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Sample records for additional soa sources

  1. Sources, properties, aging, and anthropogenic influences on OA and SOA over the Southeast US and the Amazon during SOAS, DC3, SEAC4RS, and GoAmazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Thompson, S.; Krechmer, J.; Day, D. A.; Stark, H.; Peng, Z.; Ortega, A. M.; Isaacman, G. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Holzinger, R.; de Sá, S. S.; Martin, S. T.; Alexander, M. L.; Guenther, A. B.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Massoli, P.; Kimmel, J.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Brune, W. H.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Offenberg, J. H.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; Manzi, A. O.

    2014-12-01

    The SE US and the Amazon have large sources of biogenic VOCs and varying anthropogenic pollution impact, and often poor aerosol model performance. Recent results on the sources, properties, aging, and impact of anthropogenic pollution on OA and secondary OA (SOA) over these regions will be presented. SOA from IEPOX accounts for 14-17% of the OA on average over the SE US and extending up to 6 km. Higher IEPOX-SOA correlates with airmasses of high isoprene, IEPOX, sulfate, acidity, and lower NO. The IEPOX organosulfate accounts for ~10% of IEPOX-SOA over the SE US. The AMS ion C5H6O+ is shown to be a good marker of IEPOX-SOA, while total m/z 82 (as in ACSM) suffers larger interferences. The sinks of IEPOX-SOA via both OH oxidation and evaporation are slow. The low-volatility of IEPOX-SOA contrasts with the small semivolatile molecules that have so far been identified as its components, suggesting the importance of oligomerization. Urban SOA is estimated to account for 25% of the OA in the SE US using either the GEOS-Chem model or the measured 14C (using recent results that urban SOA (POA) is 30% (50%) non-fossil, mainly due to cooking emissions). An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is used to investigate SOA formation by OH, O3, and NO3 in-situ. Largest SOA formation is always observed at night when monoterpenes (MT) are largest, and is underpredicted by SOA models that use MT as precursors but ignore partially-oxidized products. Closure results from models (VBS and GECKO-A) that account for the whole oxidation chain will be presented. The partitioning of organic acids is found to proceed rapidly in response to temperature changes, in contrast with recent reports of very slow equilibration. The agreement with absorptive partitioning theory is reasonable for most species, except small acids that may be formed by thermal decomposition during analysis. Partitioning data from four instruments is compared, with reasonable agreement in many cases including the rapid response

  2. Sources, Properties, Aging, and Anthropogenic Influences on OA and SOA over the Southeast US and the Amazon duing SOAS, DC3, SEAC4RS, and GoAmazon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SE US and the Amazon have large sources of biogenic VOCs, varying anthropogenic pollution impacts, and often poor organic aerosol (OA) model performance. Recent results on the sources, properties, aging, and impact of anthropogenic pollution on OA and secondary OA (SOA) over ...

  3. Aqueous-phase oxidation of green leaf volatiles by hydroxyl radical as a source of SOA: Product identification from methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, Amie K.; Ehrenhauser, Franz S.; Richards-Henderson, Nicole K.; Anastasio, Cort; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.

    2015-02-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a group of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) released into the atmosphere by vegetation. BVOCs produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) via gas-phase reactions, but little is known of their aqueous-phase oxidation as a source of SOA. GLVs can partition into atmospheric water phases, e.g., fog, mist, dew or rain, and be oxidized by hydroxyl radicals (˙OH). These reactions in the liquid phase also lead to products that have higher molecular weights, increased polarity, and lower vapor pressures, ultimately forming SOA after evaporation of the droplet. To examine this process, we investigated the aqueous, ˙OH-mediated oxidation of methyl jasmonate (MeJa) and methyl salicylate (MeSa), two GLVs that produce aqueous-phase SOA. High performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) was used to monitor product formation. The oxidation products identified exhibit higher molecular mass than their parent GLV due to either dimerization or the addition of oxygen and hydroxyl functional groups. The proposed structures of potential products are based on mechanistic considerations combined with the HPLC/ESI-MS data. Based on the structures, the vapor pressure and the Henry's law constant were estimated with multiple methods (SPARC, SIMPOL, MPBPVP, Bond and Group Estimations). The estimated vapor pressures of the products identified are significantly (up to 7 orders of magnitude) lower than those of the associated parent compounds, and therefore, the GLV oxidation products may remain as SOA after evaporation of the water droplet. The contribution of the identified oxidation products to SOA formation is estimated based on measured HPLC-ESI/MS responses relative to previous aqueous SOA mass yield measurements.

  4. Improving the simulation of organic aerosols from anthropogenic and burning sources: a simplified SOA formation mechanism and the impact of trash burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Organic aerosols (OA) are an major component of fine aerosols, but their sources are poorly understood. We present results of two methods to improve OA predictions in anthropogenic pollution and biomass-burning impacted regions. (1) An empirical parameterization for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in polluted air and biomass burning smoke is implemented into community chemistry-transport models (WRF/Chem and CHIMERE) and tested in this work, towards the goal of a computationally inexpensive method to calculate pollution and biomass burning SOA. This approach is based on the observed proportionality of SOA concentrations to excess CO and photochemical age of the airmass, as described in Hodzic and Jimenez (GMDD, 2011). The oxygen to carbon ratio in organic aerosols is also parameterizated vs. photochemical aged based on the ambient observations, and is used to estimate the aerosol hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The predicted SOA is assessed against observations from the Mexico City metropolitan area during the MILAGRO 2006 field experiment, and compared to previous model results using the more complex volatility basis approach (VBS) of Robinson et al.. The results suggest that the simplified approach reproduces the observed average SOA mass within 30% in the urban area and downwind, and gives better results than the original VBS. In addition to being much less computationally expensive than VBS-type methods, the empirical approach can also be used in regions where the emissions of SOA precursors are not yet available. (2) The contribution of trash burning emissions to primary and secondary organic aerosols in Mexico City are estimated, using a recently-developed emission inventory. Submicron antimony (Sb) is used as a garbage-burning tracer following the results of Christian et al. (ACP 2010), which allows evaluation of the emissions inventory. Results suggests that trash burning may be an appreciable source of organic aerosols in the Mexico City

  5. Characterizing a switching reagent ion chemical ionization high resolution time of flight mass spectrometer: Standard additions, External calibrations, and Inlet response during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, P.; Farmer, D.

    2013-12-01

    A high-resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HRToF-CIMS) with switching reagent ion source and low pressure, gas-phase inlet was deployed during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Brent, Alabama. Acetate chemistry was employed for the detection of small acids and iodine chemistry for the detection of peroxy acids. Switching between the two ion sources was found to be possible on less than ten minute time scales with minimal artifacts observed. Online calibrations for formic acid on both the acetate and iodine sources were performed every hour using both standard addition techniques as well as external standard calibrations; offline formic acid calibrations were also conducted. Inlet responses were investigated though a number of experiments finding that the inlet has minimal hysteresis and rapid response times.

  6. S – C – L triple wavelength superluminescent source based on an ultra-wideband SOA and FBGs

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, H; Zulkifli, M Z; Hassan, N A; Muhammad, F D; Harun, S W

    2013-10-31

    We propose and demonstrate a wide-band semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) based triple-wavelength superluminescent source with the output in the S-, C- and L-band regions. The proposed systems uses an ultra-wideband SOA with an amplification range from 1440 to 1620 nm as the linear gain medium. Three fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs) with centre wavelengths of 1500, 1540 and 1580 nm are used to generate the lasing wavelengths in the S-, Cand L-bands respectively, while a variable optical attenuator is used to finely balance the optical powers of the lasing wavelengths. The ultra-wideband SOA generates an amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectrum with a peak power of -33 dBm at the highest SOA drive current, and also demonstrates a down-shift in the centre wavelength of the generated spectrum due to the spatial distribution of the carrier densities. The S-band wavelength is the dominant wavelength at high drive currents, with an output power of -6 dBm as compared to the C- and L-bands, which only have powers of -11 and -10 dBm, respectively. All wavelengths have a high average signal-to-noise ratio more than 60 dB at the highest drive current of 390 mA, and the system also shows a high degree of stability, with power fluctuations of less than 3 dB within 70 min. The proposed system can find many applications where a wide-band and stable laser source is crucial, such as in communications and sensing. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  7. SOA governance in healthcare organisations.

    PubMed

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilakopoulos, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) is increasingly adopted by many sectors, including healthcare. Due to the nature of healthcare systems there is a need to increase SOA adoption success rates as the non integrated nature of healthcare systems is responsible for medical errors that cause the loss of tens of thousands patients per year. Following our previous research [1] we propose that SOA governance is a critical success factor for SOA success in healthcare. Literature reports multiple SOA governance models that have limitations and they are confusing. In addition to this, there is a lack of healthcare specific SOA governance models. This highlights a literature void and thus the purpose of this paper is to proposed a healthcare specific SOA governance framework.

  8. Source-apportionment and model evaluation: experiences with the EMEP SOA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D.; Yttri, K. E.

    2009-04-01

    The EMEP MSC-W chemical transport model (Simpson et al., 2003) has been successfully used for the prediction of photochemical oxidants and various inorganic aerosol components (sulphate, nitrate, ammonium) for many years. The model generally performs well for such species, as should be expected for compounds whose emission sources and chemistry are fairly well know. For carbonaceous particulate matter (PCM) however the model has been found to give very different results in different parts of Europe, with typically poor performance in southern Europe, but rather good results in Northern Europe (Simpson et al., 2007). Earlier comparison with the results of source-apportionment studies from the CARBOSOL project (Gelencser et al., 2007, Simpson et al., 2007) has shown that the poor performance in southern Europe can partly be ascribed to difficulties with emissions from residential wood-burning, and partly due to an underestimate of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) component. Such difficulties are expected for organic aerosols, a subject where the basic science is only partially understood, and where new experimental results continually lead to revisions in existing ideas concerning sources and formation mechanisms (e.g. Hallquist et al., 2009). In such a situation, it is essential that model results are evaluated as thoroughly as possible, and that where possible the various components of organic aerosol can be evaluated separately. A number of source-apportionment (SA) studies have recently become available in Europe, in which data on elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), 14C, levoglucosan, and various markers of primary organic carbon (cellulose, sugars/sugar-alcohols) have allowed estimates of various sources of carbonaceous particulate matter (PCM). As well as CARBOSOL, these studies include various sites in Switzerland (e.g. Lanz et al., 2008, Szidat et al., 2006), data are available from Gothenburg in Sweden (Szidat et al., 2008) and from southern

  9. Sources of SOA gaseous precursors in contrasted urban environments: a focus on mono-aromatic compounds and intermediate volatility compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameh, Therese; Borbon, Agnès; Ait-Helal, Warda; Afif, Charbel; Sauvage, Stéphane; Locoge, Nadine; Bonneau, Stéphane; Sanchez, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Among Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), the mono-aromatic compounds so-called BTEX (Benzene, Toluene, Ethylbenzene, and Xylenes) and the intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOC) with C>12 are two remarkable chemical families having high impact on health, as well as on the production of secondary pollutants like secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and ozone. However, the nature and relative importance of their sources and, consequently, their impact on SOA formation at urban scale is still under debate. On the one hand, BTEX observations in urban areas of northern mid-latitudes do not reconcile with emission inventories; the latter pointing to solvent use as the dominant source compared to traffic. Moreover, a recent study by Borbon et al. (2013) has shown an enrichment in the C7-C9 aromatic fraction in Paris atmosphere by a factor of 3 compared to other cities. Causes would be: (i) differences in gasoline composition, (ii) differences in vehicle fleet composition, and (iii) differences in solvent use related sources. On the other hand, many smog chamber studies have highlighted IVOCs as important SOA precursors over the last decade but their origin and importance in urban areas relative to other precursors like BTEX is still poorly addressed. Here we combined large VOC datasets to investigate sources of BTEX and IVOC in contrasted urban areas by source-receptor approaches and laboratory experiments. Ambient data include multi-site speciated ambient measurements of C2 to C17 VOCs (traffic, urban background, and tunnel) from air quality networks (ie. AIRPARIF in Paris) and intensive field campaigns (MEGAPOLI-Paris, TRANSEMED in Beirut and Istanbul, PHOTOPAQ in Brussels). Preliminary results for Paris suggest that traffic dominates BTEX concentrations while traffic and domestic heating for IVOC (>70%). In parallel, the detailed composition of the fuel liquid phase was determined at the laboratory for typical fuels distributed in Ile de France region (diesel, SP95

  10. SOA multiday growth: Model artifact or reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Hodzic, A.; Camredon, M.; Valorso, R.

    2013-12-01

    Simulations of SOA gas-particle partitioning with the explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A show significant SOA mass growth continuing for several days, even as the initial air parcel is diluted into the regional atmosphere. This result is a robust feature of our model and occurs with both anthropogenic and biogenic precursors. The growth originates from continuing oxidation of gas-phase precursors which persist in equilibrium with the particle phase. This result implies that sources of aerosol precursors could influence the chemical and radiative characteristics of the atmosphere over a wider region than previously imagined, and that SOA measurements near precursor sources may routinely underestimate this influence. It highlights the need to better understand the sink terms in the SOA budget.

  11. [Numerical simulation study of SOA in Pearl River Delta region].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan-li; Li, Tian-tian; Bai, Yu-hua; Li, Jin-long; Liu, Zhao-rong; Wang, Xue-song

    2009-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) is an important component of the atmospheric particle pollution, thus, determining the status and sources of SOA pollution is the premise of deeply understanding the occurrence, development law and the influence factors of the atmospheric particle pollution. Based on the pollution sources and meteorological data of Pearl River Delta region, the study used the two-dimensional model coupled with SOA module to stimulate the status and source of SOA pollution in regional scale. The results show: the generation of SOA presents obvious characteristics of photochemical reaction, and the high concentration appears at about 14:00; SOA concentration is high in some areas of Guangshou and Dongguan with large pollution source-emission, and it is also high in some areas of Zhongshan, Zhuhai and Jiangmen which are at downwind position of Guangzhou and Dongguan. Contribution ratios of several main pollution sources to SOA are: biogenic sources 72.6%, mobile sources 30.7%, point sources 12%, solvent and oil paint sources 12%, surface sources less than 5% respectively.

  12. SOA: A Quality Attribute Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-23

    JMS) – CORBA … • Infrastructure services available to service providers and/or service consumers to perform common tasks or satisfy QoS requirements...Services is one technology for SOA implementation SOA and Quality Attributes SOA WS* Web Services CORBA REST Services and POX Key Class Realization

  13. Single-source bidirectional free-space optical communications using reflective SOA-based amplified modulating retro-reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Feng, Xianglian; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Tianshu; Gao, Shiming

    2017-03-01

    A novel amplified modulating retro-reflector (AMRR) based on a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) is proposed and a bidirectional free-space optical communication (FSO) system including both downstream and upstream links is experimentally demonstrated with only a single light source using this AMRR. The RSOA-based AMRR can provide a net gain more than 4 dB and support the modulation bit rate up to 1.25 Gbit/s. The bidirectional FSO transmission performance is evaluated by observing eye diagrams and measuring bit error rate (BER) results of both 10-Gbit/s DPSK downstream and 1.25-Gbit/s OOK upstream signals. The factors that limit the modulation bit rate and transmission quality are analyzed. The power penalties of both links are less than 0.69 dB in the bidirectional FSO system at the BER of 1×10-3.

  14. Global transformation and fate of SOA: Implications of low-volatility SOA and gas-phase fragmentation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Manish; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zelenyuk, Alla; Singh, Balwinder; Zhang, Kai; Ma, Po-Lun; Chand, Duli; Ghan, Steven; Jimenez, Jose L.; Zhang, Qi; Fast, Jerome; Rasch, Philip J.; Tiitta, Petri

    2015-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are large contributors to fine-particle loadings and radiative forcing but are often represented crudely in global models. We have implemented three new detailed SOA treatments within the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) that allow us to compare the semivolatile versus nonvolatile SOA treatments (based on some of the latest experimental findings) and to investigate the effects of gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The new treatments also track SOA from biomass burning and biofuel, fossil fuel, and biogenic sources. For semivolatile SOA treatments, fragmentation reactions decrease the simulated annual global SOA burden from 7.5 Tg to 1.8 Tg. For the nonvolatile SOA treatment with fragmentation, the burden is 3.1 Tg. Larger differences between nonvolatile and semivolatile SOA (up to a factor of 5) exist in areas of continental outflow over the oceans. According to comparisons with observations from global surface Aerosol Mass Spectrometer measurements and the U.S. Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network measurements, the FragNVSOA treatment, which treats SOA as nonvolatile and includes gas-phase fragmentation reactions, agrees best at rural locations. Urban SOA is underpredicted, but this may be due to the coarse model resolution. All three revised treatments show much better agreement with aircraft measurements of organic aerosols (OA) over the North American Arctic and sub-Arctic in spring and summer, compared to the standard CAM5 formulation. This is mainly due to the oxidation of SOA precursor gases from biomass burning, not included in standard CAM5, and long-range transport of biomass burning OA at high altitudes. The revised model configurations that include fragmentation (both semivolatile and nonvolatile SOA) show much better agreement with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectrometers (MODIS) aerosol optical depth data over regions dominated by biomass burning during the summer

  15. Chamber studies of SOA formation from aromatic hydrocarbons: observation of limited glyoxal uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Liu, Y.; Tang, P.; Chen, C.-L.; Zhang, J.; Cocker, D. R., III

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluates the significance of glyoxal acting as an intermediate species leading to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation under humid conditions. Rapid SOA formation from glyoxal uptake onto aqueous (NH4)2SO4 seed particles is observed in agreement with previous studies; however, glyoxal did not partition significantly to SOA (with or without aqueous seed) during aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation within an environmental chamber (RH less than 80%). Rather, glyoxal influences SOA formation by raising hydroxyl (OH) radical concentrations. Four experimental approaches supporting this conclusion are presented in this paper: (1) increased SOA formation and decreased SOA volatility in the toluene + NOx photooxidation system with additional glyoxal was reproduced by matching OH radical concentrations through H2O2 addition; (2) glyoxal addition to SOA seed formed from toluene + NOx photooxidation did not increase SOA volume under dark; (3) SOA formation from toluene + NOx photooxidation with and without deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 seed resulted in similar SOA growth, consistent with a minor contribution from glyoxal uptake onto deliquesced seed and organic coatings; and (4) the fraction of a C4H9+ fragment (observed by Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, HR-ToF-AMS) in SOA from 2-tert-butylphenol (BP) oxidation was unchanged in the presence of additional glyoxal despite enhanced SOA formation. This study suggests that glyoxal uptake onto aerosol during the oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons is more limited than previously thought.

  16. 17 CFR 37.408 - Additional sources for compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional sources for compliance. 37.408 Section 37.408 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION SWAP EXECUTION FACILITIES Monitoring of Trading and Trade Processing § 37.408 Additional sources...

  17. 17 CFR 38.201 - Additional sources for compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional sources for compliance. 38.201 Section 38.201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Contracts Not Readily Subject to Manipulation § 38.201 Additional sources...

  18. 17 CFR 38.201 - Additional sources for compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional sources for compliance. 38.201 Section 38.201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION DESIGNATED CONTRACT MARKETS Contracts Not Readily Subject to Manipulation § 38.201 Additional sources...

  19. Global transformation and fate of SOA: Implications of Low Volatility SOA and Gas-Phase Fragmentation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zelenyuk, Alla; Singh, Balwinder; Zhang, Kai; Ma, Po-Lun; Chand, Duli; Ghan, Steven J.; Jiminez, J. L.; Zhang, Qibin; Fast, Jerome D.; Rasch, Philip J.; Tiitta, P.

    2015-05-16

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are large contributors to fine particle loadings and radiative forcing, but are often represented crudely in global models. We have implemented three new detailed SOA treatments within the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) that allow us to compare the semi-volatile versus non-volatile SOA treatments (based on some of the latest experimental findings) and also investigate the effects of gas-phase fragmentation reactions. For semi-volatile SOA treatments, fragmentation reactions decrease simulated SOA burden from 7.5 Tg to 1.8 Tg. For the non-volatile SOA treatment with fragmentation, the burden is 3.1 Tg. Larger differences between non-volatile and semi-volatile SOA (upto a factor of 5) correspond to continental outflow over the oceans. Compared to a global dataset of surface Aerosol Mass Spectrometer measurements and the US IMPROVE network measurements, the non-volatile SOA with fragmentation treatment (FragNVSOA) agrees best at rural locations. Urban SOA is under-predicted but this may be due to the coarse model resolution. All our three revised treatments show much better agreement with aircraft measurements of organic aerosols (OA) over the N. American Arctic and sub-Arctic in spring and summer, compared to the standard CAM5 formulation. This is due to treating SOA precursor gases from biomass burning, and long-range transport of biomass burning OA at elevated levels. The revised model configuration that include fragmentation (both semi-volatile and non-volatile SOA) show much better agreement with MODIS AOD data over regions dominated by biomass burning during the summer, and predict biomass burning as the largest global source of OA followed by biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The non-volatile and semi-volatile configuration predict the direct radiative forcing of SOA as -0.5 W m-2 and -0.26 W m-2 respectively, at top of the atmosphere, which are higher than previously estimated by most models, but in reasonable

  20. SOAs for Scientific Applications: Experiences and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sriram; Bhatia, Karan

    2011-01-01

    Over the past several years, with the advent of the Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA) (19) and the Web Services Resource Framework (WSRF) (25), Service-oriented Architectures (SOA) and Web service technologies have been embraced in the field of scientific and Grid computing. These new principles promise to help make scientific infrastructures simpler to use, more cost effective to implement, and easier to maintain. However, understanding how to leverage these developments to actually design and build a system remains more of an art than a science. In this paper, we present some positions learned through experience that provide guidance in leveraging SOA technologies to build scientific infrastructures. In addition, we present the technical challenges that need to be addressed in building an SOA, and as a case study, we present the SOA that we have designed for the National Biomedical Computation Resource (NBCR) (9) community. We discuss how we have addressed these technical challenges, and present the overall architecture, the individual software toolkits developed, the client interfaces, and the usage scenarios. We hope that our experiences prove to be useful in building similar infrastructures for other scientific applications. PMID:21308003

  1. Implementation of optical logic gates at 160 Gbps using nonlinear effect of single SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovkesh; Marwaha, Anupma

    2015-07-01

    This paper come across with the design of all optical logic gates OR, AND, NOT, NOR, XNOR and NOT at ultra high speed by using SOA (semiconductor optical amplifier). All logic gates are obtained by principle of XGM (cross gain modulation) and FWM (four wave mixing) in SOA at 160 Gbps. The OR, AND, NOR logics of two data sources are obtained by using additional pump signal, while XNOR logic is obtain by using two data sources with combined effect of four wave mixing and cross gain modulation. The NOT is obtained by using a pump signal along with the one data source with cross gain modulation effect. Thus realization of these logics at 160 Gbps will lead to revolutionary growth in optical signal processing for various high speed operation applications.

  2. Oxidant supply and aqueous photochemical SOA formation in cloud droplets and aqueous aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turpin, B. J.; Ervens, B.; Lim, Y. B.

    2012-12-01

    Many recent laboratory, field and model studies point to significant contributions to the total secondary organic aerosol (SOA) budget from aqueous phase reactions in cloud droplets and aqueous aerosol particles. Laboratory studies of the photochemical oxidation of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in the aqueous phase show a strong dependence on the initial concentration of dissolved organics, with preferential formation of large molecules (dimers, oligomers) at the high concentrations found in ambient deliquesced aerosol particles. In such experimental studies OH radicals are produced in the aqueous phase (via hydrogen peroxide photolysis) and OH radical is assumed to be the major oxidant. An explicit aqueous photooxidation mechanism has been validated, in part, based on the observed temporal evolution of organic intermediates and products in these experiments. In this work, this mechanism was incorporated into multiphase process models (box, cloud parcel) in order to further explore aqueous SOA formation in dilute cloud droplets and concentrated aerosol particles. We found that the predicted SOA mass in both aqueous phases can be comparable despite the much lower liquid water content in aerosols, where oligomer formation is favored. Direct uptake from the gas phase was the largest source of OH radicals in the aqueous phase. In-situ production through the Fenton reaction (Fe), hydrogen peroxide and nitrate photolysis were minor sources. Since phase transfer is slower than the OH(aq) consumption by organics, modeled OH(aq) concentrations were smaller by 1-2 orders of magnitude than predicted based on thermodynamic equilibrium. Our model studies suggest that, unless there are substantial additional sources of OH radical in the aqueous phase, aqueous SOA formation will be oxidant limited. Since the phase transfer rate is a function of the drop (or particle) surface area, aqueous SOA formation may occur preferentially at or near the drop/particle surface (e.g., be surface

  3. A synthesis theory for self-oscillating adaptive systems /SOAS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, I.; Smay, J.; Shapiro, A.

    1974-01-01

    A quantitative synthesis theory is presented for the Self-Oscillating Adaptive System (SOAS), whose nonlinear element has a static, odd character with hard saturation. The synthesis theory is based upon the quasilinear properties of the SOAS to forced inputs, which permits the extension of quantitative linear feedback theory to the SOAS. A reasonable definition of optimum design is shown to be the minimization of the limit cycle frequency. The great advantages of the SOAS is its zero sensitivity to pure gain changes. However, quasilinearity and control of the limit cycle amplitude at the system output, impose additional constraints which partially or completely cancel this advantage, depending on the numerical values of the design parameters. By means of narrow-band filtering, an additional factor is introduced which permits trade-off between filter complexity and limit cycle frequency minimization.

  4. Seasonal characteristics of oxalic acid and related SOA in the free troposphere of Mt. Hua, central China: implications for sources and formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingjing; Wang, Gehui; Li, Jianjun; Cheng, Chunlei; Ren, Yanqin; Huang, Yao; Cheng, Yuting; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Ting

    2014-09-15

    PM10 aerosols from the summit of Mt. Hua (2060 m a.s.l) in central China during the winter and summer of 2009 were analyzed for dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids and α-dicarbonyls. Molecular composition of dicarboxylic acids (C2-C11) in the free tropospheric aerosols reveals that oxalic acid (C2, 399 ± 261 ng m(-3) in winter and 522 ± 261 ng m(-3) in summer) is the most abundant species in both seasons, followed by malonic (C3) and succinic (C4) acids, being consistent with that on ground levels. Most of the diacids are more abundant in summer than in winter, but adipic (C6) and phthalic (Ph) acids are twice lower in summer, suggesting more significant impact of anthropogenic pollution on the wintertime alpine atmosphere. Moreover, glyoxal (Gly) and methylglyoxal (mGly) are also lower in summer (12 ± 6.1 ng m(-3)) than in winter (22 ± 13 ng m(-3)). As both dicarbonyls are a major precursor of C2, their seasonal variation patterns, which are opposite to those of the diacids, indicate that the mountain troposphere is more oxidative in summer. C2 showed strong linear correlations with levoglucosan in winter and oxidation products of isoprene and monoterpene in summer. PCA analysis further suggested that the wintertime C2 and related SOA in the Mt. Hua troposphere mostly originate from photochemical oxidations of anthropogenic pollutants emitted from biofuel and coal combustion in lowland regions. On contrast, the summertime C2 and related SOA mostly originate from further oxidation of the mountainous isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. The AIM model calculation results showed that oxalic acid concentration well correlated with particle acidity (R(2)=0.60) but not correlated with particle liquid water content, indicating that particle acidity favors the organic acid formation because aqueous-phase C2 production is the primary mechanism of C2 formation in ambient aerosols and is driven by acid-catalyzed oxidation.

  5. Implications of Low Volatility SOA and Gas-Phase Fragmentation Reactions on SOA Loadings and their Spatial and Temporal Evolution in the Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Easter, Richard C.; Beranek, Josef; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2013-04-27

    Recent laboratory and field measurements by a number of groups show that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) evaporates orders of magnitude slower than traditional models assume. In addition, chemical transport models using volatility basis set (VBS) SOA schemes neglect gas-phase fragmentation reactions, which are known to be extremely important. In this work, we present modeling studies to investigate the implications of non-evaporating SOA and gas-phase fragmentation reactions. Using the 3-D chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, we show that previous parameterizations, which neglect fragmentation during multi-generational gas-phase chemistry of semi-volatile/inter-mediate volatility organics ("aging SIVOC"), significantly over-predict SOA as compared to aircraft measurements downwind of Mexico City. In sharp contrast, the revised models, which include gas-phase fragmentation, show much better agreement with measurements downwind of Mexico City. We also demonstrate complex differences in spatial SOA distributions when we transform SOA to non-volatile secondary organic aerosol (NVSOA) to account for experimental observations. Using a simple box model, we show that for same amount of SOA precursors, earlier models that do not employ multi-generation gas-phase chemistry of precursors ("non-aging SIVOC"), produce orders of magnitude lower SOA than "aging SIVOC" parameterizations both with and without fragmentation. In addition, traditional absorptive partitioning models predict almost complete SOA evaporation at farther downwind locations for both "non-aging SIVOC" and "aging SIVOC" with fragmentation. In contrast, in our revised approach, SOA transformed to NVSOA implies significantly higher background concentrations as it remains in particle phase even under highly dilute conditions. This work has significant implications on understanding the role of multi-generational chemistry and NVSOA formation on SOA evolution in the atmosphere.

  6. Hybrid III-V/silicon SOA for photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, P.; Brenot, R.; Le Liepvre, A.; Accard, A.; Make, D.; Levaufre, G.; Girard, N.; Lelarge, F.; Duan, G.-H.; Olivier, S.; Jany, Christophe; Kopp, C.; Menezo, S.

    2014-11-01

    Silicon photonics has reached a considerable level of maturity, and the complexity of photonic integrated circuits (PIC) is steadily increasing. As the number of components in a PIC grows, loss management becomes more and more important. Integrated semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) will be crucial components in future photonic systems for loss compensation. In addition, there are specific applications, where SOAs can play a key role beyond mere loss compensation, such as modulated reflective SOAs in carrier distributed passive optical networks or optical gates in packet switching. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find a generic integration platform that includes the possibility of integrating SOAs on silicon. Various methods are currently being developed to integrate light emitters on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide circuits. Many of them use III-V materials for the hybrid integration on SOI. Various types of lasers have been demonstrated by several groups around the globe. In some of the integration approaches, SOAs can be implemented using essentially the same technology as for lasers. In this paper we will focus on SOA devices based on a hybrid integration approach where III-V material is bonded on SOI and a vertical optical mode transfer is used to couple light between SOI waveguides and guides formed in bonded III-V semiconductor layers. In contrast to evanescent coupling schemes, this mode transfer allows for a higher confinement factor in the gain material and thus for efficient light amplification over short propagation distances. We will outline the fabrication process of our hybrid components and present some of the most interesting results from a fabricated and packaged hybrid SOA.

  7. Volume 3a - Area Source Methods - Additional Documents

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nonpoint (area) source emission reference materials from the Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP). Provides nonpoint source guidance on ammonia emissions from natural landscapes, fertilized soils, and nonagricultural sources.

  8. Formation of Epoxide Derived SOA and Gas-Phase Acids through Aqueous Aerosol Processing in the Southeastern United States during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skog, K.; Teng, A.; Nguyen, T. B.; Nguyen, K.; Suda, S. R.; Xu, L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Feiner, P. A.; Zhang, L.; Olson, K. F.; Koss, A.; Wild, R. J.; St Clair, J.; Crounse, J.; Baumann, K.; Wennberg, P. O.; Petters, M.; Carlton, A. M. G.; Ng, N. L.; Brune, W. H.; De Gouw, J. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Brown, S. S.; Edgerton, E. S.; McNeill, V. F.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) contributes to climate and adversely affects human health, but the formation of SOA is poorly understood. Recent studies have proposed that aqueous processing of water-soluble compounds like glyoxal and IEPOX can help explain the abundance of organosulfates, higher oxygen to carbon ratios, and SOA abundance. A comprehensive set of ambient gas- and aerosol-phase data was collected during June and July of 2013 as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Centreville, AL ground site. Both gas-phase photochemistry and aqueous-phase aerosol chemistry were modeled using a zero-dimensional box model. While it has been suggested that glyoxal can contribute to aqueous aerosol through the formation of acids and higher-molecular-weight compounds, it did not produce enhanced aqSOA concentrations. Instead, processing of aqueous glyoxal resulted in the production of gas-phase acids. AqSOA consisted almost entirely of epoxide processing products, mainly from the processing of IEPOX to methyl tetrol, and the organosulfate. In addition, the pinene oxides contributed to the formation of aqSOA, through the formation of organosulfates, diols, and organonitrates. These data are consistent with the abundance of IEPOX and pinene oxide organonitrate derived SOA seen at this site.

  9. Impact of NOx on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from β-pinene photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrafzadeh, Mehrnaz; Pullinen, Iida; Springer, Monika; Kleist, Einhard; Tillmann, Ralf; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Hastie, Donald R.; Wildt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from atmospheric oxidation of volatile organics contributes substantially to the global aerosol load. It has been shown that odd nitrogen (NOx) has a significant influence on the formation of this SOA. In this study, we investigated SOA formation from β-pinene photooxidation in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC) under varying NOx conditions. At higher-NOx levels, the SOA yield was significantly suppressed by increasing the NOx concentration. However at lower-NOx levels the opposite trend, an increase in SOA with increasing NOx concentration, was observed. This increase was likely due to the increased OH concentration in the stirred flow reactor. By holding the OH concentration constant for all experiments we removed the potential effect of OH concentration on SOA mass growth. In this case increasing the NOx concentration only decreased the SOA yield. In addition, the impact of NOx on SOA formation was explored in the presence of ammonium sulfate seed aerosols. This suggested that SOA yield was only slightly suppressed under increasing NOx concentrations when seed aerosol was present.

  10. Effect of Vapor Pressure Scheme on Multiday Evolution of SOA in an Explicit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Emmons, L. K.; Tyndall, G. S.; Valorso, R.

    2011-12-01

    Recent modeling of the evolution of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) has led to the critically important prediction that SOA mass continues to increase for several days after emission of primary pollutants. This growth of organic aerosol in dispersing plumes originating from urban point sources has direct implications for regional aerosol radiative forcing. We investigate the robustness of predicted SOA mass growth downwind of Mexico City in the model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), by assessing its sensitivity to the choice of vapor pressure prediction scheme. We also explore the implications for multi-day SOA mass growth of glassification / solidification of SOA constituents during aging. Finally we use output from the MOZART-4 chemical transport model to evaluate our results in the regional and global context.

  11. Impacts of Oil and Gas Exploration Activities on SOA formation in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahreini, R.; Vu, K. K. T.; Dingle, J. H.; Apel, E. C.; Blake, N. J.; Campos, T. L.; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F. M.; Fried, A.; Herndon, S. C.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Huey, L. G.; Kaser, L.; Mauldin, L.; Meinardi, S.; Montzka, D.; Nowak, J. B.; Richter, D.; Roscioli, J. R.; Schroeder, J.; Shertz, S.; Stell, M. H.; Tanner, D.; Tyndall, G. S.; Walega, J.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Oil and gas exploration activities (O&G) in Wattenberg Field, located north of the Denver Metropolitan area, have expanded in the last few years. Although VOC emissions and the potential for ozone formation in the area from these sources have been studied previously, no information is available on the impact on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. During the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE), airborne measurements of trace gases and aerosol composition were made in the northern Front Range during July-August 2014. We present analyses on evolution of organic aerosol (OA) and their precursors in order to assess the impact of urban vs. O&G emissions on SOA formation. Significant contribution of SOA to total OA was observed in pure urban and urban plumes mixed with O&G emissions. Under an OH-exposure of 2.8×1011 molecule cm-3 s, enhancement ratios of OA relative to carbon monoxide (ΔOA/ΔCO) increased by factors of ~3.6-5.4; however, (ΔSOA/ΔCO)urban+O&G was 87% higher than (ΔSOA/ΔCO)urban. Predicted ΔSOA/ΔCO values from the oxidation of C7-C11 alkanes, C6-C9 aromatics, and biogenics were about a factor of 10-15 too small compared to the measurements. Predicated alkane-derived SOA contributed to 38% (16%) of anthropogenic ΔSOA/ΔCO values in urban+O&G- (urban-) influenced air masses.

  12. Formation of Organic Tracers for Isoprene SOA under Acidic Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical compositions of a series of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples, formed by irradiating mixtures of isoprene and NO in a smog chamber in the absence or presence of acidic aerosols, were analyzed using derivatization-based GC-MS methods. In addition to the known is...

  13. Constraining uncertainties in particle-wall deposition correction during SOA formation in chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, Theodora; McVay, Renee C.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Seinfeld, John H.; Ng, Nga L.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of vapor-wall deposition on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has gained significant attention; however, uncertainties in experimentally derived SOA mass yields due to uncertainties in particle-wall deposition remain. Different approaches have been used to correct for particle-wall deposition in SOA formation studies, each having its own set of assumptions in determining the particle-wall loss rate. In volatile and intermediate-volatility organic compound (VOC and IVOC) systems in which SOA formation is governed by kinetically limited growth, the effect of vapor-wall deposition on SOA mass yields can be constrained by using high surface area concentrations of seed aerosol to promote the condensation of SOA-forming vapors onto seed aerosol instead of the chamber walls. However, under such high seed aerosol levels, the presence of significant coagulation may complicate the particle-wall deposition correction. Here, we present a model framework that accounts for coagulation in chamber studies in which high seed aerosol surface area concentrations are used. For the α-pinene ozonolysis system, we find that after accounting for coagulation, SOA mass yields remain approximately constant when high seed aerosol surface area concentrations ( ≥ 8000 µm2 cm-3) are used, consistent with our prior study (Nah et al., 2016) showing that α-pinene ozonolysis SOA formation is governed by quasi-equilibrium growth. In addition, we systematically assess the uncertainties in the calculated SOA mass concentrations and yields between four different particle-wall loss correction methods over the series of α-pinene ozonolysis experiments. At low seed aerosol surface area concentrations (< 3000 µm2 cm-3), the SOA mass yields at peak SOA growth obtained from the particle-wall loss correction methods agree within 14 %. However, at high seed aerosol surface area concentrations ( ≥ 8000 µm2 cm-3), the SOA mass yields at peak SOA growth obtained from different particle

  14. SOA formation potential of emissions from soil and leaf litter.

    PubMed

    Faiola, Celia L; Vanderschelden, Graham S; Wen, Miao; Elloy, Farah C; Cobos, Douglas R; Watts, Richard J; Jobson, B Thomas; Vanreken, Timothy M

    2014-01-21

    Soil and leaf litter are significant global sources of small oxidized volatile organic compounds, VOCs (e.g., methanol and acetaldehyde). They may also be significant sources of larger VOCs that could act as precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. To investigate this, soil and leaf litter samples were collected from the University of Idaho Experimental Forest and transported to the laboratory. There, the VOC emissions were characterized and used to drive SOA formation via dark, ozone-initiated reactions. Monoterpenes dominated the emission profile with emission rates as high as 228 μg-C m(-2) h(-1). The composition of the SOA produced was similar to biogenic SOA formed from oxidation of ponderosa pine emissions and α-pinene. Measured soil and litter monoterpene emission rates were compared with modeled canopy emissions. Results suggest surface soil and litter monoterpene emissions could range from 12 to 136% of canopy emissions in spring and fall. Thus, emissions from leaf litter may potentially extend the biogenic emissions season, contributing to significant organic aerosol formation in the spring and fall when reduced solar radiation and temperatures reduce emissions from living vegetation.

  15. Formation of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and its influence on biogenic SOA properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, E. U.; Hallquist, M.; Kristensen, K.; Glasius, M.; Bohn, B.; Fuchs, H.; Kammer, B.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Nehr, S.; Rubach, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wu, H.-C.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2012-08-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic precursors has been studied exposing reaction mixtures to natural sunlight in the SAPHIR chamber in Jülich, Germany. Several experiments with exclusively anthropogenic precursors were performed to establish a relationship between yield and organic aerosol mass loading for the atmospheric relevant range of aerosol loads of 0.01 to 10 μg m-3. The yields (0.5-9%) were comparable to previous data and further used for the detailed evaluation of the mixed biogenic and anthropogenic experiments. For the mixed experiments a number of different oxidation schemes were addressed. The reactivity, the sequence of addition, and the amount of the precursors influenced the SOA properties. Monoterpene oxidation products, including carboxylic acids and dimer esters were identified in the aged aerosol at levels comparable to ambient air. OH radicals were measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence, which allowed for establishing relations of aerosol properties and composition to the experimental OH dose. Furthermore, the OH measurements in combination with the derived yields for anthropogenic SOA enabled application of a simplified model to calculate the chemical turnover of the anthropogenic precursor and corresponding anthropogenic contribution to the mixed aerosol. The estimated anthropogenic contributions were ranging from small (≈8%) up to significant fraction (>50%) providing a suitable range to study the effect of aerosol composition on the aerosol volatility (volume fraction remaining at 343 K: 0.86-0.94). The anthropogenic aerosol had higher oxygen to carbon ratio O/C and was less volatile than the biogenic fraction. However, in order to produce significant amount of anthropogenic SOA the reaction mixtures needed a higher OH dose that also increased O/C and provided a less volatile aerosol. A strong positive correlation was found between changes in volatility and O/C with the exception during dark

  16. Light absorption coefficient measurement of SOA using a UV-Visible spectrometer connected with an integrating sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Jang, Myoseon

    2011-08-01

    A method for measuring an aerosol light absorption coefficient ( B a) has been developed using a conventional UV-visible spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere covering a wide range of wavelengths (280-800 nm). The feasibility of the proposed method was evaluated in both the transmittance mode (TUV-IS) and the reflective mode (RUV-IS) using the reference aerosol known for the cross-sectional area. The aerosol was collected on a conventional filter and measured for B a values. The resulting RUV-IS method was applied to measure light absorption of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). SOA was produced through photooxidation of different precursor hydrocarbons such as toluene, d-limonene and α-pinene in the presence of NO x (60-70 ppb) and inorganic seed aerosol using a 2-m 3 indoor Teflon film chamber. Of the three precursor hydrocarbons, the B a value of toluene SOA (0.574 m 2 g -1 at 350 nm) was the highest compared with B a values for α-pinene SOA (0.029 m 2 g -1) and d-limonene SOA (0.038 m 2 g -1). When d-limonene SOA or toluene SOA was internally mixed with neutral [(NH 4) 2SO 4] or acidic inorganic seed (NH 4HSO 4:H 2SO 4 = 1:1 by mole), the SOA showed 2-3 times greater B a values at 350 nm than the SOA with no seed. Aerosol aging with a light source for this study reduced B a values of SOA (e.g., on average 10% for toluene SOA and 30% for d-limonene SOA within 4 h). Overall, weak absorption appeared for chamber-generated SOA over wavelengths ranging from 280 to 550 nm, which fall into the sunlight spectrum.

  17. How will SOA change in the future?: SOA IN THE FUTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guangxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Zhou, Cheng

    2016-02-17

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) plays a significant role in the Earth system by altering its radiative balance. Here we use an Earth system model coupled with an explicit SOA formation module to estimate the response of SOA concentrations to changes in climate, anthropogenic emissions, and human land use in the future. We find that climate change is the major driver for SOA change under the representative concentration pathways for the 8.5 future scenario. Climate change increases isoprene emission rate by 18% with the effect of temperature increases outweighing that of the CO2 inhibition effect. Annual mean global SOA mass is increased by 25% as a result of climate change. However, anthropogenic emissions and land use change decrease SOA. The net effect is that future global SOA burden in 2100 is nearly the same as that of the present day. The SOA concentrations over the Northern Hemisphere are predicted to decline in the future due to the control of sulfur emissions.

  18. Effects of SOA and saccharin adulteration on Polycose preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, A; Vigorito, M

    1987-01-01

    Female rats were tested for their preference for a 32% Polycose solution, and for 32% Polycose solutions made bitter or sweet by adulteration with either 0.05% sucrose octa acetate (SOA) or 0.2% saccharin during 24 hr/day two-bottle tests. The rats preferred the saccharin-Polycose to the Polycose, the Polycose to the SOA-Polycose, and strongly preferred the saccharin-Polycose to the SOA-Polycose solution. Additional rats that were given only a Polycose or an SOA-polycose solution, in addition to chow and water, consumed similar amounts of solution, and consumed as much as did the rats given the saccharin-Polycose solution. Thus, while SOA adulteration reduces, and saccharin adulteration increases, the relative palatability of Polycose, they do not alter the animal's intake when only one solution is available. In a second experiment rats were given the choice between a 32% Polycose solution and pure Polycose powder, between an SOA-Polycose solution and Polycose powder, or between an SOA-Polycose solution and sucrose powder during both 30-min/day and 24-hr/day preference tests. During the initial short-term test the rats preferred the Polycose solution and, to a lesser degree, the SOA-Polycose solution to the Polycose powder, but they strongly preferred the sucrose powder to the SOA-Polycose solution. During the subsequent long-term test, however, the rats developed a preference for the SOA-Polycose solution over the sucrose powder. The mechanism responsible for this preference switch is not certain, but it may be related to the postingestive effects of the solution, and may also be responsible for the rat's hyperphagic response to carbohydrates in solution form but not in powder form.

