also indicate the exit impedance is a significant contributor to uncertainty in the predicted attenuation.

  19. Rock penetration : finite element sensitivity and probabilistic modeling analyses.

    SciTech Connect

    Fossum, Arlo Frederick

    2004-08-01

    This report summarizes numerical analyses conducted to assess the relative importance on penetration depth calculations of rock constitutive model physics features representing the presence of microscale flaws such as porosity and networks of microcracks and rock mass structural features. Three-dimensional, nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element penetration simulations are made with a realistic geomaterial constitutive model to determine which features have the most influence on penetration depth calculations. A baseline penetration calculation is made with a representative set of material parameters evaluated from measurements made from laboratory experiments conducted on a familiar sedimentary rock. Then, a sequence of perturbations of various material parameters allows an assessment to be made of the main penetration effects. A cumulative probability distribution function is calculated with the use of an advanced reliability method that makes use of this sensitivity database, probability density functions, and coefficients of variation of the key controlling parameters for penetration depth predictions. Thus the variability of the calculated penetration depth is known as a function of the variability of the input parameters. This simulation modeling capability should impact significantly the tools that are needed to design enhanced penetrator systems, support weapons effects studies, and directly address proposed HDBT defeat scenarios.

  20. Synthesis of Trigeneration Systems: Sensitivity Analyses and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Monica; Lozano, Miguel A.; Ramos, José; Serra, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents sensitivity and resilience analyses for a trigeneration system designed for a hospital. The following information is utilized to formulate an integer linear programming model: (1) energy service demands of the hospital, (2) technical and economical characteristics of the potential technologies for installation, (3) prices of the available utilities interchanged, and (4) financial parameters of the project. The solution of the model, minimizing the annual total cost, provides the optimal configuration of the system (technologies installed and number of pieces of equipment) and the optimal operation mode (operational load of equipment, interchange of utilities with the environment, convenience of wasting cogenerated heat, etc.) at each temporal interval defining the demand. The broad range of technical, economic, and institutional uncertainties throughout the life cycle of energy supply systems for buildings makes it necessary to delve more deeply into the fundamental properties of resilient systems: feasibility, flexibility and robustness. The resilience of the obtained solution is tested by varying, within reasonable limits, selected parameters: energy demand, amortization and maintenance factor, natural gas price, self-consumption of electricity, and time-of-delivery feed-in tariffs. PMID:24453881

  1. LOX/GOX sensitivity of fluoroelastomers. [effect of formulation components and addition of fire retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of formulation components and the addition of fire retardants on the impact sensitivity of Viton B fluoroelastomer in liquid oxygen was studied with the objective of developing a procedure for reliably reducing this sensitivity. Component evaluation, carried out on more than 40 combinations of components and cure cycles, showed that almost all the standard formulation agents, including carbon, MgO, Diak-3, and PbO2, will sensitize the Viton stock either singly or in combinations, some combinations being much more sensitive than others. Cure and postcure treatments usually reduced the sensitivity of a given formulation, often dramatically, but no formulated Viton was as insensitive as the pure Viton B stock. Coating formulated Viton with a thin layer of pure Viton gave some indication of reduced sensitivity, but additional tests are needed. It is concluded that sensitivity in formulated Viton arises from a variety of sources, some physical and some chemical in origin. Elemental analyses for all the formulated Vitons are reported as are the results of a literature search on the subject of LOX impact sensitivity.

  2. Nitrogen Addition Enhances Drought Sensitivity of Young Deciduous Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Dziedek, Christoph; Härdtle, Werner; von Oheimb, Goddert; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how trees respond to global change drivers is central to predict changes in forest structure and functions. Although there is evidence on the mode of nitrogen (N) and drought (D) effects on tree growth, our understanding of the interplay of these factors is still limited. Simultaneously, as mixtures are expected to be less sensitive to global change as compared to monocultures, we aimed to investigate the combined effects of N addition and D on the productivity of three tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Pseudotsuga menziesii) in relation to functional diverse species mixtures using data from a 4-year field experiment in Northwest Germany. Here we show that species mixing can mitigate the negative effects of combined N fertilization and D events, but the community response is mainly driven by the combination of certain traits rather than the tree species richness of a community. For beech, we found that negative effects of D on growth rates were amplified by N fertilization (i.e., combined treatment effects were non-additive), while for oak and fir, the simultaneous effects of N and D were additive. Beech and oak were identified as most sensitive to combined N+D effects with a strong size-dependency observed for beech, suggesting that the negative impact of N+D becomes stronger with time as beech grows larger. As a consequence, the net biodiversity effect declined at the community level, which can be mainly assigned to a distinct loss of complementarity in beech-oak mixtures. This pattern, however, was not evident in the other species-mixtures, indicating that neighborhood composition (i.e., trait combination), but not tree species richness mediated the relationship between tree diversity and treatment effects on tree growth. Our findings point to the importance of the qualitative role (‘trait portfolio’) that biodiversity play in determining resistance of diverse tree communities to environmental changes. As such, they provide

  3. Nitrogen Addition Enhances Drought Sensitivity of Young Deciduous Tree Species.

    PubMed

    Dziedek, Christoph; Härdtle, Werner; von Oheimb, Goddert; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how trees respond to global change drivers is central to predict changes in forest structure and functions. Although there is evidence on the mode of nitrogen (N) and drought (D) effects on tree growth, our understanding of the interplay of these factors is still limited. Simultaneously, as mixtures are expected to be less sensitive to global change as compared to monocultures, we aimed to investigate the combined effects of N addition and D on the productivity of three tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Pseudotsuga menziesii) in relation to functional diverse species mixtures using data from a 4-year field experiment in Northwest Germany. Here we show that species mixing can mitigate the negative effects of combined N fertilization and D events, but the community response is mainly driven by the combination of certain traits rather than the tree species richness of a community. For beech, we found that negative effects of D on growth rates were amplified by N fertilization (i.e., combined treatment effects were non-additive), while for oak and fir, the simultaneous effects of N and D were additive. Beech and oak were identified as most sensitive to combined N+D effects with a strong size-dependency observed for beech, suggesting that the negative impact of N+D becomes stronger with time as beech grows larger. As a consequence, the net biodiversity effect declined at the community level, which can be mainly assigned to a distinct loss of complementarity in beech-oak mixtures. This pattern, however, was not evident in the other species-mixtures, indicating that neighborhood composition (i.e., trait combination), but not tree species richness mediated the relationship between tree diversity and treatment effects on tree growth. Our findings point to the importance of the qualitative role ('trait portfolio') that biodiversity play in determining resistance of diverse tree communities to environmental changes. As such, they provide further

  4. Accelerated safety analyses - structural analyses Phase I - structural sensitivity evaluation of single- and double-shell waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.L.

    1994-11-01

    Accelerated Safety Analyses - Phase I (ASA-Phase I) have been conducted to assess the appropriateness of existing tank farm operational controls and/or limits as now stipulated in the Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs) and Operating Specification Documents, and to establish a technical basis for the waste tank operating safety envelope. Structural sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the response of the different waste tank configurations to variations in loading conditions, uncertainties in loading parameters, and uncertainties in material characteristics. Extensive documentation of the sensitivity analyses conducted and results obtained are provided in the detailed ASA-Phase I report, Structural Sensitivity Evaluation of Single- and Double-Shell Waste Tanks for Accelerated Safety Analysis - Phase I. This document provides a summary of the accelerated safety analyses sensitivity evaluations and the resulting findings.

  5. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms. PMID:25649961

  6. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan. Draft for Peer Review: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

  7. Structural Glycomic Analyses at High Sensitivity: A Decade of Progress

    PubMed Central

    Alley, William R.; Novotny, Milos V.

    2014-01-01

    The field of glycomics has recently advanced in response to the urgent need for structural characterization and quantification of complex carbohydrates in biologically and medically important applications. The recent success of analytical glycobiology at high sensitivity reflects numerous advances in biomolecular mass spectrometry and its instrumentation, capillary and microchip separation techniques, and microchemical manipulations of carbohydrate reactivity. The multimethodological approach appears to be necessary to gain an in-depth understanding of very complex glycomes in different biological systems. PMID:23560930

  8. Grid and aerodynamic sensitivity analyses of airplane components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Smith, Robert E.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm is developed to obtain the grid sensitivity with respect to design parameters for aerodynamic optimization. The procedure is advocating a novel (geometrical) parameterization using spline functions such as NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) for defining the wing-section geometry. An interactive algebraic grid generation technique, known as Two-Boundary Grid Generation (TBGG) is employed to generate C-type grids around wing-sections. The grid sensitivity of the domain with respect to geometric design parameters has been obtained by direct differentiation of the grid equations. A hybrid approach is proposed for more geometrically complex configurations such as a wing or fuselage. The aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients are obtained by direct differentiation of the compressible two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. An optimization package has been introduced into the algorithm in order to optimize the wing-section surface. Results demonstrate a substantially improved design due to maximized lift/drag ratio of the wing-section.

  9. Peer review of HEDR uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.O.

    1993-06-01

    This report consists of a detailed documentation of the writings and deliberations of the peer review panel that met on May 24--25, 1993 in Richland, Washington to evaluate your draft report ``Uncertainty/Sensitivity Analysis Plan`` (PNWD-2124 HEDR). The fact that uncertainties are being considered in temporally and spatially varying parameters through the use of alternative time histories and spatial patterns deserves special commendation. It is important to identify early those model components and parameters that will have the most influence on the magnitude and uncertainty of the dose estimates. These are the items that should be investigated most intensively prior to committing to a final set of results.

  10. Photogrammetry-Derived National Shoreline: Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, F.; Parrish, C. E.; Calder, B. R.; Peeri, S.; Rzhanov, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Tidally-referenced shoreline data serve a multitude of purposes, ranging from nautical charting, to coastal change analysis, wetland migration studies, coastal planning, resource management and emergency management. To assess the suitability of the shoreline for a particular application, end users need not only the best available shoreline, but also reliable estimates of the uncertainty in the shoreline position. NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is responsible for mapping the national shoreline depicted on NOAA nautical charts. Previous studies have focused on modeling the uncertainty in NGS shoreline derived from airborne lidar data, but, to date, these methods have not been extended to aerial imagery and photogrammetric shoreline extraction methods, which remain the primary shoreline mapping methods used by NGS. The aim of this study is to develop a rigorous total propagated uncertainty (TPU) model for shoreline compiled from both tide-coordinated and non-tide-coordinated aerial imagery and compiled using photogrammetric methods. The project site encompasses the strait linking Dennys Bay, Whiting Bay and Cobscook Bay in the 'Downeast' Maine coastal region. This area is of interest, due to the ecosystem services it provides, as well as its complex geomorphology. The region is characterized by a large tide range, strong tidal currents, numerous embayments, and coarse-sediment pocket beaches. Statistical methods were used to assess the uncertainty of shoreline in this site mapped using NGS's photogrammetric workflow, as well as to analyze the sensitivity of the mapped shoreline position to a variety of parameters, including elevation gradient in the intertidal zone. The TPU model developed in this work can easily be extended to other areas and may be facilitate estimation of uncertainty in inundation models and marsh migration models.

  11. Additional Investigations of Ice Shape Sensitivity to Parameter Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Langhals, Tammy J.

    2006-01-01

    A second parameter sensitivity study was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) using a 36 in. chord (0.91 m) NACA-0012 airfoil. The objective of this work was to further investigate the feasibility of using ice shape feature changes to define requirements for the simulation and measurement of SLD and appendix C icing conditions. A previous study concluded that it was feasible to use changes in ice shape features (e.g., ice horn angle, ice horn thickness, and ice shape mass) to detect relatively small variations in icing spray condition parameters (LWC, MVD, and temperature). The subject of this current investigation extends the scope of this previous work, by also examining the effect of icing tunnel spray-bar parameter variations (water pressure, air pressure) on ice shape feature changes. The approach was to vary spray-bar water pressure and air pressure, and then evaluate the effects of these parameter changes on the resulting ice shapes. This paper will provide a description of the experimental method, present selected experimental results, and conclude with an evaluation of these results.

  12. Aleatoric and epistemic uncertainties in sampling based nuclear data uncertainty and sensitivity analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Zwermann, W.; Krzykacz-Hausmann, B.; Gallner, L.; Klein, M.; Pautz, A.; Velkov, K.

    2012-07-01

    Sampling based uncertainty and sensitivity analyses due to epistemic input uncertainties, i.e. to an incomplete knowledge of uncertain input parameters, can be performed with arbitrary application programs to solve the physical problem under consideration. For the description of steady-state particle transport, direct simulations of the microscopic processes with Monte Carlo codes are often used. This introduces an additional source of uncertainty, the aleatoric sampling uncertainty, which is due to the randomness of the simulation process performed by sampling, and which adds to the total combined output sampling uncertainty. So far, this aleatoric part of uncertainty is minimized by running a sufficiently large number of Monte Carlo histories for each sample calculation, thus making its impact negligible as compared to the impact from sampling the epistemic uncertainties. Obviously, this process may cause high computational costs. The present paper shows that in many applications reliable epistemic uncertainty results can also be obtained with substantially lower computational effort by performing and analyzing two appropriately generated series of samples with much smaller number of Monte Carlo histories each. The method is applied along with the nuclear data uncertainty and sensitivity code package XSUSA in combination with the Monte Carlo transport code KENO-Va to various critical assemblies and a full scale reactor calculation. It is shown that the proposed method yields output uncertainties and sensitivities equivalent to the traditional approach, with a high reduction of computing time by factors of the magnitude of 100. (authors)

  13. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  14. Ground water flow modeling with sensitivity analyses to guide field data collection in a mountain watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Raymond H.

    2007-01-01

    In mountain watersheds, the increased demand for clean water resources has led to an increased need for an understanding of ground water flow in alpine settings. In Prospect Gulch, located in southwestern Colorado, understanding the ground water flow system is an important first step in addressing metal loads from acid-mine drainage and acid-rock drainage in an area with historical mining. Ground water flow modeling with sensitivity analyses are presented as a general tool to guide future field data collection, which is applicable to any ground water study, including mountain watersheds. For a series of conceptual models, the observation and sensitivity capabilities of MODFLOW-2000 are used to determine composite scaled sensitivities, dimensionless scaled sensitivities, and 1% scaled sensitivity maps of hydraulic head. These sensitivities determine the most important input parameter(s) along with the location of observation data that are most useful for future model calibration. The results are generally independent of the conceptual model and indicate recharge in a high-elevation recharge zone as the most important parameter, followed by the hydraulic conductivities in all layers and recharge in the next lower-elevation zone. The most important observation data in determining these parameters are hydraulic heads at high elevations, with a depth of less than 100 m being adequate. Evaluation of a possible geologic structure with a different hydraulic conductivity than the surrounding bedrock indicates that ground water discharge to individual stream reaches has the potential to identify some of these structures. Results of these sensitivity analyses can be used to prioritize data collection in an effort to reduce time and money spend by collecting the most relevant model calibration data.

  15. Convection sensitivity and thermal analyses for indium and indium-lead mixing experiment (74-18)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, S. V.; Doty, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Sounding rocket Experiment 74-18 was designed to demonstrate the effects of the Black Brandt rocket acceleration levels (during the low-g coast phase of its flight) on the motion of a liquid metal system to assist in preflight design. Some post flight analyses were also conducted. Preflight studies consisted of heat transfer analysis and convection sensitivity and convection modeling analyses which aided in the: (1) final selection of fluid materials (indium-lead melts rather than paraffins); (2) design and timing of heater and quench system; and (3) preflight predictions of the degree of lead penetration into the pure indium segment of the fluid. Postflight studies involved: (1) updating the convection sensitivity calculations by utilizing actual flight gravity levels; and (2) modeling the mixing in the flight samples.

  16. Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts.

    SciTech Connect

    Sevougian, S. David; Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Gardner, William Payton; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Mariner, Paul

    2014-09-01

    directly, rather than through simplified abstractions. It also a llows for complex representations of the source term, e.g., the explicit representation of many individual waste packages (i.e., meter - scale detail of an entire waste emplacement drift). This report fulfills the Generic Disposal System Analysis Work Packa ge Level 3 Milestone - Performance Assessment Modeling and Sensitivity Analyses of Generic Disposal System Concepts (M 3 FT - 1 4 SN08080 3 2 ).

  17. Visualization tools for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses on thermal-hydraulic transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelin, Anne-Laure; Iooss, Bertrand

    2014-06-01

    In nuclear engineering studies, uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of simulation computer codes can be faced to the complexity of the input and/or the output variables. If these variables represent a transient or a spatial phenomenon, the difficulty is to provide tool adapted to their functional nature. In this paper, we describe useful visualization tools in the context of uncertainty analysis of model transient outputs. Our application involves thermal-hydraulic computations for safety studies of nuclear pressurized water reactors.

  18. Criticality Safety and Sensitivity Analyses of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Repository Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Maucec, Marko; Glumac, Bogdan

    2005-01-15

    Monte Carlo criticality safety and sensitivity calculations of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel repository facilities for the Slovenian nuclear power plant Krsko are presented. The MCNP4C code was deployed to model and assess the neutron multiplication parameters of pool-based storage and dry transport containers under various loading patterns and moderating conditions. To comply with standard safety requirements, fresh 4.25% enriched nuclear fuel was assumed. The impact of potential optimum moderation due to water steam or foam formation as well as of different interpretations, of neutron multiplication through varying the system boundary conditions was elaborated. The simulations indicate that in the case of compact (all rack locations filled with fresh fuel) single or 'double tiering' loading, the supercriticality can occur under the conditions of enhanced neutron moderation, due to accidentally reduced density of cooling water. Under standard operational conditions the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of pool-based storage facility remains below the specified safety limit of 0.95. The nuclear safety requirements are fulfilled even when the fuel elements are arranged at a minimal distance, which can be initiated, for example, by an earthquake. The dry container in its recommended loading scheme with 26 fuel elements represents a safe alternative for the repository of fresh fuel. Even in the case of complete water flooding, the k{sub eff} remains below the specified safety level of 0.98. The criticality safety limit may however be exceeded with larger amounts of loaded fuel assemblies (i.e., 32). Additional Monte Carlo criticality safety analyses are scheduled to consider the 'burnup credit' of PWR spent nuclear fuel, based on the ongoing calculation of typical burnup activities.

  19. Sobol method application in dimensional sensitivity analyses of different AFM cantilevers for biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, M. H.; Taheri, M.; Ghahnaviyeh, S. D.

    2015-08-01

    Due to the more delicate nature of biological micro/nanoparticles, it is necessary to compute the critical force of manipulation. The modeling and simulation of reactions and nanomanipulator dynamics in a precise manipulation process require an exact modeling of cantilevers stiffness, especially the stiffness of dagger cantilevers because the previous model is not useful for this investigation. The stiffness values for V-shaped cantilevers can be obtained through several methods. One of them is the PBA method. In another approach, the cantilever is divided into two sections: a triangular head section and two slanted rectangular beams. Then, deformations along different directions are computed and used to obtain the stiffness values in different directions. The stiffness formulations of dagger cantilever are needed for this sensitivity analyses so the formulations have been driven first and then sensitivity analyses has been started. In examining the stiffness of the dagger-shaped cantilever, the micro-beam has been divided into two triangular and rectangular sections and by computing the displacements along different directions and using the existing relations, the stiffness values for dagger cantilever have been obtained. In this paper, after investigating the stiffness of common types of cantilevers, Sobol sensitivity analyses of the effects of various geometric parameters on the stiffness of these types of cantilevers have been carried out. Also, the effects of different cantilevers on the dynamic behavior of nanoparticles have been studied and the dagger-shaped cantilever has been deemed more suitable for the manipulation of biological particles.

  20. Using Additional Analyses to Clarify the Functions of Problem Behavior: An Analysis of Two Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Steven W.; Dozier, Claudia L.; Neidert, Pamela L.; Jowett, Erica S.; Newquist, Matthew H.

    2014-01-01

    Functional analyses (FA) have proven useful for identifying contingencies that influence problem behavior. Research has shown that some problem behavior may only occur in specific contexts or be influenced by multiple or idiosyncratic variables. When these contexts or sources of influence are not assessed in an FA, further assessment may be…

  1. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  2. Effect of basic additives on sensitivity and diffusion of acid in chemical amplification resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Koji; Ushirogouchi, Tohru; Nakase, Makoto

    1995-06-01

    The effect of amine additives in chemical amplification resists is discussed. Phenolic amines such as 4-aminophenol and 2-(4-aminophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane were investigated as model compounds from the viewpoint of sensitivity, diffusion and resolution. Equal molar amounts of acid and amine deactivated at the very beginning of post-exposure bake, and could not participate in decomposing the inhibitor as a catalyst. Only the acid which survived from the deactivation diffuses in the resist, decomposing the inhibitors from the middle to late stage of PEB. The basic additives reduce the diffusion range of the acid, especially for long-range diffusion, resulting in higher contrast at the interfaces between the exposed and unexposed areas. In addition, the amine concentration required is found to be less than the concentration which causes the resist sensitivity to start decreasing.

  3. Sensitivity Tuning through Additive Heterogeneous Plasmon Coupling between 3D Assembled Plasmonic Nanoparticle and Nanocup Arrays.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sujin; Zhou, Xiangfei; Liu, Gang Logan

    2016-07-01

    Plasmonic substrates have fixed sensitivity once the geometry of the structure is defined. In order to improve the sensitivity, significant research effort has been focused on designing new plasmonic structures, which involves high fabrication costs; however, a method is reported for improving sensitivity not by redesigning the structure but by simply assembling plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) near the evanescent field of the underlying 3D plasmonic nanostructure. Here, a nanoscale Lycurgus cup array (nanoLCA) is employed as a base colorimetric plasmonic substrate and an assembly template. Compared to the nanoLCA, the NP assembled nanoLCA (NP-nanoLCA) exhibits much higher sensitivity for both bulk refractive index sensing and biotin-streptavidin binding detection. The limit of detection of the NP-nanoLCA is at least ten times smaller when detecting biotin-streptavidin conjugation. The numerical calculations confirm the importance of the additive plasmon coupling between the NPs and the nanoLCA for a denser and stronger electric field in the same 3D volumetric space. Tunable sensitivity is accomplished by controlling the number of NPs in each nanocup, or the number density of the hot spots. This simple yet scalable and cost-effective method of using additive heterogeneous plasmon coupling effects will benefit various chemical, medical, and environmental plasmon-based sensors. PMID:27206214

  4. Enhanced photovoltaic properties of modified redox electrolyte in dye-sensitized solar cells using tributyl phosphate as additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrooz, Malihe; Dehghani, Hossein

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we report the influence of a phosphate additive on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on 2-cyano-3-(4-(diphenylamino)phenyl)acrylic acid (TPA) as sensitizer. The DSSCs are fabricated by incorporating tributyl phosphate (TBPP) as an additive in the electrolyte and is attained an efficiency of about 3.03% under standard air mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) simulated sunlight, corresponding to 35% efficiency increment compare to the standard liquid electrolyte. An improvement in both open circuit voltage (Voc) and short circuit current (Jsc) obtains by adjusting the concentration of TBPP in the electrolyte, which attributes to enlarge energy difference between the Fermi level (EF) of TiO2 and the redox potential of electrolyte and suppression of charge recombination from the conduction band (CB) of TiO2 to the oxidized ions in the redox electrolyte. Electrochemical impedance analyses (EIS) reveals a dramatic increase in charge transfer resistance at the dyed-TiO2/electrolyte interface and the electron density in the CB of TiO2 that the more prominent photoelectric conversion efficiency (η) improvement with TBPP additive results by the efficient inhibition of recombination processes. This striking result leads to use a family of electron donor groups in many compounds as highly efficient additive.

  5. Metagenomic analyses of the late Pleistocene permafrost - additional tools for reconstruction of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkina, Elizaveta; Petrovskaya, Lada; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Krivushin, Kirill; Shmakova, Lyubov; Tutukina, Maria; Meyers, Arthur; Kondrashov, Fyodor

    2016-04-01

    A comparative analysis of the metagenomes from two 30 000-year-old permafrost samples, one of lake-alluvial origin and the other from late Pleistocene Ice Complex sediments, revealed significant differences within microbial communities. The late Pleistocene Ice Complex sediments (which have been characterized by the absence of methane with lower values of redox potential and Fe2+ content) showed a low abundance of methanogenic archaea and enzymes from both the carbon and nitrogen cycles, but a higher abundance of enzymes associated with the sulfur cycle. The metagenomic and geochemical analyses described in the paper provide evidence that the formation of the sampled late Pleistocene Ice Complex sediments likely took place under much more aerobic conditions than lake-alluvial sediments.

  6. Influence of electrolyte co-additives on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergiopoulos, Thomas; Rozi, Evangelia; Karagianni, Chaido-Stefania; Falaras, Polycarpos

    2011-12-01

    The presence of specific chemical additives in the redox electrolyte results in an efficient increase of the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The most effective additives are 4- tert-butylpyridine (TBP), N-methylbenzimidazole (NMBI) and guanidinium thiocyanate (GuNCS) that are adsorbed onto the photoelectrode/electrolyte interface, thus shifting the semiconductor's conduction band edge and preventing recombination with triiodides. In a comparative work, we investigated in detail the action of TBP and NMBI additives in ionic liquid-based redox electrolytes with varying iodine concentrations, in order to extract the optimum additive/I2 ratio for each system. Different optimum additive/I2 ratios were determined for TBP and NMBI, despite the fact that both generally work in a similar way. Further addition of GuNCS in the optimized electrolytic media causes significant synergistic effects, the action of GuNCS being strongly influenced by the nature of the corresponding co-additive. Under the best operation conditions, power conversion efficiencies as high as 8% were obtained.

  7. Additional Development and Systems Analyses of Pneumatic Technology for High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.; Willie, F. Scott; Lee, Warren J.

    1999-01-01

    In the Task I portion of this NASA research grant, configuration development and experimental investigations have been conducted on a series of pneumatic high-lift and control surface devices applied to a generic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) model configuration to determine their potential for improved aerodynamic performance, plus stability and control of higher performance aircraft. These investigations were intended to optimize pneumatic lift and drag performance; provide adequate control and longitudinal stability; reduce separation flowfields at high angle of attack; increase takeoff/climbout lift-to-drag ratios; and reduce system complexity and weight. Experimental aerodynamic evaluations were performed on a semi-span HSCT generic model with improved fuselage fineness ratio and with interchangeable plain flaps, blown flaps, pneumatic Circulation Control Wing (CCW) high-lift configurations, plain and blown canards, a novel Circulation Control (CC) cylinder blown canard, and a clean cruise wing for reference. Conventional tail power was also investigated for longitudinal trim capability. Also evaluated was unsteady pulsed blowing of the wing high-lift system to determine if reduced pulsed mass flow rates and blowing requirements could be made to yield the same lift as that resulting from steady-state blowing. Depending on the pulsing frequency applied, reduced mass flow rates were indeed found able to provide lift augmentation at lesser blowing values than for the steady conditions. Significant improvements in the aerodynamic characteristics leading to improved performance and stability/control were identified, and the various components were compared to evaluate the pneumatic potential of each. Aerodynamic results were provided to the Georgia Tech Aerospace System Design Lab. to conduct the companion system analyses and feasibility study (Task 2) of theses concepts applied to an operational advanced HSCT aircraft. Results and conclusions from these

  8. An experiment in software reliability: Additional analyses using data from automated replications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, Janet R.; Lauterbach, Linda A.

    1988-01-01

    A study undertaken to collect software error data of laboratory quality for use in the development of credible methods for predicting the reliability of software used in life-critical applications is summarized. The software error data reported were acquired through automated repetitive run testing of three independent implementations of a launch interceptor condition module of a radar tracking problem. The results are based on 100 test applications to accumulate a sufficient sample size for error rate estimation. The data collected is used to confirm the results of two Boeing studies reported in NASA-CR-165836 Software Reliability: Repetitive Run Experimentation and Modeling, and NASA-CR-172378 Software Reliability: Additional Investigations into Modeling With Replicated Experiments, respectively. That is, the results confirm the log-linear pattern of software error rates and reject the hypothesis of equal error rates per individual fault. This rejection casts doubt on the assumption that the program's failure rate is a constant multiple of the number of residual bugs; an assumption which underlies some of the current models of software reliability. data raises new questions concerning the phenomenon of interacting faults.

  9. Reprocessing the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) Database for Long-Term Trend Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, J. C.; Thompson, A. M.; Coetzee, G.; Fujiwara, M.; Johnson, B. J.; Sterling, C. W.; Cullis, P.; Ashburn, C. E.; Jordan, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    SHADOZ is a large archive of tropical balloon-bone ozonesonde data at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center with data from 14 tropical and subtropical stations provided by collaborators in Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa . The SHADOZ time series began in 1998, using electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes. Like many long-term sounding stations, SHADOZ is characterized by variations in operating procedures, launch protocols, and data processing such that biases within a data record and among sites appear. In addition, over time, the radiosonde and ozonesonde instruments and data processing protocols have changed, adding to the measurement uncertainties at individual stations and limiting the reliability of ozone profile trends and continuous satellite validation. Currently, the ozonesonde community is engaged in reprocessing ECC data, with an emphasis on homogenization of the records to compensate for the variations in instrumentation and technique. The goals are to improve the information and integrity of each measurement record and to support calculation of more reliable trends. We illustrate the reprocessing activity of SHADOZ with selected stations. We will (1) show reprocessing steps based on the recent WMO report that provides post-processing guidelines for ozonesondes; (2) characterize uncertainties in various parts of the ECC conditioning process; and (3) compare original and reprocessed data to co-located ground and satellite measurements of column ozone.

  10. Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratios: Sensitivity Analyses on the Impact of Coding

    PubMed Central

    Bottle, Alex; Jarman, Brian; Aylin, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hospital standardized mortality ratios (HSMRs) are derived from administrative databases and cover 80 percent of in-hospital deaths with adjustment for available case mix variables. They have been criticized for being sensitive to issues such as clinical coding but on the basis of limited quantitative evidence. Methods In a set of sensitivity analyses, we compared regular HSMRs with HSMRs resulting from a variety of changes, such as a patient-based measure, not adjusting for comorbidity, not adjusting for palliative care, excluding unplanned zero-day stays ending in live discharge, and using more or fewer diagnoses. Results Overall, regular and variant HSMRs were highly correlated (ρ > 0.8), but differences of up to 10 points were common. Two hospitals were particularly affected when palliative care was excluded from the risk models. Excluding unplanned stays ending in same-day live discharge had the least impact despite their high frequency. The largest impacts were seen when capturing postdischarge deaths and using just five high-mortality diagnosis groups. Conclusions HSMRs in most hospitals changed by only small amounts from the various adjustment methods tried here, though small-to-medium changes were not uncommon. However, the position relative to funnel plot control limits could move in a significant minority even with modest changes in the HSMR. PMID:21790587

  11. Sensitivity and first-step uncertainty analyses for the preferential flow model MACRO.

    PubMed

    Dubus, Igor G; Brown, Colin D

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses for the preferential flow model MACRO were carried out using one-at-a-time and Monte Carlo sampling approaches. Four different scenarios were generated by simulating leaching to depth of two hypothetical pesticides in a sandy loam and a more structured clay loam soil. Sensitivity of the model was assessed using the predictions for accumulated water percolated at a 1-m depth and accumulated pesticide losses in percolation. Results for simulated percolation were similar for the two soils. Predictions of water volumes percolated were found to be only marginally affected by changes in input parameters and the most influential parameter was the water content defining the boundary between micropores and macropores in this dual-porosity model. In contrast, predictions of pesticide losses were found to be dependent on the scenarios considered and to be significantly affected by variations in input parameters. In most scenarios, predictions for pesticide losses by MACRO were most influenced by parameters related to sorption and degradation. Under specific circumstances, pesticide losses can be largely affected by changes in hydrological properties of the soil. Since parameters were varied within ranges that approximated their uncertainty, a first-step assessment of uncertainty for the predictions of pesticide losses was possible. Large uncertainties in the predictions were reported, although these are likely to have been overestimated by considering a large number of input parameters in the exercise. It appears desirable that a probabilistic framework accounting for uncertainty is integrated into the estimation of pesticide exposure for regulatory purposes. PMID:11837426

  12. Sensitivity analyses of a colloid-facilitated contaminant transport model for unsaturated heterogeneous soil conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Périard, Yann; José Gumiere, Silvio; Rousseau, Alain N.; Caron, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Certain contaminants may travel faster through soils when they are sorbed to subsurface colloidal particles. Indeed, subsurface colloids may act as carriers of some contaminants accelerating their translocation through the soil into the water table. This phenomenon is known as colloid-facilitated contaminant transport. It plays a significant role in contaminant transport in soils and has been recognized as a source of groundwater contamination. From a mechanistic point of view, the attachment/detachment of the colloidal particles from the soil matrix or from the air-water interface and the straining process may modify the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Šimůnek et al. (2006) developed a model that can simulate the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media. The model is based on the solution of a modified advection-dispersion equation that accounts for several processes, namely: straining, exclusion and attachement/detachement kinetics of colloids through the soil matrix. The solutions of these governing, partial differential equations are obtained using a standard Galerkin-type, linear finite element scheme, implemented in the HYDRUS-2D/3D software (Šimůnek et al., 2012). Modeling colloid transport through the soil and the interaction of colloids with the soil matrix and other contaminants is complex and requires the characterization of many model parameters. In practice, it is very difficult to assess actual transport parameter values, so they are often calibrated. However, before calibration, one needs to know which parameters have the greatest impact on output variables. This kind of information can be obtained through a sensitivity analysis of the model. The main objective of this work is to perform local and global sensitivity analyses of the colloid-facilitated contaminant transport module of HYDRUS. Sensitivity analysis was performed in two steps: (i) we applied a screening method based on Morris' elementary

  13. Additives and salts for dye-sensitized solar cells electrolytes: what is the best choice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, Federico; Sacco, Adriano; Pugliese, Diego; Laurenti, Marco; Bianco, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    A multivariate chemometric approach is proposed for the first time for performance optimization of I-/I3- liquid electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Over the years the system composed by iodide/triiodide redox shuttle dissolved in organic solvent has been enriched with the addition of different specific cations and chemical compounds to improve the photoelectrochemical behavior of the cell. However, usually such additives act favorably with respect to some of the cell parameters and negatively to others. Moreover, the combined action of different compounds often yields contradictory results, and from the literature it is not possible to identify an optimal recipe. We report here a systematic work, based on a multivariate experimental design, to statistically and quantitatively evaluate the effect of different additives on the photovoltaic performances of the device. The effect of cation size in iodine salts, the iodine/iodide ratio in the electrolyte and the effect of type and concentration of additives are mutually evaluated by means of a Design of Experiment (DoE) approach. Through this statistical method, the optimization of the overall parameters is demonstrated with a limited number of experimental trials. A 25% improvement on the photovoltaic conversion efficiency compared with that obtained with a commercial electrolyte is demonstrated.

  14. Accounting for management costs in sensitivity analyses of matrix population models.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Peter W J; McCarthy, Michael A; Possingham, Hugh P; Menkhorst, Peter W; McLean, Natasha

    2006-06-01

    Traditional sensitivity and elasticity analyses of matrix population models have been used to inform management decisions, but they ignore the economic costs of manipulating vital rates. For example, the growth rate of a population is often most sensitive to changes in adult survival rate, but this does not mean that increasing that rate is the best option for managing the population because it may be much more expensive than other options. To explore how managers should optimize their manipulation of vital rates, we incorporated the cost of changing those rates into matrix population models. We derived analytic expressions for locations in parameter space where managers should shift between management of fecundity and survival, for the balance between fecundity and survival management at those boundaries, and for the allocation of management resources to sustain that optimal balance. For simple matrices, the optimal budget allocation can often be expressed as simple functions of vital rates and the relative costs of changing them. We applied our method to management of the Helmeted Honeyeater (Lichenostomus melanops cassidix; an endangered Australian bird) and the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) as examples. Our method showed that cost-efficient management of the Helmeted Honeyeater should focus on increasing fecundity via nest protection, whereas optimal koala management should focus on manipulating both fecundity and survival simultaneously. These findings are contrary to the cost-negligent recommendations of elasticity analysis, which would suggest focusing on managing survival in both cases. A further investigation of Helmeted Honeyeater management options, based on an individual-based model incorporating density dependence, spatial structure, and environmental stochasticity, confirmed that fecundity management was the most cost-effective strategy. Our results demonstrate that decisions that ignore economic factors will reduce management efficiency. PMID

  15. Incorporating uncertainty of management costs in sensitivity analyses of matrix population models.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Yacov; McCarthy, Michael A; Taylor, Peter; Wintle, Brendan A

    2013-02-01

    The importance of accounting for economic costs when making environmental-management decisions subject to resource constraints has been increasingly recognized in recent years. In contrast, uncertainty associated with such costs has often been ignored. We developed a method, on the basis of economic theory, that accounts for the uncertainty in population-management decisions. We considered the case where, rather than taking fixed values, model parameters are random variables that represent the situation when parameters are not precisely known. Hence, the outcome is not precisely known either. Instead of maximizing the expected outcome, we maximized the probability of obtaining an outcome above a threshold of acceptability. We derived explicit analytical expressions for the optimal allocation and its associated probability, as a function of the threshold of acceptability, where the model parameters were distributed according to normal and uniform distributions. To illustrate our approach we revisited a previous study that incorporated cost-efficiency analyses in management decisions that were based on perturbation analyses of matrix population models. Incorporating derivations from this study into our framework, we extended the model to address potential uncertainties. We then applied these results to 2 case studies: management of a Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) population and conservation of an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) population. For low aspirations, that is, when the threshold of acceptability is relatively low, the optimal strategy was obtained by diversifying the allocation of funds. Conversely, for high aspirations, the budget was directed toward management actions with the highest potential effect on the population. The exact optimal allocation was sensitive to the choice of uncertainty model. Our results highlight the importance of accounting for uncertainty when making decisions and suggest that more effort should be placed on

  16. LCF on turbogenerator rotors and coil retaining rings: material characterization and sensitivity analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, G.; Freddi, A.

    2010-06-01

    Turbogenerator rotors and coil retaining rings (CRRs) are highly loaded components typically subjected to LCF at any machine switch-on and switch-off. The present study aims at LCF characterization of two widely applied steels, 26 NiCrMoV 14 5 (for rotor manufacturing) and 18Mn18Cr (for CRR). Material anisotropy is also considered by performing an extended experimental campaign on specimens machined along different (tangential and radial) directions from trial components. The experimental tests, carried out with the use of a novel testing-constraining device for misalignment auto-compensation and with an original methodology for strain controlling, led to the determination of static, cyclic and fatigue curves for all the investigated cases. The research was completed by sensitivity analyses on the adopted models, thus determining fatigue curve tolerance bands, and by a statistical Analysis of Variance to compare the LCF performance of the different materials along the two considered machining directions. Results showed a significantly better performance of 18Mn18Cr and a weak anisotropy effect, remarkable just at the highest strain values, on a reduced portion of the LCF life range.

  17. Water sensitivity, antimicrobial, and physicochemical analyses of edible films based on HPMC and/or chitosan.

    PubMed

    Sebti, Issam; Chollet, Emilie; Degraeve, Pascal; Noel, Claude; Peyrol, Eric

    2007-02-01

    Several properties of chitosan films associated or not with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose polymer (HPMC) and HPMC films incorporating or not nisin and/or milk fat were studied. Nisin addition at a level of 250 microg mL-1 and likewise chitosan at 1% (w/v) concentration were efficient for total inhibiting Aspergillus niger and Kocuria rhizophila food deterioration microorganisms. HPMC and chitosan films were transparent, whereas nisin and/or fat incorporation induced a 2-fold lightness parameter increase and, consequently, involved more white films. Measurements of tensile strength, as well as ultimate elongation, showed that chitosan and HPMC initial films were elastic and flexible. High thermal treatments and additive incorporation induced less elastic and more plastic films. Water vapor transmission as far as total water desorption rates suggested that chitosan films were slightly sensitive to water. Water transfer was decreased by <60% as compared with other biopolymer films. Regarding its hydrophobic property, the capacity of fat to improve film water barrier was very limited. PMID:17263462

  18. Parameterization and sensitivity analyses of a radiative transfer model for remote sensing plant canopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Carlton Raden

    A major objective of remote sensing is determination of biochemical and biophysical characteristics of plant canopies utilizing high spectral resolution sensors. Canopy reflectance signatures are dependent on absorption and scattering processes of the leaf, canopy properties, and the ground beneath the canopy. This research investigates, through field and laboratory data collection, and computer model parameterization and simulations, the relationships between leaf optical properties, canopy biophysical features, and the nadir viewed above-canopy reflectance signature. Emphasis is placed on parameterization and application of an existing irradiance radiative transfer model developed for aquatic systems. Data and model analyses provide knowledge on the relative importance of leaves and canopy biophysical features in estimating the diffuse absorption a(lambda,m-1), diffuse backscatter b(lambda,m-1), beam attenuation alpha(lambda,m-1), and beam to diffuse conversion c(lambda,m-1 ) coefficients of the two-flow irradiance model. Data sets include field and laboratory measurements from three plant species, live oak (Quercus virginiana), Brazilian pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) sampled on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and Kennedy Space Center Florida in March and April of 1997. Features measured were depth h (m), projected foliage coverage PFC, leaf area index LAI, and zenith leaf angle. Optical measurements, collected with a Spectron SE 590 high sensitivity narrow bandwidth spectrograph, included above canopy reflectance, internal canopy transmittance and reflectance and bottom reflectance. Leaf samples were returned to laboratory where optical and physical and chemical measurements of leaf thickness, leaf area, leaf moisture and pigment content were made. A new term, the leaf volume correction index LVCI was developed and demonstrated in support of model coefficient parameterization. The LVCI is based on angle adjusted leaf

  19. Pre-study feasibility and identifying sensitivity analyses for protocol pre-specification in comparative effectiveness research.

    PubMed

    Girman, Cynthia J; Faries, Douglas; Ryan, Patrick; Rotelli, Matt; Belger, Mark; Binkowitz, Bruce; O'Neill, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The use of healthcare databases for comparative effectiveness research (CER) is increasing exponentially despite its challenges. Researchers must understand their data source and whether outcomes, exposures and confounding factors are captured sufficiently to address the research question. They must also assess whether bias and confounding can be adequately minimized. Many study design characteristics may impact on the results; however, minimal if any sensitivity analyses are typically conducted, and those performed are post hoc. We propose pre-study steps for CER feasibility assessment and to identify sensitivity analyses that might be most important to pre-specify to help ensure that CER produces valid interpretable results. PMID:24969153

  20. Carbon flux from plants to soil microbes is highly sensitive to nitrogen addition and biochar amendment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, C.; Solaiman, Z. M.; Kilburn, M. R.; Clode, P. L.; Fuchslueger, L.; Koranda, M.; Murphy, D. V.

    2012-04-01

    The release of carbon through plant roots to the soil has been recognized as a governing factor for soil microbial community composition and decomposition processes, constituting an important control for ecosystem biogeochemical cycles. Moreover, there is increasing awareness that the flux of recently assimilated carbon from plants to the soil may regulate ecosystem response to environmental change, as the rate of the plant-soil carbon transfer will likely be affected by increased plant C assimilation caused by increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. What has received less attention so far is how sensitive the plant-soil C transfer would be to possible regulations coming from belowground, such as soil N addition or microbial community changes resulting from anthropogenic inputs such as biochar amendments. In this study we investigated the size, rate and sensitivity of the transfer of recently assimilated plant C through the root-soil-mycorrhiza-microbial continuum. Wheat plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were grown in split-boxes which were filled either with soil or a soil-biochar mixture. Each split-box consisted of two compartments separated by a membrane which was penetrable for mycorrhizal hyphae but not for roots. Wheat plants were only grown in one compartment while the other compartment served as an extended soil volume which was only accessible by mycorrhizal hyphae associated with the plant roots. After plants were grown for four weeks we used a double-labeling approach with 13C and 15N in order to investigate interactions between C and N flows in the plant-soil-microorganism system. Plants were subjected to an enriched 13CO2 atmosphere for 8 hours during which 15NH4 was added to a subset of split-boxes to either the root-containing or the root-free compartment. Both, 13C and 15N fluxes through the plant-soil continuum were monitored over 24 hours by stable isotope methods (13C phospho-lipid fatty acids by GC-IRMS, 15N/13C in bulk plant

  1. Jerusalem artichoke and chungkookjang additively improve insulin secretion and sensitivity in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Kim, Da Sol; Park, Sunmin

    2012-01-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus Linne, HTL) and chungkookjang (CKJ; fermented soybeans) both modulate energy and glucose metabolism. However, the mechanism and their additive effects are unknown. We investigated whether the consumption of HTL and CKJ altered insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion capacity and β-cell survival in type 2 diabetic animals. Rats were divided into partially pancreatectomized (Px) diabetic rats, and sham operated non-diabetic control rats and all fed high fat diets. Diabetic rats were sub-divided into an untreated diabetic control group and those fed 5% HTL, 5% CKJ or 5% HTL+5% CKJ for 8 weeks. HTL+CKJ treatment reduced visceral fat without modulating energy intake compared to the diabetic-control. Glucose tolerance was improved in an ascending order of diabetic-control, CKJ, HTL, HTL+CKJ, and normal-control, but by different mechanisms. CKJ and CKJ+HTL, but not HTL, increased first and second phase insulin secretion in comparison to the diabetic-control at hyperglycemic clamp. However, glucose infusion rates (mg/kg bw/min) were increased by and CKJ+HTL (13.5), but not HTL (9.4) or CKJ (9.5) alone, and HTL and CKJ+ HTL decreased hepatic glucose compared to diabetic-control during the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic study and were associated with decreased triglyceride accumulation and increased glycogen storage. The improved hepatic insulin sensitivity by HTL and CKJ+HTL was explained by potentiated insulin signaling (tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 2→phosphorylation of Akt) and phosphorylation of AMPK→phosphorykation of acetyl Co carboxlase in comparison to diabetic-control and decreased PEPCK expression. Absolute β-cell mass was increased by CKJ (23.4mg) and CKJ+HTL (26.3 mg) by increasing proliferation compared to the diabetic-control (21.26 mg). Although HTL lowered β-cell apoptosis, it did not increase β-cell mass (20.8 mg). In conclusions, HTL and CKJ enhanced glucose tolerance in different

  2. Jerusalem artichoke and chungkookjang additively improve insulin secretion and sensitivity in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus Linne, HTL) and chungkookjang (CKJ; fermented soybeans) both modulate energy and glucose metabolism. However, the mechanism and their additive effects are unknown. We investigated whether the consumption of HTL and CKJ altered insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion capacity and β-cell survival in type 2 diabetic animals. Rats were divided into partially pancreatectomized (Px) diabetic rats, and sham operated non-diabetic control rats and all fed high fat diets. Diabetic rats were sub-divided into an untreated diabetic control group and those fed 5% HTL, 5% CKJ or 5% HTL+5% CKJ for 8 weeks. HTL+CKJ treatment reduced visceral fat without modulating energy intake compared to the diabetic-control. Glucose tolerance was improved in an ascending order of diabetic-control, CKJ, HTL, HTL+CKJ, and normal-control, but by different mechanisms. CKJ and CKJ+HTL, but not HTL, increased first and second phase insulin secretion in comparison to the diabetic-control at hyperglycemic clamp. However, glucose infusion rates (mg/kg bw/min) were increased by and CKJ+HTL (13.5), but not HTL (9.4) or CKJ (9.5) alone, and HTL and CKJ+ HTL decreased hepatic glucose compared to diabetic-control during the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic study and were associated with decreased triglyceride accumulation and increased glycogen storage. The improved hepatic insulin sensitivity by HTL and CKJ+HTL was explained by potentiated insulin signaling (tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 2→phosphorylation of Akt) and phosphorylation of AMPK→phosphorykation of acetyl Co carboxlase in comparison to diabetic-control and decreased PEPCK expression. Absolute β-cell mass was increased by CKJ (23.4mg) and CKJ+HTL (26.3 mg) by increasing proliferation compared to the diabetic-control (21.26 mg). Although HTL lowered β-cell apoptosis, it did not increase β-cell mass (20.8 mg). In conclusions, HTL and CKJ enhanced glucose tolerance in different

  3. Additive toxicity of herbicide mixtures and comparative sensitivity of tropical benthic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Marie; Heimann, Kirsten; Quayle, Pamela; Negri, Andrew P

    2010-11-01

    Natural waters often contain complex mixtures of unknown contaminants potentially posing a threat to marine communities through chemical interactions. Here, acute effects of the photosystem II-inhibiting herbicides diuron, tebuthiuron, atrazine, simazine, and hexazinone, herbicide breakdown products (desethyl-atrazine (DEA) and 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA)) and binary mixtures, were investigated using three tropical benthic microalgae; Navicula sp. and Cylindrotheca closterium (Ochrophyta) and Nephroselmis pyriformis (Chlorophyta), and one standard test species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Ochrophyta), in a high-throughput Maxi-Imaging-PAM bioassay (Maxi-IPAM). The order of toxicity was; diuron > hexazinone > tebuthiuron > atrazine > simazine > DEA > 3,4-DCA for all species. The tropical green alga N. pyriformis was up to 10-fold more sensitive than the diatoms tested here and reported for coral symbionts, and is recommended as a standard tropical test species for future research. All binary mixtures exhibited additive toxicity, and the use of herbicide equivalents (HEq) is therefore recommended in order to incorporate total-maximum-load measures for environmental regulatory purposes. PMID:20800855

  4. A 4D-Var CO2 inversion system with NICAM-TM: development and sensitivity analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Y.; Fujii, Y.; Sawa, Y.; Ito, A.; Iida, Y.; Tomita, H.; Masaki, S.; Imasu, R.; Matsuda, H.; Machida, T.; Saigusa, N.

    2014-12-01

    Our understanding of the global carbon cycle and its feedback mechanism to climate changes is limited due to high uncertainties in estimates of regional CO2 fluxes at the earth surface. Recently, a large amount of CO2 concentration data are becoming available from high-frequency aircraft measurements (e.g., CONTRAIL) and satellite measurements (e.g., GOSAT and OCO-2), in addition to expansion of surface measurement networks. To exploit those observational data, a new inversion system has been developed with the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) method. The system is based on Nonhydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model-based Transport Model (NICAM-TM), which consists of forward and adjoint transport modes. For the a priori fluxes at terrestrial biospheres and oceans, CO2 flux data from Vegetation Integrative SImulator for Trace Gases (VISIT) and the diagnostic model of Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) are respectively used. In the iterative calculation, the quasi-Newton method of Preconditioned Optimizing Utility for Large-dimensional analyses (POpULar) is used. In this study, we present the structure of the newly developed system and performances for CO2 flux estimates in ideal twin experiments. By the twin experiments, sensitivities to prior error covariance, numerical algorithms, and observational networks are investigated. Acknowledgment: This study is supported by the Environment Research and Technology Development Fund (2-1401) of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan.

  5. Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Skypala, Isabel J; Williams, M; Reeves, L; Meyer, R; Venter, C

    2015-01-01

    Although there is considerable literature pertaining to IgE and non IgE-mediated food allergy, there is a paucity of information on non-immune mediated reactions to foods, other than metabolic disorders such as lactose intolerance. Food additives and naturally occurring 'food chemicals' have long been reported as having the potential to provoke symptoms in those who are more sensitive to their effects. Diets low in 'food chemicals' gained prominence in the 1970s and 1980s, and their popularity remains, although the evidence of their efficacy is very limited. This review focuses on the available evidence for the role and likely adverse effects of both added and natural 'food chemicals' including benzoate, sulphite, monosodium glutamate, vaso-active or biogenic amines and salicylate. Studies assessing the efficacy of the restriction of these substances in the diet have mainly been undertaken in adults, but the paper will also touch on the use of such diets in children. The difficulty of reviewing the available evidence is that few of the studies have been controlled and, for many, considerable time has elapsed since their publication. Meanwhile dietary patterns and habits have changed hugely in the interim, so the conclusions may not be relevant for our current dietary norms. The conclusion of the review is that there may be some benefit in the removal of an additive or a group of foods high in natural food chemicals from the diet for a limited period for certain individuals, providing the diagnostic pathway is followed and the foods are reintroduced back into the diet to assess for the efficacy of removal. However diets involving the removal of multiple additives and food chemicals have the very great potential to lead to nutritional deficiency especially in the paediatric population. Any dietary intervention, whether for the purposes of diagnosis or management of food allergy or food intolerance, should be adapted to the individual's dietary habits and a suitably

  6. Addressing ten questions about conceptual rainfall-runoff models with global sensitivity analyses in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Mun-Ju; Guillaume, Joseph H. A.; Croke, Barry F. W.; Jakeman, Anthony J.