  19. Percolation model with an additional source of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    The ranges of transmission of the mobiles in a mobile ad hoc network are not uniform in reality. They are affected by the temperature fluctuation in air, obstruction due to the solid objects, even the humidity difference in the environment, etc. How the varying range of transmission of the individual active elements affects the global connectivity in the network may be an important practical question to ask. Here a model of percolation phenomena, with an additional source of disorder, is introduced for a theoretical understanding of this problem. As in ordinary percolation, sites of a square lattice are occupied randomly with probability p . Each occupied site is then assigned a circular disk of random value R for its radius. A bond is defined to be occupied if and only if the radii R1 and R2 of the disks centered at the ends satisfy a certain predefined condition. In a very general formulation, one divides the R1-R2 plane into two regions by an arbitrary closed curve. One defines a point within one region as representing an occupied bond; otherwise it is a vacant bond. The study of three different rules under this general formulation indicates that the percolation threshold always varies continuously. This threshold has two limiting values, one is pc(sq) , the percolation threshold for the ordinary site percolation on the square lattice, and the other is unity. The approach of the percolation threshold to its limiting values are characterized by two exponents. In a special case, all lattice sites are occupied by disks of random radii R ∈{0 ,R0} and a percolation transition is observed with R0 as the control variable, similar to the site occupation probability.

  20. The sources, properties, and evolution of organic aerosols in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Organic aerosols (OA) account for about 1/2 of the submicron particle mass in the atmosphere leading to important impacts on climate, human health, and other issues, but their sources, properties, and evolution are poorly understood. OA is comprised of primary OA (POA, emitted in the particle phase) and secondary OA (SOA, formed by gas-to-particle conversion). Together with others in the community and contrary to the understanding at the time, we demonstrated in the mid-2000s that SOA dominates over POA at most locations. This paradigm shift has led to intense research on the sources, processing, properties, and fate of SOA. Because pre-existing and commercial instruments were very limited for the analysis of the complex mixtures of highly oxidized species comprising real OA, we developed or co-developed several experimental and data analysis techniques aimed at extracting more information out of ambient and laboratory air, and pioneered their application in field experiments. We proposed a new paradigm (Jimenez et al., Science, 2009) that is consistent with worldwide measurements and in which OA and OA precursor gases evolve continuously by becoming increasingly oxidized, less volatile, and more hygroscopic, leading to the formation of oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA), with concentrations comparable to those of sulfate aerosol throughout the Northern Hemisphere. The amount of SOA formed from urban air is remarkably consistent across the world, although the contributions of different sources remain a subject of debate. Biomass burning emissions rarely form additional OA mass after emission, although rapid chemical aging is always observed. Global model-measurement comparisons suggest the need for a large (100 Tg/yr) "anthropogenically-controlled" SOA source, thought to be dominated by anthropogenically-enhanced biogenic SOA. SOA formed from several pathways from biogenic emissions is starting to be better characterized, as are key SOA properties such as

  1. A comparison of summertime secondary organic aerosol source contributions at contrasting urban locations.

    PubMed

    Stone, Elizabeth A; Zhou, Jiabin; Snyder, David C; Rutter, Andrew P; Mieritz, Mark; Schauer, James J

    2009-05-15

    Primary and secondary sources contributing to atmospheric organic aerosol during the months of July and August were quantitatively assessed in three North American urban areas: Cleveland, Ohio, and Detroit, Michigan, in the Midwest region and Riverside, California, in the Los Angeles Air Basin. Organic molecular marker species unique to primary aerosol sources and secondarytracers derived from isoprene, alpha-pinene, beta-caryophyllene, and toluene were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Source contributions from motor vehicles, biomass burning, vegetative detritus, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were estimated using chemical mass balance (CMB) modeling. In Cleveland, primary sources accounted for 37 +/- 2% of ambient organic carbon, measured biogenic and anthropogenic secondary sources contributed 46 +/- 6%, and other unknown sources contributed 17 +/- 4%. Similarly, Detroit aerosol was determined to be 44 +/- 5% primary and 37 +/- 3% secondary, while 19 +/- 7% was unaccounted for by measured sources. In Riverside, 21 +/- 3% of organic carbon came from primary sources, 26 +/- 5% was attributed to measured secondary sources, and 53 +/- 3% came from other sources that were expected to be secondary in nature. The comparison of samples across these two regions demonstrated that summertime SOA in the Midwestern United States was substantially different from the summertime SOA in the Los Angeles Air Basin and indicated the need to exert caution when generalizing about the sources and nature of SOA across different urban areas. Furthermore, the results of this study suggestthatthe contemporary understanding of SOA sources and formation mechanisms is satisfactory to explainthe majority of SOA in the Midwest Additional SOA sources and mechanisms of formation are needed to explain the majority of SOA in the Los Angeles Air Basin.

  2. Radiation safety attached to radioactive sources management - additional aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Kositsyn, V.F.

    1993-12-31

    Radiation sources are used in many scientific areas. Safety management requirements are determined for them with guarantee of the international and national dose limits unexceeding. As a rule, such dose limits are being developed concerning the type, energy, and flux of main radiation. Lack of knowledge of these attendant radiations can put personnel in danger. The study of the attendant neutron and gamma-radiations for plutonium 128 alpha sources was made.

  3. Fully characterization of an active optical filter based on an equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ye; Li, Ming; Shi, Nuannuan; Tang, Jian; Sun, Shuqian; Zhang, Lihong; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-10-01

    A fully characterization of an active optical filter based on an equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA has been theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. By employing an optical vector network analyzer (OVNA), transmission characteristics of the equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA are obtained. The influences of driven current on transmission characteristics of the equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA are also investigated. In addition to the advantage of integration, the proposed equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA also shows significant application in design of photonic devices for all-optical signal processing and computing.

  4. High speed cross-amplitude modulation in concatenated SOA-EAM-SOA.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Ciaran S; Manning, Robert J

    2012-06-18

    We observe a near-ideal high speed amplitude impulse response in an SOA-EAM-SOA configuration under optimum conditions. Full amplitude recovery times as low as 10 ps with modulation depths of 70% were observed in pump-probe measurements. System behavior could be controlled by the choice of signal wavelength, SOA current biases and EAM reverse bias voltages. Experimental data and impulse response modelling indicated that the slow tail in the gain response of first SOA was negated by a combination of cross-absorption modulation between pump and modulated CW probe, and self-gain modulation of the modulated CW probe in both the EAM and second SOA.

  5. Formation of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and its influence on biogenic SOA properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuelsson, E. U.; Hallquist, M.; Kristensen, K.; Glasius, M.; Bohn, B.; Fuchs, H.; Kammer, B.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Nehr, S.; Rubach, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wu, H.-C.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2013-03-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic precursors has been studied exposing reaction mixtures to natural sunlight in the SAPHIR chamber in Jülich, Germany. In this study aromatic compounds served as examples of anthropogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) and a mixture of α-pinene and limonene as an example for biogenic VOC. Several experiments with exclusively aromatic precursors were performed to establish a relationship between yield and organic aerosol mass loading for the atmospheric relevant range of aerosol loads of 0.01 to 10 μg m-3. The yields (0.5 to 9%) were comparable to previous data and further used for the detailed evaluation of the mixed biogenic and anthropogenic experiments. For the mixed experiments a number of different oxidation schemes were addressed. The reactivity, the sequence of addition, and the amount of the precursors influenced the SOA properties. Monoterpene oxidation products, including carboxylic acids and dimer esters were identified in the aged aerosol at levels comparable to ambient air. OH radicals were measured by Laser Induced Fluorescence, which allowed for establishing relations of aerosol properties and composition to the experimental OH dose. Furthermore, the OH measurements in combination with the derived yields for aromatic SOA enabled application of a simplified model to calculate the chemical turnover of the aromatic precursor and corresponding anthropogenic contribution to the mixed aerosol. The estimated anthropogenic contributions were ranging from small (≈8%) up to significant fraction (>50%) providing a suitable range to study the effect of aerosol composition on the aerosol volatility (volume fraction remaining (VFR) at 343 K: 0.86-0.94). The aromatic aerosol had higher oxygen to carbon ratio O/C and was less volatile than the biogenic fraction. However, in order to produce significant amount of aromatic SOA the reaction mixtures needed a higher OH dose that also

  6. Analysis of ROI in Industry SOA Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    22 III. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OA AND SOA AND HOW SOA ACCOMPLISHES NOA STRATEGY ...71 ix LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. DON OA Strategy ...architecture model. B. BACKGROUND Traditionally, the Navy has had rather inflexible acquisition strategies and has locked itself into single ―stove

  7. Key parameters controlling OH-initiated formation of secondary organic aerosol in the aqueous phase (aqSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, Barbara; Sorooshian, Armin; Lim, Yong B.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2014-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous phase of cloud droplets and aerosol particles (aqSOA) might contribute substantially to the total SOA burden and help to explain discrepancies between observed and predicted SOA properties. In order to implement aqSOA formation in models, key processes controlling formation within the multiphase system have to be identified. We explore parameters affecting phase transfer and OH(aq)-initiated aqSOA formation as a function of OH(aq) availability. Box model results suggest OH(aq)-limited photochemical aqSOA formation in cloud water even if aqueous OH(aq) sources are present. This limitation manifests itself as an apparent surface dependence of aqSOA formation. We estimate chemical OH(aq) production fluxes, necessary to establish thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases (based on Henry's law constants) for both cloud and aqueous particles. Estimates show that no (currently known) OH(aq) source in cloud water can remove this limitation, whereas in aerosol water, it might be feasible. Ambient organic mass (oxalate) measurements in stratocumulus clouds as a function of cloud drop surface area and liquid water content exhibit trends similar to model results. These findings support the use of parameterizations of cloud-aqSOA using effective droplet radius rather than liquid water volume or drop surface area. Sensitivity studies suggest that future laboratory studies should explore aqSOA yields in multiphase systems as a function of these parameters and at atmospherically relevant OH(aq) levels. Since aerosol-aqSOA formation significantly depends on OH(aq) availability, parameterizations might be less straightforward, and oxidant (OH) sources within aerosol water emerge as one of the major uncertainties in aerosol-aqSOA formation.

  8. Aqueous SOA formation from radical oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, P.; Siekmann, F.; Ravier, S.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Clément, J.; Ervens, B.; Monod, A.

    2013-12-01

    It is now accepted that one of the important pathways of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation occurs through aqueous phase chemistry in the atmosphere. However, the chemical mechanisms leading to macromolecules are still not well understood. It was recently shown that oligomer production by OH radical oxidation in the aerosol aqueous phase from α-dicarbonyl precursors, such as methylglyoxal and glyoxal, is irreversible and fast. We have investigated the aqueous phase photooxidation of MACR and MVK, which are biogenic organic compounds derived from isoprene. Aqueous phase photooxidation of MVK and MACR was investigated in a photoreactor using photolysis of H2O2 as OH radical source. Electrospray high resolution mass spectrometry analysis of the solutions brought clear evidence for the formation of oligomer systems having a mass range of up to 1800 Da within less than 15 minutes of reaction. Highest oligomer formation rates were obtained under conditions of low dissolved oxygen, highest temperature (T = 298 K) and highest precursor initial concentrations ([MVK]0 = 20 mM). A radical mechanism of oligomerization is proposed to explain the formation of the high molecular weight products. Furthermore, we quantified the total amount of carbon present in oligomers. Kinetic parameters of the proposed oligomerization mechanism are constrained by means of a box model that is able to reproduce the temporal evolution of intermediates and products as observed in the laboratory experiments. Additional model simulations for atmospherically-relevant conditions will be presented that show the extent to which these radical processes contribute to SOA formation in the atmospheric multiphase system as compared to other aqueous phase as well as traditional SOA sources. MVK time profile (as measured by UV Spectroscopy) and mass spectra (obtained using UPLC-ESI-MS for the retention time range 0-5 min in the positive mode) at 5, 10 and 50 min of reaction (MVK 20 mM, 25° C, under

  9. Local and distant source contributions to secondary organic aerosol in the Beijing urban area in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jian; An, Junling; Qu, Yu; Chen, Yong; Li, Ying; Tang, Yujia; Wang, Feng; Xiang, Weiling

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of local and distant source contributions to particulate matter is a key issue to improving air quality in large urban areas, but few studies have focused on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) source contributions in a large area, especially in China. In this study, we extended the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMX) version 5.4, replacing the two-product approach by the volatility basis-set (VBS) approach, with updated SOA yields based on smog chamber studies. The modules related to the computationally efficient particulate source apportionment technology (PSAT) used in CAMX v5.4 were extended based on the volatility basis set (VBS) approach. The updated version of the CAMX model was then used to calculate the local and distant source contributions to SOA in Beijing for the first time. The results indicated that the VBS approach substantially improved hourly, daily, and monthly SOA simulations, compared with the two-product approach and the observations. In August 2007, the local source contributions to anthropogenic and biogenic SOA in Beijing were 23.8% and 16.6%, respectively; distant sources dominated for both anthropogenic and biogenic SOA in Beijing: Northern Hebei, Middle Hebei, Northeast China, Inner Mongolia, Shandong, and Tianjin (including Xianghe) contributed 5.1%-18.2% to anthropogenic SOA in Beijing; whereas, Inner Mongolia, Northern Hebei, and Northeast China contributed 12.2%, 18.6%, and 10.1%, respectively, to biogenic SOA in Beijing. Additionally, other areas outside China respectively contributed 5.3% and 10.8% to anthropogenic and biogenic SOA in Beijing: this could be related to strong summer monsoon.

  10. ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOMS: AN ADDITIONAL SOURCE FOR HELIOSPHERIC PICKUP IONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bochsler, Peter; Moebius, Eberhard

    2010-09-20

    Recently, Schwadron and McComas discussed the possibility of inner source pickup particles originating from the ionization of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), based on new data from the IBEX mission. This proposition has some interesting features, namely, it might be able to explain why inner source pickup ions (PUIs) have a composition resembling solar abundances and show no indication of overabundance of refractory elements, although this should be expected, if the conventional explanation of solar wind-dust interaction for the origin of this heliospheric component were correct. In this Letter, we explore further consequences for ENA-related PUIs and investigate their velocity distributions. We conclude that this model will not reproduce the observed velocity distributions of inner source PUIs and point out a substantial deviation in their composition. However, it seems likely that the ionization of ENAs as observed with IBEX could contribute a significant amount of heliospheric suprathermal tail ions. Some possible consequences of our investigation for heliospheric particle populations are briefly discussed.

  11. Chemical oxidative potential of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the photooxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuet, Wing Y.; Chen, Yunle; Xu, Lu; Fok, Shierly; Gao, Dong; Weber, Rodney J.; Ng, Nga L.

    2017-01-01

    Particulate matter (PM), of which a significant fraction is comprised of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), has received considerable attention due to its health implications. In this study, the water-soluble oxidative potential (OPWS) of SOA generated from the photooxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic hydrocarbon precursors (isoprene, α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, pentadecane, m-xylene, and naphthalene) under different reaction conditions (RO2+ HO2 vs. RO2+ NO dominant, dry vs. humid) was characterized using dithiothreitol (DTT) consumption. The measured intrinsic OPWS-DTT values ranged from 9 to 205 pmol min-1 µg-1 and were highly dependent on the specific hydrocarbon precursor, with naphthalene and isoprene SOA generating the highest and lowest OPWS-DTT values, respectively. Humidity and RO2 fate affected OPWS-DTT in a hydrocarbon-specific manner, with naphthalene SOA exhibiting the most pronounced effects, likely due to the formation of nitroaromatics. Together, these results suggest that precursor identity may be more influential than reaction condition in determining SOA oxidative potential, demonstrating the importance of sources, such as incomplete combustion, to aerosol toxicity. In the context of other PM sources, all SOA systems, with the exception of naphthalene SOA, were less DTT active than ambient sources related to incomplete combustion, including diesel and gasoline combustion as well as biomass burning. Finally, naphthalene SOA was as DTT active as biomass burning aerosol, which was found to be the most DTT-active OA source in a previous ambient study. These results highlight a need to consider SOA contributions (particularly from anthropogenic hydrocarbons) to health effects in the context of hydrocarbon emissions, SOA yields, and other PM sources.

  12. Molecular transformations of phenolic SOA during photochemical aging in the aqueous phase: competition among oligomerization, functionalization, and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lu; Smith, Jeremy; Laskin, Alexander; George, Katheryn M.; Anastasio, Cort; Laskin, Julia; Dillner, Ann M.; Zhang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    Organic aerosol is formed and transformed in atmospheric aqueous phases (e.g., cloud and fog droplets and deliquesced airborne particles containing small amounts of water) through a multitude of chemical reactions. Understanding these reactions is important for a predictive understanding of atmospheric aging of aerosols and their impacts on climate, air quality, and human health. In this study, we investigate the chemical evolution of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA) formed during reactions of phenolic compounds with two oxidants - the triplet excited state of an aromatic carbonyl (3C∗) and hydroxyl radical (OH). Changes in the molecular composition of aqSOA as a function of aging time are characterized using an offline nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (nano-DESI MS) whereas the real-time evolution of SOA mass, elemental ratios, and average carbon oxidation state (OSC) are monitored using an online aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Our results indicate that oligomerization is an important aqueous reaction pathway for phenols, especially during the initial stage of photooxidation equivalent to ˜ 2 h irradiation under midday winter solstice sunlight in Northern California. At later reaction times functionalization (i.e., adding polar oxygenated functional groups to the molecule) and fragmentation (i.e., breaking of covalent bonds) become more important processes, forming a large variety of functionalized aromatic and open-ring products with higher OSC values. Fragmentation reactions eventually dominate the photochemical evolution of phenolic aqSOA, forming a large number of highly oxygenated ring-opening molecules with carbon numbers (nC) below 6. The average nC of phenolic aqSOA decreases while average OSC increases over the course of photochemical aging. In addition, the saturation vapor pressures (C∗) of dozens of the most abundant phenolic aqSOA molecules are estimated. A wide range of C∗ values is observed

  13. Molecular transformations of phenolic SOA during photochemical aging in the aqueous phase: competition among oligomerization, functionalization, and fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Laskin, A.; George, K. M.; Anastasio, C.; Laskin, J.; Dillner, A. M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-10-01

    Organic aerosol is formed and transformed in atmospheric aqueous phases (e.g., cloud and fog droplets and deliquesced airborne particles containing small amounts of water) through a multitude of chemical reactions. Understanding these reactions is important for a predictive understanding of atmospheric aging of aerosols and their impacts on climate, air quality, and human health. In this study, we investigate the chemical evolution of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA) formed during reactions of phenolic compounds with two oxidants - the triplet excited state of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (•OH). Changes in the molecular composition of aqSOA as a function of aging time are characterized using an offline nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (nano-DESI MS) whereas the real-time evolution of SOA mass, elemental ratios, and average carbon oxidation state (OSC) are monitored using an online aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Our results indicate that oligomerization is an important aqueous reaction pathway for phenols, especially during the initial stage of photooxidation equivalent to ∼ 2 h irradiation under midday, winter solstice sunlight in northern California. At later reaction times functionalization (i.e., adding polar oxygenated functional groups to the molecule) and fragmentation (i.e., breaking of covalent bonds) become more important processes, forming a large variety of functionalized aromatic and open-ring products with higher OSC values. Fragmentation reactions eventually dominate the photochemical evolution of phenolic aqSOA, forming a large number of highly oxygenated open-ring molecules with carbon numbers (nC) below 6. The average nC of phenolic aqSOA decreases while average OSC increases over the course of photochemical aging. In addition, the saturation vapor pressures C*) of dozens of the most abundant phenolic aqSOA molecules are estimated. A wide range of C* values is observed

  14. Molecular transformations of phenolic SOA during photochemical aging in the aqueous phase: competition among oligomerization, functionalization, and fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Lu; Smith, Jeremy; Laskin, Alexander; ...

    2016-04-13

    Organic aerosol is formed and transformed in atmospheric aqueous phases (e.g., cloud and fog droplets and deliquesced airborne particles containing small amounts of water) through a multitude of chemical reactions. Understanding these reactions is important for a predictive understanding of atmospheric aging of aerosols and their impacts on climate, air quality, and human health. In this study, we investigate the chemical evolution of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA) formed during reactions of phenolic compounds with two oxidants – the triplet excited state of an aromatic carbonyl (3C∗) and hydroxyl radical (•OH). Changes in the molecular composition of aqSOA as amore » function of aging time are characterized using an offline nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (nano-DESI MS) whereas the real-time evolution of SOA mass, elemental ratios, and average carbon oxidation state (OSC) are monitored using an online aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS). Our results indicate that oligomerization is an important aqueous reaction pathway for phenols, especially during the initial stage of photooxidation equivalent to  ∼  2 h irradiation under midday winter solstice sunlight in Northern California. At later reaction times functionalization (i.e., adding polar oxygenated functional groups to the molecule) and fragmentation (i.e., breaking of covalent bonds) become more important processes, forming a large variety of functionalized aromatic and open-ring products with higher OSC values. Fragmentation reactions eventually dominate the photochemical evolution of phenolic aqSOA, forming a large number of highly oxygenated ring-opening molecules with carbon numbers (nC) below 6. The average nC of phenolic aqSOA decreases while average OSC increases over the course of photochemical aging. In addition, the saturation vapor pressures (C∗) of dozens of the most abundant phenolic aqSOA molecules are estimated. A wide range of C∗ values

  15. Present-day to 21st century projections of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from a global climate-aerosol model with an explicit SOA formation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, G.; Penner, J. E.; Zhou, C.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) has been shown to be an important component of non-refractory submicron aerosol in the atmosphere. The presence of SOA can influence the earth's radiative balance by contributing to the absorption and scattering of radiation and by altering the properties of clouds. Globally, a large fraction of SOA originates from biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), emissions of which depend on vegetation cover and climate. Temperature, CO2 concentration, and land use and land cover change have been shown to be major drivers of global isoprene emission changes in future climates. Additionally, the SOA concentration in the atmosphere not only depends on BVOC emissions, but is also controlled by anthropogenic emissions, temperature, precipitation and the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. To project the change in SOA concentrations in the future requires a model that fully couples a BVOC emission model that represents these BVOC emission drivers, together with a sophisticated atmospheric model of SOA formation and properties. Recent studies have suggested that traditional parameterized SOA formation mechanisms that are tuned to fit smog chamber data do not fully account for the complexity and dynamics of real SOA system, calling into the question of the validity and completeness of previous SOA projections. In this study, we investigate the response of SOA mass to future physical climate change, to land cover and land use change, to changes in BVOCs emissions, and to changes in anthropogenic aerosol and gas species emissions for the year 2100, utilizing a global climate-aerosol model (CAM5-IMPACT): the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM5) coupled with a global aerosol model (IMPACT). The IMPACT model has sophisticated detailed process-based mechanisms describing aerosol microphysics and SOA formation through both gas phase and multiphase reactions. We perform sensitivity tests to isolate the relative roles of individual global change

  16. Additional muon calculations for the SLC positron source

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.R.; McCall, R.C.

    1985-04-23

    This note is an update to the muon calculations presented in CN-221 and takes into account: (1) a more complete muon production and transport model, including an estimate of wide angle production based on experimental data, (2) additional earth shielding that will be added on top and both sides of the 2/3 tunnel areas, and (3) a detailed analysis of the earth profile as it pertains to shielding in the direction of the SLAC site boundary. The highest annual dose at the SLAC boundary is found to be 13 mrem/year (4000 hours of operation at 50 kW), and this occurs at a horizontal angle of 0 degrees and a vertical angle of 3.6 degrees relative to the incident beam direction. Although the shielding criteria is 10 mrem/year at the site boundary, the radiation transport model becomes somewhat conservative at large distances from the shield, which should bring the 13 mrem/year number actually well below the criteria. This point is also about 28 feet above the roadway. Extension of this line may strike the ground in the Christmas tree farm beyond the SLAC boundary but there will be additional attenuation due to distance. We do not recommend that any additional shielding be added at this time. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Rethinking the global secondary organic aerosol (SOA) budget: stronger production, faster removal, shorter lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, Alma; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Jo, Duseong S.; Cappa, Christopher D.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Madronich, Sasha; Park, Rokjin J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent laboratory studies suggest that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation rates are higher than assumed in current models. There is also evidence that SOA removal by dry and wet deposition occurs more efficiently than some current models suggest and that photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation may be important (but currently ignored) SOA sinks. Here, we have updated the global GEOS-Chem model to include this new information on formation (i.e., wall-corrected yields and emissions of semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds) and on removal processes (photolysis and heterogeneous oxidation). We compare simulated SOA from various model configurations against ground, aircraft and satellite measurements to assess the extent to which these improved representations of SOA formation and removal processes are consistent with observed characteristics of the SOA distribution. The updated model presents a more dynamic picture of the life cycle of atmospheric SOA, with production rates 3.9 times higher and sinks a factor of 3.6 more efficient than in the base model. In particular, the updated model predicts larger SOA concentrations in the boundary layer and lower concentrations in the upper troposphere, leading to better agreement with surface and aircraft measurements of organic aerosol compared to the base model. Our analysis thus suggests that the long-standing discrepancy in model predictions of the vertical SOA distribution can now be resolved, at least in part, by a stronger source and stronger sinks leading to a shorter lifetime. The predicted global SOA burden in the updated model is 0.88 Tg and the corresponding direct radiative effect at top of the atmosphere is -0.33 W m-2, which is comparable to recent model estimates constrained by observations. The updated model predicts a population-weighed global mean surface SOA concentration that is a factor of 2 higher than in the base model, suggesting the need for a reanalysis of the contribution of

  18. Identification and Characterization of Biogenic SOA Component in Ambient Aerosols Based on Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Jimenez, J.; Allan, J. D.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tian, J.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Williams, B.; Worsnop, D. R.; Coe, H.; Goldstein, A.; Mentel, T. F.

    2008-12-01

    Recently studies have shown that multivariate factor analysis of the highly time-resolved mass spectral data obtained with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) may allow the classification and simplification of complex organic aerosol (OA) mixtures into components that are chemically meaningful and can be related to different sources and transformation processes. Two factor analysis techniques, including the Multiple Component Analysis (MCA) method (Zhang et al., 2007) and the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) method (Paatero and Tapper, 1994), were applied to a Quadrupole-AMS dataset acquired from Chebogue Pt., Nova Scotia in summer 2004. Multiple OA components were determined, including a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) component similar in mass spectra to the hydrocarbon substances observed at urban locations and two oxygenated OA (OA) components that show different fragmentation patterns and oxygen-to-carbon ratios in their mass spectra. The HOA component correlates with inert primary emission tracers (e.g., EC and CO) and likely represents diluted POA transported from urban locations. The highly oxygenated component (OOA-I) correlates well with sulfate and shows a mass spectrum resembling that of fulvic acid - a model compound representative for highly processed/oxidized organics in the environment. The less oxygenated OA component (OOA-II) reveals a mass spectral pattern that compares well with those of the biogenic SOA produced from the mixture of VOCs emitted by spruce, pine and birch trees during exposure to ozone and UV-photolysis in the Jülich plant chamber. In addition, the time series of OOA-II correlates with biogenic SOA tracer compounds determined by the thermal desorption aerosol GC/MS-FID (TAG) instrument. Furthermore, the time-resolved size distributions of OOA components, their correlations with parallel gas and aerosol measurements, and backtrajectory analysis of air masses all support the association of OOA-II to biogenic sources. Finally

  19. Identifying precursors and aqueous organic aerosol formation pathways during the SOAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, Neha; Carlton, Annmarie G.; Surratt, Jason D.; Gold, Avram; Lee, Ben; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Mohr, Claudia; Thornton, Joel A.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Lim, Yong B.; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-11-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere can lead to rapid transformation of organic compounds, forming highly oxidized, low-volatility organic aerosol and, in some cases, light-absorbing (brown) carbon. Because liquid water is globally abundant, this chemistry could substantially impact climate, air quality, and health. Gas-phase precursors released from biogenic and anthropogenic sources are oxidized and fragmented, forming water-soluble gases that can undergo reactions in the aqueous phase (in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols), leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOAAQ). Recent studies have highlighted the role of certain precursors like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone, and epoxides in the formation of SOAAQ. The goal of this work is to identify additional precursors and products that may be atmospherically important. In this study, ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases were scrubbed from the atmosphere into water at Brent, Alabama, during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Hydroxyl (OH⚫) radical oxidation experiments were conducted with the aqueous mixtures collected from SOAS to better understand the formation of SOA through gas-phase followed by aqueous-phase chemistry. Total aqueous-phase organic carbon concentrations for these mixtures ranged from 92 to 179 µM-C, relevant for cloud and fog waters. Aqueous OH-reactive compounds were primarily observed as odd ions in the positive ion mode by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ultra high-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) spectra and tandem MS (MS-MS) fragmentation of these ions were consistent with the presence of carbonyls and tetrols. Products were observed in the negative ion mode and included pyruvate and oxalate, which were confirmed by ion chromatography. Pyruvate and oxalate have been found in the particle phase in many locations (as salts and complexes). Thus

  20. SOA Formation from Aqueous Processing of BVOCs in the Southeastern United States during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) contributes to climate change and adversely affects human health, but the formation of SOA is poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that aqueous processing of water soluble compounds like glyoxal and glycolaldehyde can help close the gap in our understanding of SOA formation. During June and July of 2013, a comprehensive suite of instruments were deployed at the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) Centreville, AL ground site measuring oxidants, glyoxal and glycolaldehyde as well as their precursors, anthropogenic influence, aerosol properties and meteorology. Results from a zero-dimensional gas phase photochemical model and a zero-dimensional aqueous SOA model will be compared to the observations. Analysis will focus on the modeled contribution of glyoxal and glycolaldehyde in the context of closing the aqueous SOA budget.

  1. Chemical characterization of SOA formed from aqueous-phase reactions of phenols with the triplet excited state of carbonyl and hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Lu; Smith, Jeremy; Laskin, Alexander; Anastasio, Cort N.; Laskin, Julia; Zhang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic compounds, which are emitted in significant amounts from biomass burning, can undergo fast reactions in atmospheric aqueous phases to form secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). In this study, we investigate the reactions of phenol and two methoxy-phenols (syringol and guaiacol) with two major aqueous phase oxidants – the triplet excited states of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (•OH). We thoroughly characterize the low-volatility species produced from these reactions and interpret their formation mechanisms using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESIMS), and ion chromatography (IC). A large number of oxygenated molecules are identified, including oligomers containing up to six monomer units, functionalized monomer and oligomers with carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups, and small organic acid anions (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate). The average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios of phenolic aqSOA are in the range of 0.85-1.23, similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) observed in ambient air. The aqSOA compositions are overall similar for the same precursor, but the reactions mediated by 3C* are faster than •OH-mediated reactions and produce more oligomers and hydroxylated species at the point when 50% of the phenol had reacted. Profiles determined using a thermodenuder indicate that the volatility of phenolic aqSOA is influenced by both oligomer content and O/C ratio. In addition, the aqSOA shows enhanced light absorption in the UV-vis region, suggesting that aqueous-phase reactions of phenols are likely an important source of brown carbon in the atmosphere, especially in regions influenced by biomass burning.

  2. Symmetric 40-Gb/s TWDM-PON with 51-dB loss budget by using a single SOA as preamplifier, booster and format converter in ONU.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengxuan; Yi, Lilin; Hu, Weisheng

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, we propose to use a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) in the optical network unit (ONU) to improve the loss budget in time and wavelength division multiplexed-passive optical network (TWDM-PON) systems. The SOA boosts the upstream signal to increase the output power of the electro-absorption modulated laser (EML) and simultaneously pre-amplifies the downstream signal for sensitivity improvement. The penalty caused by cross gain modulation (XGM) effect is negligible due to the low extinction ratio (ER) of upstream signal and the large wavelength difference between upstream and downstream links. In order to achieve a higher output power, the SOA is driven into its saturation region, where the self-phase modulation (SPM) effect converts the intensity into phase information and realizes on-off-keying (OOK) to phase-shifted-keying (PSK) format conversion. In this way, the pattern effect is eliminated, which releases the requirement of gain-clamping on SOA. To further improve the loss budget of upstream link, an Erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is used in the optical line terminal (OLT) to pre-amplify the received signal. For the downstream direction, directly modulated laser (DML) is used as the laser source. Taking advantage of its carrier-less characteristic, directly modulated signal shows high tolerance to fiber nonlinearity, which could support a downstream launch power as high as + 16 dBm per channel. In addition, the signal is pre-amplified by the SOA in ONU before being detected, so the sensitivity limitation for downstream link is also removed. As a result, a truly passive symmetric 40-Gb/s TWDM-PON was demonstrated, achieving a link loss budget of 51 dB.

  3. Chemical characterization of SOA formed from aqueous-phase reactions of phenols with the triplet excited state of carbonyl and hydroxyl radical

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Laskin, A.; ...

    2014-08-19

    Phenolic compounds, which are emitted in significant amounts from biomass burning, can undergo fast reactions in atmospheric aqueous phases to form secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). In this study, we investigate the reactions of phenol and two methoxy-phenols (syringol and guaiacol) with two major aqueous phase oxidants – the triplet excited states of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (·OH). We thoroughly characterize the low-volatility species produced from these reactions and interpret their formation mechanisms using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS), and ion chromatography (IC). A large number of oxygenated molecules are identified,more » including oligomers containing up to six monomer units, functionalized monomer and oligomers with carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups, and small organic acid anions (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate). The average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratios of phenolic aqSOA are in the range of 0.85–1.23, similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) observed in ambient air. The aqSOA compositions are overall similar for the same precursor, but the reactions mediated by 3C* are faster than ·OH-mediated reactions and produce more oligomers and hydroxylated species at the point when 50% of the phenol had reacted. Profiles determined using a thermodenuder indicate that the volatility of phenolic aqSOA is influenced by both oligomer content and O / C ratio. In addition, the aqSOA shows enhanced light absorption in the UV-vis region, suggesting that aqueous-phase reactions of phenols are likely an important source of brown carbon in the atmosphere, especially in regions influenced by biomass burning.« less

  4. SOA-dependent N400 and P300 semantic priming effects using pseudoword primes and a delayed lexical decision.

    PubMed

    Hill, Holger; Ott, Friederike; Weisbrod, Matthias

    2005-06-01

    In a previous semantic priming study, we found a semantic distance effect on the lexical-decision-related P300 when SOA was short (150 ms) only, but no different RT and N400 priming effects between short and long (700 ms) SOAs. To investigate this further, we separated priming from lexical decision, using a delayed lexical decision in the present study. In the short SOA only, primed targets evoked an early peaking (approximately 480 ms) P300-like component, probably because the subject detected the semantic relationship implicitly. We hypothesize that in tasks requiring an immediate lexical decision, this early P300 and the later lexical decision P300 (approximately 600 ms) are additive. Secondly, we found both a direct and an indirect priming effect for both SOAs for the ERP amplitude of the N400 time window. However the N400 component itself was considerably larger in the long SOA than in the short SOA. We interpreted this finding as an ERP correlate for deeper semantic processing in the long SOA, due to increased attention that was provoked by the use of pseudoword primes. In contrast, in the short SOA, subjects might have used a shallowed semantic processing. N400, P300, and RTs are sensitive to semantic priming-but the modulation patterns are not consistent. This raises the question as to which variable reflects an immediate physiological correlate of semantic priming, and which variable reflects co-occurring processes associated with semantic priming.

  5. Science Opportunity Analyzer (SOA) Version 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witoff, Robert J.; Polanskey, Carol A.; Aguinaldo, Anna Marie A.; Liu, Ning; Hofstadter, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    SOA allows scientists to plan spacecraft observations. It facilitates the identification of geometrically interesting times in a spacecraft s orbit that a user can use to plan observations or instrument-driven spacecraft maneuvers. These observations can then be visualized multiple ways in both two- and three-dimensional views. When observations have been optimized within a spacecraft's flight rules, the resulting plans can be output for use by other JPL uplink tools. Now in its eighth major version, SOA improves on these capabilities in a modern and integrated fashion. SOA consists of five major functions: Opportunity Search, Visualization, Observation Design, Constraint Checking, and Data Output. Opportunity Search is a GUI-driven interface to existing search engines that can be used to identify times when a spacecraft is in a specific geometrical relationship with other bodies in the solar system. This function can be used for advanced mission planning as well as for making last-minute adjustments to mission sequences in response to trajectory modifications. Visualization is a key aspect of SOA. The user can view observation opportunities in either a 3D representation or as a 2D map projection. Observation Design allows the user to orient the spacecraft and visualize the projection of the instrument field of view for that orientation using the same views as Opportunity Search. Constraint Checking is provided to validate various geometrical and physical aspects of an observation design. The user has the ability to easily create custom rules or to use official project-generated flight rules. This capability may also allow scientists to easily assess the cost to science if flight rule changes occur. Data Output allows the user to compute ancillary data related to an observation or to a given position of the spacecraft along its trajectory. The data can be saved as a tab-delimited text file or viewed as a graph. SOA combines science planning functionality unique to

  6. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  7. Aqueous aerosol SOA formation: impact on aerosol physical properties.

    PubMed

    Woo, Joseph L; Kim, Derek D; Schwier, Allison N; Li, Ruizhi; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry in aerosol water has recently been recognized as a potentially important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) material. This SOA material may be surface-active, therefore potentially affecting aerosol heterogeneous activity, ice nucleation, and CCN activity. Aqueous aerosol chemistry has also been shown to be a potential source of light-absorbing products ("brown carbon"). We present results on the formation of secondary organic aerosol material in aerosol water and the associated changes in aerosol physical properties from GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a photochemical box model with coupled gas and detailed aqueous aerosol chemistry. The detailed aerosol composition output from GAMMA was coupled with two recently developed modules for predicting a) aerosol surface tension and b) the UV-Vis absorption spectrum of the aerosol, based on our previous laboratory observations. The simulation results suggest that the formation of oligomers and organic acids in bulk aerosol water is unlikely to perturb aerosol surface tension significantly. Isoprene-derived organosulfates are formed in high concentrations in acidic aerosols under low-NO(x) conditions, but more experimental data are needed before the potential impact of these species on aerosol surface tension may be evaluated. Adsorption of surfactants from the gas phase may further suppress aerosol surface tension. Light absorption by aqueous aerosol SOA material is driven by dark glyoxal chemistry and is highest under high-NO(x) conditions, at high relative humidity, in the early morning hours. The wavelength dependence of the predicted absorption spectra is comparable to field observations and the predicted mass absorption efficiencies suggest that aqueous aerosol chemistry can be a significant source of aerosol brown carbon under urban conditions.

  8. Probing Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and Laboratory-Generated SOA with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Hayes, Patrick L.; Liu, Shang; Jimenez, Jose L.; Russell, Lynn M.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2013-01-30

    Aerosol samples from the 2010 CalNex field study in Bakersfield (BF) and Los Angeles (LA) were analyzed using positive mode nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in a photochemical chamber by photooxidation of diesel (DSL) fuel and isoprene (ISO) under humid, high-NOx conditions, was analyzed for comparison. Three groups of organic compounds with zero, one, or two nitrogen atoms in their molecular formulas (0N, 1N, 2N) were compared in detail. The composition of ambient SOA exhibited greater overlap with DSL than with ISO. The overlap of the chamber experiments with the BF data was relatively consistent throughout the day while the overlap with LA data increased significantly in the noon-6pm sample, consistent with the SOA plume arriving from downtown Los Angeles. BF samples were more oxidized, contained more organic nitrogen, and had more overlap with the chamber data compared to LA samples. The addition of gaseous ammonia (NH3) to the DSL experiment was necessary to generate many of the 2N compounds observed in BF. This analysis demonstrates that DSL and ISO were important sources but cannot account for all of the observed ambient compounds indicating that other sources of organics were also likely important.

  9. Major sulfonate transporter Soa1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and considerable substrate diversity in its fungal family

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Sylvester; Kankipati, Harish; De Graeve, Stijn; Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Foulquié-Moreno, Maria R.; Lindgreen, Stinus; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2017-01-01

    Sulfate is a well-established sulfur source for fungi; however, in soils sulfonates and sulfate esters, especially choline sulfate, are often much more prominent. Here we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae YIL166C(SOA1) encodes an inorganic sulfur (sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate) transporter that also catalyses sulfonate and choline sulfate uptake. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal SOA1 orthologues and expression of 20 members in the sul1Δ sul2Δ soa1Δ strain, which is deficient in inorganic and organic sulfur compound uptake, reveals that these transporters have diverse substrate preferences for sulfur compounds. We further show that SOA2, a S. cerevisiae SOA1 paralogue found in S. uvarum, S. eubayanus and S. arboricola is likely to be an evolutionary remnant of the uncharacterized open reading frames YOL163W and YOL162W. Our work highlights the importance of sulfonates and choline sulfate as sulfur sources in the natural environment of S. cerevisiae and other fungi by identifying fungal transporters for these compounds. PMID:28165463

  10. Global Transformation and Fate of Secondary Organic Aerosols: Implications of Low Volatility SOA and Gas-Phase Fragmentation Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, M. B.; Easter, R. C.; Liu, X.; Zelenyuk, A.; Singh, B.; Zhang, K.; Ma, P. L.; Chand, D.; Ghan, S. J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Zhang, Q.; Fast, J. D.; Rasch, P. J.; Tiitta, P.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are often represented crudely in global models. We have implemented three new detailed SOA treatments within the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) that allow us to compare the semi-volatile versus non-volatile SOA treatments (based on some of the latest experimental findings) and also investigate the effects of gas-phase fragmentation reactions. For semi-volatile SOA treatments, fragmentation reactions decrease simulated SOA burden from 7.5 Tg to 1.8 Tg. For the non-volatile SOA treatment (with fragmentation), the burden is 3.1 Tg. Larger differences between non-volatile and semi-volatile SOA (upto a factor of 5) correspond to continental outflow over the oceans. Compared to a global dataset of surface Aerosol Mass Spectrometer measurements and the US IMPROVE network measurements, the non-volatile SOA with fragmentation treatment (FragNVSOA) agrees best at rural locations. Urban SOA is under-predicted but this may be due to the coarse model resolution. Our revised treatments show much better agreement with aircraft measurements of organic aerosols (OA) over the N. American Arctic and sub-Arctic in spring and summer, compared to the standard CAM5 formulation. This is due to treating SOA precursor gases from biomass burning, and long-range transport of biomass burning OA at elevated levels (also supported by satellite data), which undergoes less wet removal compared to the surface OA sources in the standard CAM5. Although the total simulated OA from biomass burning agrees better with aircraft measurements, recent field observations typically report lower SOA formation, suggesting that constraining the POA-SOA split from biomass burning should be the focus of future studies. The non-volatile and semi-volatile configurations predict the direct radiative forcing of SOA as -0.5 W m-2 and -0.26 W m-2 respectively, at top of the atmosphere, which are higher than previously estimated by most models, but in reasonable agreement with

  11. The preparation effect in task switching: carryover of SOA.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Erik M

    2004-01-01

    A common finding in task-switching studies is switch preparation (commonly known as the preparation effect), in which a longer interval between task cue and trial stimulus (i.e., a longer stimulus onset asynchrony, or SOA) reduces the cost of switching to a different task. Three experiments link switch preparation to within-subjects manipulations of SOA. In Experiment 1, SOA was randomized within subjects, producing switch preparation that was more pronounced when the SOA switched from the previous trial than when the SOA repeated. In Experiment 2, SOA was blocked within subjects, producing switch preparation but not on the first block of trials. In Experiment 3, SOA was manipulated between subjects with sufficient statistical power to detect switch preparation, but the effect was absent. The results favor an encoding view of cognitive control, but show that any putative switching mechanism reacts lazily when exposed to only one SOA.