    2013-10-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is generally recognized as a worthwhile step to diagnose and remedy difficulties in identifying model parameters, and indeed in discriminating between model structures. An analysis of papers in three journals indicates that SA is a standard omission in hydrological modeling exercises. We provide some answers to ten reasonably generic questions using the Morris and Sobol SA methods, including to what extent sensitivities are dependent on parameter ranges selected, length of data period, catchment response type, model structures assumed and climatic forcing. Results presented demonstrate the sensitivity of four target functions to parameter variations of four rainfall-runoff models of varying complexity (4-13 parameters). Daily rainfall, streamflow and pan evaporation data are used from four 10-year data sets and from five catchments in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) region. Similar results are obtained using the Morris and Sobol methods. It is shown how modelers can easily identify parameters that are insensitive, and how they might improve identifiability. Using a more complex objective function, however, may not result in all parameters becoming sensitive. Crucially, the results of the SA can be influenced by the parameter ranges selected. The length of data period required to characterize the sensitivities assuredly is a minimum of five years. The results confirm that only the simpler models have well-identified parameters, but parameter sensitivities vary between catchments. Answering these ten questions in other case studies is relatively easy using freely available software with the Hydromad and Sensitivity packages in R.

  7. Deterministic vs. probabilistic analyses to identify sensitive parameters in dose assessment using RESRAD.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Sunita; Cheng, Jing-Jy; Yu, Charley

    2005-05-01

    The dose assessments for sites containing residual radioactivity usually involve the use of computer models that employ input parameters describing the physical conditions of the contaminated and surrounding media and the living and consumption patterns of the receptors in analyzing potential doses to the receptors. The precision of the dose results depends on the precision of the input parameter values. The identification of sensitive parameters that have great influence on the dose results would help set priorities in research and information gathering for parameter values so that a more precise dose assessment can be conducted. Two methods of identifying site-specific sensitive parameters, deterministic and probabilistic, were compared by applying them to the RESRAD computer code for analyzing radiation exposure for a residential farmer scenario. The deterministic method has difficulty in evaluating the effect of simultaneous changes in a large number of input parameters on the model output results. The probabilistic method easily identified the most sensitive parameters, but the sensitivity measure of other parameters was obscured. The choice of sensitivity analysis method would depend on the availability of site-specific data. Generally speaking, the deterministic method would identify the same set of sensitive parameters as the probabilistic method when 1) the baseline values used in the deterministic method were selected near the mean or median value of each parameter and 2) the selected range of parameter values used in the deterministic method was wide enough to cover the 5th to 95th percentile values from the distribution of that parameter. PMID:15824576

  8. A novel approach for modelling vegetation distributions and analysing vegetation sensitivity through trait-climate relationships in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanzheng; Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Wang, Han; Xue, Wei; Lin, Guanghui; Wen, Zhongming; Chang, Jie; Wang, Meng; Liu, Guobin; Li, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that current dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have suffered from insufficient realism and are difficult to improve, particularly because they are built on plant functional type (PFT) schemes. Therefore, new approaches, such as plant trait-based methods, are urgently needed to replace PFT schemes when predicting the distribution of vegetation and investigating vegetation sensitivity. As an important direction towards constructing next-generation DGVMs based on plant functional traits, we propose a novel approach for modelling vegetation distributions and analysing vegetation sensitivity through trait-climate relationships in China. The results demonstrated that a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) trained with a LMA-Nmass-LAI data combination yielded an accuracy of 72.82% in simulating vegetation distribution, providing more detailed parameter information regarding community structures and ecosystem functions. The new approach also performed well in analyses of vegetation sensitivity to different climatic scenarios. Although the trait-climate relationship is not the only candidate useful for predicting vegetation distributions and analysing climatic sensitivity, it sheds new light on the development of next-generation trait-based DGVMs. PMID:27052108

  9. A novel approach for modelling vegetation distributions and analysing vegetation sensitivity through trait-climate relationships in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yanzheng; Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Wang, Han; Xue, Wei; Lin, Guanghui; Wen, Zhongming; Chang, Jie; Wang, Meng; Liu, Guobin; Li, Shiqing

    2016-04-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that current dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have suffered from insufficient realism and are difficult to improve, particularly because they are built on plant functional type (PFT) schemes. Therefore, new approaches, such as plant trait-based methods, are urgently needed to replace PFT schemes when predicting the distribution of vegetation and investigating vegetation sensitivity. As an important direction towards constructing next-generation DGVMs based on plant functional traits, we propose a novel approach for modelling vegetation distributions and analysing vegetation sensitivity through trait-climate relationships in China. The results demonstrated that a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) trained with a LMA-Nmass-LAI data combination yielded an accuracy of 72.82% in simulating vegetation distribution, providing more detailed parameter information regarding community structures and ecosystem functions. The new approach also performed well in analyses of vegetation sensitivity to different climatic scenarios. Although the trait-climate relationship is not the only candidate useful for predicting vegetation distributions and analysing climatic sensitivity, it sheds new light on the development of next-generation trait-based DGVMs.

  10. A novel approach for modelling vegetation distributions and analysing vegetation sensitivity through trait-climate relationships in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanzheng; Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Wang, Han; Xue, Wei; Lin, Guanghui; Wen, Zhongming; Chang, Jie; Wang, Meng; Liu, Guobin; Li, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that current dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have suffered from insufficient realism and are difficult to improve, particularly because they are built on plant functional type (PFT) schemes. Therefore, new approaches, such as plant trait-based methods, are urgently needed to replace PFT schemes when predicting the distribution of vegetation and investigating vegetation sensitivity. As an important direction towards constructing next-generation DGVMs based on plant functional traits, we propose a novel approach for modelling vegetation distributions and analysing vegetation sensitivity through trait-climate relationships in China. The results demonstrated that a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) trained with a LMA-Nmass-LAI data combination yielded an accuracy of 72.82% in simulating vegetation distribution, providing more detailed parameter information regarding community structures and ecosystem functions. The new approach also performed well in analyses of vegetation sensitivity to different climatic scenarios. Although the trait-climate relationship is not the only candidate useful for predicting vegetation distributions and analysing climatic sensitivity, it sheds new light on the development of next-generation trait-based DGVMs. PMID:27052108

  11. Sensitivity alteration of fiber Bragg grating sensors with additive micro-scale bi-material coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xixi; Alemohammad, Hamidreza; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes a combined fabrication method for creating a bi-material micro-scale coating on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) optical sensors using laser-assisted maskless microdeposition (LAMM) and electroless nickel plating. This bi-material coating alters the sensitivity of the sensor where it also acts as a protective layer. LAMM is used to coat bare FBGs with a 1-2 µm thick conductive silver layer followed by the electroless nickel plating process to increase layer thickness to a desired level ranging from 1 to 80 µm. To identify an optimum coating thickness and predict its effect on the sensor's sensitivity to force and temperature, an optomechanical model is developed in this study. According to the model if the thickness of the Ni layer is 30-50 µm, maximum temperature sensitivity is achieved. Our analytical and experimental results suggest that the temperature sensitivity of the coated FBG with 1 µm Ag and 33 µm Ni is almost doubled compared to a bare FBG with sensitivity of 0.011 ± 0.001 nm °C-1. In contrast, the force sensitivity is decreased; however, this sensitivity reduction is less than the values reported in the literature.

  12. Controlling the Electrostatic Discharge Ignition Sensitivity of Composite Energetic Materials Using Carbon Nanotube Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Kade H. Poper; Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael Daniels

    2014-10-01

    Powder energetic materials are highly sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD) ignition. This study shows that small concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to the highly reactive mixture of aluminum and copper oxide (Al + CuO) significantly reduces ESD ignition sensitivity. CNT act as a conduit for electric energy, bypassing energy buildup and desensitizing the mixture to ESD ignition. The lowest CNT concentration needed to desensitize ignition is 3.8 vol.% corresponding to percolation corresponding to an electrical conductivity of 0.04 S/cm. Conversely, added CNT increased Al + CuO thermal ignition sensitivity to a hot wire igniter.

  13. Grid and design variables sensitivity analyses for NACA four-digit wing-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Smith, Robert E.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1993-01-01

    Two distinct parameterization procedures are developed for investigating the grid sensitivity with respect to design parameters of a wing-section example. The first procedure is based on traditional (physical) relations defining NACA four-digit wing-sections. The second is advocating a novel (geometrical) parameterization using spline functions such as NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines) for defining the wing-section geometry. An interactive algebraic grid generation technique, known as Hermite Cubic Interpolation, is employed to generate C-type grids around wing-sections. The grid sensitivity of the domain with respect to design and grid parameters has been obtained by direct differentiation of the grid equations. A hybrid approach is proposed for more geometrically complex configurations. A comparison of the sensitivity coefficients with those obtained using a finite-difference approach has been made to verify the feasibility of the approach. The aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients are obtained using the compressible two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. Genome-wide functional genomic and transcriptomic analyses for genes regulating sensitivity to vorinostat

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, Katrina J; Gould, Cathryn M; Johnstone, Ricky W; Simpson, Kaylene J

    2014-01-01

    Identification of mechanisms of resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitors, such as vorinostat, is important in order to utilise these anticancer compounds more efficiently in the clinic. Here, we present a dataset containing multiple tiers of stringent siRNA screening for genes that when knocked down conferred sensitivity to vorinostat-induced cell death. We also present data from a miRNA overexpression screen for miRNAs contributing to vorinostat sensitivity. Furthermore, we provide transcriptomic analysis using massively parallel sequencing upon knockdown of 14 validated vorinostat-resistance genes. These datasets are suitable for analysis of genes and miRNAs involved in cell death in the presence and absence of vorinostat as well as computational biology approaches to identify gene regulatory networks. PMID:25977774

  15. An optimisation model for regional integrated solid waste management II. Model application and sensitivity analyses.

    PubMed

    Najm, M Abou; El-Fadel, M; Ayoub, G; El-Taha, M; Al-Awar, F

    2002-02-01

    Increased environmental concerns and the emphasis on material and energy recovery are gradually changing the orientation of MSW management and planning. In this context, the application of optimisation techniques have been introduced to design the least cost solid waste management systems, considering the variety of management processes (recycling, composting, anaerobic digestion, incineration, and landfilling), and the existence of uncertainties associated with the number of system components and their interrelations. This study presents a model that was developed and applied to serve as a solid waste decision support system for MSW management taking into account both socio-economic and environmental considerations. The model accounts for solid waste generation rates, composition, collection, treatment, disposal as well as potential environmental impacts of various MSW management techniques. The model follows a linear programming formulation with the framework of dynamic optimisation. The model can serve as a tool to evaluate various MSW management alternatives and obtain the optimal combination of technologies for the handling, treatment and disposal of MSW in an economic and environmentally sustainable way. The sensitivity of various waste management policies is also addressed. The work is presented in a series of two papers: (I) model formulation, and (II) model application and sensitivity analysis. PMID:12020095

  16. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses of a Pebble Bed HTGR Loss of Cooling Event

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strydom, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor Methods Development group at the Idaho National Laboratory identified the need for a defensible and systematic uncertainty and sensitivity approach in 2009. This paper summarizes the results of an uncertainty and sensitivity quantification investigation performed with the SUSA code, utilizing the International Atomic Energy Agency CRP 5 Pebble Bed Modular Reactor benchmark and the INL code suite PEBBED-THERMIX. Eight model input parameters were selected for inclusion in this study, and after the input parameters variations and probability density functions were specified, a total of 800 steady state and depressurized loss of forced cooling (DLOFC) transientmore » PEBBED-THERMIX calculations were performed. The six data sets were statistically analyzed to determine the 5% and 95% DLOFC peak fuel temperature tolerance intervals with 95% confidence levels. It was found that the uncertainties in the decay heat and graphite thermal conductivities were the most significant contributors to the propagated DLOFC peak fuel temperature uncertainty. No significant differences were observed between the results of Simple Random Sampling (SRS) or Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) data sets, and use of uniform or normal input parameter distributions also did not lead to any significant differences between these data sets.« less

  17. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 5, Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume of the 1992 PA contains results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to migration of gas and brine from the undisturbed repository. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B. Volume 2 describes the technical basis for the performance assessment, including descriptions of the linked computational models used in the Monte Carlo analyses. Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to the EPA`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6. Results of the 1992 uncertainty and sensitivity analyses indicate that, conditional on the modeling assumptions and the assigned parameter-value distributions, the most important parameters for which uncertainty has the potential to affect gas and brine migration from the undisturbed repository are: initial liquid saturation in the waste, anhydrite permeability, biodegradation-reaction stoichiometry, gas-generation rates for both corrosion and biodegradation under inundated conditions, and the permeability of the long-term shaft seal.

  18. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for thermo-hydraulic calculation of research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan; Isnaeni, Muh Darwis

    2013-09-09

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input parameters on thermohydraulic calculations for a research reactor has successfully done in this research. The uncertainty analysis was carried out on input parameters for thermohydraulic calculation of sub-channel analysis using Code COOLOD-N. The input parameters include radial peaking factor, the increase bulk coolant temperature, heat flux factor and the increase temperature cladding and fuel meat at research reactor utilizing plate fuel element. The input uncertainty of 1% - 4% were used in nominal power calculation. The bubble detachment parameters were computed for S ratio (the safety margin against the onset of flow instability ratio) which were used to determine safety level in line with the design of 'Reactor Serba Guna-G. A. Siwabessy' (RSG-GA Siwabessy). It was concluded from the calculation results that using the uncertainty input more than 3% was beyond the safety margin of reactor operation.

  19. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for thermo-hydraulic calculation of research reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan; Isnaeni, Muh Darwis

    2013-09-01

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input parameters on thermohydraulic calculations for a research reactor has successfully done in this research. The uncertainty analysis was carried out on input parameters for thermohydraulic calculation of sub-channel analysis using Code COOLOD-N. The input parameters include radial peaking factor, the increase bulk coolant temperature, heat flux factor and the increase temperature cladding and fuel meat at research reactor utilizing plate fuel element. The input uncertainty of 1% - 4% were used in nominal power calculation. The bubble detachment parameters were computed for S ratio (the safety margin against the onset of flow instability ratio) which were used to determine safety level in line with the design of "Reactor Serba Guna-G. A. Siwabessy" (RSG-GA Siwabessy). It was concluded from the calculation results that using the uncertainty input more than 3% was beyond the safety margin of reactor operation.

  20. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses of a Two-Parameter Impedance Prediction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. G.; Parrott, T. L.; Watson, W. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents comparisons of predicted impedance uncertainty limits derived from Monte-Carlo-type simulations with a Two-Parameter (TP) impedance prediction model and measured impedance uncertainty limits based on multiple tests acquired in NASA Langley test rigs. These predicted and measured impedance uncertainty limits are used to evaluate the effects of simultaneous randomization of each input parameter for the impedance prediction and measurement processes. A sensitivity analysis is then used to further evaluate the TP prediction model by varying its input parameters on an individual basis. The variation imposed on the input parameters is based on measurements conducted with multiple tests in the NASA Langley normal incidence and grazing incidence impedance tubes; thus, the input parameters are assigned uncertainties commensurate with those of the measured data. These same measured data are used with the NASA Langley impedance measurement (eduction) processes to determine the corresponding measured impedance uncertainty limits, such that the predicted and measured impedance uncertainty limits (95% confidence intervals) can be compared. The measured reactance 95% confidence intervals encompass the corresponding predicted reactance confidence intervals over the frequency range of interest. The same is true for the confidence intervals of the measured and predicted resistance at near-resonance frequencies, but the predicted resistance confidence intervals are lower than the measured resistance confidence intervals (no overlap) at frequencies away from resonance. A sensitivity analysis indicates the discharge coefficient uncertainty is the major contributor to uncertainty in the predicted impedances for the perforate-over-honeycomb liner used in this study. This insight regarding the relative importance of each input parameter will be used to guide the design of experiments with test rigs currently being brought on-line at NASA Langley.

  1. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 4: Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses for 40 CFR 191, Subpart B

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume of the 1992 PA contains results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to the EPA`s Environmental Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Results of the 1992 uncertainty and sensitivity analyses indicate that, conditional on the modeling assumptions, the choice of parameters selected for sampling, and the assigned parameter-value distributions, the most important parameters for which uncertainty has the potential to affect compliance with 40 CFR 191B are: drilling intensity, intrusion borehole permeability, halite and anhydrite permeabilities, radionuclide solubilities and distribution coefficients, fracture spacing in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation, porosity of the Culebra, and spatial variability of Culebra transmissivity. Performance with respect to 40 CFR 191B is insensitive to uncertainty in other parameters; however, additional data are needed to confirm that reality lies within the assigned distributions.

  2. Using ambulatory care sensitive hospitalisations to analyse the effectiveness of primary care services in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Palacios, David G; Cairns, John

    2015-11-01

    Ambulatory care sensitive hospitalisations (ACSH) have been widely used to study the quality and effectiveness of primary care. Using data from 248 general hospitals in Mexico during 2001-2011 we identify 926,769 ACSHs in 188 health jurisdictions before and during the health insurance expansion that took place in this period, and estimate a fixed effects model to explain the association of the jurisdiction ACSH rate with patient and community factors. National ACSH rate increased by 50%, but trends and magnitude varied at the jurisdiction and state level. We find strong associations of the ACSH rate with socioeconomic conditions, health care supply and health insurance coverage even after controlling for potential endogeneity in the rolling out of the insurance programme. We argue that the traditional focus on the increase/decrease of the ACSH rate might not be a valid indicator to assess the effectiveness of primary care in a health insurance expansion setting, but that the ACSH rate is useful when compared between and within states once the variation in insurance coverage is taken into account as it allows the identification of differences in the provision of primary care. The high heterogeneity found in the ACSH rates suggests important state and jurisdiction differences in the quality and effectiveness of primary care in Mexico. PMID:26387080

  3. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of groundwater travel time in a two-dimensional variably-saturated fractured geologic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Gureghian, A.B.; Sagar, B.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents a method for sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository located in a layer and fractured unconfined aquifer. Groundwater travel time (GWTT) has been selected as the performance measure. The repository is located in the unsaturated zone, and the source of aquifer recharge is due solely to steady infiltration impinging uniformly over the surface area that is to be modeled. The equivalent porous media concept is adopted to model the fractured zone in the flow field. The evaluation of pathlines and travel time of water particles in the flow domain is performed based on a Lagrangian concept. The Bubnov-Galerkin finite-element method is employed to solve the primary flow problem (non-linear), the equation of motion, and the adjoint sensitivity equations. The matrix equations are solved with a Gaussian elimination technique using sparse matrix solvers. The sensitivity measure corresponds to the first derivative of the performance measure (GWTT) with respect to the parameters of the system. The uncertainty in the computed GWTT is quantified by using the first-order second-moment (FOSM) approach, a probabilistic method that relies on the mean and variance of the system parameters and the sensitivity of the performance measure with respect to these parameters. A test case corresponding to a layered and fractured, unconfined aquifer is then presented to illustrate the various features of the method.

  4. Genome-Wide Gene-Sodium Interaction Analyses on Blood Pressure: The Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt-Sensitivity Study.

    PubMed

    Li, Changwei; He, Jiang; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Jinying; Gu, Dongfeng; Hixson, James E; Rao, Dabeeru C; Jaquish, Cashell E; Gu, Charles C; Chen, Jichun; Huang, Jianfeng; Chen, Shufeng; Kelly, Tanika N

    2016-08-01

    We performed genome-wide analyses to identify genomic loci that interact with sodium to influence blood pressure (BP) using single-marker-based (1 and 2 df joint tests) and gene-based tests among 1876 Chinese participants of the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Salt-Sensitivity (GenSalt) study. Among GenSalt participants, the average of 3 urine samples was used to estimate sodium excretion. Nine BP measurements were taken using a random zero sphygmomanometer. A total of 2.05 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms were imputed using Affymetrix 6.0 genotype data and the Chinese Han of Beijing and Japanese of Tokyo HapMap reference panel. Promising findings (P<1.00×10(-4)) from GenSalt were evaluated for replication among 775 Chinese participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Single-nucleotide polymorphism and gene-based results were meta-analyzed across the GenSalt and MESA studies to determine genome-wide significance. The 1 df tests identified interactions for UST rs13211840 on diastolic BP (P=3.13×10(-9)). The 2 df tests additionally identified associations for CLGN rs2567241 (P=3.90×10(-12)) and LOC105369882 rs11104632 (P=4.51×10(-8)) with systolic BP. The CLGN variant rs2567241 was also associated with diastolic BP (P=3.11×10(-22)) and mean arterial pressure (P=2.86×10(-15)). Genome-wide gene-based analysis identified MKNK1 (P=6.70×10(-7)), C2orf80 (P<1.00×10(-12)), EPHA6 (P=2.88×10(-7)), SCOC-AS1 (P=4.35×10(-14)), SCOC (P=6.46×10(-11)), CLGN (P=3.68×10(-13)), MGAT4D (P=4.73×10(-11)), ARHGAP42 (P≤1.00×10(-12)), CASP4 (P=1.31×10(-8)), and LINC01478 (P=6.75×10(-10)) that were associated with at least 1 BP phenotype. In summary, we identified 8 novel and 1 previously reported BP loci through the examination of single-nucleotide polymorphism and gene-based interactions with sodium. PMID:27271309

  5. Sensitivity analyses of the theoretical equations used in point velocity probe (PVP) data interpretation.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J F

    2016-09-01

    Point velocity probes (PVPs) are dedicated, relatively low-cost instruments for measuring groundwater speed and direction in non-cohesive, unconsolidated porous media aquifers. They have been used to evaluate groundwater velocity in groundwater treatment zones, glacial outwash aquifers, and within streambanks to assist with the assessment of groundwater-surfaced water exchanges. Empirical evidence of acceptable levels of uncertainty for these applications has come from both laboratory and field trials. This work extends previous assessments of the method by examining the inherent uncertainties arising from the equations used to interpret PVP datasets. PVPs operate by sensing tracer movement on the probe surface, producing apparent velocities from two detectors. Sensitivity equations were developed for the estimation of groundwater speed, v∞, and flow direction, α, as a function of the apparent velocities of water on the probe surface and the α angle itself. The resulting estimations of measurement uncertainty, which are inherent limitations of the method, apply to idealized, homogeneous porous media, which on the local scale of a PVP measurement may be approached. This work does not address experimental sources of error that may arise from the presence of cohesive sediments that prevent collapse around the probe, the effects of centimeter-scale aquifer heterogeneities, or other complications related to borehole integrity or operator error, which could greatly exceed the inherent sources of error. However, the findings reported here have been shown to be in agreement with the previous empirical work. On this basis, properly installed and functioning PVPs should be expected to produce estimates of groundwater speed with uncertainties less than ±15%, with the most accurate values of groundwater speed expected when horizontal flow is incident on the probe surface at about 50° from the active injection port. Directions can be measured with uncertainties less than

  6. Sensitivity analyses of the theoretical equations used in point velocity probe (PVP) data interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlin, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    Point velocity probes (PVPs) are dedicated, relatively low-cost instruments for measuring groundwater speed and direction in non-cohesive, unconsolidated porous media aquifers. They have been used to evaluate groundwater velocity in groundwater treatment zones, glacial outwash aquifers, and within streambanks to assist with the assessment of groundwater-surfaced water exchanges. Empirical evidence of acceptable levels of uncertainty for these applications has come from both laboratory and field trials. This work extends previous assessments of the method by examining the inherent uncertainties arising from the equations used to interpret PVP datasets. PVPs operate by sensing tracer movement on the probe surface, producing apparent velocities from two detectors. Sensitivity equations were developed for the estimation of groundwater speed, v∞, and flow direction, α, as a function of the apparent velocities of water on the probe surface and the α angle itself. The resulting estimations of measurement uncertainty, which are inherent limitations of the method, apply to idealized, homogeneous porous media, which on the local scale of a PVP measurement may be approached. This work does not address experimental sources of error that may arise from the presence of cohesive sediments that prevent collapse around the probe, the effects of centimeter-scale aquifer heterogeneities, or other complications related to borehole integrity or operator error, which could greatly exceed the inherent sources of error. However, the findings reported here have been shown to be in agreement with the previous empirical work. On this basis, properly installed and functioning PVPs should be expected to produce estimates of groundwater speed with uncertainties less than ± 15%, with the most accurate values of groundwater speed expected when horizontal flow is incident on the probe surface at about 50° from the active injection port. Directions can be measured with uncertainties less than

  7. Sensitivity of LDEF foil analyses using ultra-low background germanium vs. large NaI(Tl) multidimensional spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, James H.; Arthur, Richard J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

    1993-01-01

    Cobalt foils and stainless steel samples were analyzed for induced Co-60 activity with both an ultra-low background germanium gamma-ray spectrometer and with a large NaI(Tl) multidimensional spectrometer, both of which use electronic anticoincidence shielding to reduce background counts resulting from cosmic rays. Aluminum samples were analyzed for Na-22. The results, in addition to the relative sensitivities and precisions afforded by the two methods, are presented.

  8. Modifying structure-sensitive reactions by addition of Zn to Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, David J.; Schweitzer, Neil M.; Kamali Shahari, Seyed Mehdi; Rioux, Robert M.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Meyer, Randall J.

    2014-10-01

    Silica-supported Pd and PdZn nanoparticles of a similar size were evaluated for neopentane hydrogenolysis/isomerization and propane hydrogenolysis/dehydrogenation. Monometallic Pd showed high neopentane hydrogenolysis selectivity. Addition of small amounts of Zn to Pd lead Pd–Zn scatters in the EXAFS spectrum and an increase in the linear bonded CO by IR. In addition, the neopentane turnover rate decreased by nearly 10 times with little change in the selectivity. Increasing amounts of Zn lead to greater Pd–Zn interactions, higher linear-to-bridging CO ratios by IR and complete loss of neopentane conversion. Pd NPs also had high selectivity for propane hydrogenolysis and thus were poorly selective for propylene. The PdZn bimetallic catalysts, however, were able to preferentially catalyze dehydrogenation, were not active for propane hydrogenolysis, and thus were highly selective for propylene formation. The decrease in hydrogenolysis selectivity was attributed to the isolation of active Pd atoms by inactive metallic Zn,demonstrating that hydrogenolysis requires a particular reactive ensemble whereas propane dehydrogenation does not.

  9. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of unsaturated flow travel time in the CHnz unit of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, W.E.; Freshley, M.D.

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the results of sensitivity and uncertainty analyses conducted to improve understanding of unsaturated zone ground-water travel time distribution at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently performing detailed studies at Yucca Mountain to determine its suitability as a host for a geologic repository for the containment of high-level nuclear wastes. As part of these studies, DOE is conducting a series of Performance Assessment Calculational Exercises, referred to as the PACE problems. The work documented in this report represents a part of the PACE-90 problems that addresses the effects of natural barriers of the site that will stop or impede the long-term movement of radionuclides from the potential repository to the accessible environment. In particular, analyses described in this report were designed to investigate the sensitivity of the ground-water travel time distribution to different input parameters and the impact of uncertainty associated with those input parameters. Five input parameters were investigated in this study: recharge rate, saturated hydraulic conductivity, matrix porosity, and two curve-fitting parameters used for the van Genuchten relations to quantify the unsaturated moisture-retention and hydraulic characteristics of the matrix. 23 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Sensitivity of Arctic Permafrost Carbon in the Mackenzie River Basin: A substrate addition and incubation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedgpeth, A.; Beilman, D.; Crow, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization processes are fundamental to the functioning of high latitude soils in relation to nutrients, stability, and feedbacks to atmospheric CO2 and climate. The arctic permafrost zone covers 25% of the northern hemisphere and contains 1672Pg of soil carbon (C). 88% of this C currently resides in frozen soils that are vulnerable to environmental change. For instance, arctic growing seasons may be lengthened, resulting in an increase in plant productivity and rate of below ground labile C inputs as root exudates. Understanding controls on Arctic SOM dynamics requires recognition that labile C inputs have the potential to significantly affect mineralization of previously stable SOM, also known as 'priming effects'. We conducted a substrate addition incubation experiment to quantify and compare respiration in highly organic (42-48 %C) permafrost soils along a north-south transect in western Canada. Near surface soils (10-20 cm) were collected from permafrost peatland sites in the Mackenzie River Basin from 69.2-62.6°N. The surface soils are fairly young (Δ14C values > -140.0) and can be assumed to contain relatively reactive soil carbon. To assess whether addition of labile substrate alters SOM decomposition dynamics, 4.77-11.75 g of permafrost soil were spiked with 0.5 mg D-glucose g-1 soil and incubated at 5°C. A mass balance approach was used to determin substrate-induced respiration and preliminary results suggest a potential for positive priming in these C-rich soils. Baseline respiration rates from the three sites were similar (0.067-0.263 mg CO2 g-1 soil C) yet show some site-specific trends. The rate at which added substrate was utilized within these soils suggests that other factors besides temperature and soil C content are controlling substrate consumption and its effect on SOM decomposition. Microbial activity can be stimulated by substrate addition to such an extent that SOM turnover is enhanced, suggesting that

  11. Combination of optical and electrical loss analyses for a Si-phthalocyanine dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keng-Chu; Wang, Lili; Doane, Tennyson; Kovalsky, Anton; Pejic, Sandra; Burda, Clemens

    2014-12-11

    In order to promote the development of solar cells with varying types of sensitizers including dyes and quantum dots, it is crucial to establish a general experimental analysis that accounts for all important optical and electrical losses resulting from interfacial phenomena. All of these varying types of solar cells share common features where a mesoporous scaffold is used as a sensitizer loading support as well as an electron transport material, which may result in light scattering. The loss of efficiency at interfaces of the sensitizer, the mesoporous TiO2 nanoparticle films, the FTO conductive layer, and the supportive glass substrate should be considered in addition to the photoinduced electron transport properties within a cell. On the basis of optical parameters, one can obtain the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of a solar cell, an important parameter that cannot be directly measured but must be derived from several key experiments. By integrating an optical loss model with an electrical loss model, many solar cell parameters could be characterized from electro-optical observables including reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance of the dye sensitizer, the electron injection efficiency, and the charge collection efficiency. In this work, an integrated electro-optical approach has been applied to SiPc (Pc 61) dye-sensitized solar cells for evaluating the parameters affecting the overall power conversion efficiency. The absorptance results of the Pc 61 dye-sensitized solar cell provide evidence that the adsorbed Pc 61 forms noninjection layers on TiO2 surfaces when the dye immersion time exceeds 120 min, resulting in shading light from the active layer rather than an increase in photoelectric current efficiency. PMID:24922464

  12. Sensitivity of Middle Atmospheric Analyses to the Representation of Gravity-Wave Drag in the DAO's Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Shuhua; Chern, Jiundar; Joiner, Joanna; Lin, Shian-Jiann; Pawson, Steven; daSilva, Arlindo; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The damping of mesoscale gravity waves has important effects on the global circulation, structure, and composition of the atmosphere. A number of assimilation and forecast experiments have been conducted to examine the sensitivity of meteorological analyses and forecasts to the representation of gravity wave impacts in a data assimilation system (DAS). The experiments were conducted with the Finite-Volume (FV) DAS developed at NASA's Data Assimilation Office (DAO), The main purpose of this research is to determine the optimal combination of wave number, phase speed, wavelength, etc. for representing gravity-wave drag (GWD) in FVDAS. The GWD included in FVDAS includes a spectrum of waves, as would be forced by topography and transient motions (e.g., convection) in the troposphere. The sensitivity experiments are performed by modifying several parameters, such as the number of waves allowed, their wavelength, the background stress amplitude, etc. The results show that the assimilated fields are very sensitive to the number of gravity waves represented in the system, especially at high latitudes of the middle and upper stratosphere and mesosphere in winter. The analyzed stratopause temperature varies by up to 10K when the GWD scheme is modified from a multiple-wave scheme (using a stationary wave and waves with phase speeds of 10, 20, 30 and 40 m/s in each direction) to a single, stationary wave. Insight into the reality of the various versions of the GWD can be obtained by examining the "Observation minus Forecast" residuals from the FVDAS.

  13. Comparative analyses of fungicide sensitivity and SSR marker variations indicate a low risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chun-Fang; He, Meng-Han; Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhu, Wen; Yang, Li-Na; Wu, E-Jiao; Guo, Zheng-Liang; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the evolution of fungicide resistance is important in securing sustainable disease management in agricultural systems. In this study, we analyzed and compared the spatial distribution of genetic variation in azoxystrobin sensitivity and SSR markers in 140 Phytophthora infestans isolates sampled from seven geographic locations in China. Sensitivity to azoxystrobin and its genetic variation in the pathogen populations was measured by the relative growth rate (RGR) at four fungicide concentrations and determination of the effective concentration for 50% inhibition (EC50). We found that all isolates in the current study were sensitive to azoxystrobin and their EC50 was similar to that detected from a European population about 20 years ago, suggesting the risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in P. infestans populations is low. Further analyses indicate that reduced genetic variation and high fitness cost in resistant mutations are the likely causes for the low evolutionary likelihood of developing azoxystrobin resistance in the pathogen. We also found a negative correlation between azoxystrobin tolerance in P. infestans populations and the mean annual temperature of collection sites, suggesting that global warming may increase the efficiency of using the fungicide to control the late blight. PMID:26853908

  14. Comparative analyses of fungicide sensitivity and SSR marker variations indicate a low risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chun-Fang; He, Meng-Han; Chen, Feng-Ping; Zhu, Wen; Yang, Li-Na; Wu, E-Jiao; Guo, Zheng-Liang; Shang, Li-Ping; Zhan, Jiasui

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the evolution of fungicide resistance is important in securing sustainable disease management in agricultural systems. In this study, we analyzed and compared the spatial distribution of genetic variation in azoxystrobin sensitivity and SSR markers in 140 Phytophthora infestans isolates sampled from seven geographic locations in China. Sensitivity to azoxystrobin and its genetic variation in the pathogen populations was measured by the relative growth rate (RGR) at four fungicide concentrations and determination of the effective concentration for 50% inhibition (EC50). We found that all isolates in the current study were sensitive to azoxystrobin and their EC50 was similar to that detected from a European population about 20 years ago, suggesting the risk of developing azoxystrobin resistance in P. infestans populations is low. Further analyses indicate that reduced genetic variation and high fitness cost in resistant mutations are the likely causes for the low evolutionary likelihood of developing azoxystrobin resistance in the pathogen. We also found a negative correlation between azoxystrobin tolerance in P. infestans populations and the mean annual temperature of collection sites, suggesting that global warming may increase the efficiency of using the fungicide to control the late blight. PMID:26853908

  15. Cell-Line Selectivity Improves the Predictive Power of Pharmacogenomic Analyses and Helps Identify NADPH as Biomarker for Ferroptosis Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenichi; Hayano, Miki; Pagano, Nen C; Stockwell, Brent R

    2016-02-18

    Precision medicine in oncology requires not only identification of cancer-associated mutations but also effective drugs for each cancer genotype, which is still a largely unsolved problem. One approach for the latter challenge has been large-scale testing of small molecules in genetically characterized cell lines. We hypothesized that compounds with high cell-line-selective lethality exhibited consistent results across such pharmacogenomic studies. We analyzed the compound sensitivity data of 6,259 lethal compounds from the NCI-60 project. A total of 2,565 cell-line-selective lethal compounds were identified and grouped into 18 clusters based on their median growth inhibitory GI50 profiles across the 60 cell lines, which were shown to represent distinct mechanisms of action. Further transcriptome analysis revealed a biomarker, NADPH abundance, for predicting sensitivity to ferroptosis-inducing compounds, which we experimentally validated. In summary, incorporating cell-line-selectivity filters improves the predictive power of pharmacogenomic analyses and enables discovery of biomarkers that predict the sensitivity of cells to specific cell death inducers. PMID:26853626

  16. Biochemical analyses of the antioxidative activity and chemical ingredients in eight different Allium alien monosomic addition lines.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Shigenori; Matsumoto, Misato; Date, Rie; Harada, Kazuki; Maeda, Toshimichi; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    We measured the antioxidant contents and antioxidative activities in eight Allium fistulosum-shallot monosomic addition lines (MAL; FF+1A-FF+8A). The high antioxidative activity lines (FF+2A and FF+6A) showed high polyphenol accumulation. These additional chromosomes (2A and 6A) would therefore have anonymous genes related to the upregulation of polyphenol production, the antioxidative activities consequently being increased in these MALs. PMID:24317054

  17. Sensitization to Food Additives in Patients with Allergy: A Study Based on Skin Test and Open Oral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Hejrati, Zinatosadat; Dehghani, Zahra; Dehghani, Faranak; Kolahi, Niloofar

    2016-06-01

    There has been a great increase in the consumption of various food additives in recent years. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of sensitization to food additives by using skin prick test in patients with allergy and to determine the concordance rate between positive skin tests and oral challenge in hypersensitivity to additives. This cross-sectional study included 125 (female 71, male 54) patients aged 2-76 years with allergy and 100 healthy individuals. Skin tests were performed in both patient and control groups with 25 fresh food additives. Among patients with allergy, 22.4% showed positive skin test at least to one of the applied materials. Skin test was negative to all tested food additives in control group. Oral food challenge was done in 28 patients with positive skin test, in whom 9 patients showed reaction to culprit (Concordance rate=32.1%). The present study suggested that about one-third of allergic patients with positive reaction to food additives showed positive oral challenge; it may be considered the potential utility of skin test to identify the role of food additives in patients with allergy. PMID:27424134

  18. Advances in global sensitivity analyses of demographic-based species distribution models to address uncertainties in dynamic landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Janelle M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Developing a rigorous understanding of multiple global threats to species persistence requires the use of integrated modeling methods that capture processes which influence species distributions. Species distribution models (SDMs) coupled with population dynamics models can incorporate relationships between changing environments and demographics and are increasingly used to quantify relative extinction risks associated with climate and land-use changes. Despite their appeal, uncertainties associated with complex models can undermine their usefulness for advancing predictive ecology and informing conservation management decisions. We developed a computationally-efficient and freely available tool (GRIP 2.0) that implements and automates a global sensitivity analysis of coupled SDM-population dynamics models for comparing the relative influence of demographic parameters and habitat attributes on predicted extinction risk. Advances over previous global sensitivity analyses include the ability to vary habitat suitability across gradients, as well as habitat amount and configuration of spatially-explicit suitability maps of real and simulated landscapes. Using GRIP 2.0, we carried out a multi-model global sensitivity analysis of a coupled SDM-population dynamics model of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) in Mount Rainier National Park as a case study and quantified the relative influence of input parameters and their interactions on model predictions. Our results differed from the one-at-time analyses used in the original study, and we found that the most influential parameters included the total amount of suitable habitat within the landscape, survival rates, and effects of a prevalent disease, white pine blister rust. Strong interactions between habitat amount and survival rates of older trees suggests the importance of habitat in mediating the negative influences of white pine blister rust. Our results underscore the importance of considering habitat attributes along

  19. Advances in global sensitivity analyses of demographic-based species distribution models to address uncertainties in dynamic landscapes.

    PubMed

    Naujokaitis-Lewis, Ilona; Curtis, Janelle M R

    2016-01-01

    Developing a rigorous understanding of multiple global threats to species persistence requires the use of integrated modeling methods that capture processes which influence species distributions. Species distribution models (SDMs) coupled with population dynamics models can incorporate relationships between changing environments and demographics and are increasingly used to quantify relative extinction risks associated with climate and land-use changes. Despite their appeal, uncertainties associated with complex models can undermine their usefulness for advancing predictive ecology and informing conservation management decisions. We developed a computationally-efficient and freely available tool (GRIP 2.0) that implements and automates a global sensitivity analysis of coupled SDM-population dynamics models for comparing the relative influence of demographic parameters and habitat attributes on predicted extinction risk. Advances over previous global sensitivity analyses include the ability to vary habitat suitability across gradients, as well as habitat amount and configuration of spatially-explicit suitability maps of real and simulated landscapes. Using GRIP 2.0, we carried out a multi-model global sensitivity analysis of a coupled SDM-population dynamics model of whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) in Mount Rainier National Park as a case study and quantified the relative influence of input parameters and their interactions on model predictions. Our results differed from the one-at-time analyses used in the original study, and we found that the most influential parameters included the total amount of suitable habitat within the landscape, survival rates, and effects of a prevalent disease, white pine blister rust. Strong interactions between habitat amount and survival rates of older trees suggests the importance of habitat in mediating the negative influences of white pine blister rust. Our results underscore the importance of considering habitat attributes along

  20. Reduction of Large Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for Autoignition Using Joint Analyses of Reaction Rates and Sensitivities

    SciTech Connect

    Saylam, A; Ribaucour, M; Pitz, W J; Minetti, R

    2006-11-29

    A new technique of reduction of detailed mechanisms for autoignition, which is based on two analysis methods is described. An analysis of reaction rates is coupled to an analysis of reaction sensitivity for the detection of redundant reactions. Thresholds associated with the two analyses have a great influence on the size and efficiency of the reduced mechanism. Rules of selection of the thresholds are defined. The reduction technique has been successfully applied to detailed autoignition mechanisms of two reference hydrocarbons: n-heptane and iso-octane. The efficiency of the technique and the ability of the reduced mechanisms to reproduce well the results generated by the full mechanism are discussed. A speedup of calculations by a factor of 5.9 for n-heptane mechanism and by a factor of 16.7 for iso-octane mechanism is obtained without losing accuracy of the prediction of autoignition delay times and concentrations of intermediate species.

  1. Influence of Si Addition on Quenching Sensitivity and Formation of Nano-Precipitate in Al-Mg-Si Alloys.

    PubMed

    Kim, JaeHwang; Hayashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Equo; Sato, Tatsuo

    2016-02-01

    The age-hardening is enhanced with the high cooling rate since more vacancies are formed during quenching, whereas the stable beta phase is formed with the slow cooling rate just after solid solution treatment resulting in lower increase of hardness during aging. Meanwhile, the nanoclusters are formed during natural aging in Al-Mg-Si alloys. The formation of nanoclusters is enhanced with increasing the Si amount. High quench sensitivity based on mechanical property changes was confirmed with increasing the Si amount. Moreover, the nano-size beta" phase, main hardening phase, is more formed by the Si addition resulting in enhancement of the age-hardening. The quench sensitivity and the formation behavior of precipitates are discussed based on the age-hardening phenomena. PMID:27433677

  2. Sensitive assay of glycogen phosphorylase activity by analysing the chain-lengthening action on a Fluorogenic [corrected] maltooligosaccharide derivative.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yasushi; Omichi, Kaoru

    2009-07-01

    The action of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is essentially reversible, although GP is generally classified as a glycogen-degrading enzyme. In this study, we developed a highly sensitive and convenient assay for GP activity by analysing its chain-lengthening action on a fluorogenic maltooligosaccharide derivative in a glucose-1-phosphate-rich medium. Characterization of the substrate specificity of GP using pyridylaminated (PA-) maltooligosaccharides of various sizes revealed that a maltotetraosyl (Glc(4)) residue comprising the non-reducing-end of a PA-maltooligosaccharide is indispensable for the chain-lengthening action of GP, and PA-maltohexaose is the most suitable substrate for the purpose of this study. By using a high-performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a fluorescence spectrophotometer, PA-maltoheptaose produced by the chain elongation of PA-maltohexaose could be isolated and quantified at 10 fmol. This method was used to measure the GP activities of crude and purified GP preparations, and was demonstrated to have about 1,000 times greater sensitivity than the spectrophotometric orthophosphate assay. PMID:19279194

  3. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses for gas and brine migration at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, J.C.; Bean, J.E.; Butcher, B.M.; Garner, J.W.; Vaughn, P.; Schreiber, J.D.; Swift, P.N.

    1993-08-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis, stepwise regression analysis and examination of scatterplots are used in conjunction with the BRAGFLO model to examine two phase flow (i.e., gas and brine) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is being developed by the US Department of Energy as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. The analyses consider either a single waste panel or the entire repository in conjunction with the following cases: (1) fully consolidated shaft, (2) system of shaft seals with panel seals, and (3) single shaft seal without panel seals. The purpose of this analysis is to develop insights on factors that are potentially important in showing compliance with applicable regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency (i.e., 40 CFR 191, Subpart B; 40 CFR 268). The primary topics investigated are (1) gas production due to corrosion of steel, (2) gas production due to microbial degradation of cellulosics, (3) gas migration into anhydrite marker beds in the Salado Formation, (4) gas migration through a system of shaft seals to overlying strata, and (5) gas migration through a single shaft seal to overlying strata. Important variables identified in the analyses include initial brine saturation of the waste, stoichiometric terms for corrosion of steel and microbial degradation of cellulosics, gas barrier pressure in the anhydrite marker beds, shaft seal permeability, and panel seal permeability.

  4. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8–24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12–24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  5. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor.

    PubMed

    Cedergreen, Nina; Nørhave, Nils Jakob; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8-24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12-24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  6. Using Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses in Socioecological Agent-Based Models to Improve Their Analytical Performance and Policy Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Ligmann-Zielinska, Arika; Kramer, Daniel B.; Spence Cheruvelil, Kendra; Soranno, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Agent-based models (ABMs) have been widely used to study socioecological systems. They are useful for studying such systems because of their ability to incorporate micro-level behaviors among interacting agents, and to understand emergent phenomena due to these interactions. However, ABMs are inherently stochastic and require proper handling of uncertainty. We propose a simulation framework based on quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to build parsimonious ABMs that serve two purposes: exploration of the outcome space to simulate low-probability but high-consequence events that may have significant policy implications, and explanation of model behavior to describe the system with higher accuracy. The proposed framework is applied to the problem of modeling farmland conservation resulting in land use change. We employ output variance decomposition based on quasi-random sampling of the input space and perform three computational experiments. First, we perform uncertainty analysis to improve model legitimacy, where the distribution of results informs us about the expected value that can be validated against independent data, and provides information on the variance around this mean as well as the extreme results. In our last two computational experiments, we employ sensitivity analysis to produce two simpler versions of the ABM. First, input space is reduced only to inputs that produced the variance of the initial ABM, resulting in a model with output distribution similar to the initial model. Second, we refine the value of the most influential input, producing a model that maintains the mean of the output of initial ABM but with less spread. These simplifications can be used to 1) efficiently explore model outcomes, including outliers that may be important considerations in the design of robust policies, and 2) conduct explanatory analysis that exposes the smallest number of inputs influencing the steady state of the modeled system. PMID:25340764

  7. Using uncertainty and sensitivity analyses in socioecological agent-based models to improve their analytical performance and policy relevance.

    PubMed

    Ligmann-Zielinska, Arika; Kramer, Daniel B; Spence Cheruvelil, Kendra; Soranno, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    Agent-based models (ABMs) have been widely used to study socioecological systems. They are useful for studying such systems because of their ability to incorporate micro-level behaviors among interacting agents, and to understand emergent phenomena due to these interactions. However, ABMs are inherently stochastic and require proper handling of uncertainty. We propose a simulation framework based on quantitative uncertainty and sensitivity analyses to build parsimonious ABMs that serve two purposes: exploration of the outcome space to simulate low-probability but high-consequence events that may have significant policy implications, and explanation of model behavior to describe the system with higher accuracy. The proposed framework is applied to the problem of modeling farmland conservation resulting in land use change. We employ output variance decomposition based on quasi-random sampling of the input space and perform three computational experiments. First, we perform uncertainty analysis to improve model legitimacy, where the distribution of results informs us about the expected value that can be validated against independent data, and provides information on the variance around this mean as well as the extreme results. In our last two computational experiments, we employ sensitivity analysis to produce two simpler versions of the ABM. First, input space is reduced only to inputs that produced the variance of the initial ABM, resulting in a model with output distribution similar to the initial model. Second, we refine the value of the most influential input, producing a model that maintains the mean of the output of initial ABM but with less spread. These simplifications can be used to 1) efficiently explore model outcomes, including outliers that may be important considerations in the design of robust policies, and 2) conduct explanatory analysis that exposes the smallest number of inputs influencing the steady state of the modeled system. PMID:25340764

  8. Assessing uncertainty in ecological systems using global sensitivity analyses: a case example of simulated wolf reintroduction effects on elk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fieberg, J.; Jenkins, Kurt J.

    2005-01-01

    Often landmark conservation decisions are made despite an incomplete knowledge of system behavior and inexact predictions of how complex ecosystems will respond to management actions. For example, predicting the feasibility and likely effects of restoring top-level carnivores such as the gray wolf (Canis lupus) to North American wilderness areas is hampered by incomplete knowledge of the predator-prey system processes and properties. In such cases, global sensitivity measures, such as Sobola?? indices, allow one to quantify the effect of these uncertainties on model predictions. Sobola?? indices are calculated by decomposing the variance in model predictions (due to parameter uncertainty) into main effects of model parameters and their higher order interactions. Model parameters with large sensitivity indices can then be identified for further study in order to improve predictive capabilities. Here, we illustrate the use of Sobola?? sensitivity indices to examine the effect of parameter uncertainty on the predicted decline of elk (Cervus elaphus) population sizes following a hypothetical reintroduction of wolves to Olympic National Park, Washington, USA. The strength of density dependence acting on survival of adult elk and magnitude of predation were the most influential factors controlling elk population size following a simulated wolf reintroduction. In particular, the form of density dependence in natural survival rates and the per-capita predation rate together accounted for over 90% of variation in simulated elk population trends. Additional research on wolf predation rates on elk and natural compensations in prey populations is needed to reliably predict the outcome of predatora??prey system behavior following wolf reintroductions.

  9. Seasonality, Rather than Nutrient Addition or Vegetation Types, Influenced Short-Term Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu-Qi; He, Feng-Peng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The response of microbial respiration from soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition to environmental changes plays a key role in predicting future trends of atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, it remains uncertain whether there is a universal trend in the response of microbial respiration to increased temperature and nutrient addition among different vegetation types. In this study, soils were sampled in spring, summer, autumn and winter from five dominant vegetation types, including pine, larch and birch forest, shrubland, and grassland, in the Saihanba area of northern China. Soil samples from each season were incubated at 1, 10, and 20°C for 5 to 7 days. Nitrogen (N; 0.035 mM as NH4NO3) and phosphorus (P; 0.03 mM as P2O5) were added to soil samples, and the responses of soil microbial respiration to increased temperature and nutrient addition were determined. We found a universal trend that soil microbial respiration increased with increased temperature regardless of sampling season or vegetation type. The temperature sensitivity (indicated by Q10, the increase in respiration rate with a 10°C increase in temperature) of microbial respiration was higher in spring and autumn than in summer and winter, irrespective of vegetation type. The Q10 was significantly positively correlated with microbial biomass and the fungal: bacterial ratio. Microbial respiration (or Q10) did not significantly respond to N or P addition. Our results suggest that short-term nutrient input might not change the SOC decomposition rate or its temperature sensitivity, whereas increased temperature might significantly enhance SOC decomposition in spring and autumn, compared with winter and summer. PMID:27070782

  10. Seasonality, Rather than Nutrient Addition or Vegetation Types, Influenced Short-Term Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng-Peng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The response of microbial respiration from soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition to environmental changes plays a key role in predicting future trends of atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, it remains uncertain whether there is a universal trend in the response of microbial respiration to increased temperature and nutrient addition among different vegetation types. In this study, soils were sampled in spring, summer, autumn and winter from five dominant vegetation types, including pine, larch and birch forest, shrubland, and grassland, in the Saihanba area of northern China. Soil samples from each season were incubated at 1, 10, and 20°C for 5 to 7 days. Nitrogen (N; 0.035 mM as NH4NO3) and phosphorus (P; 0.03 mM as P2O5) were added to soil samples, and the responses of soil microbial respiration to increased temperature and nutrient addition were determined. We found a universal trend that soil microbial respiration increased with increased temperature regardless of sampling season or vegetation type. The temperature sensitivity (indicated by Q10, the increase in respiration rate with a 10°C increase in temperature) of microbial respiration was higher in spring and autumn than in summer and winter, irrespective of vegetation type. The Q10 was significantly positively correlated with microbial biomass and the fungal: bacterial ratio. Microbial respiration (or Q10) did not significantly respond to N or P addition. Our results suggest that short-term nutrient input might not change the SOC decomposition rate or its temperature sensitivity, whereas increased temperature might significantly enhance SOC decomposition in spring and autumn, compared with winter and summer. PMID:27070782

  11. Sensitivity analyses for clustered data: an illustration from a large-scale clustered randomized controlled trial in education.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yasuyo; Gee, Kevin A

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the importance of conducting well-thought-out sensitivity analyses for handling clustered data (data in which individuals are grouped into higher order units, such as students in schools) that arise from cluster randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This is particularly relevant given the rise in rigorous impact evaluations that use cluster randomized designs across various fields including education, public health and social welfare. Using data from a recently completed cluster RCT of a school-based teacher professional development program, we demonstrate our use of four commonly applied methods for analyzing clustered data. These methods include: (1) hierarchical linear modeling (HLM); (2) feasible generalized least squares (FGLS); (3) generalized estimating equations (GEE); and (4) ordinary least squares (OLS) regression with cluster-robust (Huber-White) standard errors. We compare our findings across each method, showing how inconsistent results - in terms of both effect sizes and statistical significance - emerged across each method and our analytic approach to resolving such inconsistencies. PMID:25090223

  12. Sensitivity Analyses in Small Break LOCA with HPI-Failure: Effect of Break-Size in Secondary-Side Depressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Ikuo; Torige, Toshihide; Yamada, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    In the case of total failure of the high pressure injection (HPI) system following small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA) in pressurized water reactor (PWR), the break size is so small that the primary system does not depressurize to the accumulator (ACC) injection pressure before the core is uncovered extensively. Therefore, steam generator (SG) secondary-side depressurization is necessary as an accident management in order to grant accumulator system actuation and core reflood. A thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP5/MOD3 was made on SBLOCA with HPI-failure for Oi Units 3/4 operated by Kansai Electoric Power Co., which are conventional 4 loop PWR plants. The effectiveness of SG secondary-side depressurization procedure was investigated for the real plant design and operational characteristics. The sensitivity analyses using RELAP5/MOD3.2 showed that the accident management was effective for a wide range of break sizes, various orientations and positions. The critical break can be 3 inch cold-leg bottom break.

  13. Urea as a long-term stable alternative to guanidium thiocyanate additive in dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mi-Jeong; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-09-01

    Photovoltaic performance of 0.05 M urea-contained redox electrolyte is compared to that of 0.05 M guanidinium thiocyanate (GSCN)-contained one in dye-sensitized solar cell. No significant difference in the initial photovoltaic performance is observed, which means that the role of urea additive is similar to that of GSCN. Initial solar-to-electrical conversion efficiency of the device containing GSCN shows 7% that is diminished to 5.8% after 40 days, whereas the device containing urea exhibits stable photovoltaic performance showing that initial efficiency of 7.2% is almost remained unchanged after 40 days (7.1%). The lowered efficiency of the GSCN-contained device is mainly due to the decreased photocurrent density, which is ascribed to the formation of needle-shaped crystals on TiO2 layer. Infrared spectroscopic study confirms that the crystals are dye analogue, which is indicative of dye desorption in the presence of GSCN. On the other hand, no crystals are formed in the urea-contained electrolyte, which implies that dye desorption is negligible. Urea additive is thus found to be less reactive in dye desorption than GSCN, leading to long-term stability.

  14. Phenotypic and Genetic Analyses of the Varroa Sensitive Hygienic Trait in Russian Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Kirrane, Maria J.; de Guzman, Lilia I.; Holloway, Beth; Frake, Amanda M.; Rinderer, Thomas E.; Whelan, Pádraig M.

    2015-01-01

    Varroa destructor continues to threaten colonies of European honey bees. General hygiene, and more specific Varroa Sensitive Hygiene (VSH), provide resistance towards the Varroa mite in a number of stocks. In this study, 32 Russian (RHB) and 14 Italian honey bee colonies were assessed for the VSH trait using two different assays. Firstly, colonies were assessed using the standard VSH behavioural assay of the change in infestation of a highly infested donor comb after a one-week exposure. Secondly, the same colonies were assessed using an “actual brood removal assay” that measured the removal of brood in a section created within the donor combs as a potential alternative measure of hygiene towards Varroa-infested brood. All colonies were then analysed for the recently discovered VSH quantitative trait locus (QTL) to determine whether the genetic mechanisms were similar across different stocks. Based on the two assays, RHB colonies were consistently more hygienic toward Varroa-infested brood than Italian honey bee colonies. The actual number of brood cells removed in the defined section was negatively correlated with the Varroa infestations of the colonies (r2 = 0.25). Only two (percentages of brood removed and reproductive foundress Varroa) out of nine phenotypic parameters showed significant associations with genotype distributions. However, the allele associated with each parameter was the opposite of that determined by VSH mapping. In this study, RHB colonies showed high levels of hygienic behaviour towards Varroa -infested brood. The genetic mechanisms are similar to those of the VSH stock, though the opposite allele associates in RHB, indicating a stable recombination event before the selection of the VSH stock. The measurement of brood removal is a simple, reliable alternative method of measuring hygienic behaviour towards Varroa mites, at least in RHB stock. PMID:25909856

  15. A Sensitive and Robust HPLC Assay with Fluorescence Detection for the Quantification of Pomalidomide in Human Plasma for Pharmacokinetic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shandiz; Peer, Cody J.; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Roth, Jeffrey; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Aleman, Karen; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Yarchoan, Robert; Figg, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Pomalidomide is a second generation IMiD (immunomodulatory agent) that has recently been granted approval by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma after prior treatment with two antimyeloma agents, including lenalidomide and bortezomib. A simple and robust HPLC assay with fluorescence detection for pomalidomide over the range of 1–500 ng/mL has been developed for application to pharmacokinetic studies in ongoing clinical trials in various other malignancies. A liquid-liquid extraction from human plasma alone or pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl was performed, using propyl paraben as the internal standard. From plasma either pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl or not, the assay was shown to be selective, sensitive, accurate, precise, and have minimal matrix effects (<20%). Pomalidomide was stable in plasma through 4 freeze-thaw cycles (<12% change), in plasma at room temperature for up to 2 hr for samples not pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl and up to 8 hr in samples pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl, 24 hr post-preparation at 4 °C (<2% change), and showed excellent extraction recovery (~90%). This is the first reported description of the freeze/thaw and plasma stability of pomalidomide in plasma either pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl or not. The information presented in this manuscript is important when performing pharmacokinetic analyses. The method was used to analyze clinical pharmacokinetics samples obtained after a 5 mg oral dose of pomalidomide. This relatively simple HPLC-FL assay allows a broader range of laboratories to measure pomalidomide for application to clinical pharmacokinetics. PMID:24486861

  16. A sensitive and robust HPLC assay with fluorescence detection for the quantification of pomalidomide in human plasma for pharmacokinetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Shandiz; Peer, Cody J; Polizzotto, Mark N; Uldrick, Thomas S; Roth, Jeffrey; Wyvill, Kathleen M; Aleman, Karen; Zeldis, Jerome B; Yarchoan, Robert; Figg, William D

    2014-04-01

    Pomalidomide is a second generation IMiD (immunomodulatory agent) that has recently been granted approval by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of relapsed multiple myeloma after prior treatment with two antimyeloma agents, including lenalidomide and bortezomib. A simple and robust HPLC assay with fluorescence detection for pomalidomide over the range of 1-500ng/mL has been developed for application to pharmacokinetic studies in ongoing clinical trials in various other malignancies. A liquid-liquid extraction from human plasma alone or pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl was performed, using propyl paraben as the internal standard. From plasma either pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl or not, the assay was shown to be selective, sensitive, accurate, precise, and have minimal matrix effects (<20%). Pomalidomide was stable in plasma through 4 freeze-thaw cycles (<12% change), in plasma at room temperature for up to 2h for samples not pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl and up to 8h in samples pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl, 24h post-preparation at 4°C (<2% change), and showed excellent extraction recovery (∼90%). This is the first reported description of the freeze/thaw and plasma stability of pomalidomide in plasma either pre-stabilized with 0.1% HCl or not. The information presented in this manuscript is important when performing pharmacokinetic analyses. The method was used to analyze clinical pharmacokinetics samples obtained after a 5mg oral dose of pomalidomide. This relatively simple HPLC-FL assay allows a broader range of laboratories to measure pomalidomide for application to clinical pharmacokinetics. PMID:24486861

  17. Phenotypic and genetic analyses of the varroa sensitive hygienic trait in Russian honey bee (hymenoptera: apidae) colonies.

    PubMed

    Kirrane, Maria J; de Guzman, Lilia I; Holloway, Beth; Frake, Amanda M; Rinderer, Thomas E; Whelan, Pádraig M

    2014-01-01

    Varroa destructor continues to threaten colonies of European honey bees. General hygiene, and more specific Varroa Sensitive Hygiene (VSH), provide resistance towards the Varroa mite in a number of stocks. In this study, 32 Russian (RHB) and 14 Italian honey bee colonies were assessed for the VSH trait using two different assays. Firstly, colonies were assessed using the standard VSH behavioural assay of the change in infestation of a highly infested donor comb after a one-week exposure. Secondly, the same colonies were assessed using an "actual brood removal assay" that measured the removal of brood in a section created within the donor combs as a potential alternative measure of hygiene towards Varroa-infested brood. All colonies were then analysed for the recently discovered VSH quantitative trait locus (QTL) to determine whether the genetic mechanisms were similar across different stocks. Based on the two assays, RHB colonies were consistently more hygienic toward Varroa-infested brood than Italian honey bee colonies. The actual number of brood cells removed in the defined section was negatively correlated with the Varroa infestations of the colonies (r2 = 0.25). Only two (percentages of brood removed and reproductive foundress Varroa) out of nine phenotypic parameters showed significant associations with genotype distributions. However, the allele associated with each parameter was the opposite of that determined by VSH mapping. In this study, RHB colonies showed high levels of hygienic behaviour towards Varroa -infested brood. The genetic mechanisms are similar to those of the VSH stock, though the opposite allele associates in RHB, indicating a stable recombination event before the selection of the VSH stock. The measurement of brood removal is a simple, reliable alternative method of measuring hygienic behaviour towards Varroa mites, at least in RHB stock. PMID:25909856

  18. Cisapride a green analytical reagent for rapid and sensitive determination of bromate in drinking water, bread and flour additives by oxidative coupling spectrophotometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Okab, Riyad Ahmed

    2013-02-01

    Green analytical methods using Cisapride (CPE) as green analytical reagent was investigated in this work. Rapid, simple, and sensitive spectrophotometric methods for the determination of bromate in water sample, bread and flour additives were developed. The proposed methods based on the oxidative coupling between phenoxazine and Cisapride in the presence of bromate to form red colored product with max at 520 nm. Phenoxazine and Cisapride and its reaction products were found to be environmentally friendly under the optimum experimental condition. The method obeys beers law in concentration range 0.11-4.00 g ml-1 and molar absorptivity 1.41 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1. All variables have been optimized and the presented reaction sequences were applied to the analysis of bromate in water, bread and flour additive samples. The performance of these method was evaluated in terms of Student's t-test and variance ratio F-test to find out the significance of proposed methods over the reference method. The combination of pharmaceutical drugs reagents with low concentration create some unique green chemical analyses.

  19. Cisapride a green analytical reagent for rapid and sensitive determination of bromate in drinking water, bread and flour additives by oxidative coupling spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Al Okab, Riyad Ahmed

    2013-02-15

    Green analytical methods using Cisapride (CPE) as green analytical reagent was investigated in this work. Rapid, simple, and sensitive spectrophotometric methods for the determination of bromate in water sample, bread and flour additives were developed. The proposed methods based on the oxidative coupling between phenoxazine and Cisapride in the presence of bromate to form red colored product with max at 520 nm. Phenoxazine and Cisapride and its reaction products were found to be environmentally friendly under the optimum experimental condition. The method obeys beers law in concentration range 0.11-4.00 g ml(-1) and molar absorptivity 1.41 × 10(4) L mol(-1)cm(-1). All variables have been optimized and the presented reaction sequences were applied to the analysis of bromate in water, bread and flour additive samples. The performance of these method was evaluated in terms of Student's t-test and variance ratio F-test to find out the significance of proposed methods over the reference method. The combination of pharmaceutical drugs reagents with low concentration create some unique green chemical analyses. PMID:23261631

  20. The quest for the best: The impact of different EPI sequences on the sensitivity of random effect fMRI group analyses.

    PubMed

    Kirilina, Evgeniya; Lutti, Antoine; Poser, Benedikt A; Blankenburg, Felix; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-02-01

    We compared the sensitivity of standard single-shot 2D echo planar imaging (EPI) to three advanced EPI sequences, i.e., 2D multi-echo EPI, 3D high resolution EPI and 3D dual-echo fast EPI in fixed effect and random effects group level fMRI analyses at 3T. The study focused on how well the variance reduction in fixed effect analyses achieved by advanced EPI sequences translates into increased sensitivity in the random effects group level analysis. The sensitivity was estimated in a functional MRI experiment of an emotional learning and a reward based learning tasks in a group of 24 volunteers. Each experiment was acquired with the four different sequences. The task-related response amplitude, contrast level and respective t-value were proxies for the functional sensitivity across the brain. All three advanced EPI methods increased the sensitivity in the fixed effects analyses, but standard single-shot 2D EPI provided a comparable performance in random effects group analysis when whole brain coverage and moderate resolution are required. In this experiment inter-subject variability determined the sensitivity of the random effects analysis for most brain regions, making the impact of EPI pulse sequence improvements less relevant or even negligible for random effects analyses. An exception concerns the optimization of EPI reducing susceptibility-related signal loss that translates into an enhanced sensitivity e.g. in the orbitofrontal cortex for multi-echo EPI. Thus, future optimization strategies may best aim at reducing inter-subject variability for higher sensitivity in standard fMRI group studies at moderate spatial resolution. PMID:26515905

  1. The quest for the best: The impact of different EPI sequences on the sensitivity of random effect fMRI group analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kirilina, Evgeniya; Lutti, Antoine; Poser, Benedikt A.; Blankenburg, Felix; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    We compared the sensitivity of standard single-shot 2D echo planar imaging (EPI) to three advanced EPI sequences, i.e., 2D multi-echo EPI, 3D high resolution EPI and 3D dual-echo fast EPI in fixed effect and random effects group level fMRI analyses at 3 T. The study focused on how well the variance reduction in fixed effect analyses achieved by advanced EPI sequences translates into increased sensitivity in the random effects group level analysis. The sensitivity was estimated in a functional MRI experiment of an emotional learning and a reward based learning tasks in a group of 24 volunteers. Each experiment was acquired with the four different sequences. The task-related response amplitude, contrast level and respective t-value were proxies for the functional sensitivity across the brain. All three advanced EPI methods increased the sensitivity in the fixed effects analyses, but standard single-shot 2D EPI provided a comparable performance in random effects group analysis when whole brain coverage and moderate resolution are required. In this experiment inter-subject variability determined the sensitivity of the random effects analysis for most brain regions, making the impact of EPI pulse sequence improvements less relevant or even negligible for random effects analyses. An exception concerns the optimization of EPI reducing susceptibility-related signal loss that translates into an enhanced sensitivity e.g. in the orbitofrontal cortex for multi-echo EPI. Thus, future optimization strategies may best aim at reducing inter-subject variability for higher sensitivity in standard fMRI group studies at moderate spatial resolution. PMID:26515905

  2. Nano-morphology induced additional surface plasmon resonance enhancement of SERS sensitivity in Ag/GaN nanowall network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharvani, S.; Upadhayaya, Kishor; Kumari, Gayatri; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    The GaN nanowall network, formed by opening the screw dislocations by kinetically controlled MBE growth, possesses a large surface and high conductivity. Sharp apexed nanowalls show higher surface electron concentration in the band-tail states, in comparison to blunt apexed nanowalls. Uncapped silver nanoparticles are vapor deposited on the blunt and sharp GaN nanowall networks to study the morphological dependence of band-edge plasmon-coupling. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies performed with a rhodamine 6G analyte on these two configurations clearly show that the sharp nanowall morphology with smaller Ag nanoparticles shows higher enhancement of the Raman signal. A very large enhancement factor of 2.8 × 107 and a very low limit of detection of 10-10 M is observed, which is attributed to the surface plasmon resonance owing to the high surface electron concentration on the GaN nanowall in addition to that of the Ag nanoparticles. The significantly higher sensitivity with same-sized Ag nanoparticles confirms the unconventional role of morphology-dependent surface charge carrier concentration of GaN nanowalls in the enhancement of Raman signals.

  3. Nano-morphology induced additional surface plasmon resonance enhancement of SERS sensitivity in Ag/GaN nanowall network.

    PubMed

    Sharvani, S; Upadhayaya, Kishor; Kumari, Gayatri; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Shivaprasad, S M

    2015-11-20

    The GaN nanowall network, formed by opening the screw dislocations by kinetically controlled MBE growth, possesses a large surface and high conductivity. Sharp apexed nanowalls show higher surface electron concentration in the band-tail states, in comparison to blunt apexed nanowalls. Uncapped silver nanoparticles are vapor deposited on the blunt and sharp GaN nanowall networks to study the morphological dependence of band-edge plasmon-coupling. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies performed with a rhodamine 6G analyte on these two configurations clearly show that the sharp nanowall morphology with smaller Ag nanoparticles shows higher enhancement of the Raman signal. A very large enhancement factor of 2.8 × 10(7) and a very low limit of detection of 10(-10) M is observed, which is attributed to the surface plasmon resonance owing to the high surface electron concentration on the GaN nanowall in addition to that of the Ag nanoparticles. The significantly higher sensitivity with same-sized Ag nanoparticles confirms the unconventional role of morphology-dependent surface charge carrier concentration of GaN nanowalls in the enhancement of Raman signals. PMID:26502004

  4. Thermal threshold and sensitivity of the only symbiotic Mediterranean gorgonian Eunicella singularis by morphometric and genotypic analyses.

    PubMed

    Pey, Alexis; Catanéo, Jérôme; Forcioli, Didier; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Furla, Paola

    2013-07-01

    The only symbiotic Mediterranean gorgonian, Eunicella singularis, has faced several mortality events connected to abnormal high temperatures. Since thermotolerance data remain scarce, heat-induced necrosis was monitored in aquarium by morphometric analysis. Gorgonian tips were sampled at two sites: Medes (Spain) and Riou (France) Islands, and at two depths: -15 m and-35 m. Although coming from contrasting thermal regimes, seawater above 28 °C led to rapid and complete tissue necrosis for all four populations. However, at 27 °C, the time length leading to 50% tissue necrosis allowed us to classify samples within three classes of thermal sensitivity. Irrespectively of the depth, Medes specimens were either very sensitive or resistant, while Riou fragments presented a medium sensitivity. Microsatellite analysis revealed that host and symbiont were genetically differentiated between sites, but not between depths. Finally, these genetic differentiations were not directly correlated to a specific thermal sensitivity whose molecular bases remain to be discovered. PMID:23932253

  5. IMPROVING PARTICULATE MATTER SOURCE APPORTIONMENT FOR HEALTH STUDIES: A TRAINED RECEPTOR MODELING APPROACH WITH SENSITIVITY, UNCERTAINTY AND SPATIAL ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approach for conducting PM source apportionment will be developed, tested, and applied that directly addresses limitations in current SA methods, in particular variability, biases, and intensive resource requirements. Uncertainties in SA results and sensitivities to SA inpu...

  6. Phylogenetic Analyses and Characterization of RNase X25 from Drosophila melanogaster Suggest a Conserved Housekeeping Role and Additional Functions for RNase T2 Enzymes in Protostomes

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Linda; Bailey, Ryan; Ding, Jian; MacIntosh, Gustavo C.

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleases belonging to the RNase T2 family are enzymes associated with the secretory pathway that are almost absolutely conserved in all eukaryotes. Studies in plants and vertebrates suggest they have an important housekeeping function in rRNA recycling. However, little is known about this family of enzymes in protostomes. We characterized RNase X25, the only RNase T2 enzyme in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that RNase X25 is the major contributor of ribonuclease activity in flies as detected by in gel assays, and has an acidic pH preference. Gene expression analyses showed that the RNase X25 transcript is present in all adult tissues and developmental stages. RNase X25 expression is elevated in response to nutritional stresses; consistent with the hypothesis that this enzyme has a housekeeping role in recycling RNA. A correlation between induction of RNase X25 expression and autophagy was observed. Moreover, induction of gene expression was triggered by oxidative stress suggesting that RNase X25 may have additional roles in stress responses. Phylogenetic analyses of this family in protostomes showed that RNase T2 genes have undergone duplication events followed by divergence in several phyla, including the loss of catalytic residues, and suggest that RNase T2 proteins have acquired novel functions. Among those, it is likely that a role in host immunosuppression evolved independently in several groups, including parasitic Platyhelminthes and parasitoid wasps. The presence of only one RNase T2 gene in the D. melanogaster genome, without any other evident secretory RNase activity detected, makes this organism an ideal system to study the cellular functions of RNase T2 proteins associated with RNA recycling and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. On the other hand, the discovery of gene duplications in several protostome genomes also presents interesting new avenues to study additional biological functions of this ancient family of proteins. PMID:25133712

  7. Alternative Toxicity Testing: Analyses on Skin Sensitization, ToxCast Phases I and II, and Carcinogenicity Provide Indications on How to Model Mechanisms Linked to Adverse Outcome Pathways.

    PubMed

    Benigni, Romualdo; Battistelli, Chiara Laura; Bossa, Cecilia; Giuliani, Alessandro; Tcheremenskaia, Olga

    2015-01-01

    This article studies alternative toxicological approaches, with new (skin sensitization, ToxCast) and previous (carcinogenicity) analyses. Quantitative modeling of rate-limiting steps in skin sensitization and carcinogenicity predicts the majority of toxicants. Similarly, successful (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationships models exploit the quantification of only one, or few rate-limiting steps. High-throughput assays within ToxCast point to promising associations with endocrine disruption, whereas markers for pathways intermediate events have limited correlation with most endpoints. Since the pathways may be very different (often not simple linear chains of events), quantitative analysis is necessary to identify the type of mechanism and build the appropriate model. PMID:26398111

  8. Pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses were performed to estimate critical factors in the performance of the site with respect to a criterion in terms of pre-waste-emplacement ground-water travel time. The degree of failure in the analytical model to meet the criterion is sensitive to the estimate of fracture porosity in the upper welded unit of the problem domain. Fracture porosity is derived from a number of more fundamental measurements including fracture frequency, fracture orientation, and the moisture-retention characteristic inferred for the fracture domain.

  9. Phenotypic and genetic analyses of the Varroa Sensitive Hygienic trait in Russian Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varroa destructor continues to threaten colonies of European honey bees. General hygiene and more specific VarroaVarroa Sensitive Hygiene (VSH) provide resistance toward the Varroa mite in a number of stocks. In this study, Russian (RHB) and Italian honey bees were assessed for the VSH trait. Two...

  10. Evaluation of habitat suitability index models by global sensitivity and uncertainty analyses: a case study for submerged aquatic vegetation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zajac, Zuzanna; Stith, Bradley M.; Bowling, Andrea C.; Langtimm, Catherine A.; Swain, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat suitability index (HSI) models are commonly used to predict habitat quality and species distributions and are used to develop biological surveys, assess reserve and management priorities, and anticipate possible change under different management or climate change scenarios. Important management decisions may be based on model results, often without a clear understanding of the level of uncertainty associated with model outputs. We present an integrated methodology to assess the propagation of uncertainty from both inputs and structure of the HSI models on model outputs (uncertainty analysis: UA) and relative importance of uncertain model inputs and their interactions on the model output uncertainty (global sensitivity analysis: GSA). We illustrate the GSA/UA framework using simulated hydrology input data from a hydrodynamic model representing sea level changes and HSI models for two species of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in southwest Everglades National Park: Vallisneria americana (tape grass) and Halodule wrightii (shoal grass). We found considerable spatial variation in uncertainty for both species, but distributions of HSI scores still allowed discrimination of sites with good versus poor conditions. Ranking of input parameter sensitivities also varied spatially for both species, with high habitat quality sites showing higher sensitivity to different parameters than low-quality sites. HSI models may be especially useful when species distribution data are unavailable, providing means of exploiting widely available environmental datasets to model past, current, and future habitat conditions. The GSA/UA approach provides a general method for better understanding HSI model dynamics, the spatial and temporal variation in uncertainties, and the parameters that contribute most to model uncertainty. Including an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in modeling efforts as part of the decision-making framework will result in better-informed, more robust

  11. Evaluation of habitat suitability index models by global sensitivity and uncertainty analyses: a case study for submerged aquatic vegetation

    PubMed Central

    Zajac, Zuzanna; Stith, Bradley; Bowling, Andrea C; Langtimm, Catherine A; Swain, Eric D

    2015-01-01

    Habitat suitability index (HSI) models are commonly used to predict habitat quality and species distributions and are used to develop biological surveys, assess reserve and management priorities, and anticipate possible change under different management or climate change scenarios. Important management decisions may be based on model results, often without a clear understanding of the level of uncertainty associated with model outputs. We present an integrated methodology to assess the propagation of uncertainty from both inputs and structure of the HSI models on model outputs (uncertainty analysis: UA) and relative importance of uncertain model inputs and their interactions on the model output uncertainty (global sensitivity analysis: GSA). We illustrate the GSA/UA framework using simulated hydrology input data from a hydrodynamic model representing sea level changes and HSI models for two species of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in southwest Everglades National Park: Vallisneria americana (tape grass) and Halodule wrightii (shoal grass). We found considerable spatial variation in uncertainty for both species, but distributions of HSI scores still allowed discrimination of sites with good versus poor conditions. Ranking of input parameter sensitivities also varied spatially for both species, with high habitat quality sites showing higher sensitivity to different parameters than low-quality sites. HSI models may be especially useful when species distribution data are unavailable, providing means of exploiting widely available environmental datasets to model past, current, and future habitat conditions. The GSA/UA approach provides a general method for better understanding HSI model dynamics, the spatial and temporal variation in uncertainties, and the parameters that contribute most to model uncertainty. Including an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in modeling efforts as part of the decision-making framework will result in better-informed, more robust

  12. Evaluation of habitat suitability index models by global sensitivity and uncertainty analyses: a case study for submerged aquatic vegetation.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Zuzanna; Stith, Bradley; Bowling, Andrea C; Langtimm, Catherine A; Swain, Eric D

    2015-07-01

    Habitat suitability index (HSI) models are commonly used to predict habitat quality and species distributions and are used to develop biological surveys, assess reserve and management priorities, and anticipate possible change under different management or climate change scenarios. Important management decisions may be based on model results, often without a clear understanding of the level of uncertainty associated with model outputs. We present an integrated methodology to assess the propagation of uncertainty from both inputs and structure of the HSI models on model outputs (uncertainty analysis: UA) and relative importance of uncertain model inputs and their interactions on the model output uncertainty (global sensitivity analysis: GSA). We illustrate the GSA/UA framework using simulated hydrology input data from a hydrodynamic model representing sea level changes and HSI models for two species of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in southwest Everglades National Park: Vallisneria americana (tape grass) and Halodule wrightii (shoal grass). We found considerable spatial variation in uncertainty for both species, but distributions of HSI scores still allowed discrimination of sites with good versus poor conditions. Ranking of input parameter sensitivities also varied spatially for both species, with high habitat quality sites showing higher sensitivity to different parameters than low-quality sites. HSI models may be especially useful when species distribution data are unavailable, providing means of exploiting widely available environmental datasets to model past, current, and future habitat conditions. The GSA/UA approach provides a general method for better understanding HSI model dynamics, the spatial and temporal variation in uncertainties, and the parameters that contribute most to model uncertainty. Including an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in modeling efforts as part of the decision-making framework will result in better-informed, more robust

  13. Proteomic analyses reveal differences in cold acclimation mechanisms in freezing-tolerant and freezing-sensitive cultivars of alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Han, Guiqing; Shang, Chen; Li, Jikai; Zhang, Hailing; Liu, Fengqi; Wang, Jianli; Liu, Huiying; Zhang, Yuexue

    2015-01-01

    Cold acclimation in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plays a crucial role in cold tolerance to harsh winters. To examine the cold acclimation mechanisms in freezing-tolerant alfalfa (ZD) and freezing-sensitive alfalfa (W5), holoproteins, and low-abundance proteins (after the removal of RuBisCO) from leaves were extracted to analyze differences at the protein level. A total of 84 spots were selected, and 67 spots were identified. Of these, the abundance of 49 spots and 24 spots in ZD and W5, respectively, were altered during adaptation to chilling stress. Proteomic results revealed that proteins involved in photosynthesis, protein metabolism, energy metabolism, stress and redox and other proteins were mobilized in adaptation to chilling stress. In ZD, a greater number of changes were observed in proteins, and autologous metabolism and biosynthesis were slowed in response to chilling stress, thereby reducing consumption, allowing for homeostasis. The capability for protein folding and protein biosynthesis in W5 was enhanced, which allows protection against chilling stress. The ability to perceive low temperatures was more sensitive in freezing-tolerant alfalfa compared to freezing-sensitive alfalfa. This proteomics study provides new insights into the cold acclimation mechanism in alfalfa. PMID:25774161

  14. Compact variant-rich customized sequence database and a fast and sensitive database search for efficient proteogenomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Park, Heejin; Bae, Junwoo; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Sangok; Kim, Hokeun; Mun, Dong-Gi; Joh, Yoonsung; Lee, Wonyeop; Chae, Sehyun; Lee, Sanghyuk; Kim, Hark Kyun; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Sang-Won; Paek, Eunok

    2014-12-01

    In proteogenomic analysis, construction of a compact, customized database from mRNA-seq data and a sensitive search of both reference and customized databases are essential to accurately determine protein abundances and structural variations at the protein level. However, these tasks have not been systematically explored, but rather performed in an ad-hoc fashion. Here, we present an effective method for constructing a compact database containing comprehensive sequences of sample-specific variants--single nucleotide variants, insertions/deletions, and stop-codon mutations derived from Exome-seq and RNA-seq data. It, however, occupies less space by storing variant peptides, not variant proteins. We also present an efficient search method for both customized and reference databases. The separate searches of the two databases increase the search time, and a unified search is less sensitive to identify variant peptides due to the smaller size of the customized database, compared to the reference database, in the target-decoy setting. Our method searches the unified database once, but performs target-decoy validations separately. Experimental results show that our approach is as fast as the unified search and as sensitive as the separate searches. Our customized database includes mutation information in the headers of variant peptides, thereby facilitating the inspection of peptide-spectrum matches. PMID:25316439

  15. Effects of Taiwan Roselle anthocyanin treatment and single-walled carbon nanotube addition on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. S.; Tsai, P. J.; Wu, P.; Shu, G. G.; Huang, Y. H.; Chen, Y. S.

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the performance of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) sensitized by a natural sensitizer of Taiwan Roselle anthocyanin (TRA) and fabrication process conditions of the DSSC. A set of systematic experiments has been carried out at various soaking temperatures, soaking periods, sensitizer concentrations, pH values, and additions of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). An absorption peak (520 nm) is found for TRA, and it is close to that of the N719 dye (518 nm). At a fixed concentration of TRA and a fixed soaking period, a lower pH of the extract or a lower soaking temperature is found favorable to the formation of pigment cations, which leads to an enhanced power conversion efficiency (η) of DSSC. For instance, by applying 17.53 mg/100ml TRA at 30 for 10 h, as the pH of the extract decreases to 2.00 from 2.33 (the original pH of TRA), the η of DSSC with TiO2+SWCNT electrode increases to 0.67% from 0.11% of a traditional DSSC with TiO2 electrode. This performance improvement can be explained by the combined effect of the pH of sensitizer and the additions of SWCNT, a first investigation in DSSC using the natural sensitizer with SWCNT.

  16. Quasi-laminar stability and sensitivity analyses for turbulent flows: Prediction of low-frequency unsteadiness and passive control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettot, Clément; Sipp, Denis; Bézard, Hervé

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a quasi-laminar stability approach to identify in high-Reynolds number flows the dominant low-frequencies and to design passive control means to shift these frequencies. The approach is based on a global linear stability analysis of mean-flows, which correspond to the time-average of the unsteady flows. Contrary to the previous work by Meliga et al. ["Sensitivity of 2-D turbulent flow past a D-shaped cylinder using global stability," Phys. Fluids 24, 061701 (2012)], we use the linearized Navier-Stokes equations based solely on the molecular viscosity (leaving aside any turbulence model and any eddy viscosity) to extract the least stable direct and adjoint global modes of the flow. Then, we compute the frequency sensitivity maps of these modes, so as to predict before hand where a small control cylinder optimally shifts the frequency of the flow. In the case of the D-shaped cylinder studied by Parezanović and Cadot [J. Fluid Mech. 693, 115 (2012)], we show that the present approach well captures the frequency of the flow and recovers accurately the frequency control maps obtained experimentally. The results are close to those already obtained by Meliga et al., who used a more complex approach in which turbulence models played a central role. The present approach is simpler and may be applied to a broader range of flows since it is tractable as soon as mean-flows — which can be obtained either numerically from simulations (Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), Large Eddy Simulation (LES), unsteady Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes (RANS), steady RANS) or from experimental measurements (Particle Image Velocimetry - PIV) — are available. We also discuss how the influence of the control cylinder on the mean-flow may be more accurately predicted by determining an eddy-viscosity from numerical simulations or experimental measurements. From a technical point of view, we finally show how an existing compressible numerical simulation code may be used in

  17. High-Resolution Linkage Analyses to Identify Genes That Influence Varroa Sensitive Hygiene Behavior in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Tsuruda, Jennifer M.; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Bourgeois, Lanie; Danka, Robert G.; Hunt, Greg J.

    2012-01-01

    Varroa mites (V. destructor) are a major threat to honey bees (Apis melilfera) and beekeeping worldwide and likely lead to colony decline if colonies are not treated. Most treatments involve chemical control of the mites; however, Varroa has evolved resistance to many of these miticides, leaving beekeepers with a limited number of alternatives. A non-chemical control method is highly desirable for numerous reasons including lack of chemical residues and decreased likelihood of resistance. Varroa sensitive hygiene behavior is one of two behaviors identified that are most important for controlling the growth of Varroa populations in bee hives. To identify genes influencing this trait, a study was conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTL). Individual workers of a backcross family were observed and evaluated for their VSH behavior in a mite-infested observation hive. Bees that uncapped or removed pupae were identified. The genotypes for 1,340 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms were used to construct a high-resolution genetic map and interval mapping was used to analyze the association of the genotypes with the performance of Varroa sensitive hygiene. We identified one major QTL on chromosome 9 (LOD score = 3.21) and a suggestive QTL on chromosome 1 (LOD = 1.95). The QTL confidence interval on chromosome 9 contains the gene ‘no receptor potential A’ and a dopamine receptor. ‘No receptor potential A’ is involved in vision and olfaction in Drosophila, and dopamine signaling has been previously shown to be required for aversive olfactory learning in honey bees, which is probably necessary for identifying mites within brood cells. Further studies on these candidate genes may allow for breeding bees with this trait using marker-assisted selection. PMID:23133626

  18. Complex patterns of divergence among green-sensitive (RH2a) African cichlid opsins revealed by Clade model analyses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene duplications play an important role in the evolution of functional protein diversity. Some models of duplicate gene evolution predict complex forms of paralog divergence; orthologous proteins may diverge as well, further complicating patterns of divergence among and within gene families. Consequently, studying the link between protein sequence evolution and duplication requires the use of flexible substitution models that can accommodate multiple shifts in selection across a phylogeny. Here, we employed a variety of codon substitution models, primarily Clade models, to explore how selective constraint evolved following the duplication of a green-sensitive (RH2a) visual pigment protein (opsin) in African cichlids. Past studies have linked opsin divergence to ecological and sexual divergence within the African cichlid adaptive radiation. Furthermore, biochemical and regulatory differences between the RH2aα and RH2aβ paralogs have been documented. It thus seems likely that selection varies in complex ways throughout this gene family. Results Clade model analysis of African cichlid RH2a opsins revealed a large increase in the nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution rate ratio (ω) following the duplication, as well as an even larger increase, one consistent with positive selection, for Lake Tanganyikan cichlid RH2aβ opsins. Analysis using the popular Branch-site models, by contrast, revealed no such alteration of constraint. Several amino acid sites known to influence spectral and non-spectral aspects of opsin biochemistry were found to be evolving divergently, suggesting that orthologous RH2a opsins may vary in terms of spectral sensitivity and response kinetics. Divergence appears to be occurring despite intronic gene conversion among the tandemly-arranged duplicates. Conclusions Our findings indicate that variation in selective constraint is associated with both gene duplication and divergence among orthologs in African cichlid RH2a opsins. At

  19. Analysing agricultural drought vulnerability at sub-district level through exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity based composite index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, C. S.; Laxman, B.; Sesha Sai, M. V. R.; Diwakar, P. G.

    2014-11-01

    Information on agricultural drought vulnerability status of different regions is extremely useful for implementation of long term drought management measures. A quantitative approach for measuring agricultural drought vulnerability at sub-district level was developed and implemented in the current study, which was carried-out in Andhra Pradesh state, India with the data of main cropping season i.e., kharif. The contributing indicators represent exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity components of vulnerability and were drawn from weather, soil, crop, irrigation and land holdings related data. After performing data normalisation and variance based weights generation, component wise composite indices were generated. Agricultural Drought Vulnerability Index (ADVI) was generated using the three component indices and beta distribution was fitted to it. Mandals (sub-district level administrative units) of the state were categorised into 5 classes - Less vulnerable, Moderately vulnerable, Vulnerable, Highly vulnerable and Very highly vulnerable. Districts dominant with vulnerable Mandals showed considerably larger variability of detrended yields of principal crops compared to the other districts, thus validating the index based vulnerability status. Current status of agricultural drought vulnerability in the state, based on ADVI, indicated that vulnerable to very highly vulnerable group of Mandals represent 54 % of total Mandals and about 55 % of the agricultural area and 65 % of the rainfed crop area. The variability in the agricultural drought vulnerability at disaggregated level was effectively captured by ADVI. The vulnerability status map is useful for diagnostic analysis and for formulating vulnerability reduction plans.

  20. Pushing the surface-enhanced Raman scattering analyses sensitivity by magnetic concentration: a simple non core-shell approach.

    PubMed

    Toma, Sergio H; Santos, Jonnatan J; Araki, Koiti; Toma, Henrique E

    2015-01-15

    A simple and accessible method for molecular analyses down to the picomolar range was realized using self-assembled hybrid superparamagnetic nanostructured materials, instead of complicated SERS substrates such as core-shell, surface nanostructured, or matrix embedded gold nanoparticles. Good signal-to-noise ratio has been achieved in a reproducible way even at concentrations down to 5×10(-11) M using methylene blue (MB) and phenanthroline (phen) as model species, exploiting the plasmonic properties of conventional citrate protected gold nanoparticles and alkylamine functionalized magnetite nanoparticles. The hot spots were generated by salt induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) in the presence of those analytes. Then, the aggregates of AuNP/analyte were decorated with small magnetite nanoparticles by electrostatic self-assembly forming MagSERS hybrid nanostructured materials. SERS peaks were enhanced up to 100 times after magnetic concentration in a circular spot using a magnet in comparison with the respective dispersion of the nanostructured material. PMID:25542091

  1. Impact of enzalutamide on quality of life in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy: additional analyses from the AFFIRM randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Cella, D.; Ivanescu, C.; Holmstrom, S.; Bui, C. N.; Spalding, J.; Fizazi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background To present longitudinal changes in Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) scores during 25-week treatment with enzalutamide or placebo in men with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after chemotherapy in the AFFIRM trial. Patients and methods Patients were randomly assigned to enzalutamide 160 mg/day or placebo. FACT-P was completed before randomization, at weeks 13, 17, 21, and 25, and every 12 weeks thereafter while on study treatment. Longitudinal changes in FACT-P scores from baseline to 25 weeks were analyzed using a mixed effects model for repeated measures (MMRM), with a pattern mixture model (PMM) applied as secondary analysis to address non-ignorable missing data. Cumulative distribution function (CDF) plots were generated and different methodological approaches and models for handling missing data were applied. Due to the exploratory nature of the analyses, adjustments for multiple comparisons were not made. AFFIRM is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00974311. Results The intention-to-treat FACT-P population included 938 patients (enzalutamide, n = 674; placebo n = 264) with evaluable FACT-P assessments at baseline and ≥1 post-baseline assessment. After 25 weeks, the mean FACT-P total score decreased by 1.52 points with enzalutamide compared with 13.73 points with placebo (P < 0.001). In addition, significant treatment differences at week 25 favoring enzalutamide were evident for all FACT-P subscales and indices, whether analyzed by MMRM or PMM. CDF plots revealed differences favoring enzalutamide compared with placebo across the full range of possible response levels for FACT-P total and all disease- and symptom-specific subscales/indices. Conclusion In men with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel-based chemotherapy, enzalutamide is superior to placebo in health-related quality-of-life outcomes, regardless of analysis model or threshold selected for meaningful response. Clinical

  2. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of Cu-based metal-organic frameworks sensitized solar cell by addition of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Deok Yeon; Shin, Chan Yong; Yoon, Seog Joon; Lee, Haw Young; Lee, Wonjoo; Shrestha, Nabeen K.; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, TiO2 nanoparticle and multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite powder is prepared hydrothermally. After doctor blading the paste from composite powder, the resulted composite film is sensitized with Cu-based metal-organic frameworks using a layer-by-layer deposition technique and the film is characterized using FE-SEM, EDX, XRD, UV/Visible spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of the carbon nanotubes in photovoltaic performance is studied by constructing a Grätzel cell with I3−/I− redox couple containing electrolyte. The results demonstrate that the introduction of carbon nanotubes accelerates the electron transfer, and thereby enhances the photovoltaic performance of the cell with a nearly 60% increment in power conversion efficiency. PMID:24488110

  3. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of Cu-based metal-organic frameworks sensitized solar cell by addition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Deok Yeon; Shin, Chan Yong; Yoon, Seog Joon; Lee, Haw Young; Lee, Wonjoo; Shrestha, Nabeen K.; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, TiO2 nanoparticle and multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite powder is prepared hydrothermally. After doctor blading the paste from composite powder, the resulted composite film is sensitized with Cu-based metal-organic frameworks using a layer-by-layer deposition technique and the film is characterized using FE-SEM, EDX, XRD, UV/Visible spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of the carbon nanotubes in photovoltaic performance is studied by constructing a Grätzel cell with I3-/I- redox couple containing electrolyte. The results demonstrate that the introduction of carbon nanotubes accelerates the electron transfer, and thereby enhances the photovoltaic performance of the cell with a nearly 60% increment in power conversion efficiency.

  4. Two Model-Based Methods for Policy Analyses of Fine Particulate Matter Control in China: Source Apportionment and Source Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, B.; Zhang, Q.; He, K.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic emissions have been controlled in recent years in China to mitigate fine particulate matter (PM2.5) pollution. Recent studies show that sulfate dioxide (SO2)-only control cannot reduce total PM2.5 levels efficiently. Other species such as nitrogen oxide, ammonia, black carbon, and organic carbon may be equally important during particular seasons. Furthermore, each species is emitted from several anthropogenic sectors (e.g., industry, power plant, transportation, residential and agriculture). On the other hand, contribution of one emission sector to PM2.5 represents contributions of all species in this sector. In this work, two model-based methods are used to identify the most influential emission sectors and areas to PM2.5. The first method is the source apportionment (SA) based on the Particulate Source Apportionment Technology (PSAT) available in the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) driven by meteorological predictions of the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model. The second method is the source sensitivity (SS) based on an adjoint integration technique (AIT) available in the GEOS-Chem model. The SA method attributes simulated PM2.5 concentrations to each emission group, while the SS method calculates their sensitivity to each emission group, accounting for the non-linear relationship between PM2.5 and its precursors. Despite their differences, the complementary nature of the two methods enables a complete analysis of source-receptor relationships to support emission control policies. Our objectives are to quantify the contributions of each emission group/area to PM2.5 in the receptor areas and to intercompare results from the two methods to gain a comprehensive understanding of the role of emission sources in PM2.5 formation. The results will be compared in terms of the magnitudes and rankings of SS or SA of emitted species and emission groups/areas. GEOS-Chem with AIT is applied over East Asia at a horizontal grid

  5. Tailoring Catalytic Activity of Pt Nanoparticles Encapsulated Inside Dendrimers by Tuning Nanoparticle Sizes with Subnanometer Accuracy for Sensitive Chemiluminescence-Based Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyojung; Ju, Youngwon; Kim, Joohoon

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report the size-dependent catalysis of Pt dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) having well-defined sizes over the range of 1-3 nm with subnanometer accuracy for the highly enhanced chemiluminescence of the luminol/H2O2 system. This size-dependent catalysis is ascribed to the differences in the chemical states of the Pt DENs as well as in their surface areas depending on their sizes. Facile and versatile applications of the Pt DENs in diverse oxidase-based assays are demonstrated as efficient catalysts for sensitive chemiluminescence-based analyses. PMID:27032992

  6. Sensitivity analyses for the DTMs derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in gully erosion mapping: Nallihan badland area (Ankara, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdan, Ugur; Gorum, Tolga; Comert, Resul; Nefeslioglu, Hakan

    2015-04-01

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the spatial resolutions for the Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) derived from Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in gully erosion mapping. For the purpose, Nallihan badland area (Ankara, Turkey) was selected to be the experimental site. The investigations were carried out in 3 stages; (i) production of the DTMs having 3 cm and 9 cm spatial resolutions by using the orthophoto imagery acquired from the UAV at 97.5 m and 292.4 m altitudes, respectively, (ii) Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) of the experimental site and production of the DTMs derived from the TLS data resampled at 3 cm and 9 cm spatial resolutions, and (iii) spatial and profile comparisons of the derived data. The average altitude differences were obtained on the intervals (-0.1, 0.1) m and (-0.2, 0.2) m for the comparisons between TLS-3cm and UAV-3cm, and TLS-9cm and UAV-9cm data, respectively. Additionally, considering the profile comparisons, it is revealed that depending on the decreasing of spatial resolution, the erosion rates calculated from the DTMs increase artificially.

  7. A near-infrared fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye allows for moderate-throughput electrophysiological analyses of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Izquierdo, Angelica; Warren, Mark; Riedel, Michael; Cho, Scott; Lai, Shuping; Lux, Robert L.; Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Benjamin, Ivor J.; Jou, Chuanchau J.

    2014-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (iPSC-CM)-based assays are emerging as a promising tool for the in vitro preclinical screening of QT interval-prolonging side effects of drugs in development. A major impediment to the widespread use of human iPSC-CM assays is the low throughput of the currently available electrophysiological tools. To test the precision and applicability of the near-infrared fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye 1-(4-sulfanatobutyl)-4-{β[2-(di-n-butylamino)-6-naphthyl]butadienyl}quinolinium betaine (di-4-ANBDQBS) for moderate-throughput electrophysiological analyses, we compared simultaneous transmembrane voltage and optical action potential (AP) recordings in human iPSC-CM loaded with di-4-ANBDQBS. Optical AP recordings tracked transmembrane voltage with high precision, generating nearly identical values for AP duration (AP durations at 10%, 50%, and 90% repolarization). Human iPSC-CMs tolerated repeated laser exposure, with stable optical AP parameters recorded over a 30-min study period. Optical AP recordings appropriately tracked changes in repolarization induced by pharmacological manipulation. Finally, di-4-ANBDQBS allowed for moderate-throughput analyses, increasing throughput >10-fold over the traditional patch-clamp technique. We conclude that the voltage-sensitive dye di-4-ANBDQBS allows for high-precision optical AP measurements that markedly increase the throughput for electrophysiological characterization of human iPSC-CMs. PMID:25172899

  8. A near-infrared fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye allows for moderate-throughput electrophysiological analyses of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Izquierdo, Angelica; Warren, Mark; Riedel, Michael; Cho, Scott; Lai, Shuping; Lux, Robert L; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Benjamin, Ivor J; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Jou, Chuanchau J

    2014-11-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (iPSC-CM)-based assays are emerging as a promising tool for the in vitro preclinical screening of QT interval-prolonging side effects of drugs in development. A major impediment to the widespread use of human iPSC-CM assays is the low throughput of the currently available electrophysiological tools. To test the precision and applicability of the near-infrared fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye 1-(4-sulfanatobutyl)-4-{β[2-(di-n-butylamino)-6-naphthyl]butadienyl}quinolinium betaine (di-4-ANBDQBS) for moderate-throughput electrophysiological analyses, we compared simultaneous transmembrane voltage and optical action potential (AP) recordings in human iPSC-CM loaded with di-4-ANBDQBS. Optical AP recordings tracked transmembrane voltage with high precision, generating nearly identical values for AP duration (AP durations at 10%, 50%, and 90% repolarization). Human iPSC-CMs tolerated repeated laser exposure, with stable optical AP parameters recorded over a 30-min study period. Optical AP recordings appropriately tracked changes in repolarization induced by pharmacological manipulation. Finally, di-4-ANBDQBS allowed for moderate-throughput analyses, increasing throughput >10-fold over the traditional patch-clamp technique. We conclude that the voltage-sensitive dye di-4-ANBDQBS allows for high-precision optical AP measurements that markedly increase the throughput for electrophysiological characterization of human iPSC-CMs. PMID:25172899

  9. Beta-carotene suppression of benzophenone-sensitized lipid peroxidation in hexane through additional chain-breaking activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetković, Dragan; Marković, Dejan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate the antioxidant activity of β-carotene in the presence of two different mixtures of phospholipids in hexane solution, under continuous UV-irradiation from three different ranges (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C). β-Carotene is employed to control lipid peroxidation process generated by UV-irradiation, in the presence and in the absence of selected photosensitizer, benzophenone, by scavenging the involved, created free radicals. The results show that β-carotene undergoes to a substantial, probably structural dependent destruction (bleaching), highly dependent on UV-photons energy input, more expressed in the presence than in the absence of benzophenone. The additional bleaching is synchronized with the further increase in β-carotene antioxidant activity in the presence of benzophenone, implying the same cause: increase in (phospholipids peroxidation) chain-breaking activities.

  10. Effect of sodium acetate additive in successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction on the performance of CdS quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Ping; Chen, Liang-Yih; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2016-09-01

    Sodium acetate (NaAc) is utilized as an additive in cationic precursors of the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process to fabricate CdS quantum-dot (QD)-sensitized photoelectrodes. The effects of the NaAc concentration on the deposition rate and distribution of QDs in mesoporous TiO2 films, as well as on the performance of CdS-sensitized solar cells are studied. The experimental results show that the presence of NaAc can significantly accelerate the deposition of CdS, improve the QD distribution across photoelectrodes, and thereby, increase the performance of solar cells. These results are mainly attributed to the pH-elevation effect of NaAc to the cationic precursors which increases the electrostatic interaction of the TiO2 film to cadmium ions. The light-to-energy conversion efficiency of the CdS-sensitized solar cell increases with increasing concentration of the NaAc and approaches a maximum value (3.11%) at 0.05 M NaAc. Additionally, an ionic exchange is carried out on the photoelectrode to transform the deposited CdS into CdS1-xSex ternary QDs. The light-absorption range of the photoelectrode is extended and an exceptional power conversion efficiency of 4.51% is achieved due to this treatment.

  11. Increasing the sensitivity of PCR detection in bovine preputial smegma spiked with Tritrichomonas foetus by the addition of agar and resin.