  12. Analysis of the hygroscopic and volatile properties of ammonium sulphate seeded and unseeded SOA particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, N. K.; Duplissy, J.; Gysel, M.; Metzger, A.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Alfarra, M. R.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Fletcher, C.; Good, N.; McFiggans, G.; Jonsson, Â. M.; Hallquist, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2009-01-01

    The volatile and hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulphate seeded and unseeded secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from the photo-oxidation of atmospherically relevant concentrations of α-pinene were studied. The seed particles were electrospray generated ammonium sulphate ((NH4)2SO4) having diameters of approximately 33 nm with a quasi-mono-disperse size distribution (geometric standard deviation σg=1.3). The volatile and hygroscopic properties of both seeded and unseeded SOA were simultaneously measured with a VH-TDMA (volatility - hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer). VH-TDMA measurements of unseeded SOA show a decrease in the hygroscopic growth (HGF) factor for increased volatilisation temperatures such that the more volatile compounds appear to be more hygroscopic. This is opposite to the expected preferential evaporation of more volatile but less hygroscopic material, but could also be due to enhanced oligomerisation occurring at the higher temperature in the thermodenuder. In addition, HGF measurements of seeded SOA were measured as a function of time at two relative humidities, below (RH 75%) and above (RH 85%) the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the pure ammonium sulphate seeds. As these measurements were conducted during the onset phase of photo-oxidation, during particle growth, they enabled us to find the dependence of the HGF as a function of the volume fraction of the SOA coating. HGF's measured at RH of 85% showed a continuous decrease as the SOA coating thickness increased. The measured growth factors show good agreements with ZSR predictions indicating that, at these RH values, there are only minor solute-solute interactions. At 75% RH, as the SOA fraction increased, a rapid increase in the HGF was observed indicating that an increasing fraction of the (NH4)2SO4 is subject to a phase transition, going into solution, with an increasing volume fraction of SOA. To our knowledge this is the first time that SOA derived

  13. Aerosol mass spectrometric features of biogenic SOA: observations from a plant chamber and in rural atmospheric environments.

    PubMed

    Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Zhang, Qi; Hohaus, Thorsten; Kleist, Einhard; Mensah, Amewu; Mentel, Thomas F; Spindler, Christian; Uerlings, Ricarda; Tillmann, Ralf; Wildt, Jürgen

    2009-11-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is known to form from a variety of anthropogenic and biogenic precursors. Current estimates of global SOA production vary over 2 orders of magnitude. Since no direct measurement technique for SOA exists, quantifying SOA remains a challenge for atmospheric studies. The identification of biogenic SOA (BSOA) based on mass spectral signatures offers the possibility to derive source information of organic aerosol (OA) with high time resolution. Here we present data from simulation experiments. The BSOA from tree emissions was characterized with an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Collection efficiencies were close to 1, and effective densities of the BSOA were found to be 1.3 +/- 0.1 g/cm(3). The mass spectra of SOA from different trees were found to be highly similar. The average BSOA mass spectrum from tree emissions is compared to a BSOA component spectrum extracted from field data. It is shown that overall the spectra agree well and that the mass spectral features of BSOA are distinctively different from those of OA components related to fresh fossil fuel and biomass combustions. The simulation chamber mass spectrum may potentially be useful for the identification and interpretation of biogenic SOA components in ambient data sets.

  14. Ice core records of monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers from Aurora Peak in Alaska since 1660s: Implication for climate change variability in the North Pacific Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Ambarish; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Ono, Kaori; Seki, Osamu; Fu, Pingqing; Matoba, Sumio; Shiraiwa, Takayuki

    2016-04-01

    Monoterpene and isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers are reported for the first time in an Alaskan ice core to better understand the biological source strength before and after the industrial revolution in the Northern Hemisphere. We found significantly high concentrations of monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers (e.g., pinic, pinonic, and 2-methylglyceric acids, 2-methylthreitol and 2-methylerythritol) in the ice core, which show historical trends with good correlation to each other since 1660s. They show positive correlations with sugar compounds (e.g., mannitol, fructose, glucose, inositol and sucrose), and anti-correlations with α-dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal) and fatty acids (e.g., C18:1) in the same ice core. These results suggest similar sources and transport pathways for monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers. In addition, we found that concentrations of C5-alkene triols (e.g., 3-methyl-2,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene, cis-2-methyl 1,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene and trans-2-methyl-1,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene) in the ice core have increased after the Great Pacific Climate Shift (late 1970s). They show positive correlations with α-dicarbonyls and fatty acids (e.g., C18:1) in the ice core, suggesting that enhanced oceanic emissions of biogenic organic compounds through the marine boundary layer are recorded in the ice core from Alaska. Photochemical oxidation process for these monoterpene- and isoprene-/sesquiterpene-SOA tracers are suggested to be linked with the periodicity of multi-decadal climate oscillations and retreat of sea ice in the Northern Hemisphere.

  15. Wide tuning range wavelength-swept laser with a single SOA at 1020 nm for ultrahigh resolution Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Won; Song, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Moon-Youn; Kim, Seung-Hwan

    2011-10-24

    In this study, we demonstrated a wide tuning range wavelength-swept laser with a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) at 1020 nm for ultrahigh resolution, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (UHR, FD-OCT). The wavelength-swept laser was constructed with an external line-cavity based on a Littman configuration. An optical wavelength selection filter consisted of a grating, a telescope, and a polygon scanner. Before constructing the optical wavelength selection filter, we observed that the optical power, the spectrum bandwidth, and the center wavelength of the SOA were affected by the temperature of the thermoelectric (TE) cooler in the SOA mount as well as the applied current. Therefore, to obtain a wide wavelength tuning range, we adjusted the temperature of the TE cooler in the SOA mount. When the temperature in the TE cooler was 9 °C, our swept source had a tuning range of 142 nm and a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 121.5 nm at 18 kHz. The measured instantaneous spectral bandwidth (δλ) is 0.085 nm, which was measured by an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution bandwidth of 0.06 nm. This value corresponds to an imaging depth of 3.1 mm in air. Additionally, the averaged optical power of our swept source was 8.2 mW. In UHR, FD/SS-OCT using our swept laser, the measured axial resolution was 4.0 μm in air corresponding to 2.9 μm in tissue (n = 1.35). The sensitivity was measured to be 93.1 dB at a depth of 100 μm. Finally, we obtained retinal images (macular and optic disk) and a corneal image.

  16. End-to-End Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) Security Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    architecture for SOA. • A novel service invocation control mechanism for SOA using dynamic taint analysis (TA). • A trust broker (TB) system that maintains...architectures (SOAs) because the SOAs stress on machine-to-machine interactions, while most of the IT security mechanisms are based on human-to- machine...listing services worldwide. It is a standard mechanism for registering or publishing and discovering Web services. The services published into the UDDI

  17. Molecular formula composition of β-caryophyllene ozonolysis SOA formed in humid and dry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Shuvashish; Fisseha, Rebeka; Putman, Annie L.; Rahn, Thom A.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.

    2017-04-01

    We studied the molecular formula composition of six β-caryophyllene SOA samples using ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry under various reaction conditions. The SOA samples were generated in dry or low relative humidity (RH) chamber conditions with or without cyclohexane. All of the studied SOA mass spectra have three distinct clusters of hundreds of negative ions referred to as Group I (100 < m/z < 400), Group II (400 < m/z < 700) and Group III (700 < m/z < 1 000) compounds. C14-16H22-28O2-11, C28-29H42-48O6-16 and C42-43H68-70O14-16 were observed as highly abundant organic compounds in the compound class of Group I, II and III, respectively. The relative intensities of most analytes were higher in humid conditions compared to those in dry conditions, indicating the importance of water-dependent reactions and the catalytic role of water both in the presence and absence of cyclohexane. In addition, molecular formulas with higher average carbon numbers were observed in humid SOA than in dry SOA in the absence of cyclohexane, suggesting a decrease of cleavage reactions in humid condition. This study characterizes β-caryophyllene ozonolysis SOA based on ultrahigh mass resolution and demonstrates the significance of humidity in terms of the molecular distributions and relative abundances of the analytes. We also discuss the possible mechanism for the formation of Group I-III compounds based on the current understanding of SOA formation in the atmosphere.

  18. SOA Formation Potential of Emissions from Soil and Leaf Litter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Vanderschelden, G. S.; Wen, M.; Cobos, D. R.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from natural sources exceed all anthropogenic sources combined. VOCs participate in oxidative chemistry in the atmosphere and impact the concentrations of ozone and particulate material. The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is particularly complex and is frequently underestimated using state-of-the-art modeling techniques. We present findings that suggest emissions of important SOA precursors from soil and leaf litter are higher than current inventories would suggest, particularly under conditions typical of Fall and Spring. Soil and leaf litter samples were collected at Big Meadow Creek from the University of Idaho Experimental Forest. The dominant tree species in this area of the forest are ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and western larch. Samples were transported to the laboratory and housed within a 0.9 cubic meter Teflon dynamic chamber where VOC emissions were continuously monitored with a GC-FID-MS and PTR-MS. Aerosol was generated from soil and leaf litter emissions by pumping the emissions into a 7 cubic meter Teflon aerosol growth chamber where they were oxidized with ozone in the absence of light. The evolution of particle microphysical and chemical characteristics was monitored over the following eight hours. Particle size distribution and chemical composition were measured with a SMPS and HR-ToF-AMS respectively. Monoterpenes dominated the emission profile with emission rates up to 283 micrograms carbon per meter squared per hour. The dominant monoterpenes emitted were beta-pinene, alpha-pinene, and delta-3-carene in descending order. The composition of the SOA produced was similar to biogenic SOA formed from oxidation of ponderosa pine emissions and alpha-pinene. Measured soil/litter monoterpene emission rates were compared with modeled canopy emissions. Results suggest that during fall and spring when tree emissions are lower, monoterpene emissions within forests may be

  19. Simulation of semi-explicit mechanisms of SOA formation from glyoxal in a 3D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C. J.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Volkamer, R.; Orlando, J. J.; Baidar, S.; Brioude, J. F.; Fast, J. D.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hayes, P. L.; Knighton, W. B.; Oetjen, H.; Setyan, A.; Stark, H.; Thalman, R. M.; Tyndall, G. S.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Waxman, E.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) through multi-phase processing of glyoxal has been proposed recently as a relevant contributor to SOA mass. Glyoxal has both anthropogenic and biogenic sources, and readily partitions into the aqueous-phase of cloud droplets and aerosols. Both reversible and irreversible chemistry in the liquid-phase has been observed. A recent laboratory study indicates that the presence of salts in the liquid-phase strongly enhances the Henry';s law constant of glyoxal, allowing for much more effective multi-phase processing. In our work we investigate the contribution of glyoxal to SOA formation on the regional scale. We employ the regional chemistry transport model WRF-chem with MOZART gas-phase chemistry and MOSAIC aerosols, which we both extended to improve the description of glyoxal formation in the gas-phase, and its interactions with aerosols. The detailed description of aerosols in our setup allows us to compare very simple (uptake coefficient) parameterizations of SOA formation from glyoxal, as has been used in previous modeling studies, with much more detailed descriptions of the various pathways postulated based on laboratory studies. Measurements taken during the CARES and CalNex campaigns in California in summer 2010 allowed us to constrain the model, including the major direct precursors of glyoxal. Simulations at convection-permitting resolution over a 2 week period in June 2010 have been conducted to assess the effect of the different ways to parameterize SOA formation from glyoxal and investigate its regional variability. We find that depending on the parameterization used the contribution of glyoxal to SOA is between 1 and 15% in the LA basin during this period, and that simple parameterizations based on uptake coefficients derived from box model studies lead to higher contributions (15%) than parameterizations based on lab experiments (1%). A kinetic limitation found in experiments hinders substantial contribution

  20. Simulation of semi-explicit mechanisms of SOA formation from glyoxal in aerosol in a 3-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Volkamer, R.; Orlando, J. J.; Baidar, S.; Brioude, J.; Fast, J.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hayes, P. L.; Knighton, W. B.; Oetjen, H.; Setyan, A.; Stark, H.; Thalman, R.; Tyndall, G.; Washenfelder, R.; Waxman, E.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-06-01

    New pathways to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have been postulated recently. Glyoxal, the smallest dicarbonyl, is one of the proposed precursors. It has both anthropogenic and biogenic sources, and readily partitions into the aqueous phase of cloud droplets and deliquesced particles where it undergoes both reversible and irreversible chemistry. In this work we extend the regional scale chemistry transport model WRF-Chem to include detailed gas-phase chemistry of glyoxal formation as well as a state-of-the-science module describing its partitioning and reactions in the aerosol aqueous-phase. A comparison of several proposed mechanisms is performed to quantify the relative importance of different formation pathways and their regional variability. The CARES/CalNex campaigns over California in summer 2010 are used as case studies to evaluate the model against observations. A month-long simulation over the continental United States (US) enables us to extend our results to the continental scale. In all simulations over California, the Los Angeles (LA) basin was found to be the hot spot for SOA formation from glyoxal, which contributes between 1% and 15% of the model SOA depending on the mechanism used. Our results indicate that a mechanism based only on a reactive (surface limited) uptake coefficient leads to higher SOA yields from glyoxal compared to a more detailed description that considers aerosol phase state and chemical composition. In the more detailed simulations, surface uptake is found to give the highest SOA mass yields compared to a volume process and reversible formation. We find that the yields of the latter are limited by the availability of glyoxal in aerosol water, which is in turn controlled by an increase in the Henry's law constant depending on salt concentrations ("salting-in"). A time dependence in this increase prevents substantial partitioning of glyoxal into aerosol water at high salt concentrations. If this limitation is removed, volume

  1. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS

    DOE PAGES

    Woody, Matthew C.; Baker, Kirk R.; Hayes, Patrick L.; ...

    2016-03-29

    efficiency for that model is estimated to be too low by about 7 × . From source-apportioned model results, we found most of the CMAQ-VBS modeled POA at the Pasadena CalNex site was attributable to meat cooking emissions (48 %, consistent with a substantial fraction of cooking OA in the observations). This is compared to 18 % from gasoline vehicle emissions, 13 % from biomass burning (in the form of residential wood combustion), and 8 % from diesel vehicle emissions. All "other" inventoried emission sources (e.g., industrial, point, and area sources) comprised the final 13 %. The CMAQ-VBS semivolatile POA treatment underpredicted AMS hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) + cooking-influenced OA (CIOA) at Pasadena by a factor of 1.8 compared to a factor of 1.4 overprediction of POA in CMAQ-AE6, but it did capture the AMS diurnal profile of HOA and CIOA well, with the exception of the midday peak. Overall, the CMAQ-VBS with its semivolatile treatment of POA, SOA from intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs), and aging of SOA improves SOA model performance (though SOA formation efficiency is still 1.6–2 ×  too low). However, continued efforts are needed to better understand assumptions in the parameterization (e.g., SOA aging) and provide additional certainty to how best to apply existing emission inventories in a framework that treats POA as semivolatile, which currently degrades existing model performance at routine monitoring networks. The VBS and other approaches (e.g., AE6) require additional work to appropriately incorporate IVOC emissions and subsequent SOA formation.« less

  2. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, Matthew C.; Baker, Kirk R.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Koo, Bonyoung; Pye, Havala O. T.

    2016-03-01

    estimated to be too low by about 7 × . From source-apportioned model results, we found most of the CMAQ-VBS modeled POA at the Pasadena CalNex site was attributable to meat cooking emissions (48 %, consistent with a substantial fraction of cooking OA in the observations). This is compared to 18 % from gasoline vehicle emissions, 13 % from biomass burning (in the form of residential wood combustion), and 8 % from diesel vehicle emissions. All "other" inventoried emission sources (e.g., industrial, point, and area sources) comprised the final 13 %. The CMAQ-VBS semivolatile POA treatment underpredicted AMS hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) + cooking-influenced OA (CIOA) at Pasadena by a factor of 1.8 compared to a factor of 1.4 overprediction of POA in CMAQ-AE6, but it did capture the AMS diurnal profile of HOA and CIOA well, with the exception of the midday peak. Overall, the CMAQ-VBS with its semivolatile treatment of POA, SOA from intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs), and aging of SOA improves SOA model performance (though SOA formation efficiency is still 1.6-2 × too low). However, continued efforts are needed to better understand assumptions in the parameterization (e.g., SOA aging) and provide additional certainty to how best to apply existing emission inventories in a framework that treats POA as semivolatile, which currently degrades existing model performance at routine monitoring networks. The VBS and other approaches (e.g., AE6) require additional work to appropriately incorporate IVOC emissions and subsequent SOA formation.

  3. Impacts of aqueous phase radical mechanism of oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) on SOA formation: on the prevailing role of dissolved oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, P.; Ervens, B.; Siekmann, F.; Vassalo, L.; Ravier, S.; Clement, J.; Monod, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is now recognized that the aqueous phase photochemistry of organic compounds in cloud droplets and deliquescent aerosol particles lead to the formation of oligomers and thus it might produce a substantial amount of atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) with unique properties. However, the chemical mechanisms leading to these oligomers are still poorly understood, and consequently, their atmospheric impacts are difficult to assess. The goal of this study was to investigate the atmospheric impact of an aqueous phase radical mechanism of oligomerization of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK: one of the main reaction products of isoprene) on SOA formation. Aqueous phase photooxidation of MVK was investigated in a photoreactor using photolysis of H2O2 as OH radical generator. Electrospray high resolution mass spectrometry analysis of the solutions brought clear evidence for the formation of oligomer systems having a mass range of up to 1800 Da within less than 15 minutes of reaction. Highest oligomer formation rates were obtained under conditions of low dissolved oxygen, highest temperature and highest MVK initial concentrations. A radical mechanism of polymerization is proposed to explain this oligomer formation. Furthermore, we quantified the total amount of carbon present in oligomers, and the initial radical branching ratios. Kinetic parameters of the proposed oligomerization mechanism are constrained by means of a box model that is able to reproduce the temporal evolution of intermediates and products as observed in the laboratory experiments. Additional model simulations for atmospherically-relevant conditions will be presented that show the extent to which these radical processes contribute to SOA formation in the multiphase system as compared to other aqueous phase as well as traditional SOA sources.

  4. Investigations of BVOC-SOA-cloud-climate feedbacks via interactive biogenic emissions using NorESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alterskjær, Kari; Egill Kristjansson, Jon; Grini, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Kirkevåg, Alf; Olivié, Dirk; Schulz, Michael; Seland, Øyvind

    2016-04-01

    Climate feedbacks represent a large source of uncertainty in future climate projections. One such feedback involves a change in emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) under global warming and a subsequent change in cloud radiative effects. Parts of the atmospheric BVOCs will oxidize in the atmosphere, which may reduce their volatility enough to form secondary organic aerosols (SOA). A changed SOA load will affect cloud radiative properties through aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI) and therefore act to reduce or enhance the temperature change resulting from greenhouse gases alone. In order to study this effect, a development version of the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM) has been extended to include explicit atmospheric particle nucleation and a treatment of SOA based on work by Risto Makkonen and collaborators. Biogenic sources of monoterpene and isoprene are interactively calculated by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), version 2.1, incorporated into the Community Land Model, version 4.5. Monoterpene and isoprene are oxidized by O3, OH and NO3 to form SOA with a yield of 15 % and 5 % respectively. It is assumed that 50 % of the product from monoterpene ozonolysis is of low enough volatility to nucleate new particles. The remaining oxidized BVOCs condensate onto preexisting particles. The model improvements include three new tracers to account for both SOA and the BVOCs. This allows for transport of both SOA and precursor gases, making it possible for SOA to form above the surface layer of the model. The new SOA treatment also changes the size distribution of most model aerosols due to condensation. Preliminary results from 6-year simulations with prescribed sea surface temperatures show that the present day emissions of both isoprene (435.9 Tg/yr) and monoterpenes (121.4 Tg/yr) are within the range found in other studies. The resulting SOA production is on the order of 77 Tg/yr, also within the range found by

  5. Aqueous Secondary Organic Aerosol (aqSOA) Formation By Radical Reactions: Model Studies Comparing the Role of OH Versus Organic Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, B.; Renard, P.; Reed Harris, A.; Vaida, V.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chemical reactions in the aqueous phase are thought to significantly contribute to ambient aerosol mass under specific conditions. Results from many laboratory studies suggest that these reactions are efficiently initiated by the OH radical and lead to high molecular weight compounds (oligomers). Recent laboratory experiments have shown that methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) can form oligomers in high yield in aqueous solutions similar to aerosol water. Additional experiments have shown that the direct photolysis of pyruvic acid can generate organic radicals that initiate similar oligomer products upon oxidation of MVK (Renard et al., submitted). Sources of the OH radical in the aerosol aqueous phase include the direct uptake from the gas phase, Fenton reactions and, to a smaller extent, direct photolyses of hydrogen peroxide and nitrate. Recent model studies imply that under many conditions, aqSOA formation might be oxidant-limited since these OH(aq) sources are not sufficient to provide a continuous OH supply. This limitation can be (partially) removed if additional radical sources in the multiphase system are considered. Exemplary, we include the direct photolysis of aqueous pyruvic acid as a proxy for possible other radical sources. Model results will be shown and consequences for aqSOA formation and processing under ambient conditions will be discussed.

  6. [Research on SOA for hospital information system].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Min

    2010-09-01

    Integration of heterogeneous systems in hospital is an important subject. The loose-coupling and efficient data interaction can be realized with SOA, the complexity of cross-point can be avoided with ESB and Service-Oriented when system integration, the unified control can come for information management. Finally it will meet a variety of needs related with management and business in hospital, adapting quickly to changes.

  7. Transitions from functionalization to fragmentation reactions of laboratory secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from the OH oxidation of alkane precursors.

    PubMed

    Lambe, Andrew T; Onasch, Timothy B; Croasdale, David R; Wright, Justin P; Martin, Alexander T; Franklin, Jonathan P; Massoli, Paola; Kroll, Jesse H; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Brune, William H; Worsnop, Douglas R; Davidovits, Paul

    2012-05-15

    Functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) reactions governing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the OH oxidation of alkane precursors were studied in a flow reactor in the absence of NO(x). SOA precursors were n-decane (n-C10), n-pentadecane (n-C15), n-heptadecane (n-C17), tricyclo[5.2.1.0(2,6)]decane (JP-10), and vapors of diesel fuel and Southern Louisiana crude oil. Aerosol mass spectra were measured with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, from which normalized SOA yields, hydrogen-to-carbon (H/C) and oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios, and C(x)H(y)+, C(x)H(y)O+, and C(x)H(y)O(2)+ ion abundances were extracted as a function of OH exposure. Normalized SOA yield curves exhibited an increase followed by a decrease as a function of OH exposure, with maximum yields at O/C ratios ranging from 0.29 to 0.74. The decrease in SOA yield correlates with an increase in oxygen content and decrease in carbon content, consistent with transitions from functionalization to fragmentation. For a subset of alkane precursors (n-C10, n-C15, and JP-10), maximum SOA yields were estimated to be 0.39, 0.69, and 1.1. In addition, maximum SOA yields correspond with a maximum in the C(x)H(y)O+ relative abundance. Measured correlations between OH exposure, O/C ratio, and H/C ratio may enable identification of alkane precursor contributions to ambient SOA.

  8. Application of Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Detection and Identification of Oxidized Organic Species during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, M. R.; Krechmer, J.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results obtained with a chemical ionization ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) that was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Supersite in Centreville, AL. This two dimensional technique, which separates ions on the basis of their interactions with buffer gases before analysis by high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry, allows for detailed separation and identification of isomeric and isobaric species. During SOAS the IMS-TOF was coupled to a chemical ionization source that utilized NO3- as the reagent ion. The NO3- reagent ion clusters with highly oxidized species and allows for a unique means of directly detecting particle phase precursors in the gas phase. Gas phase molecules corresponding to oxidized products of isoprene and terpenes were detected throughout the campaign with a time resolution of 5 minutes. Ion mobility separation and trends observed for several of these key species are discussed. In addition to ambient sampling, the CI-IMS-TOF was also operated behind a potential aerosol mass (PAM) flow reactor which exposed ambient air to high levels of OH radical. Ambient CI-IMS-TOF spectra obtained with and without the flow reactor are presented and compared with laboratory flow reactor spectra generated from isoprene and terpene precursors.

  9. Characterization of a real-time tracer for isoprene epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; de Sá, S. S.; McKinney, K.; Martin, S. T.; Hu, M.; Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Riva, M.; Surratt, J. D.; St. Clair, J. M.; Isaacman-Van Wertz, G.; Yee, L. D.; Goldstein, A. H.; Carbone, S.; Brito, J.; Artaxo, P.; de Gouw, J. A.; Koss, A.; Wisthaler, A.; Mikoviny, T.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Docherty, K. S.; Alexander, M. L.; Robinson, N. H.; Coe, H.; Allan, J. D.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Paulot, F.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of organic aerosol (OA) in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS), 78 % of PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA is accounted by the measured IEPOX-SOA molecular tracers (2-methyltetrols, C5-Triols, and IEPOX-derived organosulfate and its dimers), making it the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. An enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O (fC5H6O= C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber, and source data sets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1 ‰ (‰ = parts per thousand) is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning, and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.6 ‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0 ‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7 ‰), which leaves some room to separate both contributions to OA. Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2 ‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12-40 ‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown to reflect

  10. Characterization of a real-time tracer for isoprene epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; ...

    2015-10-23

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying positive matrix factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of organic aerosol (OA) in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS), 78 % of PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA is accountedmore » by the measured IEPOX-SOA molecular tracers (2-methyltetrols, C5-Triols, and IEPOX-derived organosulfate and its dimers), making it the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. An enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O (fC5H6O= C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber, and source data sets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1 ‰ (‰ = parts per thousand) is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning, and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.6 ‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0 ‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7 ‰), which leaves some room to separate both contributions to OA. Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2 ‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12–40 ‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown

  11. Simulation of semi-explicit mechanisms of SOA formation from glyoxal in a 3-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Volkamer, R.; Orlando, J. J.; Baidar, S.; Brioude, J.; Fast, J.; Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.; Hayes, P. L.; Knighton, W. B.; Oetjen, H.; Setyan, A.; Stark, H.; Thalman, R.; Tyndall, G.; Washenfelder, R.; Waxman, E.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-10-01

    New pathways to form secondary organic aerosols (SOA) have been postulated recently. Glyoxal, the smallest dicarbonyl, is one of the proposed precursors. It has both anthropogenic and biogenic sources, and readily partitions into the aqueous-phase of cloud droplets and deliquesced aerosols where it undergoes both reversible and irreversible chemistry. In this work we extend the regional scale chemistry transport model WRF-Chem to include a detailed gas-phase chemistry of glyoxal formation as well as a state-of-the-science module describing its partitioning and reactions in the aqueous-phase of aerosols. A comparison of several proposed mechanisms is performed to quantify the relative importance of different formation pathways and their regional variability. The CARES/CalNex campaigns over California in summer 2010 are used as case studies to evaluate the model against observations. In all simulations the LA basin was found to be the hotspot for SOA formation from glyoxal, which contributes between 1% and 15% of the model SOA depending on the mechanism used. Our results indicate that a mechanism based only on a simple uptake coefficient, as frequently employed in global modeling studies, leads to higher SOA contributions from glyoxal compared to a more detailed description that considers aerosol phase state and chemical composition. In the more detailed simulations, surface uptake is found to be the main contributor to SOA mass compared to a volume process and reversible formation. We find that contribution of the latter is limited by the availability of glyoxal in aerosol water, which is in turn controlled by an increase in the Henry's law constant depending on salt concentrations ("salting-in"). A kinetic limitation in this increase prevents substantial partitioning of glyoxal into aerosol water at high salt concentrations. If this limitation is removed, volume pathways contribute >20% of glyoxal SOA mass, and the total mass formed (5.8% of total SOA in the LA

  12. Molecular characterization of nitrogen and sulfur containing compounds in night-time SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Mutzel, Anke; Rodigast, Maria; Böge, Olaf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to the formation of low volatile organic compounds that can form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Studies in the past showed that laboratory generated and ambient SOA are made of polar molecules with O/C ratios generally greater than 0.5. More recent studies have shown that SOA compounds can contain heteroatoms mainly sulfur and nitrogen atoms. Offline chemical analysis with high-resolution mass spectrometers and fragmentation experiments has shown that sulphur containing compounds are mainly organosulfates and nitrogen containing species are aromatic heterocyclic compounds such as imidazole and nitrated aromatic compounds such as nitrophenols. In addition to these, SOA compounds containing both sulfur and nitrogen have been reported from the analysis of ambient organic aerosol, rainwater, fog and cloud samples. Based on the mass spectrometric evidence these compounds are attributed to nitrooxy-organosulfates originating from isoprene and monoterpenes. Although these compounds are ubiquitously detected in the ambient samples, reports about their detection in laboratory generated SOA are scares and their formation mechanisms are not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the formation of sulfur and nitrogen containing SOA species in the oxidation of biogenic VOCs. Photooxidation and night-time oxidation experiments were performed in a smog chamber to produce SOA samples. The laboratory generated SOA samples were analysed with UPLC-IMS-TOFMS (Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry). The presence of highly acidic sulphate seed particles (pH0) did not promote the formation of compounds with chemical formula of C10H17NO7S- and m/z value of 294.0653, indicating that the formation mechanisms of these compounds unlikely involve the ring opening reactions of epoxides and subsequent sulfation reactions. On the other hand, their

  13. A Scenario-Based Technique for Developing SOA Technical Governance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    18  Figure 5:  CBDi-SAE SOA Governance Framework 19  Figure 6:  IBM SOA Governance and Management Method 20  Figure 7:  ITIL Core Framework 21...organizations, even if they are not SOA specific, such as the Information Technol- ogy Infrastructure Library ( ITIL ) [10] These frameworks can be very...based on a standard or a widely recommended approach such as ITIL , one custom-built for the organization, or a hybrid of all of the preceding. For

  14. Sensitivity analysis of simulated SOA loadings using a variance-based statistical approach: SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF SOA

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, Manish; Zhao, Chun; Easter, Richard C.; Qian, Yun; Zelenyuk, Alla; Fast, Jerome D.; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Qi; Guenther, Alex

    2016-04-08

    We investigate the sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) loadings simulated by a regional chemical transport model to 7 selected tunable model parameters: 4 involving emissions of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds, anthropogenic semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organics (SIVOCs), and NOx, 2 involving dry deposition of SOA precursor gases, and one involving particle-phase transformation of SOA to low volatility. We adopt a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling approach to effectively sample the high-dimensional parameter space, and perform a 250 member ensemble of simulations using a regional model, accounting for some of the latest advances in SOA treatments based on our recent work. We then conduct a variance-based sensitivity analysis using the generalized linear model method to study the responses of simulated SOA loadings to the tunable parameters. Analysis of SOA variance from all 250 simulations shows that the volatility transformation parameter, which controls whether particle-phase transformation of SOA from semi-volatile SOA to non-volatile is on or off, is the dominant contributor to variance of simulated surface-level daytime SOA (65% domain average contribution). We also split the simulations into 2 subsets of 125 each, depending on whether the volatility transformation is turned on/off. For each subset, the SOA variances are dominated by the parameters involving biogenic VOC and anthropogenic SIVOC emissions. Furthermore, biogenic VOC emissions have a larger contribution to SOA variance when the SOA transformation to non-volatile is on, while anthropogenic SIVOC emissions have a larger contribution when the transformation is off. NOx contributes less than 4.3% to SOA variance, and this low contribution is mainly attributed to dominance of intermediate to high NOx conditions throughout the simulated domain. The two parameters related to dry deposition of SOA precursor gases also have very low contributions to SOA variance

  15. Effects of additional HONO sources on visibility over the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; An, Junling; Gultepe, Ismail

    2014-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to better understand the impacts of the additional sources of nitrous acid (HONO) on visibility, which is an aspect not considered in current air quality models. Simulations of HONO contributions to visibility over the North China Plain (NCP) during August 2007 using the fully coupled Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model were performed, including three additional HONO sources: (1) the reaction of photo-excited nitrogen dioxide (NO * 2) with water vapor; (2) the NO2 heterogeneous reaction on aerosol surfaces; and (3) HONO emissions. The model generally reproduced the spatial patterns and diurnal variations of visibility over the NCP well. When the additional HONO sources were included in the simulations, the visibility was occasionally decreased by 20%-30% (3-4 km) in local urban areas of the NCP. Monthly-mean concentrations of NO{3/-}, NH{4/+}, SO{4/2-} and PM2.5 were increased by 20%-52% (3-11 μg m-3), 10%-38%, 6%-10%, and 6%-11% (9-17 μg m-3), respectively; and in urban areas, monthly-mean accumulationmode number concentrations (AMNC) and surface concentrations of aerosols were enhanced by 15%-20% and 10%-20%, respectively. Overall, the results suggest that increases in concentrations of PM2.5, its hydrophilic components, and AMNC, are key factors for visibility degradation. A proposed conceptual model for the impacts of additional HONO sources on visibility also suggests that visibility estimation should consider the heterogeneous reaction on aerosol surfaces and the enhanced atmospheric oxidation capacity due to additional HONO sources, especially in areas with high mass concentrations of NO x and aerosols.

  16. To what extent can biogenic SOA be controlled?

    PubMed

    Carlton, Annmarie G; Pinder, Robert W; Bhave, Prakash V; Pouliot, George A

    2010-05-01

    The implicit assumption that biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is natural and can not be controlled hinders effective air quality management. Anthropogenic pollution facilitates transformation of naturally emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the particle phase, enhancing the ambient concentrations of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA). It is therefore conceivable that some portion of ambient biogenic SOA can be removed by controlling emissions of anthropogenic pollutants. Direct measurement of the controllable fraction of biogenic SOA is not possible, but can be estimated through 3-dimensional photochemical air quality modeling. To examine this in detail, 22 CMAQ model simulations were conducted over the continental U.S. (August 15 to September 4, 2003). The relative contributions of five emitted pollution classes (i.e., NO(x), NH(3), SO(x), reactive non methane carbon (RNMC) and primary carbonaceous particulate matter (PCM)) on biogenic SOA were estimated by removing anthropogenic emissions of these pollutants, one at a time and all together. Model results demonstrate a strong influence of anthropogenic emissions on predicted biogenic SOA concentrations, suggesting more than 50% of biogenic SOA in the eastern U.S. can be controlled. Because biogenic SOA is substantially enhanced by controllable emissions, classification of SOA as biogenic or anthropogenic based solely on VOC origin is not sufficient to describe the controllable fraction.

  17. Services oriented architecture (SOA)-based persistent ISR simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Genshe; Blasch, Erik; Shen, Dan; Chen, Huimin; Pham, Khanh

    2010-04-01

    In the modern networked battlefield, network centric warfare (NCW) scenarios need to interoperate between shared resources and data assets such as sensors, UAVs, satellites, ground vehicles, and command and control (C2/C4I) systems. By linking and fusing platform routing information, sensor exploitation results, and databases (e.g. Geospatial Information Systems [GIS]), the shared situation awareness and mission effectiveness will be improved. Within the information fusion community, various research efforts are looking at open standard approaches to composing the heterogeneous network components under one framework for future modeling and simulation applications. By utilizing the open source services oriented architecture (SOA) based sensor web services, and GIS visualization services, we propose a framework that ensures the fast prototyping of intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) system simulations to determine an asset mix for a desired mission effectiveness, performance modeling for sensor management and prediction, and user testing of various scenarios.

  18. Beamforming for directional sources: additional estimator and evaluation of performance under different acoustic scenarios.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Christian; Havelock, David I; Bouchard, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Beamforming is done with an array of sensors to achieve a directional or spatially-specific response by using a model of the arriving wavefront. Conventionally, a plane wave or point source model is used and this can cause decreased array gain or even total breakdown of beamforming when the source is directional. To avoid this, the authors proposed in recent work an alternative beamforming method which defines a set of "sub-beamformers," each designed to respond to a different spatial mode of the source. The outputs of the individual sub-beamformers are combined in a weighted sum to give an overall output of better quality than that of a monopole beamformer. This paper extends the previous work by introducing an additional estimator for the weighted sum and by presenting simulation results to demonstrate the relative performance of the proposed method and the different estimators for a directional source in the presence of diffuse noise, reverberation, and an interfering source. Gain optimization subject to a constraint on the white-noise gain with the proposed beamforming method is also introduced. Generally, when beamforming on directional sources, the proposed method outperforms beamforming with a point source model when the input signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is 0 dB or higher.

  19. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from isoprene epoxydiols: Insights into formation, aging and distribution over the continental US from the DC3 and SEAC4RS campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campuzano Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Hu, W.; Ortega, A. M.; Jimenez, J. L.; Liao, J.; Froyd, K. D.; Pollack, I. B.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; St Clair, J. M.; Crounse, J.; Wennberg, P. O.; Mikoviny, T.; Wisthaler, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Isoprene-derived SOA formation has been studied extensively in the laboratory. However, it is still unclear to what extent isoprene contributes to the overall SOA burden over the southeastern US, an area with both strong isoprene emissions as well as large discrepancies between modeled and observed aerosol optical depth. For the low-NO isoprene oxidation pathway, the key gas-phase intermediate is believed to be isoprene epoxide (IEPOX), which can be incorporated into the aerosol phase by either sulfate ester formation (IEPOX sulfate) or direct hydrolysis. As first suggested by Robinson et al, the SOA formed by this mechanism (IEPOX-SOA) has a characteristic fragmentation pattern when analyzed by an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) with enhanced relative abundances of the C5H6O+ ion (fC5H6O). Based on data from previous ground campaigns and chamber studies, we have developed a empirical method to quantify IEPOX-SOA and have applied it to the data from the DC3 and SEAC4RS aircraft campaigns that sampled the SE US during the Spring of 2012 and the Summer of 2013. We used Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to extract IEPOX-SOA factors that show good correlation with inside or downwind of high isoprene emitting areas and in general agree well with the IEPOX-SOA mass predicted by the empirical expression. According to this analysis, the empirical method performs well regardless of (at times very strong) BBOA or urban OA influences. On average 17% of SOA in the SE US boundary layer was IEPOX-SOA. Overall, the highest concentrations of IEPOX-SOA were typically found around 1-2 km AGL, several hours downwind of the isoprene source areas with high gas-phase IEPOX present. IEPOX-SOA was also detected up to altitudes of 6 km, with a clear trend towards more aged aerosol at altitude, likely a combination of chemical aging and physical airmass mixing. The unique instrument package aboard the NASA-DC8 allows us to examine the influence of multiple factors (aerosol

  20. Use of additional fission sources or scattering sources to model inward axial leakages in fast-reactor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1981-10-01

    When calculations of flux are done in less than three dimensions, bucklings are normally used to model leakages (flows) in the dimensions for which the flux is not calculated. If the net leakage for a given energy group is outward (positive), the buckling is positive, and buckling methods work well. However, if the new leakage for a given energy group is inward (negative), the buckling is negative and can lead to numerical instabilities (oscillations in the iterative flux calculation). This report discusses two equivalent nonbuckling methods to model inward leakages. One method (the chi/sub g/ method) models these incoming neutrons by additional fission sources. The other method (the ..sigma../sub s/(1 ..-->.. g) method) models them by increased downscatter sources. The derivation of the two methods is shown, and the flux spectra obtained by their use are compared with those obtained from two-dimensional (RZ) calculations.

  1. All-optical phase discrimination using SOA.

    PubMed

    Power, Mark J; Webb, Roderick P; Manning, Robert J

    2013-11-04

    We describe the first experimental demonstration of a novel all-optical phase discrimination technique, which can separate the two orthogonal phase components of a signal onto different frequencies. This method exploits nonlinear mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) to separate a 10.65 Gbaud QPSK signal into two 10.65 Gb/s BPSK signals which are then demodulated using a delay interferometer (DI). Eye diagrams and spectral measurements verify correct operation and a conversion efficiency greater than 9 dB is observed on both output BPSK channels when compared with the input QPSK signal.

  2. Observation Planning Made Simple with Science Opportunity Analyzer (SOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; Polanskey, Carol A.

    2004-01-01

    As NASA undertakes the exploration of the Moon and Mars as well as the rest of the Solar System while continuing to investigate Earth's oceans, winds, atmosphere, weather, etc., the ever-existing need to allow operations users to easily define their observations increases. Operation teams need to be able to determine the best time to perform an observation, as well as its duration and other parameters such as the observation target. In addition, operations teams need to be able to check the observation for validity against objectives and intent as well as spacecraft constraints such as turn rates and acceleration or pointing exclusion zones. Science Opportunity Analyzer (SOA), in development for the last six years, is a multi-mission toolset that has been built to meet those needs. The operations team can follow six simple steps and define his/her observation without having to know the complexities of orbital mechanics, coordinate transformations, or the spacecraft itself.

  3. Electrophysiology reveals semantic priming at a short SOA irrespective of depth of prime processing.

    PubMed

    Küper, Kristina; Heil, Martin

    2009-04-03

    The otherwise robust behavioral semantic priming effect is reduced to the point of being absent when a letter search has to be performed on the prime word. As a result the automaticity of semantic activation has been called into question. It is unclear, however, in how far automatic processes are even measurable in the letter search priming paradigm as the prime task necessitates a long prime-probe stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA). In a modified procedure, a short SOA can be realized by delaying the prime task response until after participants have made a lexical decision on the probe. While the absence of lexical decision priming has already been demonstrated in this design it seems premature to draw any definite conclusions from this purely behavioral result since event related potential (ERP) measures have been shown to be a more sensitive index of semantic activation. Using the modified paradigm we thus recorded ERP in addition to lexical decision times. Stimuli were presented at two different SOAs (240 ms vs. 840 ms) and participants performed either a grammatical discrimination (Experiment 1) or a letter search (Experiment 2) on the prime. Irrespective of prime task, the modulation of the N400, the ERP correlate of semantic activation, provided clear-cut evidence of semantic processing at the short SOA. Implications for theories of semantic activation as well as the constraints of the delayed prime task procedure are discussed.

  4. Carbon source utilization profiles suggest additional metabolic interactions in a synergistic linuron-degrading bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik; Springael, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    A bacterial triple-species consortium that synergistically metabolizes the phenylurea herbicide linuron was studied to determine whether synergy is extended toward the metabolism of other C-sources. The metabolic performance and range of the individual consortium members were compared with those of paired and three-species combinations in Biolog GN2 MicroPlate assays. The strain combinations showed an increase in the rate and extent of utilization of 80% of the C-sources that were utilized by either one or more of the individual consortium members and the additional utilization of eight C-sources for which oxidation was not observed for the individual strains. When one of the three strains was replaced by bacterial strains 'foreign' to the consortium, either belonging to the same genus or to other genera, mainly antagonistic effects occurred. The data suggest that the consortium members cooperate in the metabolism of C-sources in addition to linuron. This feature can contribute in consolidating consortium composition when linuron is absent or present at low concentrations.

  5. Volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds in suburban Paris: variability, origin and importance for SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Helal, W.; Borbon, A.; Sauvage, S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Colomb, A.; Gros, V.; Freutel, F.; Crippa, M.; Afif, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Beekmann, M.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand-Jolibois, R.; Fronval, I.; Grand, N.; Leonardis, T.; Lopez, M.; Michoud, V.; Miet, K.; Perrier, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Schneider, J.; Siour, G.; Zapf, P.; Locoge, N.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of gaseous and particulate organic carbon were performed during the MEGAPOLI experiments, in July 2009 and January-February 2010, at the SIRTA observatory in suburban Paris. Measurements comprise primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs), of both anthropogenic and biogenic origins, including C12-C16 n-alkanes of intermediate volatility (IVOCs), suspected to be efficient precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The time series of gaseous carbon are generally consistent with times series of particulate organic carbon at regional scale, and are clearly affected by meteorology and air mass origin. Concentration levels of anthropogenic VOCs in urban and suburban Paris were surprisingly low (2-963 ppt) compared to other megacities worldwide and to rural continental sites. Urban enhancement ratios of anthropogenic VOC pairs agree well between the urban and suburban Paris sites, showing the regional extent of anthropogenic sources of similar composition. Contrary to other primary anthropogenic VOCs (aromatics and alkanes), IVOCs showed lower concentrations in winter (< 5 ppt) compared to summer (13-27 ppt), which cannot be explained by the gas-particle partitioning theory. Higher concentrations of most oxygenated VOCs in winter (18-5984 ppt) suggest their dominant primary anthropogenic origin. The respective role of primary anthropogenic gaseous compounds in regional SOA formation was investigated by estimating the SOA mass concentration expected from the anthropogenic VOCs and IVOCs (I / VOCs) measured at SIRTA. From an integrated approach based on emission ratios and SOA yields, 38 % of the SOA measured at SIRTA is explained by the measured concentrations of I / VOCs, with a 2% contribution by C12-C16 n-alkane IVOCs. From the results of an alternative time-resolved approach, the average IVOC contribution to SOA formation is estimated to be 7%, which is half of the average contribution of the traditional aromatic compounds (15%). Both

  6. Calculation of farfield distortion for a tilted-facet SOA

    SciTech Connect

    Ratowsky, R.P.; Dijaili, S.; Walker, J.; Patterson, F.; Kallman, J.; Deri, R.

    1996-04-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are very important elements for telecommunications, computer communications, and signal processing applications. For stable, low noise operation, the modal reflection into the guided SOA mode must be minimized; modal reflectivity typically has to be kept below about {minus}40 dB. This can be accomplished by antireflection (AR) coatings, or by tilting of the SOA end facet. The latter approach has been vigorously pursued recently, because effective AR coatings require very high tolerances and have polarization-dependent reflectivities. Consequently, there has been a great deal of theoretical effort aimed at calculating the modal reflectivity from tilted interfaces, using a variety of approaches. However, there has been little attention directed toward calculating the transmitted field of a tilted-facet SOA. This is a problem of considerable importance, because the coupling of the SOA light to an element such as an optical fiber depends critically on the field distribution at the entrance plane to the fiber. Moreover, experimental measurements of the farfield of tilted-facet SOAs have revealed a curious crescent-shaped intensity distribution. To improve coupling efficiency it is important to understand to what extent this phenomenon is due to the SOA modal field distribution and to what extent it is due to the tilted interface. The authors explain the crescent-shaped farfield intensity distribution of tilted-facet SOAs using vector wave optics, and discuss implications for coupling to other optical elements.

  7. VOC species and emission inventory from vehicles and their SOA formation potentials estimation in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Wang, H. L.; Li, L.; Wang, Q.; Lu, Q.; de Gouw, J. A.; Zhou, M.; Jing, S. A.; Lu, J.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-10-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) species from vehicle exhausts and gas evaporation were investigated by chassis dynamometer and on-road measurements of nine gasoline vehicles, seven diesel vehicles, five motorcycles, and four gas evaporation samples. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields of gasoline, diesel, motorcycle exhausts, and gas evaporation were estimated based on the mixing ratio of measured C2-C12 VOC species and inferred carbon number distributions. High aromatic contents were measured in gasoline exhausts and contributed comparatively more SOA yield. A vehicular emission inventory was compiled based on a local survey of on-road traffic in Shanghai and real-world measurements of vehicle emission factors from previous studies in the cities of China. The inventory-based vehicular organic aerosol (OA) productions to total CO emissions were compared with the observed OA to CO concentrations (ΔOA / ΔCO) in the urban atmosphere. The results indicate that vehicles dominate the primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions and OA production, which contributed about 40 and 60 % of OA mass in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. Diesel vehicles, which accounted for less than 20 % of vehicle kilometers of travel (VKT), contribute more than 90 % of vehicular POA emissions and 80-90 % of OA mass derived by vehicles in urban Shanghai. Gasoline exhaust could be an important source of SOA formation. Tightening the limit of aromatic content in gasoline fuel will be helpful to reduce its SOA contribution. Intermediate-volatile organic compounds (IVOCs) in vehicle exhausts greatly contribute to SOA formation in the urban atmosphere of China. However, more experiments need to be conducted to determine the contributions of IVOCs to OA pollution in China.

  8. Analysis of the hygroscopic and volatile properties of ammonium sulphate seeded and un-seeded SOA particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, N. K.; Duplissy, J.; Gysel, M.; Metzger, A.; Dommen, J.; Weingartner, E.; Alfarra, M. R.; Fletcher, C.; Good, N.; McFiggans, G.; Jonsson, Ã. M.; Hallquist, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2008-05-01

    The volatile and hygroscopic properties of ammonium sulphate seeded and un-seeded secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from the photo-oxidation of atmospherically relevant concentrations of α-pinene were studied. The seed particles were electrospray generated ammonium sulphate ((NH4)2SO4) having diameters of approximately 33 nm with a quasi-mono-disperse size distribution (geometric standard deviation σg=1.3). The volatile and hygroscopic properties of both seeded and unseeded SOA were simultaneously measured with a VH-TDMA (volatility - hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer). VH-TDMA measurements of unseeded SOA show a decrease in the hygroscopic growth (HGF) factor for increased volatilisation temperatures such that the more volatile compounds appear to be more hygroscopic. This is opposite to the expected preferential evaporation of more volatile but less hygroscopic material, but could also be due to enhanced oligomerisation occurring at the higher temperature in the thermodenuder. In addition, HGF measurements of seeded SOA were measured as a function of time at two relative humidities, below (RH 75%) and above (RH 85%) the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of the pure ammonium sulphate seeds. As these measurements were conducted during the onset phase of photo-oxidation, during particle growth, they enabled us to find the dependence of the HGF as a function of the volume fraction of the SOA coating. HGF's measured at RH of 85% showed a continuous decrease as the SOA coating thickness increased. The measured growth factors show good agreements with ZSR predictions indicating that, at these RH values, there are only minor solute-solute interactions. At 75% RH, as the SOA fraction increased, a rapid increase in the HGF was observed indicating that an increasing fraction of the (NH4)2SO4 is subject to a phase transition, going into solution, with an increasing volume fraction of SOA. To our knowledge this is the first time that SOA derived

  9. SOA formation from naphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene, and 2-methylnaphthalene photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Li; Kacarab, Mary; Tang, Ping; Cocker, David R.

    2016-04-01

    The SOA yield and chemical characteristics of SOA formation from naphthalene and two methyl substituted naphthalenes, 1-methylnaphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene, were studied for high NOx, low NOx, and ultra-low NOx conditions. The SOA yields are high compared to previous studies for all three PAHs precursors: 1-methylnaphthalene > 2-methylnaphthalene ∼ naphthalene for all atmospheric conditions studied. The SOA yields range from 0.03 to 0.60 for naphthalene, 0.21-1.52 for 1-methylnaphthalene, and 0.34-0.55 for 2-methylnaphthalene under high NOx with HONO (initial PAH:NO ratio = 0.03-0.17) conditions. The SOA yield ranges from 0.04 to 0.31 for naphthalene, 0.14-0.72 for 1-methylnaphthalene, and 0.06-0.49 for 2-methylnaphthalene under low NOx (initial PAH:NO ratio = 0.54-2.20) conditions. SOA yields were substantially greater than 1.0 under H2O2 (ultra low NOx) and low NOx + H2O2 conditions for all three PAH precursors. The system reactivity influenced by OH radicals, NOx levels, initial PAH/NO ratios, NO2/NO ratios, and all impacted the SOA formation from the PAH precursors. Fractal-like SOA is observed for the methylnaphthalene isomers during high NOx photooxidation experiments, implying that researchers studying SOA formation from this precursor must carefully account for particle shape or effective density. A m/z 104 (C7H4O+,104.026) peak, consistent with SOA products phthalic acid from earlier studies, was observed as a potential marker of PAH oxidation during HR-ToF-AMS analysis.

  10. Evaluating the time and source of hydrocarbon additions to soils using lead isotopes and historical changes in industrial lead sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, R.W. California State Univ., Los Angeles, CA )

    1994-04-01

    Isotopic analysis of anthropogenic Pb in well-dated, southern California coastal sediments have been integrated with historical changes in ore Pb sources to produce calibration curves (206Pb/207Pb vs. time) that allow us to model the time anthropogenic Pb was added to a soil horizon. The major, historical sources of anthropogenic Pb in southern California are fossil fuels (e.g. gasoline). Hence, Pb model ages (LABILE model; Los Angeles Borderland Industrial Lead) provide time constraints on Pb deposition from fossil fuel combustion via airborne deposition, runoff, and/or sewage outfall in this region. The correlation between the LABILE model age and known times of anthropogenic Pb additions at 17 specific sites is good (r = 0.978); the accuracy of the method ranges from one to five years in the post-1960 time interval. Factors influencing accuracy include analytical uncertainties in Pb isotopic measurements ([<=]0.1%), the scatter in isotopic ratios of anthropogenic Pb (circa 0.2%), and the uncertainty in the sediment age used to calibrate the method (0-15 yr). At one site three statistically distinguishable events were identified; they correlate with residential development (1968), airborne vehicular Pb deposition (1983), and site remediation (1991). Gasoline incursions at two tests sites have been dated accurately ([+-] 1 yr). The limitations of the LABILE model (geographic, age, types of hydrocarbons, and industry to which it applies) are now under investigation.

  11. SOA genes encode proteins controlling lipase expression in response to triacylglycerol utilization in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Desfougères, Thomas; Haddouche, Ramdane; Fudalej, Franck; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2010-02-01

    The oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica efficiently metabolizes hydrophobic substrates such as alkanes, fatty acids or triacylglycerol. This yeast has been identified in oil-polluted water and in lipid-rich food. The enzymes involved in lipid breakdown, for use as a carbon source, are known, but the molecular mechanisms controlling the expression of the genes encoding these enzymes are still poorly understood. The study of mRNAs obtained from cells grown on oleic acid identified a new group of genes called SOA genes (specific for oleic acid). SOA1 and SOA2 are two small genes coding for proteins with no known homologs. Single- and double-disrupted strains were constructed. Wild-type and mutant strains were grown on dextrose, oleic acid and triacylglycerols. The double mutant presents a clear phenotype consisting of a growth defect on tributyrin and triolein, but not on dextrose or oleic acid media. Lipase activity was 50-fold lower in this mutant than in the wild-type strain. The impact of SOA deletion on the expression of the main extracellular lipase gene (LIP2) was monitored using a LIP2-beta-galactosidase promoter fusion protein. These data suggest that Soa proteins are components of a molecular mechanism controlling lipase gene expression in response to extracellular triacylglycerol.

  12. simpleGAMMA - a reduced model of secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous aerosol phase (aaSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, J. L.; McNeill, V. F.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the uptake and aqueous processing of water-soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by wet aerosols or cloud droplets is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We recently developed GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a zero-dimensional kinetic model that couples gas-phase and detailed aqueous-phase atmospheric chemistry for speciated prediction of SOA and organosulfate formation in cloudwater or aqueous aerosols. Results from GAMMA simulations of SOA formation in aerosol water (McNeill et al., 2012) indicate that it is dominated by two pathways: isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) uptake followed by ring-opening chemistry (under low-NOx conditions) and glyoxal uptake. This suggested that it is possible to model the majority of aqueous aerosol phase SOA mass using a highly simplified reaction scheme. We have therefore developed a reduced version of GAMMA, simpleGAMMA. Close agreement in predicted aaSOA mass is observed between simpleGAMMA and GAMMA under all conditions tested (between pH 1-4 and RH 40-80%) after 12 h of simulation. simpleGAMMA is computationally efficient and suitable for coupling with larger-scale atmospheric chemistry models.

  13. Wavelength-transparent nonlinear optical gate based on self-seeded gain modulation in folded tandem-SOA.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Jin; Park, Jonghan; Park, Namkyoo

    2007-04-16

    In this paper, an all-optical nonlinear gate employing a folded tandem-SOA structure is proposed. With a partial reflection mirror for the amplified signal, we achieve a self-seeded gain modulation effect in the folded tandem-SOA, thus eliminating an external saturating source required for the conventional tandem-SOA optical gate. The performance analysis of the proposed device as a 2R regenerator / logic gates (NOR) shows excellent compatibility with the conventional structure, but in a highly integrated form with added benefit of wavelength transparency over wide spectral bandwidth (>100nm). Studies also have been carried out to investigate optimum operation condition of the device as a function of input wavelength and signal input power.

  14. VOC characteristics, emissions and contributions to SOA formation during hazy episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jie; Wu, Fangkun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Guiqian; Zhang, Junke; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are important precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The pollution processes in Beijing were investigated from 18th October to 6th November 2013 to study the characteristics, SOA formation potential and contributing factors of VOC during hazy episodes. The mean concentrations of VOC were 67.4 ± 33.3 μg m-3 on clear days and have 5-7-fold increase in polluted periods. VOC concentrations rapidly increased at a visibility range of 4-5 km with the rate of 25%/km in alkanes, alkenes and halocarbons and the rate of 45%/km in aromatics. Analysis of the mixing layer height (MLH); wind speed and ratios of benzene/toluene (B/T), ethylbenzene/m,p-xylene (E/X), and isopentane/n-pentane (i/n) under different visibility conditions revealed that the MLH and wind speed were the 2 major factors affecting the variability of VOC during clear days and that local emissions and photochemical reactions were main causes of VOC variation on polluted days. Combined with the fractional aerosol coefficient (FAC) method, the SOA formation potentials of alkanes, alkenes and aromatics were 0.3 ± 0.2 μg m-3, 1.1 ± 1.0 μg m-3 and 6.5 ± 6.4 μg m-3, respectively. As the visibility deteriorated, the SOA formation potential increased from 2.1 μg m-3 to 13.2 μg m-3, and the fraction of SOA-forming aromatics rapidly increased from 56.3% to 90.1%. Initial sources were resolved by a positive matrix factorization (PMF) model. Vehicle-related emissions were an important source of VOC at all visibility ranges, accounting for 23%-32%. As visibility declined, emissions from solvents and the chemical industry increased from 13.2% and 6.3% to 34.2% and 23.0%, respectively. Solvents had the greatest SOA formation ability, accounting for 52.5% on average on hazy days, followed by vehicle-related emissions (20.7%).

  15. Modeling SOA production from the oxidation of intermediate volatility alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapour pressure. This process was investigated using the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Results for the C8-C24 n-alkane series show the expected trends, i.e. (i) SOA yield grows with the carbon backbone of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yields decreases with the decreasing pre-existing organic aerosol concentration, (iii) the number of generations required to describe SOA production increases when the pre-existing organic aerosol concentration decreases. Most SOA contributors were found to be not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA). Branched alkanes are more prone to fragment in the early stage of the oxidation than their corresponding linear analogues. Fragmentation is expected to alter both the yield and the mean oxidation state of the SOA. Here, GECKO-A is applied to generate highly detailed oxidation schemes for various series of branched and cyclised alkanes. Branching and cyclisation effects on SOA yields and oxidation states will be examined.

  16. Evidence for an Additional Heat Source in the Warm Ionized Medium of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, R. J.; Haffner, L. M.; Tufte, S. L.

    1999-11-01

    Spatial variations of the [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα line intensity ratios observed in the gaseous halo of the Milky Way and other galaxies are inconsistent with pure photoionization models. They appear to require a supplemental heating mechanism that increases the electron temperature at low densities, ne. This would imply that in addition to photoionization, which has a heating rate per unit volume proportional to n2e, there is another source of heat with a rate per unit volume proportional to a lower power of ne. One possible mechanism is the dissipation of interstellar plasma turbulence, which, according to Minter & Spangler, heats the ionized interstellar medium in the Milky Way at a rate of ~1×10-25ne ergs cm-3 s-1. If such a source were present, it would dominate over photoionization heating in regions where ne<~0.1 cm-3, producing the observed increases in the [S II]/Hα and [N II]/Hα intensity ratios at large distances from the galactic midplane as well as accounting for the constancy of [S II]/[N II], which is not explained by pure photoionization. Other supplemental heating sources, such as magnetic reconnection, cosmic rays, or photoelectric emission from small grains, could also account for these observations, provided they supply ~10-5 ergs s-1 per square centimeter of the Galactic disk to the warm ionized medium.

  17. Molecular Composition and Volatility of Organic Aerosol in the Southeastern U.S.: Implications for IEPOX Derived SOA.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F D; Mohr, C; D'Ambro, E L; Lutz, A; Riedel, T P; Gaston, C J; Iyer, S; Zhang, Z; Gold, A; Surratt, J D; Lee, B H; Kurten, T; Hu, W W; Jimenez, J; Hallquist, M; Thornton, J A

    2016-03-01

    We present measurements as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) during which atmospheric aerosol particles were comprehensively characterized. We present results utilizing a Filter Inlet for Gases and AEROsol coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). We focus on the volatility and composition of isoprene derived organic aerosol tracers and of the bulk organic aerosol. By utilizing the online volatility and molecular composition information provided by the FIGAERO-CIMS, we show that the vast majority of commonly reported molecular tracers of isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is derived from thermal decomposition of accretion products or other low volatility organics having effective saturation vapor concentrations <10(-3) μg m(-3). In addition, while accounting for up to 30% of total submicrometer organic aerosol mass, the IEPOX-derived SOA has a higher volatility than the remaining bulk. That IEPOX-SOA, and more generally bulk organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. is comprised of effectively nonvolatile material has important implications for modeling SOA derived from isoprene, and for mechanistic interpretations of molecular tracer measurements. Our results show that partitioning theory performs well for 2-methyltetrols, once accretion product decomposition is taken into account. No significant partitioning delays due to aerosol phase or viscosity are observed, and no partitioning to particle-phase water or other unexplained mechanisms are needed to explain our results.

  18. Accelerated Source-Encoding Full-Waveform Inversion with Additional Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, C.; Fichtner, A.; Ulbrich, M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a flexible framework of Newton-type methods for constrained full-waveform inversion in the time domain. Our main goal is (1) to incorporate additional prior knowledge by using general constraints on the model parameters and (2) to reduce the computational costs of solving the inverse problem by tailoring source-encoding strategies to Newton-type methods.In particular, we apply the Moreau-Yosida regularization to handle the constraints and use a continuation strategy to adjust the regularization parameter. Furthermore, we propose a semismooth Newton method with a trust-region globalization that relies on second-order adjoints to compute the Newton system with a matrix-free preconditioned conjugate gradient solver. The costs of conventional FWI approaches scale proportionally with the number of seismic sources. Here, source-encoding strategies that trigger different sources simultaneously have been proven to be a successful tool to trade a small loss of information for huge savings of computational time to solve the inverse problem. This is particularly interesting for our setting as one iteration of Newton's methods using the full Hessian is considerably more expensive than quasi-Newton methods like L-BFGS. To this end, we discuss a sample average approximation model that is accelerated by using inexact Hessian information based on mini-batches of the samples. Furthermore, we compare its performance with stochastic descent schemes. Here, the classical stochastic gradient method is accelerated by an L-BFGS preconditioner and moreover, the stability of this stochastic preconditioner is enhanced by using the Hessian instead of only gradient information.Numerical results are presented for problems in geophysical exploration on reservoir-scale.

  19. Scientific Workflows Composition and Deployment on SOA Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Kulkarni, Anand V.

    2011-12-12

    Scientific workflows normally consist of multiple applications acquiring and transforming data, running data intensive analyses and visualizing the results for scientific discovery. To compose and deploy such scientific workflows, an SOA platform can provide integration of third-party components, services, and tools. In this paper, we present our application of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) to compose and deploy systems biology workflows. In developing this application, our solution uses MeDICi a middleware framework built on SOA platforms as an integration layer. We discuss our experience and lessons learnt about this solution that are generally applicable to scientific workflows in other domains.

  20. Secondary organic aerosol formation and source apportionment in Southeast Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Ying, Qi

    2011-06-01

    The latest version of US EPA's Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ v4.7) model with the most recent update on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation pathways was adapted into a source-oriented modeling framework to determine the contributions of different emission sources to SOA concentrations from a carbon source perspective in Southeast Texas during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000) from August 25 to September 5, 2000. A comparison of the VOC and SOA predictions with observations shows that anthropogenic emissions of long chain alkanes and aromatics are likely underestimated in the EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) inventory and the current SOA mechanism in CMAQ still under-predicts SOA. The peak SOA concentrations measured at La Porte are more accurately predicted by increasing the emissions of the anthropogenic SOA precursors by a factor of 5 although the overall precursor concentrations are better predicted by increasing the emissions by a factor of 2. A linear correlation between SOA and odd oxygen (ΔSOA/ΔOx = 23.0-28.4 μg m-3/ppm Ox) can be found when they are formed simultaneously in the air masses passing the urban Houston area on high SOA days. Based on the adjusted emissions (a factor of 2 increase in the alkane and aromatics precursor emissions), approximately 20% of the total SOA in the Houston-Galveston Bay area is due to anthropogenic sources. Solvent utilization and gasoline engines are the main anthropogenic sources. SOA from alkanes and aromatics accounts for approximately 2-4% and 5-9% of total SOA, respectively. The predicted overall anthropogenic SOA concentrations are not sensitive to the half-life time used to calculate the conversion rate of semi-volatile organic compounds to non-volatile oligomers in the particle phase. The main precursors of biogenic SOA are sesquiterpenes, which contribute to approximately 12-35% of total SOA. Monoterpenes contribute to 3-14% and isoprene accounts for approximately 6-9% of the

  1. Statistical addition method for external noise sources affecting HF-MF-LF systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudegg, David

    2001-01-01

    The current statistical method for the addition of external component noise sources in the LF, MF, and lower HF band (100 kHz to 3 MHz) produces total median noise levels that may be less than the largest-component median in some cases. Several case studies illustrate this anomaly. Methods used to sum the components rely on their power (decibels) distributions being represented as normal by the statistical parameters. The atmospheric noise component is not correctly represented by its decile values when it is assumed to have a normal distribution, causing anomalies in the noise summation when components are similar in magnitude. A revised component summation method is proposed, and the way it provides a more physically realistic total noise median for LF, MF, and lower HF frequencies is illustrated.

  2. SOA FROM ISOPRENE OXIDATION PRODUCTS: MODEL SIMULATION OF CLOUD CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent laboratory evidence supports the hypothesis that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is formed in the atmosphere through aqueous-phase reactions in clouds. The results of batch photochemical reactions of glyoxal, methylglyoxal and hydrogen peroxide are presented. These labor...

  3. CMAQ Application to the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    CMAQ was used to simulate conditions during the the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in the summer of 2013. Data collected as part of this study have been used to perform diagnostic model evaluation.

  4. Science Opportunity Analyzer (SOA): Not Just Another Pretty Face

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Streiiffert, Barbara; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Science Opportunity Analyzer (SOA). For the first time at JPL, the Cassini mission to Saturn is using distributed science operations for sequence generation. This means that scientist at other institutions has more responsibility to build the spacecraft sequence. Tools are required to support the sequence development. JPL tools required a complete configuration behind a firewall, and the tools that the user community had developed did not interface with the JPL tools. Therefore the SOA was created to bridge the gap between the remote scientists and the JPL operations teams. The presentation reviews the development of the SOA, and what was required of the system. The presentation reviews the functions that the SOA performed.

  5. Evidence for ambient dark aqueous SOA formation in the Po Valley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Amy P.; Hodas, Natasha; Turpin, Barbara J.; Skog, Kate; Keutsch, Frank N.; Gilardoni, Stefania; Paglione, Marco; Rinaldi, Matteo; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Poulain, Laurent; Herrmann, Hartmut; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Nemitz, Eiko; Twigg, Marsailidh M.; Collett, Jeffrey L., Jr.

    2016-07-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that water-soluble products from the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds can partition into atmospheric waters where they are further oxidized to form low volatility products, providing an alternative route for oxidation in addition to further oxidation in the gas phase. These products can remain in the particle phase after water evaporation, forming what is termed as aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). However, few studies have attempted to observe ambient aqSOA. Therefore, a suite of measurements, including near-real-time WSOC (water-soluble organic carbon), inorganic anions/cations, organic acids, and gas-phase glyoxal, were made during the PEGASOS (Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls-climate interaction Study) 2012 campaign in the Po Valley, Italy, to search for evidence of aqSOA. Our analysis focused on four periods: Period A on 19-21 June, Period B on 30 June and 1-2 July, Period C on 3-5 July, and Period D on 6-7 July to represent the first (Period A) and second (Periods B, C, and D) halves of the study. These periods were picked to cover varying levels of WSOC and aerosol liquid water. In addition, back trajectory analysis suggested all sites sampled similar air masses on a given day. The data collected during both periods were divided into times of increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreasing RH, with the aim of diminishing the influence of dilution and mixing on SOA concentrations and other measured variables. Evidence for local aqSOA formation was only observed during Period A. When this occurred, there was a correlation of WSOC with organic aerosol (R2 = 0.84), aerosol liquid water (R2 = 0.65), RH (R2 = 0.39), and aerosol nitrate (R2 = 0.66). Additionally, this was only observed during times of increasing RH, which coincided with dark conditions. Comparisons of WSOC with oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) factors, determined from application of positive matrix factorization analysis on the aerosol mass

  6. Characterizing the Amount and Chemistry of Biogenic SOA Formation from Pine Forest Air Using a Flow Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, B. B.; Ortega, A. M.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Fry, J.; Zarzana, K. J.; Draper, D. C.; Brown, S. S.; Kaser, L.; Karl, T.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Hodzic, A.; Dube, W. P.; Wagner, N. L.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    :C elemental ratios of the SOA mass added from 1-5 days exposure to each oxidant were approximately 0.54 and 1.56, respectively, consistent with known monoterpene-derived SOA constituents (e.g., pinic acid = C9H14O4). At higher OH exposures, the O:C of new SOA mass increased while the H:C decreased, and evidence of heterogeneous oxidation was observed. PTR-TOF-MS measurements of oxidized air showed that some compounds were depleted (e.g., monoterpenes) while some compounds were produced (e.g., acetaldehyde) due to oxidation. When applying laboratory yields measured with this reactor, assuming complete consumption of the most abundant VOCs measured at the forest site (monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene), a simple model underpredicted the amount of SOA formed in the reactor in the field observations by a factor of ~6. This suggests one or more issues, including a large SOA source from oxygenated VOCs (e.g., monoterpene oxidation products) that were not included in our simple model, or from other VOCs not considered in the model, or limitations of the extrapolation of single precursor lab yields to multiple-precursor ambient air.

  7. simpleGAMMA v1.0 - a reduced model of secondary organic aerosol formation in the aqueous aerosol phase (aaSOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, J. L.; McNeill, V. F.

    2015-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that the uptake and aqueous processing of water-soluble volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by wet aerosols or cloud droplets is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). We recently developed GAMMA (Gas-Aerosol Model for Mechanism Analysis), a zero-dimensional kinetic model that couples gas-phase and detailed aqueous-phase atmospheric chemistry for speciated prediction of SOA and organosulfate formation in cloud water or aqueous aerosols. Results from GAMMA simulations of SOA formation in aerosol water (aaSOA) (McNeill et al., 2012) indicate that it is dominated by two pathways: isoprene epoxydiol (IEPOX) uptake followed by ring-opening chemistry (under low-NOx conditions) and glyoxal uptake. This suggested that it is possible to model the majority of aaSOA mass using a highly simplified reaction scheme. We have therefore developed a reduced version of GAMMA, simpleGAMMA. Close agreement in predicted aaSOA mass is observed between simpleGAMMA and GAMMA under all conditions tested (between pH 1-4 and RH 40-80 %) after 12 h of simulation. simpleGAMMA is computationally efficient and suitable for coupling with larger-scale atmospheric chemistry models or analyzing ambient measurement data.

  8. Acid-catalyzed Reactions in Model Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA): Insights using Desorption-electrospray Ionization (DESI) Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiddler, M. N.; Cooks, R. G.; Shepson, P.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are presently little understood in terms of their sources, formation, and effect on climate forcing, despite their significant impacts on climate change and respiratory health. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which were thought to arise entirely from simple gas-particle partitioning, have recently been found to contain oligomeric species which result from the condensed-phase reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The non-methane VOC with the greatest emission flux, isoprene, is known to produce aerosols through chemistry involving its oxidation products. We selected one of its major oxidation product, methacrolein, to assess its role in oligomeric SOA formation in response to the acidic conditions found in cloud water. Since it has been found that acidified aerosol produces oligomeric species with greater molecular weight and yield, acid-catalyzed oligomerization is likely a significant process in the formation of SOA. Aqueous solutions of methacrolein were acidified with sulfuric acid, and studied using linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LIT-MS) with a home-built desorption-electrospray ionization (DESI) source. An extremely heterogeneous mixture of products was produced in this system, resulting from hydrolysis, acid- catalyzed oxidation, reduction, and organosulfate formation. Evidence for disproportionation and heterocycle formation are proposed as reaction mechanisms hitherto unrecognized in the production of SOA. The proposed structure and formation mechanism for several species, based upon their MS/MS spectra, will also be presented.

  9. Evidence for ambient dark aqueous SOA formation in the Po Valley, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, A. P.; Hodas, N.; Turpin, B. J.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Gilardoni, S.; Paglione, M.; Rinaldi, M.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Poulain, L.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A.; Nemitz, E.; Twigg, M. M.; Collett, J. L., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that water-soluble products from the gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds can partition into atmospheric waters where they are further oxidized to form low volatility products, providing an alternative route for oxidation in addition to further oxidation in the gas-phase. These products can remain in the particle phase after water evaporation forming what is termed as aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). However, few studies have attempted to observe ambient aqSOA. Therefore, a suite of measurements, including near real-time WSOC (water-soluble organic carbon), inorganic anions/cations, organic acids, and gas-phase glyoxal, were made during the PEGASOS (Pan-European Gas-AeroSols-climate interaction Study) 2012 campaign in the Po Valley, Italy to search for evidence of aqSOA. Our analysis focused on two specific periods: Period A on 19-21 June and Period B on 3-5 July to represent the first and second halves of the study, respectively. The large scale circulation was predominately from the west in both periods. Plus back trajectory analysis suggested all sites sampled similar air masses during both periods allowing for comparison of Periods A and B. The data collected during both periods were divided into times of increasing relative humidity (RH) and decreasing RH with the aim of diminishing the influence of dilution and mixing on SOA concentrations and other measured variables. Evidence for local aqSOA formation was only observed during Period A. When this occurred, there was a correlation of WSOC with organic aerosol (R2 = 0.86), aerosol liquid water (R2 = 0.69), RH (R2 = 0.45), and aerosol nitrate (R2 = 0.71). Additionally, this was only observed during times of increasing RH, which coincided with dark conditions. Comparisons of WSOC with oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) factors determined from application of positive matrix factorization analysis on the aerosol mass spectrometer observations of the submicron non

  10. Elite sport is not an additional source of distress for adolescents with high stress levels.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Brand, Serge

    2011-04-01

    This study examined whether participation in elite sport interacts with stress in decreasing or increasing symptoms of depression and anxiety among adolescents, and further, whether the interplay between participation in high-performance sport and stress is related to the perceived quality of sleep. 434 adolescents (278 girls, 156 boys; age: M = 17.2 yr.) from 15 "Swiss Olympic Sport Classes" and 9 conventional classes answered a questionnaire and completed a 7-day sleep log. Analyses of covariance showed that heightened stress was related to more depressive symptoms and higher scores for trait-anxiety. Moreover, those classified as having poor sleep by a median split cutoff reported higher levels of depressive symptoms. No significant (multivariate) main effects were found for high-performance sport athletes. Similarly, no significant two- or three-way interaction effects were found. These results caution against exaggerated expectations concerning sport participation as a stress buffer. Nevertheless, participation in high-performance sport was not found to be an additional source of distress for adolescents who reported high stress levels despite prior research that has pointed toward such a relationship.

  11. Design consideration of a 77-channel 64-QAM signal transmission system using a light-injected MQW-SOA as an in-line amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeng, SohnLing; Tai, Chien; Chang, Hung-Chun

    1998-06-01

    In the future digital video transmission, a multichannel subcarrier multiplexed system with M-ary quadrature- amplitude-modulation (M-QAM) signals over fiber-optic transmission is an excellent candidate. A system using 1.3 micrometers semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) for increasing the span length or for power splitting is very economical at the situations of the penetration of 1.3-micrometers single-mode fiber with the having installed 1.3-micrometers optical transmitters. However, the significant intermodulation distortions (IMDs) resulted from the signal-induced carrier density modulation of SOA limits the system capability, including channel capacity and power budget. A method using the external light injection to the SOA used in a 77-channel 64-QAM signal transmission system as an in-line amplifier is capable of increasing system power budget. From the viewpoint of system design, two approaches are addressed, one is the optimization of the in-line SOA used the external light injection, the other is the consideration of the optical modulation index per channel (OMI/ch) applied to transmitted. From the experimental results, the pumping wavelength and the pump power in approach one are mainly decided by the requirement of BER and the dynamic range of SOA, in addition, choosing the pump resulting in a smaller accompanied signal gain reduction can enlarge the system power budget. In approach, the optimum position of the in- line SOA incorporated is determined by the value of applied OMI/ch.

  12. Solar neutrinos and the influences of opacity, thermal instability, additional neutrino sources, and a central black hole on solar models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.; Ezer, D.

    1972-01-01

    Significant quantities that affect the internal structure of the sun are examined for factors that reduce the temperature near the sun's center. The four factors discussed are: opacity, central black hole, thermal instability, and additional neutrino sources.

  13. ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS OF PLANETS AND QUASI-STELLAR RADIO SOURCES AT 3 MM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MERCURY ( PLANET ), VENUS( PLANET ), PERIODIC VARIATIONS, RADIO ASTRONOMY, SPECTRUM SIGNATURES...EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIO WAVES, SOURCES), GALAXIES, BLACKBODY RADIATION, BRIGHTNESS, TEMPERATURE, MARS( PLANET ), JUPITER( PLANET ), SATURN( PLANET

  14. Illuminating the Atmospheric Oxidation Mechanisms, SOA Formation Pathways and Radical Yields of the Monoterpene Myrcene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyche, Kevin; Carr, Timo; Monks, Paul; Ellis, Andrew; Alfarra, Rami; McFiggans, Gordon; Hamilton, Jacqueline; Ward, Martyn; Boss, William; Camredon, Marie

    2010-05-01

    Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOCs) are ubiquitous in the global troposphere, being emitted primarily from terrestrial plant life in significant quantities. Indeed, it is estimated that the total annual emission rate of all (non-methane) BVOCs is roughly ten times that of all anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (Guenther et al., 1995). With the exception of methane, the most dominant species of BVOC, in terms of emission strength, reactivity and their impact upon the atmosphere, are terpenes. Terpenes are a subdivision of BVOCs, composed primarily of hemiterpenes (C5), monoterpenes (C10), sesquiterpenes (C15) and diterpenes (C20). Under troposheric conditions terpenes react via complex and extensive gas phase oxidation pathways, have strong photochemical ozone creation potentials, constitute a significant radical source and are known to generate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in high yields. At present there exists a certain lack of understanding regarding the oxidation mechanisms of certain terpenes and their role in SOA and radical formation. Consequently, as part of the NERC funded Aerosol Coupling in the Earth's System (ACES) and Total RAdical Production from the OZonolysis of alkenes (TRAPOZ) projects, a comprehensive series of simulation chamber experiments were conducted at the University of Manchester aerosol chamber facility, and at the EUropean PHOto REactor (EUPHORE) in order to investigate the gas phase degradation mechanisms, and SOA and radical formation potentials of a number of atmospherically significant terpenes. Both simulation chambers were highly instrumented during all experiments such that detailed and concomitant gas and aerosol phase measurements were made across a range of conditions. The work presented here describes the findings obtained from both photooxidation and ozonolysis experiments involving the common, but less well studied, aliphatic monoterpene, myrcene. The data presented include NOx and ozone measurements and

  15. Comparison of affective and semantic priming in different SOA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhongqing; Qu, Yuhong; Xiao, Yanli; Wu, Qi; Xia, Likun; Li, Wenhui; Liu, Ying

    2016-11-01

    Researchers have been at odds on whether affective or semantic priming is faster or stronger. The present study selects a series of facial expression photos and words, which have definite emotional meaning or gender meaning, to set up experiment including both affective and semantic priming. The intensity of emotion and gender information in the prime as well as the strength of emotional or semantic (in gender) relationship between the prime and the target is matched. Three groups of participants are employed separately in our experiment varied with stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) as 50, 250 or 500 ms. The results show that the difference between two types of priming effect is revealed when the SOA is at 50 ms, in which the affective priming effect is presented when the prime has negative emotion. It indicates that SOA can affect the comparison between the affective and semantic priming, and the former takes the priority in the automatic processing level.

  16. The water up-take of semisolid SOA particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajunoja, A.; Lambe, A. T.; Hakala, J. P.; Rastak, N.; Hao, L.; Paramonov, M.; Hong, J.; Laaksonen, A. J.; Kulmala, M. T.; Massoli, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Donahue, N. M.; Riipinen, I.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.; Petäjä, T.; Virtanen, A.

    2014-12-01

    The dependence of aerosol particle hygroscopicity on particle composition is often represented with the single parameter k commonly used in global models to describe the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosol particles. From the theoretical formulation of k the same value is expected for ideal solutes in both the sub- and supersaturated regimes as typically calculated from hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA) and cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNc) measurements respectively (i.e. k HGF and kCCN). Yet, a number of recent studies conducted on SOA indicate that the two measurements yield different k values (k HGF < kCCN). There are several studies discussing the behaviour but the underlying reasons are unresolved. To investigate this in more detailed, CCNc and HTDMA measurements were conducted to determine the effects of chemical composition, oxidation level, the phase state and RH on the associated water uptake properties of biogenic SOA particles formed from isoprene, a-pinene, and longifolene precursors. Pure SOA particles by OH and/or O3 oxidation of the gas-phase precursors were formed in a PAM (Potential Aerosol Mass) flow tube reactor. Hygroscopic growth factors (HGF) were measured by Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (HTDMA) at RH range of 50-~95% and CCN activation by CCN counter. To investigate the physical phase of the particles the particle bounced fraction (BF) using an Aerosol Bounce Instrument (ABI) was also measured. SOA oxidation state and composition was measured by a c-ToF-AMS. Based on the measurements we suggest that at subsaturation conditions semi solid SOA particles take up water mostly via surface adsorption resulting a large discrepancy between the kHGF and kCCN values. By calculating the aerosol direct radiative effect (Wm-2) using our results we also show that ambiguity about the κ values has important implications for quantifying the climate effects of SOA in atmospheric models.

  17. Meta-analysis on Methane Mitigating Properties of Saponin-rich Sources in the Rumen: Influence of Addition Levels and Plant Sources

    PubMed Central

    Jayanegara, Anuraga; Wina, Elizabeth; Takahashi, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Saponins have been considered as promising natural substances for mitigating methane emissions from ruminants. However, studies reported that addition of saponin-rich sources often arrived at contrasting results, i.e. either it decreased methane or it did not. The aim of the present study was to assess ruminal methane emissions through a meta-analytical approach of integrating related studies from published papers which described various levels of different saponin-rich sources being added to ruminant feed. A database was constructed from published literature reporting the addition of saponin-rich sources at various levels and then monitoring ruminal methane emissions in vitro. Accordingly, levels of saponin-rich source additions as well as different saponin sources were specified in the database. Apart from methane, other related rumen fermentation parameters were also included in the database, i.e. organic matter digestibility, gas production, pH, ammonia concentration, short-chain fatty acid profiles and protozoal count. A total of 23 studies comprised of 89 data points met the inclusion criteria. The data obtained were subsequently subjected to a statistical meta-analysis based on mixed model methodology. Accordingly, different studies were treated as random effects whereas levels of saponin-rich source additions or different saponin sources were considered as fixed effects. Model statistics used were p-value and root mean square error. Results showed that an addition of increasing levels of a saponin-rich source decreased methane emission per unit of substrate incubated as well as per unit of total gas produced (p<0.05). There was a decrease in acetate proportion (linear pattern; p<0.001) and an increase in propionate proportion (linear pattern; p<0.001) with increasing levels of saponin. Log protozoal count decreased (p<0.05) at higher saponin levels. Comparing between different saponin-rich sources, all saponin sources, i.e. quillaja, tea and yucca saponins

  18. Volatile and intermediate-volatility organic compounds in sub-urban Paris: variability, origin and importance for SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait-Helal, W.; Borbon, A.; Sauvage, S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Colomb, A.; Gros, V.; Freutel, F.; Crippa, M.; Afif, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Beekmann, M.; Doussin, J.-F.; Durand-Jolibois, R.; Fronval, I.; Grand, N.; Leonardis, T.; Lopez, M.; Michoud, V.; Miet, K.; Perrier, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Schneider, J.; Siour, G.; Zapf, P.; Locoge, N.

    2014-02-01

    Measurements of gaseous and particulate organic carbon were performed during the MEGAPOLI experiments, in July 2009 and January-February 2010, at the SIRTA observatory in sub-urban Paris. Measurements of primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs), of both anthropogenic and biogenic origins, including for the first time C12-C16 n-alkanes of intermediate volatility (IVOCs), suspected to be efficient precursors of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The time series of gaseous carbon are generally consistent with times series of particulate organic carbon at regional scales and are clearly affected by meteorology and air mass origin. Concentration levels of anthropogenic VOCs in urban and sub-urban Paris were surprisingly low (2-963 ppt) compared to other megacities worldwide and to rural continental sites. Urban enhancement ratios of anthropogenic VOC pairs agree well between the urban and sub-urban Paris sites, showing the regional extent of anthropogenic sources of similar composition. Contrary to other primary anthropogenic VOCs (aromatics and alkanes), IVOCs showed lower concentrations in winter (< 5 ppt) compared to summer (13-27 ppt) in agreement with a gas-particle partitioning in favor of their transfer to the particle phase in winter. Higher concentrations of most oxygenated VOCs in winter (18-5984 ppt) suggest their dominant primary anthropogenic origin. The respective role of primary anthropogenic gaseous compounds in regional SOA formation was investigated by estimating the SOA mass concentration expected from the anthropogenic VOCs and IVOCs (I / VOCs) measured at SIRTA. From an approach based on emissions inferred from the I / VOC concentrations times the SOA formation yields', the so-called integrated approach conducted in this study, 46% of the SOA measured at SIRTA is explained by our measured concentrations of I / VOC, with 10% explained by only C12-C16 IVOCs. From results of an alternative time-resolved approach, the explained variability

  19. Impacts of carbon source addition on denitrification and phosphorus uptake in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shamim A; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2013-01-01

    In this study, simultaneous denitrification and phosphorus (P) removal were investigated in batch tests using nitrified mixed liquor and secondary wastewater influent from a full-scale treatment plant and different levels of acetate and propionate as supplemental carbon sources. Without supplemental carbon source, denitrification occurred at low rate and P release and P uptake was negatively affected (i.e., P removal of only 59.7%). When acetate and propionate were supplied, denitrification and P release occurred simultaneously under anoxic conditions. For acetate and propionate at a C/N stoichiometric ratio of 7.6, P release was negatively affected by denitrification. For acetate, the percent P removal and denitrification were very similar for C/N ratios of 22 (5X stoichiometric) and 59 (10X stoichiometric). For propionate, both percent P removal and denitrification deteriorated for C/N ratios of 22 (5X stoichiometric) and 45 (10X stoichiometric). It was observed that carbon source added in excess to stoichiometric ratio was consumed in the aerobic zone, but P was not taken up. This implies that PAO bacteria may utilize the excess carbon source in the aerobic zone rather than their polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) reserves, thereby promoting deterioration of the system.

  20. Aerosol-halogen interaction: Change of physico-chemical properties of SOA by naturally released halogen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, J.; Balzer, N.; Buxmann, J.; Grothe, H.; Krüger, H.; Platt, U.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species are released by various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol or salt pans and salt lakes. These heterogeneous release mechanisms have been overlooked so far, although their potential of interaction with organic aerosols like Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA), Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol (BBOA) or Atmospheric Humic LIke Substances (HULIS) is completely unknown. Such reactions can constitute sources of gaseous organo-halogen compounds or halogenated organic particles in the atmospheric boundary layer. To study the interaction of organic aerosols with reactive halogen species (RHS), SOA was produced from α-pinene, catechol and guaiacol using an aerosol smog-chamber. The model SOAs were characterized in detail using a variety of physico-chemical methods (Ofner et al., 2011). Those aerosols were exposed to molecular halogens in the presence of UV/VIS irradiation and to halogens, released from simulated natural halogen sources like salt pans, in order to study the complex aerosol-halogen interaction. The heterogeneous reaction of RHS with those model aerosols leads to different gaseous species like CO2, CO and small reactive/toxic molecules like phosgene (COCl2). Hydrogen containing groups on the aerosol particles are destroyed to form HCl or HBr, and a significant formation of C-Br bonds could be verified in the particle phase. Carbonyl containing functional groups of the aerosol are strongly affected by the halogenation process. While changes of functional groups and gaseous species were visible using FTIR spectroscopy, optical properties were studied using Diffuse Reflectance UV/VIS spectroscopy. Overall, the optical properties of the processed organic aerosols are significantly changed. While chlorine causes a "bleaching" of the aerosol particles, bromine shifts the maximum of UV/VIS absorption to the red end of the UV/VIS spectrum. Further physico-chemical changes were recognized according to the aerosol size-distributions or the

  1. Quantum dot SOA input power dynamic range improvement for differential-phase encoded signals.

    PubMed

    Vallaitis, T; Bonk, R; Guetlein, J; Hillerkuss, D; Li, J; Brenot, R; Lelarge, F; Duan, G H; Freude, W; Leuthold, J

    2010-03-15

    Experimentally we find a 10 dB input power dynamic range advantage for amplification of phase encoded signals with quantum dot SOA as compared to low-confinement bulk SOA. An analysis of amplitude and phase effects shows that this improvement can be attributed to the lower alpha-factor found in QD SOA.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF AN IMPROVED SOA REPRESENTATION IN THE CMAQ MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster outlines ongoing laboratory and field work being performed to a) identify the major SOA precursors b) identify tracer compounds for the major SOA precursors and c) determine reaction mechanisms for SOA formation. The goal of this work is to incorporate newly-developed...