    PubMed

    Chen, X G; Li, J

    2001-07-01

    Methods for the extraction of DNA from the preputial smegma of cattle infected with Tritrichomonas foetus for the purposes of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection are usually time-consuming, relatively insensitive and require hazardous chemicals. In order to solve these problems, we have developed a rapid, sensitive and harmless method to extract quality DNA from preputial smegma spiked with T. foetus. Results indicate that the addition of 5% Chelex-100 resin and 0.05% agar solution to the spiked smegma before the process of DNA extraction by the boiling method can significantly increase the sensitivity of PCR detection. This improved method may be suitable for routine DNA extraction for the diagnosis of cattle and even human trichomoniasis by PCR. PMID:11484853

  12. Identification of carbonates as additives in pressure-sensitive adhesive tape substrate with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and its application in three explosive cases.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jungang; Feng, Jimin; Zhang, Wen; Shi, Rongguang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zhaohong; Zhao, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive tape is often used to bind explosive devices. It can become important trace evidence in many cases. Three types of calcium carbonate (heavy, light, and active CaCO(3)), which were widely used as additives in pressure-sensitive tape substrate, were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in this study. A Spectrum GX 2000 system with a diamond anvil cell and a deuterated triglycine sulfate detector was employed for IR observation. Background was subtracted for every measurement, and triplicate tests were performed. Differences in positions of main peaks and the corresponding functional groups were investigated. Heavy CaCO(3) could be identified from the two absorptions near 873 and 855/cm, while light CaCO(3) only has one peak near 873/cm because of the low content of aragonite. Active CaCO(3) could be identified from the absorptions in the 2800-2900/cm region because of the existence of organic compounds. Tiny but indicative changes in the 878-853/cm region were found in the spectra of CaCO(3) with different content of aragonite and calcite. CaCO(3) in pressure-sensitive tape, which cannot be differentiated by scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and thermal analysis, can be easily identified using FTIR. The findings were successfully applied to three specific explosive cases and would be helpful in finding the possible source of explosive devices in future cases. PMID:22724657

  13. Additive-dominance genetic model analyses for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in a bread wheat factorial crossing population.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Ibrahim, Amir M H

    2015-12-01

    Elevated level of late maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) can result in low falling number scores, reduced grain quality, and downgrade of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) class. A mating population was developed by crossing parents with different levels of LMAA. The F2 and F3 hybrids and their parents were evaluated for LMAA, and data were analyzed using the R software package 'qgtools' integrated with an additive-dominance genetic model and a mixed linear model approach. Simulated results showed high testing powers for additive and additive × environment variances, and comparatively low powers for dominance and dominance × environment variances. All variance components and their proportions to the phenotypic variance for the parents and hybrids were significant except for the dominance × environment variance. The estimated narrow-sense heritability and broad-sense heritability for LMAA were 14 and 54%, respectively. High significant negative additive effects for parents suggest that spring wheat cultivars 'Lancer' and 'Chester' can serve as good general combiners, and that 'Kinsman' and 'Seri-82' had negative specific combining ability in some hybrids despite of their own significant positive additive effects, suggesting they can be used as parents to reduce LMAA levels. Seri-82 showed very good general combining ability effect when used as a male parent, indicating the importance of reciprocal effects. High significant negative dominance effects and high-parent heterosis for hybrids demonstrated that the specific hybrid combinations; Chester × Kinsman, 'Lerma52' × Lancer, Lerma52 × 'LoSprout' and 'Janz' × Seri-82 could be generated to produce cultivars with significantly reduced LMAA level. PMID:26403988

  14. A miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation analyser for investigation of elemental/isotopic composition with the sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of the elemental and isotopic composition of solar system objects imposes critical constraints on models describing the origin of our solar system and can provide insight to chemical and physical processes taking place during the planetary evolution. So far, the investigation of chemical composition of planetary surfaces could be conducted almost exclusively by remotely controlled spectroscopic instruments from orbiting spacecraft, landers or rovers. With some exceptions, the sensitivity of these techniques is, however, limited and often only abundant elements can be investigated. Nevertheless, the spectroscopic techniques proved to be successful for global chemical mapping of entire planetary objects such as the Moon, Mars and asteroids. A combined afford of the measurements from orbit, landers and rovers can also yield the determination of local mineralogy. New instruments including Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (LIMS), have been recently included for several landed missions. LIBS is thought to improve flexibility of the investigations and offers a well localised chemical probing from distances up to 10-13 m. Since LIMS is a mass spectrometric technique it allows for very sensitive measurements of elements and isotopes. We will demonstrate the results of the current performance tests obtained by application of a miniaturised laser ablation/ionisation mass spectrometer, a LIMS instrument, developed in Bern for the chemical analysis of solids. So far, the only LIMS instrument on a spacecraft is the LAZMA instrument. This spectrometer was a part of the payload for PHOBOS-GRUNT mission and is also currently selected for LUNA-RESURCE and LUNA-GLOB missions to the lunar south poles (Managadze et al., 2011). Our LIMS instrument has the dimensions of 120 x Ø60 mm and with a weight of about 1.5 kg (all electronics included), it is the lightest mass analyser designed for in situ chemical

  15. Sensitivity of Multiangle, Multispectral Polarimetric Remote Sensing Over Open Oceans to Water-Leaving Radiance: Analyses of RSP Data Acquired During the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chowdhary, Jacek; Cairns, Brian; Waquet, Fabien; Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Ottaviani, Matteo; Redemann, Jens; Travis, Larry; Mishchenko, Michael

    2012-01-01

    For remote sensing of aerosol over the ocean, there is a contribution from light scattered underwater. The brightness and spectrum of this light depends on the biomass content of the ocean, such that variations in the color of the ocean can be observed even from space. Rayleigh scattering by pure sea water, and Rayleigh-Gans type scattering by plankton, causes this light to be polarized with a distinctive angular distribution. To study the contribution of this underwater light polarization to multiangle, multispectral observations of polarized reflectance over ocean, we previously developed a hydrosol model for use in underwater light scattering computations that produces realistic variations of the ocean color and the underwater light polarization signature of pure sea water. In this work we review this hydrosol model, include a correction for the spectrum of the particulate scattering coefficient and backscattering efficiency, and discuss its sensitivity to variations in colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and in the scattering function of marine particulates. We then apply this model to measurements of total and polarized reflectance that were acquired over open ocean during the MILAGRO field campaign by the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP). Analyses show that our hydrosol model faithfully reproduces the water-leaving contributions to RSP reflectance, and that the sensitivity of these contributions to Chlorophyll a concentration [Chl] in the ocean varies with the azimuth, height, and wavelength of observations. We also show that the impact of variations in CDOM on the polarized reflectance observed by the RSP at low altitude is comparable to or much less than the standard error of this reflectance whereas their effects in total reflectance may be substantial (i.e. up to >30%). Finally, we extend our study of polarized reflectance variations with [Chl] and CDOM to include results for simulated spaceborne observations.

  16. Novel Flow Cytometry Analyses of Boar Sperm Viability: Can the Addition of Whole Sperm-Rich Fraction Seminal Plasma to Frozen-Thawed Boar Sperm Affect It?

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rommy; Boguen, Rodrigo; Martins, Simone Maria Massami Kitamura; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Leal, Diego Feitosa; Oliveira, Melissa de Lima; Muro, Bruno Bracco Donatelli; Parra, Beatriz Martins; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Papa, Frederico Ozanan; Dell’Aqua, José Antônio; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Moretti, Aníbal de Sant’Anna; Sepúlveda, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    Boar semen cryopreservation remains a challenge due to the extension of cold shock damage. Thus, many alternatives have emerged to improve the quality of frozen-thawed boar sperm. Although the use of seminal plasma arising from boar sperm-rich fraction (SP-SRF) has shown good efficacy; however, the majority of actual sperm evaluation techniques include a single or dual sperm parameter analysis, which overrates the real sperm viability. Within this context, this work was performed to introduce a sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential. We then used the sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique to study the effect of SP-SRF on frozen-thawed boar sperm and further evaluated the effect of this treatment on sperm movement, tyrosine phosphorylation and fertility rate (FR). The sperm fourfold stain technique is accurate (R2 = 0.9356, p > 0.01) for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential (IPIAH cells). Centrifugation pre-cryopreservation was not deleterious (p > 0.05) for any analyzed variables. Addition of SP-SRF after cryopreservation was able to improve total and progressive motility (p < 0.05) when boar semen was cryopreserved without SP-SRF; however, it was not able to decrease tyrosine phosphorylation (p > 0.05) or improve IPIAH cells (p > 0.05). FR was not (p > 0.05) statistically increased by the addition of seminal plasma, though females inseminated with frozen-thawed boar semen plus SP-SRF did perform better than those inseminated with sperm lacking seminal plasma. Thus, we conclude that sperm fourfold stain can be used to simultaneously evaluate plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of SP-SRF at thawed boar semen cryopreserved in absence of SP-SRF improve its total and progressive motility. PMID:27529819

  17. Halogen-free ionic liquid as an additive in zinc(II)-selective electrode: surface analyses as correlated to the membrane activity.

    PubMed

    Al-Asousi, Maryam F; Shoukry, Adel F; Bu-Olayan, Abdul Hadi

    2012-05-30

    Two conventional Zn(II) polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane electrodes have been prepared and characterized. They were based on dibenzo-24-crown-8 (DBC) as a neutral carrier, dioctyl phthalate (DOP) as a plasticizer, and potassium tetrakis (p-chlorophenyl) borate, KTpClPB or the halogen-free ionic liquid, tetraoctylammonium dodecylbenzene sulfonate [TOA][DBS] as an additive. The use of ionic liquid has been found to enhance the selectivity of the sensor. For each electrode, the surfaces of two membranes were investigated using X-ray photoelectron, ion-scattering spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. One of the two membranes was conditioned by soaking it for 24 h in a 1.0×10(-3) M Zn(NO(3))(2) solution and the second was soaked in bi-distilled water for the same interval (24 h). Comparing the two surfaces indicated the following: (a) the high selectivity in case of using [TOA][DBS] as an additive is due to the extra mediation caused by the ionic liquid and (b) the working mechanism of the electrode is based on phase equilibrium at the surface of the membrane associated with ion transport through the bulk of the membrane. PMID:22608433

  18. Assessing the risk of bluetongue to UK livestock: uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of a temperature-dependent model for the basic reproduction number.

    PubMed

    Gubbins, Simon; Carpenter, Simon; Baylis, Matthew; Wood, James L N; Mellor, Philip S

    2008-03-01

    Since 1998 bluetongue virus (BTV), which causes bluetongue, a non-contagious, insect-borne infectious disease of ruminants, has expanded northwards in Europe in an unprecedented series of incursions, suggesting that there is a risk to the large and valuable British livestock industry. The basic reproduction number, R(0), provides a powerful tool with which to assess the level of risk posed by a disease. In this paper, we compute R(0) for BTV in a population comprising two host species, cattle and sheep. Estimates for each parameter which influences R(0) were obtained from the published literature, using those applicable to the UK situation wherever possible. Moreover, explicit temperature dependence was included for those parameters for which it had been quantified. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on Latin hypercube sampling and partial rank correlation coefficients identified temperature, the probability of transmission from host to vector and the vector to host ratio as being most important in determining the magnitude of R(0). The importance of temperature reflects the fact that it influences many processes involved in the transmission of BTV and, in particular, the biting rate, the extrinsic incubation period and the vector mortality rate. PMID:17638649

  19. Intra-Articular Corticosteroids in Addition to Exercise for Reducing Pain Sensitivity in Knee Osteoarthritis: Exploratory Outcome from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie; Bandak, Elisabeth; Ellegaard, Karen; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of one intra-articular corticosteroid injection two weeks prior to an exercise-based intervention program for reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design Randomized, masked, parallel, placebo-controlled trial involving 100 participants with clinical and radiographic knee OA that were randomized to one intra-articular injection on the knee with either 1 ml of 40 mg/ml methylprednisolone (corticosteroid) dissolved in 4 ml lidocaine (10 mg/ml) or 1 ml isotonic saline (placebo) mixed with 4 ml lidocaine (10 mg/ml). Two weeks after the injections all participants undertook a 12-week supervised exercise program. Main outcomes were changes from baseline in pressure-pain sensitivity (pressure-pain threshold [PPT] and temporal summation [TS]) assessed using cuff pressure algometry on the calf. These were exploratory outcomes from a randomized controlled trial. Results A total of 100 patients were randomized to receive either corticosteroid (n = 50) or placebo (n = 50); 45 and 44, respectively, completed the trial. Four participants had missing values for PPT and one for TS at baseline; thus modified intention-to-treat populations were analyzed. The mean group difference in changes from baseline at week 14 was 0.6 kPa (95% CI: -1.7 to 2.8; P = 0.626) for PPT and 384 mm×sec (95% CI: -2980 to 3750; P = 0.821) for TS. Conclusions These results suggest that adding intra-articular corticosteroid injection 2 weeks prior to an exercise program does not provide additional benefits compared to placebo in reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee OA. Trial Registration EU clinical trials (EudraCT): 2012-002607-18 PMID:26871954

  20. Effects of zinc additions on the stress corrosion crack growth rate of sensitized stainless steel, Alloy 600 and Alloy 182 weld metal in 288 C water

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, P.L.; Angeliu, T.M.

    1995-09-01

    ZnO additions to boiling water reactor (BWR) water have been the focus of recent interest, primarily because of their beneficial influence in reducing buildup of radioactive species such as Co{sup 60} in the oxide film of structural components, e.g., stainless steel piping. The effect of ZnO additions on stress corrosion crack growth rates were studied using 1T CT fracture mechanics specimens of sensitized type 304 stainless steel, sensitized Alloy 600, and Alloy 182 weld metal exposed to {approx}288 C water containing various levels of dissolved oxygen and impurities. Zn levels of 5 to 100 ppb Zn{sup 2+} were evaluated and found to reduce crack growth rates for all materials and in all water chemistries. Many Zn tests involved long term exposure and were performed at somewhat reduced corrosion potential (e.g., from {approx}+200 to 0 {minus}+50 mV{sub she}); variations in corrosion potential from +200, to +50, to {minus}50 mV{sub she} clearly had an important effect. The benefit of Zn appeared to be most pronounced when the growth rate was decreased (e.g., by corrosion potential). This was consistent with the findings of mechanistic studies, which showed that Zn decreased the repassivation response at times >10{sup 4} s, which is associated with low crack tip strain rates, i.e., low growth rates. Reduced corrosion potentials are also expected to directly effect Zn, since high (crack mouth) corrosion potentials inhibit the transport of Zn{sup 2+} into the crack. Zn also increased the fracture strain of the oxide on stainless steel, and may also reduce crack growth rates by increasing the pH in the crack. Similar benefits are expected for other structural materials, such as nonsensitized or irradiated stainless steel, carbon steel, low alloy steel, and other nickel alloys.

  1. Sensitivity Analyses of Exposure Estimates from a Quantitative Job-exposure Matrix (SYN-JEM) for Use in Community-based Studies

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the elaboration and sensitivity analyses of a quantitative job-exposure matrix (SYN-JEM) for respirable crystalline silica (RCS). The aim was to gain insight into the robustness of the SYN-JEM RCS estimates based on critical decisions taken in the elaboration process. Methods: SYN-JEM for RCS exposure consists of three axes (job, region, and year) based on estimates derived from a previously developed statistical model. To elaborate SYN-JEM, several decisions were taken: i.e. the application of (i) a single time trend; (ii) region-specific adjustments in RCS exposure; and (iii) a prior job-specific exposure level (by the semi-quantitative DOM-JEM), with an override of 0 mg/m3 for jobs a priori defined as non-exposed. Furthermore, we assumed that exposure levels reached a ceiling in 1960 and remained constant prior to this date. We applied SYN-JEM to the occupational histories of subjects from a large international pooled community-based case–control study. Cumulative exposure levels derived with SYN-JEM were compared with those from alternative models, described by Pearson correlation (Rp) and differences in unit of exposure (mg/m3-year). Alternative models concerned changes in application of job- and region-specific estimates and exposure ceiling, and omitting the a priori exposure ranking. Results: Cumulative exposure levels for the study subjects ranged from 0.01 to 60 mg/m3-years, with a median of 1.76 mg/m3-years. Exposure levels derived from SYN-JEM and alternative models were overall highly correlated (Rp > 0.90), although somewhat lower when omitting the region estimate (Rp = 0.80) or not taking into account the assigned semi-quantitative exposure level (Rp = 0.65). Modification of the time trend (i.e. exposure ceiling at 1950 or 1970, or assuming a decline before 1960) caused the largest changes in absolute exposure levels (26–33% difference), but without changing the relative ranking (Rp = 0.99). Conclusions: Exposure estimates

  2. In-Situ Spectroscopic Analyses of the Dye Uptake on ZnO and TiO2 Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Nadia; Pugliese, Diego; Shahzad, Muhammad Imran; Tresso, Elena

    2015-08-01

    UV-Vis spectroscopic measurements have been performed on Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) photoanodes at different dye impregnation times ranging from few minutes to 24 hours. In addition to the traditional absorbance experiments, based on diffuse and specular reflectance of dye impregnated thin films and on the desorption of dye molecules from the photoanodes by means of a basic solution, an alternative in-situ solution depletion measurement, which enables fast and continuous evaluation of dye uptake, has been employed. Two different nanostructured semiconducting oxide films (mesoporous TiO2 and sponge-like ZnO) and two different dyes, the traditional Ruthenizer 535-bisTBA (N719) and a newly introduced metal-free organic dye based on a hemi-squaraine molecule (CT1), have been analyzed. DSSCs have been fabricated with the dye-impregnated photoanodes using a customized microfluidic architecture. The dye adsorption results are discussed and correlated to the obtained DSSC electrical performances such as photovoltaic conversion efficiencies and Incident Photon-to-electron Conversion Efficiency (IPCE) spectra. It is shown that simple UV-Vis measurements can give useful insights on the dye adsorption mechanisms and on the evaluation of the optimal impregnation times. PMID:26369186

  3. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses applied to one-dimensional radionuclide transport in a layered fractured rock: MULTFRAC --Analytic solutions and local sensitivities; Phase 2, Iterative performance assessment: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gureghian, A.B.; Wu, Y.T.; Sagar, B.; Codell, R.A.

    1992-12-01

    Exact analytical solutions based on the Laplace transforms are derived for describing the one-dimensional space-time-dependent, advective transport of a decaying species in a layered, saturated rock system intersected by a planar fracture of varying aperture. These solutions, which account for advection in fracture, molecular diffusion into the rock matrix, adsorption in both fracture and matrix, and radioactive decay, predict the concentrations in both fracture and rock matrix and the cumulative mass in the fracture. The solute migration domain in both fracture and rock is assumed to be semi-infinite with non-zero initial conditions. The concentration of each nuclide at the source is allowed to decay either continuously or according to some periodical fluctuations where both are subjected to either a step or band release mode. Two numerical examples related to the transport of Np-237 and Cm-245 in a five-layered system of fractured rock were used to verify these solutions with several well established evaluation methods of Laplace inversion integrals in the real and complex domain. In addition, with respect to the model parameters, a comparison of the analytically derived local sensitivities for the concentration and cumulative mass of Np-237 in the fracture with the ones obtained through a finite-difference method of approximation is also reported.

  4. Determinant for β-subunit regulation in high-conductance voltage-activated and Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels: An additional transmembrane region at the N terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Martin; Meera, Pratap; Toro, Ligia

    1996-01-01

    The pore-forming α subunit of large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K (MaxiK) channels is regulated by a β subunit that has two membrane-spanning regions separated by an extracellular loop. To investigate the structural determinants in the pore-forming α subunit necessary for β-subunit modulation, we made chimeric constructs between a human MaxiK channel and the Drosophila homologue, which we show is insensitive to β-subunit modulation, and analyzed the topology of the α subunit. A comparison of multiple sequence alignments with hydrophobicity plots revealed that MaxiK channel α subunits have a unique hydrophobic segment (S0) at the N terminus. This segment is in addition to the six putative transmembrane segments (S1–S6) usually found in voltage-dependent ion channels. The transmembrane nature of this unique S0 region was demonstrated by in vitro translation experiments. Moreover, normal functional expression of signal sequence fusions and in vitro N-linked glycosylation experiments indicate that S0 leads to an exoplasmic N terminus. Therefore, we propose a new model where MaxiK channels have a seventh transmembrane segment at the N terminus (S0). Chimeric exchange of 41 N-terminal amino acids, including S0, from the human MaxiK channel to the Drosophila homologue transfers β-subunit regulation to the otherwise unresponsive Drosophila channel. Both the unique S0 region and the exoplasmic N terminus are necessary for this gain of function. PMID:8962157

  5. Determinant for beta-subunit regulation in high-conductance voltage-activated and Ca(2+)-sensitive K+ channels: an additional transmembrane region at the N terminus.

    PubMed

    Wallner, M; Meera, P; Toro, L

    1996-12-10

    The pore-forming alpha subunit of large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-sensitive K (MaxiK) channels is regulated by a beta subunit that has two membrane-spanning regions separated by an extracellular loop. To investigate the structural determinants in the pore-forming alpha subunit necessary for beta-subunit modulation, we made chimeric constructs between a human MaxiK channel and the Drosophila homologue, which we show is insensitive to beta-subunit modulation, and analyzed the topology of the alpha subunit. A comparison of multiple sequence alignments with hydrophobicity plots revealed that MaxiK channel alpha subunits have a unique hydrophobic segment (S0) at the N terminus. This segment is in addition to the six putative transmembrane segments (S1-S6) usually found in voltage-dependent ion channels. The transmembrane nature of this unique S0 region was demonstrated by in vitro translation experiments. Moreover, normal functional expression of signal sequence fusions and in vitro N-linked glycosylation experiments indicate that S0 leads to an exoplasmic N terminus. Therefore, we propose a new model where MaxiK channels have a seventh transmembrane segment at the N terminus (S0). Chimeric exchange of 41 N-terminal amino acids, including S0, from the human MaxiK channel to the Drosophila homologue transfers beta-subunit regulation to the otherwise unresponsive Drosophila channel. Both the unique S0 region and the exoplasmic N terminus are necessary for this gain of function. PMID:8962157

  6. Lidar Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.

    1995-01-01

    A brief description of enhancements made to the NASA MSFC coherent lidar model is provided. Notable improvements are the addition of routines to automatically determine the 3 dB misalignment loss angle and the backscatter value at which the probability of a good estimate (for a maximum likelihood estimator) falls to 50%. The ability to automatically generate energy/aperture parametrization (EAP) plots which include the effects of angular misalignment has been added. These EAP plots make it very easy to see that for any practical system where there is some degree of misalignment then there is an optimum telescope diameter for which the laser pulse energy required to achieve a particular sensitivity is minimized. Increasing the telescope diameter above this will result in a reduction of sensitivity. These parameterizations also clearly show that the alignment tolerances at shorter wavelengths are much stricter than those at longer wavelengths. A brief outline of the NASA MSFC AEOLUS program is given and a summary of the lidar designs considered during the program is presented. A discussion of some of the design trades is performed both in the text and in a conference publication attached as an appendix.

  7. Whole genome and transcriptome analyses of environmental antibiotic sensitive and multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates exposed to waste water and tap water

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Thomas; Armant, Olivier; Bretschneider, Nancy; Hahn, Alexander; Kirchen, Silke; Seifert, Martin; Dötsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The fitness of sensitive and resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different aquatic environments depends on genetic capacities and transcriptional regulation. Therefore, an antibiotic-sensitive isolate PA30 and a multi-resistant isolate PA49 originating from waste waters were compared via whole genome and transcriptome Illumina sequencing after exposure to municipal waste water and tap water. A number of different genomic islands (e.g. PAGIs, PAPIs) were identified in the two environmental isolates beside the highly conserved core genome. Exposure to tap water and waste water exhibited similar transcriptional impacts on several gene clusters (antibiotic and metal resistance, genetic mobile elements, efflux pumps) in both environmental P. aeruginosa isolates. The MexCD-OprJ efflux pump was overexpressed in PA49 in response to waste water. The expression of resistance genes, genetic mobile elements in PA49 was independent from the water matrix. Consistently, the antibiotic sensitive strain PA30 did not show any difference in expression of the intrinsic resistance determinants and genetic mobile elements. Thus, the exposure of both isolates to polluted waste water and oligotrophic tap water resulted in similar expression profiles of mentioned genes. However, changes in environmental milieus resulted in rather unspecific transcriptional responses than selected and stimuli-specific gene regulation. PMID:25186059

  8. Whole genome and transcriptome analyses of environmental antibiotic sensitive and multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates exposed to waste water and tap water.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Thomas; Armant, Olivier; Bretschneider, Nancy; Hahn, Alexander; Kirchen, Silke; Seifert, Martin; Dötsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The fitness of sensitive and resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different aquatic environments depends on genetic capacities and transcriptional regulation. Therefore, an antibiotic-sensitive isolate PA30 and a multi-resistant isolate PA49 originating from waste waters were compared via whole genome and transcriptome Illumina sequencing after exposure to municipal waste water and tap water. A number of different genomic islands (e.g. PAGIs, PAPIs) were identified in the two environmental isolates beside the highly conserved core genome. Exposure to tap water and waste water exhibited similar transcriptional impacts on several gene clusters (antibiotic and metal resistance, genetic mobile elements, efflux pumps) in both environmental P. aeruginosa isolates. The MexCD-OprJ efflux pump was overexpressed in PA49 in response to waste water. The expression of resistance genes, genetic mobile elements in PA49 was independent from the water matrix. Consistently, the antibiotic sensitive strain PA30 did not show any difference in expression of the intrinsic resistance determinants and genetic mobile elements. Thus, the exposure of both isolates to polluted waste water and oligotrophic tap water resulted in similar expression profiles of mentioned genes. However, changes in environmental milieus resulted in rather unspecific transcriptional responses than selected and stimuli-specific gene regulation. PMID:25186059

  9. Investigation of the skin sensitizing properties of 5 osmolytic prodrugs in a weight-of-evidence assessment, employing in silico, in vivo, and read across analyses.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Julia; Keller, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid esters ethyl glycinate (EG), DL-α-tocopheryl-(mono-)betainate hydrochloride (TMB), DL-α-tocopheryl-(mono-)glycinate hydrochloride (TMG), DL-α-tocopheryl-(mono-)prolinate hydrochloride (TMP), and DL-α-tocopheryl-(mono-)sarcosinate hydrochloride (TMS) were previously shown to exert an osmoprotective function to human skin in vitro. Based on literature data, the parent compounds α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and the amino acids glycine, betaine (trimethylated glycine), proline, and sarcosine (N-methylated glycine) are not considered to be sensitizers. To investigate skin sensitizing properties of the esters, EG, TMG, and TMP were tested in the Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA). Remaining esters were assessed by read across analysis considering structural similarities and mechanistic aspects. The LLNA results were consistent with in silico outcomes from ToxTree 2.5.0 indicative for protein binding; EG was negative; TMG and TMP were positive. Since TMB and TMS showed structural similarities to TMG and TMP and were also positive in ToxTree, it was concluded that both TMB and TMS can also be expected to have a skin sensitizing potential and therefore animal testing was waived. PMID:22855551

  10. Analysing the Temperature Effect on the Competitiveness of the Amine Addition versus the Amidation Reaction in the Epoxidized Oil/Amine System by MCR-ALS of FTIR Data

    PubMed Central

    del Río, Vanessa; Callao, M. Pilar; Larrechi, M. Soledad

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of the temperature effect on the competitiveness between the amine addition and the amidation reaction in a model cure acid-catalysed reaction between the epoxidized methyl oleate (EMO), obtained from high oleic sunflower oil, and aniline is reported. The study was carried out analysing the kinetic profiles of the chemical species involved in the system, which were obtained applying multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) to the Fourier transform infrared spectra data obtained from the reaction monitoring at two different temperatures (60°C and 30°C). At both experimental temperatures, two mechanisms were postulated: non-autocatalytic and autocatalytic. The different behaviour was discussed considering not only the influence of the temperature on the amidation reaction kinetic, but also the presence of the homopolymerization of the EMO reagent. PMID:21765830

  11. Spectrally resolved and phase-sensitive far-field measurement for the coherent addition of laser pulses in a tiled grating compressor.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Marco; Bödefeld, Ragnar; Kessler, Alexander; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2010-06-15

    We describe a method that can be used for the coherent addition of laser pulses. As different laser pulses are initially generated in a laser-pulse compressor equipped with a tiled grating, such a coherent addition is indispensable in order to maximize the intensity in the laser far field. We present measurements in this context where, up to now, an unavoidable difference in the grating constants between the phased gratings reduced the maximum achievable intensity. The method significantly facilitates the high-precision alignment of a tiled grating compressor and could also be used for a coherent addition of laser pulses. PMID:20548390

  12. Sensitivity of predicted muscle forces to parameters of the optimization-based human leg model revealed by analytical and numerical analyses.

    PubMed

    Raikova, R T; Prilutsky, B I

    2001-10-01

    There are different opinions in the literature on whether the cost functions: the sum of muscle stresses squared and the sum of muscle stresses cubed, can reasonably predict muscle forces in humans. One potential reason for the discrepancy in the results could be that different authors use different sets of model parameters which could substantially affect forces predicted by optimization-based models. In this study, the sensitivity of the optimal solution obtained by minimizing the above cost functions for a planar three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) model of the leg with nine muscles was investigated analytically for the quadratic function and numerically for the cubic function. Analytical results revealed that, generally, the non-zero optimal force of each muscle depends in a very complex non-linear way on moments at all three joints and moment arms and physiological cross-sectional areas (PCSAs) of all muscles. Deviations of the model parameters (moment arms and PCSAs) from their nominal values within a physiologically feasible range affected not only the magnitude of the forces predicted by both criteria, but also the number of non-zero forces in the optimal solution and the combination of muscles with non-zero predicted forces. Muscle force magnitudes calculated by both criteria were similar. They could change several times as model parameters changed, whereas patterns of muscle forces were typically not as sensitive. It is concluded that different opinions in the literature about the behavior of optimization-based models can be potentially explained by differences in employed model parameters. PMID:11522304

  13. Constrained sensitivity theory

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, E.; Williams, M.L.

    1980-01-01

    In sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of to-be-built reactors it is customary to use k-reset sensitivity functions - accounting for the combined effects of the change (or uncertainty) in the input data and of the alteration in some design variable applied to maintain criticality. Critical reactors are usually subjected to several constraints, such as power peaking factor and breeding ratio constraints, in addition to the criticality constraint. Perturbation theory formulations which can account, simultaneously, for several constraints both in critical reactors and in source driven systems (such as radiation shields and blankets of fusion devices) are presented. All the sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of source driven systems carried out so far used unconstrained sensitivity functions despite the fact that such systems can be also subjected to a variety of constraints.

  14. Revealing Additional Dimensions of Globalisation and Cultural Hegemony: A Response to Roland S. Persson's Call for Cultural Sensitivity in Gifted Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Don

    2012-01-01

    In this commentary, the author finds the interdisciplinary approach of Roland S. Persson's (2012a) target article refreshing. Persson's (2012a) additional emphases on ethnocentricity, cultural bias and strong threads of influence from the global economy also are helpful. They shed light on some strong contextual influences that shape the…

  15. A mechanistic model of H{sub 2}{sup 18}O and C{sup 18}OO fluxes between ecosystems and the atmosphere: Model description and sensitivity analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W.J.; Still, C.J.; Torn, M.S.; Berry, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The concentration of 18O in atmospheric CO2 and H2O is a potentially powerful tracer of ecosystem carbon and water fluxes. In this paper we describe the development of an isotope model (ISOLSM) that simulates the 18O content of canopy water vapor, leaf water, and vertically resolved soil water; leaf photosynthetic 18OC16O (hereafter C18OO) fluxes; CO2 oxygen isotope exchanges with soil and leaf water; soil CO2 and C18OO diffusive fluxes (including abiotic soil exchange); and ecosystem exchange of H218O and C18OO with the atmosphere. The isotope model is integrated into the land surface model LSM, but coupling with other models should be straightforward. We describe ISOLSM and apply it to evaluate (a) simplified methods of predicting the C18OO soil-surface flux; (b) the impacts on the C18OO soil-surface flux of the soil-gas diffusion coefficient formulation, soil CO2 source distribution, and rooting distribution; (c) the impacts on the C18OO fluxes of carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity in soil and leaves; and (d) the sensitivity of model predictions to the d18O value of atmospheric water vapor and CO2. Previously published simplified models are unable to capture the seasonal and diurnal variations in the C18OO soil-surface fluxes simulated by ISOLSM. Differences in the assumed soil CO2 production and rooting depth profiles, carbonic anhydrase activity in soil and leaves, and the d18O value of atmospheric water vapor have substantial impacts on the ecosystem CO2 flux isotopic composition. We conclude that accurate prediction of C18OO ecosystem fluxes requires careful representation of H218O and C18OO exchanges and transport in soils and plants.

  16. Sociopolitical Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains four articles devoted to the topic of "Sociopolitical Analyses." In "An Interview with Peter L. McLaren," Mary Leach presented the views of Peter L. McLaren on topics of local and national discourses, values, and the politics of difference. Landon E. Beyer's "Educational Studies and…

  17. Sensitivity analyses of underground drift temperature, stresses, and safety factors to variation in the rock mass properties of tuff for a nuclear waste repository located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.L.

    1987-05-01

    Preliminary two-dimensional thermal and thermal/mechanical sensitivity analyses of the design of the horizontal emplacement drift were performed for times out to 100 years after waste emplacement. The purpose of the analyses is to provide insight into the relative importance of the thermal and thermal/mechanical properties that impact the stability of the emplacement drift-specifically, heat capacity, conductivity, thermal expansion, insitu thermal gradient, insitu stress, joint cohesion and friction angle, elastic modulus, Poisson`s ratio, rock friction angle, rock compressive and tensile strength. This will help prioritize future characterization and analysis activities prior to development. The model input properties were varied over the expected range of their values and the corresponding effect on the temperature, stresses, and safety factors of the rock mass surrounding the drift were recorded. First, the properties were varied individually to determine the independent effects on drift performance. Second, select properties were varied simultaneously to assess joint effects and estimate the probability of undesired drift performance. The results represent a first attempt to estimate the variability of the properties and their effects on the drift. Other sources of variability that can affect drift design are not considered, hence the results are considered preliminary. As site characterization proceeds, the enhanced understanding of property variability will lead to updating the results and conclusions of this report. 15 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  19. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  20. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  1. SNS shielding analyses overview

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz; Iverson, Erik B; Lu, Wei; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on on-going shielding analyses for Spallation Neutron Source. Presently, the most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, save operation and adequate radiation background in the future. There is on-going work for the accelerator facility. This includes radiation-protection analyses for radiation monitors placement, designing shielding for additional facilities to test accelerator structures, redesigning some parts of the facility, and designing test facilities to the main accelerator structure for component testing. Neutronics analyses are required as well to support spent structure management, including waste characterisation analyses, choice of proper transport/storage package and shielding enhancement for the package if required.

  2. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  3. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  4. Spacelab Charcoal Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slivon, L. E.; Hernon-Kenny, L. A.; Katona, V. R.; Dejarme, L. E.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes analytical methods and results obtained from chemical analysis of 31 charcoal samples in five sets. Each set was obtained from a single scrubber used to filter ambient air on board a Spacelab mission. Analysis of the charcoal samples was conducted by thermal desorption followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). All samples were analyzed using identical methods. The method used for these analyses was able to detect compounds independent of their polarity or volatility. In addition to the charcoal samples, analyses of three Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) water samples were conducted specifically for trimethylamine.

  5. The negative affect hypothesis of noise sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Daniel; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja; Heikkilä, Kauko; Dirks, Kim N; Hautus, Michael J; Welch, David; McBride, David

    2015-05-01

    Some studies indicate that noise sensitivity is explained by negative affect, a dispositional tendency to negatively evaluate situations and the self. Individuals high in such traits may report a greater sensitivity to other sensory stimuli, such as smell, bright light and pain. However, research investigating the relationship between noise sensitivity and sensitivity to stimuli associated with other sensory modalities has not always supported the notion of a common underlying trait, such as negative affect, driving them. Additionally, other explanations of noise sensitivity based on cognitive processes have existed in the clinical literature for over 50 years. Here, we report on secondary analyses of pre-existing laboratory (n = 74) and epidemiological (n = 1005) data focusing on the relationship between noise sensitivity to and annoyance with a variety of olfactory-related stimuli. In the first study a correlational design examined the relationships between noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, and perceptual ratings of 16 odors. The second study sought differences between mean noise and air pollution annoyance scores across noise sensitivity categories. Results from both analyses failed to support the notion that, by itself, negative affectivity explains sensitivity to noise. PMID:25993104

  6. The Negative Affect Hypothesis of Noise Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Daniel; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja; Heikkilä, Kauko; Dirks, Kim N.; Hautus, Michael J.; Welch, David; McBride, David

    2015-01-01

    Some studies indicate that noise sensitivity is explained by negative affect, a dispositional tendency to negatively evaluate situations and the self. Individuals high in such traits may report a greater sensitivity to other sensory stimuli, such as smell, bright light and pain. However, research investigating the relationship between noise sensitivity and sensitivity to stimuli associated with other sensory modalities has not always supported the notion of a common underlying trait, such as negative affect, driving them. Additionally, other explanations of noise sensitivity based on cognitive processes have existed in the clinical literature for over 50 years. Here, we report on secondary analyses of pre-existing laboratory (n = 74) and epidemiological (n = 1005) data focusing on the relationship between noise sensitivity to and annoyance with a variety of olfactory-related stimuli. In the first study a correlational design examined the relationships between noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, and perceptual ratings of 16 odors. The second study sought differences between mean noise and air pollution annoyance scores across noise sensitivity categories. Results from both analyses failed to support the notion that, by itself, negative affectivity explains sensitivity to noise. PMID:25993104

  7. Information Omitted From Analyses.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    In the Original Article titled “Higher- Order Genetic and Environmental Structure of Prevalent Forms of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology” published in the February 2011 issue of JAMA Psychiatry (then Archives of General Psychiatry) (2011;68[2]:181-189), there were 2 errors. Although the article stated that the dimensions of psychopathology were measured using parent informants for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and oppositional defiant disorder, and a combination of parent and youth informants for conduct disorder, major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, all dimensional scores used in the reported analyses were actually based on parent reports of symptoms; youth reports were not used. In addition, whereas the article stated that each symptom dimension was residualized on age, sex, age-squared, and age by sex, the dimensions actually were only residualized on age, sex, and age-squared. All analyses were repeated using parent informants for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and oppositional defiant disorder, and a combination of parent and youth informants for conduct disorder,major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder; these dimensional scores were residualized on age, age-squared, sex, sex by age, and sex by age-squared. The results of the new analyses were qualitatively the same as those reported in the article, with no substantial changes in conclusions. The only notable small difference was that major depression and generalized anxiety disorder dimensions had small but significant loadings on the internalizing factor in addition to their substantial loadings on the general factor in the analyses of both genetic and non-shared covariances in the selected models in the new analyses. Corrections were made to the

  8. Development, Testing, and Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analyses of a Transport and Reaction Simulation Engine (TaRSE) for Spatially Distributed Modeling of Phosphorus in South Florida Peat Marsh Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jawitz, James W.; Munoz-Carpena, Rafael; Muller, Stuart; Grace, Kevin A.; James, Andrew I.

    2008-01-01

    in the phosphorus cycling mechanisms were simulated in these case studies using different combinations of phosphorus reaction equations. Changes in water column phosphorus concentrations observed under the controlled conditions of laboratory incubations, and mesocosm studies were reproduced with model simulations. Short-term phosphorus flux rates and changes in phosphorus storages were within the range of values reported in the literature, whereas unknown rate constants were used to calibrate the model output. In STA-1W Cell 4, the dominant mechanism for phosphorus flow and transport is overland flow. Over many life cycles of the biological components, however, soils accrue and become enriched in phosphorus. Inflow total phosphorus concentrations and flow rates for the period between 1995 and 2000 were used to simulate Cell 4 phosphorus removal, outflow concentrations, and soil phosphorus enrichment over time. This full-scale application of the model successfully incorporated parameter values derived from the literature and short-term experiments, and reproduced the observed long-term outflow phosphorus concentrations and increased soil phosphorus storage within the system. A global sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the model was performed using modern techniques such as a qualitative screening tool (Morris method) and the quantitative, variance-based, Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) method. These techniques allowed an in-depth exploration of the effect of model complexity and flow velocity on model outputs. Three increasingly complex levels of possible application to southern Florida were studied corresponding to a simple soil pore-water and surface-water system (level 1), the addition of plankton (level 2), and of macrophytes (level 3). In the analysis for each complexity level, three surface-water velocities were considered that each correspond to residence times for the selected area (1-kilometer long) of 2, 10, and 20

  9. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uncertainty analyses. 436.24 Section 436.24 Energy... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or... by conducting additional analyses using any standard engineering economics method such as...

  10. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uncertainty analyses. 436.24 Section 436.24 Energy... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or... by conducting additional analyses using any standard engineering economics method such as...

  11. Elucidating the relationship between noise sensitivity and personality.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Daniel; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja; Hautus, Michael J; Heikkilä, Kauko

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity to unwanted sounds is common in general and clinical populations. Noise sensitivity refers to physiological and psychological internal states of an individual that increase the degree of reactivity to noise in general. The current study investigated the relationship between the Big Five personality dimensions and noise sensitivity using the 240-item NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI) and 35-item The Noise-Sensitivity-Questionnaire (NoiSeQ) scales, respectively. Overall, the Big Five accounted for 33% of the variance in noise sensitivity, with the Introversion-Extroversion dimension explaining the most variability. Furthermore, the Big Five personality dimensions (neuroticism, extroversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) had an independent effect on noise sensitivity, which were linear. However, additional analyses indicated that the influence of gender and age must be considered when examining the relationship between personality and noise sensitivity. The findings caution against pooling data across genders, not controlling for age, and using personality dimensions in isolation. PMID:25913556

  12. Elucidating the relationship between noise sensitivity and personality

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Daniel; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja; Hautus, Michael J.; Heikkilä, Kauko

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity to unwanted sounds is common in general and clinical populations. Noise sensitivity refers to physiological and psychological internal states of an individual that increase the degree of reactivity to noise in general. The current study investigated the relationship between the Big Five personality dimensions and noise sensitivity using the 240-item NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI) and 35-item The Noise-Sensitivity-Questionnaire (NoiSeQ) scales, respectively. Overall, the Big Five accounted for 33% of the variance in noise sensitivity, with the Introversion-Extroversion dimension explaining the most variability. Furthermore, the Big Five personality dimensions (neuroticism, extroversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) had an independent effect on noise sensitivity, which were linear. However, additional analyses indicated that the influence of gender and age must be considered when examining the relationship between personality and noise sensitivity. The findings caution against pooling data across genders, not controlling for age, and using personality dimensions in isolation. PMID:25913556

  13. Multiple predictor smoothing methods for sensitivity analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, Jon Craig; Storlie, Curtis B.

    2006-08-01

    The use of multiple predictor smoothing methods in sampling-based sensitivity analyses of complex models is investigated. Specifically, sensitivity analysis procedures based on smoothing methods employing the stepwise application of the following nonparametric regression techniques are described: (1) locally weighted regression (LOESS), (2) additive models, (3) projection pursuit regression, and (4) recursive partitioning regression. The indicated procedures are illustrated with both simple test problems and results from a performance assessment for a radioactive waste disposal facility (i.e., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). As shown by the example illustrations, the use of smoothing procedures based on nonparametric regression techniques can yield more informative sensitivity analysis results than can be obtained with more traditional sensitivity analysis procedures based on linear regression, rank regression or quadratic regression when nonlinear relationships between model inputs and model predictions are present.

  14. Synthesis of highly functionalized oligobenzamide proteomimetic foldamers by late stage introduction of sensitive groups† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ob00078a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Burslem, George M.; Kyle, Hannah F.; Prabhakaran, Panchami; Breeze, Alexander L.; Edwards, Thomas A.; Warriner, Stuart L.; Nelson, Adam

    2016-01-01

    α-Helix proteomimetics represent an emerging class of ligands that can be used to inhibit an array of helix mediated protein–protein interactions. Within this class of inhibitor, aromatic oligobenzamide foldamers have been widely and successfully used. This manuscript describes alternative syntheses of these compounds that can be used to access mimetics that are challenging to synthesize using previously described methodologies, permitting access to compounds functionalized with multiple sensitive side chains and accelerated library assembly through late stage derivatisation. PMID:27005701

  15. Precise Chemical Analyses of Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kring, David; Schweitzer, Jeffrey; Meyer, Charles; Trombka, Jacob; Freund, Friedemann; Economou, Thanasis; Yen, Albert; Kim, Soon Sam; Treiman, Allan H.; Blake, David; Lisse, Carey

    1996-01-01

    We identify the chemical elements and element ratios that should be analyzed to address many of the issues identified by the Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration (COMPLEX). We determined that most of these issues require two sensitive instruments to analyze the necessary complement of elements. In addition, it is useful in many cases to use one instrument to analyze the outermost planetary surface (e.g. to determine weathering effects), while a second is used to analyze a subsurface volume of material (e.g., to determine the composition of unaltered planetary surface material). This dual approach to chemical analyses will also facilitate the calibration of orbital and/or Earth-based spectral observations of the planetary body. We determined that in many cases the scientific issues defined by COMPLEX can only be fully addressed with combined packages of instruments that would supplement the chemical data with mineralogic or visual information.

  16. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses of annualized relapse rate over 2 years in the ADVANCE trial of peginterferon beta-1a in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Scott D; Kieseier, Bernd C; Arnold, Douglas L; Shang, Shulian; Liu, Shifang; Hung, Serena; Sabatella, Guido

    2016-09-01

    ADVANCE was a 2-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 study in 1512 patients aged 18-65 years with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, which demonstrated that peginterferon beta-1a 125 mcg administered subcutaneously every 2 or 4 weeks led to significant reductions in annualized relapse rate (ARR) compared with placebo. This analysis examined ARR over 2 years in ADVANCE across subgroups. Patients were treated with peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks, or placebo during Year 1. Thereafter, patients on placebo were re-randomized to peginterferon beta-1a every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks (delayed treatment). Subgroup analyses were conducted by demographics and baseline disease characteristics. The following results compared ARR in these subgroups for patients in continuous 2-week treatment versus continuous 4-week treatment. ARR was similar in most demographic and baseline disease characteristic subgroups evaluated within the peginterferon beta-1a every-2-week arm or every-4-week arm over 2 years. Although for both doses some differences in the point estimates for ARR were noted among the subgroups, considerable overlap in the confidence intervals suggested that the efficacy of peginterferon beta-1a is similar in all patients irrespective of gender, age, body weight, geographical region, and disease activity at initiation of treatment. Within each peginterferon beta-1a dosing group, ARR was generally similar across most subgroups. PMID:27314959

  17. Efficient eco-friendly inverted quantum dot sensitized solar cells† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of QDs, XPS spectra, UV-vis and PL spectra of the sensitized electrodes, details about photophysical characterization and IPCE spectra interpretation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta06769c Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhyung; Sajjad, Muhammad T.; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Ruseckas, Arvydas; Faure-Vincent, Jérôme; Reiss, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells has demonstrated the possibility of low-cost and efficient photovoltaics. However, the standard device structure based on n-type materials often suffers from slow hole injection rate, which may lead to unbalanced charge transport. We have fabricated efficient p-type (inverted) QD sensitized cells, which combine the advantages of conventional QD cells with p-type dye sensitized configurations. Moreover, p-type QD sensitized cells can be used in highly promising tandem configurations with n-type ones. QDs without toxic Cd and Pb elements and with improved absorption and stability were successfully deposited onto mesoporous NiO electrode showing good coverage and penetration according to morphological analysis. Detailed photophysical charge transfer studies showed that high hole injection rates (108 s–1) observed in such systems are comparable with electron injection in conventional n-type QD assemblies. Inverted solar cells fabricated with various QDs demonstrate excellent power conversion efficiencies of up to 1.25%, which is 4 times higher than the best values for previous inverted QD sensitized cells. Attempts to passivate the surface of the QDs show that traditional methods of reduction of recombination in the QD sensitized cells are not applicable to the inverted architectures. PMID:27478616

  18. Enhancing aspergiolide A production from a shear-sensitive and easy-foaming marine-derived filamentous fungus Aspergillus glaucus by oxygen carrier addition and impeller combination in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Cai, Menghao; Zhou, Xiangshan; Lu, Jian; Fan, Weimin; Niu, Chuanpeng; Zhou, Jiushun; Sun, Xueqian; Kang, Li; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2011-02-01

    Production enhancement of a novel antitumor compound aspergiolide A from shear-sensitive and easy-foaming marine-derived fungus Aspergillus glaucus HB1-19 in a 5-l stirred bioreactor was investigated. Two types of impellers, i.e., six-flat-blade disc turbine impeller (DT) and three-sector-blade pitched blade turbine impeller (PB) were used in this work. In cultures with fermentation medium, the combination of upper PB and lower DT led to the maximum dry biomass (13.8 g/l) and aspergiolide A production (19.3 mg/l). However, two PBs brought the highest aspergiolide A yield coefficient (1.9 mg/g dry biomass) despite it produced the lowest dry biomass (5.3 g/l). By contrast, two DTs and the upper DT and lower PB showed insignificant results. Feeding 0.35% (v/v) n-dodecane in cultures with upper PB and lower DT further improved aspergiolide A production by 31.0%, i.e., 25.3 mg/l, which is also 322% higher than that in the ordinary cultures with two DTs. PMID:21074418

  19. Efficient bifacial dye-sensitized solar cells through disorder by design† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta10091g Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Muñoz, José M.; Carretero-Palacios, Sol; Jiménez-Solano, Alberto; Li, Yuelong; Lozano, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Herein we realize an optical design that optimizes the performance of bifacial solar cells without modifying any of the usually employed components. In order to do so, dielectric scatterers of controlled size and shape have been successfully integrated in the working electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), resulting in bifacial devices of outstanding performance. Power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) as high as 6.7% and 5.4% have been attained under front and rear illumination, respectively, which represent a 25% and a 33% PCE enhancement with respect to an 8 μm-thick standard solar cell electrode using platinum as the catalytic material. The remarkable bifacial character of our approach is demonstrated by the high rear/front efficiency ratio attained, around 80%, which is among the largest reported for this sort of device. The proposed optimized design is based on a Monte Carlo approach in which the multiple scattering of light within the cell is fully accounted for. We identified that the spherical shape of the scatterers is the key parameter controlling the angular distribution of the scattering, the most efficient devices being those in which the inclusions provide a narrow forward-oriented angular distribution of the scattered light. PMID:27019714

  20. Biological aerosol warner and analyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, Harry; Kürbitz, Gunther; Miethe, Peter; Spieweck, Michael

    2006-05-01

    The development of an integrated sensor device BiSAM (Biological Sampling and Analysing Module) is presented which is designed for rapid detection of aerosol or dust particles potentially loaded with biological warfare agents. All functional steps from aerosol collection via immuno analysis to display of results are fully automated. The core component of the sensor device is an ultra sensitive rapid analyser PBA (Portable Benchtop Analyser) based on a 3 dimensional immuno filtration column of large internal area, Poly HRP marker technology and kinetic optical detection. High sensitivity despite of the short measuring time, high chemical stability of the micro column and robustness against interferents make the PBA an ideal tool for fielded sensor devices. It is especially favourable to combine the PBA with a bio collector because virtually no sample preparation is necessary. Overall, the BiSAM device is capable to detect and identify living micro organisms (bacteria, spores, viruses) as well as toxins in a measuring cycle of typically half an hour duration. In each batch up to 12 different tests can be run in parallel together with positive and negative controls to keep the false alarm rate low.

  1. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W; Gotham, Douglas J.; Luciani, Ralph L.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  2. UNCERTAINTY AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSES FOR VERY HIGH ORDER MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While there may in many cases be high potential for exposure of humans and ecosystems to chemicals released from a source, the degree to which this potential is realized is often uncertain. Conceptually, uncertainties are divided among parameters, model, and modeler during simula...

  3. Marginal Utility of Conditional Sensitivity Analyses for Dynamic Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/MethodsDynamic ecological processes may be influenced by many factors. Simulation models thatmimic these processes often have complex implementations with many parameters. Sensitivityanalyses are subsequently used to identify critical parameters whose uncertai...

  4. Sensitive Optical and Microfluidic Systems for Cellular Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, Perry G.