  3. Preparing Students to Take SOA/CAS Exam FM/2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides suggestions for preparing students to take the actuarial examination on financial mathematics, SOA/CAS Exam FM/2. It is based on current practices employed at Slippery Rock University, a small public liberal arts university. Detailed descriptions of our Theory of Interest course and subsequent Exam FM/2 prep course are provided…

  4. The STAR Grants Contribution to the SOAS Campaign

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) is a community-led field campaign that was part of the Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS). As one of the largest field studies in decades to characterize air quality in the Southeastern United States, SAS is a collaborative project invo...

  5. SOA from BVOCs in the Southeastern United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic hydrocarbons contribute to organic aerosol in the southeast United States. In this work, we represent aerosol formation from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes in CMAQ and compare to data from the Southeast Oxidants and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Sensitivity simulatio...

  6. VOC species and emission inventory from vehicles and their SOA formation potentials estimation in Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.; Wang, H. L.; Li, L.; Wang, Q.; Lu, Q.; de Gouw, J. A.; Zhou, M.; Jing, S. A.; Lu, J.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-03-01

    VOC species from vehicle exhaust and gas evaporation were investigated by chassis dynamometer and on-road measurements of 9 gasoline vehicles, 7 diesel vehicles, 5 motorcycles, and 4 gas evaporation samples. The SOA mass yields of gasoline, diesel, motorcycle exhausts, and gas evaporation were calculated based on the mixing ratio of individual VOC species. The SOA mass yields of gasoline and motorcycle exhaust were similar to the results of the published smog chamber study with the exception of that of diesel exhaust was 20% lower than experimental data (Gordon et al., 2013, 2014a, b). This suggests the requirement for further research on SVOC or LVOC emissions. A vehicular emission inventory was compiled based on a local survey of vehicle mileage traveled and real-world measurements of vehicle emission factors. The inventory-based vehicular initial emission ratio of OA to CO was 15.6 μg m-3 ppmv-1. The OA production rate reached 22.3 and 42.7 μg m-3 ppmv-1 under high-NOx and low-NOx conditions, respectively. To determine the vehicular contribution to OA pollution, the inventory-based OA formation ratios for vehicles were calculated with a photochemical-age-based parameterization method and compared with the observation-based OA formation ratios in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. The results indicated that VOC emissions from vehicle exhaust and gas evaporation only explained 15 and 22% of the total organic aerosols observed in summer and winter, respectively. SOA production only accounted for 25 and 18% of the total vehicular OA formation in summer and winter. VOC emissions from gasoline vehicles contribute 21-38% of vehicular OA formation after 6-24 h of photochemical aging. The results suggest that vehicle emissions are an important contributor to OA pollution in the urban atmosphere of Shanghai. However, a large number of OA mass in the atmosphere still cannot be explained in this study. SOA formation contributions from other sources (e.g. coal burning

  7. A radio/optical reference frame. 5: Additional source positions in the mid-latitude southern hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, J. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; De Vegt, C.; Zacharias, N.; Ma, C.; Fey, A. L.; Johnston, K. J.; Hindsley, R.; Hughes, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    We report new accurate radio position measurements for 30 sources, preliminary positions for two sources, improved radio postions for nine additional sources which had limited previous observations, and optical positions and optical-radio differences for six of the radio sources. The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations are part of the continuing effort to establish a global radio reference frame of about 400 compact, flat spectrum sources, which are evenly distributed across the sky. The observations were made using Mark III data format in four separate sessions in 1988-89 with radio telescopes at Tidbinbilla, Australia, Kauai, USA, and Kashima, Japan. We observed a total of 54 sources, including ten calibrators and three which were undetected. The 32 new source positions bring the total number in the radio reference frame catalog to 319 (172 northern and 147 southern) and fill in the zone -25 deg greater than delta greater than -45 deg which, prior to this list, had the lowest source density. The VLBI positions have an average formal precision of less than 1 mas, although unknown radio structure effects of about 1-2 mas may be present. The six new optical postion measurements are part of the program to obtain positions of the optical counterparts of the radio reference frame source and to map accurately the optical on to the radio reference frames. The optical measurements were obtained from United States Naval Observatory (USNO) Black Birch astrograph plates and source plates from the AAT, and Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 4 m, and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Schmidt. The optical positions have an average precision of 0.07 sec, mostly due to the zero point error when adjusted to the FK5 optical frame using the IRS catalog. To date we have measured optical positions for 46 sources.

  8. Urban stress-induced biogenic VOC emissions and SOA-forming potentials in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Xie, Junfei; Zheng, Xunhua; Wang, Yuesi; Grote, Rüdiger; Block, Katja; Wildt, Jürgen; Mentel, Thomas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Hallquist, Mattias; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2016-03-01

    Trees can significantly impact the urban air chemistry by the uptake and emission of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which are involved in ozone and particle formation. Here we present the emission potentials of "constitutive" (cBVOCs) and "stress-induced" BVOCs (sBVOCs) from the dominant broadleaf woody plant species in the megacity of Beijing. Based on the municipal tree census and cuvette BVOC measurements on leaf level, we built an inventory of BVOC emissions, and assessed the potential impact of BVOCs on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in 2005 and 2010, i.e., before and after realizing the large tree-planting program for the 2008 Olympic Games. We found that sBVOCs, such as fatty acid derivatives, benzenoids, and sesquiterpenes, constituted a significant fraction ( ˜ 40 %) of the total annual BVOC emissions, and we estimated that the overall annual BVOC budget may have doubled from ˜ 4.8 × 109 g C year-1 in 2005 to ˜ 10.3 × 109 g C year-1 in 2010 due to the increase in urban greening, while at the same time the emission of anthropogenic VOCs (AVOCs) decreased by 24 %. Based on the BVOC emission assessment, we estimated the biological impact on SOA mass formation potential in Beijing. Constitutive and stress-induced BVOCs might produce similar amounts of secondary aerosol in Beijing. However, the main contributors of SOA-mass formations originated from anthropogenic sources (> 90 %). This study demonstrates the general importance to include sBVOCs when studying BVOC emissions. Although the main problems regarding air quality in Beijing still originate from anthropogenic activities, the present survey suggests that in urban plantation programs, the selection of low-emitting plant species has some potential beneficial effects on urban air quality.

  9. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are early onset neurodevelopmental syndromes typified by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviors. While rare and especially de novo genetic variation are known to affect liability, whether common genetic polymorphism plays a substantial role is an open question and the relative contribution of genes and environment is contentious. It is probable that the relative contributions of rare and common variation, as well as environment, differs between ASD families having only a single affected individual (simplex) versus multiplex families who have two or more affected individuals. Methods By using quantitative genetics techniques and the contrast of ASD subjects to controls, we estimate what portion of liability can be explained by additive genetic effects, known as narrow-sense heritability. We evaluate relatives of ASD subjects using the same methods to evaluate the assumptions of the additive model and partition families by simplex/multiplex status to determine how heritability changes with status. Results By analyzing common variation throughout the genome, we show that common genetic polymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on ASD liability and that simplex/multiplex family status has an impact on the identified composition of that risk. As a fraction of the total variation in liability, the estimated narrow-sense heritability exceeds 60% for ASD individuals from multiplex families and is approximately 40% for simplex families. By analyzing parents, unaffected siblings and alleles not transmitted from parents to their affected children, we conclude that the data for simplex ASD families follow the expectation for additive models closely. The data from multiplex families deviate somewhat from an additive model, possibly due to parental assortative mating. Conclusions Our results, when viewed in the context of results from genome

  10. Chemical characterization of biogenic SOA generated from plant emissions under baseline and stressed conditions: inter- and intra-species variability for six coniferous species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Wen, M.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-10-01

    The largest global source of secondary organic aerosol in the atmosphere is derived from the oxidation of biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. Alterations to the biogenic VOC profile could impact the characteristics of the SOA formed from those emissions. This study investigated the impacts of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on the composition of SOA derived from real plant emissions. Herbivory was simulated via application of methyl jasmonate, a proxy compound. Experiments were repeated under pre- and post-treatment conditions for six different coniferous plant types. VOCs emitted from the plants were oxidized to form SOA via dark ozone-initiated chemistry. The SOA particle size distribution and chemical composition were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS), respectively. The aerosol mass spectra of pre-treatment biogenic SOA from all plant types tended to be similar with correlations usually greater than or equal to 0.90. The presence of a stressor produced characteristic differences in the SOA mass spectra. Specifically, the following m/z were identified as a possible biogenic stress AMS marker with the corresponding HR ion(s) shown in parentheses: m/z 31 (CH3O+), m/z 58 (C2H2O2+, C3H6O+) m/z 29 (C2H5+), m/z 57 (C3H5O+), m/z 59 (C2H3O2+, C3H7O+), m/z 71 (C3H3O2+, C4H7O+), and m/z 83 (C5H7O+). The first aerosol mass spectrum of SOA generated from the oxidation of the plant stress hormone, methyl jasmonate, is also presented. Elemental analysis results demonstrated an O:C range of baseline biogenic SOA between 0.3-0.47. The O:C of standard methyl jasmonate SOA was 0.52. Results presented here could be used to help identify a biogenic plant stress marker in ambient datasets collected in forest environments.

  11. All-optical noise reduction of fiber laser via intracavity SOA structure.

    PubMed

    Ying, Kang; Chen, Dijun; Pan, Zhengqing; Zhang, Xi; Cai, Haiwen; Qu, Ronghui

    2016-10-10

    We have designed a unique intracavity semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) structure to suppress the relative intensity noise (RIN) for a fiber DFB laser. By exploiting the gain saturation effect of the SOA, a maximum noise suppression of 30 dB around the relaxation oscillation frequency is achieved, and the whole resonance relaxation oscillation peak completely disappears. Moreover, via a specially designed intracavity SOA structure, the optical intensity inside the SOA will be in a balanced state via the oscillation in the laser cavity, and the frequency noise of the laser will not be degraded with the SOA.

  12. Photonic generation of ultra-wideband signals by direct current modulation on SOA section of an SOA-integrated SGDBR laser.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui; Yu, Yonglin; Shu, Tan; Huang, Dexiu; Jiang, Shan; Barry, Liam P

    2010-03-29

    Photonic ultra-wideband (UWB) pulses are generated by direct current modulation of a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) section of an SOA-integrated sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector (SGDBR) laser. Modulation responses of the SOA section of the laser are first simulated with a microwave equivalent circuit model. Simulated results show a resonance behavior indicating the possibility to generate UWB signals with complex shapes in the time domain. The UWB pulse generation is then experimentally demonstrated for different selected wavelength channels with an SOA-integrated SGDBR laser.

  13. [Genetic screening and analysis of suppressors of asa1-1 (soa) defective in jasmonate-mediated lateral root formation in Arabidopsis].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-An; Qi, Lin-Lin; Sun, Jia-Qiang; Liu, Hong-Yu; Li, Chuan-You

    2011-09-01

    It has been shown that jasmonate modulates the lateral root development through crosstalk with auxin in Arabidopsis thaliana. Exogenous application of jasmonate stimulates lateral root formation in wild type but inhibits lateral root formation in asa1-1. Our previous work has demonstrated that the lateral root formation defect of asa1-1 is co-related with jasmonte effect on PIN2 protein levels. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying jasmonate-mediated reduction of plasma membrane (PM)-resident PIN2 abundance, we have conducted a genetic screen to identify suppressors of asa1-1 (soa), which showed lateral root formation in the presence of jasmonate. Here, we described the basic characterization of soa563 and soa856. We showed that both soa563 and soa856 displayed restored lateral root formation in response to exogenous jasmonate. In addition, jasmonate-induced PIN2:GFP reduction was blocked in these two mutants. Our on-going effort to identify genes defined by these mutants promise to shed new light on the understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling jasmonate-mediated regulation of PIN2 protein trafficking and turnover.

  14. Organic acids as indicators of VOC oxidation: Measurements of formic acid and other gas-phase acids during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, D.; Brophy, P.; Murschell, T.

    2013-12-01

    Oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere affects not only the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, but also the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Organic acids are produced during VOC oxidation, although additional sources include biomass burning and primary emissions. While some organic acids are semi-volatile and dominantly present in the aerosol phase, formic acid and other small organic acids are dominantly present in the gas phase. The concentrations of these gas-phase organic acids can provide insight into oxidation chemistry. Here, we present measurements made during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centerville, Alabama during the summer of 2013 by a high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-CIMS) operated in a novel switching reagent ion mode to measure gas phase organic acids with both acetate (CH3COO-) and iodide (I-) reagent ions. Formic acid was quantified using for both ionization schemes using multiple calibration techniques. In this study, we will focus on the impact of anthropogenic pollutants, including nitrogen and sulfur oxides, on oxidation chemistry, and discuss the potential use of organic acids as tracers for atmospheric oxidation chemistry.

  15. Identification of oxidized organic atmospheric species during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) using a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (IMS-ToF-CIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Kimmel, J.; Junninen, H.; Knochenmuss, R.; Cubison, M.; Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Surratt, J. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from the field deployment of a novel Ion Mobility Time-of-flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CI-IMS-TOF) during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). IMS-TOF is a 2-dimensional analysis method, which separates gas-phase ions by mobility prior to determination of mass-to-charge ratio by mass spectrometry. Ion mobility is a unique physical property that is determined by the collisional cross section of an ion. Because mobility depends on size and shape, the IMS measurement is able to resolve isomers and isobaric compounds. Additionally, trends in IMS-TOF data space can be used to identify relationships between ions, such as common functionality or polymeric series. During SOAS we interfaced the IMS-TOF to a nitrate ion (NO3-) chemical ionization source that enables the selective ionization of highly oxidized gas phase species (those having a high O:C ratio) through clustering with the reagent ion. Highly oxidized products of terpenes and isoprene are important secondary organic aerosol precursors (SOA) that play an uncertain but important role in particle-phase chemistry. We present several case studies of atmospheric events during SOAS that exhibited elevated concentrations of sulfuric acid and/or organics. These events exhibited a rise in particle number and provide an opportunity to examine the role that organic species may have in local atmospheric new particle formation events. We also present the results from the field deployment and subsequent laboratory studies utilizing a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor as the inlet for the CI-IMS-TOF. The reactor draws in ambient air and exposes it to high concentrations of the OH radical, created by photolysis O3 in the presence of water. The highly oxidized products are then sampled directly by the CI-IMS-TOF. We performed several experiments including placing pine and deciduous plants directly in front of the reactor opening and observed large increases in the number and

  16. Wood decomposition in Amazonian hydropower reservoirs: An additional source of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abril, Gwenaël; Parize, Marcelo; Pérez, Marcela A. P.; Filizola, Naziano

    2013-07-01

    Amazonian hydroelectric reservoirs produce abundant carbon dioxide and methane from large quantities of flooded biomass that decompose anaerobically underwater. Emissions are extreme the first years after impounding and progressively decrease with time. To date, only water-to-air fluxes have been considered in these estimates. Here, we investigate in two Amazonian reservoirs (Balbina and Petit Saut) the fate of above water standing dead trees, by combining a qualitative analysis of wood state and density through time and a quantitative analysis of the biomass initially flooded. Dead wood was much more decomposed in the Balbina reservoir 23 years after flooding than in the Petit Saut reservoir 10 years after flooding. Termites apparently played a major role in wood decomposition, occurring mainly above water, and resulting in a complete conversion of this carbon biomass into CO2 and CH4 at a timescale much shorter than reservoir operation. The analysis of pre-impounding wood biomass reveals that above-water decomposition in Amazonian reservoirs is a large, previously unrecognized source of carbon emissions to the atmosphere, representing 26-45% of the total reservoir flux integrated over 100 years. Accounting for both below- and above-water fluxes, we could estimate that each km2 of Amazonian forest converted to reservoir would emit over 140 Gg CO2-eq in 100 years. Hydropower plants in the Amazon should thus generate 0.25-0.4 MW h per km2 flooded area to produce lower greenhouse gas emissions than gas power plants. They also have the disadvantage to emit most of their greenhouse gases the earliest years of operation.

  17. Sump additives as a source of bioaerosols in a school building.

    PubMed

    Thorne, P S

    1993-04-01

    An investigation was launched following complaints of poor air quality and building-related illness in a public elementary school. Occlusion of air intakes put the building under negative pressure and caused vents from a below-ground sump to become air intakes. Outside air drawn through the sump pit traveled into the adjacent main air handling unit and was disseminated throughout the building. Sump additives introduced in an attempt to counteract foul odors contained spores of Bacillus species, which appeared as bioaerosols throughout the school. Viable microbial sampling identified B subtilis, B cereus, and B licheniformis in the sump room and classrooms at levels as high as 760 colony forming units/m3 (CFU/m3). Concentrations of CO2 in classrooms were 1250 ppm, indicating inadequate makeup air. Remediation was accomplished by opening the air intakes, isolating the sump room from the air handling system, venting the sump to the outside, and flushing the sump with fresh water on a regular basis.

  18. High Temperature Thermoplastic Additive Manufacturing Using Low-Cost, Open-Source Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, John M.; Stelter, Christopher J.; Yashin, Edward A.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (or 3D printing) via Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF), also known as Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM), is a process where material is placed in specific locations layer-by-layer to create a complete part. Printers designed for FFF build parts by extruding a thermoplastic filament from a nozzle in a predetermined path. Originally developed for commercial printers, 3D printing via FFF has become accessible to a much larger community of users since the introduction of Reprap printers. These low-cost, desktop machines are typically used to print prototype parts or novelty items. As the adoption of desktop sized 3D printers broadens, there is increased demand for these machines to produce functional parts that can withstand harsher conditions such as high temperature and mechanical loads. Materials meeting these requirements tend to possess better mechanical properties and higher glass transition temperatures (Tg), thus requiring printers with high temperature printing capability. This report outlines the problems and solutions, and includes a detailed description of the machine design, printing parameters, and processes specific to high temperature thermoplastic 3D printing.

  19. Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Formation from Hydroxyl Radical Oxidation and Ozonolysis of Monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Defeng; Kaminski, Martin; Schlag, Patrick; Fuchs, Hendrik; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Haeseler, Rolf; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wang, Mingjin; Wegner, Robert; Wahner, Andreas; Mentel, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    that functionalization was dominant in the beginning of the reaction and fragmentation started to be dominant after that. Moreover, Aerosol Mass Spectrometer data shows that SOA from monoterpene OH oxidation follows a slope of shallower than -1 in the Van Krevelen diagram, indicative of an oxidation process of precursor without significant hydrogen loss. SOA from OH oxidation has a higher H/C than that from O3 oxidation. In ozonolysis, the process with significant hydrogen loss such as addition of carbonyl seems to play an important role in SOA formation. Reference: Ng, N. L. et al. Sci. & Tech. 40, 2283-2297, 10.1021/es052269u, 2006.

  20. Source Distribution Method for Unsteady One-Dimensional Flows With Small Mass, Momentum, and Heat Addition and Small Area Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold

    1959-01-01

    A source distribution method is presented for obtaining flow perturbations due to small unsteady area variations, mass, momentum, and heat additions in a basic uniform (or piecewise uniform) one-dimensional flow. First, the perturbations due to an elemental area variation, mass, momentum, and heat addition are found. The general solution is then represented by a spatial and temporal distribution of these elemental (source) solutions. Emphasis is placed on discussing the physical nature of the flow phenomena. The method is illustrated by several examples. These include the determination of perturbations in basic flows consisting of (1) a shock propagating through a nonuniform tube, (2) a constant-velocity piston driving a shock, (3) ideal shock-tube flows, and (4) deflagrations initiated at a closed end. The method is particularly applicable for finding the perturbations due to relatively thin wall boundary layers.

  1. Security Broker—A Complementary Tool for SOA Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamatchi, R.; Rakshit, Atanu

    2011-09-01

    The Service Oriented Architecture along with web services is providing a new dimension to the world of reusability and resource sharing. The services developed by a creator can be used by any service consumers from anywhere despite of their platforms used. This open nature of the SOA architecture is also raising the issues of security at various levels of usage. This is paper is discussing on the implementation benefits of a service broker with the Service Oriented Architecture.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of simulated SOA loadings using a variance-based statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Manish; Zhao, Chun; Easter, Richard C.; Qian, Yun; Zelenyuk, Alla; Fast, Jerome D.; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Qi; Guenther, Alex

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) loadings simulated by a regional chemical transport model to seven selected model parameters using a modified volatility basis-set (VBS) approach: four involving emissions of anthropogenic and biogenic volatile organic compounds, anthropogenic semivolatile and intermediate volatility organics (SIVOCs), and NOx; two involving dry deposition of SOA precursor gases, and one involving particle-phase transformation of SOA to low volatility. We adopt a quasi-Monte Carlo sampling approach to effectively sample the high-dimensional parameter space, and perform a 250 member ensemble of simulations using a regional model, accounting for some of the latest advances in SOA treatments based on our recent work. We then conduct a variance-based sensitivity analysis using the generalized linear model method to study the responses of simulated SOA loadings to the model parameters. Analysis of SOA variance from all 250 simulations shows that the volatility transformation parameter, which controls whether or not SOA that starts as semivolatile is rapidly transformed to nonvolatile SOA by particle-phase processes such as oligomerization and/or accretion, is the dominant contributor to variance of simulated surface-level daytime SOA (65% domain average contribution). We also split the simulations into two subsets of 125 each, depending on whether the volatility transformation is turned on/off. For each subset, the SOA variances are dominated by the parameters involving biogenic VOC and anthropogenic SIVOC emissions. Furthermore, biogenic VOC emissions have a larger contribution to SOA variance when the SOA transformation to nonvolatile is on, while anthropogenic SIVOC emissions have a larger contribution when the transformation is off. NOx contributes less than 4.3% to SOA variance, and this low contribution is mainly attributed to dominance of intermediate to high NOx conditions throughout the simulated domain. However

  3. Science Opportunity Analyzer (SOA): Science Planning Made Simple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; Polanskey, Carol A.

    2004-01-01

    .For the first time at JPL, the Cassini mission to Saturn is using distributed science operations for developing their experiments. Remote scientists needed the ability to: a) Identify observation opportunities; b) Create accurate, detailed designs for their observations; c) Verify that their designs meet their objectives; d) Check their observations against project flight rules and constraints; e) Communicate their observations to other scientists. Many existing tools provide one or more of these functions, but Science Opportunity Analyzer (SOA) has been built to unify these tasks into a single application. Accurate: Utilizes JPL Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) SPICE* software tool kit - Provides high fidelity modeling. - Facilitates rapid adaptation to other flight projects. Portable: Available in Unix, Windows and Linux. Adaptable: Designed to be a multi-mission tool so it can be readily adapted to other flight projects. Implemented in Java, Java 3D and other innovative technologies. Conclusion: SOA is easy to use. It only requires 6 simple steps. SOA's ability to show the same accurate information in multiple ways (multiple visualization formats, data plots, listings and file output) is essential to meet the needs of a diverse, distributed science operations environment.

  4. Novel cloud and SOA-based framework for e-health monitoring using wireless biosensors.

    PubMed

    Benharref, Abdelghani; Serhani, Mohamed Adel

    2014-01-01

    Various and independent studies are showing that an exponential increase of chronic diseases (CDs) is exhausting governmental and private healthcare systems to an extent that some countries allocate half of their budget to healthcare systems. To benefit from the IT development, e-health monitoring and prevention approaches revealed to be among top promising solutions. In fact, well-implemented monitoring and prevention schemes have reported a decent reduction of CDs risk and have narrowed their effects, on both patients' health conditions and on government budget spent on healthcare. In this paper, we propose a framework to collect patients' data in real time, perform appropriate nonintrusive monitoring, and propose medical and/or life style engagements, whenever needed and appropriate. The framework, which relies on service-oriented architecture (SOA) and the Cloud, allows a seamless integration of different technologies, applications, and services. It also integrates mobile technologies to smoothly collect and communicate vital data from a patient's wearable biosensors while considering the mobile devices' limited capabilities and power drainage in addition to intermittent network disconnections. Then, data are stored in the Cloud and made available via SOA to allow easy access by physicians, paramedics, or any other authorized entity. A case study has been developed to evaluate the usability of the framework, and the preliminary results that have been analyzed are showing very promising results.

  5. Characterization of asphalt additive produced from hydroretorted Alabama shale

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, D.M.; Roberts, M.J.

    1992-12-31

    Shale oil, produced from beneficiated Alabama shale by pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting, was fractionated to produce shale oil asphalt additives (SOA). Three shale oil fractions boiling above 305{degrees}C were added to standard AC-20 asphalt to improve pavement properties. The physical properties and aging characteristics of AC-20 asphalt binder (cement) containing SOA are similar to those of unmodified AC-20 asphalt binder. Asphalt pavement briquettes made with AC-20 asphalt binder containing 5 to 10 percent SOA have superior resistance to freeze-thaw cracking and a greater retention of tensile strength when wet compared to pavement briquettes containing AC-20 binder alone.

  6. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source.

  7. Local source impacts on primary and secondary aerosols in the Midwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayarathne, Thilina; Rathnayake, Chathurika M.; Stone, Elizabeth A.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) exhibits heterogeneity in composition across urban areas, leading to poor representation of outdoor air pollutants in human exposure assessments. To examine heterogeneity in PM composition and sources across an urban area, fine particulate matter samples (PM2.5) were chemically profiled in Iowa City, IA from 25 August to 10 November 2011 at two monitoring stations. The urban site is the federal reference monitoring (FRM) station in the city center and the peri-urban site is located 8.0 km to the west on the city edge. Measurements of PM2.5 carbonaceous aerosol, inorganic ions, molecular markers for primary sources, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers were used to assess statistical differences in composition and sources across the two sites. PM2.5 mass ranged from 3 to 26 μg m-3 during this period, averaging 11.2 ± 4.9 μg m-3 (n = 71). Major components of PM2.5 at the urban site included organic carbon (OC; 22%), ammonium (14%), sulfate (13%), nitrate (7%), calcium (2.9%), and elemental carbon (EC; 2.2%). Periods of elevated PM were driven by increases in ammonium, sulfate, and SOA tracers that coincided with hot and dry conditions and southerly winds. Chemical mass balance (CMB) modeling was used to apportion OC to primary sources; biomass burning, vegetative detritus, diesel engines, and gasoline engines accounted for 28% of OC at the urban site and 24% of OC at the peri-urban site. Secondary organic carbon from isoprene and monoterpene SOA accounted for an additional 13% and 6% of OC at the urban and peri-urban sites, respectively. Differences in biogenic SOA across the two sites were associated with enhanced combustion activities in the urban area and higher aerosol acidity at the urban site. Major PM constituents (e.g., OC, ammonium, sulfate) were generally well-represented by a single monitoring station, indicating a regional source influence. Meanwhile, nitrate, biomass burning, food cooking, suspended dust, and

  8. Unspeciated Organic Emissions From Combustion Sources And Their Influence On The Secondary Organic Aerosol Budget In The United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jathar, S.; Gordon, T.; Hennigan, C. J.; Pye, H. O.; Donahue, N. M.; Adams, P. J.; Robinson, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Combustion sources are a major source of organic emissions and therefore a potentially important source for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere. Although speciated organic emissions from combustion sources are considered in models to form SOA, a large fraction of the organics are unspeciated. In this work, we analyze data from numerous smog chamber experiments, which photo-oxidized dilute emissions from different combustion sources (on-road gasoline vehicles, aircraft, on-road diesel vehicles, wood burning and open biomass burning), to determine the contribution that unspeciated emissions make to SOA formation. An SOA model based on speciated organics is able to explain, on average, 8-31% of the SOA measured in the experiments. We hypothesize that the remainder results from the gas-phase oxidation of unspeciated emissions, which account on average for 25-75% of the non-methane organic gas (NMOG) emissions. Using the SOA data, we develop, for the first time, source-specific parameterizations to model SOA from unspeciated emissions; all sources seem to have median SOA yields similar to large n-alkanes (C12+). To assess the influence of unspeciated emissions on SOA formation regionally, we use the parameterization to predict SOA production in the United States. Using emissions data collected during the smog chamber experiments and data available in literature, we build a gross inventory for unspeciated emissions in the United States. We discover that unspeciated organics might be included in the current generation of SOA models but misallocated in terms of its SOA potential. The top six combustion sources (on- and off-road gasoline, on- and off-road diesel, open biomass and wood burning) emit 2.61 Tg yr-1 of unspeciated emissions (20% of US anthropogenic VOC emissions from combustion sources) and are estimated to form a minimum of 0.68 Tg yr-1 of SOA; the estimate is a third of the biogenic SOA produced in the US. We predict that accounting for

  9. High-resolution genetic mapping of the sucrose octaacetate taste aversion (Soa) locus on mouse Chromosome 6.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, A A; Li, X; Li, S; Neira, M; Beauchamp, G K; Azen, E A

    2001-09-01

    An acetylated sugar, sucrose octaacetate (SOA), tastes bitter to humans and has an aversive taste to at least some mice and other animals. In mice, taste aversion to SOA depends on allelic variation of a single locus, Soa. Three Soa alleles determine 'taster' (Soa(a)), 'nontaster' (Soa(b)), and 'demitaster' (Soa(c)) phenotypes of taste sensitivity to SOA. Although Soa has been mapped to distal Chromosome (Chr) 6, the limits of the Soa region have not been defined. In this study, mice from congenic strains SW.B6-Soa(b), B6.SW-Soa(a), and C3.SW-Soa(a/c) and from an outbred CFW strain were genotyped with polymorphic markers on Chr 6. In the congenic strains, the limits of introgressed donor fragments were determined. In the outbred mice, linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analyses were conducted. Positions of the markers were further resolved by using radiation hybrid mapping. The results show that the Soa locus is contained in an approximately 1-cM (3.3-4.9 Mb) region including the Prp locus.

  10. An SOA model for toluene oxidation in the presence of inorganic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Jang, Myoseon

    2010-01-15

    A predictive model for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation including both partitioning and heterogeneous reactions is explored for the SOA produced from the oxidation of toluene in the presence of inorganic seed aerosols. The predictive SOA model comprises the explicit gas-phase chemistry of toluene, gas-particle partitioning, and heterogeneous chemistry. The resulting products from the explicit gas phase chemistry are lumped into several classes of chemical species based on their vapor pressure and reactivity for heterogeneous reactions. Both the gas-particle partitioning coefficient and the heterogeneous reaction rate constant of each lumped gas-phase product are theoretically determined using group contribution and molecular structure-reactivity. In the SOA model, the predictive SOA mass is decoupled into partitioning (OM(P)) and heterogeneous aerosol production (OM(H)). OM(P) is estimated from the SOA partitioning model developed by Schell et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 2001, 106, 28275-28293 ) that has been used in a regional air quality model (CMAQ 4.7). OM(H) is predicted from the heterogeneous SOA model developed by Jang et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2006, 40, 3013-3022 ). The SOA model is evaluated using a number of the experimental SOA data that are generated in a 2 m(3) indoor Teflon film chamber under various experimental conditions (e.g., humidity, inorganic seed compositions, NO(x) concentrations). The SOA model reasonably predicts not only the gas-phase chemistry, such as the ozone formation, the conversion of NO to NO(2), and the toluene decay, but also the SOA production. The model predicted that the OM(H) fraction of the total toluene SOA mass increases as NO(x) concentrations decrease: 0.73-0.83 at low NO(x) levels and 0.17-0.47 at middle and high NO(x) levels for SOA experiments with high initial toluene concentrations. Our study also finds a significant increase in the OM(H) mass fraction in the SOA generated with low initial toluene

  11. Source apportionment of submicron organic aerosol at an urban background and a road site in Barcelona (Spain) during SAPUSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alier, M.; van Drooge, B. L.; Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Grimalt, J. O.; Tauler, R.

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the contribution of potential sources to the submicron (PM1) organic aerosol (OA) simultaneously detected at an urban background (UB) and a road site (RS) in Barcelona during the 30 days of the intensive field campaign of SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies, September-October 2010). A total of 103 filters at 12 h sampling time resolution were collected at both sites. Thirty-six neutral and polar organic compounds of known emission sources and photo-chemical transformation processes were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The concentrations of the trace chemical compounds analyzed are herein presented and discussed. Additionally, OA source apportionment was performed by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) and six OA components were identified at both sites: two were of primary anthropogenic OA origin and three of secondary OA origin, while a sixth one was not clearly defined. Primary organics from emissions of local anthropogenic activities (urban primary organic aerosol, or POA Urban), mainly traffic emissions but also cigarette smoke, contributed 43% (1.5 μg OC m-3) and 18% (0.4 μg OC m-3) to OA at RS and UB, respectively. A secondary primary source - biomass burning (BBOA) - was found in all the samples (average values 7% RS; 12% UB; 0.3 μg OC m-3), but this component was substantially contributing to OA only when the sampling sites were under influence of regional air mass circulation (REG.). Three secondary organic aerosol (SOA) components (describing overall 60% of the variance) were observed in the urban ambient PM1. Products of isoprene oxidation (SOA ISO) - i.e. 2-methylglyceric acid, C5 alkene triols and 2-methyltetrols - showed the highest abundance at both sites when the city was under influence of inland air masses. The overall concentrations of SOA ISO were similar at both sites (0.4 and 0.3 μg m-3, or 16% and 7%, at UB and RS, respectively

  12. Source apportionment of submicron organic aerosol at an urban background and a road site in Barcelona, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alier, M.; van Drooge, B. L.; Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Grimalt, J. O.; Tauler, R.

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the contribution of potential sources to the sub-micron (PM1) organic aerosol (OA) simultaneously detected at an urban background (UB) and a road site (RS) in Barcelona during the 30 days of the intensive field campaign of SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies, September-October 2010). 103 filters at 12 h sampling time resolution were collected at both sites. Thirty-six neutral and polar organic compounds of known emission sources and photo-chemical transformation processes were analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The concentrations of the trace chemical compounds analyzed are herein presented and discussed. Additionally, OA source apportionment was performed by Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) and six OA components were identified at both sites: two were of primary anthropogenic OA origin, three of secondary OA origin while a sixth one was not clearly defined. Primary organics from emissions of local anthropogenic activities (Urban primary organic aerosol, Urban POA) contributed for 43% (1.5 μg OC m-3) and 18% (0.4 μg OC m-3) to OA in RS and UB, respectively. A secondary primary source - biomass burning (BBOA) - was found in all the samples (average values 7% RS; 12% UB; 0.3 μg OC m-3), but this component was substantially contributing to OA only when the sampling sites were under influence of regional air mass circulation. Three Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) components (describing overall 60% of the variance) were observed in the urban ambient PM1. Products of isoprene oxidation (SOA ISO), i.e. 2-methylglyceric acid, C5 alkene triols and 2-methyltetrols, showed the highest abundance at both sites when the city was under influence of inland air masses. The overall concentrations of SOA ISO were similar at both sites (0.4 and 0.3 μg m-3, 16% and 7%, at UB and RS, respectively). By contrast, a SOA biogenic component attributed to α-pinene oxidation (SOA

  13. Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity, Droplet Growth Kinetics and Hygroscopicity of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Defeng; Buchholz, Angela; Kortner, Birthe; Schlag, Patrick; Rubach, Florian; Hendrik, Fucks; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Tillmann, Ralf; Wahner, Andreas; Hallquist, Mattias; Flores, Michel; Rudich, Yinon; Glasius, Marianne; Kourtchev, Ivan; Kalberer, Markus; Mentel, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Recent field data and model analysis show that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is enhanced under anthropogenic influences (de Gouw et al. 2005, Spracklen et al. 2011). The interaction of biogenic VOCs (BVOCs) with anthropogenic emissions such as anthropogenic VOCs (AVOCs) could change the particle formation yields and the aerosol properties, as was recently demonstrated (Emanuelsson et al., 2013; Flores et al., 2014). However, the effect of the interaction of BVOCs with AVOCs on cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity and hygroscopicity of SOA remains elusive. Characterizing such changes is necessary in order to assess the indirect radiative forcing of biogenic aerosols that form under anthropogenic influence. In this study, we investigated the influence of AVOCs on CCN activation and hygroscopic growth of BSOA. SOA was formed from photooxidation of monoterpenes and aromatics as representatives of BVOCs and AVOCs, respectively. The hygroscopicity and CCN activation of BSOA were studied and compared with that of anthropogenic SOA (ASOA) and the mixture of ASOA and BSOA (ABSOA). We found that ASOA had a significantly higher hygroscopicity than BSOA at similar OH dose, which is attributed to a higher oxidation level of ASOA. While the ASOA fraction had an enhancing effect on the hygroscopicity of ABSOA compared to BSOA, the hygroscopicity of ABSOA cannot be explained by a linear combination of the pure ASOA and BSOA systems, indicating potentially additional non-linear effects such as oligomerization. However, in contrast to hygroscopicity, ASOA showed similar CCN activity as BSOA, in spite of its higher oxidation level. The ASOA fraction did not enhance the CCN activity of ABSOA. The discrepancy between hygroscopicity and CCN activity is discussed. In addition, BSOA, ABSOA and ASOA formed similar droplet size with ammonium sulfate in CCN at a given supersaturation, indicating none of these aerosols had a delay in the water uptake in the supersaturated

  14. Using SOA Patterns to promote understanding across disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, A.

    2012-04-01

    The NETMAR consortium is building an open service network for marine environmental data by combining expertise from Ireland, France, the UK and Norway in disciplines such as Semantics, Software Engineering, UI Programming and Service Orchestration. Through the International Coastal Atlas Network, it engages user groups from Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. In doing so, it faces challenges in bringing these disciplines and groups together in a way that makes them greater than the sum of their parts. Service Oriented Architecture has been successfully applied in many cases to help build useful systems across organisational and geographic boundaries in order to expose diverse capabilities which can function together through a mutual exchange of value. This should make it ideally suited to a distributed decision making environment without centralised command and control. In theory, SOA should facilitate the building of global and complex infrastructures and the integration of information systems characterized by diverse protocols and interfaces,and with different data policies and security levels. The presentation will discuss a number of approaches used by NETMAR to bring the theory of SOA to bear in a useful way while maintaining the emphasis on keeping multi-disciplinary domain expertise as the primary driver of the project. It will discuss three approaches used: . Populating one or more standard reference models . Trade-off analysis based on business drivers and quality attributes . Documenting design reuse in the form of patterns. The three approaches will be compared in terms of how they succeed in bringing 'just enough' service architecture knowledge into the project. We discuss how the approaches can interact and complement each other. Finally, we present a number of SOA patterns identified as being relevant to NETMAR and explain why they are felt to be particularly effective in gaining consensus on how to build the NETMAR system of systems.

  15. Architectural Knowledge in an SOA Infrastructure Reference Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Olaf; Kopp, Petra; Pappe, Stefan

    In this chapter, we present an industrial case study for the creation and usage of architectural knowledge. We first introduce the business domain, service portfolio, and knowledge management approach of the company involved in the case. Next, we introduce a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) infrastructure reference architecture as a primary carrier of architectural knowledge in this company. Moreover, we present how we harvested architectural knowledge from industry projects to create this reference architecture. We also present feedback from early reference architecture users. Finally, we conclude and give an outlook to future work.

  16. Black Carbon Aging from SOA Coatings and Coagulation with Diesel BC Emissions during SAAS at the PNNL Environmental Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiken, A. C.; Liu, S.; Dubey, M. K.; Zaveri, R. A.; Shilling, J. E.; Gourihar, K.; Pekour, M. S.; Subramanian, R.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Sharma, N.

    2014-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is considered to be potentially the 2nd most important global warming factor behind CO2 (Bond et al., 2013). Uncertainties exist due to BC morphology and mixing state on the extent of the warming that it causes, e.g. Cappa et al., 2012. Core-shell BC is expected to enhance absorption by up to a factor of 2, but has yet to be observed to this extent from ambient data. Experiments were conducted during the Soot Aerosol Aging Study (SAAS) Laboratory Campaign at Pactific Northwest National Laboratory's Environmental Chamber in the winter of 2013-2014 to investigate the relationship between coatings and enhancements from diesel emissions. Direct on-line measurements were made with the single particle soot photometer (SP2) from fresh and aged BC from coating and coagulation experiments with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed in the chamber. BC measurements are coupled with photoactoustic measurements spanning the visible region to probe BC enhancements when mixed with SOA. Here we focus on the enhancements at 781 nm, that are tracked throughout SOA growth on BC, as determined from SP2 coating thicknesses. Thermal denuder (TD) experiments are conducted and enhancements are calculated from two different methods that agree well with each other, confirming the observed results. BC measurements are also compared with co-located measurements from SPLAT-II and filter analysis using SEM and TEM. BC coagulated with SOA produces minimal absorption enhancement values, whereas coatings are observed to have significant enhancement values at 300 degrees C, e.g. 1.3 for thickly coated BC. BC particles were coagulated with SOA in the chamber since this morphology has been observed in wildfire emissions (Sedlacek et al., 2012). Since we did not observe appreciable enhancements for the coagulated BC, we expect that ambient emissions dominated by this particle type to have enhancements due to other sources, such as brown carbon (BrC) that is often co-emitted (Saleh et

  17. Xylem-Transported Glucose as an Additional Carbon Source for Leaf Isoprene Formation in Quercus Robur L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, M.; Kreuzwieser, J.; Schnitzler, J.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.; Rennenberg, H.

    2003-04-01

    Isoprene is emitted from mature, photosynthesizing leaves of many plant species, particularly of trees. Current interest in understanding the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling isoprene formation is caused by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) thereby generating oxidizing agents such as ozone and organic peroxides. Ozone causes significant deterioration in air quality and can pose threats to human health therefore its control is a major goal in Europe and the United States. In recent years, much progress has been made in elucidating the pathways of isoprene biosynthesis. Nevertheless the regulatory mechanisms controlling isoprene emission are not completely understood. Light and temperature appear to be the main factors controlling short-term variations in isoprene emission. Exposure of plants to C-13 labeled carbon dioxide showed instantaneous assimilated carbon is the primary carbon source for isoprene formation. However, variations in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes, which cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may exist contributing to isoprene emissions. The aim of the present study was to test whether xylem-transported carbohydrates act as additional sources for isoprene biosynthesis. For this purpose, [U-C-13] alpha-D-glucose was fed to photosynthesizing leaves via the xylem of Quercus robur L. seedlings and the incorporation of glucose derived C-13 into emitted isoprene was monitored in real time using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). A rapid incorporation of C-13 from xylem-fed glucose into single (mass 70) and double (mass 71) C-13 labeled isoprene molecules was observed after a lag phase of approximately 5 to 10 minutes. This incorporation was temperature dependent and was highest (up to 13% C-13 of total carbon emitted as isoprene) at the temperature optimum of

  18. Xylem-transported Glucose as an Additional Carbon Source for Leaf Isoprene Formation in Quercus Robur L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graus, M.; Wisthaler, A.; Hansel, A.; Kreuzwieser, J.; Rennenberg, H.; Schnitzler, J.

    2002-12-01

    Isoprene is emitted from mature, photosynthesizing leaves of many plant species, particularly of trees. Current interest in understanding the biochemical and physiological mechanisms controlling isoprene formation is caused by the important role isoprene plays in atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene reacts with hydroxyl radicals (OH) thereby generating oxidizing agents such as ozone and organic peroxides. Ozone causes significant deterioration in air quality and can pose threats to human health therefore its control is a major goal in Europe and the United States. In recent years, much progress has been made in elucidating the pathways of isoprene biosynthesis. Nevertheless the regulatory mechanisms controlling isoprene emission are not completely understood. Light and temperature appear to be the main factors controlling short-term variations in isoprene emission. Exposure of plants to 13CO2 showed instantaneous assimilated carbon is the primary carbon source for isoprene formation. However, variations in diurnal and seasonal isoprene fluxes, which cannot be explained by temperature, light, and leaf development led to the suggestion that alternative carbon sources may exist contributing to isoprene emissions. The aim of the present study was to test whether xylem-transported carbohydrates act as additional sources for isoprene biosynthesis. For this purpose, [U-13C]α-D-glucose was fed to photosynthesizing leaves via the xylem of {Quercus} {robur} L. seedlings and the incorporation of glucose derived 13C into emitted isoprene was monitored in real time using Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS). A rapid incorporation of 13C from xylem-fed glucose into single (mass 70) and double (mass 71) 13C-labeled isoprene molecules was observed after a lag phase of approximately 5 to 10 minutes. This incorporation was temperature dependent and was highest (up to 13 % 13C of total carbon emitted as isoprene) at the temperature optimum of isoprene emission (40 - 42

  19. Tracking Changes in Absorptivity, Stiffness, and Organic Chemical Composition in Laboratory Generated HULIS SOA using Atomic Force Microscopy and X-ray Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L. N.; Lemire, A.; Kong, W.