    Investigating rare cells and heterogeneous subpopulations is challenging for a myriad reasons. This dissertation describes novel techniques to analyze single molecules, synaptic vesicles, and rare circulating tumor cells. The eDAR platform for isolating rare cells in fluids provides a new method to monitor breast cancer status in patients as well as to guide research for personalized treatment and efficacy. In a side-by-side comparison with CellSearch, eDAR detected CTCs in all 20 Stage IV metastatic breast cancer patients while the CellSearch system found CTCs in just 8 patients. The single-molecule capillary electrophoresis technology is a method to characterize an entire sample one molecule at a time, providing detailed information about the absolute number and nature of molecules present in a sample. The nFASS platform has the potential to apply the advantages that currently exist in flow cytometry to the study of items on a much smaller scale such as subcellular organelles and nanometer-sized objects. For example, the isolation of subpopulations of synaptic vesicles will allow for detailed protein quantification and identification in the study of neurological diseases. These tools facilitate fundamental investigation of objects ranging from single molecules to single cells.

  5. DATA AND ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to promote transparency and clarity of the analyses performed in support of EPA's Supplemental Guidance for Assessing Susceptibility from Early-Life Exposure to Carcinogens, the data and the analyses are now available on this web site. The data is presented in two diffe...

  6. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin. PMID:26805416

  7. RESRAD parameter sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J.J.; Yu, C.; Zielen, A.J.

    1991-08-01

    Three methods were used to perform a sensitivity analysis of RESRAD code input parameters -- enhancement of RESRAD by the Gradient Enhanced Software System (GRESS) package, direct parameter perturbation, and graphic comparison. Evaluation of these methods indicated that (1) the enhancement of RESRAD by GRESS has limitations and should be used cautiously, (2) direct parameter perturbation is tedious to implement, and (3) the graphics capability of RESRAD 4.0 is the most direct and convenient method for performing sensitivity analyses. This report describes procedures for implementing these methods and presents a comparison of results. 3 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Climate Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lindzen, Richard

    2011-11-09

    Warming observed thus far is entirely consistent with low climate sensitivity. However, the result is ambiguous because the sources of climate change are numerous and poorly specified. Model predictions of substantial warming aredependent on positive feedbacks associated with upper level water vapor and clouds, but models are notably inadequate in dealing with clouds and the impacts of clouds and water vapor are intimately intertwined. Various approaches to measuring sensitivity based on the physics of the feedbacks will be described. The results thus far point to negative feedbacks. Problems with these approaches as well as problems with the concept of climate sensitivity will be described.

  9. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a) For... identify and address relevant markets and issues, and provide additional information as requested by...

  10. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a) For... identify and address relevant markets and issues, and provide additional information as requested by...

  11. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a) For... identify and address relevant markets and issues, and provide additional information as requested by...

  12. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or... impact of uncertainty on the calculation of life cycle cost effectiveness or the assignment of rank order... and probabilistic analysis. If additional analysis casts substantial doubt on the life cycle...

  13. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or... impact of uncertainty on the calculation of life cycle cost effectiveness or the assignment of rank order... and probabilistic analysis. If additional analysis casts substantial doubt on the life cycle...

  14. Gluten Sensitivity

    MedlinePlus

    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. It is found mainly in foods but ... products like medicines, vitamins, and supplements. People with gluten sensitivity have problems with gluten. It is different ...

  15. Gluten Sensitivity

    MedlinePlus

    ... have problems with gluten. It is different from celiac disease, an immune disease in which people can't ... the symptoms of gluten sensitivity are similar to celiac disease. They include tiredness and stomachaches. It can cause ...

  16. Consumption patterns and perception analyses of hangwa.

    PubMed

    Kwock, Chang Geun; Lee, Min A; Park, So Hyun

    2012-03-01

    Hangwa is a traditional food, corresponding to the current consumption trend, in need of marketing strategies to extend its consumption. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze consumers' consumption patterns and perception of Hangwa to increase consumption in the market. A questionnaire was sent to 250 consumers by e-mail from Oct 8∼23, 2009 and the data from 231 persons were analyzed in this study. Statistical, descriptive, paired samples t-test, and importance-performance analyses were conducted using SPSS WIN 17.0. According to the results, Hangwa was purchased mainly 'for present' (39.8%) and the main reasons for buying it were 'traditional image' (33.3%) and 'taste' (22.5%). When importance and performance of attributes considered in purchasing Hangwa were evaluated, performance was assessed to be lower than importance for all attributes. The attributes in the first quadrant with a high importance and a high performance were 'a sanitary process', 'a rigorous quality mark' and 'taste', which were related with quality of the products. In addition, those with a high importance but a low performance were 'popularization through advertisement', 'promotion through mass media', 'conversion of thought on traditional foods', 'a reasonable price' and 'a wide range of price'. In conclusion, Hangwa manufacturers need to diversify products and extend the expiration date based on technologies to promote its consumption. In terms of price, Hangwa should become more available by lowering the price barrier for consumers who are sensitive to price. PMID:24471065

  17. NOAA's National Snow Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. R.; Cline, D. W.; Olheiser, C. M.; Rost, A. A.; Nilsson, A. O.; Fall, G. M.; Li, L.; Bovitz, C. T.

    2005-12-01

    NOAA's National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) routinely ingests all of the electronically available, real-time, ground-based, snow data; airborne snow water equivalent data; satellite areal extent of snow cover information; and numerical weather prediction (NWP) model forcings for the coterminous U.S. The NWP model forcings are physically downscaled from their native 13 km2 spatial resolution to a 1 km2 resolution for the CONUS. The downscaled NWP forcings drive an energy-and-mass-balance snow accumulation and ablation model at a 1 km2 spatial resolution and at a 1 hour temporal resolution for the country. The ground-based, airborne, and satellite snow observations are assimilated into the snow model's simulated state variables using a Newtonian nudging technique. The principle advantages of the assimilation technique are: (1) approximate balance is maintained in the snow model, (2) physical processes are easily accommodated in the model, and (3) asynoptic data are incorporated at the appropriate times. The snow model is reinitialized with the assimilated snow observations to generate a variety of snow products that combine to form NOAA's NOHRSC National Snow Analyses (NSA). The NOHRSC NSA incorporate all of the available information necessary and available to produce a "best estimate" of real-time snow cover conditions at 1 km2 spatial resolution and 1 hour temporal resolution for the country. The NOHRSC NSA consist of a variety of daily, operational, products that characterize real-time snowpack conditions including: snow water equivalent, snow depth, surface and internal snowpack temperatures, surface and blowing snow sublimation, and snowmelt for the CONUS. The products are generated and distributed in a variety of formats including: interactive maps, time-series, alphanumeric products (e.g., mean areal snow water equivalent on a hydrologic basin-by-basin basis), text and map discussions, map animations, and quantitative gridded products

  18. 24 CFR 81.65 - Other information and analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Other information and analyses. 81... information and analyses. When deemed appropriate and requested in writing, on a case by-case basis, by the... conduct additional analyses concerning any such report. A GSE shall submit additional reports or...

  19. Wavelet Analyses and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordeianu, Cristian C.; Landau, Rubin H.; Paez, Manuel J.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how a modern extension of Fourier analysis known as wavelet analysis is applied to signals containing multiscale information. First, a continuous wavelet transform is used to analyse the spectrum of a nonstationary signal (one whose form changes in time). The spectral analysis of such a signal gives the strength of the signal in each…

  20. Apollo 14 microbial analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    Extensive microbiological analyses that were performed on the Apollo 14 prime and backup crewmembers and ancillary personnel are discussed. The crewmembers were subjected to four separate and quite different environments during the 137-day monitoring period. The relation between each of these environments and observed changes in the microflora of each astronaut are presented.

  1. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects. PMID:24772784

  2. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  3. Ultrasensitive flow cytometric analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.H.; Cram, L.S.; Keller, R.A.; Martin, J.C.; Saunders, G.C.; Sklar, L.A.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    New techniques and approaches to cellular analysis being developed at the Los Alamos National Flow Cytometry Resource can be divided into those that improve sensitivity and those that move the technology into new areas by refining existing approaches. An example of the first category is a flow cytometric system capable of measuring the phase shift of fluorescence emitted by fluorophors bound to cells is being assembled. This phase sensitive cytometer is be capable of quantifying fluorescence life time on a cell-by-cell basis as well as using the phase sensitive detection to separate fluorescence emissions that overlap spectrally but have different lifetimes. A Fourier transform flow cytometer capable of measuring the fluorescence emission spectrum of individual labeled cells at rates approaching several hundred per second is also in the new technology category. The current implementation is capable of resolving the visible region of the spectrum into 8 bands. With this instrument, it is possible to resolve the contributions of fluorophors with overlapping emission spectra and to determine the emission spectra of dyes such as calcium concentration indicators that are sensitive to the physiological environment. Flow cytometric techniques have been refined to the point that it is possible to detect individual fluorescent molecules in solution as they flow past a laser beam. This capability has lead to a rapid DNA sequencing project. The goal of the project is to develop a technique that is capable of sequencing long strands of DNA (40,000 kb) at a rate of between 100 and 1,000 bases per second.

  4. Additive usage levels.

    PubMed

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  5. Analysing specificity of a bipolar EEG measurement.

    PubMed

    Vaisanen, Juho; Ryynanen, Outi; Hyttinen, Jari; Malmivuo, Jaakko

    2006-01-01

    The objective in bioelectric measurements such as ECG and EEG is to register the signal arising from sources in the region of interest. It is also desired that signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a measurement is high. The sensitivity of an ideal measurement should focus on and be greater on the target areas in comparison to other areas of the volume conductor. Previously the half-sensitivity volume (HSV) has been applied to describe how focused the measurement is. In this paper we introduce a concept of the half-sensitivity ratio (HSR) which describes how well the sensitivity is concentrated in HSV compared to other source regions i.e. how specific the measurement is to the sources in HSV. Further we may have different region of interests (ROI) to which the measurements are wanted to be specific. Then the concept is called region of interest sensitivity ratio (ROISR). We present here an application of the HSR in analysing sensitivity distributions of bioelectric measurements. We studied the effects of interelectrode distance and the scalp/skull/brain resistivity ratio on the HSR of a bipolar EEG measurement with a three-layer spherical head model. The results indicate that when the focus of interest is on cortical activity more specified and concentrated sensitivity distributions are achieved with smaller interelectrode distances. Further a preliminary measurement with visual evoked potentials provides evidence of the relationship between HSR and SNR of a measurement. PMID:17945619

  6. An additional middle cuneiform?

    PubMed Central

    Brookes-Fazakerley, S.D.; Jackson, G.E.; Platt, S.R.

    2015-01-01

    Additional cuneiform bones of the foot have been described in reference to the medial bipartite cuneiform or as small accessory ossicles. An additional middle cuneiform has not been previously documented. We present the case of a patient with an additional ossicle that has the appearance and location of an additional middle cuneiform. Recognizing such an anatomical anomaly is essential for ruling out second metatarsal base or middle cuneiform fractures and for the preoperative planning of arthrodesis or open reduction and internal fixation procedures in this anatomical location. PMID:26224890

  7. High perfomance liquid chromatography in pharmaceutical analyses.

    PubMed

    Nikolin, Branko; Imamović, Belma; Medanhodzić-Vuk, Saira; Sober, Miroslav

    2004-05-01

    In testing the pre-sale procedure the marketing of drugs and their control in the last ten years, high performance liquid chromatography replaced numerous spectroscopic methods and gas chromatography in the quantitative and qualitative analysis. In the first period of HPLC application it was thought that it would become a complementary method of gas chromatography, however, today it has nearly completely replaced gas chromatography in pharmaceutical analysis. The application of the liquid mobile phase with the possibility of transformation of mobilized polarity during chromatography and all other modifications of mobile phase depending upon the characteristics of substance which are being tested, is a great advantage in the process of separation in comparison to other methods. The greater choice of stationary phase is the next factor which enables realization of good separation. The separation line is connected to specific and sensitive detector systems, spectrafluorimeter, diode detector, electrochemical detector as other hyphernated systems HPLC-MS and HPLC-NMR, are the basic elements on which is based such wide and effective application of the HPLC method. The purpose high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of any drugs is to confirm the identity of a drug and provide quantitative results and also to monitor the progress of the therapy of a disease.1) Measuring presented on the Fig. 1. is chromatogram obtained for the plasma of depressed patients 12 h before oral administration of dexamethasone. It may also be used to further our understanding of the normal and disease process in the human body trough biomedical and therapeutically research during investigation before of the drugs registration. The analyses of drugs and metabolites in biological fluids, particularly plasma, serum or urine is one of the most demanding but one of the most common uses of high performance of liquid chromatography. Blood, plasma or serum contains numerous endogenous

  8. Carbamate deposit control additives

    SciTech Connect

    Honnen, L.R.; Lewis, R.A.

    1980-11-25

    Deposit control additives for internal combustion engines are provided which maintain cleanliness of intake systems without contributing to combustion chamber deposits. The additives are poly(oxyalkylene) carbamates comprising a hydrocarbyloxyterminated poly(Oxyalkylene) chain of 2-5 carbon oxyalkylene units bonded through an oxycarbonyl group to a nitrogen atom of ethylenediamine.

  9. LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Model calculations and analyses have been carried out to compare with several sets of data (dose, induced radioactivity in various experiment samples and spacecraft components, fission foil measurements, and LET spectra) from passive radiation dosimetry on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, which was recovered after almost six years in space. The calculations and data comparisons are used to estimate the accuracy of current models and methods for predicting the ionizing radiation environment in low earth orbit. The emphasis is on checking the accuracy of trapped proton flux and anisotropy models.

  10. Scaling in sensitivity analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, W.A.; Doherty, P.F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Population matrix models allow sets of demographic parameters to be summarized by a single value 8, the finite rate of population increase. The consequences of change in individual demographic parameters are naturally measured by the corresponding changes in 8; sensitivity analyses compare demographic parameters on the basis of these changes. These comparisons are complicated by issues of scale. Elasticity analysis attempts to deal with issues of scale by comparing the effects of proportional changes in demographic parameters, but leads to inconsistencies in evaluating demographic rates. We discuss this and other problems of scaling in sensitivity analysis, and suggest a simple criterion for choosing appropriate scales. We apply our suggestions to data for the killer whale, Orcinus orca.

  11. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  12. Broadband rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The various mechanisms which generate broadband noise on a range of rotors studied include load fluctuations due to inflow turbulence, due to turbulent boundary layers passing the blades' trailing edges, and due to tip vortex formation. Existing analyses are used and extensions to them are developed to make more accurate predictions of rotor noise spectra and to determine which mechanisms are important in which circumstances. Calculations based on the various prediction methods in existing experiments were compared. The present analyses are adequate to predict the spectra from a wide variety of experiments on fans, full scale and model scale helicopter rotors, wind turbines, and propellers to within about 5 to 10 dB. Better knowledge of the inflow turbulence improves the accuracy of the predictions. Results indicate that inflow turbulence noise depends strongly on ambient conditions and dominates at low frequencies. Trailing edge noise and tip vortex noise are important at higher frequencies if inflow turbulence is weak. Boundary layer trailing edge noise, important, for large sized rotors, increases slowly with angle of attack but not as rapidly as tip vortex noise.

  13. Broadband rotor noise analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1984-04-01

    The various mechanisms which generate broadband noise on a range of rotors studied include load fluctuations due to inflow turbulence, due to turbulent boundary layers passing the blades' trailing edges, and due to tip vortex formation. Existing analyses are used and extensions to them are developed to make more accurate predictions of rotor noise spectra and to determine which mechanisms are important in which circumstances. Calculations based on the various prediction methods in existing experiments were compared. The present analyses are adequate to predict the spectra from a wide variety of experiments on fans, full scale and model scale helicopter rotors, wind turbines, and propellers to within about 5 to 10 dB. Better knowledge of the inflow turbulence improves the accuracy of the predictions. Results indicate that inflow turbulence noise depends strongly on ambient conditions and dominates at low frequencies. Trailing edge noise and tip vortex noise are important at higher frequencies if inflow turbulence is weak. Boundary layer trailing edge noise, important, for large sized rotors, increases slowly with angle of attack but not as rapidly as tip vortex noise.

  14. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  15. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  16. Consumption Patterns and Perception Analyses of Hangwa

    PubMed Central

    Kwock, Chang Geun; Lee, Min A; Park, So Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Hangwa is a traditional food, corresponding to the current consumption trend, in need of marketing strategies to extend its consumption. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze consumers’ consumption patterns and perception of Hangwa to increase consumption in the market. A questionnaire was sent to 250 consumers by e-mail from Oct 8∼23, 2009 and the data from 231 persons were analyzed in this study. Statistical, descriptive, paired samples t-test, and importance-performance analyses were conducted using SPSS WIN 17.0. According to the results, Hangwa was purchased mainly ‘for present’ (39.8%) and the main reasons for buying it were ‘traditional image’ (33.3%) and ‘taste’ (22.5%). When importance and performance of attributes considered in purchasing Hangwa were evaluated, performance was assessed to be lower than importance for all attributes. The attributes in the first quadrant with a high importance and a high performance were ‘a sanitary process’, ‘a rigorous quality mark’ and ‘taste’, which were related with quality of the products. In addition, those with a high importance but a low performance were ‘popularization through advertisement’, ‘promotion through mass media’, ‘conversion of thought on traditional foods’, ‘a reasonable price’ and ‘a wide range of price’. In conclusion, Hangwa manufacturers need to diversify products and extend the expiration date based on technologies to promote its consumption. In terms of price, Hangwa should become more available by lowering the price barrier for consumers who are sensitive to price. PMID:24471065

  17. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  18. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  19. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  20. Adverse reactions to the sulphite additives

    PubMed Central

    Misso, Neil LA

    2012-01-01

    Sulphites are widely used as preservative and antioxidant additives in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Exposure to sulphites has been reported to induce a range of adverse clinical effects in sensitive individuals, ranging from dermatitis, urticaria, flushing, hypotension, abdominal pain and diarrhoea to life-threatening anaphylactic and asthmatic reactions. Exposure to the sulphites arises mainly from the consumption of foods and drinks that contain these additives; however exposure may also occur through the use of pharmaceutical products, as well as in occupational settings. Most studies report a prevalence of sulphite sensitivity of 3 to 10% among asthmatic subjects who ingest these additives. However, the severity of these reactions varies, and steroid-dependent asthmatics, those with marked airway hyperresponsiveness, and children with chronic asthma, appear to be at greater risk. Although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed, the precise mechanisms underlying sulphite sensitivity remain unclear. PMID:24834193

  1. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  2. LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) under contract NAS8-39386 from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center entitled LDEF Satellite Radiation Analyses. The basic objective of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of present models and computational methods for defining the ionizing radiation environment for spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) by making comparisons with radiation measurements made on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) satellite, which was recovered after almost six years in space. The emphasis of the work here is on predictions and comparisons with LDEF measurements of induced radioactivity and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) measurements. These model/data comparisons have been used to evaluate the accuracy of current models for predicting the flux and directionality of trapped protons for LEO missions.

  3. Network Class Superposition Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Carl A. B.; Zeng, Chen; Simha, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., for the yeast cell cycle process [1]), considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix , which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for derived from Boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with . We show how to generate Derrida plots based on . We show that -based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on . We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology Boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for , for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses. PMID:23565141

  4. Thyroid disrupting chemicals in plastic additives and thyroid health.

    PubMed

    Andra, Syam S; Makris, Konstantinos C

    2012-01-01

    The globally escalating thyroid nodule incidence rates may be only partially ascribed to better diagnostics, allowing for the assessment of environmental risk factors on thyroid disease. Endocrine disruptors or thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDC) like bisphenol A, phthalates, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers are widely used as plastic additives in consumer products. This comprehensive review studied the magnitude and uncertainty of TDC exposures and their effects on thyroid hormones for sensitive subpopulation groups like pregnant women, infants, and children. Our findings qualitatively suggest the mixed, significant (α = 0.05) TDC associations with natural thyroid hormones (positive or negative sign). Future studies should undertake systematic meta-analyses to elucidate pooled TDC effect estimates on thyroid health indicators and outcomes. PMID:22690712

  5. Gluten Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Catassi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a syndrome characterized by intestinal and extraintestinal symptoms related to the ingestion of gluten-containing food in subjects who are not affected by either celiac disease (CD) or wheat allergy (WA). The prevalence of NCGS is not clearly defined yet. Indirect evidence suggests that NCGS is slightly more common than CD, the latter affecting around 1% of the general population. NCGS has been mostly described in adults, particularly in females in the age group of 30-50 years; however, pediatric case series have also been reported. Since NCGS may be transient, gluten tolerance needs to be reassessed over time in patients with NCGS. NCGS is characterized by symptoms that usually occur soon after gluten ingestion, disappear with gluten withdrawal, and relapse following gluten challenge within hours/days. The 'classical' presentation of NCGS is a combination of irritable bowel syndrome-like symptoms, including abdominal pain, bloating, bowel habit abnormalities (either diarrhea or constipation), and systemic manifestations such as 'foggy mind', headache, fatigue, joint and muscle pain, leg or arm numbness, dermatitis (eczema or skin rash), depression, and anemia. In recent years, several studies explored the relationship between the ingestion of gluten-containing food and the appearance of neurological and psychiatric disorders/symptoms like ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, schizophrenia, autism, depression, anxiety, and hallucinations (so-called gluten psychosis). The diagnosis of NCGS should be considered in patients with persistent intestinal and/or extraintestinal complaints showing a normal result of the CD and WA serological markers on a gluten-containing diet, usually reporting worsening of symptoms after eating gluten-rich food. NCGS should not be an exclusion diagnosis only. Unfortunately, no biomarker is sensitive and specific enough for diagnostic purposes; therefore, the diagnosis of NCGS is currently based on

  6. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  7. Evaluation of MELCOR improvements: Peach Bottom station blackout analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Madni, I.K.

    1993-12-31

    Long-term station blackout analyses in Peach Bottom were first carried out using MELCOR 1.8BC, and later with 1.8DN, as part of an overall program between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), to provide independent assessment of MELCOR as a severe accident/source term analysis tool. In addition to the reference MELCOR calculation, several sensitivity calculations were also performed to explore the impact of varying user-input modeling and timestep control parameters on the accident progression and radionuclide releases to the environment calculated by MELCOR. An area of concern that emerged from these studies was the impact of the selection of maximum allowable timestep ({Delta}t{sub max}) on the calculational behavior of MELCOR, where the results showed significant differences in timing of key events, and a lack of convergence of the solution with reduction of {Delta}t{sub max}. These findings were reported to the NRC, SNL, and the MELCOR Peer Review Committee. As a consequence, a significant effort was undertaken to eliminate or mitigate these sensitivities. The latest released version of MELCOR, Version 1.8.2, released in April 1993, contains several new or improved models, and has corrections to mitigate numerical sensitivities. This paper presents the results of updating the earlier sensitivity studies on maximum timestep, to more properly represent the abilities of the improved MELCOR version 1.8.2. Results are presenter in terms of timing of key events, thermal-hydraulic response of the system, and environmental release of radionuclides. The impact of some of the newer models, such as falling debris quench model, and ORNL`s new BH model, is also evaluated.

  8. Characterization of Metal Powders Used for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, JA; Garboczi, EJ; Stutzman, PE; Ferraris, CF; Watson, SS; Peltz, MA

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) techniques1 can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical parts, such as those found in aerospace components. The production of AM parts with consistent and predictable properties requires input materials (e.g., metal powders) with known and repeatable characteristics, which in turn requires standardized measurement methods for powder properties. First, based on our previous work, we assess the applicability of current standardized methods for powder characterization for metal AM powders. Then we present the results of systematic studies carried out on two different powder materials used for additive manufacturing: stainless steel and cobalt-chrome. The characterization of these powders is important in NIST efforts to develop appropriate measurements and standards for additive materials and to document the property of powders used in a NIST-led additive manufacturing material round robin. An extensive array of characterization techniques was applied to these two powders, in both virgin and recycled states. The physical techniques included laser diffraction particle size analysis, X-ray computed tomography for size and shape analysis, and optical and scanning electron microscopy. Techniques sensitive to structure and chemistry, including X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive analytical X-ray analysis using the X-rays generated during scanning electron microscopy, and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also employed. The results of these analyses show how virgin powder changes after being exposed to and recycled from one or more Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) additive manufacturing build cycles. In addition, these findings can give insight into the actual additive manufacturing process. PMID:26601040

  9. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  10. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  11. Performance of the new pyrolytic graphite analyser bank on the near-backscattering spectrometer IRIS on the ISIS pulsed source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telling, M. T. F.; Campbell, S. I.; Abbley, D. D.; Cragg, D. A.; Balchin, J. J. P.; Carlile, C. J.

    The pyrolytic graphite (PG) analyser bank on the IRIS high-resolution quasi-elastic/low-energy inelastic neutron scattering spectrometer at ISIS has been upgraded. While the original analyser utilised a 6-row by 225-column array of graphite crystals cooled to 30 K, the new design is comprised of 4212 crystal pieces (18 rows by 234 columns). In addition, the graphite is now cooled close to liquid-helium temperature to further improve the sensitivity of the spectrometer. In this paper, the performance of the newly upgraded instrument is determined by comparing resolution measurements collected from the complete IRIS spectrometer before and after modification.

  12. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate. PMID:3302664

  13. Tuberculin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Eason, R J

    1987-06-01

    A prospective study of tuberculin sensitivity has been conducted among 3610 subjects under 20 years old in the Solomon Islands, Western Province. Mantoux positivity (greater than or equal to mm induration after 5 TU) fell from 81% during the 6 months following birth BCG vaccination to 13% for children aged 1-8 years of age among whom it was not significantly higher than the rate of 9% noted for unvaccinated subjects. Birth BCG does not, therefore, hinder the diagnostic usefulness of tuberculin testing for such children. For the study population as a whole, BCG-induced Mantoux positivity was restricted to induration under 15 mm diameter. Stronger responses were considered specific for tuberculin infection and indicated a prevalence rate that rose from 2% to 16% with age. Accelerated BCG reactions recorded among 45% of 162 tuberculin non-reactors under 8 years old indicated that the waning of tuberculin responsiveness at this time could not be equated with loss of clinical protection against tuberculosis. PMID:2441657

  14. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  15. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  16. Conducting ANOVA Trend Analyses Using Polynomial Contrasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laija, Wilda

    When analysis of variance (ANOVA) or linear regression is used, results may only indicate statistical significance. This statistical significance tells the researcher very little about the data being analyzed. Additional analyses need to be used to extract all the possible information obtained from a study. While a priori and post hoc comparisons…

  17. SBML-SAT: a systems biology markup language (SBML) based sensitivity analysis tool

    PubMed Central

    Zi, Zhike; Zheng, Yanan; Rundell, Ann E; Klipp, Edda

    2008-01-01

    Background It has long been recognized that sensitivity analysis plays a key role in modeling and analyzing cellular and biochemical processes. Systems biology markup language (SBML) has become a well-known platform for coding and sharing mathematical models of such processes. However, current SBML compatible software tools are limited in their ability to perform global sensitivity analyses of these models. Results This work introduces a freely downloadable, software package, SBML-SAT, which implements algorithms for simulation, steady state analysis, robustness analysis and local and global sensitivity analysis for SBML models. This software tool extends current capabilities through its execution of global sensitivity analyses using multi-parametric sensitivity analysis, partial rank correlation coefficient, SOBOL's method, and weighted average of local sensitivity analyses in addition to its ability to handle systems with discontinuous events and intuitive graphical user interface. Conclusion SBML-SAT provides the community of systems biologists a new tool for the analysis of their SBML models of biochemical and cellular processes. PMID:18706080

  18. Gender differences in dimensions of anxiety sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S H; Taylor, S; Baker, J M

    1997-01-01

    Anxiety sensitivity (AS) is the fear of anxiety-related sensations arising from beliefs that these sensations have harmful physical, psychological, or social consequences. AS is measured using the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI), a 16-item self-report questionnaire. Little is known about the origins of AS, although social learning experiences (including sex-role socialization experiences) may be important. The present study examined whether there were gender differences in: (a) the lower- or higher-order factor structure of the ASI; and/or (b) pattern of ASI factor scores. The ASI was completed by 818 university students (290 males; 528 females). Separate principal components analyses on the ASI items of the total sample, males, and females revealed nearly identical lower-order three-factor structures for all groups, with factors pertaining to fears about the anticipated (a) physical, (b) psychological, and (c) social consequences of anxiety. Separate principal components analyses on the lower-order factor scores of the three samples revealed similar unidimensional higher-order solutions for all groups. Gender x AS dimension analyses on ASI lower-order factor scores showed that: females scored higher than males only on the physical concerns factor; females scored higher on the physical concerns factor relative to their scores on the social and psychological concerns factors; and males scored higher on the social and psychological concerns factors relative to their scores on the physical concerns factor. Finally, females scored higher than males on the higher-order factor representing the global AS construct. The present study provides further support for the empirical distinction of the three lower-order dimensions of AS, and additional evidence for the theoretical hierarchical structure of the ASI. Results also suggest that males and females differ on these various AS dimensions in ways consistent with sex role socialization practices. PMID:9168341

  19. Boron addition to alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Coad, B. C.

    1985-08-20

    A process for addition of boron to an alloy which involves forming a melt of the alloy and a reactive metal, selected from the group consisting of aluminum, titanium, zirconium and mixtures thereof to the melt, maintaining the resulting reactive mixture in the molten state and reacting the boric oxide with the reactive metal to convert at least a portion of the boric oxide to boron which dissolves in the resulting melt, and to convert at least portion of the reactive metal to the reactive metal oxide, which oxide remains with the resulting melt, and pouring the resulting melt into a gas stream to form a first atomized powder which is subsequently remelted with further addition of boric oxide, re-atomized, and thus reprocessed to convert essentially all the reactive metal to metal oxide to produce a powdered alloy containing specified amounts of boron.

  20. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  1. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  2. [Biologically active food additives].

    PubMed

    Velichko, M A; Shevchenko, V P

    1998-07-01

    More than half out of 40 projects for the medical science development by the year of 2000 have been connected with the bio-active edible additives that are called "the food of XXI century", non-pharmacological means for many diseases. Most of these additives--nutricevtics and parapharmacevtics--are intended for the enrichment of food rations for the sick or healthy people. The ecologicaly safest and most effective are combined domestic adaptogens with immuno-modulating and antioxidating action that give anabolic and stimulating effect,--"leveton", "phytoton" and "adapton". The MKTs-229 tablets are residue discharge means. For atherosclerosis and general adiposis they recommend "tsar tablets" and "aiconol (ikhtien)"--on the base of cod-liver oil or "splat" made out of seaweed (algae). All these preparations have been clinically tested and received hygiene certificates from the Institute of Dietology of the Russian Academy of Medical Science. PMID:9752776

  3. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  4. Hydrocarbon fuel additive

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogio, S.

    1989-02-28

    This patent describes the method of fuel storage or combustion, wherein the fuel supply contains small amounts of water, the step of adding to the fuel supply an additive comprising a blend of a hydrophilic agent chosen from the group of ethylene glycol, n-butyl alcohol, and cellosolve in the range of 22-37% by weight; ethoxylated nonylphenol in the range of 26-35% by weight; nonylphenol polyethylene glycol ether in the range of 32-43% by weight.

  5. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  6. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  7. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  8. Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved capacitive proximity sensors constructed by incorporating one or more additional driven shield(s). Sensitivity and range of sensor altered by adjusting driving signal(s) applied to shield(s). Includes sensing electrode and driven isolating shield that correspond to sensing electrode and driven shield.

  9. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  10. Oil additive process

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a method of making an additive comprising: (a) adding 2 parts by volume of 3% sodium hypochlorite to 45 parts by volume of diesel oil fuel to form a sulphur free fuel, (b) removing all water and foreign matter formed by the sodium hypochlorite, (c) blending 30 parts by volume of 24% lead naphthanate with 15 parts by volume of the sulphur free fuel, 15 parts by volume of light-weight material oil to form a blended mixture, and (d) heating the blended mixture slowly and uniformly to 152F.

  11. TSUNAMI Primer: A Primer for Sensitivity/Uncertainty Calculations with SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T; Mueller, Don; Bowman, Stephen M; Busch, Robert D.; Emerson, Scott

    2009-01-01

    This primer presents examples in the application of the SCALE/TSUNAMI tools to generate k{sub eff} sensitivity data for one- and three-dimensional models using TSUNAMI-1D and -3D and to examine uncertainties in the computed k{sub eff} values due to uncertainties in the cross-section data used in their calculation. The proper use of unit cell data and need for confirming the appropriate selection of input parameters through direct perturbations are described. The uses of sensitivity and uncertainty data to identify and rank potential sources of computational bias in an application system and TSUNAMI tools for assessment of system similarity using sensitivity and uncertainty criteria are demonstrated. Uses of these criteria in trending analyses to assess computational biases, bias uncertainties, and gap analyses are also described. Additionally, an application of the data adjustment tool TSURFER is provided, including identification of specific details of sources of computational bias.

  12. Evaluating additives and impurities in zinc electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Dominguez, J. A.; Lew, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    The zinc electrowinning (EW) process is very sensitive to the presence of impurities. There is only one EW plant in the world that we know of that operates at moderate current efficiency and deposition times without using any additives. All the others must use them continuously. Additives allow zinc EW to occur at high current efficiencies while suppressing excessive acid mist formation. The study of the electrochemical effects of additives in zinc EW is not straightforward. This article presents a review of the experimental techniques currently used at Cominco Research: Cyclic voltammetry, Hull cells, laboratory and mini-cell electrowinning techniques are all described and their relationship to the industrial operation is discussed.

  13. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  14. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  15. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  16. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  17. Stochastic resonance in visual sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Ajanta; Sarkar, Sandip

    2015-04-01

    It is well known from psychophysical studies that stochastic resonance, in its simplest threshold paradigm, can be used as a tool to measure the detection sensitivity to fine details in noise contaminated stimuli. In the present manuscript, we report simulation studies conducted in the similar threshold paradigm of stochastic resonance. We have estimated the contrast sensitivity in detecting noisy sine-wave stimuli, with varying area and spatial frequency, as a function of noise strength. In all the cases, the measured sensitivity attained a peak at intermediate noise strength, which indicate the occurrence of stochastic resonance. The peak sensitivity exhibited a strong dependence on area and spatial frequency of the stimulus. We show that the peak contrast sensitivity varies with spatial frequency in a nonmonotonic fashion and the qualitative nature of the sensitivity variation is in good agreement with human contrast sensitivity function. We also demonstrate that the peak sensitivity first increases and then saturates with increasing area, and this result is in line with the results of psychophysical experiments. Additionally, we also show that critical area, denoting the saturation of contrast sensitivity, decreases with spatial frequency and the associated maximum contrast sensitivity varies with spatial frequency in a manner that is consistent with the results of psychophysical experiments. In all the studies, the sensitivities were elevated via a nonlinear filtering operation called stochastic resonance. Because of this nonlinear effect, it was not guaranteed that the sensitivities, estimated at each frequency, would be in agreement with the corresponding results of psychophysical experiments; on the contrary, close agreements were observed between our results and the findings of psychophysical investigations. These observations indicate the utility of stochastic resonance in human vision and suggest that this paradigm can be useful in psychophysical studies

  18. Search for single top production using multivariate analyses at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschbuhl, Dominic; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2007-10-01

    This article reports on recent searches for single-top-quark production by the CDF collaboration at the Tevatron using a data set that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 955 pb{sup -1}. Three different analyses techniques are employed, one using likelihood discriminants, one neural networks and one matrix elements. The sensitivity to single-top production at the rate predicted by the standard model ranges from 2.1 to 2.6 {sigma}. While the first two analyses observe a deficit of single-top like events compared to the expectation, the matrix element method observes an excess corresponding to a background fluctuation of 2.3 {sigma}. The null results of the likelihood and neural network analyses translate in upper limits on the cross section of 2.6 pb for the t-channel production mode and 3.7 pb for the s-channel mode at the 95% C.L. The matrix element result corresponds to a measurement of 2.7{sub -1.3}{sup +1.5} pb for the combined t- and s-channel single-top cross section. In addition, CDF has searched for non-standard model production of single-top-quarks via the s-channel exchange of a heavy W{prime} boson. No signal of this process is found resulting in lower mass limits of 760 GeV/c{sup 2} in case the mass of the right-handed neutrino is smaller than the mass of the right-handed W{prime} or 790 GeV/c{sup 2} in the opposite case.

  19. Local analyses of Planck maps with Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Bernui, A.; Marques, G. A.; Ferreira, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    Minkowski functionals (MF) are excellent tools to investigate the statistical properties of the cosmic background radiation (CMB) maps. Between their notorious advantages is the possibility to use them efficiently in patches of the CMB sphere, which allow studies in masked skies, inclusive analyses of small sky regions. Then, possible deviations from Gaussianity are investigated by comparison with MF obtained from a set of Gaussian isotropic simulated CMB maps to which are applied the same cut-sky masks. These analyses are sensitive enough to detect contaminations of small intensity like primary and secondary CMB anisotropies. Our methodology uses the MF, widely employed to study non-Gaussianities in CMB data, and asserts Gaussian deviations only when all of them points out an exceptional χ2 value, at more than 2.2σ confidence level, in a given sky patch. Following this rigorous procedure, we find 13 regions in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps that evince such high levels of non-Gaussian deviations. According to our results, these non-Gaussian contributions show signatures that can be associated to the presence of hot or cold spots in such regions. Moreover, some of these non-Gaussian deviations signals suggest the presence of foreground residuals in those regions located near the Galactic plane. Additionally, we confirm that most of the regions revealed in our analyses, but not all, have been recently reported in studies done by the Planck collaboration. Furthermore, we also investigate whether these non-Gaussian deviations can be possibly sourced by systematics, like inhomogeneous noise and beam effect in the released Planck data, or perhaps due to residual Galactic foregrounds.

  20. Noise and mental performance: personality attributes and noise sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Belojevic, G; Jakovljevic, B; Slepcevic, V

    2003-01-01

    The contradictory and confusing results in noise research on humans may partly be due to individual differences between the subjects participating in different studies. This review is based on a twelve year research on the role of neuroticism, extroversion and subjective noise sensitivity during mental work in noisy environment. Neurotic persons might show enhanced "arousability" i.e. their arousal level increases more in stress. Additional unfavorable factors for neurotics are worrying and anxiety, which might prevent them coping successfully with noise, or some other stressors during mental performance. In numerous experiments introverts have showed higher sensitivity to noise during mental performance compared to extroverts, while extroverts often cope with a boring task even by requesting short periods of noise during performance. Correlation analyses have regularly revealed a highly significant negative relation between extroversion and noise annoyance during mental processing. Numerous studies have shown that people with high noise sensitivity may be prevented from achieving the same work results as other people in noisy environment, thus leading to psychosomatic, neurotic or other difficulties. Positive relation between noise annoyance and subjective noise sensitivity might be very strong. Our results have shown, after matching with the results of other relevant studies, that more stable personality, with extroversive tendencies and with a relatively lower subjective noise sensitivity measured with standard questionnaires, may be expected to better adapt to noise during mental performance, compared to people with opposite personality traits. PMID:14965455

  1. Analytical performance, agreement and user-friendliness of six point-of-care testing urine analysers for urinary tract infection in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Schot, Marjolein J C; van Delft, Sanne; Kooijman-Buiting, Antoinette M J; de Wit, Niek J; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Various point-of-care testing (POCT) urine analysers are commercially available for routine urine analysis in general practice. The present study compares analytical performance, agreement and user-friendliness of six different POCT urine analysers for diagnosing urinary tract infection in general practice. Setting All testing procedures were performed at a diagnostic centre for primary care in the Netherlands. Urine samples were collected at four general practices. Primary and secondary outcome measures Analytical performance and agreement of the POCT analysers regarding nitrite, leucocytes and erythrocytes, with the laboratory reference standard, was the primary outcome measure, and analysed by calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and Cohen's κ coefficient for agreement. Secondary outcome measures were the user-friendliness of the POCT analysers, in addition to other characteristics of the analysers. Results The following six POCT analysers were evaluated: Uryxxon Relax (Macherey Nagel), Urisys 1100 (Roche), Clinitek Status (Siemens), Aution 11 (Menarini), Aution Micro (Menarini) and Urilyzer (Analyticon). Analytical performance was good for all analysers. Compared with laboratory reference standards, overall agreement was good, but differed per parameter and per analyser. Concerning the nitrite test, the most important test for clinical practice, all but one showed perfect agreement with the laboratory standard. For leucocytes and erythrocytes specificity was high, but sensitivity was considerably lower. Agreement for leucocytes varied between good to very good, and for the erythrocyte test between fair and good. First-time users indicated that the analysers were easy to use. They expected higher productivity and accuracy when using these analysers in daily practice. Conclusions The overall performance and user-friendliness of all six commercially available POCT urine analysers was sufficient to justify routine

  2. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias; Wilcox, Lucas C.; Hill, Judith C.; Ghattas, Omar; Berggren, Martin Olof; Akcelik, Volkan; Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first

  3. Coherency Sensitive Hashing.

    PubMed

    Korman, Simon; Avidan, Shai

    2016-06-01

    Coherency Sensitive Hashing (CSH) extends Locality Sensitivity Hashing (LSH) and PatchMatch to quickly find matching patches between two images. LSH relies on hashing, which maps similar patches to the same bin, in order to find matching patches. PatchMatch, on the other hand, relies on the observation that images are coherent, to propagate good matches to their neighbors in the image plane, using random patch assignment to seed the initial matching. CSH relies on hashing to seed the initial patch matching and on image coherence to propagate good matches. In addition, hashing lets it propagate information between patches with similar appearance (i.e., map to the same bin). This way, information is propagated much faster because it can use similarity in appearance space or neighborhood in the image plane. As a result, CSH is at least three to four times faster than PatchMatch and more accurate, especially in textured regions, where reconstruction artifacts are most noticeable to the human eye. We verified CSH on a new, large scale, data set of 133 image pairs and experimented on several extensions, including: k nearest neighbor search, the addition of rotation and matching three dimensional patches in videos. PMID:26372204

  4. [Metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Salem, Naji; Walz, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The prostate cancer in its hormone-sensitive metastatic presentation is infrequent, it is either an initial presentation of the disease or an evolution after local treatment, without castration of the biological relapse. The surgical or biological castration remains the cornerstone of the treatment. The deadline of castration initiation and its modalities of administration, intermittent or continuous rest debated but consensual on the initiation is the appearance of the symptomatic disease. The chemotherapy by docetaxel in association with the castration increases significantly the survival of the patients having a high tumoral volume. The efficacy on the whole metastatic population requires additional analyses. Clinical prognostic factors as the bone localizations (axial or appendicular), the visceral involvement (liver, lung) are determining for the survival of these patients. Biological prognostic factors are in evaluation. Except the clodronate acid, which showed a survival improvement in the hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer (HSMPC), the other treatments targeting the bone (zoledronic acid, rank-ligand inhibitor) demonstrated a benefit only in castrate resistant metastatic prostate cancer (MCRPC). The management of local disease lets suggest a benefit to at least symptomatic disease, but it requires to be estimated prospectively in clinical trials. The new hormonal treatments targeting the androgen receptor in CPMRC are in evaluation in CPMHS. The objective is to increase the survival and the quality of life of the CPMHS and to delay the evolution towards the castration resistant metastatic disease. PMID:25609491

  5. Application of design sensitivity analysis for greater improvement on machine structural dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshimura, Masataka

    1987-01-01

    Methodologies are presented for greatly improving machine structural dynamics by using design sensitivity analyses and evaluative parameters. First, design sensitivity coefficients and evaluative parameters of structural dynamics are described. Next, the relations between the design sensitivity coefficients and the evaluative parameters are clarified. Then, design improvement procedures of structural dynamics are proposed for the following three cases: (1) addition of elastic structural members, (2) addition of mass elements, and (3) substantial charges of joint design variables. Cases (1) and (2) correspond to the changes of the initial framework or configuration, and (3) corresponds to the alteration of poor initial design variables. Finally, numerical examples are given for demonstrating the availability of the methods proposed.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis in Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Howard M. (Compiler); Haftka, Raphael T. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    The symposium proceedings presented focused primarily on sensitivity analysis of structural response. However, the first session, entitled, General and Multidisciplinary Sensitivity, focused on areas such as physics, chemistry, controls, and aerodynamics. The other four sessions were concerned with the sensitivity of structural systems modeled by finite elements. Session 2 dealt with Static Sensitivity Analysis and Applications; Session 3 with Eigenproblem Sensitivity Methods; Session 4 with Transient Sensitivity Analysis; and Session 5 with Shape Sensitivity Analysis.

  7. NOx analyser interefence from alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Lee, J. D.; Vazquez, M.; Munoz, A.; Rodenas, M.

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, collectively NOx) are critical intermediates in atmospheric chemistry. NOx abundance controls the levels of the primary atmospheric oxidants OH, NO3 and O3, and regulates the ozone production which results from the degradation of volatile organic compounds. NOx are also atmospheric pollutants in their own right, and NO2 is commonly included in air quality objectives and regulations. In addition to their role in controlling ozone formation, NOx levels affect the production of other pollutants such as the lachrymator PAN, and the nitrate component of secondary aerosol particles. Consequently, accurate measurement of nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere is of major importance for understanding our atmosphere. The most widely employed approach for the measurement of NOx is chemiluminescent detection of NO2* from the NO + O3 reaction, combined with NO2 reduction by either a heated catalyst or photoconvertor. The reaction between alkenes and ozone is also chemiluminescent; therefore alkenes may contribute to the measured NOx signal, depending upon the instrumental background subtraction cycle employed. This interference has been noted previously, and indeed the effect has been used to measure both alkenes and ozone in the atmosphere. Here we report the results of a systematic investigation of the response of a selection of NOx analysers, ranging from systems used for routine air quality monitoring to atmospheric research instrumentation, to a series of alkenes ranging from ethene to the biogenic monoterpenes, as a function of conditions (co-reactants, humidity). Experiments were performed in the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) to ensure common calibration, a common sample for the monitors, and to unequivocally confirm the alkene (via FTIR) and NO2 (via DOAS) levels present. The instrument responses ranged from negligible levels up to 10 % depending upon the alkene present and conditions used. Such interferences may be of substantial importance

  8. Trends in sensitivity analysis practice in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Federico; Saltelli, Andrea; Tarantola, Stefano

    2016-10-15

    The majority of published sensitivity analyses (SAs) are either local or one factor-at-a-time (OAT) analyses, relying on unjustified assumptions of model linearity and additivity. Global approaches to sensitivity analyses (GSA) which would obviate these shortcomings, are applied by a minority of researchers. By reviewing the academic literature on SA, we here present a bibliometric analysis of the trends of different SA practices in last decade. The review has been conducted both on some top ranking journals (Nature and Science) and through an extended analysis in the Elsevier's Scopus database of scientific publications. After correcting for the global growth in publications, the amount of papers performing a generic SA has notably increased over the last decade. Even if OAT is still the most largely used technique in SA, there is a clear increase in the use of GSA with preference respectively for regression and variance-based techniques. Even after adjusting for the growth of publications in the sole modelling field, to which SA and GSA normally apply, the trend is confirmed. Data about regions of origin and discipline are also briefly discussed. The results above are confirmed when zooming on the sole articles published in chemical modelling, a field historically proficient in the use of SA methods. PMID:26934843

  9. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, J.A.

    1992-12-31

    This report describes phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) which provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts.

  10. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Steinkamp, John A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts.

  11. Phase-sensitive flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Steinkamp, J.A.

    1993-12-14

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer (FCM) provides additional FCM capability to use the fluorescence lifetime of one or more fluorochromes bound to single cells to provide additional information regarding the cells. The resulting fluorescence emission can be resolved into individual fluorescence signals if two fluorochromes are present or can be converted directly to a decay lifetime from a single fluorochrome. The excitation light for the fluorochromes is modulated to produce an amplitude modulated fluorescence pulse as the fluorochrome is excited in the FCM. The modulation signal also forms a reference signal that is phase-shifted a selected amount for subsequent mixing with the output modulated fluorescence intensity signal in phase-sensitive detection circuitry. The output from the phase-sensitive circuitry is then an individual resolved fluorochrome signal or a single fluorochrome decay lifetime, depending on the applied phase shifts. 15 figures.

  12. Structure of Preschool Phonological Sensitivity: Overlapping Sensitivity to Rhyme, Words, Syllables, and Phonemes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Jason L.; Lonigan, Christopher J.; Burgess, Stephen R.; Driscoll, Kimberly; Phillips, Beth M.; Cantor, Brenlee G.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined relations among sensitivity to words, syllables, rhymes, and phonemes in older and younger preschoolers. Confirmatory factor analyses found that a one-factor model best explained the date from both groups of children. Only variance common to all phonological sensitivity skills was related to print knowledge and rudimentary…

  13. Recent developments in structural sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments are reviewed in two major areas of structural sensitivity analysis: sensitivity of static and transient response; and sensitivity of vibration and buckling eigenproblems. Recent developments from the standpoint of computational cost, accuracy, and ease of implementation are presented. In the area of static response, current interest is focused on sensitivity to shape variation and sensitivity of nonlinear response. Two general approaches are used for computing sensitivities: differentiation of the continuum equations followed by discretization, and the reverse approach of discretization followed by differentiation. It is shown that the choice of methods has important accuracy and implementation implications. In the area of eigenproblem sensitivity, there is a great deal of interest and significant progress in sensitivity of problems with repeated eigenvalues. In addition to reviewing recent contributions in this area, the paper raises the issue of differentiability and continuity associated with the occurrence of repeated eigenvalues.

  14. Analyses of Transistor Punchthrough Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David P.

    1999-01-01

    The failure of two transistors in the Altitude Switch Assembly for the Solid Rocket Booster followed by two additional failures a year later presented a challenge to failure analysts. These devices had successfully worked for many years on numerous missions. There was no history of failures with this type of device. Extensive checks of the test procedures gave no indication for a source of the cause. The devices were manufactured more than twenty years ago and failure information on this lot date code was not readily available. External visual exam, radiography, PEID, and leak testing were performed with nominal results Electrical testing indicated nearly identical base-emitter and base-collector characteristics (both forward and reverse) with a low resistance short emitter to collector. These characteristics are indicative of a classic failure mechanism called punchthrough. In failure analysis punchthrough refers to an condition where a relatively low voltage pulse causes the device to conduct very hard producing localized areas of thermal runaway or "hot spots". At one or more of these hot spots, the excessive currents melt the silicon. Heavily doped emitter material diffuses through the base region to the collector forming a diffusion pipe shorting the emitter to base to collector. Upon cooling, an alloy junction forms between the pipe and the base region. Generally, the hot spot (punch-through site) is under the bond and no surface artifact is visible. The devices were delidded and the internal structures were examined microscopically. The gold emitter lead was melted on one device, but others had anomalies in the metallization around the in-tact emitter bonds. The SEM examination confirmed some anomalies to be cosmetic defects while other anomalies were artifacts of the punchthrough site. Subsequent to these analyses, the contractor determined that some irregular testing procedures occurred at the time of the failures heretofore unreported. These testing

  15. Analyses of the LMC Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlandingham, K. M.; Schwarz, G. J.; Starrfield, S.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Shore, S. N.; Sonneborn, G.