    2014-12-01

    Light absorbing organic compounds are among the many products of aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation. Once formed, these compounds can alter the optical and material properties of SOA in ways that impact their ability to scatter and absorb solar radiation, deliquesce and evaporate quickly during cloud cycling, and react with gas phase species such as oxidants. To quantify these effects, we have characterized the changes in UV-visible absorption, stiffness, and particle shape that occur when aqueous SOA is exposed to repeated wet-dry cycles and photooxidation. Material properties were measured with Atomic Force Microscopy of atomized laboratory generated SOA; this material was created by combining glyoxal, methylglyoxal, or glycolaldehyde with ammonium sulfate, glycine, or methylamine in solution and either spray drying or evaporating the bulk solution. In addition to optical and material properties, changes in organic functional groups were tracked using scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) of the near carbon edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Photooxidation experiments of the same aqueous SOA revealed concomitant changes in the organic functional groups and light absorption spectra, along with measurable changes in particle stiffness.

  20. Additively manufactured MEMS multiplexed coaxial electrospray sources for high-throughput, uniform generation of core-shell microparticles.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Trejo, D; Velásquez-García, L F

    2016-10-18

    This study reports the first MEMS multiplexed coaxial electrospray sources in the literature. Coaxial electrospraying is a microencapsulation technology based on electrohydrodynamic jetting of two immiscible liquids, which allows precise control with low size variation of the geometry of the core-shell particles it generates, which is of great importance in numerous biomedical and engineering applications, e.g., drug delivery and self-healing composites. By implementing monolithic planar arrays of miniaturized coaxial electrospray emitters that work uniformly in parallel, the throughput of the compound microdroplet source is greatly increased, making the microencapsulation technology compatible with low-cost commercial applications. Miniaturized core-shell particle generators with up to 25 coaxial electrospray emitters (25 emitters cm(-2)) were fabricated via stereolithography, which is an additive manufacturing process that can create complex microfluidic devices at a small fraction of the cost per device and fabrication time associated with silicon-based counterparts. The characterization of devices with the same emitter structure but different array sizes demonstrates uniform array operation. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the per-emitter current is approximately proportional to the square root of the flow rate of the driving liquid, and it is independent of the flow rate of the driven liquid, as predicted by the theory. The core/shell diameters and the size distribution of the generated compound microparticles can be modulated by controlling the flow rates fed to the emitters.

  1. SOA YIELDS AND ORGANIC PRODUCT DISTRIBUTION FROM NATURAL HYDROCARBON/NOX IRRADIATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) typically comprises one-quarter to one-third of the ambient aerosol mass in summertime urban atmospheres. In tropospheric environments, the main precursors of SOA come from aromatic and natural hydrocarbons. Recent work by various investigators...

  2. Modeling SOA formation from the oxidation of intermediate volatility n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-08-01

    The chemical mechanism leading to SOA formation and ageing is expected to be a multigenerational process, i.e. a successive formation of organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. This process is here investigated with the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Gas phase oxidation schemes are generated for the C8-C24 series of n-alkanes. Simulations are conducted to explore the time evolution of organic compounds and the behavior of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation for various preexisting organic aerosol concentration (COA). As expected, simulation results show that (i) SOA yield increases with the carbon chain length of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yield decreases with decreasing COA, (iii) SOA production rates increase with increasing COA and (iv) the number of oxidation steps (i.e. generations) needed to describe SOA formation and evolution grows when COA decreases. The simulated oxidative trajectories are examined in a two dimensional space defined by the mean carbon oxidation state and the volatility. Most SOA contributors are not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA), suggesting that OOA may underestimate SOA. Results show that the model is unable to produce highly oxygenated aerosols (OOA) with large yields. The limitations of the model are discussed.

  3. Modeling SOA formation from the oxidation of intermediate volatility n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical mechanism leading to SOA formation and ageing is expected to be a multigenerational process, i.e. a successive formation of organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. This process is here investigated with the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Gas phase oxidation schemes are generated for the C8-C24 series of n-alkanes. Simulations are conducted to explore the time evolution of organic compounds and the behavior of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation for various preexisting organic aerosol concentration (COA). As expected, simulation results show that (i) SOA yield increases with the carbon chain length of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yield decreases with decreasing COA, (iii) SOA production rates increase with increasing COA and (iv) the number of oxidation steps (i.e. generations) needed to describe SOA formation and evolution grows when COA decreases. The simulated oxidative trajectories are examined in a two dimensional space defined by the mean carbon oxidation state and the volatility. Most SOA contributors are not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA), suggesting that OOA may underestimate SOA. Results show that the model is unable to produce highly oxygenated aerosols (OOA) with large yields. The limitations of the model are discussed.

  4. Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds during SOAS 2013 using nitrate ion chemical ionization coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Cnagaratna, M.; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J. P.; Mauldin, R.; Ehn, M.; Sipila, M.; Krechmer, J.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry. This technique allows to selectively detect oxidized gas-phase species, e.g., oxidized organic molecules and sulfuric acid via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. The capability of making such measurements is important because both sulfuric acid and organic gas molecules have a recognized key role in new particle formation (NPF) processes and likely have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest supersite in Centreville, AL, from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The main goal of the SOAS campaign was to investigate the composition and sources of SOA in the Southeast US, where emissions are mainly represented by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emissions and in less extent by anthropogenic emissions (AVOC). During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected a range of organic ions that based on previous literature could be identified as oxidation products of both isoprene and terpenes. The isoprene products were 5 to 10 times more abundant than the terpene products. The isoprene-related molecules showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, typically after 1500 local time, while the terpene products were higher at night (between 2000 and 0600 local time). These results are consistent with the diurnal trends of primary BVOC emissions from other co-located instruments. The ambient data are also compared to laboratory measurements where oxidized organic vapors are produced using a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor by the OH oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors (isoprene, a-pinene) over multiple days of equivalent atmospheric exposure.

  5. Dual-facet coupling of SOA array on 4-μm silicon-on-insulator implementing a hybrid integrated SOA-MZI wavelength converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexoudi, T.; Fitsios, D.; Kanellos, G. T.; Pleros, N.; Tekin, T.; Cherchi, M.; Ylinen, S.; Harjanne, M.; Kapulainen, M.; Aalto, T.

    2014-03-01

    Hybrid integration on Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) has emerged as a practical solution for compact and high-performance Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs). It aims at combining the cost-effectiveness and CMOS-compatibility benefits of the low-loss SOI waveguide platform with the versatile active optical functions that can be realized by III-V photonic materials. The utilization of SOI, as an integration board, with μm-scale dimensions allows for an excellent optical mode matching between silicon rib waveguides and active chips, allowing for minimal-loss coupling of the pre-fabricated IIIV components. While dual-facet coupling as well as III-V multi-element array bonding should be employed to enable enhanced active on-chip functions, so far only single side SOA bonding has been reported. In the present communication, we present a novel integration scheme that flip-chip bonds a 6-SOA array on 4-μm thick SOI technology by coupling both lateral SOA facets to the waveguides, and report on the experimental results of wavelength conversion operation of a dual-element Semiconductor Optical Amplifier - Mach Zehnder Interferometer (SOA-MZI) circuit. Thermocompression bonding was applied to integrate the pre-fabricated SOAs on SOI, with vertical and horizontal alignment performed successfully at both SOA facets. The demonstrated device has a footprint of 8.2mm x 0.3mm and experimental evaluation revealed a 12Gb/s wavelength conversion operation capability with only 0.8dB power penalty for the first SOA-MZI-on-SOI circuit and a 10Gb/s wavelength conversion operation capability with 2 dB power penalty for the second SOA-MZI circuit. Our experiments show how dual facet integration can significantly increase the level of optical functionalities achievable by flip-chip hybrid technology and pave the way for more advanced and more densely PICs.

  6. Reduction of Methane Emission during Slurry Storage by the Addition of Effective Microorganisms and Excessive Carbon Source from Brewing Sugar.

    PubMed

    Bastami, Mohd Saufi B; Jones, Davey L; Chadwick, David R

    2016-11-01

    Storing livestock manure is the primary stage of manure management where microbial processes and chemical reactions result in the release of methane (CH), nitrous oxide (NO), ammonia (NH), and carbon dioxide (CO). This study examined the reduction of CH emissions from slurry storage under two temperatures (cool [10°C] and warm [30°C]) when a glucose-rich substrate (brewing sugar) and activated effective microorganisms were applied at 10% (w/w) and 5% (v/w), respectively. Brewing sugar addition influenced microbial anaerobic respiration, resulting in a reduction of slurry pH to <5.0, through "self-acidification" caused by lactic acid production. Subsequently, CH emissions were significantly reduced by 87 and 99% in the cool and warm environments, respectively. The effective microorganism treatment did not change the chemical characteristics of the slurry but reduced CH emissions by 17 and 27% ( < 0.05) in the cool and warm environments, respectively. These results suggest that self-acidification after addition of a carbon source may be a promising alternative to slurry acidification using concentrated acids.

  7. Semantic priming in schizophrenia: an examination of spreading activation using word pronunciation and multiple SOAs.

    PubMed

    Barch, D M; Cohen, J D; Servan-Schreiber, D; Steingard, S; Cohen, J D; Steinhauer, S S; van Kammen, D P

    1996-11-01

    Semantic priming in word pronunciation was examined at 5 stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) in 75 medicated and 25 unmedicated people with schizophrenia (SCZ) and in 10 depressed and 28 normal controls. At SOAs < 950 ms, SCZ displayed priming similar to that of normal and depressed controls. At the 950-ms SOA, SCZ displayed less priming than controls. Medication dosage, but not conceptual disorganization scores, was positively associated with priming at SOAs < 950 ms. These results suggest that prior reports of enhanced priming in schizophrenia may have been confounded by methodological problems and that automatic priming processes operate normally in SCZ. The failure of SCZ to display significant priming at the 950-ms SOA is consistent with a hypothesized disturbance in higher level processes.

  8. All-optical flip-flop based on coupled SOA-PSW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Yongjun; Wu, Chen; Wang, Fu

    2016-12-01

    The semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) has obvious advantages in all-optical signal processing, because of the simple structure, strong non-linearity, and easy integration. A variety of all-optical signal processing functions, such as all-optical wavelength conversion, all-optical logic gates and all-optical sampling, can be completed by SOA. So the SOA has been widespread concerned in the field of all-optical signal processing. Recently, the polarization rotation effect of SOA is receiving considerable interest, and many researchers have launched numerous research work utilizing this effect. In this paper, a new all-optical flip-flop structure using polarization switch (PSW) based on polarization rotation effect of SOA is presented.

  9. Examining the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol formation during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Look Rock, Tennessee ground site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budisulistiorini, S. H.; Li, X.; Bairai, S. T.; Renfro, J.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Y. J.; McKinney, K. A.; Martin, S. T.; McNeill, V. F.; Pye, H. O. T.; Nenes, A.; Neff, M. E.; Stone, E. A.; Mueller, S.; Knote, C.; Shaw, S. L.; Zhang, Z.; Gold, A.; Surratt, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    A suite of offline and real-time gas- and particle-phase measurements was deployed at Look Rock, Tennessee (TN), during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to examine the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. High- and low-time-resolution PM2.5 samples were collected for analysis of known tracer compounds in isoprene-derived SOA by gas chromatography/electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) and ultra performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/DAD-ESI-HR-QTOFMS). Source apportionment of the organic aerosol (OA) was determined by positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of mass spectrometric data acquired on an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM). Campaign average mass concentrations of the sum of quantified isoprene-derived SOA tracers contributed to ~ 9 % (up to 28 %) of the total OA mass, with isoprene-epoxydiol (IEPOX) chemistry accounting for ~ 97 % of the quantified tracers. PMF analysis resolved a factor with a profile similar to the IEPOX-OA factor resolved in an Atlanta study and was therefore designated IEPOX-OA. This factor was strongly correlated (r2 > 0.7) with 2-methyltetrols, C5-alkene triols, IEPOX-derived organosulfates, and dimers of organosulfates, confirming the role of IEPOX chemistry as the source. On average, IEPOX-derived SOA tracer mass was ~ 26 % (up to 49 %) of the IEPOX-OA factor mass, which accounted for 32 % of the total OA. A low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and an oxidized factor with a profile similar to 91Fac observed in areas where emissions are biogenic-dominated were also resolved by PMF analysis, whereas no primary organic aerosol (POA) sources could be resolved. These findings were consistent with low levels of primary pollutants, such as nitric oxide (NO ~ 0.03 ppb), carbon monoxide (CO ~ 116 ppb), and black

  10. Development of a Carbon Number Polarity Grid SOA Model with the use of Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S. H.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Asher, W.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Pankow, J. F.; Barsanti, K. C.

    2012-12-01

    A major weakness in current air quality and climate models is the ability to simulate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) levels and physiochemical properties accurately. A new approach to model SOA formation is the carbon number (nc) polarity grid (CNPG) framework. The CNPG framework makes use of a nc vs. polarity grid for representing relevant organic compounds and their time-dependent concentrations. The nc vs polarity grid is well suited for modeling SOA because nc together with some suitable measure of total molecular polarity provides the minimum yet sufficient formation for estimating the parameters required to calculate partitioning coefficients. Furthermore, CNPG allows consideration of the effects of variation in the activity coefficients of the partitioning compounds, variation in the mean molecular weight of the absorbing organic phase, water uptake, and the possibility of phase separation in the organic aerosol phase. In this work, we use the GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) chemistry mechanism to produce the chemical structures of SOA precursor oxidization products and their time-dependent concentrations. The SIMPOL group contribution method is used to calculate the enthalpy of vaporization ΔHvap for each product. The total molecular polarity is then calculated as ΔHvap,diff, the difference between each compound's ΔHvap and that of its carbon-number equivalent straight-chain hydrocarbon. The gas- and particle-phase concentrations of each compound are mapped onto the nc vs polarity grid as a function of time to evaluate the time evolution of SOA-relevant oxidation products and to help guide lumping strategies for reducing complexity. In addition to using ΔHvap,diff, use of other measures of polarity will also be explored. Initial SOA precursor studies include toluene (C7) + n-heptadecane (C17) and α-pinene, under atmospherically relevant conditions. Results will be discussed in the context of the

  11. Chemical characterization of SOA formed from aqueous-phase reactions of phenols with the triplet excited state of carbonyl and hydroxyl radical

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Laskin, A.; ...

    2014-12-23

    Phenolic compounds, which are emitted in significant amounts from biomass burning, can undergo fast reactions in atmospheric aqueous phases to form secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). In this study, we investigate the reactions of phenol (compound with formula C6H5OH)), guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), and syringol (2,6-dimethoxyphenol) with two major aqueous-phase oxidants – the triplet excited states of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (· OH). We thoroughly characterize the low-volatility species produced from these reactions and interpret their formation mechanisms using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS), and ion chromatography (IC). A large number of oxygenatedmore » molecules are identified, including oligomers containing up to six monomer units, functionalized monomer and oligomers with carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups, and small organic acid anions (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate). The average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratios of phenolic aqSOA are in the range of 0.85–1.23, similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) observed in ambient air. The aqSOA compositions are overall similar for the same precursor, but the reactions mediated by 3C* are faster than · OH-mediated reactions and produce more oligomers and hydroxylated species at the point when 50% of the phenolic compound has reacted. Profiles determined using a thermodenuder indicate that the volatility of phenolic aqSOA is influenced by both oligomer content and O / C ratio. In addition, the aqSOA shows enhanced light absorption in the UV–visible region, suggesting that aqueous-phase reactions of phenols may contribute to formation of secondary brown carbon in the atmosphere, especially in regions influenced by biomass burning.« less

  12. Volatility of methylglyoxal cloud SOA formed through OH radical oxidation and droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L.; Schwier, Allison N.; Lim, Yong B.; McNeill, V. Faye; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-04-01

    The volatility of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud processing (aqueous hydroxyl radical (radOH) oxidation and droplet evaporation) of methylglyoxal (MGly) was studied. Effective vapor pressure and effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap,eff) were determined using 1) droplets containing MGly and its oxidation products, 2) a Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG) system, and 3) Temperature Programmed Desorption Aerosol-Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TPD Aerosol-CIMS). Simulated in-cloud MGly oxidation (for 10-30 min) produces an organic mixture of higher and lower volatility components with an overall effective vapor pressure of (4 ± 7) × 10-7 atm at pH 3. The effective vapor pressure decreases by a factor of 2 with addition of ammonium hydroxide (pH 7). The fraction of organic material remaining in the particle-phase after drying was smaller than for similar experiments with glycolaldehyde and glyoxal SOA. The ΔHvap,eff of pyruvic acid and oxalic acid + methylglyoxal in the mixture (from TPD Aerosol-CIMS) were smaller than the theoretical enthalpies of the pure compounds and smaller than that estimated for the entire precursor/product mix after droplet evaporation. After 10-30 min of aqueous oxidation (one cloud cycle) the majority of the MGly + radOH precursor/product mix (even neutralized) will volatilize during droplet evaporation; neutralization and at least 80 min of oxidation at 10-12 M radOH (or >12 h at 10-14 M) is needed before low volatility ammonium oxalate exceeds pyruvate.

  13. An experimental and numerical study on the forward biased SOA of IGBT`s

    SciTech Connect

    Hagino, Hiroyasu; Yamashita, Junichi; Uenishi, Akio; Haruguchi, Hideki

    1996-03-01

    Power modules are commonly used in the industrial field for medium power output class purposes such as inverters, uninterruptable power suppliers (UPS), NC servo-amplifiers, welders and so on. Insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules, which were developed in the latter part of the 1980s, are of particular interest. IGBT modules possess attractive features which satisfy customer demands for compact and low-noise machinery, because of their drive circuit simplicity and high speed switching performances. Here, thermal and electrical destructions of n-ch 600 V punchthrough type IGBT`s in F.B.SOA are investigated by experiments and simulations. The cause of the thermal destruction is the thermal disappearance of built-in potential of p-n junction between the n{sup +} emitter and the p base of the IGBT integral DMOSFET occurring at the critical temperature of {approximately}650 K. Experiment and simulation results for the critical temperature show a good agreement. The cause of the electrical destruction is impact ionization at the n{sup {minus}} drift/n{sup +} buffer junction in addition to the n{sup {minus}} drift/p base junctions. That triggers a positive feedback mechanism of increasing IGBT integral pnp transistor current which causes the device to lose gate controllability. The experimentally obtained critical power dissipation is {approximately}2,000 kW/cm{sup 2}. This value is ten times greater than BJT`s one. It was also found that emitter ballast resistance (EBR) plays an important role in describing the F.B.SOA of IGBT`s.

  14. Addition of a worm leachate as source of humic substances in the drinking water of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Rosales, S; de L Angeles, M

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the growth performance, the apparent ileal digestibility of nitrogen and energy, the retention of nutrients and the apparent metabolizable energy corrected to zero nitrogen retention (AMEn) in broiler chickens supplemented with increasing doses of a worm leachate (WL) as a source of humic substances (HS) in the drinking water. In Exp. 1, 140 male broilers were penned individually and assigned to four WL levels (0%, 10%, 20%, and 30%) mixed in the drinking water from 21 to 49 days of age. Water was offered in plastic bottles tied to the cage. In Exp. 2, 600 male broilers from 21 to 49 days of age housed in floor pens were assigned to three levels of WL (0%, 10%, and 20%) mixed in the drinking water. The WL was mixed with tap water in plastic containers connected by plastic tubing to bell drinkers. The results of both experiments were subjected to analysis of variance and polynomial contrasts. In Exp. 1, the daily water consumption was similar among treatments but the consumption of humic, fulvic, and total humic acids increased linearly (p<0.01) as the WL increased in the drinking water. The feed conversion (p<0.01) and the ileal digestibility of energy, the excretion of dry matter and energy, the retention of dry matter, ash and nitrogen and the AMEn showed quadratic responses (p<0.05) relative to the WL levels in drinking water. In Exp. 2, the increasing level of WL in the drinking water had quadratic effects on the final body weight, daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio (p<0.05). The addition of WL as a source of HS in the drinking water had beneficial effects on the growth performance, ileal digestibility of energy, the retention of nutrients as well on the AMEn in broiler chickens; the best results were observed when the WL was mixed at levels of 20% to 30% in the drinking water.

  15. Diagnostic Air Quality Model Evaluation of Source-Specific ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ambient measurements of 78 source-specific tracers of primary and secondary carbonaceous fine particulate matter collected at four midwestern United States locations over a full year (March 2004–February 2005) provided an unprecedented opportunity to diagnostically evaluate the results of a numerical air quality model. Previous analyses of these measurements demonstrated excellent mass closure for the variety of contributing sources. In this study, a carbon-apportionment version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was used to track primary organic and elemental carbon emissions from 15 independent sources such as mobile sources and biomass burning in addition to four precursor-specific classes of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) originating from isoprene, terpenes, aromatics, and sesquiterpenes. Conversion of the source-resolved model output into organic tracer concentrations yielded a total of 2416 data pairs for comparison with observations. While emission source contributions to the total model bias varied by season and measurement location, the largest absolute bias of −0.55 μgC/m3 was attributed to insufficient isoprene SOA in the summertime CMAQ simulation. Biomass combustion was responsible for the second largest summertime model bias (−0.46 μgC/m3 on average). Several instances of compensating errors were also evident; model underpredictions in some sectors were masked by overpredictions in others. The National Exposure Research L

  16. Explicit modelling of SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation: sensitivity to vapour pressure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valorso, R.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Raventos-Duran, T.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2011-07-01

    The sensitivity of the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the estimated vapour pressures of the condensable oxidation products is explored. A highly detailed reaction scheme was generated for α-pinene photooxidation using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A). Vapour pressures (Pvap) were estimated with three commonly used structure activity relationships. The values of Pvap were compared for the set of secondary species generated by GECKO-A to describe α-pinene oxidation. Discrepancies in the predicted vapour pressures were found to increase with the number of functional groups borne by the species. For semi-volatile organic compounds (i.e. organic species of interest for SOA formation), differences in the predicted Pvap range between a factor of 5 to 200 on average. The simulated SOA concentrations were compared to SOA observations in the Caltech chamber during three experiments performed under a range of NOx conditions. While the model captures the qualitative features of SOA formation for the chamber experiments, SOA concentrations are systematically overestimated. For the conditions simulated, the modelled SOA speciation appears to be rather insensitive to the Pvap estimation method.

  17. Explicit modelling of SOA formation from α-pinene photooxidation: sensitivity to vapour pressure estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valorso, R.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Raventos-Duran, T.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Ng, N. L.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2011-03-01

    The sensitivity of the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) to the estimated vapour pressures of the condensable oxidation products is explored. A highly detailed reaction scheme was generated for α-pinene photooxidation using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A). Vapour pressures (Pvap) were estimated with three commonly used structure activity relationships. The values of Pvap were compared for the set of secondary species generated by GECKO-A to describe α-pinene oxidation. Discrepancies in the predicted vapour pressures were found to increase with the number of functional groups borne by the species. For semi-volatile organic compounds (i.e. organic species of interest for SOA formation), differences in the predicted Pvap range between a factor of 5 to 200 in average. The simulated SOA concentrations were compared to SOA observations in the Caltech chamber during three experiments performed under a range of NOx conditions. While the model captures the qualitative features of SOA formation for the chamber experiments, SOA concentrations are systematically overestimated. For the conditions simulated, the modelled SOA speciation appears to be rather insensitive to the Pvap estimation method.

  18. SOA formation from partitioning and heterogeneous reactions: model study in the presence of inorganic species.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myoseon; Czoschke, Nadine M; Northcross, Amanda L; Cao, Gang; Shaof, David

    2006-05-01

    A predictive model for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation by both partitioning and heterogeneous reactions was developed for SOA created from ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in the presence of preexisting inorganic seed aerosols. SOA was created in a 2 m3 polytetrafluoroethylene film indoor chamber under darkness. Extensive sets of SOA experiments were conducted varying humidity, inorganic seed compositions comprising of ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid, and amounts of inorganic seed mass. SOA mass was decoupled into partitioning (OM(P)) and heterogeneous aerosol production (OM(H)). The reaction rate constant for OM(H) production was subdivided into three categories (fast, medium, and slow) to consider different reactivity of organic products for the particle phase heterogeneous reactions. The influence of particle acidity on reaction rates was treated in a previous semiempirical model. Model OM(H) was developed with medium and strong acidic seed aerosols, and then extrapolated to OM(H) in weak acidic conditions, which are more relevant to atmospheric aerosols. To demonstrate the effects of preexisting glyoxal derivatives (e.g., glyoxal hydrate and dimer) on OM(H), SOA was created with a seed mixture comprising of aqueous glyoxal and inorganic species. Our results show that heterogeneous SOA formation was also influenced by preexisting reactive glyoxal derivatives.

  19. SOA formation by biogenic and carbonyl compounds: data evaluation and application.

    PubMed

    Ervens, Barbara; Kreidenweis, Sonia M

    2007-06-01

    The organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols affects the physical and chemical properties of the particles and their role in the climate system. Current models greatly underpredict secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass. Based on a compilation of literature studies that address SOA formation, we discuss different parameters that affect the SOA formation efficiency of biogenic compounds (alpha-pinene, isoprene) and aliphatic aldehydes (glyoxal, hexanal, octanal, hexadienal). Applying a simple model, we find that the estimated SOA mass after one week of aerosol processing under typical atmospheric conditions is increased by a few microg m(-3) (low NO(x) conditions). Acid-catalyzed reactions can create > 50% more SOA mass than processes under neutral conditions; however, other parameters such as the concentration ratio of organics/NO(x), relative humidity, and absorbing mass are more significant. The assumption of irreversible SOA formation not limited by equilibrium in the particle phase or by depletion of the precursor leads to unrealistically high SOA masses for some of the assumptions we made (surface vs volume controlled processes).

  20. Uncertainties in SOA simulations due to meteorological uncertainties in Mexico City during MILAGRO-2006 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bei, N.; Li, G.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the uncertainties in simulating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in Mexico City metropolitan area (MCMA) due to meteorological initial uncertainties using the WRF-CHEM model through ensemble simulations. The simulated periods (24 and 29 March 2006) represent two typical meteorological episodes ("Convection-South" and "Convection-North", respectively) in the Mexico City basin during the MILAGRO-2006 field campaign. The organic aerosols are simulated using a non-traditional SOA model including the volatility basis-set modeling method and the contributions from glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Model results demonstrate that uncertainties in meteorological initial conditions have significant impacts on SOA simulations, including the peak time concentrations, the horizontal distributions, and the temporal variations. The ensemble spread of the simulated peak SOA at T0 can reach up to 4.0 μg m-3 during the daytime, which is around 35% of the ensemble mean. Both the basin wide wind speed and the convergence area affect the magnitude and the location of the simulated SOA concentrations inside the Mexico City basin. The wind speed, especially during the previous midnight and the following early morning, influences the magnitude of the peak SOA concentration through ventilation. The surface horizontal convergence zone generally determines the area with high SOA concentrations. The magnitude of the ensemble spreads may vary with different meteorological episodes but the ratio of the ensemble spread to mean does not change significantly.

  1. Uncertainties in SOA simulations due to meteorological uncertainties in Mexico City during MILAGRO-2006 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bei, N.; Li, G.; Molina, L. T.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the uncertainties in simulating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in Mexico City metropolitan area (MCMA) due to meteorological initial uncertainties using the WRF-CHEM model through ensemble simulations. The simulated periods (24 and 29 March 2006) represent two typical meteorological episodes ("Convection-South" and "Convection-North", respectively) in the Mexico City basin during the MILAGRO-2006 field campaign. The organic aerosols are simulated using a non-traditional SOA model including the volatility basis-set modeling method and the contributions from glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Model results demonstrate that uncertainties in meteorological initial conditions have significant impacts on SOA simulations, including the peak time concentrations, the horizontal distributions, and the temporal variations. The ensemble spread of the simulated peak SOA at T0 can reach up to 4.0 μg m-3 during the daytime, which is around 35% of the ensemble mean. Both the basin wide wind speed and the convergence area affect the magnitude and the location of the simulated SOA concentrations inside the Mexico City basin. The wind speed, especially during the previous midnight and the following early morning, influences the magnitude of the peak SOA concentration through ventilation. The surface horizontal convergence zone generally determines the area with high SOA concentrations. The magnitude of the ensemble spreads may vary with different meteorological episodes but the ratio of the ensemble spread to mean does not change significantly.

  2. Uncertainties in SOA simulations due to meteorological uncertainties in Mexico City during MILAGRO-2006 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bei, N.; Li, G.; Molina, L. T.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the uncertainties in simulating secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in Mexico City metropolitan area (MCMA) due to meteorological initial uncertainties using the WRF-CHEM model through ensemble simulations. The simulated periods (24 and 29 March 2006) represent two typical meteorological episodes ("Convection-South" and "Convection-North", respectively) in the Mexico City basin during the MILAGRO-2006 field campaign. The organic aerosols are simulated using a non-traditional SOA model including the volatility basis-set modeling method and the contributions from glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Model results demonstrate that uncertainties in meteorological initial conditions have significant impacts on SOA simulations, including the peak time concentrations, the horizontal distributions, and the temporal variations. The ensemble spread of the simulated peak SOA at T0 can reach up to 4.0 µg m-3 during the daytime, which is around 35% of the ensemble mean. Both the basin wide wind speed and the convergence area affect the magnitude and the location of the simulated SOA concentrations inside the Mexico City basin. The wind speed, especially during the previous midnight and the following early morning, influences the magnitude of the peak SOA concentration through ventilation. The surface horizontal convergence zone generally determines the area with high SOA concentrations. The magnitude of the ensemble spreads may vary with different meteorological episodes but has same significance compared to the ensemble mean.

  3. Field-scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as an oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition. Appendices. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This document contains appendices regarding a reprint on a field scale investigation of enhanced petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in the vadose zone combining soil venting as a oxygen source with moisture and nutrient addition.

  4. The SOA formation model combined with semiempirical quantum chemistry for predicting UV-Vis absorption of secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min; Jang, Myoseon; Oliferenko, Alexander; Pillai, Girinath G; Katritzky, Alan R

    2012-07-07

    A new model for predicting the UV-visible absorption spectra of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. The model consists of two primary parts: a SOA formation model and a semiempirical quantum chemistry method. The mass of SOA is predicted using the PHRCSOA (Partitioning Heterogeneous Reaction Consortium Secondary Organic Aerosol) model developed by Cao and Jang [Environ. Sci. Technol., 2010, 44, 727]. The chemical composition is estimated using a combination of the kinetic model (MCM) and the PHRCSOA model. The absorption spectrum is obtained by taking the sum of the spectrum of each SOA product calculated using a semiempirical NDDO (Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap)-based method. SOA was generated from the photochemical reaction of toluene or α-pinene at different NO(x) levels (low NO(x): 24-26 ppm, middle NO(x): 49 ppb, high NO(x): 104-105 ppb) using a 2 m(3) indoor Teflon film chamber. The model simulation reasonably agrees with the measured absorption spectra of α-pinene SOA but underestimates toluene SOA under high and middle NO(x) conditions. The absorption spectrum of toluene SOA is moderately enhanced with increasing NO(x) concentrations, while that of α-pinene SOA is not affected. Both measured and calculated UV-visible spectra show that the light absorption of toluene SOA is much stronger than that of α-pinene SOA.

  5. Patterning effect mitigation using complementary data for NRZ wavelength conversion with a SOA-MZI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Xuelin; Weng, Qiwei; Hu, Weisheng

    2011-12-01

    A novel scheme of Non-Return-to-Zero (NRZ) all-optical wavelength conversion is proposed using a semiconductor optical amplifier based Mach-Zehnder interferometer (SOA-MZI), where the complementary NRZ data is used to mitigate SOA patterning effect. The performances of the wavelength converters are numerically evaluated in terms of the waveform, eye-diagram and Q factor of the output signals at 40 Gb/s, using a time-domain SOA model. It is shown that the new complementary scheme significantly improves the Q factor of the converted signal from 3.8 to 8.1, compared with the traditional scheme.

  6. Tunable multiwavelength SOA fiber laser with ultra-narrow wavelength spacing based on nonlinear polarization rotation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuxing; Wu, Jian; Xu, Kun; Hong, Xiaobin; Lin, Jintong

    2009-09-14

    A tunable multiwavelength fiber laser with ultra-narrow wavelength spacing and large wavelength number using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) has been demonstrated. Intensity-dependent transmission induced by nonlinear polarization rotation in the SOA accounts for stable multiwavelength operation with wavelength spacing less than the homogenous broadening linewidth of the SOA. Stable multiwavelength lasing with wavelength spacing as small as 0.08 nm and wavelength number up to 126 is achieved at room temperature. Moreover, wavelength tuning of 20.2 nm is implemented via polarization tuning.

  7. 77 FR 12226 - Sadex Corp.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... Petition (Animal Use); Electron Beam and X-Ray Sources for Irradiation of Poultry Feed and Poultry Feed... poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on the... use of electron beam and x- ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry feed...

  8. A reconfigurable all-optical VPN based on XGM effect of SOA in WDM PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Liang; Cao, Pan; Wang, Tao; Su, Yikai

    2010-12-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a reconfigurable all-optical VPN scheme enabling intercommunications among different ONUs in a WDM PON. Reconfiguration is realized by dynamically setting wavelength conversion of optical VPN signal using a SOA in the OLT.

  9. Stable passive optical clock generation in SOA-based fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Yun; Lin, Kuei-Huei; Chen, Hou-Ren

    2015-02-15

    Stable optical pulse trains are obtained from 1.3-μm and 1.5-μm semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based fiber lasers using passive optical technology. The waveforms depend on SOA currents, and the repetition rates can be tuned by varying the relative length of sub-cavities. The output pulse trains of these SOA-based fiber lasers are stable against intracavity polarization adjustment and environmental perturbation. The optical clock generation is explained in terms of mode competition, self-synchronization, and SOA saturation. Without resorting to any active modulation circuits or devices, the technology used here is simple and may find various applications in the future.

  10. [Study on transformation mechanism of SOA from biogenic VOC under UV-B condition].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Ying; Li, Xiang; Chen, Jian-Min

    2011-12-01

    A laboratory study was carried out to investigate the biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) in a lab-made glass chamber. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products can be detected under the UV photooxidation of BVOC. Pelargonium x Citrenella was chosen as the target plant in this research because it can release a large amount of BVOCs. The predominant 7 alkene and ketol compounds were detected by using solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The photochemical experiment indicated that these BVOC can be rapidly oxidized into SOA under UV-B irradiation. A tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) was used to measure the size distribution and the hygroscopicity of the SOA. The particle diameter was in the range of 50 nm to 320 nm. The high hygroscopicity of SOA was also obtained and the size increased from 1.05 to 1.11 during the wet experiment.

  11. Contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to SOA formed in an irradiated toluene/alpha-pinene/NO(x)/ air mixture: comparison of results using 14C content and SOA organic tracer methods.

    PubMed

    Offenberg, John H; Lewis, Charles W; Lewandowski, Michael; Jaoui, Mohammed; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Edney, Edward O

    2007-06-01

    An organic tracer method, recently proposed for estimating individual contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was evaluated by conducting a laboratory study where a binary hydrocarbon mixture, containing the anthropogenic aromatic hydrocarbon, toluene, and the biogenic monoterpene, alpha-pinene, was irradiated in air in the presence of NO(x) to form SOA. The contributions of toluene and alpha-pinene to the total SOA concentration, calculated using the organic tracer method, were compared with those obtained with a more direct 14C content method. In the study, SOA to SOC ratios of 2.07 +/- 0.08 and 1.41 +/- 0.04 were measured for toluene and (alpha-pinene SOA, respectively. The individual tracer-based SOA contributions of 156 microg m(-3) for toluene and 198 microg m(-)3 for alpha-pinene, which together accounted for 82% of the gravimetrically determined total SOA concentration, compared well with the 14C values of 182 and 230 microg m(-3) measured for the respective SOA precursors. While there are uncertainties associated with the organic tracer method, largely due to the chemical complexity of SOA forming chemical mechanisms, the results of this study suggest the organic tracer method may serve as a useful tool for determining whether a precursor hydrocarbon is a major SOA contributor.

  12. All-optical D and T flip-flops based on polarization switch of SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lina; Wang, Yongjun; Wu, Chen

    2016-11-01

    The semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) plays an important role in the development of the all-optical signal processing because of the advantages of simple structure, easy integration and strong non-linearity. Especially the nonlinear polarization rotation effect of SOA is receiving considerable interest by many researchers nowadays. The all-optical flip-flop using the properties of SOA also obtains widespread attention by researchers, as all-optical flip-flop is an important part in the field of all-optical signal processing. In this paper, a new all-optical flip-flop structure using polarization switch (PSW) based on polarization rotation effect of SOA is presented. The main work of the paper is the simulation of all-optical logic gates and optical SR latch. The logic gate setup only uses one SOA, but it can get two different logic gates through a simulation. The extinction ratio of the logic gate is about 30dB. The structure of optical SR latch utilizes the two coupled polarization rotation switch of SOA. The structure of the flip-flop is based on these two parts. To demonstrate the feasibility of the structure, we analyze two types of flip-flops, including all-optical D and T flip-flops, whose clock pulse repetition rate is 1GHz with the pulse width of 0.3ns. The quality of all-optical flip-flop in this paper is measured by the falling and rising edge time. In the simulation, the falling edge time is about 50ps, while the rising edge time is higher than the falling edge time, because the gain increases slowly to the recovery time after the decrease of the gain of SOA. The results are useful for the development of all-optical flip-flop based on SOA.

  13. How important are glassy SOA ice nuclei for the formation of cirrus clouds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C.; Penner, J. E.; Lin, G.; Liu, X.; Wang, M.

    2014-12-01

    Extremely low ice numbers (i.e. 5 - 100 / L) have been observed in the tropical troposphere layer (TTL) in a variety of field campaigns. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain these low numbers, including the effect of glassy secondary organic aerosol acting as heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN). In this study, we explored these effects using the CAM5.3 model. SOA fields were provided by an offline version of the University of Michigan-IMPACT model, which has a detailed process-based mechanism that describes aerosol microphysics and SOA formation through both gas phase and multiphase reactions. The transition criterion of SOA to glassy heterogeneous IN follows the parameterization developed by Wang et al. 2012. With this parameterization, glassy SOA IN form mainly when the temperature (T) is lower than 210K. In the default CAM5.3 set-up in which only the fraction of Aitken mode sulfate aerosols with diameter larger than 100nm participate in the ice nucleation (Liu and Penner 2005 parameterization), glassy SOA IN are shown to decrease the ice number (Ni) by suppressing some of the homogeneous freezing at low temperatures thereby leading to an improved representation of the relationship between Ni and T compared to the observations summarized by Kramer et al. 2009. However, when we allow the total number of the Aitken mode sulfate particles to participate in homogeneous freezing, glassy SOA IN have only a small impact on the relationship between Ni and T. If the subgrid updraft velocity is decreased to 0.1 m/s (compared to 0.2 m/s in the default set-up), there is a large decrease of Ni, since homogeneous freezing is more easily suppressed by glassy SOA IN at these updrafts. We also present the effects of glassy SOA IN using an alternative ice nucleation scheme (Barahona and Nenes, 2009).

  14. Primary particulate emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from idling diesel vehicle exhaust in China.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wei; Hu, Qihou; Liu, Tengyu; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Yanli; Song, Wei; Sun, Yele; Bi, Xinhui; Yu, Jianzhen; Yang, Weiqiang; Huang, Xinyu; Zhang, Zhou; Huang, Zhonghui; He, Quanfu; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; George, Christian

    2017-03-26

    In China diesel vehicles dominate the primary emission of particulate matters from on-road vehicles, and they might also contribute substantially to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). In this study tailpipe exhaust of three typical in-use diesel vehicles under warm idling conditions was introduced directly into an indoor smog chamber with a 30m(3) Teflon reactor to characterize primary emissions and SOA formation during photo-oxidation. The emission factors of primary organic aerosol (POA) and black carbon (BC) for the three types of Chinese diesel vehicles ranged 0.18-0.91 and 0.15-0.51gkg-fuel(-1), respectively; and the SOA production factors ranged 0.50-1.8gkg-fuel(-1) and SOA/POA ratios ranged 0.7-3.7 with an average of 2.2. The fuel-based POA emission factors and SOA production factors from this study for idling diesel vehicle exhaust were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than those reported in previous studies for idling gasoline vehicle exhaust. The emission factors for total particle numbers were 0.65-4.0×10(15)particleskg-fuel(-1), and particles with diameters less than 50nm dominated in total particle numbers. Traditional C2-C12 precursor non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) could only explain less than 3% of the SOA formed during aging and contribution from other precursors including intermediate volatile organic compounds (IVOC) needs further investigation.

  15. Research of marine sensor web based on SOA and EDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongguo; Dou, Jinfeng; Guo, Zhongwen; Hu, Keyong

    2015-04-01

    A great deal of ocean sensor observation data exists, for a wide range of marine disciplines, derived from in situ and remote observing platforms, in real-time, near-real-time and delayed mode. Ocean monitoring is routinely completed using sensors and instruments. Standardization is the key requirement for exchanging information about ocean sensors and sensor data and for comparing and combining information from different sensor networks. One or more sensors are often physically integrated into a single ocean `instrument' device, which often brings in many challenges related to diverse sensor data formats, parameters units, different spatiotemporal resolution, application domains, data quality and sensors protocols. To face these challenges requires the standardization efforts aiming at facilitating the so-called Sensor Web, which making it easy to provide public access to sensor data and metadata information. In this paper, a Marine Sensor Web, based on SOA and EDA and integrating the MBARI's PUCK protocol, IEEE 1451 and OGC SWE 2.0, is illustrated with a five-layer architecture. The Web Service layer and Event Process layer are illustrated in detail with an actual example. The demo study has demonstrated that a standard-based system can be built to access sensors and marine instruments distributed globally using common Web browsers for monitoring the environment and oceanic conditions besides marine sensor data on the Web, this framework of Marine Sensor Web can also play an important role in many other domains' information integration.