    In the past 10 years, 6 classical novae have been observed in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). We have begun a study of these objects using ultraviolet spectra obtained by IUE and optical spectra from nova surveys. We are using the results of this study to further our understanding of novae and stellar evolution. Our study includes analysis of both the early, optically thick spectra using model atmospheres, and the later nebular spectra using optimization of photoionization codes. By analysing of all the LMC novae in a consistent manner, we can compare their individual results and use their combined properties to calibrate Galactic novae. In addition, our studies can be used to determine the elemental abundances of the nova ejecta, the amount of mass ejected, and the contribution of novae to the ISM abundances. To date we have analyzed Nova LMC 1988#1 and Nova LMC 1990#1, and have obtained preliminary results for Nova LMC 1991. The results of this work are presented in this poster. The metal content of the LMC is known to be sub-solar and varies as a function of location within the cloud. A detailed abundance analysis of the ejecta of the LMC novae provides important information concerning the effect of initial metal abundances on energetics of the nova outburst. Since the distance to the LMC is well known, many important parameters of the outburst, such as the luminosity, can be absolutely determined. Both galactic and extragalactic novae have been proposed as potential standard candles. Recent work by Della Valle & Livio (1995) has improved on the standard relations (e.g., Schmidt 1957; Pfau 1976; Cohen 1985; Livio 1992) by including novae from the LMC and M31. Unfortunately, the dependence of the nova outburst on metallicity has not been well-studied. Recent theoretical work by Starrfield et al. (1998) indicates that the luminosity of the outburst increases with decreasing metal abundances. If there is a dependence of luminosity on metallicity, it will have to

  16. Evaluation of weather forecasts and observations using surface analyses over the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrick, David Thomas

    Surface analyses created by the Advanced Regional Prediction System Data Assimilation System (ADAS) valid during the 2003/04 winter season (18 November 2003-7 March 2004) are used to verify National Weather Service (NWS) gridded temperature forecasts and evaluate the sensitivity of objective analyses to Remote Automated Weather Station (RAWS) temperature and wind speed observations. The ADAS analyses are based on Rapid Update Cycle analyses that are adjusted by over 3000 surface observations from MesoWest. Accuracy and skill of the NWS gridded forecasts are determined by point verification against the MesoWest observations and gridded verification against the RUC and ADAS analyses. The impact of RAWS observations on the ADAS analyses is assessed by three metrics (accuracy, sensitivity, and areal influence) that rely on results from a series of data withholding experiments. For the West as a whole, the NWS gridded temperature forecasts issued at 0000 UTC during the 2003/04 winter season exhibit skill at lead times of 12, 24, 36, and 48 h on the basis of several verification approaches. The root-mean-square errors (rmse) of the NWS gridded temperature forecasts are estimated to be on the order of 3°C at lead times shorter than 48 h and greater than 4°C at lead times longer than 120 h. Incremental improvements in forecast accuracy as a result of forecaster adjustments to the 0000 UTC temperature grids from 144- to 24-h lead times are estimated to be on the order of 13%. Random withholding of observations from the ADAS analyses provides a baseline estimate of the analysis quality. Relative to this baseline, removing the RAWS observations degrades ADAS temperature (wind speed) analyses by an additional 0.5°C (0.9 m s-1) when evaluated in terms of rmse over the entire season. RAWS temperature observations adjust the RUC background the most during the early morning hours and during winter season cold pool events in the western United States while wind speed

  17. Chronic Opioid Therapy and Central Sensitization in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Carroll, C Patrick; Lanzkron, Sophie; Haywood, Carlton; Kiley, Kasey; Pejsa, Megan; Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Campbell, Claudia M

    2016-07-01

    Chronic opioid therapy (COT) for chronic non-cancer pain is frequently debated, and its effectiveness is unproven in sickle cell disease (SCD). The authors conducted a descriptive study among 83 adult SCD patients and compared the severity of disease and pain symptoms among those who were prescribed COT (n=29) with those who were not using COT. All patients completed baseline laboratory pain assessment and questionnaires between January 2010 and June 2014. Thereafter, participants recorded daily pain, crises, function, and healthcare utilization for 90 days using electronic diaries. Analyses were conducted shortly after the final diary data collection period. Patients on COT did not differ on age, sex, or measures of disease severity. However, patients on COT exhibited greater levels of clinical pain (particularly non-crisis); central sensitization; and depression and increased diary measures of pain severity, function, and healthcare utilization on crisis and non-crisis diary days, as well as a greater proportion of days in crisis. Including depressive symptoms in multivariate models did not change the associations between COT and pain, interference, central sensitization, or utilization. Additionally, participants not on COT displayed the expected positive relationship between central sensitization and clinical pain, whereas those on COT demonstrated no such relationship, despite having both higher central sensitization and higher clinical pain. Overall, the results point out a high symptom burden in SCD patients on COT, including those on high-dose COT, and suggest that nociceptive processing in SCD patients on COT differs from those who are not. PMID:27320469

  18. Sensitivities of extant animal taxa to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Astrid C.; Pörtner, Hans-O.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is absorbed by the oceans, causing a progressive increase in ocean inorganic carbon concentrations and resulting in decreased water pH and calcium carbonate saturation. This phenomenon, called ocean acidification, is in addition to the warming effects of CO2 emissions. Ocean acidification has been reported to affect ocean biota, but the severity of this threat to ocean ecosystems (and humans depending on these ecosystems) is poorly understood. Here we evaluate the scale of this threat in the context of widely used representative concentration pathways (RCPs) by analysing the sensitivities of five animal taxa (corals, echinoderms, molluscs, crustaceans and fishes) to a wide range of CO2 concentrations. Corals, echinoderms and molluscs are more sensitive to RCP8.5 (936 ppm in 2100) than are crustaceans. Larval fishes may be even more sensitive than the lower invertebrates, but taxon sensitivity on evolutionary timescales remains obscure. The variety of responses within and between taxa, together with observations in mesocosms and palaeo-analogues, suggest that ocean acidification is a driver for substantial change in ocean ecosystems this century, potentially leading to long-term shifts in species composition.

  19. Could the Pliocene constrain the equilibrium climate sensitivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, J. C.; Annan, J. D.

    2016-08-01

    The mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP) is the most recent interval in which atmospheric carbon dioxide was substantially higher than in modern pre-industrial times. It is, therefore, a potentially valuable target for testing the ability of climate models to simulate climates warmer than the pre-industrial state. The recent Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP) presented boundary conditions for the mPWP and a protocol for climate model experiments. Here we analyse results from the PlioMIP and, for the first time, discuss the potential for this interval to usefully constrain the equilibrium climate sensitivity. We observe a correlation in the ensemble between their tropical temperature anomalies at the mPWP and their equilibrium sensitivities. If the real world is assumed to also obey this relationship, then the reconstructed tropical temperature anomaly at the mPWP can in principle generate a constraint on the true sensitivity. Directly applying this methodology using available data yields a range for the equilibrium sensitivity of 1.9-3.7 °C, but there are considerable additional uncertainties surrounding the analysis which are not included in this estimate. We consider the extent to which these uncertainties may be better quantified and perhaps lessened in the next few years.

  20. Preloadable vector sensitive latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acres, William R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A preloadable vector-sensitive latch which automatically releases when the force vector from a latch memebr reaches a specified release angle is presented. In addition, it contains means to remove clearance between the latched members and to preload the latch to prevent separation at angles less than the specified release angle. The latch comprises a triangular main link, a free link connected between a first corner of the main link and a yoke member, a housing, and an actuator connected between the yoke member and the housing. A return spring bias means connects the main link to a portion of the housing. A second corner of the main link is slidably and pivotally connected to the housing via a slot in a web portion of the housing. The latch housing has a rigid docking ring alignable with a mating locking ring which is engageable by a locking roller journalled on the third corner of the triangular main link.

  1. Causal Mediation Analyses for Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Kevin G; Cary, Mark; Gallop, Robert; Ten Have, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    In the context of randomized intervention trials, we describe causal methods for analyzing how post-randomization factors constitute the process through which randomized baseline interventions act on outcomes. Traditionally, such mediation analyses have been undertaken with great caution, because they assume that the mediating factor is also randomly assigned to individuals in addition to the randomized baseline intervention (i.e., sequential ignorability). Because the mediating factors are typically not randomized, such analyses are unprotected from unmeasured confounders that may lead to biased inference. We review several causal approaches that attempt to reduce such bias without assuming that the mediating factor is randomized. However, these causal approaches require certain interaction assumptions that may be assessed if there is enough treatment heterogeneity with respect to the mediator. We describe available estimation procedures in the context of several examples from the literature and provide resources for software code. PMID:19484136

  2. Overview of SNS accelerator shielding analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, I.; Gallmeier, F. X.; Ferguson, P.; Iverson, E.; Lu, W.

    2012-07-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source is an accelerator driven neutron scattering facility for materials research. During all phases of SNS development, including design, construction, commissioning and operation, extensive neutronics work was performed in order to provide adequate shielding, to assure safe facility operation from radiation protection point of view, and to optimize performance of the accelerator and target facility. Presently, most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, safe operation and adequate radiation background in the future. Although the accelerator is built and in operation mode, there is extensive demand for shielding and activation analyses. It includes redesigning some parts of the facility, facility upgrades, designing additional structures, storage and transport containers for accelerator structures taken out of service, and performing radiation protection analyses and studies on residual dose rates inside the accelerator. (authors)

  3. Neuronal network analyses: premises, promises and uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Parker, David

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal networks assemble the cellular components needed for sensory, motor and cognitive functions. Any rational intervention in the nervous system will thus require an understanding of network function. Obtaining this understanding is widely considered to be one of the major tasks facing neuroscience today. Network analyses have been performed for some years in relatively simple systems. In addition to the direct insights these systems have provided, they also illustrate some of the difficulties of understanding network function. Nevertheless, in more complex systems (including human), claims are made that the cellular bases of behaviour are, or will shortly be, understood. While the discussion is necessarily limited, this issue will examine these claims and highlight some traditional and novel aspects of network analyses and their difficulties. This introduction discusses the criteria that need to be satisfied for network understanding, and how they relate to traditional and novel approaches being applied to addressing network function. PMID:20603354

  4. The cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in addition to screening: a Dutch perspective.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Didik; Luttjeboer, Jos; Westra, Tjalke Arend; Wilschut, Jan C; Suwantika, Auliya A; Daemen, Toos; Atthobari, Jarir; Wilffert, Bob; Postma, Maarten J

    2015-04-01

    Addition of the HPV vaccine to available cytological screening has been proposed to increase HPV-related cancer prevention. A comprehensive review on this combined strategy implemented in the Netherlands is lacking. For this review, we therefore analyzed all relevant studies on cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccines in combination with cervical screening in the Netherlands. Most of the studies agree that vaccination in pre-sexual-activity periods of life is cost-effective. Based on published sensitivity analyses, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was found to be mainly driven by vaccine cost and discount rates. Fewer vaccine doses, inclusion of additional benefits of these vaccines to prevent HPV-related non-cervical cancers and vaccination of males to further reduce the burden of HPV-induced cancers are three relevant options suggested to be investigated in upcoming economic evaluations. PMID:25482311

  5. Does finger sense predict addition performance?

    PubMed

    Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-05-01

    The impact of fingers on numerical and mathematical cognition has received a great deal of attention recently. However, the precise role that fingers play in numerical cognition is unknown. The current study explores the relationship between finger sense, arithmetic and general cognitive ability. Seventy-six children between the ages of 5 and 12 participated in the study. The results of stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that while general cognitive ability including language processing was a predictor of addition performance, finger sense was not. The impact of age on the relationship between finger sense, and addition was further examined. The participants were separated into two groups based on age. The results showed that finger gnosia score impacted addition performance in the older group but not the younger group. These results appear to support the hypothesis that fingers provide a scaffold for calculation and that if that scaffold is not properly built, it has continued differential consequences to mathematical cognition. PMID:26993292

  6. How Sensitively Timed Are Sensitive Periods?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zener, Rita Schaefer

    2003-01-01

    Reviews Maria Montessori's view of sensitive periods and examines the kinds of help needed from adults: an open mind, specific help from a prepared learning environment, and challenges presented at the right time. Stresses the universality of sensitive periods and their connection to brain development. Focuses on the unconscious nature and…

  7. Absorption spectra and photovoltaic characterization of chlorophyllins as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Calogero, Giuseppe; Citro, Ilaria; Crupi, Cristina; Di Marco, Gaetano

    2014-11-11

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on Chlorine-e6 (Chl-e6), a Chlorophyll a derivative, and Chl-e6 containing Cu, have been investigated by carrying out incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The effect of the metallic ion and the influence of the solvent polarity on the dye aggregation and their absorption bands have been analysed by performing electronic absorption measurements. The dependence of the photoelectrochemical parameters of these DSSCs on the electrolyte by the addition of pyrimidine and/or pyrrole has been discussed in details. For the first time I-V curves for a DSSC based on copper Chl-e6 dye have been shown and compared with Zn based chlorophyllin. Furthermore, the performance of a Cu-Chl-e6 based DSSC has been deeply improved by a progressive optimization of the TiO2 multilayer photoanode overcoming the best data reported in literature so far for this dye. It's worth to emphasize that, the analysis reported in this paper supplies very useful information which paves the way to further detailed studies turned to the employment of natural pigments as sensitizers for solar cells. PMID:24892526

  8. Analysing intracellular deformation of polymer capsules using structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Cui, Jiwei; Sun, Huanli; Müllner, Markus; Yan, Yan; Noi, Ka Fung; Ping, Yuan; Caruso, Frank

    2016-06-01

    , which induce capsule deformation during cell uptake, vary between cell lines, indicating that the capsules are exposed to higher mechanical forces in HeLa cells, followed by RAW264.7 and then differentiated THP-1 cells. Our study demonstrates the use of super-resolution SIM in analysing intracellular capsule deformation, offering important insights into the cellular processing of drug carriers in cells and providing fundamental knowledge of intracellular mechanobiology. Furthermore, this study may aid in the design of novel drug carriers that are sensitive to deformation for enhanced drug release properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02151d

  9. Ringberg15: Earth's Climate Sensitivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Bony, Sandrine; Hegerl, Gabi; Schmidt, Gavin; Sherwood, Steven; Webb, Mark

    2015-01-01

    To assess gaps in understanding of Earth's climate sensitivities a workshop was organised under the auspices of the WCRP (World Climate Research Programme) Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity (Ringberg15). The workshop took place in March 2015 and gathered together over thirty experts from around the world for one week. Attendees each gave short presentations and participated in moderated discussions of specific questions related to understanding Earth's climate sensitivities. Most of the time was focused on understanding of the equilibrium climate sensitivity, defined as the equilibrium near-surface warming associated with a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The workshop produced nine recommendations, many of them focusing on specific research avenues that could be exploited to advance understanding of climate sensitivity. Many of these dealt, in one fashion or another, with the need to more sharply focus research on identifying and testing story lines for a high (larger than 4 degrees Kelvin) or low (less than 2 degrees Kelvin) equilibrium climate sensitivity. Additionally, a subset of model intercomparison projects (CFMIP (Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project), PMIP (Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project), PDRMIP (Precipitation Driver and Response Model Intercomparison Project), RFMIP (Radiative Forcing Model Intercomparison Project) and VolMIP (Volcanic Forcings Model Intercomparison Project)) that have been proposed for inclusion within CMIP were identified as being central to resolving important issues raised at the workshop; for this reason modelling groups were strongly encouraged to participate in these projects. Finally the workshop participants encouraged the WCRP to initiate and support an assessment process lead by the Grand Science Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity on the topic of Earth's Climate Sensitivities, culminating in a report that will be published in 2019

  10. Sensitivity to Uncertainty in Asteroid Impact Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathias, D.; Wheeler, L.; Prabhu, D. K.; Aftosmis, M.; Dotson, J.; Robertson, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Engineering Risk Assessment (ERA) team at NASA Ames Research Center is developing a physics-based impact risk model for probabilistically assessing threats from potential asteroid impacts on Earth. The model integrates probabilistic sampling of asteroid parameter ranges with physics-based analyses of entry, breakup, and impact to estimate damage areas and casualties from various impact scenarios. Assessing these threats is a highly coupled, dynamic problem involving significant uncertainties in the range of expected asteroid characteristics, how those characteristics may affect the level of damage, and the fidelity of various modeling approaches and assumptions. The presented model is used to explore the sensitivity of impact risk estimates to these uncertainties in order to gain insight into what additional data or modeling refinements are most important for producing effective, meaningful risk assessments. In the extreme cases of very small or very large impacts, the results are generally insensitive to many of the characterization and modeling assumptions. However, the nature of the sensitivity can change across moderate-sized impacts. Results will focus on the value of additional information in this critical, mid-size range, and how this additional data can support more robust mitigation decisions.

  11. Reward sensitivity predicts ice cream-related attentional bias assessed by inattentional blindness.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Tao, Qian; Fang, Ya; Cheng, Chen; Hao, Yangyang; Qi, Jianjun; Li, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-06-01

    The cognitive mechanism underlying the association between individual differences in reward sensitivity and food craving is unknown. The present study explored the mechanism by examining the role of reward sensitivity in attentional bias toward ice cream cues. Forty-nine college students who displayed high level of ice cream craving (HICs) and 46 who displayed low level of ice cream craving (LICs) performed an inattentional blindness (IB) task which was used to assess attentional bias for ice cream. In addition, reward sensitivity and coping style were assessed by the Behavior Inhibition System/Behavior Activation System Scales and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire. Results showed significant higher identification rate of the critical stimulus in the HICs than LICs, suggesting greater attentional bias for ice cream in the HICs. It was indicated that attentional bias for food cues persisted even under inattentional condition. Furthermore, a significant correlation was found between the attentional bias and reward sensitivity after controlling for coping style, and reward sensitivity predicted attentional bias for food cues. The mediation analyses showed that attentional bias mediated the relationship between reward sensitivity and food craving. Those findings suggest that the association between individual differences in reward sensitivity and food craving may be attributed to attentional bias for food-related cues. PMID:25681293

  12. Can Broad Inferences Be Drawn from Lottery Analyses of School Choice Programs? An Exploration of Appropriate Sensitivity Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Ron; Engberg, John

    2016-01-01

    School choice programs continue to be controversial, spurring a number of researchers into evaluating them. When possible, researchers evaluate the effect of attending a school of choice using randomized designs to eliminate possible selection bias. Randomized designs are often thought of as the gold standard for research, but many circumstances…

  13. Maternal sensitivity, infant limbic structure volume and functional connectivity: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rifkin-Graboi, A; Kong, L; Sim, L W; Sanmugam, S; Broekman, B F P; Chen, H; Wong, E; Kwek, K; Saw, S-M; Chong, Y-S; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Pederson, D; Meaney, M J; Qiu, A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the profound parental effects on cognitive, emotional and social development in humans remain poorly understood. Studies with nonhuman models suggest variations in parental care affect the limbic system, influential to learning, autobiography and emotional regulation. In some research, nonoptimal care relates to decreases in neurogenesis, although other work suggests early-postnatal social adversity accelerates the maturation of limbic structures associated with emotional learning. We explored whether maternal sensitivity predicts human limbic system development and functional connectivity patterns in a small sample of human infants. When infants were 6 months of age, 20 mother-infant dyads attended a laboratory-based observational session and the infants underwent neuroimaging at the same age. After considering age at imaging, household income and postnatal maternal anxiety, regression analyses demonstrated significant indirect associations between maternal sensitivity and bilateral hippocampal volume at six months, with the majority of associations between sensitivity and the amygdala demonstrating similar indirect, but not significant results. Moreover, functional analyses revealed direct associations between maternal sensitivity and connectivity between the hippocampus and areas important for emotional regulation and socio-emotional functioning. Sensitivity additionally predicted indirect associations between limbic structures and regions related to autobiographical memory. Our volumetric results are consistent with research indicating accelerated limbic development in response to early social adversity, and in combination with our functional results, if replicated in a larger sample, may suggest that subtle, but important, variations in maternal care influence neuroanatomical trajectories important to future cognitive and emotional functioning. PMID:26506054

  14. Maternal sensitivity, infant limbic structure volume and functional connectivity: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Rifkin-Graboi, A; Kong, L; Sim, L W; Sanmugam, S; Broekman, B F P; Chen, H; Wong, E; Kwek, K; Saw, S-M; Chong, Y-S; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Pederson, D; Meaney, M J; Qiu, A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the profound parental effects on cognitive, emotional and social development in humans remain poorly understood. Studies with nonhuman models suggest variations in parental care affect the limbic system, influential to learning, autobiography and emotional regulation. In some research, nonoptimal care relates to decreases in neurogenesis, although other work suggests early-postnatal social adversity accelerates the maturation of limbic structures associated with emotional learning. We explored whether maternal sensitivity predicts human limbic system development and functional connectivity patterns in a small sample of human infants. When infants were 6 months of age, 20 mother–infant dyads attended a laboratory-based observational session and the infants underwent neuroimaging at the same age. After considering age at imaging, household income and postnatal maternal anxiety, regression analyses demonstrated significant indirect associations between maternal sensitivity and bilateral hippocampal volume at six months, with the majority of associations between sensitivity and the amygdala demonstrating similar indirect, but not significant results. Moreover, functional analyses revealed direct associations between maternal sensitivity and connectivity between the hippocampus and areas important for emotional regulation and socio-emotional functioning. Sensitivity additionally predicted indirect associations between limbic structures and regions related to autobiographical memory. Our volumetric results are consistent with research indicating accelerated limbic development in response to early social adversity, and in combination with our functional results, if replicated in a larger sample, may suggest that subtle, but important, variations in maternal care influence neuroanatomical trajectories important to future cognitive and emotional functioning. PMID:26506054

  15. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-21

    Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribe’s energy vision. The overarching goals of the “first steps” project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the “best fit” energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor

  16. Analysing Children's Drawings: Applied Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Derek

    2012-01-01

    This article centres on a research project in which freehand drawings provided a richly creative and colourful data source of children's imagined, ideal learning environments. Issues concerning the analysis of the visual data are discussed, in particular, how imaginative content was analysed and how the analytical process was dependent on an…

  17. Feed analyses and their interpretation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compositional analysis is central to determining the nutritional value of feedstuffs. The utility of the values and how they should be used depends on how representative the feed subsample is, the nutritional relevance of the assays, analytical variability of the analyses, and whether a feed is suit...

  18. Transportation systems analyses: Volume 1: Executive Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The principal objective of this study is to accomplish a systems engineering assessment of the nation's space transportation infrastructure. This analysis addresses the necessary elements to perform man delivery and return, cargo transfer, cargo delivery, payload servicing, and the exploration of the Moon and Mars. Specific elements analyzed, but not limited to, include the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), the National Launch System (NLS), the current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) fleet, ground facilities, the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and other civil, military and commercial payloads. The performance of this study entails maintaining a broad perspective on the large number of transportation elements that could potentially comprise the U.S. space infrastructure over the next several decades. To perform this systems evaluation, top-level trade studies are conducted to enhance our understanding of the relationships between elements of the infrastructure. This broad 'infrastructure-level perspective' permits the identification of preferred infrastructures. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assure the credibility and usefulness of study results. This executive summary of the transportation systems analyses (TSM) semi-annual report addresses the SSF logistics resupply. Our analysis parallels the ongoing NASA SSF redesign effort. Therefore, there could be no SSF design to drive our logistics analysis. Consequently, the analysis attempted to bound the reasonable SSF design possibilities (and the subsequent transportation implications). No other strategy really exists until after a final decision is rendered on the SSF configuration.

  19. Trace Elements and Chemotherapy Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihui; Yang, Weiping; Long, Gang; Wei, Changyuan

    2016-10-01

    Trace elements might be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the efficacy of chemotherapy against HCC. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the association between trace elements and efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with HCC. Cancer, cancer-adjacent, and cancer-free tissues were collected intraoperatively from 55 patients with HCC between January 2001 and April 2004 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Guangxi Medical University in Guangxi (China), a high HCC incidence area in the world. Trace element levels were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. In vitro sensitivity of cancer cells to five chemotherapeutic drugs (5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, cisplatin, carboplatin, and mitomycin) was tested using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in cancer cells from 32 patients. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium levels had the same gradient distribution in different liver tissues: cancer < cancer-adjacent < cancer-free tissues. Copper levels of cancer tissues were negatively correlated with body weight (r = -0.278, P = 0.027), while manganese and selenium levels were negatively correlated with age (r = -0.297, P = 0.015; r = -0.285, P = 0.018, respectively). Simple correlation analyses revealed that the carboplatin sensitivity was negatively correlated with selenium levels of cancer tissues, while doxorubicin sensitivity was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.497, P = 0.004). Partial correlation analyses showed that doxorubicin sensitivity only was negatively correlated with manganese levels (r = -0.450, P = 0.014). These results suggest that the selenium and manganese content in primary HCC tissues could influence the response of the HCC cells to carboplatin and doxorubicin. These preliminary results provide a basis for future studies. PMID:26961293

  20. Pharmacogenetics: detecting sensitive populations.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, P G

    1994-01-01

    Risk assessment models strive to predict risks to humans from toxic agents. Safety factors and assumptions are incorporated into these models to allow a margin of error. In the case of cancer, substantial evidence shows that the carcinogenic process is a multistage process driven by the interaction of exogenous carcinogenic exposures, genetic traits, and other endogenous factors. Current risk assessment models fail to consider genetic predispositions that make people more sensitive or resistant to exogenous exposures and endogenous processes. Several cytochrome P450 enzymes, responsible for metabolically activating carcinogens and medications, express wide interindividual variation whose genetic coding has now been identified as polymorphic and linked to cancer risk. For example, a restriction fragment-length polymorphism for cytochrome P4501A1, which metabolizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and cytochrome P4502E1, which metabolizes N-nitrosamines and benzene, is linked to lung cancer risk. Cytochrome P4502D6, responsible for metabolizing many clinically important medications, also is linked to lung cancer risk. The frequency for each of these genetic polymorphisms vary among different ethnic and racial groups. In addition to inherited factors for the detection of sensitive populations, determining the biologically effective doses for carcinogenic exposures also should quantitatively and qualitatively enhance the risk assessment process. Levels of carcinogen-DNA adducts reflect the net effect of exposure, absorption, metabolic activation, detoxification, and DNA repair. These effects are genetically predetermined, inducibility notwithstanding. The combination of adduct and genotyping assays provide an assessment of risk that reflects recent exogenous exposure as well as one's lifetime ability to activate and detoxify carcinogens. PMID:7737047

  1. Does equity sensitivity moderate the relationship between effort-reward imbalance and burnout.

    PubMed

    Oren, Lior; Littman-Ovadia, Hadassah

    2013-01-01

    The model of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) received considerable research attention in the job stress literature. However, very scarce research investigated individual differences as moderators between ERI and stress. The present study is aimed at examining the combined effects of ERI, overcommitment (OVC), and the interaction between ERI and overcommitment on burnout (i.e., emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficacy) and the moderating role of equity sensitivity. A questionnaire measuring ERI, burnout, and equity sensitivity was administered to 159 employees. Regression analyses were conducted to test the proposed relations and moderating hypotheses. ERI was negatively related to inefficacy and overcommitment was positively related to emotional exhaustion and cynicism. In addition, equity sensitivity was found to moderate the effect of overcommitment on emotional exhaustion and inefficacy. The findings emphasize the detrimental effect overcommitment may have on employee's mental health and suggest that the ERI model components may be closely related to perceptions of organizational justice. PMID:23286362

  2. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  3. Deciphering the roles of multiple additives in organocatalyzed Michael additions.

    PubMed

    Günler, Z Inci; Companyó, Xavier; Alfonso, Ignacio; Burés, Jordi; Jimeno, Ciril; Pericàs, Miquel A

    2016-05-21

    The synergistic effects of multiple additives (water and acetic acid) on the asymmetric Michael addition of acetone to nitrostyrene catalyzed by primary amine-thioureas (PAT) were precisely determined. Acetic acid facilitates hydrolysis of the imine intermediates, thus leading to catalytic behavior, and minimizes the formation of the double addition side product. In contrast, water slows down the reaction but minimizes catalyst deactivation, eventually leading to higher final yields. PMID:27128165

  4. Identification of seismically risk-sensitive systems and components in nuclear power plants: feasibility study. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Azarm, M; Boccio, J; Farahzad, P

    1983-06-01

    An approach for the identification of risk-sensitive components in a nuclear power plant during and after a seismic event is described. Application of the methodology to two hypothetical power plants - a Boiling Water Reactor and a Pressurized Water Reactor - are presented and the results are given in tabular and graphical form. Conclusions drawn and lessons learned through the course of this study, based on the relative importance of various accident scenarios and sensitivity analyses, are discussed. In addition, the areas that may need further investigation are identified.

  5. Observational analyses and idealized numerical simulations of African wave dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Travis Allen

    The role of the Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) in West African rainfall climatology has received little attention in the research community to date. Therefore, this dissertation will examine the instabilities and wave activity associated with the TEJ and their implications regarding interannual rainfall variability over western Africa. First, the instability of the TEJ is examined using potential vorticity (PV) concepts to contrast wet and dry years in West Africa. Analyses of the meridional PV gradient indicate an abrupt shift in both location and magnitude of the instability associated with the TEJ during the transition from wet to dry years in the Sahel. Additionally, the signs of the climatological anomalies of PV at the TEJ level strongly reflect the four primary modes (wet, dry, wet dipole, and dry dipole) of interannual rainfall variability in West Africa. Several examples of PV perturbation analyses at the TEJ level confirm that the upper-level development of African Easterly Waves (AEWs) differs considerably between the two periods. These results support recent observations and modeling studies that suggest that the interaction between the TEJ and the African Easterly Jet (AEJ) plays an important role in the development and structure of AEWs. In addition to the observational study, a multi-layer primitive equation model is utilized to examine easterly wave activity and vertical motion patterns based on the juxtaposition of the three primary jets located over western Africa. Idealized simulations based on the basic states of the low-level westerly jet (LLWJ), African Easterly Jet (AEJ), and the Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) for several anomalously wet and dry years in the Sahel are studied. Results are compared to several linearized GCM simulations that are initialized with NCEP observational data. Results show that the location, intensity, and scale of wave perturbations are sensitive to the position and intensity of the jets. Vertical motion patterns also

  6. Pressure Sensitive Paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Bencic, T.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews new advances and applications of pressure sensitive paints in aerodynamic testing. Emphasis is placed on important technical aspects of pressure sensitive paint including instrumentation, data processing, and uncertainty analysis.

  7. Dynamical compactness and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Khilko, Danylo; Kolyada, Sergiĭ; Zhang, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    To link the Auslander point dynamics property with topological transitivity, in this paper we introduce dynamically compact systems as a new concept of a chaotic dynamical system (X , T) given by a compact metric space X and a continuous surjective self-map T : X → X. Observe that each weakly mixing system is transitive compact, and we show that any transitive compact M-system is weakly mixing. Then we discuss the relationships between it and other several stronger forms of sensitivity. We prove that any transitive compact system is Li-Yorke sensitive and furthermore multi-sensitive if it is not proximal, and that any multi-sensitive system has positive topological sequence entropy. Moreover, we show that multi-sensitivity is equivalent to both thick sensitivity and thickly syndetic sensitivity for M-systems. We also give a quantitative analysis for multi-sensitivity of a dynamical system.

  8. The Theoretical Foundation of Sensitivity Analysis for GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikoska, U.; Davchev, D.; Shikoski, J.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper the equations of sensitivity analysis are derived and established theoretical underpinnings for the analyses. Paper propounds a land-vehicle navigation concepts and definition for sensitivity analysis. Equations of sensitivity analysis are presented for a linear Kalman filter and case study is given to illustrate the use of sensitivity analysis to the reader. At the end of the paper, extensions that are required for this research are made to the basic equations of sensitivity analysis specifically; the equations of sensitivity analysis are re-derived for a linearized Kalman filter.

  9. Fuel and Additive Characterization for HCCI Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Pitz, W J; Dibble, R

    2003-02-12

    This paper shows a numerical evaluation of fuels and additives for HCCl combustion. First, a long list of candidate HCCl fuels is selected. For all the fuels in the list, operating conditions (compression ratio, equivalence ratio and intake temperature) are determined that result in optimum performance under typical operation for a heavy-duty engine. Fuels are also characterized by presenting Log(p)-Log(T) maps for multiple fuels under HCCl conditions. Log(p)-Log(T) maps illustrate important processes during HCCl engine operation, including compression, low temperature heat release and ignition. Log(p)-Log(T) diagrams can be used for visualizing these processes and can be used as a tool for detailed analysis of HCCl combustion. The paper also includes a ranking of many potential additives. Experiments and analyses have indicated that small amounts (a few parts per million) of secondary fuels (additives) may considerably affect HCCl combustion and may play a significant role in controlling HCCl combustion. Additives are ranked according to their capability to advance HCCl ignition. The best additives are listed and an explanation of their effect on HCCl combustion is included.

  10. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-06-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component.

  11. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component.

  12. Workload analyse of assembling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghenghea, L. D.

    2015-11-01

    The workload is the most important indicator for managers responsible of industrial technological processes no matter if these are automated, mechanized or simply manual in each case, machines or workers will be in the focus of workload measurements. The paper deals with workload analyses made to a most part manual assembling technology for roller bearings assembling process, executed in a big company, with integrated bearings manufacturing processes. In this analyses the delay sample technique have been used to identify and divide all bearing assemblers activities, to get information about time parts from 480 minutes day work time that workers allow to each activity. The developed study shows some ways to increase the process productivity without supplementary investments and also indicated the process automation could be the solution to gain maximum productivity.

  13. An Additive Definition of Molecular Complexity.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Thomas

    2016-03-28

    A framework for molecular complexity is established that is based on information theory and consistent with chemical knowledge. The resulting complexity index Cm is derived from abstracting the information content of a molecule by the degrees of freedom in the microenvironments on a per-atom basis, allowing the molecular complexity to be calculated in a simple and additive way. This index allows the complexity of any molecule to be universally assessed and is sensitive to stereochemistry, heteroatoms, and symmetry. The performance of this complexity index is evaluated and compared against the current state of the art. Its additive character gives consistent values also for very large molecules and supports direct comparisons of chemical reactions. Finally, this approach may provide a useful tool for medicinal chemistry in drug design and lead selection, as demonstrated by correlating molecular complexities of antibiotics with compound-specific parameters. PMID:26857537

  14. Supplementary report on antilock analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellner, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Generic modulator analysis was performed to quantify the effects of dump and reapply pressure rates on antilock stability and performance. Analysis will include dump and reapply rates, and lumped modulator delay. Based on the results of the generic modulator analysis and earlier toggle optimization analysis (with Mitsubishi modulator), a recommended preliminary antilock design was synthesized and its response and performance simulated. The results of these analyses are documented.

  15. SVDS plume impingement modeling development. Sensitivity analysis supporting level B requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, P. B.; Pearson, D. J.; Muhm, P. M.; Schoonmaker, P. B.; Radar, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    A series of sensitivity analyses (trade studies) performed to select features and capabilities to be implemented in the plume impingement model is described. Sensitivity analyses were performed in study areas pertaining to geometry, flowfield, impingement, and dynamical effects. Recommendations based on these analyses are summarized.

  16. Mitogenomic analyses of eutherian relationships.

    PubMed

    Arnason, U; Janke, A

    2002-01-01

    Reasonably correct phylogenies are fundamental to the testing of evolutionary hypotheses. Here, we present phylogenetic findings based on analyses of 67 complete mammalian mitochondrial (mt) genomes. The analyses, irrespective of whether they were performed at the amino acid (aa) level or on nucleotides (nt) of first and second codon positions, placed Erinaceomorpha (hedgehogs and their kin) as the sister group of remaining eutherians. Thus, the analyses separated Erinaceomorpha from other traditional lipotyphlans (e.g., tenrecs, moles, and shrews), making traditional Lipotyphla polyphyletic. Both the aa and nt data sets identified the two order-rich eutherian clades, the Cetferungulata (comprising Pholidota, Carnivora, Perissodactyla, Artiodactyla, and Cetacea) and the African clade (Tenrecomorpha, Macroscelidea, Tubulidentata, Hyracoidea, Proboscidea, and Sirenia). The study corroborated recent findings that have identified a sister-group relationship between Anthropoidea and Dermoptera (flying lemurs), thereby making our own order, Primates, a paraphyletic assembly. Molecular estimates using paleontologically well-established calibration points, placed the origin of most eutherian orders in Cretaceous times, 70-100 million years before present (MYBP). The same estimates place all primate divergences much earlier than traditionally believed. For example, the divergence between Homo and Pan is estimated to have taken place approximately 10 MYBP, a dating consistent with recent findings in primate paleontology. PMID:12438776

  17. Sensitivity of Local Temperature CDFs to Global Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stainforth, D.; Chapman, S. C.; Watkins, N. W.

    2011-12-01

    The sensitivity of climate to increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases at the global scale has been much studied [Knutti and Hegerl 2008, and references therein]. Scientific information to support climate change adaptation activities, however, is often sought at regional or local scales; the scales on which most adaptation decisions are made. Information on these scales is most often based on simulations of complex climate models [Murphy et al. 2009, Tebaldi et al. 2005] and have questionable reliability [Stainforth et al., 2007]. Rather than using data derived or obtained from models we focus on observational timeseries to evaluate the sensitivity of different parts of the local climatic distribution. Such an approach has many advantages: it avoids issues relating to model imperfections [Stainforth et al. 2007], it can be focused on decision relevant thresholds [e.g. Porter and Semenov, 2005], and it inherently integrates information relating to local climatic influences. Taking a timeseries of local daily temperatures for various locations across the United Kingdom we extract the changing cumulative distribution functions over time. We present a simple mathematical deconstruction of how two different observations from two different time periods can be assigned to the combination of natural variability and/or the consequences of climate change. Using this deconstruction we analyse the changing shape of the distributions and thus the sensitivity of different quartiles of the distribution. These sensitivities are found to be both regionally consistent and geographically varying across the United Kingdom; as one would expect given the different influences on local climate between, say, Western Scotland and South East England. We nevertheless find a common pattern of increased sensitivity in the 60th to 80th percentiles; above the mean but below the greatest extremes. The method has the potential to be applied to many other variables in addition to temperature and to

  18. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  19. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  20. Sensitivity Test Analysis

    1992-02-20

    SENSIT,MUSIG,COMSEN is a set of three related programs for sensitivity test analysis. SENSIT conducts sensitivity tests. These tests are also known as threshold tests, LD50 tests, gap tests, drop weight tests, etc. SENSIT interactively instructs the experimenter on the proper level at which to stress the next specimen, based on the results of previous responses. MUSIG analyzes the results of a sensitivity test to determine the mean and standard deviation of the underlying population bymore » computing maximum likelihood estimates of these parameters. MUSIG also computes likelihood ratio joint confidence regions and individual confidence intervals. COMSEN compares the results of two sensitivity tests to see if the underlying populations are significantly different. COMSEN provides an unbiased method of distinguishing between statistical variation of the estimates of the parameters of the population and true population difference.« less

  1. A miniaturised, nested-cylindrical electrostatic analyser geometry for dual electron and ion, multi-energy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedington, Robert; Kataria, Dhiren; Smith, Alan

    2015-09-01

    The CATS (Cylindrical And Tiny Spectrometer) electrostatic optics geometry features multiple nested cylindrical analysers to simultaneously measure multiple energies of electron and multiple energies of ion in a configuration that is targeted at miniaturisation and MEMS fabrication. In the prototyped model, two configurations of cylindrical analyser were used, featuring terminating side-plates that caused particle trajectories to either converge (C type) or diverge (D type) in the axial direction. Simulations show how these different electrode configurations affect the particle focussing and instrument parameters; C-type providing greater throughputs but D-type providing higher resolving powers. The simulations were additionally used to investigate unexpected plate spacing variations in the as-built model, revealing that the k-factors are most sensitive to the width of the inter-electrode spacing at its narrowest point.

  2. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  3. 75 FR 27313 - Proposed Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED PROCUREMENT LIST Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed additions to the... or Severely Disabled, Jefferson Plaza 2, Suite 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway,...

  4. New sensitive seismic cable with imbedded geophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, Alex; Pisano, Dan; Goldburt, Tim

    2005-10-01

    Seismic detection systems for homeland security applications are an important additional layer to perimeter and border protection and other security systems. General Sensing Systems has been developing low mass, low cost, highly sensitive geophones. These geophones are being incorporated within a seismic cable. This article reports on the concept of a seismic sensitive cable and seismic sensitive ribbon design. Unlike existing seismic cables with sensitivity distributed along their lengths, the GSS new cable and ribbon possesses high sensitivity distributed in several points along the cable/ribbon with spacing of about 8-12 to 100 meters between geophones. This cable/ribbon is highly suitable for design and installation in extended perimeter protection systems. It allows the use of a mechanical cable layer for high speed installation. We show that any installation mistakes in using the GSS seismic sensitive cable/ribbon have low impact on output seismic signal value and detection range of security systems.

  5. Social anxiety and alcohol consumption: the role of alcohol expectancies and reward sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Booth, Catherine; Hasking, Penelope

    2009-09-01

    Although the relationship between social anxiety and alcohol consumption has been the subject of extensive exploration, previous studies have failed to draw consistent conclusions about the nature of this relationship. Gray [Gray, J.A. (1970). The psychophysiological basis of introversion-extraversion. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 8, 249-266] suggested that individuals who are sensitive to reward are likely to place themselves in potentially rewarding environments (e.g. pubs and clubs). As such these individuals will have a greater chance to experience and vicariously observe the effects of alcohol in these environments, leading to the formation and modification of alcohol expectancies. Consequently, reinforcement sensitivity theory and alcohol expectancies are inherently related, yet have remained disparate areas of research. In this study, a total of 454 young adults responded to a questionnaire assessing social anxiety, alcohol consumption, reward sensitivity and alcohol expectancies. Regression analyses revealed a positive relationship between reward sensitivity, expectations of tension reduction and increased confidence, and alcohol consumption. Expectations of tension reduction were observed to moderate the relationship between social anxiety and alcohol consumption. In addition, three-way relationships between reward sensitivity, alcohol expectancies and social anxiety were observed to predict alcohol consumption. Overall, these results suggest that both reward sensitivity and alcohol expectancies play a role in the relationship between social anxiety and alcohol consumption, and that inclusion of these constructs in further research may aid in further clarifying the mechanisms underlying comorbid social anxiety and alcohol abuse. PMID:19464809

  6. Local sensitivity analysis for compositional data with application to soil texture in hydrologic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loosvelt, L.; Vernieuwe, H.; Pauwels, V. R. N.; De Baets, B.; Verhoest, N. E. C.

    2012-07-01

    Compositional data, such as soil texture, are hard to deal with in the geosciences as standard statistical methods are often inappropriate to analyse this type of data. Especially in sensitivity analysis, the closed character of the data is often ignored. To that end, we developed a method to assess the local sensitivity of a model output w.r.t. a compositional model input. We adapted the finite difference technique such that the different parts of the input are perturbed simultaneously while the closed character of the data is preserved. We applied this method to a hydrologic model and assessed the sensitivity of the simulated soil moisture content to local changes in soil texture. Based on a high number of model runs, in which the soil texture was varied across the entire texture triangle, we identified zones of high sensitivity in the texture triangle. In such zones, the model output uncertainty induced by the discrepancy between the scale of measurement and the scale of model application, is advised to be reduced through additional data collection. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis provided more insight into the hydrologic model behaviour as it revealed how the model sensitivity is related to the shape of the soil moisture retention curve.

  7. Local sensitivity analysis for compositional data with application to soil texture in hydrologic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loosvelt, L.; Vernieuwe, H.; Pauwels, V. R. N.; De Baets, B.; Verhoest, N. E. C.

    2013-02-01

    Compositional data, such as soil texture, are hard to deal with in the geosciences as standard statistical methods are often inappropriate to analyse this type of data. Especially in sensitivity analysis, the closed character of the data is often ignored. To that end, we developed a method to assess the local sensitivity of a model output with resect to a compositional model input. We adapted the finite difference technique such that the different parts of the input are perturbed simultaneously while the closed character of the data is preserved. This method was applied to a hydrologic model and the sensitivity of the simulated soil moisture content to local changes in soil texture was assessed. Based on a high number of model runs, in which the soil texture was varied across the entire texture triangle, we identified zones of high sensitivity in the texture triangle. In such zones, the model output uncertainty induced by the discrepancy between the scale of measurement and the scale of model application, is advised to be reduced through additional data collection. Furthermore, the sensitivity analysis provided more insight into the hydrologic model behaviour as it revealed how the model sensitivity is related to the shape of the soil moistureretention curve.

  8. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q.; Cizek, J.

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  9. Study design and sampling intensity for demographic analyses of bear populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, R.B.; Schwartz, C.C.; Mace, R.D.; Haroldson, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The rate of population change through time (??) is a fundamental element of a wildlife population's conservation status, yet estimating it with acceptable precision for bears is difficult. For studies that follow known (usually marked) bears, ?? can be estimated during some defined time by applying either life-table or matrix projection methods to estimates of individual vital rates. Usually however, confidence intervals surrounding the estimate are broader than one would like. Using an estimator suggested by Doak et al. (2005), we explored the precision to be expected in ?? from demographic analyses of typical grizzly (Ursus arctos) and American black (U. americanus) bear data sets. We also evaluated some trade-offs among vital rates in sampling strategies. Confidence intervals around ?? were more sensitive to adding to the duration of a short (e.g., 3 yrs) than a long (e.g., 10 yrs) study, and more sensitive to adding additional bears to studies with small (e.g., 10 adult females/yr) than large (e.g., 30 adult females/yr) sample sizes. Confidence intervals of ?? projected using process-only variance of vital rates were only slightly smaller than those projected using total variances of vital rates. Under sampling constraints typical of most bear studies, it may be more efficient to invest additional resources into monitoring recruitment and juvenile survival rates of females already a part of the study, than to simply increase the sample size of study females. ?? 2011 International Association for Bear Research and Management.

  10. Climate Sensitivity in the Anthropocene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Previdi, M.; Liepert, B. G.; Peteet, Dorothy M.; Hansen, J.; Beerling, D. J.; Broccoli, A. J.; Frolking, S.; Galloway, J. N.; Heimann, M.; LeQuere, C.; Levitus, S.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2014-01-01

    Climate sensitivity in its most basic form is defined as the equilibrium change in global surface temperature that occurs in response to a climate forcing, or externally imposed perturbation of the planetary energy balance. Within this general definition, several specific forms of climate sensitivity exist that differ in terms of the types of climate feedbacks they include. Based on evidence from Earth's history, we suggest here that the relevant form of climate sensitivity in the Anthropocene (e.g. from which to base future greenhouse gas (GHG) stabilization targets) is the Earth system sensitivity including fast feedbacks from changes in water vapour, natural aerosols, clouds and sea ice, slower surface albedo feedbacks from changes in continental ice sheets and vegetation, and climate-GHG feedbacks from changes in natural (land and ocean) carbon sinks. Traditionally, only fast feedbacks have been considered (with the other feedbacks either ignored or treated as forcing), which has led to estimates of the climate sensitivity for doubled CO2 concentrations of about 3 C. The 2×CO2 Earth system sensitivity is higher than this, being approx. 4-6 C if the ice sheet/vegetation albedo feedback is included in addition to the fast feedbacks, and higher still if climate-GHG feedbacks are also included. The inclusion of climate-GHG feedbacks due to changes in the natural carbon sinks has the advantage of more directly linking anthropogenic GHG emissions with the ensuing global temperature increase, thus providing a truer indication of the climate sensitivity to human perturbations. The Earth system climate sensitivity is difficult to quantify due to the lack of palaeo-analogues for the present-day anthropogenic forcing, and the fact that ice sheet and climate-GHG feedbacks have yet to become globally significant in the Anthropocene. Furthermore, current models are unable to adequately simulate the physics of ice sheet decay and certain aspects of the natural carbon and

  11. Treatment of pica through multiple analyses of its reinforcing functions.

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, C C; Fisher, W W; Hanley, G P; LeBlanc, L A; Worsdell, A S; Lindauer, S E; Keeney, K M

    1998-01-01

    We conducted functional analyses of the pica of 3 participants. The pica of 1 participant appeared to be maintained by automatic reinforcement; that of the other 2 participants appeared to be multiply controlled by social and automatic reinforcement. Subsequent preference and treatment analyses were used to identify stimuli that would complete with the automatic function of pica for the 3 participants. These analyses also identified the specific aspect of oral stimulation that served as automatic reinforcement for 2 of the participants. In addition, functional analysis-based treatments were used to address the socially motivated components of 2 of the participants' pica. Results are discussed in terms of (a) the importance of using the results of functional analyses to develop treatments for pica and (b) the advantages of developing indirect analyses to identify specific sources of reinforcement for automatically reinforced behavior. PMID:9652098

  12. Analysing photonic structures in plants

    PubMed Central

    Vignolini, Silvia; Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J.; Steiner, Ullrich

    2013-01-01

    The outer layers of a range of plant tissues, including flower petals, leaves and fruits, exhibit an intriguing variation of microscopic structures. Some of these structures include ordered periodic multilayers and diffraction gratings that give rise to interesting optical appearances. The colour arising from such structures is generally brighter than pigment-based colour. Here, we describe the main types of photonic structures found in plants and discuss the experimental approaches that can be used to analyse them. These experimental approaches allow identification of the physical mechanisms producing structural colours with a high degree of confidence. PMID:23883949

  13. Summary of LDEF battery analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Chris; Thaller, Larry; Bittner, Harlin; Deligiannis, Frank; Tiller, Smith; Sullivan, David; Bene, James

    1992-01-01

    Tests and analyses of NiCd, LiSO2, and LiCf batteries flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) includes results from NASA, Aerospace, and commercial labs. The LiSO2 cells illustrate six-year degradation of internal components acceptable for space applications, with up to 85 percent battery capacity remaining on discharge of some returned cells. LiCf batteries completed their mission, but lost any remaining capacity due to internal degradation. Returned NiCd batteries tested an GSFC showed slight case distortion due to pressure build up, but were functioning as designed.

  14. Sensitivity to volcanic field boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody; Bebbington, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Lindsay, Jan; Rashad Moufti, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazard analyses are desirable where there is potential for future volcanic activity to affect a proximal population. This is frequently the case for volcanic fields (regions of distributed volcanism) where low eruption rates, fertile soil, and attractive landscapes draw populations to live close by. Forecasting future activity in volcanic fields almost invariably uses spatial or spatio-temporal point processes with model selection and development based on exploratory analyses of previous eruption data. For identifiability reasons, spatio-temporal processes, and practically also spatial processes, the definition of a spatial region is required to which volcanism is confined. However, due to the complex and predominantly unknown sub-surface processes driving volcanic eruptions, definition of a region based solely on geological information is currently impossible. Thus, the current approach is to fit a shape to the known previous eruption sites. The class of boundary shape is an unavoidable subjective decision taken by the forecaster that is often overlooked during subsequent analysis of results. This study shows the substantial effect that this choice may have on even the simplest exploratory methods for hazard forecasting, illustrated using four commonly used exploratory statistical methods and two very different regions: the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, and Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For Harrat Rahat, sensitivity of results to boundary definition is substantial. For the Auckland Volcanic Field, the range of options resulted in similar shapes, nevertheless, some of the statistical tests still showed substantial variation in results. This work highlights the fact that when carrying out any hazard analysis on volcanic fields, it is vital to specify how the volcanic field boundary has been defined, assess the sensitivity of boundary choice, and to carry these assumptions and related uncertainties through to estimates of future activity and

  15. Comparative acute and chronic sensitivity of fish and amphibians: a critical review of data.

    PubMed

    Weltje, Lennart; Simpson, Peter; Gross, Melanie; Crane, Mark; Wheeler, James R

    2013-04-01

    The relative sensitivity of amphibians to chemicals in the environment, including plant protection product active substances, is the subject of ongoing scientific debate. The objective of this study was to compare systematically the relative sensitivity of amphibians and fish to chemicals. Acute and chronic toxicity data were obtained from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) ECOTOX database and were supplemented with data from the scientific and regulatory literature. The overall outcome is that fish and amphibian toxicity data are highly correlated and that fish are more sensitive (both acute and chronic) than amphibians. In terms of acute sensitivity, amphibians were between 10- and 100-fold more sensitive than fish for only four of 55 chemicals and more than 100-fold more sensitive for only two chemicals. However, a detailed inspection of these cases showed a similar acute sensitivity of fish and amphibians. Chronic toxicity data for fish were available for 52 chemicals. Amphibians were between 10- and 100-fold more sensitive than fish for only two substances (carbaryl and dexamethasone) and greater than 100-fold more sensitive for only a single chemical (sodium perchlorate). The comparison for carbaryl was subsequently determined to be unreliable and that for sodium perchlorate is a potential artifact of the exposure medium. Only a substance such as dexamethasone, which interferes with a specific aspect of amphibian metamorphosis, might not be detected using fish tests. However, several other compounds known to influence amphibian metamorphosis were included in the analysis, and these did not affect amphibians disproportionately. These analyses suggest that additional amphibian testing is not necessary during chemical risk assessment. PMID:23381988

  16. Inhomogeneous Forcing and Transient Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shindell, Drew T.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding climate sensitivity is critical to projecting climate change in response to a given forcing scenario. Recent analyses have suggested that transient climate sensitivity is at the low end of the present model range taking into account the reduced warming rates during the past 10-15 years during which forcing has increased markedly. In contrast, comparisons of modelled feedback processes with observations indicate that the most realistic models have higher sensitivities. Here I analyse results from recent climate modelling intercomparison projects to demonstrate that transient climate sensitivity to historical aerosols and ozone is substantially greater than the transient climate sensitivity to CO2. This enhanced sensitivity is primarily caused by more of the forcing being located at Northern Hemisphere middle to high latitudes where it triggers more rapid land responses and stronger feedbacks. I find that accounting for this enhancement largely reconciles the two sets of results, and I conclude that the lowest end of the range of transient climate response to CO2 in present models and assessments (less than 1.3 C) is very unlikely.

  17. A numerical comparison of sensitivity analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    Engineering and scientific phenomena are often studied with the aid of mathematical models designed to simulate complex physical processes. In the nuclear industry, modeling the movement and consequence of radioactive pollutants is extremely important for environmental protection and facility control. One of the steps in model development is the determination of the parameters most influential on model results. A {open_quotes}sensitivity analysis{close_quotes} of these parameters is not only critical to model validation but also serves to guide future research. A previous manuscript (Hamby) detailed many of the available methods for conducting sensitivity analyses. The current paper is a comparative assessment of several methods for estimating relative parameter sensitivity. Method practicality is based on calculational ease and usefulness of the results. It is the intent of this report to demonstrate calculational rigor and to compare parameter sensitivity rankings resulting from various sensitivity analysis techniques. An atmospheric tritium dosimetry model (Hamby) is used here as an example, but the techniques described can be applied to many different modeling problems. Other investigators (Rose; Dalrymple and Broyd) present comparisons of sensitivity analyses methodologies, but none as comprehensive as the current work.

  18. Molecular and antimicrobial analyses of non-classical Bordetella isolated from a laboratory mouse

    PubMed Central

    LOONG, Shih Keng; MAHFODZ, Nur Hidayana; WALI, Haryanti Azura Mohamad; TALIB, Siti Aisyah A.; NASRAH, Siti Noraisah Ahmad; WONG, Pooi Fong; ABUBAKAR, Sazaly

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification and separation of non-classical Bordetella species is very difficult. These species have been implicated in animal infections. B. hinzii, a non-classical Bordetella, has been isolated from mice in experimental facilities recently. We isolated and characterized one non-classical Bordetella isolate from the trachea and lung of an ICR mouse. Isolate BH370 was initially identified as B. hinzii by 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA sequencing. Additionally, isolate BH370 also displayed antimicrobial sensitivity profiles similar to B. hinzii. However, analyses of nrdA sequences determined its identity as Bordetella genogroup 16. The isolation of BH370 from a healthy mouse suggests the possibility of it being a commensal. The nrdA gene was demonstrated to possess greater phylogenetic resolution as compared with 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA for the discrimination of non-classical Bordetella species. PMID:26782013

  19. Molecular and antimicrobial analyses of non-classical Bordetella isolated from a laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Loong, Shih Keng; Mahfodz, Nur Hidayana; Wali, Haryanti Azura Mohamad; Talib, Siti Aisyah A; Nasrah, Siti Noraisah Ahmad; Wong, Pooi Fong; Abubakar, Sazaly

    2016-05-01

    Accurate identification and separation of non-classical Bordetella species is very difficult. These species have been implicated in animal infections. B. hinzii, a non-classical Bordetella, has been isolated from mice in experimental facilities recently. We isolated and characterized one non-classical Bordetella isolate from the trachea and lung of an ICR mouse. Isolate BH370 was initially identified as B. hinzii by 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA sequencing. Additionally, isolate BH370 also displayed antimicrobial sensitivity profiles similar to B. hinzii. However, analyses of nrdA sequences determined its identity as Bordetella genogroup 16. The isolation of BH370 from a healthy mouse suggests the possibility of it being a commensal. The nrdA gene was demonstrated to possess greater phylogenetic resolution as compared with 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA for the discrimination of non-classical Bordetella species. PMID:26782013

  20. NMC stratospheric analyses during the 1987 Antarctic expedition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelman, Melvyn E.; Newman, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    Stratospheric constant pressure analyses of geopotential height and temperature, produced as part of regular operations at the National Meteorological Center (NMC), were used by several participants of the Antarctic Ozone Expedition. A brief decription is given of the NMC stratospheric analyses and the data that are used to derive them. In addition, comparisons of the analysis values at the locations of radiosonde and aircraft data are presented to provide indications for assessing the representativeness of the NMC stratospheric analyses during the 1987 Antarctic winter-spring period.

  1. Shielding Analyses for VISION Beam Line at SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz X

    2014-01-01

    Full-scale neutron and gamma transport analyses were performed to design shielding around the VISION beam line, instrument shielding enclosure, beam stop, secondary shutter including a temporary beam stop for the still closed neighboring beam line to meet requirement is to achieve dose rates below 0.25 mrem/h at 30 cm from the shielding surface. The beam stop and the temporary beam stop analyses were performed with the discrete ordinate code DORT additionally to Monte Carlo analyses with the MCNPX code. Comparison of the results is presented.

  2. [Network analyses in neuroimaging studies].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shigeki; Yamada, Makiko

    2013-06-01

    Neurons are anatomically and physiologically connected to each other, and these connections are involved in various neuronal functions. Multiple important neural networks involved in neurodegenerative diseases can be detected using network analyses in functional neuroimaging. First, the basic methods and theories of voxel-based network analyses, such as principal component analysis, independent component analysis, and seed-based analysis, are described. Disease- and symptom-specific brain networks have been identified using glucose metabolism images in patients with Parkinson's disease. These networks enable us to objectively evaluate individual patients and serve as diagnostic tools as well as biomarkers for therapeutic interventions. Many functional MRI studies have shown that "hub" brain regions, such as the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, are deactivated by externally driven cognitive tasks; such brain regions form the "default mode network." Recent studies have shown that this default mode network is disrupted from the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease and is associated with amyloid deposition in the brain. Some recent studies have shown that the default mode network is also impaired in Parkinson's disease, whereas other studies have shown inconsistent results. These incongruent results could be due to the heterogeneous pharmacological status, differences in mesocortical dopaminergic impairment status, and concomitant amyloid deposition. Future neuroimaging network analysis studies will reveal novel and interesting findings that will uncover the pathomechanisms of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:23735528

  3. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  4. Analyses of particles in beryllium by ion imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.W.; Norberg, J.C.; Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA )

    1989-10-06

    Ion microanalysis using a {sup 133}Cs{sup +} primary ion beam and SIMS has sufficiently high sensitivity that it can be used to analyze Be for trace amounts of most elements. High sensitivity is important, because O, C, and other elements have low solubilities in Be, and reliable analyses of these elements becaome difficult as they approach their solid solubility limits (about 6 appm for O; C also is suspected to be within this range). Because of the low solubilities of these elements, major portions of their total concentrations can be contained in particles. Quantitative depth-profile analyses using ion-implanted standards are ideal to analyze the Be matrix, but if particles exist, supplementary techniques such as stereology are required to determine the amounts of the elements that are associated with the particles. This paper will demonstrate the use of ion imaging to identify various types of particles and determine their spatial distributions. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Microsample analyses via DBS: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Henion, Jack; Oliveira, Regina V; Chace, Donald H

    2013-10-01

    The use of DBS is an appealing approach to employing microsampling techniques for the bioanalysis of samples, as has been demonstrated for the past 50 years in the metabolic screening of metabolites and diseases. In addition to its minimally invasive sample collection procedures and its economical merits, DBS microsampling benefits from the very high sensitivity, selectivity and multianalyte capabilities of LC-MS, which has been especially well demonstrated in newborn screening applications. Only a few microliters of a biological fluid are required for analysis, which also translates to significantly reduced demands on clinical samples from patients or from animals. Recently, the pharmaceutical industry and other arenas have begun to explore the utility and practicality of DBS microsampling. This review discusses the basis for why DBS techniques are likely to be part of the future, as well as offering insights into where these benefits may be realized. PMID:24138627

  6. Calculators and Computers: Graphical Addition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spero, Samuel W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is presented that generates problem sets involving sketching graphs of trigonometric functions using graphical addition. The students use calculators to sketch the graphs and a computer solution is used to check it. (MP)

  7. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  8. Analyses of Oxyanion Materials by Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Perry, D.L.; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Leung, K.-N.; Garabedian, G.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2008-03-24

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) has been used to analyze metal ion oxyanion materials that have multiple applications, including medicine, materials, catalysts, and electronics. The significance for the need for accurate, highly sensitive analyses for the materials is discussed in the context of quality control of end products containing the parent element in each material. Applications of the analytical data for input to models and theoretical calculations related to the electronic and other properties of the materials are discussed.

  9. An Illumination Modeling System for Human Factors Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Thong; Maida, James C.; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Seeing is critical to human performance. Lighting is critical for seeing. Therefore, lighting is critical to human performance. This is common sense, and here on earth, it is easily taken for granted. However, on orbit, because the sun will rise or set every 45 minutes on average, humans working in space must cope with extremely dynamic lighting conditions. Contrast conditions of harsh shadowing and glare is also severe. The prediction of lighting conditions for critical operations is essential. Crew training can factor lighting into the lesson plans when necessary. Mission planners can determine whether low-light video cameras are required or whether additional luminaires need to be flown. The optimization of the quantity and quality of light is needed because of the effects on crew safety, on electrical power and on equipment maintainability. To address all of these issues, an illumination modeling system has been developed by the Graphics Research and Analyses Facility (GRAF) and Lighting Environment Test Facility (LETF) in the Space Human Factors Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center. The system uses physically based ray tracing software (Radiance) developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, a human factors oriented geometric modeling system (PLAID) and an extensive database of humans and environments. Material reflectivity properties of major surfaces and critical surfaces are measured using a gonio-reflectometer. Luminaires (lights) are measured for beam spread distribution, color and intensity. Video camera performances are measured for color and light sensitivity. 3D geometric models of humans and the environment are combined with the material and light models to form a system capable of predicting lighting conditions and visibility conditions in space.

  10. Influence of bio-additives on combustion of liquid fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsch, Marek; Durčanský, Peter

    2016-06-01

    In this contribution there are analyses of the course of the pressure curves, which were measured in the diesel engine MD UR IV, which is often used in cogeneration units. The results of the analyses confront the properties and quality of fuels. The measuring was realized with a constant rotation speed of the engine and by using different fuels. The fuels were pure diesel fuels and diesel fuel with bio-additives of hydrogenate RO (rape oil), FAME, and bioethanol.

  11. ISFSI site boundary radiation dose rate analyses.

    PubMed

    Hagler, R J; Fero, A H

    2005-01-01

    Across the globe nuclear utilities are in the process of designing and analysing Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installations (ISFSI) for the purpose of above ground spent-fuel storage primarily to mitigate the filling of spent-fuel pools. Using a conjoining of discrete ordinates transport theory (DORT) and Monte Carlo (MCNP) techniques, an ISFSI was analysed to determine neutron and photon dose rates for a generic overpack, and ISFSI pad configuration and design at distances ranging from 1 to -1700 m from the ISFSI array. The calculated dose rates are used to address the requirements of 10CFR72.104, which provides limits to be enforced for the protection of the public by the NRC in regard to ISFSI facilities. For this overpack, dose rates decrease by three orders of magnitude through the first 200 m moving away from the ISFSI. In addition, the contributions from different source terms changes over distance. It can be observed that although side photons provide the majority of dose rate in this calculation, scattered photons and side neutrons take on more importance as the distance from the ISFSI is increased. PMID:16604670

  12. Integrated Genomic Analyses of Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project has analyzed mRNA expression, miRNA expression, promoter methylation, and DNA copy number in 489 high-grade serous ovarian adenocarcinomas (HGS-OvCa) and the DNA sequences of exons from coding genes in 316 of these tumors. These results show that HGS-OvCa is characterized by TP53 mutations in almost all tumors (96%); low prevalence but statistically recurrent somatic mutations in 9 additional genes including NF1, BRCA1, BRCA2, RB1, and CDK12; 113 significant focal DNA copy number aberrations; and promoter methylation events involving 168 genes. Analyses delineated four ovarian cancer transcriptional subtypes, three miRNA subtypes, four promoter methylation subtypes, a transcriptional signature associated with survival duration and shed new light on the impact on survival of tumors with BRCA1/2 and CCNE1 aberrations. Pathway analyses suggested that homologous recombination is defective in about half of tumors, and that Notch and FOXM1 signaling are involved in serous ovarian cancer pathophysiology. PMID:21720365

  13. Bioinformatics tools for analysing viral genomic data.

    PubMed

    Orton, R J; Gu, Q; Hughes, J; Maabar, M; Modha, S; Vattipally, S B; Wilkie, G S; Davison, A J

    2016-04-01

    The field of viral genomics and bioinformatics is experiencing a strong resurgence due to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, which enables the rapid and cost-effective sequencing and subsequent assembly of large numbers of viral genomes. In addition, the unprecedented power of HTS technologies has enabled the analysis of intra-host viral diversity and quasispecies dynamics in relation to important biological questions on viral transmission, vaccine resistance and host jumping. HTS also enables the rapid identification of both known and potentially new viruses from field and clinical samples, thus adding new tools to the fields of viral discovery and metagenomics. Bioinformatics has been central to the rise of HTS applications because new algorithms and software tools are continually needed to process and analyse the large, complex datasets generated in this rapidly evolving area. In this paper, the authors give a brief overview of the main bioinformatics tools available for viral genomic research, with a particular emphasis on HTS technologies and their main applications. They summarise the major steps in various HTS analyses, starting with quality control of raw reads and encompassing activities ranging from consensus and de novo genome assembly to variant calling and metagenomics, as well as RNA sequencing. PMID:27217183

  14. Geomorphic analyses from space imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morisawa, M.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most obvious applications of space imagery to geomorphological analyses is in the study of drainage patterns and channel networks. LANDSAT, high altitude photography and other types of remote sensing imagery are excellent for depicting stream networks on a regional scale because of their broad coverage in a single image. They offer a valuable tool for comparing and analyzing drainage patterns and channel networks all over the world. Three aspects considered in this geomorphological study are: (1) the origin, evolution and rates of development of drainage systems; (2) the topological studies of network and channel arrangements; and (3) the adjustment of streams to tectonic events and geologic structure (i.e., the mode and rate of adjustment).

  15. Analyses to improve operational flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Trikouros, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    Operational flexibility is greatly enhanced if the technical bases for plant limits and design margins are fully understood, and the analyses necessary to evaluate the effect of plant modifications or changes in operating modes on these parameters can be performed as required. If a condition should arise that might jeopardize a plant limit or reduce operational flexibility, it would be necessary to understand the basis for the limit or the specific condition limiting operational flexibility and be capable of performing a reanalysis to either demonstrate that the limit will not be violated or to change the limit. This paper provides examples of GPU Nuclear efforts in this regard. Examples of Oyster Creek and Three Mile Island operating experiences are discussed.

  16. Chemical analyses of provided samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Christopher H.

    1993-01-01

    Two batches of samples were received and chemical analysis was performed of the surface and near surface regions of the samples by the surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) method. The samples included four one-inch optics and several paint samples. The analyses emphasized surface contamination or modification. In these studies, pulsed sputtering by 7 keV Ar+ and primarily single-photon ionization (SPI) by coherent 118 nm radiation (at approximately 5 x 10(exp 5) W/cm(sup 2) were used. For two of the samples, also multiphoton ionization (MPI) at 266 nm (approximately 5 x 10(exp 11) W/cm(sup 2) was used. Most notable among the results was the silicone contamination on Mg2 mirror 28-92, and that the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) paint sample had been enriched in K and Na and depleted in Zn, Si, B, and organic compounds relative to the control paint.

  17. Analyses of Scenarios for Past and Possible Future Aircraft Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuebbles, Donald J.; Patten, Kenneth O.; Rahmes, Tim

    1997-01-01

    This project contains several components to work with the NASA AEAP program in better definition of scenarios for aircraft emissions and in determining the sensitivity of the atmosphere to such emissions. Under this project, Don Wuebbles continues as chair of the Operations and Emissions Scenarios Committee for AEAP. We are also coordinating with the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to ensure the highest quality possible in the emissions scenarios promoted by the Emissions Scenarios committee. We continue to help coordination of NASA AEAP with international activities. This includes work with ICAO towards international analysis of aircraft emissions inventories; performing analyses to compare and evaluate databases of aircraft emissions developed for NASA and by various international groups and from these analyses, develop guidelines for future emissions scenarios development. Special sensitivity analyses, using our two-dimensional chemical-transport model of the global troposphere and stratosphere, have been used to determine potential sensitivity of further enhancements that could be made to emissions scenarios development. The latter studies are to be used in prioritizing further emissions scenario development.

  18. Isotopic signatures by bulk analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.

    1997-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a series of measurement techniques for identification of nuclear signatures by analyzing bulk samples. Two specific applications for isotopic fingerprinting to identify the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in bulk samples are presented. The first example is the analyses of environmental samples collected in the US Arctic to determine the impact of dumping of radionuclides in this polar region. Analyses of sediment and biota samples indicate that for the areas sampled the anthropogenic radionuclide content of sediments was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. The anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. It can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected. The second example is isotopic fingerprinting of water and sediment samples from the Rocky Flats Facility (RFP). The largest source of anthropogenic radioactivity presently affecting surface-waters at RFP is the sediments that are currently residing in the holding ponds. One gram of sediment from a holding pond contains approximately 50 times more plutonium than 1 liter of water from the pond. Essentially 100% of the uranium in Ponds A-1 and A-2 originated as depleted uranium. The largest source of radioactivity in the terminal Ponds A-4, B-5 and C-2 was naturally occurring uranium and its decay product radium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.05% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public. All of the radioactivity observed in soil, sediment and water samples collected at RFP was naturally occurring, the result of processes at RFP or the result of global fallout. No extraneous anthropogenic alpha, beta or gamma activities were detected. The plutonium concentrations in Pond C-2 appear to vary seasonally.

  19. ADDITIVITY ASSESSMENT OF TRIHALOMETHANE MIXTURES BY PROPORTIONAL RESPONSE ADDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    If additivity is known or assumed, the toxicity of a chemical mixture may be predicted from the dose response curves of the individual chemicals comprising the mixture. As single chemical data are abundant and mixture data sparse, mixture risk methods that utilize single chemical...

  20. Proteome Analyses of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Megger, Dominik A.; Naboulsi, Wael; Meyer, Helmut E.; Sitek, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics has evolved into a powerful and widely used bioanalytical technique in the study of cancer, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this review, we provide an up to date overview of feasible proteome-analytical techniques for clinical questions. In addition, we present a broad summary of proteomic studies of HCC utilizing various technical approaches for the analysis of samples derived from diverse sources like HCC cell lines, animal models, human tissue and body fluids. PMID:26357614

  1. [INVITED] Lasers in additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J.

    2016-04-01

    Additive manufacturing is a topic of considerable ongoing interest, with forecasts predicting it to have major impact on industry in the future. This paper focusses on the current status and potential future development of the technology, with particular reference to the role of lasers within it. It begins by making clear the types and roles of lasers in the different categories of additive manufacturing. This is followed by concise reviews of the economic benefits and disadvantages of the technology, current state of the market and use of additive manufacturing in different industries. Details of these fields are referenced rather than expanded in detail. The paper continues, focusing on current indicators to the future of additive manufacturing. Barriers to its development, trends and opportunities in major industrial sectors, and wider opportunities for its development are covered. Evidence indicates that additive manufacturing may not become the dominant manufacturing technology in all industries, but represents an excellent opportunity for lasers to increase their influence in manufacturing as a whole.

  2. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, and to prepare specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for eight food additives (Benzoe tonkinensis; carrageenan; citric and fatty acid esters of glycerol; gardenia yellow; lutein esters from Tagetes erecta; octenyl succinic acid-modified gum arabic; octenyl succinic acid-modified starch; paprika extract; and pectin) and eight groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; ionones and structurally related substances; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; phenol and phenol derivatives; phenyl-substituted aliphatic alcohols and related aldehydes and esters; and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: citric acid; gellan gum; polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate; potassium aluminium silicate; and Quillaia extract (Type 2). Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for dietary exposures to and toxicological evaluations of all of the food additives and flavouring agents considered at this meeting. PMID:26118220

  3. Transportation systems analyses. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-11-01

    The principal objective is to accomplish a systems engineering assessment of the nation's space transportation infrastructure. This analysis addresses the necessary elements to perform crew delivery and return, cargo transfer, cargo delivery and return, payload servicing, and the exploration of the Moon and Mars. Specific elements analyzed, but not limited to, include: the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI), the National Launch System (NLS), the current expendable launch vehicle (ELV) fleet, ground facilities, the Space Station Freedom (SSF), and other civil, military and commercial payloads. The performance of this study entails maintaining a broad perspective on the large number of transportation elements that could potentially comprise the U.S. space infrastructure over the next several decades. To perform this systems evaluation, top-level trade studies are conducted to enhance our understanding of the relationship between elements of the infrastructure. This broad 'infrastructure-level perspective' permits the identification of preferred infrastructures. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assure the credibility and usefulness of study results. Conceptual studies of transportation elements contribute to the systems approach by identifying elements (such as ETO node and transfer/excursion vehicles) needed in current and planned transportation systems. These studies are also a mechanism to integrate the results of relevant parallel studies.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of a process based erosion model using FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabelmann, Petra; Wienhöfer, Jan; Zehe, Erwin

    2015-04-01

    Erosion, sediment redistribution and related particulate transport are severe problems in agro-ecosystems with highly erodible loess soils. They are controlled by various factors, for example rainfall intensity, topography, initial wetness conditions, spatial patterns of soil hydraulic parameters, land use and tillage practice. The interplay between those factors is not well understood. A number of models were developed to indicate those complex interactions and to estimate the amount of sediment which will be removed, transported and accumulated. In order to make use of physical-based models to provide insight on the physical system under study it is necessary to understand the interactions of parameters and processes in the model domain. Sensitivity analyses give insight in the relative importance of model parameters, which in addition is useful for judging where the greatest efforts have to be spent in acquiring or calibrating input parameters. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the erosion-related parameters in the CATFLOW model. We analysed simulations from the Weiherbach catchment, where good matches of observed hydrological response and erosion dynamics had been obtained in earlier studies. The Weiherbach catchment is located in an intensively cultivated loess region in southwest Germany and due to the hilly landscape and the highly erodible loess soils, erosion is a severe environmental problem. CATFLOW is a process-based hydrology and erosion model that can operate on catchment and hillslope scales. Soil water dynamics are described by the Richards equation including effective approaches for preferential flow. Evapotranspiration is simulated using an approach based on the Penman-Monteith equation. The model simulates overland flow using the diffusion wave equation. Soil detachment is related to the attacking forces of rainfall and overland flow, and the erosion resistance of the soil. Sediment transport capacity and sediment

  5. Parametric sensitivity and temporal dynamics of sapphire crystal growth via the micro-pulling-down method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Gaurab; Yeckel, Andrew; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2012-11-01

    The micro-pulling-down (μ-PD) crystal growth of sapphire fibers, whose steady-state limits were the focus of our prior study [Samanta et al., Journal of Crystal Growth 335 (2011) 148-159], is further examined using a parametric sensitivity computation derived by linearizing the nonlinear model around a quasi-steady-state (QSS). In addition, transient analyses are performed to assess inherent stability and dynamic responses in this μ-PD system. Information from these two approaches enlarges our understanding of this particular process, and the approaches themselves are put forth as valuable complements to classical QSS analysis.

  6. Time series analyses of global change data.

    PubMed

    Lane, L J; Nichols, M H; Osborn, H B

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that statistical analyses of historical time series data can be used to separate the influences of natural variations from anthropogenic sources on global climate change is tested. Point, regional, national, and global temperature data are analyzed. Trend analyses for the period 1901-1987 suggest mean annual temperatures increased (in degrees C per century) globally at the rate of about 0.5, in the USA at about 0.3, in the south-western USA desert region at about 1.2, and at the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in south-eastern Arizona at about 0.8. However, the rates of temperature change are not constant but vary within the 87-year period. Serial correlation and spectral density analysis of the temperature time series showed weak periodicities at various frequencies. The only common periodicity among the temperature series is an apparent cycle of about 43 years. The temperature time series were correlated with the Wolf sunspot index, atmospheric CO(2) concentrations interpolated from the Siple ice core data, and atmospheric CO(2) concentration data from Mauna Loa measurements. Correlation analysis of temperature data with concurrent data on atmospheric CO(2) concentrations and the Wolf sunspot index support previously reported significant correlation over the 1901-1987 period. Correlation analysis between temperature, atmospheric CO(2) concentration, and the Wolf sunspot index for the shorter period, 1958-1987, when continuous Mauna Loa CO(2) data are available, suggest significant correlation between global warming and atmospheric CO(2) concentrations but no significant correlation between global warming and the Wolf sunspot index. This may be because the Wolf sunspot index apparently increased from 1901 until about 1960 and then decreased thereafter, while global warming apparently continued to increase through 1987. Correlation of sunspot activity with global warming may be spurious but additional analyses are required to test this hypothesis

  7. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Transformation of Modern Environmental Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Lucy; Yan, Fangzhi; Bach, Stephen; Pihakari, Katianna; Klein, David

    2016-01-01

    Unknown compounds in environmental samples are difficult to identify using standard mass spectrometric methods. Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) has revolutionized how environmental analyses are performed. With its unsurpassed mass accuracy, high resolution and sensitivity, researchers now have a tool for difficult and complex environmental analyses. Two features of FTMS are responsible for changing the face of how complex analyses are accomplished. First is the ability to quickly and with high mass accuracy determine the presence of unknown chemical residues in samples. For years, the field has been limited by mass spectrometric methods that were based on knowing what compounds of interest were. Secondly, by utilizing the high resolution capabilities coupled with the low detection limits of FTMS, analysts also could dilute the sample sufficiently to minimize the ionization changes from varied matrices. PMID:26784175

  8. Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Transformation of Modern Environmental Analyses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lucy; Yan, Fangzhi; Bach, Stephen; Pihakari, Katianna; Klein, David

    2016-01-01

    Unknown compounds in environmental samples are difficult to identify using standard mass spectrometric methods. Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) has revolutionized how environmental analyses are performed. With its unsurpassed mass accuracy, high resolution and sensitivity, researchers now have a tool for difficult and complex environmental analyses. Two features of FTMS are responsible for changing the face of how complex analyses are accomplished. First is the ability to quickly and with high mass accuracy determine the presence of unknown chemical residues in samples. For years, the field has been limited by mass spectrometric methods that were based on knowing what compounds of interest were. Secondly, by utilizing the high resolution capabilities coupled with the low detection limits of FTMS, analysts also could dilute the sample sufficiently to minimize the ionization changes from varied matrices. PMID:26784175

  9. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  10. Additive Manufacturing of Hybrid Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron C.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2016-07-01

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects. Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. Finally, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.

  11. Mentoring Emotionally Sensitive Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Self, Elizabeth

    Mentoring individuals who are gifted, talented, and creative, but somewhat emotionally sensitive is a challenging and provocative arena. Several reasons individuals experience heightened sensitivity include: lack of nurturing, abuse, alcoholism in the family, low self-esteem, unrealistic parental expectations, and parental pressure to achieve.…

  12. Are Psychopaths Morally Sensitive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Bruce; Le Sage, Leonie

    2009-01-01

    Philosophical and psychological opinion is divided over whether moral sensitivity, understood as the ability to pick out a situation's morally salient features, necessarily involves emotional engagement. This paper seeks to offer insight into this question. It reasons that if moral sensitivity does draw significantly on affective capacities of…

  13. Tuned cavity magnetometer sensitivity.

    SciTech Connect

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a high sensitivity (sensitivity levels.

  14. 7 CFR 94.102 - Analyses available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Analyses available. 94.102 Section 94.102 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Voluntary Analyses of Egg Products § 94.102 Analyses available. A wide array of analyses for voluntary egg product samples is available. Voluntary egg product samples include...

  15. 7 CFR 94.102 - Analyses available.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Analyses available. 94.102 Section 94.102 Agriculture... POULTRY AND EGG PRODUCTS Voluntary Analyses of Egg Products § 94.102 Analyses available. A wide array of analyses for voluntary egg product samples is available. Voluntary egg product samples include...

  16. Global and Local Sensitivity Analysis Methods for a Physical System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morio, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is the study of how the different input variations of a mathematical model influence the variability of its output. In this paper, we review the principle of global and local sensitivity analyses of a complex black-box system. A simulated case of application is given at the end of this paper to compare both approaches.…

  17. Tougher Addition Polyimides Containing Siloxane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, T. L.; Maudgal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Laminates show increased impact resistances and other desirable mechanical properties. Bismaleamic acid extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:1 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic dianhydride. Bismaleamic acid also extended by reaction of diaminosiloxane with maleic anhydride in 1:2 molar ratio, followed by reaction with half this molar ratio of aromatic diamine (Michael-addition reaction). Impact resistances improved over those of unmodified bismaleimide, showing significant increase in toughness. Aromatic addition polyimides developed as both matrix and adhesive resins for applications on future aircraft and spacecraft.

  18. Extended Forward Sensitivity Analysis for Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2011-09-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are playing more important roles to quantify uncertainties and realize high fidelity simulations in engineering system analyses, such as transients happened in a complex nuclear reactor system. Traditional V&V in the reactor system analysis focused more on the validation part or did not differentiate verification and validation. The traditional approach to uncertainty quantification is based on a 'black box' approach. The simulation tool is treated as an unknown signal generator, a distribution of inputs according to assumed probability density functions is sent in and the distribution of the outputs is measured and correlated back to the original input distribution. The 'black box' method mixes numerical errors with all other uncertainties. It is also not efficient to perform sensitivity analysis. Contrary to the 'black box' method, a more efficient sensitivity approach can take advantage of intimate knowledge of the simulation code. In these types of approaches equations for the propagation of uncertainty are constructed and the sensitivities are directly solved for as variables in the simulation. This paper presents the forward sensitivity analysis as a method to help uncertainty qualification. By including time step and potentially spatial step as special sensitivity parameters, the forward sensitivity method is extended as one method to quantify numerical errors. Note that by integrating local truncation errors over the whole system through the forward sensitivity analysis process, the generated time step and spatial step sensitivity information reflect global numerical errors. The discretization errors can be systematically compared against uncertainties due to other physical parameters. This extension makes the forward sensitivity method a much more powerful tool to help uncertainty qualification. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time and space steps with other interested physical parameters, the simulation is allowed

  19. Malaria Diagnosis Using Automated Analysers: A Boon for Hematopathologists in Endemic Areas

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Vikram; Sood, Neena; Garg, Bhavna; Gupta, Vikram Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Haematological abnormalities are common in acute febrile tropical illnesses. Malaria is a major health problem in tropics. In endemic areas especially in the post monsoon season, it is not practical to manually screen all peripheral blood films (PBF) for malarial parasite. Automated analysers offer rapid, sensitive and cost effective screening of all samples. Aim The study was done to evaluate the usefulness of automated cell counters analysing their histograms, scatter-grams and the flaggings generated in malaria positive and negative cases. The comparison of other haematological parameters were also studied which could help to identify malaria parasite in peripheral blood smear. Materials and Methods The blood samples were analysed using Beckman coulter LH-750. The abnormal scatter grams and additional peaks in WBC histograms were observed diligently & compared with normal controls. Haematological abnormalities were also evaluated. Statistical Analysis Statistical analysis was done by using software Epi-Info version 7.1.4 freely available from CDC website. Fisher exact test was applied to calculate the p-value and value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Final identification of malarial parasite species was done independently by peripheral blood smear examination by two pathologists. Results Of all the 200 cases evaluated abnormal scatter grams were observed in all the cases of malaria while abnormal WBC histogram peaks were noted in 96% cases demonstrating a peak at the threshold of the histogram. The difference between number of slides positive for abnormal WBC scatter gram and abnormal WBC histogram peaks were statistically highly significant (p=0.007). So abnormal WBC scatter gram can better give idea of malarial parasite presence. Of the haematological parameters thrombocytopenia (92% cases) emerged as the strongest predictor of malaria. Conclusion It is recommended for haematopathologists to review the haematological data and the scatter plots

  20. Sensitivity enhancement in the TROSY experiment.

    PubMed

    Czisch, M; Boelens, R

    1998-09-01

    A modification of the TROSY experiment which allows for sensitivity enhancement without introduction of additional delays is presented. The method relies on the combination of two orthogonal pathways and results in a signal-to-noise gain of 2 independent of the size of the molecule. The sensitivity enhanced TROSY scheme can be combined with gradient coherence selection. The method has been applied to the 269 residue serine protease PB92. PMID:9740742

  1. Sensitivity Enhancement in the TROSY Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czisch, M.; Boelens, R.

    1998-09-01

    A modification of the TROSY experiment which allows for sensitivity enhancement without introduction of additional delays is presented. The method relies on the combination of two orthogonal pathways and results in a signal-to-noise gain of2independent of the size of the molecule. The sensitivity enhanced TROSY scheme can be combined with gradient coherence selection. The method has been applied to the 269 residue serine protease PB92.

  2. Comparative sequence analyses of sixteen reptilian paramyxoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahne, W.; Batts, W.N.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Viral genomic RNA of Fer-de-Lance virus (FDLV), a paramyxovirus highly pathogenic for reptiles, was reverse transcribed and cloned. Plasmids with significant sequence similarities to the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and polymerase (L) genes of mammalian paramyxoviruses were identified by BLAST search. Partial sequences of the FDLV genes were used to design primers for amplification by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of 518-bp L gene and 352-bp HN gene fragments from a collection of 15 previously uncharacterized reptilian paramyxoviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the partial L and HN sequences produced similar trees in which there were two distinct subgroups of isolates that were supported with maximum bootstrap values, and several intermediate isolates. Within each subgroup the nucleotide divergence values were less than 2.5%, while the divergence between the two subgroups was 20-22%. This indicated that the two subgroups represent distinct virus species containing multiple virus strains. The five intermediate isolates had nucleotide divergence values of 11-20% and may represent additional distinct species. In addition to establishing diversity among reptilian paramyxoviruses, the phylogenetic groupings showed some correlation with geographic location, and clearly demonstrated a low level of host species-specificity within these viruses. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Analyse von Unterrichtsmaterialien der Menschenrechtsbildung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, Volker

    2002-07-01

    This article surveys five manuals on human rights education, examining and comparing them according to a set of basic categories such as the educational level of the target audience, the learning objectives and the educational content. This approach is used to establish the overall curricular orientation of the manuals. In addition, one teaching unit from each manual is selected for special analysis. Based on the results of this survey, the author argues that the tradition of moral education elaborated by Lawrence Kohlberg should be integrated into our concept of human rights teaching and learning.

  4. Analysing surnames as geographic data.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, James

    2014-01-01

    With most surname research undertaken within the fields of anthropology and population genetics, geographers have overlooked surnames as a credible data source. In addition to providing a review of recent developments in surname analysis, this paper highlights areas where geographers can make important contributions to advancing surname research, both in terms of its quality and also its applications. The review discusses the emerging applications for surname research, not least in the mining of online data, and ends by suggesting three future research themes to ensure the building momentum of surname research continues to grow across disciplines. PMID:25020015

  5. Promoting Additive Acculturation in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    A study focusing on 113 ninth graders of Mexican descent indicates that most students and their parents adhere to a strategy of additive acculturation (incorporating skills of the new culture and language), but that the school curriculum and general school climate devalue Mexican culture. (SLD)

  6. Individualized Additional Instruction for Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takata, Ken

    2010-01-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the…

  7. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  8. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  9. Tinkertoy Color-Addition Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joe L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple home-built device, using an overhead projector, for use in demonstrations of the addition of various combinations of red, green, and blue light. Useful in connection with discussions of color, color vision, or color television. (JRH)

  10. Silage Additives and Management Issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculants are the most common silage additives in the United States. These products contain lactic acid bacteria to supplement the lactic acid bacteria naturally on the crop and help insure a consistent fermentation in the silo. There are three types of inoculants: homofermentative lactic acid bact...

  11. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  12. The Effect of Regular Exercise on Insulin Sensitivity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Way, Kimberley L; Hackett, Daniel A; Baker, Michael K; Johnson, Nathan A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of regular exercise training on insulin sensitivity in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the pooled data available from randomised controlled trials. In addition, we sought to determine whether short-term periods of physical inactivity diminish the exercise-induced improvement in insulin sensitivity. Eligible trials included exercise interventions that involved ≥3 exercise sessions, and reported a dynamic measurement of insulin sensitivity. There was a significant pooled effect size (ES) for the effect of exercise on insulin sensitivity (ES, -0.588; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.816 to -0.359; P<0.001). Of the 14 studies included for meta-analyses, nine studies reported the time of data collection from the last exercise bout. There was a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity in favour of exercise versus control between 48 and 72 hours after exercise (ES, -0.702; 95% CI, -1.392 to -0.012; P=0.046); and this persisted when insulin sensitivity was measured more than 72 hours after the last exercise session (ES, -0.890; 95% CI, -1.675 to -0.105; P=0.026). Regular exercise has a significant benefit on insulin sensitivity in adults with T2DM and this may persist beyond 72 hours after the last exercise session. PMID:27535644

  13. The Effect of Regular Exercise on Insulin Sensitivity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Daniel A.; Baker, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of regular exercise training on insulin sensitivity in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using the pooled data available from randomised controlled trials. In addition, we sought to determine whether short-term periods of physical inactivity diminish the exercise-induced improvement in insulin sensitivity. Eligible trials included exercise interventions that involved ≥3 exercise sessions, and reported a dynamic measurement of insulin sensitivity. There was a significant pooled effect size (ES) for the effect of exercise on insulin sensitivity (ES, –0.588; 95% confidence interval [CI], –0.816 to –0.359; P<0.001). Of the 14 studies included for meta-analyses, nine studies reported the time of data collection from the last exercise bout. There was a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity in favour of exercise versus control between 48 and 72 hours after exercise (ES, –0.702; 95% CI, –1.392 to –0.012; P=0.046); and this persisted when insulin sensitivity was measured more than 72 hours after the last exercise session (ES, –0.890; 95% CI, –1.675 to –0.105; P=0.026). Regular exercise has a significant benefit on insulin sensitivity in adults with T2DM and this may persist beyond 72 hours after the last exercise session. PMID:27535644

  14. Trait impulsivity and increased pre-attentional sensitivity to intense stimuli in bipolar disorder and controls.

    PubMed

    Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D; Moeller, F Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L; Swann, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity and sensation seeking are stimulus-oriented traits. Because they differ in degree of intention and planning, they may have distinct neurophysiological mechanisms. Impulsivity is prominent in bipolar disorder, and may be related to pre-attentional information filtering and stimulus-orientation. We investigated specificity of relationships between impulsivity and sensitivity to stimulus intensity in bipolar disorder and controls, using intensity-sensitivity of auditory evoked potentials. Seventy-six subjects (37 healthy controls, 39 with bipolar disorder) were administered an intensity-sensitivity paradigm. Additional measures included Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and Eysenck Impulsivity and Venturesomeness scores. State-dependent rapid-response impulsivity was measured using the Immediate Memory Task. Intensity-sensitivities of the auditory evoked P1N1, N1P2, P1, N1, and P2 potentials were assessed as the slope of amplitude relative to loudness. Analyses used general linear models (GLM) with impulsivity-related measures as dependent variables and age, gender, education, and diagnosis as dependent variables. BIS-11 total, motor, and attentional impulsivity scores correlated positively with pre-attentional N1 and P1N1 intensity-sensitivity slopes in bipolar disorder, but not in controls. BIS-11 nonplanning and Eysenck Venturesomeness scores did not correlate with intensity-sensitivity. Intensity-sensitivity slopes did not correlate with rapid-response impulsivity. Correlations between N1 or P1N1 slopes and BIS-11 scores in bipolar disorder were not affected by age, education, WAIS, treatment, symptoms, or gender. Trait impulsivity in bipolar disorder may be related to poorly modulated stimulus-driven late pre-attentional responses to stimuli, potentially resulting in exaggerated responses to intense stimuli even before conscious awareness. Components of trait impulsivity are physiologically heterogenous relative to intensity-sensitivity. PMID

  15. Sobol‧ sensitivity analysis of NAPL-contaminated aquifer remediation process based on multiple surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiannan; Lu, Wenxi

    2014-06-01

    Sobol‧ sensitivity analyses based on different surrogates were performed on a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer to assess the sensitivity of the design variables of remediation duration, surfactant concentration and injection rates at four wells to remediation efficiency First, the surrogate models of a multi-phase flow simulation model were constructed by applying radial basis function artificial neural network (RBFANN) and Kriging methods, and the two models were then compared. Based on the developed surrogate models, the Sobol‧ method was used to calculate the sensitivity indices of the design variables which affect the remediation efficiency. The coefficient of determination (R2) and the mean square error (MSE) of these two surrogate models demonstrated that both models had acceptable approximation accuracy, furthermore, the approximation accuracy of the Kriging model was slightly better than that of the RBFANN model. Sobol‧ sensitivity analysis results demonstrated that the remediation duration was the most important variable influencing remediation efficiency, followed by rates of injection at wells 1 and 3, while rates of injection at wells 2 and 4 and the surfactant concentration had negligible influence on remediation efficiency. In addition, high-order sensitivity indices were all smaller than 0.01, which indicates that interaction effects of these six factors were practically insignificant. The proposed Sobol‧ sensitivity analysis based on surrogate is an effective tool for calculating sensitivity indices, because it shows the relative contribution of the design variables (individuals and interactions) to the output performance variability with a limited number of runs of a computationally expensive simulation model. The sensitivity analysis results lay a foundation for the optimal groundwater remediation process optimization.

  16. Speed analyses of stimulus equivalence.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, T J; Chase, P N

    1996-01-01

    The functional substitutability of stimuli in equivalence classes was examined through analyses of the speed of college students' accurate responding. After training subjects to respond to 18 conditional relations, subjects' accuracy and speed of accurate responding were compared across trial types (baseline, symmetry, transitivity, and combined transitivity and symmetry) and nodal distance (one- through five-node transitive and combined transitive and symmetric relations). Differences in accuracy across nodal distance and trial type were significant only on the first tests of equivalence, whereas differences in speed were significant even after extended testing. Response speed was inversely related to the number of nodes on which the tested relations were based. Significant differences in response speed were also found across trial types, except between transitivity and combined trials. To determine the generality of these comparisons, three groups of subjects were included: An instructed group was given an instruction that specified the interchangeability of stimuli related through training; a queried group was queried about the basis for test-trial responding: and a standard group was neither instructed nor queried. There were no significant differences among groups. These results suggest the use of response speed and response accuracy to measure the strength of matching relations. PMID:8636663

  17. Helicopter tail rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to interactions with the main rotor tip vortices, and with the fuselage separation mean wake. The tail rotor blade-main rotor tip vortex interaction is modelled as an airfoil of infinite span cutting through a moving vortex. The vortex and the geometry information required by the analyses are obtained through a free wake geometry analysis of the main rotor. The acoustic pressure-time histories for the tail rotor blade-vortex interactions are then calculated. These acoustic results are compared to tail rotor loading and thickness noise, and are found to be significant to the overall tail rotor noise generation. Under most helicopter operating conditions, large acoustic pressure fluctuations can be generated due to a series of skewed main rotor tip vortices passing through the tail rotor disk. The noise generation depends strongly upon the helicopter operating conditions and the location of the tail rotor relative to the main rotor.

  18. Digital image analyser for autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, R.A.; Plotnick, J.

    1985-05-01

    The most critical parameter in quantitative autoradiography for assay of tissue concentrations of tracers is the ability to obtain precise and accurate measurements of optical density of the images. Existing high precision systems for image analysis, rotating drum densitometers, are expensive, suffer from mechanical problems and are slow. More moderately priced and reliable video camera based systems are available, but their outputs generally do not have the uniformity and stability necessary for high resolution quantitative autoradiography. The authors have designed and constructed an image analyser optimized for quantitative single and multiple tracer autoradiography which the authors refer to as a memory-mapped charged-coupled device scanner (MM-CCD). The input is from a linear array of CCD's which is used to optically scan the autoradiograph. Images are digitized into 512 x 512 picture elements with 256 gray levels and the data is stored in buffer video memory in less than two seconds. Images can then be transferred to RAM memory by direct memory-mapping for further processing. Arterial blood curve data and optical density-calibrated standards data can be entered and the optical density images can be converted automatically to tracer concentration or functional images. In double tracer studies, images produced from both exposures can be stored and processed in RAM to yield ''pure'' individual tracer concentration or functional images. Any processed image can be transmitted back to the buffer memory to be viewed on a monitor and processed for region of interest analysis.

  19. Imprecise probabilities in engineering analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Michael; Ferson, Scott; Kreinovich, Vladik

    2013-05-01

    Probabilistic uncertainty and imprecision in structural parameters and in environmental conditions and loads are challenging phenomena in engineering analyses. They require appropriate mathematical modeling and quantification to obtain realistic results when predicting the behavior and reliability of engineering structures and systems. But the modeling and quantification is complicated by the characteristics of the available information, which involves, for example, sparse data, poor measurements and subjective information. This raises the question whether the available information is sufficient for probabilistic modeling or rather suggests a set-theoretical approach. The framework of imprecise probabilities provides a mathematical basis to deal with these problems which involve both probabilistic and non-probabilistic information. A common feature of the various concepts of imprecise probabilities is the consideration of an entire set of probabilistic models in one analysis. The theoretical differences between the concepts mainly concern the mathematical description of the set of probabilistic models and the connection to the probabilistic models involved. This paper provides an overview on developments which involve imprecise probabilities for the solution of engineering problems. Evidence theory, probability bounds analysis with p-boxes, and fuzzy probabilities are discussed with emphasis on their key features and on their relationships to one another. This paper was especially prepared for this special issue and reflects, in various ways, the thinking and presentation preferences of the authors, who are also the guest editors for this special issue.

  20. Comparison between Inbreeding Analyses Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Esparza, Mireia; Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Sjøvold, Torstein; González-José, Rolando; Hernández, Miquel

    2015-12-01

    Surnames are widely used in inbreeding analysis, but the validity of results has often been questioned due to the failure to comply with the prerequisites of the method. Here we analyze inbreeding in Hallstatt (Austria) between the 17th and the 19th centuries both using genealogies and surnames. The high and significant correlation of the results obtained by both methods demonstrates the validity of the use of surnames in this kind of studies. On the other hand, the inbreeding values obtained (0.24 x 10⁻³ in the genealogies analysis and 2.66 x 10⁻³ in the surnames analysis) are lower than those observed in Europe for this period and for this kind of population, demonstrating the falseness of the apparent isolation of Hallstatt's population. The temporal trend of inbreeding in both analyses does not follow the European general pattern, but shows a maximum in 1850 with a later decrease along the second half of the 19th century. This is probably due to the high migration rate that is implied by the construction of transport infrastructures around the 1870's. PMID:26987150

  1. Network analyses in systems pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Seth I.; Iyengar, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    Systems pharmacology is an emerging area of pharmacology which utilizes network analysis of drug action as one of its approaches. By considering drug actions and side effects in the context of the regulatory networks within which the drug targets and disease gene products function, network analysis promises to greatly increase our knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the multiple actions of drugs. Systems pharmacology can provide new approaches for drug discovery for complex diseases. The integrated approach used in systems pharmacology can allow for drug action to be considered in the context of the whole genome. Network-based studies are becoming an increasingly important tool in understanding the relationships between drug action and disease susceptibility genes. This review discusses how analysis of biological networks has contributed to the genesis of systems pharmacology and how these studies have improved global understanding of drug targets, suggested new targets and approaches for therapeutics, and provided a deeper understanding of the effects of drugs. Taken together, these types of analyses can lead to new therapeutic options while improving the safety and efficacy of existing medications. Contact: ravi.iyengar@mssm.edu PMID:19648136

  2. Exploring sensitivity of a multistate occupancy model to inform management decisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, A.W.; Bailey, L.L.; Nichols, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic occupancy models are often used to investigate questions regarding the processes that influence patch occupancy and are prominent in the fields of population and community ecology and conservation biology. Recently, multistate occupancy models have been developed to investigate dynamic systems involving more than one occupied state, including reproductive states, relative abundance states and joint habitat-occupancy states. Here we investigate the sensitivities of the equilibrium-state distribution of multistate occupancy models to changes in transition rates. We develop equilibrium occupancy expressions and their associated sensitivity metrics for dynamic multistate occupancy models. To illustrate our approach, we use two examples that represent common multistate occupancy systems. The first example involves a three-state dynamic model involving occupied states with and without successful reproduction (California spotted owl Strix occidentalis occidentalis), and the second involves a novel way of using a multistate occupancy approach to accommodate second-order Markov processes (wood frog Lithobates sylvatica breeding and metamorphosis). In many ways, multistate sensitivity metrics behave in similar ways as standard occupancy sensitivities. When equilibrium occupancy rates are low, sensitivity to parameters related to colonisation is high, while sensitivity to persistence parameters is greater when equilibrium occupancy rates are high. Sensitivities can also provide guidance for managers when estimates of transition probabilities are not available. Synthesis and applications. Multistate models provide practitioners a flexible framework to define multiple, distinct occupied states and the ability to choose which state, or combination of states, is most relevant to questions and decisions about their own systems. In addition to standard multistate occupancy models, we provide an example of how a second-order Markov process can be modified to fit a multistate

  3. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to concluding as to safety concerns and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of and assessment of dietary exposure to food additives, including flavouring agents. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and dietary exposure data for five food additives (magnesium dihydrogen diphosphate; mineral oil (medium and low viscosity) classes II and III; 3-phytase from Aspergillus niger expressed in Aspergillus niger; serine protease (chymotrypsin) from Nocardiopsis prasina expressed in Bacillus licheniformis; and serine protease (trypsin) from Fusarium oxysporum expressed in Fusarium venenatum) and 16 groups of flavouring agents (aliphatic and aromatic amines and amides; aliphatic and aromatic ethers; aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers containing furan substitution; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; amino acids and related substances; epoxides; furfuryl alcohol and related substances; linear and branched-chain aliphatic, unsaturated, unconjugated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; phenol and phenol derivatives; pyrazine derivatives; pyridine, pyrrole and quinoline derivatives; saturated aliphatic acyclic branched-chain primary alcohols, aldehydes and acids; simple aliphatic and aromatic sulfides and thiols; sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds; and sulfur-substituted furan derivatives). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: ethyl cellulose, mineral oil (medium viscosity), modified starches and titanium

  4. Extended Forward Sensitivity Analysis for Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2008-09-01

    This report presents the forward sensitivity analysis method as a means for quantification of uncertainty in system analysis. The traditional approach to uncertainty quantification is based on a “black box” approach. The simulation tool is treated as an unknown signal generator, a distribution of inputs according to assumed probability density functions is sent in and the distribution of the outputs is measured and correlated back to the original input distribution. This approach requires large number of simulation runs and therefore has high computational cost. Contrary to the “black box” method, a more efficient sensitivity approach can take advantage of intimate knowledge of the simulation code. In this approach equations for the propagation of uncertainty are constructed and the sensitivity is solved for as variables in the same simulation. This “glass box” method can generate similar sensitivity information as the above “black box” approach with couples of runs to cover a large uncertainty region. Because only small numbers of runs are required, those runs can be done with a high accuracy in space and time ensuring that the uncertainty of the physical model is being measured and not simply the numerical error caused by the coarse discretization. In the forward sensitivity method, the model is differentiated with respect to each parameter to yield an additional system of the same size as the original one, the result of which is the solution sensitivity. The sensitivity of any output variable can then be directly obtained from these sensitivities by applying the chain rule of differentiation. We extend the forward sensitivity method to include time and spatial steps as special parameters so that the numerical errors can be quantified against other physical parameters. This extension makes the forward sensitivity method a much more powerful tool to help uncertainty analysis. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time and space steps with other

  5. "Analysing Genre: Language Use in Professional Settings." A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, Helen

    1995-01-01

    "Analysing Genre," by Vijay K. Bhatia, is a timely addition to the literature on genre analysis in English for specific purposes. It is divided into three parts: the first provides theoretical background; the second explains how genre analysis works in different academic and professional settings; and the third exemplifies the application of genre…

  6. FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses, Volume 1: Scientific Bases and Analyses, Rev 00

    SciTech Connect

    David Dobson

    2001-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. A decision to recommend the site has not been made: the DOE has provided the S&ER and its supporting documents as an aid to the public in formulating comments on the possible recommendation. When the S&ER (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]) was released, the DOE acknowledged that technical and scientific analyses of the site were ongoing. Therefore, the DOE noted in the Federal Register Notice accompanying the report (66 FR 23 013 [DIRS 155009], p. 2) that additional technical information would be released before the dates, locations, and times for public hearings on the possible recommendation were announced. This information includes: (1) the results of additional technical studies of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, contained in this FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses; and FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 2, Performance Analyses (McNeish 2001 [DIRS 155023]) (collectively referred to as the SSPA) and (2) a preliminary evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site's preclosure and postclosure performance against the DOE's proposed site suitability guidelines (10 CFR Part 963 [64 FR 67054] [DIRS 124754]). By making the large amount of information developed on Yucca Mountain available in stages, the DOE intends to provide the public and interested parties with time to review the available materials and to formulate and submit

  7. Prediction of Toddlers’ Expressive Language From Maternal Sensitivity And Toddlers’ Anger Expressions: A Developmental Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nozadi, Sara S; Spinrad, Tracy L; Eisenberg, Nancy; Bolnick, Rebecca; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie. D; Smith, Cynthia L; Gaertner, Bridget; Kupfer, Anne; Sallquist, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Despite evidence for the importance of individual differences in expressive language during toddlerhood in predicting later literacy skills, few researchers have examined individual and contextual factors related to language abilities across the toddler years. Furthermore, a gap remains in the literature about the extent to which the relations of negative emotions and parenting to language skills may differ for girls and boys. The purpose of this longitudinal study was to investigate the associations among maternal sensitivity, children’s observed anger reactivity, and expressive language when children were 18 (T1; n = 247) and 30 (T2; n = 216) months. At each age, mothers reported on their toddlers’ expressive language, and mothers’ sensitive parenting behavior was observed during an unstructured free-play task. Toddlers’ anger expressions were observed during an emotion-eliciting task. Using path modeling, results showed few relations at T1. At T2, maternal sensitivity was negatively related to anger, and in turn, anger was associated with lower language skills. However, moderation analyses showed that these findings were significant for boys but not for girls. In addition, T1 maternal sensitivity and anger positively predicted expressive language longitudinally for both sexes. Findings suggest that the relations between maternal sensitivity, anger reactivity and expressive language may vary depending on the child’s developmental stage and sex. PMID:23911594

  8. Uncertainty quantification and global sensitivity analysis of the Los Alamos sea ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrego-Blanco, Jorge R.; Urban, Nathan M.; Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Turner, Adrian K.; Jeffery, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    Changes in the high-latitude climate system have the potential to affect global climate through feedbacks with the atmosphere and connections with midlatitudes. Sea ice and climate models used to understand these changes have uncertainties that need to be characterized and quantified. We present a quantitative way to assess uncertainty in complex computer models, which is a new approach in the analysis of sea ice models. We characterize parametric uncertainty in the Los Alamos sea ice model (CICE) in a standalone configuration and quantify the sensitivity of sea ice area, extent, and volume with respect to uncertainty in 39 individual model parameters. Unlike common sensitivity analyses conducted in previous studies where parameters are varied one at a time, this study uses a global variance-based approach in which Sobol' sequences are used to efficiently sample the full 39-dimensional parameter space. We implement a fast emulator of the sea ice model whose predictions of sea ice extent, area, and volume are used to compute the Sobol' sensitivity indices of the 39 parameters. Main effects and interactions among the most influential parameters are also estimated by a nonparametric regression technique based on generalized additive models. A ranking based on the sensitivity indices indicates that model predictions are most sensitive to snow parameters such as snow conductivity and grain size, and the drainage of melt ponds. It is recommended that research be prioritized toward more accurately determining these most influential parameter values by observational studies or by improving parameterizations in the sea ice model.