  16. Organic Aerosol Formation in the Humid, Photochemically-Active Southeastern US: SOAS Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, N.; Lim, Y. B.; Carlton, A. G.; Turpin, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Aqueous multiphase chemistry in the atmosphere can lead to rapid transformation of organic compounds, forming highly oxidized low volatility organic aerosol and, in some cases, light absorbing (brown) carbon. Because liquid water is globally abundant, this chemistry could substantially impact climate, air quality, health, and the environment. Gas-phase precursors released from biogenic and anthropogenic sources are oxidized and fragmented forming water-soluble gases that can undergo reactions in the aqueous phase (in clouds, fogs, and wet aerosols) leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOAAQ). Recent studies have highlighted the role of certain precursors like glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone, and epoxides in the formation of SOAAQ. The goal of this work is to identify other precursors that are atmospherically important. In this study, ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases were scrubbed from the atmosphere at Brent, Alabama during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Four mist chambers in parallel collected ambient gases in a DI water medium at 20-25 LPM with a 4 hr collection time. Total organic carbon (TOC) values in daily composited samples were 64-180 μM. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments were conducted with these mixtures in a newly designed cuvette chamber to understand the formation of SOA through gas followed by aqueous chemistry. OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were formed in-situ in the chamber, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Precursors and products of these aqueous OH experiments were characterized using ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and IC-ESI-MS. ESI-MS results from a June 12th, 2013 sample showed precursors to be primarily odd, positive mode ions, indicative of the presence of non-nitrogen containing alcohols, aldehydes, organic peroxides, or epoxides. Products were seen in the negative mode and included organic acid ions like pyruvate

  17. Application of SOA (Service Oriented Architecture) in Early Warning Systems for Tsunamis and other Natural Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendholt, Matthias; Hammitzsch, Martin; Wächter, Joachim

    2010-05-01

    The DEWS (Distant Early Warning System) [1] project, funded under the 6th Framework Programme of the European Union, has the target to create a new generation of interoperable early warning systems. Two major objectives have steered the development process: usage of free and open source software (FOSS) and compliance to the principles of a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). The second objective was mainly driven by the superior ambition of the development of a generic early warning framework not only for tsunamis but also for other natural hazards. The development of a reference architecture enforced the clear separation between hazard-specific and generic functionality. Integration of sensor networks was realized with Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) [2] Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) [3] services. Sensor types are relatively specific for different hazard types: while inundation sensors can be used both for tsunami and floodwater hazards, contamination meters requires a complete different semantic integration into the client application. Based on sensor measurements a simulation system supports the operator with forecasts to enable the dissemination of precise warning messages. The simulation integration was realized with the Web Processing Service (WPS) [4] but here again semantic integration is simulation specific and has to be realized inside the client application. In contrast the integration of Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) via Web Mapping Service (WMS) [5] and Web Feature Service (WFS) [6] to complete the situation report is independent from any hazard type and depends on the data availability and requirements of each warning centre. The downstream component - the message dissemination from the operator via information logistics to the dissemination channel endpoints - has been realized independently from any specific hazard type. Using the Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) [7] and Emergency Data Exchange Language (EDXL) [8] enables the re-usage for all kind

  18. Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emission Source Aerosols (TERESA)—Power plant studies: assessment of breathing pattern

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Edgar A.; Lemos, Miriam; Coull, Brent; Long, Mark S.; Rohr, Annette C.; Ruiz, Pablo; Gupta, Tarun; Kang, Choong-Min; Godleski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Our approach to study multi-pollutant aerosols isolates a single emissions source, evaluates the toxicity of primary and secondary particles derived from this source, and simulates chemical reactions that occur in the atmosphere after emission. Three U.S. coal-fired power plants utilizing different coals and with different emission controls were evaluated. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) derived from α-pinene and/or ammonia was added in some experiments. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for 6 h to filtered air or different atmospheric mixtures. Scenarios studied at each plant included the following: primary particles (P); secondary (oxidized) particles (PO); oxidized particles + SOA (POS); and oxidized and neutralized particles + SOA (PONS); additional control scenarios were also studied. Continuous respiratory data were obtained during exposures using whole body plethysmography chambers. Of the 12 respiratory outcomes assessed, each had statistically significant changes at some plant and with some of the 4 scenarios. The most robust outcomes were found with exposure to the PO scenario (increased respiratory frequency with decreases in inspiratory and expiratory time); and the PONS scenario (decreased peak expiratory flow and expiratory flow at 50%). PONS findings were most strongly associated with ammonium, neutralized sulfate, and elemental carbon (EC) in univariate analyses, but only with EC in multivariate analyses. Control scenario O (oxidized without primary particles) had similar changes to PO. Adjusted R2 analyses showed that scenario was a better predictor of respiratory responses than individual components, suggesting that the complex atmospheric mixture was responsible for respiratory effects. PMID:21639693

  19. Influence of humidity, temperature, and radicals on the formation and thermal properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from ozonolysis of β-pinene.

    PubMed

    Emanuelsson, Eva U; Watne, Ågot K; Lutz, Anna; Ljungström, Evert; Hallquist, Mattias

    2013-10-10

    The influence of water and radicals on SOAs produced by β-pinene ozonolysis was investigated at 298 and 288 K using a laminar flow reactor. A volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) was used to measure the evaporation of the SOA, enabling the parametrization of its volatility properties. The parameters extracted included the temperature at which 50% of the aerosol had evaporated (T(VFR0.5)) and the slope factor (S(VFR)). An increase in S(VFR) indicates a broader distribution of vapor pressures for the aerosol constituents. Reducing the reaction temperature increased S(VFR) and decreased T(VFR0.5) under humid conditions but had less effect on T(VFR0.5) under dry conditions. In general, higher water concentrations gave lower T(VFR0.5) values, more negative S(VFR) values, and a reduction in total SOA production. The radical conditions were changed by introducing OH scavengers to generate systems with and without OH radicals and with different [HO2]/[RO2] ratios. The presence of a scavenger and lower [HO2]/[RO2] ratio reduced SOA production. Observed changes in S(VFR) values could be linked to the more complex chemistry that occurs in the absence of a scavenger and indicated that additional HO2 chemistry gives products with a wider range of vapor pressures. Updates to existing ozonolysis mechanisms with routes that describe the observed responses to water and radical conditions for monoterpenes with endocyclic and exocyclic double bonds are discussed.

  20. Exposure of BALB/c Mice to Diesel Engine Exhaust Origin Secondary Organic Aerosol (DE-SOA) during the Developmental Stages Impairs the Social Behavior in Adult Life of the Males.

    PubMed

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Kyi-Tha-Thu, Chaw; Moe, Yadanar; Fujitani, Yuji; Tsukahara, Shinji; Hirano, Seishiro

    2015-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a component of particulate matter (PM) 2.5 and formed in the atmosphere by oxidation of volatile organic compounds. Recently, we have reported that inhalation exposure to diesel engine exhaust (DE) originated SOA (DE-SOA) affect novel object recognition ability and impair maternal behavior in adult mice. However, it is not clear whether early life exposure to SOA during the developmental stages affect social behavior in adult life or not. In the present study, to investigate the effects of early life exposure to DE-SOA during the gestational and lactation stages on the social behavior in the adult life, BALB/c mice were exposed to clean air (control), DE, DE-SOA and gas without any PM in the inhalation chambers from gestational day 14 to postnatal day 21 for 5 h a day and 5 days per week. Then adult mice were examined for changes in their social behavior at the age of 13 week by a sociability and social novelty preference, social interaction with a juvenile mouse and light-dark transition test, hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of social behavior-related genes, estrogen receptor-alpha and oxytocin receptor as well as of the oxidative stress marker gene, heme oxygenase (HO)-1 by real-time RT-PCR method. In addition, hypothalamic level of neuronal excitatory marker, glutamate was determined by ELISA method. We observed that sociability and social novelty preference as well as social interaction were remarkably impaired, expression levels of estrogen receptor-alpha, oxytocin receptor mRNAs were significantly decreased, expression levels of HO-1 mRNAs and glutamate levels were significantly increased in adult male mice exposed to DE-SOA compared to the control ones. Findings of this study indicate early life exposure of BALB/c mice to DE-SOA may affect their late-onset hypothalamic expression of social behavior related genes, trigger neurotoxicity and impair social behavior in the males.

  1. Exposure of BALB/c Mice to Diesel Engine Exhaust Origin Secondary Organic Aerosol (DE-SOA) during the Developmental Stages Impairs the Social Behavior in Adult Life of the Males

    PubMed Central

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Kyi-Tha-Thu, Chaw; Moe, Yadanar; Fujitani, Yuji; Tsukahara, Shinji; Hirano, Seishiro

    2016-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is a component of particulate matter (PM) 2.5 and formed in the atmosphere by oxidation of volatile organic compounds. Recently, we have reported that inhalation exposure to diesel engine exhaust (DE) originated SOA (DE-SOA) affect novel object recognition ability and impair maternal behavior in adult mice. However, it is not clear whether early life exposure to SOA during the developmental stages affect social behavior in adult life or not. In the present study, to investigate the effects of early life exposure to DE-SOA during the gestational and lactation stages on the social behavior in the adult life, BALB/c mice were exposed to clean air (control), DE, DE-SOA and gas without any PM in the inhalation chambers from gestational day 14 to postnatal day 21 for 5 h a day and 5 days per week. Then adult mice were examined for changes in their social behavior at the age of 13 week by a sociability and social novelty preference, social interaction with a juvenile mouse and light-dark transition test, hypothalamic mRNA expression levels of social behavior-related genes, estrogen receptor-alpha and oxytocin receptor as well as of the oxidative stress marker gene, heme oxygenase (HO)-1 by real-time RT-PCR method. In addition, hypothalamic level of neuronal excitatory marker, glutamate was determined by ELISA method. We observed that sociability and social novelty preference as well as social interaction were remarkably impaired, expression levels of estrogen receptor-alpha, oxytocin receptor mRNAs were significantly decreased, expression levels of HO-1 mRNAs and glutamate levels were significantly increased in adult male mice exposed to DE-SOA compared to the control ones. Findings of this study indicate early life exposure of BALB/c mice to DE-SOA may affect their late-onset hypothalamic expression of social behavior related genes, trigger neurotoxicity and impair social behavior in the males. PMID:26834549

  2. VOC emissions, evolutions and contributions to SOA formation at a receptor site in eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, B.; Hu, W. W.; Shao, M.; Wang, M.; Chen, W. T.; Lu, S. H.; Zeng, L. M.; Hu, M.

    2013-09-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured by two online instruments (GC-FID/MS and PTR-MS) at a receptor site on Changdao Island (37.99° N, 120.70° E) in eastern China. Reaction with OH radical dominated chemical losses of most VOC species during the Changdao campaign. A photochemical-age-based parameterization method is used to calculate VOC emission ratios and to quantify the evolution of ambient VOCs. The calculated emission ratios of most hydrocarbons agree well with those obtained from emission inventory data, but determined emission ratios of oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) are significantly higher than those from emission inventory data. The photochemical-age-based parameterization method is also used to investigate primary emissions and secondary formation of organic aerosol. The primary emission ratio of organic aerosol (OA) to CO is determined to be 14.9 μg m-3 ppm-1, and secondary organic aeorosols (SOA) are produced at an enhancement ratio of 18.8 μg m-3 ppm-1 to CO after 50 h of photochemical processing in the atmosphere. SOA formation is significantly higher than the level determined from VOC oxidation under both high-NOx (2.0 μg m-3 ppm-1 CO) and low-NOx conditions (6.5 μg m-3 ppm-1 CO). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and higher alkanes (> C10) account for as high as 17.4% of SOA formation, which suggests semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) may be a large contributor to SOA formation during the Changdao campaign. The SOA formation potential of primary VOC emissions determined from field campaigns in Beijing and Pearl River Delta (PRD) is lower than the measured SOA levels reported in the two regions, indicating SOA formation is also beyond explainable by VOC oxidation in the two city clusters.

  3. Unspeciated organic emissions from combustion sources and their influence on the secondary organic aerosol budget in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jathar, Shantanu H; Gordon, Timothy D; Hennigan, Christopher J; Pye, Havala O T; Pouliot, George; Adams, Peter J; Donahue, Neil M; Robinson, Allen L

    2014-07-22

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from the atmospheric oxidation of nonmethane organic gases (NMOG) is a major contributor to atmospheric aerosol mass. Emissions and smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate SOA formation from gasoline vehicles, diesel vehicles, and biomass burning. About 10-20% of NMOG emissions from these major combustion sources are not routinely speciated and therefore are currently misclassified in emission inventories and chemical transport models. The smog chamber data demonstrate that this misclassification biases model predictions of SOA production low because the unspeciated NMOG produce more SOA per unit mass than the speciated NMOG. We present new source-specific SOA yield parameterizations for these unspeciated emissions. These parameterizations and associated source profiles are designed for implementation in chemical transport models. Box model calculations using these new parameterizations predict that NMOG emissions from the top six combustion sources form 0.7 Tg y(-1) of first-generation SOA in the United States, almost 90% of which is from biomass burning and gasoline vehicles. About 85% of this SOA comes from unspeciated NMOG, demonstrating that chemical transport models need improved treatment of combustion emissions to accurately predict ambient SOA concentrations.

  4. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from Biomass Combustion - Emission Ratios, OH Reactivities and SOA Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, W. C.; Gilman, J. B.; Goldan, P. D.; Warneke, C.; Degouw, J.; Veres, P. R.; Burling, I. R.; Yokelson, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Multiple instruments including a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), a proton ion trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS), a negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometer (NI-PT-CIMS) and a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) acquired data from 77 burns of various biomass fuels conducted at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Sciences Laboratory (FSL) in Missoula, MT in February 2009. We compare VOC measurements of oxygenates, aromatics and biogenics from the various instruments as well as from the various fuel types collected in southeastern and southwestern regions of the United States. The relative contribution of the combustion species to the total reactivity with the OH radical is calculated and compared to ambient air reactivity in various locations. Total reactivity for measured species in these fires occasionally exceeded 1000 sec-1 with the majority of this reactivity due to alkenes. In addition, we investigate the relative contribution of the combustion species to the potential for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Measurements of several compounds not previously reported in various urban ambient air measurement campaigns such as pyrazole (C3H4N2), pyrrole (C4H5N), benzofuran (C8H6O) and 2-furanaldehyde (C5H4O2), which are highly reactive with OH, will be presented.

  5. Net-centric transformation to empower the war-fighter through enhanced enterprise data services: exploring the SOA approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farroha, Deborah L.; Farroha, Bassam S.

    2009-05-01

    As DoD moves towards an Enterprise approach to IT, CIOs have been lauding SOA as the solution. It is clear that SOA addresses many challenges that face the DoD from information sharing to the fiscal issues of maintaining an IT infrastructure. As SOA is applied to more complex tasks and as we move IT out to the tactical edge there is an increased need to ensure access to the right information, in the right place at the right time. This paper explores the various methodologies of data services that are making SOA an accessible reality DoD.

  6. Biochemical methane potential from sewage sludge: Effect of an aerobic pretreatment and fly ash addition as source of trace elements.

    PubMed

    Huiliñir, César; Pinto-Villegas, Paula; Castillo, Alejandra; Montalvo, Silvio; Guerrero, Lorna

    2017-03-18

    The effect of aerobic pretreatment and fly ash addition on the production of methane from mixed sludge is studied. Three assays with pretreated and not pretreated mixed sludge in the presence of fly ash (concentrations of 0, 10, 25, 50, 250 and 500mg/L) were run at mesophilic condition. It was found that the combined use of aerobic pretreatment and fly ash addition increases methane production up to 70% when the fly ash concentrations were lower than 50mg/L, while concentrations higher than 250mg/L cause up to 11% decrease of methane production. For the anaerobic treatment of mixed sludge without pretreatment, the fly ash improved methane generation at all the concentrations studied, with a maximum of 56%. The removal of volatile solids does not show an improvement compared to the separate use of an aerobic pre-treatment and fly ash addition. Therefore, the combined use of the aerobic pre-treatment and fly ash addition improves only the production of methane.

  7. Contributions and source identification of biogenic and anthropogenic hydrocarbons to secondary organic aerosols at Mt. Tai in 2014.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanhong; Yang, Lingxiao; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Jianmin; Ono, Kaori; Wang, Xinfeng; Xue, Likun; Wang, Wenxing

    2017-01-01

    Ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) collected at Mt. Tai in summer 2014 were analysed and the data were used to identify the contribution of biogenic and anthropogenic hydrocarbons to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and their sources and potential source areas in high mountain regions. Compared with those in 2006, the 2014 anthropogenic SOA tracers in PM2.5 aerosols and VOC species related to vehicular emissions exhibited higher concentrations, whereas the levels of biogenic SOA tracers were lower, possibly due to decreased biomass burning. Using the SOA tracer and parameterisation method, we estimated the contributions from biogenic and anthropogenic VOCs, respectively. The results showed that the average concentration of biogenic SOA was 1.08 ± 0.51 μg m(-3), among which isoprene SOA tracers were dominant. The anthropogenic VOC-derived SOA were 7.03 ± 1.21 μg m(-3) and 1.92 ± 1.34 μg m(-3) under low- and high-NOx conditions, respectively, and aromatics made the greatest contribution. However, the sum of biogenic and anthropogenic SOA only contributed 18.1-49.1% of the total SOA. Source apportionment by positive matrix factorisation (PMF) revealed that secondary oxidation and biomass burning were the major sources of biogenic SOA tracers. Anthropogenic aromatics mainly came from solvent use, fuel and plastics combustion and vehicular emissions. However, for > C6 alkanes and cycloalkanes, vehicular emissions and fuel and plastics combustion were the most important contributors. The potential source contribution function (PSCF) identified the Bohai Sea Region (BSR) as the major source area for organic aerosol compounds and VOC species at Mt. Tai.

  8. Diagnostic air quality model evaluation of source-specific primary and secondary fine particulate carbon.

    PubMed

    Napelenok, Sergey L; Simon, Heather; Bhave, Prakash V; Pye, Havala O T; Pouliot, George A; Sheesley, Rebecca J; Schauer, James J

    2014-01-01

    Ambient measurements of 78 source-specific tracers of primary and secondary carbonaceous fine particulate matter collected at four midwestern United States locations over a full year (March 2004-February 2005) provided an unprecedented opportunity to diagnostically evaluate the results of a numerical air quality model. Previous analyses of these measurements demonstrated excellent mass closure for the variety of contributing sources. In this study, a carbon-apportionment version of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was used to track primary organic and elemental carbon emissions from 15 independent sources such as mobile sources and biomass burning in addition to four precursor-specific classes of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) originating from isoprene, terpenes, aromatics, and sesquiterpenes. Conversion of the source-resolved model output into organic tracer concentrations yielded a total of 2416 data pairs for comparison with observations. While emission source contributions to the total model bias varied by season and measurement location, the largest absolute bias of -0.55 μgC/m(3) was attributed to insufficient isoprene SOA in the summertime CMAQ simulation. Biomass combustion was responsible for the second largest summertime model bias (-0.46 μgC/m(3) on average). Several instances of compensating errors were also evident; model underpredictions in some sectors were masked by overpredictions in others.

  9. Recent Additions in the Modeling Capabilities of an Open-Source Wave Energy Converter Design Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tom, N.; Lawson, M.; Yu, Y. H.

    2015-04-20

    WEC-Sim is a midfidelity numerical tool for modeling wave energy conversion devices. The code uses the MATLAB SimMechanics package to solve multibody dynamics and models wave interactions using hydrodynamic coefficients derived from frequency-domain boundary-element methods. This paper presents the new modeling features introduced in the latest release of WEC-Sim. The first feature discussed conversion of the fluid memory kernel to a state-space form. This enhancement offers a substantial computational benefit after the hydrodynamic body-to-body coefficients are introduced and the number of interactions increases exponentially with each additional body. Additional features include the ability to calculate the wave-excitation forces based on the instantaneous incident wave angle, allowing the device to weathervane, as well as import a user-defined wave elevation time series. A review of the hydrodynamic theory for each feature is provided and the successful implementation is verified using test cases.

  10. High-NOx Photooxidation of n-Dodecane: Temperature Dependence of SOA Formation.

    PubMed

    Lamkaddam, Houssni; Gratien, Aline; Pangui, Edouard; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Picquet-Varrault, Bénédicte; Doussin, Jean-François

    2017-01-03

    The temperature and concentration dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields has been investigated for the first time for the photooxidation of n-dodecane (C12H26) in the presence of NOx in the CESAM chamber (French acronym for "Chamber for Atmospheric Multiphase Experimental Simulation"). Experiments were performed with and without seed aerosol between 283 and 304.5 K. In order to quantify the SOA yields, a new parametrization is proposed to account for organic vapor loss to the chamber walls. Deposition processes were found to impact the aerosol yields by a factor from 1.3 to 1.8 between the lowest and the highest value. As with other photooxidation systems, experiments performed without seed and at low concentration of oxidant showed a lower SOA yield than other seeded experiments. Temperature did not significantly influence SOA formation in this study. This unforeseen behavior indicates that the SOA is dominated by sufficiently low volatility products for which a change in their partitioning due to temperature would not significantly affect the condensed quantities.

  11. Heritability and genetic covariation of sensitivity to PROP, SOA, quinine HCl, and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jonathan L; Reed, Danielle R; Wright, Margaret J; Martin, Nicholas G; Breslin, Paul A S

    2006-06-01

    The perceived bitterness intensity for bitter solutions of propylthiouracil (PROP), sucrose octa-acetate (SOA), quinine HCl and caffeine were examined in a genetically informative sample of 392 females and 313 males (mean age of 17.8 +/- 3.1 years), including 62 monozygotic and 131 dizygotic twin pairs and 237 sib pairs. Broad-sense heritabilities were estimated at 0.72, 0.28, 0.34, and 0.30 for PROP, SOA, quinine, and caffeine, respectively, for perceived intensity measures. Modeling showed 1) a group factor which explained a large amount of the genetic variation in SOA, quinine, and caffeine (22-28% phenotypic variation), 2) a factor responsible for all the genetic variation in PROP (72% phenotypic variation), which only accounted for 1% and 2% of the phenotypic variation in SOA and caffeine, respectively, and 3) a modest specific genetic factor for quinine (12% phenotypic variation). Unique environmental influences for all four compounds were due to a single factor responsible for 7-22% of phenotypic variation. The results suggest that the perception of PROP and the perception of SOA, quinine, and caffeine are influenced by two distinct sets of genes.

  12. Uncertainties in SOA Formation from the Photooxidation of α-pinene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVay, R.; Zhang, X.; Aumont, B.; Valorso, R.; Camredon, M.; La, S.; Seinfeld, J.

    2015-12-01

    Explicit chemical models such as GECKO-A (the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) enable detailed modeling of gas-phase photooxidation and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Comparison between these explicit models and chamber experiments can provide insight into processes that are missing or unknown in these models. GECKO-A is used to model seven SOA formation experiments from α-pinene photooxidation conducted at varying seed particle concentrations with varying oxidation rates. We investigate various physical and chemical processes to evaluate the extent of agreement between the experiments and the model predictions. We examine the effect of vapor wall loss on SOA formation and how the importance of this effect changes at different oxidation rates. Proposed gas-phase autoxidation mechanisms are shown to significantly affect SOA predictions. The potential effects of particle-phase dimerization and condensed-phase photolysis are investigated. We demonstrate the extent to which SOA predictions in the α-pinene photooxidation system depend on uncertainties in the chemical mechanism.

  13. Relationship between aerosol oxidation level and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Williams, L. R.; Ehn, M.; Mikkilä, J.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Brune, W. H.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J. T.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Laaksonen, A.; Kolb, C. E.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory experiments investigated the relationship between oxidation level and hygroscopic properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles generated via OH radical oxidation in an aerosol flow reactor. The hygroscopic growth factor at 90% RH (HGF90%), the CCN activity ($\\kappa$ORG,CCN) and the level of oxidation (atomic O:C ratio) of the SOA particles were measured. Both HGF90% and $\\kappa$ORG,CCN increased with O:C; the HGF90% varied linearly with O:C, while $\\kappa$ORG,CCN mostly followed a nonlinear trend. An average HGF90% of 1.25 and $\\kappa$ORG,CCN of 0.19 were measured for O:C of 0.65, in agreement with results reported for ambient data. The $\\kappa$ORG values estimated from the HGF90% ($\\kappa$ORG,HGF) were 20 to 50% lower than paired $\\kappa$ORG,CCN values for all SOA particles except 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), the least hygroscopic of the SOA systems. Within the limitations of instrumental capabilities, we show that differences in hygroscopic behavior among the investigated SOA systems may correspond to differences in elemental composition.

  14. Relationship between aerosol oxidation level and hygroscopic properties of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Lambe, A.; Ahern, A.; Williams, L. R.; Ehn, M.; Mikkila, J.; Canagaratna, M.; Brune, W. H.; Onasch, T. B.; Jayne, J.; Petdjd, T. T.; Kulmala, M. T.; Laaksonen, A.; Kolb, C. E.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Laboratory experiments investigated the relationship between degree of oxidation and hygroscopic properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles. The hygroscopic growth factor (HGF), the CCN activity (κCCN) and the degree of aerosol oxidation (represented by the atomic O:C ratio) were measured for α-pinene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), m-xylene and α pinene/m-xylene mixture SOA generated via OH radical oxidation in an aerosol flow reactor. Our results show that both HGF and κCCN increase with O:C. The TMB and m-xylene SOA were, respectively, the least and most hygroscopic of the system studied. An average HGF of 1.25 and a κCCN of 0.2 were measured at O:C of 0.65, in agreement with results reported for ambient data. The HGF based κ(κHGF) under predicted the κCCN values of 20 to 50% for all but the TMB SOA. Within the limitations of instrumental capabilities, we define the extent to which the hygroscopic properties of SOA particles can be predicted from their oxidation level and provide parameterizations suitable for interpreting ambient data.

  15. In situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction of tobermorite formation in autoclaved aerated concrete: Influence of silica source reactivity and Al addition

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Kunio; Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Sato, Masugu

    2011-05-15

    The hydrothermal formation of tobermorite during the processing of autoclaved aerated concrete was investigated by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. High-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly developed autoclave cell and a photon-counting pixel array detector were used. To investigate the effects of the silica source, reactive quartz from chert and less-reactive quartz from quartz sand were used as starting materials. The effect of Al addition on tobermorite formation was also studied. In all cases, C-S-H, hydroxylellestadite and katoite were clearly observed as intermediates. Acceleration of tobermorite formation by Al addition was clearly observed. However, Al addition did not affect the dissolution rate of quartz. Two pathways, via C-S-H and katoite, were also observed in the Al-containing system. These results suggest that the structure of initially formed C-S-H is important for the subsequent tobermorite formation reactions.

  16. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moseman-Valtierra, S.; Gonzalez, R.; Kroeger, K.D.; Tang, J.; Chao, W.C.; Crusius, J.; Bratton, J.; Green, A.; Shelton, J.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N2O, CH4, and CO2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N2O, CH4 and respiratory CO2 fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m-2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N2O and CH4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N2O in July 2009 averaged -33 ??mol N2O m-2 day-1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 ??mol N2O m-2 day-1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N2O and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N2O and CH4 fluxes observed, exceeded half the magnitude of typical

  17. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N2O

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Gonzalez, Rosalinda; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Tang, Jianwu; Chao, Wei Chun; Crusius, John; Bratton, John; Green, Adrian; Shelton, James

    2011-01-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N2O, CH4, and CO2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N2O, CH4 and respiratory CO2fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m−2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N2O and CH4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N2O in July 2009 averaged −33 μmol N2O m−2 day−1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 μmol N2O m−2 day−1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N2O and CH4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N2O and CH4 fluxes observed, exceeded half

  18. Short-term nitrogen additions can shift a coastal wetland from a sink to a source of N 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseman-Valtierra, Serena; Gonzalez, Rosalinda; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Tang, Jianwu; Chao, Wei Chun; Crusius, John; Bratton, John; Green, Adrian; Shelton, James

    2011-08-01

    Coastal salt marshes sequester carbon at high rates relative to other ecosystems and emit relatively little methane particularly compared to freshwater wetlands. However, fluxes of all major greenhouse gases (N 2O, CH 4, and CO 2) need to be quantified for accurate assessment of the climatic roles of these ecosystems. Anthropogenic nitrogen inputs (via run-off, atmospheric deposition, and wastewater) impact coastal marshes. To test the hypothesis that a pulse of nitrogen loading may increase greenhouse gas emissions from salt marsh sediments, we compared N 2O, CH 4 and respiratory CO 2 fluxes from nitrate-enriched plots in a Spartina patens marsh (receiving single additions of NaNO 3 equivalent to 1.4 g N m -2) to those from control plots (receiving only artificial seawater solutions) in three short-term experiments (July 2009, April 2010, and June 2010). In July 2009, we also compared N 2O and CH 4 fluxes in both opaque and transparent chambers to test the influence of light on gas flux measurements. Background fluxes of N 2O in July 2009 averaged -33 μmol N 2O m -2 day -1. However, within 1 h of nutrient additions, N 2O fluxes were significantly greater in plots receiving nitrate additions relative to controls in July 2009. Respiratory rates and CH 4 fluxes were not significantly affected. N 2O fluxes were significantly higher in dark than in transparent chambers, averaging 108 and 42 μmol N 2O m -2 day -1 respectively. After 2 days, when nutrient concentrations returned to background levels, none of the greenhouse gas fluxes differed from controls. In April 2010, N 2O and CH 4 fluxes were not significantly affected by nitrate, possibly due to higher nitrogen demands by growing S. patens plants, but in June 2010 trends of higher N 2O fluxes were again found among nitrate-enriched plots, indicating that responses to nutrient pulses may be strongest during the summer. In terms of carbon equivalents, the highest average N 2O and CH 4 fluxes observed, exceeded half

  19. Evaluation of NOy Species Composition and PM2.5 Mass Balance Closure during SOAS at Centreville, AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Jansen, J. J.; Shaw, S. L.; Knipping, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    The SEARCH network site near Centreville, AL served as the comprehensive scientific ground measurement site during the June 1 to July 15, 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS). Besides basic meteorological parameters, the suite of aerosol parameters routinely measured in SEARCH includes individual reactive nitrogen species (NO, NO2, HNO3, alkyl-nitrates, per-nitrates, particulate nitrate) and PM2.5 species sulfate, nitrate and ammonium ions, organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC). Ambient measurements of these species made during the 6-week SOAS campaign are being evaluated and compared with their respective total NOy and PM2.5 mass, measured via reduction on 350°C Mo to NO with subsequent CLD and TEOM, respectively. Thanks to this separate and independent determination of total NOy and PM2.5 mass, the level of closure with the sum of individual species concentrations serves as independent quality assurance and plausibility check. More importantly, though, the lack of closure allows investigation into the reasons why. Especially in the case of PM2.5, the lack of mass closure is predominantly caused by other organic components, whose mass remains unknown due to the specific OC measurement. In order to report organic mass (OM) the factor OM/OC is commonly used and can vary between 1.4 and 2.5 (e.g. Turpin and Lim, 2001; Aiken et al., 2008), largely due to the oxygen content in OM. Measurements made during SOAS indicate that the OM/OC factor can vary significantly from hour to hour depending on time of day and air mass transported to the site. Dependencies for varying OM/OC in PM2.5 as well as for varying lack of NOy closure are investigated and presented. Overall, NO and particulate nitrate were always the smallest contributors to NOy, both showing highest values early mornings before and around sunrise. Organic and per-nitrates showed broad peaks late mornings, while HNO3 peaked mid to late afternoon. Nighttime levels of NO2 were systematically higher

  20. Metadata-Driven SOA-Based Application for Facilitation of Real-Time Data Warehousing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintar, Damir; Vranić, Mihaela; Skočir, Zoran

    Service-oriented architecture (SOA) has already been widely recognized as an effective paradigm for achieving integration of diverse information systems. SOA-based applications can cross boundaries of platforms, operation systems and proprietary data standards, commonly through the usage of Web Services technology. On the other side, metadata is also commonly referred to as a potential integration tool given the fact that standardized metadata objects can provide useful information about specifics of unknown information systems with which one has interest in communicating with, using an approach commonly called "model-based integration". This paper presents the result of research regarding possible synergy between those two integration facilitators. This is accomplished with a vertical example of a metadata-driven SOA-based business process that provides ETL (Extraction, Transformation and Loading) and metadata services to a data warehousing system in need of a real-time ETL support.

  1. Bidirectional Data Injection Operation of Hybrid Integrated SOA MZI All-Optical Wavelength Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Masaharu; Nishimura, Kohsuke; Inohara, Ryo; Usami, Masashi

    2007-02-01

    A bidirectional data signal input scheme of a semiconductor optical amplifier Mach Zehnder interferometer (SOA MZI) wavelength converter was proposed and experimentally verified for a nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ)-format signal. Theoretical analyses reveal that it is possible to mitigate the patterning effect induced by cross-gain modulation (XGM) by utilizing the difference of the ratio between the XGM and cross-phase modulation on the injection directions of data signals. A hybrid integrated SOA MZI all-optical wavelength converter, in which the coupling loss between the SOA and the silica waveguide was as small as 1 dB owing to a unique active alignment technique, was used for the experiment. We have verified the superior characteristics of the proposed operation scheme for the first time. Error-free wavelength-conversion operation for an NRZ signal at 40 Gb/s was confirmed.

  2. Masked priming by misspellings: Word frequency moderates the effects of SOA and prime-target similarity.

    PubMed

    Burt, Jennifer S

    2016-02-01

    University students made lexical decisions to eight- or nine-letter words preceded by masked primes that were the target, an unrelated word, or a typical misspelling of the target. At a stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) of 47 ms, primes that were misspellings of the target produced a priming benefit for low-, medium-, and high-frequency words, even when the misspelled primes were changed to differ phonologically from their targets. At a longer SOA of 80 ms, misspelled primes facilitated lexical decisions only to medium- and low-frequency targets, and a phonological change attenuated the benefit for medium-frequency targets. The results indicate that orthographic similarity can be preserved over changes in letter position and word length, and that the priming effect of misspelled words at the shorter SOA is orthographically based. Orthographic-priming effects depend on the quality of the orthographic learning of the target word.

  3. Insight into the numerical challenges of implementing 2-dimensional SOA models in atmospheric chemical transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napier, W. J.; Ensberg, J. J.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-10-01

    The new generation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) models that represent gas- and particle-phase chemistry and thermodynamic partitioning using discrete two-dimensional grids (e.g. SOM, 2D-VBS) cannot be efficiently implemented into three-dimensional atmospheric chemical transport models (CTMs) due to the large number of bins (tracers) required. In this study, we introduce a novel mathematical framework, termed the Oxidation State/Volatility Moment Method, that is designed to address these computational burdens so as to allow the new generation of SOA models to be implemented into CTMs. This is accomplished by mapping the two-dimensional grids onto probability distributions that conserve carbon and oxygen mass. Assessment of the Moment Method strengths (speed, carbon and oxygen conservation) and weaknesses (numerical drift) provide valuable insight that can guide future development of SOA modules for atmospheric CTMs.

  4. SOA formation from the atmospheric oxidation of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and its implications for PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoui, M.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.; Lonneman, W. A.

    2011-08-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated by irradiating 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) in the presence and/or absence of NOx, H2O2, and/or SO2 was examined. Experiments were conducted in smog chambers operated either in dynamic or steady-state mode. A filter/denuder sampling system was used for simultaneously collecting gas and particle phase products. The structural characterization of gas and particulate products was investigated using BSTFA, BSTFA + PFBHA, and DNPH derivatization techniques followed by GC-MS and liquid chromatography analysis. This analysis showed the occurrence of more than 68 oxygenated organic compounds in the gas and particle phase, 28 of which were identified. The major components observed include 2,3-dihydroxyisopentanol (DHIP), 2-hydroxy-2-oxoisopentanol, 2,3-dihydroxy-3-methylbutanal, 2,3-dihydroxy-2-methylsuccinic acid, 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanedioic acid, acetone, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and formaldehyde. Most of these oxygenated compounds were detected for the first time in this study. While measurements of the gas phase photooxidation products have been made, the focus of this work has been an examination of the particle phase. SOA from some experiments was analyzed for the organic mass to organic carbon ratio (OM/OC), the effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvapeff), and the aerosol yield. Additionally, aerosol size, volume, and number concentrations were measured by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer coupled to a Condensation Particle Counter system. The OM/OC was found to be 2.1 in MBO/H2O2 system. The ΔHvapeff was 41 kJ mol-1, a value similar to that of isoprene SOA. The laboratory SOA yield measured in this study was found to be 0.7 % in MBO/H2O2 for an aerosol mass of 33 μg m-3. Time profiles and proposed reaction schemes are provided for selected compounds. The contribution of SOA products from MBO oxidation to ambient PM2.5 was investigated by analyzing a series of ambient PM2.5 samples

  5. SOA formation from the atmospheric oxidation of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol and its implications for PM2.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaoui, M.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.; Lonneman, W. A.

    2012-02-01

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated by irradiating 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) in the presence and/or absence of NOx, H2O2, and/or SO2 was examined. Experiments were conducted in smog chambers operated in either dynamic or static mode. A filter/denuder sampling system was used for simultaneously collecting gas- and particle-phase products. The structural characterization of gas and particulate products was investigated using BSTFA, BSTFA + PFBHA, and DNPH derivatization techniques followed by GC-MS and liquid chromatography analysis. This analysis showed the occurrence of more than 68 oxygenated organic compounds in the gas and particle phases, 28 of which were tentatively identified. The major components observed include 2,3-dihydroxyisopentanol (DHIP), 2-hydroxy-2-oxoisopentanol, 2,3-dihydroxy-3-methylbutanal, 2,3-dihydroxy-2-methylsuccinic acid, 2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanedioic acid, acetone, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and formaldehyde. Most of these oxygenated compounds were detected for the first time in this study. While measurements of the gas-phase photooxidation products have been made, the focus of this work has been an examination of the particle phase. SOA from some experiments was analyzed for the organic mass to organic carbon ratio (OM/OC), the effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvapeff), and the aerosol yield. Additionally, aerosol size, volume, and number concentrations were measured by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer coupled to a Condensation Particle Counter system. The OM/OC ratio was 2.1 in the MBO/H2O2 system. The ΔHvapeff was 41 kJ mol-1, a value similar to that of isoprene SOA. The laboratory SOA yield measured in this study was 0.7% in MBO/H2O2 for an aerosol mass of 33 μg m-3. Secondary organic aerosol was found to be negligible under conditions with oxides of nitrogen (NOx) present. Time profiles and proposed reaction schemes are provided for selected compounds. The contribution of SOA products

  6. Towards mechanistic representations of SOA from BVOC + NO3 reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monoterpene reaction with nitrate radicals is a significant source of organic aerosol in the southeast United States. This source of organic aerosol represents an anthropogenic control on biogenic organic aerosol since nitrate radicals result from NOx emissions and are generally ...

  7. Populations of Dalapon-decomposing Bacteria in Soil as Influenced by Additions of Dalapon or Other Carbon Sources

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Wylie D.

    1969-01-01

    The numbers of bacteria capable of decomposing the herbicide dalapon were determined for five soils by the most-probable-number method. Before treatment of the soils with dalapon, the numbers varied from 1,000 to 10,000 cells per g of soil. Incubation of the soils with dalapon resulted in large increases (100-fold) in two of three soils in which dalapon was decomposed rapidly. Lack of increase in numbers in spite of rapid decomposition in the other soil probably indicated breakdown by a chemical process or decomposition by fungi. In the remaining two soils, in which decomposition was slow in one and did not occur in the other, the initial numbers were at the low end of the range and the increase was small on incubation with dalapon. Addition of ground alfalfa or ground corn plant material to a soil did not result in significant increases in the numbers of dalapon-decomposing bacteria, either during or after decomposition of the plant material. Glucose depressed the rate of breakdown of dalapon in the soil and increased dalapon-decomposing Bacillus species rather than Arthrobacter and Agrobacterium species, which were found to increase on incubation with dalapon itself. The most-probable-number method appears to be a valuable tool for pesticide-ecology studies. PMID:5772393

  8. A Framework for Developing Applications Based on SOA in Mobile Environment with Security Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sene Fonseca, Johnneth; Abdelouahab, Zair

    Constant evolution of technologies used in mobile devices allows an increase of capabilities related to storage, processing and transmission of data, including more than one type of technology of transmission in a same device. These factors enable a greater number of applications but also it gives rise to a necessity to find a model of service development. One of the best options which currently exist is SOA (Service Oriented Architecture). This article aims to present a framework that allows the development of SOA in mobile environment. The objective of the framework is to give developers with all necessary tools for provision of services in this environment.

  9. Ring-resonator-integrated tunable external cavity laser employing EAM and SOA.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ki-Hong; Kwon, O-Kyun; Kim, Ki Soo; Choi, Byung-Seok; Oh, Su Hwan; Kim, Hyun Su; Sim, Jae-Sik; Kim, Chul Soo

    2011-12-05

    We propose and demonstrate a tunable external cavity laser (ECL) composed of a polymer Bragg reflector (PBR) and integrated gain chip with gain, a ring resonator, an electro-absorption modulator (EAM), and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The cavity of the laser is composed of the PBR, gain, and ring resonator. The ring resonator reflects the predetermined wavelengths into the gain region and transmits the output signal into integrated devices such as the EAM and SOA. The output wavelength of the tunable laser is discretely tuned in steps of about 0.8 nm through the thermal-optic effect of the PBR and predetermined mode spacing of the ring resonator.

  10. Numerical simulation of all-optical wavelength conversion of DPSK signal based on SOA in a Mach-Zehnder configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei; Li, Minghao; Huang, Dexiu; Zhang, Xinliang; Zhu, Guangxi

    2008-11-01

    All-optical wavelength conversion of differential phase-shift keyed (DPSK) signals based on SOA in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer (SOA-MZI) configuration is simulated and analyzed using the transfer function of MZI and a wideband dynamic model of SOA. The operation principle is analyzed and operation point selection, influence of SOA physical parameters, different signal format and operation speed are discussed in detail. The results of 10Gb/s operation show that SOA-MZI is compatible with both non-return-to-zero (NRZ) and return-to-zero (RZ) formatted signals. However, the conversion performance is sensitive to the operation point of the involved SOAs. To maximize the Q value of the demodulated conversion signal, the power and wavelength of the original DPSK signal and the probe light should be optimized to obtain approximately π phase difference between the upper and lower arms of MZI in the middle of each bit. Besides, SOA with short carrier lifetime and large linewidth enhancement factor is preferred for wavelength conversion applications. 40Gb/s operation is also simulated with SOA carrier lifetime of 100ps, and the results strongly suggests 40Gb/s operation with RZ formatted signals and relatively large input powers of the clock signal.

  11. Temperature Effects on Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) from the Dark Ozonolysis and Photo-Oxidation of Isoprene.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher H; Kacarab, Mary; Nakao, Shunsuke; Asa-Awuku, Akua; Sato, Kei; Cocker, David R

    2016-06-07

    Isoprene is globally the most ubiquitous nonmethane hydrocarbon. The biogenic emission is found in abundance and has a propensity for SOA formation in diverse climates. It is important to characterize isoprene SOA formation with varying reaction temperature. In this work, the effect of temperature on SOA formation, physical properties, and chemical nature is probed. Three experimental systems are probed for temperature effects on SOA formation from isoprene, NO + H2O2 photo-oxidation, H2O2 only photo-oxidation, and dark ozonolysis. These experiments show that isoprene readily forms SOA in unseeded chamber experiments, even during dark ozonolysis, and also reveal that temperature affects SOA yield, volatility, and density formed from isoprene. As temperature increases SOA yield is shown to generally decrease, particle density is shown to be stable (or increase slightly), and formed SOA is shown to be less volatile. Chemical characterization is shown to have a complex trend with both temperature and oxidant, but extensive chemical speciation are provided.

  12. Critical factors determining the variation in SOA yields from terpene ozonolysis: a combined experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Neil M; Hartz, Kara E Huff; Chuong, Bao; Presto, Albert A; Stanier, Charles O; Rosenhørn, Thomas; Robinson, Allen L; Pandis, Spyros N

    2005-01-01

    A substantial fraction of the total ultrafine particulate mass is comprised of organic compounds. Of this fraction, a significant subfraction is secondary organic aerosol (SOA), meaning that the compounds are a by-product of chemistry in the atmosphere. However, our understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms leading to and following SOA formation is in its infancy. We lack a clear description of critical phenomena; we often don't know the key, rate limiting steps in SOA formation mechanisms. We know almost nothing about aerosol yields past the first generation of oxidation products. Most importantly, we know very little about the derivatives in these mechanisms; we do not understand how changing conditions, be they precursor levels, oxidant concentrations, co-reagent concentrations (i.e., the VOC/NOx ratio) or temperature will influence the yields of SOA. In this paper we explore the connections between fundamental details of physical chemistry and the multitude of steps associated with SOA formation, including the initial gas-phase reaction mechanisms leading to condensible products, the phase partitioning itself, and the continued oxidation of the condensed-phase organic products. We show that SOA yields in the alpha-pinene + ozone are highly sensitive to NOx, and that SOA yields from beta-caryophylene + ozone appear to increase with continued ozone exposure, even as aerosol hygroscopicity increases as well. We suggest that SOA yields are likely to increase substantially through several generations of oxidative processing of the semi-volatile products.