  9. [Contrast sensitivity in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Bartos, D

    1989-05-01

    Author reports on results of the contrast sensitivity examinations using the Cambridge low-contrast lattice test supplied by Clement Clarke International LTD, in patients with open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. In glaucoma patients there was observed statistically significant decrease of the contrast sensitivity. In patients with ocular hypertension decrease of the contrast sensitivity was in patients affected by corresponding changes of the visual field and of the optical disc. The main advantages of the Cambridge low-contrast lattice test were simplicity, rapidity and precision of its performance. PMID:2743444

  10. Decontamination formulation with sorbent additive

    DOEpatents

    Tucker; Mark D. , Comstock; Robert H.

    2007-10-16

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator, a sorbent additive, and water. The highly adsorbent, water-soluble sorbent additive (e.g., sorbitol or mannitol) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients, such as the liquid bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate) and convert the activator into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field.

  11. Automated nutrient analyses in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Whitledge, T.E.; Malloy, S.C.; Patton, C.J.; Wirick, C.D.

    1981-02-01

    This manual was assembled for use as a guide for analyzing the nutrient content of seawater samples collected in the marine coastal zone of the Northeast United States and the Bering Sea. Some modifications (changes in dilution or sample pump tube sizes) may be necessary to achieve optimum measurements in very pronounced oligotrophic, eutrophic or brackish areas. Information is presented under the following section headings: theory and mechanics of automated analysis; continuous flow system description; operation of autoanalyzer system; cookbook of current nutrient methods; automated analyzer and data analysis software; computer interfacing and hardware modifications; and trouble shooting. The three appendixes are entitled: references and additional reading; manifold components and chemicals; and software listings. (JGB)

  12. Robust stability under additive perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaya, A.; Desoer, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    A MIMO linear time-invariant feedback system 1S(P,C) is considered which is assumed to be U-stable. The plant P is subjected to an additive perturbation Delta P which is proper but not necessarily stable. It is proved that the perturbed system is U-stable if and only if Delta P(I + Q x Delta P) exp -1 is U-stable.

  13. Additive manufacturing of hybrid circuits

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bell, Nelson S.; Sarobol, Pylin; Cook, Adam; Clem, Paul G.; Keicher, David M.; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2016-03-26

    There is a rising interest in developing functional electronics using additively manufactured components. Considerations in materials selection and pathways to forming hybrid circuits and devices must demonstrate useful electronic function; must enable integration; and must complement the complex shape, low cost, high volume, and high functionality of structural but generally electronically passive additively manufactured components. This article reviews several emerging technologies being used in industry and research/development to provide integration advantages of fabricating multilayer hybrid circuits or devices. First, we review a maskless, noncontact, direct write (DW) technology that excels in the deposition of metallic colloid inks for electrical interconnects.more » Second, we review a complementary technology, aerosol deposition (AD), which excels in the deposition of metallic and ceramic powder as consolidated, thick conformal coatings and is additionally patternable through masking. As a result, we show examples of hybrid circuits/devices integrated beyond 2-D planes, using combinations of DW or AD processes and conventional, established processes.« less

  14. Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Shell

    1999-04-20

    SUNS (Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Shell) is a 32-bit application that runs under Windows 95/98 and Windows NT. It is designed to aid in statistical analyses for a broad range of applications. The class of problems for which SUNS is suitable is generally defined by two requirements: 1. A computer code is developed or acquired that models some processes for which input is uncertain and the user is interested in statistical analysis of the outputmore » of that code. 2. The statistical analysis of interest can be accomplished using the Monte Carlo analysis. The implementation then requires that the user identify which input to the process model is to be manipulated for statistical analysis. With this information, the changes required to loosely couple SUNS with the process model can be completed. SUNS is then used to generate the required statistical sample and the user-supplied process model analyses the sample. The SUNS post processor displays statistical results from any existing file that contains sampled input and output values.« less

  15. Evaluation of certain food additives.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives, including flavouring agents, with a view to recommending acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) and to preparing specifications for identity and purity. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation and assessment of intake of food additives (in particular, flavouring agents). A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of technical, toxicological and intake data for certain food additives (asparaginase from Aspergillus niger expressed in A. niger, calcium lignosulfonate (40-65), ethyl lauroyl arginate, paprika extract, phospholipase C expressed in Pichia pastoris, phytosterols, phytostanols and their esters, polydimethylsiloxane, steviol glycosides and sulfites [assessment of dietary exposure]) and 10 groups of related flavouring agents (aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters; aliphatic linear alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes, acids and related alcohols, acetals and esters; aliphatic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; alkoxy-substituted allylbenzenes present in foods and essential oils and used as flavouring agents; esters of aliphatic acyclic primary alcohols with aliphatic linear saturated carboxylic acids; furan-substituted aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and related esters, sulfides, disulfides and ethers; miscellaneous nitrogen-containing substances; monocyclic and bicyclic secondary alcohols, ketones and related esters; hydroxy- and alkoxy-substituted benzyl derivatives; and substances structurally related to menthol). Specifications for the following food additives were revised: canthaxanthin; carob bean gum and carob bean gum (clarified); chlorophyllin copper complexes, sodium and potassium salts; Fast Green FCF; guar gum and guar gum (clarified

  16. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxyamide (PHA) and polymethoxyamide (PMeOA) are fire-retardant (FR) thermoplastic polymers and have been found to be useful as an additive for imparting fire retardant properties to other compatible, thermoplastic polymers (including some elastomers). Examples of compatible flammable polymers include nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. Unlike most prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not appreciably degrade the mechanical properties of the matrix polymer; indeed, in some cases, mechanical properties are enhanced. Also, unlike some prior additives, PHA and PMeOA do not decompose into large amounts of corrosive or toxic compounds during combustion and can be processed at elevated temperatures. PMeOA derivative formulations were synthesized and used as an FR additive in the fabrication of polyamide (PA) and polystyrene (PS) composites with notable reduction (>30 percent for PS) in peak heat release rates compared to the neat polymer as measured by a Cone Calorimeter (ASTM E1354). Synergistic effects were noted with nanosilica composites. These nanosilica composites had more than 50-percent reduction in peak heat release rates. In a typical application, a flammable thermoplastic, thermoplastic blend, or elastomer that one seeks to render flame-retardant is first dry-mixed with PHA or PMeOA or derivative thereof. The proportion of PHA or PMeOA or derivative in the mixture is typically chosen to lie between 1 and 20 weight percent. The dry blend can then be melt-extruded. The extruded polymer blend can further be extruded and/or molded into fibers, pipes, or any other of a variety of objects that may be required to be fire-retardant. The physical and chemical mechanisms which impart flame retardancy of the additive include inhibiting free-radical oxidation in the vapor phase, preventing vaporization of fuel (the polymer), and cooling through the formation of chemical bonds in either the vapor or the condensed phase. Under thermal stress, the cyclic hydroxyl/ methoxy

  17. Use of a pre-analysis osmolality normalisation method to correct for variable urine concentrations and for improved metabolomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Chetwynd, Andrew J; Abdul-Sada, Alaa; Holt, Stephen G; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-29

    Metabolomics analyses of urine have the potential to provide new information on the detection and progression of many disease processes. However, urine samples can vary significantly in total solute concentration and this presents a challenge to achieve high quality metabolomic datasets and the detection of biomarkers of disease or environmental exposures. This study investigated the efficacy of pre- and post-analysis normalisation methods to analyse metabolomic datasets obtained from neat and diluted urine samples from five individuals. Urine samples were extracted by solid phase extraction (SPE) prior to metabolomic analyses using a sensitive nanoflow/nanospray LC-MS technique and the data analysed by principal component analyses (PCA). Post-analysis normalisation of the datasets to either creatinine or osmolality concentration, or to mass spectrum total signal (MSTS), revealed that sample discrimination was driven by the dilution factor of urine rather than the individual providing the sample. Normalisation of urine samples to equal osmolality concentration prior to LC-MS analysis resulted in clustering of the PCA scores plot according to sample source and significant improvements in the number of peaks common to samples of all three dilutions from each individual. In addition, the ability to identify discriminating markers, using orthogonal partial least squared-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), was greatly improved when pre-analysis normalisation to osmolality was compared with post-analysis normalisation to osmolality and non-normalised datasets. Further improvements for peak area repeatability were observed in some samples when the pre-analysis normalisation to osmolality was combined with a post-analysis mass spectrum total useful signal (MSTUS) or MSTS normalisation. Future adoption of such normalisation methods may reduce the variability in metabolomics analyses due to differing urine concentrations and improve the discovery of discriminating metabolites

  18. Sensitivity of photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Building on its high spatial resolution, deep penetration depth and excellent image contrast, 3D photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has grown tremendously since its first publication in 2005. Integrating optical excitation and acoustic detection, PAM has broken through both the optical diffusion and optical diffraction limits. PAM has 100% relative sensitivity to optical absorption (i.e., a given percentage change in the optical absorption coefficient yields the same percentage change in the photoacoustic amplitude), and its ultimate detection sensitivity is limited only by thermal noise. Focusing on the engineering aspects of PAM, this Review discusses the detection sensitivity of PAM, compares the detection efficiency of different PAM designs, and summarizes the imaging performance of various endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. It then describes representative PAM applications with high detection sensitivity, and outlines paths to further improvement. PMID:25302158

  19. Contact sensitization in children.

    PubMed

    Manzini, B M; Ferdani, G; Simonetti, V; Donini, M; Seidenari, S

    1998-01-01

    Our study concerns contact sensitization in children, the frequency of which is still debated in the literature, even though specific reports are increasing. During a 7 year period (1988-1994) 670 patients, 6 months to 12 years of age, were patch tested with the European standard series, integrated with 24 haptens, at the same concentrations as for adults. We observed positive results in 42% of our patients. Thimerosal, nickel sulfate, Kathon CG, fragrance mix, neomycin, wool alcohols, and ammoniated mercury induced most of the positive responses. The highest sensitization rate was found in children from 0 to 3 years of age. Comments on main positive haptens are reported. Seventy-seven percent of our sensitized patients were atopics, suggesting that atopy represents a predisposing factor for contact hypersensitivity. Patch testing represents a useful diagnostic procedure for the definition of childhood eczematous dermatitis and for the identification of agents inducing contact sensitization which is frequently associated with atopic dermatitis. PMID:9496796

  20. LISA Telescope Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The results of a LISA telescope sensitivity analysis will be presented, The emphasis will be on the outgoing beam of the Dall-Kirkham' telescope and its far field phase patterns. The computed sensitivity analysis will include motions of the secondary with respect to the primary, changes in shape of the primary and secondary, effect of aberrations of the input laser beam and the effect the telescope thin film coatings on polarization. An end-to-end optical model will also be discussed.

  1. Fast Neutron Sensitivity with HPGe

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, Allen; Hensley, Walter K.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Pitts, W. K.

    2008-01-22

    In addition to being excellent gamma-ray detectors, germanium detectors are also sensitive to fast neutrons. Incident neutrons undergo inelastic scattering {Ge(n,n')Ge*} off germanium nuclei and the resulting excited states emit gamma rays or conversion electrons. The response of a standard 140% high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a bismuth germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield was measured for several neutron sources to characterize the ability of the HPGe detector to detect fast neutrons. For a sensitivity calculation performed using the characteristic fast neutron response peak that occurs at 692 keV, the 140% germanium detector system exhibited a sensitivity of ~175 counts / kg of WGPumetal in 1000 seconds at a source-detector distance of 1 meter with 4 in. of lead shielding between source and detector. Theoretical work also indicates that it might be possible to use the shape of the fast-neutron inelastic scattering signatures (specifically, the end-point energy of the long high energy tail of the resulting asymmetric peak) to gain additional information about the energy distribution of the incident neutron spectrum. However, the experimentally observed end-point energies appear to be almost identical for each of the fast neutron sources counted. Detailed MCNP calculations show that the neutron energy distributions impingent on the detector for these sources are very similar in this experimental configuration, due to neutron scattering in a lead shield (placed between the neutron source and HPGe detector to reduce the gamma ray flux), the BGO anti-coincidence detector, and the concrete floor.

  2. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-01-01

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha(-1) y(-1) from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0-0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0-10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces between plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. By most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha(-1) y(-1) and 159 kg ha(-1), respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha(-1) y(-1) and 114 kg ha(-1), respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. However, large effect sizes at low N

  3. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore » plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N

  4. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-01-01

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces between plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. By most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. However, large effect sizes at low N addition

  5. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N addition rates indicate that arid ecosystems are sensitive to modest increments in anthropogenic N deposition.

  6. Bayesian inference analyses of the polygenic architecture of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Eli A; Wegmann, Daniel; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Do, Ron; Voight, Benjamin F; Kraft, Peter; Chen, Robert; Kallberg, Henrik J; Kurreeman, Fina A S; Kathiresan, Sekar; Wijmenga, Cisca; Gregersen, Peter K; Alfredsson, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Worthington, Jane; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    The genetic architectures of common, complex diseases are largely uncharacterized. We modeled the genetic architecture underlying genome-wide association study (GWAS) data for rheumatoid arthritis and developed a new method using polygenic risk-score analyses to infer the total liability-scale variance explained by associated GWAS SNPs. Using this method, we estimated that, together, thousands of SNPs from rheumatoid arthritis GWAS explain an additional 20% of disease risk (excluding known associated loci). We further tested this method on datasets for three additional diseases and obtained comparable estimates for celiac disease (43% excluding the major histocompatibility complex), myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease (48%) and type 2 diabetes (49%). Our results are consistent with simulated genetic models in which hundreds of associated loci harbor common causal variants and a smaller number of loci harbor multiple rare causal variants. These analyses suggest that GWAS will continue to be highly productive for the discovery of additional susceptibility loci for common diseases. PMID:22446960

  7. Objective analysis of the ARM IOP data: method and sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cedarwall, R; Lin, J L; Xie, S C; Yio, J J; Zhang, M H

    1999-04-01

    Motivated by the need of to obtain accurate objective analysis of field experimental data to force physical parameterizations in numerical models, this paper -first reviews the existing objective analysis methods and interpolation schemes that are used to derive atmospheric wind divergence, vertical velocity, and advective tendencies. Advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. It is shown that considerable uncertainties in the analyzed products can result from the use of different analysis schemes and even more from different implementations of a particular scheme. The paper then describes a hybrid approach to combine the strengths of the regular grid method and the line-integral method, together with a variational constraining procedure for the analysis of field experimental data. In addition to the use of upper air data, measurements at the surface and at the top-of-the-atmosphere are used to constrain the upper air analysis to conserve column-integrated mass, water, energy, and momentum. Analyses are shown for measurements taken in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Programs (ARM) July 1995 Intensive Observational Period (IOP). Sensitivity experiments are carried out to test the robustness of the analyzed data and to reveal the uncertainties in the analysis. It is shown that the variational constraining process significantly reduces the sensitivity of the final data products.

  8. Transformation (normalization) of slope gradient and surface curvatures, automated for statistical analyses from DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csillik, O.; Evans, I. S.; Drăguţ, L.

    2015-03-01

    Automated procedures are developed to alleviate long tails in frequency distributions of morphometric variables. They minimize the skewness of slope gradient frequency distributions, and modify the kurtosis of profile and plan curvature distributions toward that of the Gaussian (normal) model. Box-Cox (for slope) and arctangent (for curvature) transformations are tested on nine digital elevation models (DEMs) of varying origin and resolution, and different landscapes, and shown to be effective. Resulting histograms are illustrated and show considerable improvements over those for previously recommended slope transformations (sine, square root of sine, and logarithm of tangent). Unlike previous approaches, the proposed method evaluates the frequency distribution of slope gradient values in a given area and applies the most appropriate transform if required. Sensitivity of the arctangent transformation is tested, showing that Gaussian-kurtosis transformations are acceptable also in terms of histogram shape. Cube root transformations of curvatures produced bimodal histograms. The transforms are applicable to morphometric variables and many others with skewed or long-tailed distributions. By avoiding long tails and outliers, they permit parametric statistics such as correlation, regression and principal component analyses to be applied, with greater confidence that requirements for linearity, additivity and even scatter of residuals (constancy of error variance) are likely to be met. It is suggested that such transformations should be routinely applied in all parametric analyses of long-tailed variables. Our Box-Cox and curvature automated transformations are based on a Python script, implemented as an easy-to-use script tool in ArcGIS.

  9. Additional evidence of Mercurian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trask, N.J.; Strom, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence concerned with (1) the character and distribution of terrain surrounding fresh basins, (2) albedo, color and temporal differences between a basin rim and smooth plains on its floor, and (3) the stratigraphic relations and local distribution of smooth plains in the hilly and lineated terrain are cited as additional evidence for an internal origin of much of the Mercurian smooth plains. Altough the question of Mercurian volcanism should be kept open, this evidence together with that presented in an earlier paper suggests that volcanism occurred on Mercury early in its history. ?? 1976.

  10. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  11. Water based drilling mud additive

    SciTech Connect

    McCrary, J.L.

    1983-12-13

    A water based fluid additive useful in drilling mud used during drilling of an oil or gas well is disclosed, produced by reacting water at temperatures between 210/sup 0/-280/sup 0/ F. with a mixture comprising in percent by weight: gilsonite 25-30%, tannin 7-15%, lignite 25-35%, sulfonating compound 15-25%, water soluble base compound 5-15%, methylene-yielding compound 1-5%, and then removing substantially all of the remaining water to produce a dried product.

  12. Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazier, William E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of an important, rapidly emerging, manufacturing technology that is alternatively called additive manufacturing (AM), direct digital manufacturing, free form fabrication, or 3D printing, etc. A broad contextual overview of metallic AM is provided. AM has the potential to revolutionize the global parts manufacturing and logistics landscape. It enables distributed manufacturing and the productions of parts-on-demand while offering the potential to reduce cost, energy consumption, and carbon footprint. This paper explores the material science, processes, and business consideration associated with achieving these performance gains. It is concluded that a paradigm shift is required in order to fully exploit AM potential.

  13. On study design in neuroimaging heritability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koran, Mary Ellen; Li, Bo; Jahanshad, Neda; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Glahn, David C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Blangero, John; Nichols, Thomas E.; Kochunov, Peter; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging genetics is an emerging methodology that combines genetic information with imaging-derived metrics to understand how genetic factors impact observable structural, functional, and quantitative phenotypes. Many of the most well-known genetic studies are based on Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), which use large populations of related or unrelated individuals to associate traits and disorders with individual genetic factors. Merging imaging and genetics may potentially lead to improved power of association in GWAS because imaging traits may be more sensitive phenotypes, being closer to underlying genetic mechanisms, and their quantitative nature inherently increases power. We are developing SOLAR-ECLIPSE (SE) imaging genetics software which is capable of performing genetic analyses with both large-scale quantitative trait data and family structures of variable complexity. This program can estimate the contribution of genetic commonality among related subjects to a given phenotype, and essentially answer the question of whether or not the phenotype is heritable. This central factor of interest, heritability, offers bounds on the direct genetic influence over observed phenotypes. In order for a trait to be a good phenotype for GWAS, it must be heritable: at least some proportion of its variance must be due to genetic influences. A variety of family structures are commonly used for estimating heritability, yet the variability and biases for each as a function of the sample size are unknown. Herein, we investigate the ability of SOLAR to accurately estimate heritability models based on imaging data simulated using Monte Carlo methods implemented in R. We characterize the bias and the variability of heritability estimates from SOLAR as a function of sample size and pedigree structure (including twins, nuclear families, and nuclear families with grandparents).

  14. Mechanical properties of additively manufactured octagonal honeycombs.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-12-01

    Honeycomb structures have found numerous applications as structural and biomedical materials due to their favourable properties such as low weight, high stiffness, and porosity. Application of additive manufacturing and 3D printing techniques allows for manufacturing of honeycombs with arbitrary shape and wall thickness, opening the way for optimizing the mechanical and physical properties for specific applications. In this study, the mechanical properties of honeycomb structures with a new geometry, called octagonal honeycomb, were investigated using analytical, numerical, and experimental approaches. An additive manufacturing technique, namely fused deposition modelling, was used to fabricate the honeycomb from polylactic acid (PLA). The honeycombs structures were then mechanically tested under compression and the mechanical properties of the structures were determined. In addition, the Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories were used for deriving analytical relationships for elastic modulus, yield stress, Poisson's ratio, and buckling stress of this new design of honeycomb structures. Finite element models were also created to analyse the mechanical behaviour of the honeycombs computationally. The analytical solutions obtained using Timoshenko beam theory were close to computational results in terms of elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and yield stress, especially for relative densities smaller than 25%. The analytical solutions based on the Timoshenko analytical solution and the computational results were in good agreement with experimental observations. Finally, the elastic properties of the proposed honeycomb structure were compared to those of other honeycomb structures such as square, triangular, hexagonal, mixed, diamond, and Kagome. The octagonal honeycomb showed yield stress and elastic modulus values very close to those of regular hexagonal honeycombs and lower than the other considered honeycombs. PMID:27612831

  15. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  16. Design of 3-D Nacelle near Flat-Plate Wing Using Multiblock Sensitivity Analysis (ADOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eleshaky, Mohamed E.; Baysal, Oktay

    1994-01-01

    One of the major design tasks involved in reducing aircraft drag is the integration of the engine nacelles and airframe. With this impetus, nacelle shapes with and without the presence of a flat-plate wing nearby were optimized. This also served as a demonstration of the 3-D version of the recently developed aerodynamic design optimization methodology using sensitivity analysis, ADOS. The required flow analyses were obtained by solving the three-dimensional, compressible, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit, upwind-biased, finite volume scheme. The sensitivity analyses were performed using the preconditioned version of the SADD scheme (sensitivity analysis on domain decomposition). In addition to demonstrating the present method's capability for automatic optimization, the results offered some insight into two important issues related to optimizing the shapes of multicomponent configurations in close proximity. First, inclusion of the mutual interference between the components resulted in a different shape as opposed to shaping an isolated component. Secondly, exclusion of the viscous effects compromised not only the flow physics but also the optimized shapes even for isolated components.

  17. Aerothermodynamic Analyses of Towed Ballutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Buck, Greg; Moss, James N.; Nielsen, Eric; Berger, Karen; Jones, William T.; Rudavsky, Rena

    2006-01-01

    A ballute (balloon-parachute) is an inflatable, aerodynamic drag device for application to planetary entry vehicles. Two challenging aspects of aerothermal simulation of towed ballutes are considered. The first challenge, simulation of a complete system including inflatable tethers and a trailing toroidal ballute, is addressed using the unstructured-grid, Navier-Stokes solver FUN3D. Auxiliary simulations of a semi-infinite cylinder using the rarefied flow, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo solver, DSV2, provide additional insight into limiting behavior of the aerothermal environment around tethers directly exposed to the free stream. Simulations reveal pressures higher than stagnation and corresponding large heating rates on the tether as it emerges from the spacecraft base flow and passes through the spacecraft bow shock. The footprint of the tether shock on the toroidal ballute is also subject to heating amplification. Design options to accommodate or reduce these environments are discussed. The second challenge addresses time-accurate simulation to detect the onset of unsteady flow interactions as a function of geometry and Reynolds number. Video of unsteady interactions measured in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Laboratory 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel and CFD simulations using the structured grid, Navier-Stokes solver LAURA are compared for flow over a rigid spacecraft-sting-toroid system. The experimental data provides qualitative information on the amplitude and onset of unsteady motion which is captured in the numerical simulations. The presence of severe unsteady fluid - structure interactions is undesirable and numerical simulation must be able to predict the onset of such motion.

  18. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a) For major and significant transactions, applicants shall submit impact analyses (exhibit 12) describing...

  19. 10 CFR 61.13 - Technical analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Technical analyses. 61.13 Section 61.13 Energy NUCLEAR....13 Technical analyses. The specific technical information must also include the following analyses... air, soil, groundwater, surface water, plant uptake, and exhumation by burrowing animals. The...

  20. 49 CFR 1180.7 - Market analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Market analyses. 1180.7 Section 1180.7..., TRACKAGE RIGHTS, AND LEASE PROCEDURES General Acquisition Procedures § 1180.7 Market analyses. (a) For major and significant transactions, applicants shall submit impact analyses (exhibit 12) describing...

  1. 10 CFR 61.13 - Technical analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Technical analyses. 61.13 Section 61.13 Energy NUCLEAR....13 Technical analyses. The specific technical information must also include the following analyses... air, soil, groundwater, surface water, plant uptake, and exhumation by burrowing animals. The...

  2. 10 CFR 436.24 - Uncertainty analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Uncertainty analyses. 436.24 Section 436.24 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING PROGRAMS Methodology and Procedures for Life Cycle Cost Analyses § 436.24 Uncertainty analyses. If particular items of cost data or timing of cash flows are uncertain and...

  3. Rate sensitive continuum damage models and mesh dependence in finite element analyses.

    PubMed

    Ljustina, Goran; Fagerström, Martin; Larsson, Ragnar

    2014-01-01

    The experiences from orthogonal machining simulations show that the Johnson-Cook (JC) dynamic failure model exhibits significant element size dependence. Such mesh dependence is a direct consequence of the utilization of local damage models. The current contribution is an investigation of the extent of the possible pathological mesh dependence. A comparison of the resulting JC model behavior combined with two types of damage evolution is considered. The first damage model is the JC dynamic failure model, where the development of the "damage" does not affect the response until the critical state is reached. The second one is a continuum damage model, where the damage variable is affecting the material response continuously during the deformation. Both the plasticity and the damage models are rate dependent, and the damage evolutions for both models are defined as a postprocessing of the effective stress response. The investigation is conducted for a series of 2D shear tests utilizing different FE representations of the plane strain plate with pearlite material properties. The results show for both damage models, using realistic pearlite material parameters, that similar extent of the mesh dependence is obtained and that the possible viscous regularization effects are absent in the current investigation. PMID:25530994

  4. Examining Treatment Effects for Single-Case ABAB Designs through Sensitivity Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumbacher, Christine A.

    2013-01-01

    Single-case designs (SCDs) are often used to examine the impact of an intervention over brief periods of time (Kratochwill & Stoiber, 2002; Segool, Brinkman, & Carlson, 2007). The majority of SCDs are inspected using visual analysis (Kromrey & Foster-Johnson, 1996; Morgan & Morgan, 2009). Although the single-case literature…

  5. Appendix C. Analyses of Sensitivity Distributions for Estimation of Acute Hazard Concentrations to Aquatic Animals

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA’s Office of Water (OW) and Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) are both charged with assessing risks of chemicals to aquatic species. The offices have developed scientifically defensible methods to assess chemicals under the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Federal Insecticide...

  6. Rate Sensitive Continuum Damage Models and Mesh Dependence in Finite Element Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Fagerström, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The experiences from orthogonal machining simulations show that the Johnson-Cook (JC) dynamic failure model exhibits significant element size dependence. Such mesh dependence is a direct consequence of the utilization of local damage models. The current contribution is an investigation of the extent of the possible pathological mesh dependence. A comparison of the resulting JC model behavior combined with two types of damage evolution is considered. The first damage model is the JC dynamic failure model, where the development of the “damage” does not affect the response until the critical state is reached. The second one is a continuum damage model, where the damage variable is affecting the material response continuously during the deformation. Both the plasticity and the damage models are rate dependent, and the damage evolutions for both models are defined as a postprocessing of the effective stress response. The investigation is conducted for a series of 2D shear tests utilizing different FE representations of the plane strain plate with pearlite material properties. The results show for both damage models, using realistic pearlite material parameters, that similar extent of the mesh dependence is obtained and that the possible viscous regularization effects are absent in the current investigation. PMID:25530994

  7. UNCERTAINTY AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSES FOR INTEGRATED HUMAN HEALTH AND ECOLOGICAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    While there is a high potential for exposure of humans and ecosystems to chemicals released from hazardous waste sites, the degree to which this potential is realized is often uncertain. Conceptually divided among parameter, model, and modeler uncertainties imparted during simula...

  8. Descriptive and sensitivity analyses of WATBALI: A dynamic soil water model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildreth, W. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A soil water computer model that uses the IBM Continuous System Modeling Program III to solve the dynamic equations representing the soil, plant, and atmospheric physical or physiological processes considered is presented and discussed. Using values describing the soil-plant-atmosphere characteristics, the model predicts evaporation, transpiration, drainage, and soil water profile changes from an initial soil water profile and daily meteorological data. The model characteristics and simulations that were performed to determine the nature of the response to controlled variations in the input are described the results of the simulations are included and a change that makes the response of the model more closely represent the observed characteristics of evapotranspiration and profile changes for dry soil conditions is examined.

  9. EVALUATION AND SENSITIVITY ANALYSES RESULTS OF THE MESOPUFF II MODEL WITH CAPTEX MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The MESOPUFF II regional Lagrangian puff model has been evaluated and tested against measurements from the Cross-Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX) data base in an effort to assess its abilIty to simulate the transport and dispersion of a nonreactive, nondepositing tracer plu...

  10. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  11. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed

    Barker, R H

    1975-06-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  12. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  13. Allergic sensitization: screening methods.

    PubMed

    Ladics, Gregory S; Fry, Jeremy; Goodman, Richard; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Madsen, Charlotte B; Penninks, André; Pomés, Anna; Roggen, Erwin L; Smit, Joost; Wal, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Experimental in silico, in vitro, and rodent models for screening and predicting protein sensitizing potential are discussed, including whether there is evidence of new sensitizations and allergies since the introduction of genetically modified crops in 1996, the importance of linear versus conformational epitopes, and protein families that become allergens. Some common challenges for predicting protein sensitization are addressed: (a) exposure routes; (b) frequency and dose of exposure; (c) dose-response relationships; (d) role of digestion, food processing, and the food matrix; (e) role of infection; (f) role of the gut microbiota; (g) influence of the structure and physicochemical properties of the protein; and (h) the genetic background and physiology of consumers. The consensus view is that sensitization screening models are not yet validated to definitively predict the de novo sensitizing potential of a novel protein. However, they would be extremely useful in the discovery and research phases of understanding the mechanisms of food allergy development, and may prove fruitful to provide information regarding potential allergenicity risk assessment of future products on a case by case basis. These data and findings were presented at a 2012 international symposium in Prague organized by the Protein Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute. PMID:24739743

  14. Sensitivity Analysis Without Assumptions

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, Tyler J.

    2016-01-01

    Unmeasured confounding may undermine the validity of causal inference with observational studies. Sensitivity analysis provides an attractive way to partially circumvent this issue by assessing the potential influence of unmeasured confounding on causal conclusions. However, previous sensitivity analysis approaches often make strong and untestable assumptions such as having an unmeasured confounder that is binary, or having no interaction between the effects of the exposure and the confounder on the outcome, or having only one unmeasured confounder. Without imposing any assumptions on the unmeasured confounder or confounders, we derive a bounding factor and a sharp inequality such that the sensitivity analysis parameters must satisfy the inequality if an unmeasured confounder is to explain away the observed effect estimate or reduce it to a particular level. Our approach is easy to implement and involves only two sensitivity parameters. Surprisingly, our bounding factor, which makes no simplifying assumptions, is no more conservative than a number of previous sensitivity analysis techniques that do make assumptions. Our new bounding factor implies not only the traditional Cornfield conditions that both the relative risk of the exposure on the confounder and that of the confounder on the outcome must satisfy but also a high threshold that the maximum of these relative risks must satisfy. Furthermore, this new bounding factor can be viewed as a measure of the strength of confounding between the exposure and the outcome induced by a confounder. PMID:26841057

  15. Allergic sensitization: screening methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Experimental in silico, in vitro, and rodent models for screening and predicting protein sensitizing potential are discussed, including whether there is evidence of new sensitizations and allergies since the introduction of genetically modified crops in 1996, the importance of linear versus conformational epitopes, and protein families that become allergens. Some common challenges for predicting protein sensitization are addressed: (a) exposure routes; (b) frequency and dose of exposure; (c) dose-response relationships; (d) role of digestion, food processing, and the food matrix; (e) role of infection; (f) role of the gut microbiota; (g) influence of the structure and physicochemical properties of the protein; and (h) the genetic background and physiology of consumers. The consensus view is that sensitization screening models are not yet validated to definitively predict the de novo sensitizing potential of a novel protein. However, they would be extremely useful in the discovery and research phases of understanding the mechanisms of food allergy development, and may prove fruitful to provide information regarding potential allergenicity risk assessment of future products on a case by case basis. These data and findings were presented at a 2012 international symposium in Prague organized by the Protein Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute’s Health and Environmental Sciences Institute. PMID:24739743

  16. A novel addition polyimide adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.; Progar, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    An addition polyimide adhesive, LARC 13, was developed which shows promise for bonding both titanium and composites for applications which require service temperatures in excess of 533 K. The LARC 13 is based on an oligomeric bis nadimide containing a meta linked aromatic diamine. The adhesive melts prior to polymerization due to its oligomeric nature, thereby allowing it to be processed at 344 kPa or less. Therefore, LARC 13 is ideal for the bonding of honeycomb sandwich structures. After melting, the resin thermosets during the cure of the nadic endcaps to a highly crosslinked system. Few volatiles are evolved, thus allowing large enclosed structures to be bonded. Preparation of the adhesive as well as bonding, aging, and testing of lap shear and honeycomb samples are discussed.

  17. Optics of progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Sheedy, J E; Buri, M; Bailey, I L; Azus, J; Borish, I M

    1987-02-01

    The optical characteristics of the major progressive addition lenses were measured using an automated lensometer with a specially designed lens holder to simulate eye rotation. Measurements were made every 3 degrees (about 1.5 mm) and graphs of isospherical equivalent lines and isocylinder lines were developed. Generally the near zone of these lenses is narrower and lower than in bifocal or trifocal lenses. Distinct differences exist between the various progressive lenses. The width of the near zone, rate of power progression, amount of unwanted cylinder (level with the distance center), and clarity of the distance zone are compared for the various lenses. The optical measurements demonstrate an apparent trade-off between the size of the cylinder-free area of the lens and the amount of the cylinder. PMID:3826294

  18. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  19. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  20. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  1. SIPSEY WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, ALABAMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweinfurth, Stanley P.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of geologic, geochemical, and mineral surveys the Sipsey Wilderness and additions are deemed to have little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources. Although limestone, shale, and sandstone resources that occur in the area are physically suitable for a variety of uses, similar materials are available outside the area closer to transportation routes and potential markets. A small amount of coal has been identified in the area, occurring as nonpersistent beds less than 28 in. thick. Oil and (or) natural gas resources may be present if suitable structural traps exist in the subsurface. Therefore, the area has a probable oil and gas potential. Small amounts of asphaltic sandstone and limestone, commonly referred to as tar sands, may also occur in the subsurface. 5 refs.

  2. Sensitivity of rainfall-runoff processes in the Hydrological Open Air Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Széles, Borbála; Parajka, Juraj; Blöschl, Günter; Oismüller, Markus; Hajnal, Géza

    2016-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to simulate the rainfall response and analyse the sensitivity of rainfall-runoff processes of the Hydrological Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) in Petzenkirchen, a small experimental watershed (66 ha) located in the western part of Lower Austria and dominated by agricultural land use. Due to the extensive monitoring network in the HOAL, the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of hydro-meteorological elements are exceptionally well represented on the catchment scale. The study aimed to exploit the facilities of the available database collected by innovative sensing techniques to advance the understanding of various rainfall-runoff processes. The TUWmodel, a lumped, conceptual hydrological model, following the structure of the HBV model was implemented on the catchment. In addition to the surface runoff at the catchment outlet, several different runoff generation mechanisms (tile drainage flow, saturation excess runoff from wetlands and groundwater discharge from springs) were also simulated, which gave an opportunity to describe the spatial distribution of model parameters in the study area. This helped to proceed from the original lumped model concept towards a spatially distributed one. The other focus of this work was to distinguish the dominant model parameters from the less sensitive ones for each tributary with different runoff type by applying two different sensitivity analysis methods, the simple local perturbation and the global Latin-Hypercube-One-Factor-At-a-Time (LH-OAT) tools. Moreover, the impacts of modifying the initial parameters of the LH-OAT method and the applied objective functions were also taken into consideration. The results and findings of the model and sensitivity analyses were summarized and future development perspectives were outlined. Key words: spatial heterogeneity of rainfall-runoff mechanisms, sensitivity analysis, lumped conceptual hydrological model

  3. Computational Aeroelastic Analyses of a Low-Boom Supersonic Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Connolly, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Commercial Supersonic Technology (CST) Aeroservoelasticity (ASE) element is provided with a focus on recent computational aeroelastic analyses of a low-boom supersonic configuration developed by Lockheed-Martin and referred to as the N+2 configuration. The overview includes details of the computational models developed to date including a linear finite element model (FEM), linear unsteady aerodynamic models, unstructured CFD grids, and CFD-based aeroelastic analyses. In addition, a summary of the work involving the development of aeroelastic reduced-order models (ROMs) and the development of an aero-propulso-servo-elastic (APSE) model is provided.

  4. Causal mediation analyses with rank preserving models.

    PubMed

    Have, Thomas R Ten; Joffe, Marshall M; Lynch, Kevin G; Brown, Gregory K; Maisto, Stephen A; Beck, Aaron T

    2007-09-01

    We present a linear rank preserving model (RPM) approach for analyzing mediation of a randomized baseline intervention's effect on a univariate follow-up outcome. Unlike standard mediation analyses, our approach does not assume that the mediating factor is also randomly assigned to individuals in addition to the randomized baseline intervention (i.e., sequential ignorability), but does make several structural interaction assumptions that currently are untestable. The G-estimation procedure for the proposed RPM represents an extension of the work on direct effects of randomized intervention effects for survival outcomes by Robins and Greenland (1994, Journal of the American Statistical Association 89, 737-749) and on intervention non-adherence by Ten Have et al. (2004, Journal of the American Statistical Association 99, 8-16). Simulations show good estimation and confidence interval performance by the proposed RPM approach under unmeasured confounding relative to the standard mediation approach, but poor performance under departures from the structural interaction assumptions. The trade-off between these assumptions is evaluated in the context of two suicide/depression intervention studies. PMID:17825022

  5. The quantitative surface analysis of an antioxidant additive in a lubricant oil matrix by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Caitlyn; Reynolds, James C; Whitmarsh, Samuel; Lynch, Tom; Creaser, Colin S

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Chemical additives are incorporated into commercial lubricant oils to modify the physical and chemical properties of the lubricant. The quantitative analysis of additives in oil-based lubricants deposited on a surface without extraction of the sample from the surface presents a challenge. The potential of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for the quantitative surface analysis of an oil additive in a complex oil lubricant matrix without sample extraction has been evaluated. METHODS The quantitative surface analysis of the antioxidant additive octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix was carried out by DESI-MS in the presence of 2-(pentyloxy)ethyl 3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)propionate as an internal standard. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with an in-house modified ion source enabling non-proximal DESI-MS was used for the analyses. RESULTS An eight-point calibration curve ranging from 1 to 80 µg/spot of octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix and in the presence of the internal standard was used to determine the quantitative response of the DESI-MS method. The sensitivity and repeatability of the technique were assessed by conducting replicate analyses at each concentration. The limit of detection was determined to be 11 ng/mm2 additive on spot with relative standard deviations in the range 3–14%. CONCLUSIONS The application of DESI-MS to the direct, quantitative surface analysis of a commercial lubricant additive in a native oil lubricant matrix is demonstrated. © 2013 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24097398

  6. Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

    2009-07-31

    introduced two model energy codes Pawnee Nation should consider for adoption. Summary of Current and Expected Future Electricity Usage The research team provided a summary overview of electricity usage patterns in current buildings and included discussion of known plans for new construction. Utility Options Review Pawnee Nation electric utility options were analyzed through a four-phase process, which included: 1) summarizing the relevant utility background information; 2) gathering relevant utility assessment data; 3) developing a set of realistic Pawnee electric utility service options, and 4) analyzing the various Pawnee electric utility service options for the Pawnee Energy Team’s consideration. III. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribe’s main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site.

  7. Mechanisms of Salt-Sensitive Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Leonella; Noboa, Oscar; Boggia, José

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and its consequences, including heart failure, stroke, and kidney disease, are responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lifestyle changes, particularly sodium reduction, contribute to blood pressure control. However, not all individuals, whether normotensive or hypertensive, have the same susceptibility to the effects of salt. While a variety of approaches have been proposed to identify salt sensitive patients, there is no consensus for a definition of salt sensitivity and the precise mechanisms that explain their association are not yet fully understood. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the various pathophysiological mechanisms potentially involved in determining the salt sensitive phenotype. Genetic, neuronal, and immune alterations are reviewed. Additionally, we provide an update on the current knowledge of a new approach proposing the interstitium of the skin may act as a sodium reservoir. The role of dietary potassium on salt sensitive hypertension is also summarized. PMID:26028243

  8. 40 CFR 798.4100 - Dermal sensitization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sensitization reaction in each individual animal. (3) Test report. In addition to the reporting requirements as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the following specific information should be reported: (i) A... (allergic contact dermatitis) is an immunologically mediated cutaneous reaction to a substance. In the...

  9. 40 CFR 798.4100 - Dermal sensitization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sensitization reaction in each individual animal. (3) Test report. In addition to the reporting requirements as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the following specific information should be reported: (i) A... (allergic contact dermatitis) is an immunologically mediated cutaneous reaction to a substance. In the...

  10. Sensitivities of Soap Solutions in Leak Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuck, D.; Lam, D. Q.; Daniels, C.

    1985-01-01

    Document describes method for determining minimum leak rate to which soap-solution leak detectors sensitive. Bubbles formed at smaller leak rates than previously assumed. In addition to presenting test results, document discusses effects of joint-flange configurations, properties of soap solutions, and correlation of test results with earlier data.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of SPURR

    SciTech Connect

    Witholder, R.E.

    1980-04-01

    The Solar Energy Research Institute has conducted a limited sensitivity analysis on a System for Projecting the Utilization of Renewable Resources (SPURR). The study utilized the Domestic Policy Review scenario for SPURR agricultural and industrial process heat and utility market sectors. This sensitivity analysis determines whether variations in solar system capital cost, operation and maintenance cost, and fuel cost (biomass only) correlate with intuitive expectations. The results of this effort contribute to a much larger issue: validation of SPURR. Such a study has practical applications for engineering improvements in solar technologies and is useful as a planning tool in the R and D allocation process.

  12. Structural Sensitivity of Dry Storage Canisters

    SciTech Connect

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Karri, Naveen K.; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2013-09-27

    This LS-DYNA modeling study evaluated a generic used nuclear fuel vertical dry storage cask system under tip-over, handling drop, and seismic load cases to determine the sensitivity of the canister containment boundary to these loads. The goal was to quantify the expected failure margins to gain insight into what material changes over the extended long-term storage lifetime could have the most influence on the security of the containment boundary. It was determined that the tip-over case offers a strong challenge to the containment boundary, and identifies one significant material knowledge gap, the behavior of welded stainless steel joints under high-strain-rate conditions. High strain rates are expected to increase the material’s effective yield strength and ultimate strength, and may decrease its ductility. Determining and accounting for this behavior could potentially reverse the model prediction of a containment boundary failure at the canister lid weld. It must be emphasized that this predicted containment failure is an artifact of the generic system modeled. Vendor specific designs analyze for cask tip-over and these analyses are reviewed and approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Another location of sensitivity of the containment boundary is the weld between the base plate and the canister shell. Peak stresses at this location predict plastic strains through the whole thickness of the welded material. This makes the base plate weld an important location for material study. This location is also susceptible to high strain rates, and accurately accounting for the material behavior under these conditions could have a significant effect on the predicted performance of the containment boundary. The handling drop case was largely benign to the containment boundary, with just localized plastic strains predicted on the outer surfaces of wall sections. It would take unusual changes in the handling drop scenario to harm the containment boundary, such as

  13. Ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry of geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Lima, E.; Weiss, B. P.

    2012-12-01

    Scanning SQUID microscopy offers a unique combination of high spatial resolution and magnetic field sensitivity that allows for the detection of magnetic moments as weak as 10^-16 Am2. This opens the possibility of extending paleomagnetic analyses to samples that have not been accessible to standard moment magnetometry, for which the detection limit is 10^-12 Am2. Of particular interest are individual terrestrial and extraterrestrial particles of small size (< 500 μm) that may preserve records of planetary dynamos and early nebular magnetic fields. Example targets include impact melt spherules, zircon and other silicate crystals, micrometeorites, cosmic dust, chondrules and refractory inclusions. These grains may be adequately modeled as small uniformly magnetized volumes, such that retrieving their magnetic moments from measured magnetic field maps does not require solving non-unique inverse problems. As a consequence, SQUID microscopes can be utilized as ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometers. We show alternating field and thermal demagnetization data for several grains that demonstrate the performance of this technique. In addition, we compare scanning SQUID microscopy data with net moment measurements of the same samples performed by a commercial superconducting rock magnetometer. The results agree for stronger moments, as expected, but rapidly diverge as net moments fall below the lower 10^-10 Am2 range. These studies underscore the inability of conventional instruments not only to detect very weak moments but also to isolate contamination originating from background sources such as sample holders and mounts. We expect ultra-high sensitivity moment magnetometry using scanning SQUID microscopy will be a powerful tool in helping elucidate the formation of the solar system and planetary history.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: warfarin sensitivity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions warfarin sensitivity warfarin sensitivity Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Warfarin sensitivity is a condition in which individuals have a ...

  15. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; van der Stok, Johan; Amin Yavari, Saber; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of its good biocompatibility. In this study selective laser melting technology was used for the first time to manufacture highly porous pure tantalum implants with fully interconnected open pores. The architecture of the porous structure in combination with the material properties of tantalum result in mechanical properties close to those of human bone and allow for bone ingrowth. The bone regeneration performance of the porous tantalum was evaluated in vivo using an orthotopic load-bearing bone defect model in the rat femur. After 12 weeks, substantial bone ingrowth, good quality of the regenerated bone and a strong, functional implant-bone interface connection were observed. Compared to identical porous Ti-6Al-4V structures, laser-melted tantalum shows excellent osteoconductive properties, has a higher normalized fatigue strength and allows for more plastic deformation due to its high ductility. It is therefore concluded that this is a first step towards a new generation of open porous tantalum implants manufactured using selective laser melting. PMID:25500631

  16. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, SK

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  17. Additive Transforms Paint into Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Tech Traders Inc. sought assistance developing low-cost, highly effective coatings and paints that created useful thermal reflectance and were safe and non-toxic. In cooperation with a group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center., Tech Traders created Insuladd, a powder additive made up of microscopic, inert gas-filled, ceramic microspheres that can be mixed into ordinary interior or exterior paint, allowing the paint to act like a layer of insulation. When the paint dries, this forms a radiant heat barrier, turning the ordinary house paint into heat-reflecting thermal paint. According to Tech Traders, the product works with all types of paints and coatings and will not change the coverage rate, application, or adhesion of the paint. Other useful applications include feed storage silos to help prevent feed spoilage, poultry hatcheries to reduce the summer heat and winter cold effects, and on military vehicles and ships. Tech Traders has continued its connection to the aerospace community by recently providing Lockheed Martin Corporation with one of its thermal products for use on the F-22 Raptor.

  18. Sustainability Characterization for Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Mani, Mahesh; Lyons, Kevin W; Gupta, S K

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to create geometrically complex parts that require a high degree of customization, using less material and producing less waste. Recent studies have shown that AM can be an economically viable option for use by the industry, yet there are some inherent challenges associated with AM for wider acceptance. The lack of standards in AM impedes its use for parts production since industries primarily depend on established standards in processes and material selection to ensure the consistency and quality. Inability to compare AM performance against traditional manufacturing methods can be a barrier for implementing AM processes. AM process sustainability has become a driver due to growing environmental concerns for manufacturing. This has reinforced the importance to understand and characterize AM processes for sustainability. Process characterization for sustainability will help close the gaps for comparing AM performance to traditional manufacturing methods. Based on a literature review, this paper first examines the potential environmental impacts of AM. A methodology for sustainability characterization of AM is then proposed to serve as a resource for the community to benchmark AM processes for sustainability. Next, research perspectives are discussed along with relevant standardization efforts. PMID:26601038

  19. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  20. Labeling of virus components for advanced, quantitative imaging analyses.

    PubMed

    Sakin, Volkan; Paci, Giulia; Lemke, Edward A; Müller, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, investigation of virus-cell interactions has moved from ensemble measurements to imaging analyses at the single-particle level. Advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques provide single-molecule sensitivity and subdiffraction spatial resolution, allowing observation of subviral details and individual replication events to obtain detailed quantitative information. To exploit the full potential of these techniques, virologists need to employ novel labeling strategies, taking into account specific constraints imposed by viruses, as well as unique requirements of microscopic methods. Here, we compare strengths and limitations of various labeling methods, exemplify virological questions that were successfully addressed, and discuss challenges and future potential of novel approaches in virus imaging. PMID:26987299