  13. Effect of SO2 concentration on SOA formation in a photorreactor from a mixture of anthropogenic hydrocarbons and HONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Vivanco, Marta; Santiago, Manuel; García Diego, Cristina; Borrás, Esther; Ródenas, Milagros; Martínez-Tarifa, Adela

    2010-05-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is an important urban atmospheric pollutant, mainly produced by the combustion of fossil fuels containing sulfur. In the atmosphere, SO2 can react with OH radicals to form sulfuric acid, which can condense to form acidic aerosol. Sulfuric acid particles act as an acid catalyst for some heterogeneous carbonyl reactions like hydration, polymerization or acetals formation, which may lead to a large increase on SOA mass. In order to evaluate the effect of the SO2 concentration on SOA formation, 3 experiments were performed during the campaign carried out by CIEMAT on the EUPHORE facility (CEAM, Valencia, Spain) during June- July 2008. The objective of the campaign was to evaluate the effect of different experimental conditions on SOA formation from the photooxidation of some anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs using HONO as oxidant. Experiment on 6/17/08 was selected as base case (no SO2 was introduced) and experiments 6/26/08 and 7/1/08 were selected as high SO2 (2600 ug/m3) and low SO2 (60 ug/m3) concentration experiments respectively. In the three experiments a mixture of toluene, 1,3,5-TMB (trimethylbenzene), o-xylene and octane was selected as the parent VOCs. Single and coupled to mass spectroscopy gas cromatography (GC and GC/MS), as well as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to measure the initial VOCs and oxidant concentrations decay and the formation of gas phase oxidation products through the experiments. Aerosol size distribution and concentration were measured with SMPS (scanning mobility particle sizer) and TEOM (tapered element oscillating monitor) respectively. In addition, analysis of the organic and inorganic aerosol content was also performed via filter sampling followed by GC/MS and ionic chromatography (for organic and inrganic content respectively). Comparing the filters collected in the three experiments, clearly the largest mass aerosol formation is observed

  14. Elucidating the Chemical Complexity of Organic Aerosol Constituents Measured During the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, L.; Isaacman, G. A.; Spielman, S. R.; Worton, D. R.; Zhang, H.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Wilson, K. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Thousands of volatile organic compounds are uniquely created in the atmosphere, many of which undergo chemical transformations that result in more highly-oxidized and often lower vapor pressure species. These species can contribute to secondary organic aerosol, a complex mixture of organic compounds that is still not chemically well-resolved. Organic aerosol collected on filters taken during the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) constitute hundreds of unique chemical compounds. Some of these include known anthropogenic and biogenic tracers characterized using standardized analytical techniques (e.g. GC-MS, UPLC, LC-MS), but the majority of the chemical diversity has yet to be explored. By employing analytical techniques involving sample derivatization and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with high-resolution-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-MS), we elucidate the chemical complexity of the organic aerosol matrix along the volatility and polarity grids. Further, by utilizing both electron impact (EI) and novel soft vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization mass spectrometry, a greater fraction of the organic mass is fully speciated. The GC x GC-HR-ToF-MS with EI/VUV technique efficiently provides an unprecedented level of speciation for complex ambient samples. We present an extensive chemical characterization and quantification of organic species that goes beyond typical atmospheric tracers in the SOAS samples. We further demonstrate that complex organic mixtures can be chemically deconvoluted by elucidation of chemical formulae, volatility, functionality, and polarity. These parameters provide insight into the sources (anthropogenic vs. biogenic), chemical processes (oxidation pathways), and environmental factors (temperature, humidity), controlling organic aerosol growth in the Southeastern United States.

  15. Secondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic mass at Bakersfield

    EPA Science Inventory

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), known to form in the atmosphere from oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by anthropogenic and biogenic sources, are a poorly understood but substantial component of atmospheric particles. In this study, we examined the chemic...

  16. SOA gain recovery wavelength dependence: simulation and measurement using a single-color pump-probe technique.

    PubMed

    Mathlouthi, W; Vacondio, F; Lemieux, P; Rusch, Leslie A

    2008-12-08

    Measurements to date of the wavelength dependency of gain recovery time in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) have mostly used pump-probe techniques with a pump and probe operated on distinct wavelengths. Choice of pump wavelength, and its relative proximity to the probe wavelength, could influence measurements and impede unambiguous observation of wavelength dependence on recovery dynamics. We use a single-color pump-probe measurement technique to directly access the wavelength dependence of the gain recovery time in bulk InGaAsP SOAs. We used ultrashort pulses from a single mode locked laser to measure unambiguously the spectral dependency and temporal behavior of SOAs. Simulation results using a model that takes into account intra-band and inter-band contributions to SOA saturation, as well as experimental results for the SOA tested, show recovery rate dependency similar to gain spectrum.

  17. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  18. Constraining the properties of hydrocarbon oxidation products via SOA studies at high loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, J. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Franklin, J. P.; Boulanger, K.; Cross, E. S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The oxidation processes that lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generate products with a spectrum of vapor pressures. In accordance with absorptive partitioning theory, only a fraction of these components will condense under typical experimental and atmospheric conditions at low to medium organic aerosol concentration (Coa). The more volatile products may go on to form additional aerosol or other oxidation products by serving as precursors in further oxidation chemistry. They may also serve as sinks for airborne organic carbon if they are lost to environmental surfaces prior to reaction. As Coa is increased, more volatile oxidation products will partition to the condensed phase, where they can be measured using conventional aerosol techniques. In the limit of very high Coa, the aerosol yield plateaus somewhere at or below an organic carbon yield of 100%. At a carbon yield of 100%, all of the carbon from the precursor is found in the condensed phase, with yields below 100% indicating that some carbon is still in the gas phase. This limit gives the yield of condensable carbon for a given precursor, and thereby the branching between pathways yielding condensable versus strictly gas-phase products. Experiments have been performed in which the Coa is systematically increased in order to approach this limit for various precursors. The precursors have been chosen across a variety of parent vapor pressures and structures, allowing the influence of these properties on the limiting yield to be assessed. The influence of ';trapping,' wherein products that are primarily condensed see their overall reaction rate decreased is also discussed. The primary effect of trapping on these experiments is that as Coa is increased, more volatile components are trapped in the condensed phase, leading to overall less oxidized and younger generation aerosol. The chemistry of the organic aerosol is evaluated using aerosol mass spectrometry, enabling the oxygen to carbon

  19. Ultrahigh-resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry characterization of a-pinene ozonolysis SOA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) of α-pinene ozonolysis with and without hydroxyl radical scavenging hexane was characterized by ultrahigh-resolution. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). Molecular formulas for more than 900 negative ions were i...

  20. SOA Does Not Reveal the Absolute Time Course of Cognitive Processing in Fast Priming Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tzur, Boaz; Frost, Ram

    2007-01-01

    Applying Bloch's law to visual word recognition research, both exposure duration of the prime and its luminance determine the prime's overall energy, and consequently determine the size of the priming effect. Nevertheless, experimenters using fast-priming paradigms traditionally focus only on the SOA between prime and target to reflect the…

  1. SOA-based model for value-added ITS services delivery.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Quintero, Luis Felipe; Maciá-Pérez, Francisco; Marcos-Jorquera, Diego; Gilart-Iglesias, Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Integration is currently a key factor in intelligent transportation systems (ITS), especially because of the ever increasing service demands originating from the ITS industry and ITS users. The current ITS landscape is made up of multiple technologies that are tightly coupled, and its interoperability is extremely low, which limits ITS services generation. Given this fact, novel information technologies (IT) based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) paradigm have begun to introduce new ways to address this problem. The SOA paradigm allows the construction of loosely coupled distributed systems that can help to integrate the heterogeneous systems that are part of ITS. In this paper, we focus on developing an SOA-based model for integrating information technologies (IT) into ITS to achieve ITS service delivery. To develop our model, the ITS technologies and services involved were identified, catalogued, and decoupled. In doing so, we applied our SOA-based model to integrate all of the ITS technologies and services, ranging from the lowest-level technical components, such as roadside unit as a service (RSUAAS), to the most abstract ITS services that will be offered to ITS users (value-added services). To validate our model, a functionality case study that included all of the components of our model was designed.

  2. Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) Instantiation within a Hard Real-Time, Deterministic Combat System Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland, James D., Jr

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates the instantiation of a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) within a hard real-time (stringent time constraints), deterministic (maximum predictability) combat system (CS) environment. There are numerous stakeholders across the U.S. Department of the Navy who are affected by this development, and therefore the system…

  3. SOA-Based Model for Value-Added ITS Services Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Quintero, Luis Felipe; Maciá-Pérez, Francisco; Marcos-Jorquera, Diego; Gilart-Iglesias, Virgilio

    2014-01-01

    Integration is currently a key factor in intelligent transportation systems (ITS), especially because of the ever increasing service demands originating from the ITS industry and ITS users. The current ITS landscape is made up of multiple technologies that are tightly coupled, and its interoperability is extremely low, which limits ITS services generation. Given this fact, novel information technologies (IT) based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) paradigm have begun to introduce new ways to address this problem. The SOA paradigm allows the construction of loosely coupled distributed systems that can help to integrate the heterogeneous systems that are part of ITS. In this paper, we focus on developing an SOA-based model for integrating information technologies (IT) into ITS to achieve ITS service delivery. To develop our model, the ITS technologies and services involved were identified, catalogued, and decoupled. In doing so, we applied our SOA-based model to integrate all of the ITS technologies and services, ranging from the lowest-level technical components, such as roadside unit as a service (RSUAAS), to the most abstract ITS services that will be offered to ITS users (value-added services). To validate our model, a functionality case study that included all of the components of our model was designed. PMID:25019101

  4. Evidence for different SOA formation mechanisms in Los Angeles and Atlanta with contrasting emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Parker, E. T.; Weber, R.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the gas/particle partitioning of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and formation of secondary organic constituents using in-situ measurements of chemical composition and optical properties of PM2.5 liquid extracts at two urban regions, Los Angeles, California and Atlanta, Georgia. Distinct and different diurnal patterns of gaseous and particulate WSOC, oxalate (and other organic acids), and soluble brown carbon were observed at the two sites. In Los Angeles, measured species followed identical diurnal profiles, reaching maximum levels in the early afternoon, suggestive of simultaneous local photochemical production of SOA and their light-absorbing components. In Atlanta, particulate WSOC and other SOA components exhibited moderate daytime enhancements relative to a large regional background, and the fresh WSOC was 4 to 6 times less light absorbing compared to Los Angeles. Different WSOC partitioning behaviors between gas/particle phases were also observed. In Atlanta, the fraction of particulate WSOC relative to the total WSOC (FP) was linked to inferred particle water content. In contrast, FP in Los Angeles had no correlation with RH, but was instead related to organic carbon mass, consistent with partition to the organic fraction as observed in environmental chambers. Overall, multiple forms of evidence suggest very different SOA formation processes in Los Angeles and Atlanta. The results are consistent with a dominant role in SOA formation played by anthropogenic VOCs in Los Angles and biogenic VOCs within Atlanta.

  5. Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation from hydroxyl radical oxidation and ozonolysis of monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, D. F.; Kaminski, M.; Schlag, P.; Fuchs, H.; Acir, I.-H.; Bohn, B.; Häseler, R.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wang, M. J.; Wegener, R.; Wildt, J.; Wahner, A.; Mentel, T. F.

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation by hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozonolysis are the two major pathways of daytime biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) oxidation and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In this study, we investigated the particle formation of several common monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene, and limonene) by OH dominated oxidation, which has seldom been investigated. OH oxidation experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR chamber in Jülich, Germany, at low NOx (0.01-1 ppbV) and low ozone (O3) concentration. OH concentration and OH reactivity were measured directly so that the overall reaction rates of organic compounds with OH were quantified. Multi-generation reaction process, particle growth, new particle formation, particle yield, and chemical composition were analyzed and compared with that of monoterpene ozonolysis. Multi-generation products were found to be important in OH dominated SOA formation. The relative role of functionalization and fragmentation in the reaction process of OH oxidation was analyzed by examining the particle mass and the particle size as a function of OH dose. We developed a novel method which quantitatively links particle growth to the reaction of OH with organics in a reaction system. This method was also used to analyze the evolution of functionalization and fragmentation of organics in the particle formation by OH oxidation. It shows that functionalization of organics was dominant in the beginning of the reaction (within two lifetimes of the monoterpene) and fragmentation started to be dominant after that. We compared particle formation from OH oxidation with that from pure ozonolysis. In individual experiments, growth rates of the particle size did not necessarily correlate with the reaction rate of monoterpene with OH and O3. Comparing the size growth rates at the similar reaction rates of monoterpene with OH or O3 indicates that generally, OH oxidation and ozonolysis had similar efficiency in particle growth. The SOA yield of

  6. Differences in BVOC oxidation and SOA formation above and below the forest canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Benjamin C.; Wallace, Henry W.; Flynn, James H.; Lefer, Barry L.; Erickson, Matt H.; Jobson, B. Tom; Dusanter, Sebastien; Griffith, Stephen M.; Hansen, Robert F.; Stevens, Philip S.; VanReken, Timothy; Griffin, Robert J.

    2017-02-01

    Gas-phase biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are oxidized in the troposphere to produce secondary pollutants such as ozone (O3), organic nitrates (RONO2), and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Two coupled zero-dimensional models have been used to investigate differences in oxidation and SOA production from isoprene and α-pinene, especially with respect to the nitrate radical (NO3), above and below a forest canopy in rural Michigan. In both modeled environments (above and below the canopy), NO3 mixing ratios are relatively small (< 0.5 pptv); however, daytime (08:00-20:00 LT) mixing ratios below the canopy are 2 to 3 times larger than those above. As a result of this difference, NO3 contributes 12 % of total daytime α-pinene oxidation below the canopy while only contributing 4 % above. Increasing background pollutant levels to simulate a more polluted suburban or peri-urban forest environment increases the average contribution of NO3 to daytime below-canopy α-pinene oxidation to 32 %. Gas-phase RONO2 produced through NO3 oxidation undergoes net transport upward from the below-canopy environment during the day, and this transport contributes up to 30 % of total NO3-derived RONO2 production above the canopy in the morning (˜ 07:00). Modeled SOA mass loadings above and below the canopy ultimately differ by less than 0.5 µg m-3, and extremely low-volatility organic compounds dominate SOA composition. Lower temperatures below the canopy cause increased partitioning of semi-volatile gas-phase products to the particle phase and up to 35 % larger SOA mass loadings of these products relative to above the canopy in the model. Including transport between above- and below-canopy environments increases above-canopy NO3-derived α-pinene RONO2 SOA mass by as much as 45 %, suggesting that below-canopy chemical processes substantially influence above-canopy SOA mass loadings, especially with regard to monoterpene-derived RONO2.

  7. Consideration of HOMs in α- and β-pinene SOA model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzsche, Kathrin; Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Mutzel, Anke; Berndt, Torsten; Wolke, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is the major burden of the atmospheric organic particulate matter with 140 - 910 TgC yr-1 (Hallquist et al., 2009). SOA particles are formed via the oxidation of volatile organic carbons (VOCs), where the volatility of the VOCs is lowered due to the increase in their functionalization as well as their binding ability. Therefore, gaseous compounds can either nucleate to form new particles or condense on existing particles. The framework of SOA formation under natural conditions is very complex, because there are a multitude of gas-phase precursors, atmospheric degradation processes and products after oxidation. A lacking understanding about chemical and physical processes associated with SOA formation makes modeling of SOA processes difficult, leading to discrepancy between measured and modeled global SOA burdens. The present study utilizes a parcel model SPACCIM (SPectral Aerosol Cloud Chemistry Interaction Model, Wolke et al., 2005) that couples a multiphase chemical model with a microphysical model. For SOA modeling a further development of SPACCIM was necessary. Therefore, two components are added (i) a gas-phase chemistry mechanism for the VOC oxidation and (ii) a partitioning approach for the gas-to-particle phase transfer. An aggregated gas-phase chemistry mechanism for α- and β-pinene was adapted from Chen and Griffin (2005). For the phase transfer an absorptive partitioning approach (Pankow, 1994) and a kinetic approach (Zaveri et al., 2014) are implemented. Whereby the kinetic approach serves some advantages. The organic aerosol can be resolved in different size sections, whereby the particle radius is involved in the partitioning equations. The phase state of the organic material and the reactivity of the organic compounds in the particle-phase directly influence the modeled SOA yields. Recently, highly oxidized multifunctional organic compounds (HOMs) were found in the gas phase from lab and field studies. They are also

  8. Severe open ankle sprain (SOAS): a lesion presenting as a penetrating soft tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Soubeyrand, Marc; Vincent-Mansour, César; Guidon, Julie; Asselineau, Alain; Ducharnes, Gildas; Molina, Véronique

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective case study was to describe the incidence and clinical features of severe open ankle sprain (SOAS), defined as a tear of the lateral or medial collateral ligaments with an associated transverse tear of the skin over the corresponding malleolus. To this end, we reviewed the medical records of patients with SOAS managed between January 2005 and January 2009, using the databases of 3 different orthopedic trauma centers. Our review revealed 9 patients with SOAS, 7 (77.77%) of which involved the lateral ligaments and 2 (22.22%) of which involved the medial ligaments. The median age was 32 (range 21 to 45) years, and the injury occurred as a result of a motor vehicle accident in 6 (66.67%) patients, and as a result of a fall from a height in 3 (33.33%) patients. Two tendons were damaged in 2 (22.22%) patients, the deep fibular nerve (deep peroneal nerve) in 2 (22.22%) patients, and the anterior tibial artery in 1 (11.11%) patient. The only abnormality on plain radiographs was pneumarthrosis, which was present in 5 (55.56%) patients. The incidence of SOAS is rare, accounting for 0.002% (9/438,000) of all trauma cases and 0.22% (9/4142) of all cases of ankle trauma. The diagnosis was confirmed by intraoperative stress-maneuvers in all 9 patients. In conclusion, SOAS should be suspected in patients who present with a traumatic skin wound over the malleolus.

  9. Effect of Ammonia on Glyoxal SOA in Inorganic Aqueous Seed Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waxman, E.; Volkamer, R. M.; Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Koenig, T. K.; Baltensperger, U.; Dommen, J.; Prevot, A. S.; Slowik, J.; Maxut, A.; Noziere, B.; Wang, S.; Yu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Glyoxal (C2H2O2) is a ubiquitous small molecule that is observed in the terrestrial biogenic, urban, marine and arctic atmosphere. It forms secondary organic aerosol (SOA) as a result of multiphase chemical reactions in water. The rate of these reactions is controlled by the effective Henry's law partitioning coefficient (Heff) which is enhanced in the presence of inorganic salts by up to 3 orders of magnitude (Kampf et al., 2013, ES&T). Aerosol particles are among the most concentrated salt solutions on Earth and the SOA formation rate in aerosol water is strongly modified by this 'salting-in' mechanism. We have studied the effect of gas-phase ammonia on the rate of SOA formation in real particles composed of different inorganic salts (sulfate, nitrate, chloride). A series of simulation chamber experiments were conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland during Summer 2013. The SOA formation rate in experiments with added gas-phase ammonia (NH3) was found to be greatly accelerated compared to experiments without added NH3. Product analysis of particles included online HR-ToF-AMS and offline nano-DESI and LC-MS. We find that imidazole-like oligomer compounds dominate the observed products, rather than high-O/C oligomers containing solely C, H, and O. We further employed isotopically labelled di-substituted 13C glyoxal experiments in order to unambiguously link product formation to glyoxal (and separate it from chamber wall contamination). We present a molecular perspective on the reaction pathways and evaluate the effect of environmental parameters (RH, particle pH, seed chemical composition) on the formation of these imidazole-like oligomer compounds. The implications for SOA formation from photosensitized oxidation chemistry is discussed.

  10. Characterizing the chemical evolution of air masses via multi-platform measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during CalNEX: Composition, OH reactivity, and potential SOA formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Bon, D.; Warneke, C.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Holloway, J. S.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Blake, D. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Li, S.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are critical components in the photochemical production of ozone (O3) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). During the CalNex 2010 field campaign, an extensive set of VOCs were measured at the Pasadena ground site, and aboard the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and the WHOI Research Vessel Atlantis. The measurements from each platform provide a unique perspective into the emissions, transport, and atmospheric processing of VOCs within the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The observed enhancement ratios of the hydrocarbons measured on all three platforms are in good agreement and are generally well correlated with carbon monoxide (CO), indicating the prevalence of on-road VOC emission sources throughout the SoCAB. Offshore measurements aboard the ship and aircraft are used to characterize the air mass composition as a function of the land/sea-breeze effect. VOC ratios and other trace gases are used to identify air masses containing relatively fresh emissions that were often associated with offshore flow and re-circulated continental air associated with onshore flow conditions. With the prevailing southwesterly airflow pattern in the LAB throughout the daytime, the Pasadena ground site effectively functions as a receptor site and is used to characterize primary VOC emissions from downtown Los Angeles and to identify the corresponding secondary oxidation products. The chemical evolution of air masses as a function of the time of day is investigated in order to determine the relative impacts of primary emissions vs. secondary VOC products on OH reactivity and potential SOA formation. The reactivity of VOCs with the hydroxyl radical (OH) at the Pasadena site was dominated by the light hydrocarbons, isoprene, and oxygenated VOCs including aldehydes (secondary products) and alcohols (primary anthropogenic emissions). Toluene and benzaldehyde, both of which are associated with primary anthropogenic emissions, are the predominant VOC precursors to the

  11. 40 Gb/s 2R Burst Mode Receiver with a single integrated SOA-MZI switch.

    PubMed

    Kanellos, G T; Pleros, N; Petrantonakis, D; Zakynthinos, P; Avramopoulos, H; Maxwell, G; Poustie, A

    2007-04-16

    We demonstrate a novel scheme for 2R burst mode reception capable of operating error-free with 40 Gb/s variable length, asynchronous optical data packets that exhibit up to 9 dB packet-to-packet power variation. It consists of a single, hybrid integrated, SOA-based Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (SOA-MZI) with unequal splitting ratio couplers, configured to operate as a self-switch. We analyze theoretically the power equalization properties of unequal splitting ratio SOA-MZI switches and show good agreement between theory and experiment.

  12. Ice core records of monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers from Aurora Peak in Alaska since 1660s: Implication for climate variability in the North Pacific Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, A.; Kawamura, K.; Seki, O.; Ono, K.; Matoba, S.; Shiraiwa, T.

    2015-12-01

    180 m long ice core (ca. 343 years old) was drilled in the saddle of the Aurora Peak of Alaska, which is located southeast of Fairbanks (63.52°N; 146.54°W, elevation: 2,825 m). Samples were directly transported to the Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University and have been analyzed for monoterpene- and isoprene-SOA tracers using gas chromatograph (GC; HP 6890) and mass spectrometry system (GC/MS; Agilent). Ice core collected from mountain glacier has not been explored for SOA yet. We found significantly high concentrations of these tracers (e.g., pinic, pinonic, and 2-methylglyceric acids, 2-methylthreitol and 2-methylrythritol), which show historical trends with good correlation with each other since 1665-2008. They show positive correlations with sugar compounds (e.g., mannitol, glucose, fructose, inositol, and sucrose), and anti-correlations with diacids (e.g., C9), w-oxocarboxylic (wC4-wC9), a-dicarbonyls and low molecular weight fatty acids (LFAs) (e.g., C18:1). LFAs show strong correlations with MSA- and nss-SO42- in the same ice core. These results suggest source regions of SOA tracers and ice core chemistry of Alaska. Concentrations of C5-alkene triols (e.g., 3-methyl-2,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene, cis-2-methyl 1,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene and trans-2-methyl-1,3,4-trihydroxy-1-butene) have increased in the ice core after the Great Pacific Climate Shift (late 1970's). They show positive correlations with a-dicarbonyls and LFAs (e.g., C18:1) in the ice core, suggesting that enhanced oceanic emissions of biogenic organic compounds through the surface microlayer are recorded in the ice core. Photochemical oxidation processes for these monoterpene- and isoprene-/sesquiterpene-SOA tracers are suggested to be linked with the periodicity of multi-decadal climate oscillations (e.g., North Pacific Index) and we can look at a whole range of environmental parameters in parallel with the robust reconstructed temperature changes in the Northern Hemisphere.

  13. Evaluation of a quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) for predicting mid-visible refractive index of secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

    PubMed

    Redmond, Haley; Thompson, Jonathan E

    2011-04-21

    In this work we describe and evaluate a simple scheme by which the refractive index (λ = 589 nm) of non-absorbing components common to secondary organic aerosols (SOA) may be predicted from molecular formula and density (g cm(-3)). The QSPR approach described is based on three parameters linked to refractive index-molecular polarizability, the ratio of mass density to molecular weight, and degree of unsaturation. After computing these quantities for a training set of 111 compounds common to atmospheric aerosols, multi-linear regression analysis was conducted to establish a quantitative relationship between the parameters and accepted value of refractive index. The resulting quantitative relationship can often estimate refractive index to ±0.01 when averaged across a variety of compound classes. A notable exception is for alcohols for which the model consistently underestimates refractive index. Homogenous internal mixtures can conceivably be addressed through use of either the volume or mole fraction mixing rules commonly used in the aerosol community. Predicted refractive indices reconstructed from chemical composition data presented in the literature generally agree with previous reports of SOA refractive index. Additionally, the predicted refractive indices lie near measured values we report for λ = 532 nm for SOA generated from vapors of α-pinene (R.I. 1.49-1.51) and toluene (R.I. 1.49-1.50). We envision the QSPR method may find use in reconstructing optical scattering of organic aerosols if mass composition data is known. Alternatively, the method described could be incorporated into in models of organic aerosol formation/phase partitioning to better constrain organic aerosol optical properties.

  14. Reflective SOA fiber cavity adaptive laser source for measuring dynamic strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Heming; Tao, Chuanyi; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-04-01

    Smart sensors based on Optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are suitable for structural health monitoring of dynamic strains in civil, aerospace, and mechanical structures. In these structures, dynamic strains with high frequencies reveal acoustic emissions cracking or impact loading. It is necessary to find a practical tool for monitoring such structural damages. In this work, we explore an intelligent system based on a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA)- FBG composed as a fiber cavity for measuring dynamic strain in intelligent structures. The ASE light emitted from a RSOA laser and reflected by a FBG is amplified in the fiber cavity and coupled out by a 90:10 coupler, which is demodulated by a low frequency compensated Michelson interferometer using a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller and is monitored via a photodetector. As the wavelength of the FBG shifts due to dynamic strain, the wavelength of the optical output from the laser cavity shifts accordingly, which is demodulated by the Michelson Interferometer. Because the RSOA has a quick transition time, the RSOA- FBG fiber cavity shows an ability of high frequency response to the FBG reflective spectrum shift, with frequency response extending to megahertz.

  15. CONTRIBUTIONS OF TOLUENE AND Α -PINENE TO SOA FORMED IN AN IRRADIATED TOLUENE/Α-PINENE/NOX/AIR MIXTURE: COMPARISON OF RESULTS USING 14C CONTENT AND SOA ORGANIC TRACER METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An organic tracer method, recently proposed for estimating individual contributions of toluene and α-pinene to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, was evaluated by conducting a laboratory study where a binary hydrocarbon mixture, containing the anthropogenic aromatic hydro...

  16. Tactical Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) Protocols and Techniques (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Dissemination (QED) • KAoS policies/ guards 2) Mediation • Lightweight ESB ( )• Gateways Secure Tactical-to-Enterprise 3) Effective Messaging • Various...source offerings • Squid • Apache Traffic Server 23Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. (88ABW-2011-4080, 25 Jul 2011) Test Articles...XMPP • Service/Info Discovery + Decentralized Svc Mgt + • SLAs/QoS – KAoS Policies/ Guards M di i SLA/QoS + Effective Messaging + Mediation

  17. Error vector magnitude based parameter estimation for digital filter back-propagation mitigating SOA distortions in 16-QAM.

    PubMed

    Amiralizadeh, Siamak; Nguyen, An T; Rusch, Leslie A

    2013-08-26

    We investigate the performance of digital filter back-propagation (DFBP) using coarse parameter estimation for mitigating SOA nonlinearity in coherent communication systems. We introduce a simple, low overhead method for parameter estimation for DFBP based on error vector magnitude (EVM) as a figure of merit. The bit error rate (BER) penalty achieved with this method has negligible penalty as compared to DFBP with fine parameter estimation. We examine different bias currents for two commercial SOAs used as booster amplifiers in our experiments to find optimum operating points and experimentally validate our method. The coarse parameter DFBP efficiently compensates SOA-induced nonlinearity for both SOA types in 80 km propagation of 16-QAM signal at 22 Gbaud.

  18. Volatility and lifetime against OH heterogeneous reaction of ambient isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA)

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Weiwei; Palm, Brett B.; Day, Douglas A.; ...

    2016-09-19

    Isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) can contribute substantially to organic aerosol (OA) concentrations in forested areas under low NO conditions, hence significantly influencing the regional and global OA budgets, accounting, for example, for 16–36 % of the submicron OA in the southeastern United States (SE US) summer. Particle evaporation measurements from a thermodenuder show that the volatility of ambient IEPOX-SOA is lower than that of bulk OA and also much lower than that of known monomer IEPOX-SOA tracer species, indicating that IEPOX-SOA likely exists mostly as oligomers in the aerosol phase. The OH aging process of ambient IEPOX-SOA was investigated withmore » an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). New IEPOX-SOA formation in the reactor was negligible, as the OFR does not accelerate processes such as aerosol uptake and reactions that do not scale with OH. Simulation results indicate that adding  ∼  100 µg m−3 of pure H2SO4 to the ambient air allows IEPOX-SOA to be efficiently formed in the reactor. The heterogeneous reaction rate coefficient of ambient IEPOX-SOA with OH radical (kOH) was estimated as 4.0 ± 2.0  ×  10−13 cm3 molec−1 s−1, which is equivalent to more than a 2-week lifetime. A similar kOH was found for measurements of OH oxidation of ambient Amazon forest air in an OFR. At higher OH exposures in the reactor (>  1  ×  1012 molec cm−3 s), the mass loss of IEPOX-SOA due to heterogeneous reaction was mainly due to revolatilization of fragmented reaction products. We report, for the first time, OH reactive uptake coefficients (γOH =  0.59 ± 0.33 in SE US and γOH =  0.68 ± 0.38 in Amazon) for SOA under ambient conditions. A relative humidity dependence of kOH and γOH was observed, consistent with surface-area-limited OH uptake. No decrease of kOH was observed as OH concentrations increased. These observations of physicochemical

  19. Volatility and lifetime against OH heterogeneous reaction of ambient isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA)

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Weiwei; Palm, Brett B.; Day, Douglas A.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Krechmer, Jordan E.; Peng, Zhe; de Sá, Suzane S.; Martin, Scot T.; Alexander, M. Lizabeth; Baumann, Karsten; Hacker, Lina; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Koss, Abigail R.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Seco, Roger; Sjostedt, Steven J.; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Guenther, Alex B.; Kim, Saewung; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, André S. H.; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-01-01

    Isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) can contribute substantially to organic aerosol (OA) concentrations in forested areas under low NO conditions, hence significantly influencing the regional and global OA budgets, accounting, for example, for 16–36 % of the submicron OA in the southeastern United States (SE US) summer. Particle evaporation measurements from a thermodenuder show that the volatility of ambient IEPOX-SOA is lower than that of bulk OA and also much lower than that of known monomer IEPOX-SOA tracer species, indicating that IEPOX-SOA likely exists mostly as oligomers in the aerosol phase. The OH aging process of ambient IEPOX-SOA was investigated with an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). New IEPOX-SOA formation in the reactor was negligible, as the OFR does not accelerate processes such as aerosol uptake and reactions that do not scale with OH. Simulation results indicate that adding ~100 µg m-3 of pure H2SO4 to the ambient air allows IEPOX-SOA to be efficiently formed in the reactor. The heterogeneous reaction rate coefficient of ambient IEPOX-SOA with OH radical (kOH) was estimated as 4.0 ± 2.0 ×10-13 cm3 molec-1 s-1, which is equivalent to more than a 2-week lifetime. A similar kOH was found for measurements of OH oxidation of ambient Amazon forest air in an OFR. At higher OH exposures in the reactor (> 1 × 1012 molec cm-3 s), the mass loss of IEPOX-SOA due to heterogeneous reaction was mainly due to revolatilization of fragmented reaction products. We report, for the first time, OH reactive uptake coefficients (γOH = 0.59±0.33 in SE US and γOH = 0.68±0.38 in Amazon) for SOA under ambient conditions. A relative humidity dependence of kOH and γOH was observed, consistent with surface-area-limited OH uptake

  20. Volatility and lifetime against OH heterogeneous reaction of ambient isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Palm, Brett B.; Day, Douglas A.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Krechmer, Jordan E.; Peng, Zhe; de Sá, Suzane S.; Martin, Scot T.; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Baumann, Karsten; Hacker, Lina; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Koss, Abigail R.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Seco, Roger; Sjostedt, Steven J.; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Guenther, Alex B.; Kim, Saewung; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, André S. H.; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-09-01

    Isoprene-epoxydiols-derived secondary organic aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) can contribute substantially to organic aerosol (OA) concentrations in forested areas under low NO conditions, hence significantly influencing the regional and global OA budgets, accounting, for example, for 16-36 % of the submicron OA in the southeastern United States (SE US) summer. Particle evaporation measurements from a thermodenuder show that the volatility of ambient IEPOX-SOA is lower than that of bulk OA and also much lower than that of known monomer IEPOX-SOA tracer species, indicating that IEPOX-SOA likely exists mostly as oligomers in the aerosol phase. The OH aging process of ambient IEPOX-SOA was investigated with an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). New IEPOX-SOA formation in the reactor was negligible, as the OFR does not accelerate processes such as aerosol uptake and reactions that do not scale with OH. Simulation results indicate that adding ˜ 100 µg m-3 of pure H2SO4 to the ambient air allows IEPOX-SOA to be efficiently formed in the reactor. The heterogeneous reaction rate coefficient of ambient IEPOX-SOA with OH radical (kOH) was estimated as 4.0 ± 2.0 × 10-13 cm3 molec-1 s-1, which is equivalent to more than a 2-week lifetime. A similar kOH was found for measurements of OH oxidation of ambient Amazon forest air in an OFR. At higher OH exposures in the reactor (> 1 × 1012 molec cm-3 s), the mass loss of IEPOX-SOA due to heterogeneous reaction was mainly due to revolatilization of fragmented reaction products. We report, for the first time, OH reactive uptake coefficients (γOH = 0.59 ± 0.33 in SE US and γOH = 0.68 ± 0.38 in Amazon) for SOA under ambient conditions. A relative humidity dependence of kOH and γOH was observed, consistent with surface-area-limited OH uptake. No decrease of kOH was observed as OH concentrations increased. These observations of physicochemical properties of IEPOX-SOA can help to constrain OA impact on air quality and climate.

  1. SOA Formation form the NO3 radicals Chemistry of Isoprene, Monoterpenes, Sesquiterpenes, Biogenic Oxygenated Compounds, and Aromatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Docherty, K.; Corse, E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Lewandowski, M.

    2011-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere primarily by hydroxyl radicals (OH) during daylight hours but also by nitrate radicals (NO3) during overnight, photochemically inactive periods. While reactions with OH have received considerable attention with regard to gas-phase reaction products and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, less is known about the mechanisms and products resulting from nighttime NO3 reactions despite their potential for SOA formation. To date, there have been limited studies on the chemical characteristics of aerosol reaction products formed from VOCs oxidation with NO3, and few SOA reaction products have been identified. Nighttime reactions have nevertheless been incorporated into some air quality models despite the limited information available and substantial uncertainties which still exist. The National Exposure Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently undertook an integrated laboratory research effort to better understand the contribution of NO3 reactions to nighttime SOA formation. Isoprene, methacrolein, a-pinene, b-pinene, d-limonene, b-caryophyllene, farnesene, a-humulene, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol, toluene, m-xylene, and naphthalene were reacted with NO3 under a wide range of conditions in a series of separate photochemical reaction chamber experiments. These hydrocarbons are thought to contribute to ambient SOA formation. NO3 was formed through thermal decomposition of N2O5. The yield, physical characteristics, and composition of SOA formed in each experiment was analyzed by a suite of instruments including a scanning mobility particle sizer, a Sunset Labs semi continuous EC-OC monitor, a volatility differential mobility analyzer, a direct insertion probe-mass spectrometer, a high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, and a gas-chromatography-mass spectrometer. To understand the relative contributions of nighttime versus daytime VOCs reactions, a similar

  2. Fundamental Heterogeneous Reaction Chemistry Related to Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimoto, H.

    2016-11-01

    Typical reaction pathways of formation of dicarboxylic acids, larger multifunctional compounds, oligomers, and organosulfur and organonitrogen compounds in secondary organic aerosols (SOA), revealed by laboratory experimental studies are reviewed with a short introduction to field observations. In most of the reactions forming these compounds, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal and related difunctional carbonyl compounds play an important role as precursors, and so their formation pathways in the gas phase are discussed first. A substantial discussion is then presented for the OH-initiated aqueous phase radical oxidation reactions of glyoxal and other carbonyls which form dicarboxylic acids, larger multifunctional compounds and oligomers, and aqueous-phase non-radical reactions which form oligomers, organosulfates and organonitrogen compounds. Finally, the heterogeneous oxidation reaction of gaseous O3, OH and NO3 with liquid and solid organic aerosols at the air-particle interface is discussed relating to the aging of SOA in the atmosphere.

  3. Optimizing electrical power consumption in SOA based optical packet switching nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaotang; Hu, Weisheng; Sun, Weiqiang; He, Hao

    2011-12-01

    Since the underlying demand for network capacity can be satisfied only by extremely increasing transmission bit rate, processing speed, and switching capacity, it definitely will lead to increased power consumption of network nodes. Energy crisis is global crisis nowadays and it has brought up many problems. Power consumption is becoming a crucial issue in designing high-performance network devices. This paper studies the power consumption model of a kind of Optical Packet Switching (OPS) node based on Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers (SOA). Our results show that by dynamically adjusting the bias current of SOAs, the power consumption on an OPS node can be reduced considerably, especially when the traffic distribution across multiple ports is not balanced and inter-nodal distances vary. The total electrical power consumption can be cut off significantly. We also show the power consumption can be further reduced by jointly optimizing the thermoelectric cooler current.

  4. On the Risk Management and Auditing of SOA Based Business Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orriens, Bart; Heuvel, Willem-Jan V./D.; Papazoglou, Mike

    SOA-enabled business processes stretch across many cooperating and coordinated systems, possibly crossing organizational boundaries, and technologies like XML and Web services are used for making system-to-system interactions commonplace. Business processes form the foundation for all organizations, and as such, are impacted by industry regulations. This requires organizations to review their business processes and ensure that they meet the compliance standards set forth in legislation. In this paper we sketch a SOA-based service risk management and auditing methodology including a compliance enforcement and verification system that assures verifiable business process compliance. This is done on the basis of a knowledge-based system that allows integration of internal control systems into business processes conform pre-defined compliance rules, monitor both the normal process behavior and those of the control systems during process execution, and log these behaviors to facilitate retrospective auditing.

  5. A theoretical model for sampled grating DBR laser integrated with SOA and MZ modulator.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Zhao, Shengzhi; Jiang, Shan; Liu, Shuihua

    2009-09-14

    A theoretical model is presented for simulating the sampled grating distributed Bragg reflector (SGDBR) laser integrated with semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and Mach-Zehnder (MZ) modulator. In this model, the active and passive sections are processed separately. The active region of laser and the SOA section are modeled by time domain traveling wave (TDTW) method. While the spectral properties of the SG and the MZ modulator are firstly calculated by Transfer-Matrix Method (TMM) and Beam Propagation Method (BPM), respectively, and then transformed into time domain using digital filter approach. Furthermore, the nonuniform carrier-dependence of gain and refractive index are also incorporated via Effective Bloch Equations (EBE). Compared with the full time-domain method, our model would be more flexible and efficient. The static and modulation performances of device are successfully simulated. This indicates that it can be a powerful platform for investigating the complex Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs).

  6. Single SOA based simultaneous amplitude regeneration for WDM-PDM RZ-PSK signals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenhan; Yu, Yu; Zou, Bingrong; Yang, Weili; Zhang, Xinliang

    2013-03-25

    We propose and demonstrate all-optical amplitude regeneration for the wavelength division multiplexing and polarization division multiplexing (WDM-PDM) return-to-zero phase shift keying (RZ-PSK) signals using a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and subsequent filtering. The regeneration is based on the cross phase modulation (XPM) effect in the saturated SOA and the subsequent narrow filtering. The spectrum of the distorted signal can be broadened due to the phase modulation induced by the synchronous optical clock signal. A narrow band pass filter is utilized to extract part of the broadened spectrum and remove the amplitude noise, while preserving the phase information. The working principle for multi-channel and polarization orthogonality preserving is analyzed. 4-channel dual polarization signals can be simultaneously amplitude regenerated without introducing wavelength and polarization demultiplexing. An average power penalty improvement of 1.75dB can be achieved for the WDM-PDM signals.

  7. Fast gain recovery rates with strong wavelength dependence in a non-linear SOA.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Ciaran S; Power, Mark J; Schneider, Simon; Webb, Roderick P; Manning, Robert J

    2010-12-06

    We report remarkably fast and strongly wavelength-dependent gain recovery in a single SOA without the aid of an offset filter. Full gain recovery times as short as 9 ps were observed in pump-probe measurements when pumping to the blue wavelength side of a continuous wave probe, in contrast to times of 25 to 30 ps when pumping to the red wavelength side. Experimental and numerical analysis indicate that the long effective length and high gain led to deep saturation of the second half of the SOA by the probe. The consequent absorption of blue-shifted pump pulses in this region resulted in device dynamics analogous to those of the Turbo-Switch.

  8. All-optical NRZ wavelength conversion based on a single hybrid III-V/Si SOA and optical filtering.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingchen; Huang, Qiangsheng; Keyvaninia, Shahram; Katumba, Andrew; Zhang, Jing; Xie, Weiqiang; Morthier, Geert; He, Jian-Jun; Roelkens, Gunther

    2016-09-05

    We demonstrate all-optical wavelength conversion (AOWC) of non-return-to-zero (NRZ) signal based on cross-gain modulation in a single heterogeneously integrated III-V-on-silicon semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with an optical bandpass filter. The SOA is 500 μm long and consumes less than 250 mW electrical power. We experimentally demonstrate 12.5 Gb/s and 40 Gb/s AOWC for both wavelength up and down conversion.

  9. Time delay generation at high frequency using SOA based slow and fast light.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel; Alouini, Mehdi

    2011-10-24

    We show how Up-converted Coherent Population Oscillations (UpCPO) enable to get rid of the intrinsic limitation of the carrier lifetime, leading to the generation of time delays at any high frequencies in a single SOA device. The linear dependence of the RF phase shift with respect to the RF frequency is theoretically predicted and experimentally evidenced at 16 and 35 GHz.

  10. Ultra-broad band, low power, highly efficient coherent wavelength conversion in quantum dot SOA.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, G; Yoshida, Y; Maruta, A; Kitayama, K

    2012-12-03

    We report broadband, all-optical wavelength conversion over 100 nm span, in full S- and C-band, with positive conversion efficiency with low optical input power exploiting dual pump Four-Wave-Mixing in a Quantum Dot Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (QD-SOA). We also demonstrate by Error Vector Magnitude analysis the full transparency of the conversion scheme for coherent modulation formats (QPSK, 8-PSK, 16-QAM, OFDM-16QAM) in the whole C-band.

  11. Determination of additivity of apparent and standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids in diets containing multiple protein sources fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Xue, P C; Ragland, D; Adeola, O

    2014-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in growing pigs to investigate the additivity of apparent ileal digestibility (AID) or standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of CP and AA in mixed diets containing multiple protein sources. Using the determined AID or SID for CP and AA in corn, soybean meal (SBM), corn distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS), or canola meal (CM), the AID or SID for 4 mixed diets based on corn-SBM, corn-SBM-DDGS, corn-SBM-CM, or corn-SBM-DDGS-CM were predicted and compared with determined AID or SID, respectively. Eighteen growing pigs (initial BW = 61.3 ± 5.5 kg) were surgically fitted with T-cannulas and assigned to a duplicated 9 × 4 incomplete Latin square design with 9 diets and 4 periods. The 9 experimental diets consisted of a nitrogen-free diet (NFD) to estimate basal ileal endogenous loss (BEL) of AA, 4 semipurified diets to determine the AID and SID of CP and AA in the 4 ingredients, and 4 mixed diets to test the additivity of AID and SID. Chromic oxide was added as an indigestible marker. Pigs were fed 1 of the 9 diets during each 7-d period, and ileal digesta were collected on d 6 and 7, from 0800 to 1800 h. The analyzed AA levels for the mixed diets were close to the calculated values based on the AA composition of each ingredient. The results revealed that the predicted SID were consistent with determined values, except for Leu, Thr, Asp, Cys, Pro, and Ser in the corn-SBM diet and Met and Cys in the corn-SBM-DDGS diet. The determined AID for total AA and Arg, His, Trp, Gly, and Pro in the corn-SBM diet were greater (P < 0.05) than predicted. For the corn-SBM-DDGS diet, the determined AID were greater (P < 0.05) than predicted AID for CP, total AA, and all AA except for Arg, Leu, and Pro. In the corn-SBM-CM diet, the determined AID were greater (P < 0.05) than predicted AID for Arg, Cys, and Gly. When compared with determined values, predicted AID in the corn-SBM-DDGS-CM diet were lower (P < 0.05) for total AA and Arg, Met, Cys, and

  12. Increasing fermentation efficiency at high sugar concentrations by supplementing an additional source of nitrogen during the exponential phase of the tequila fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Arrizon, Javier; Gschaedler, Anne

    2002-11-01

    In the tequila industry, fermentation is traditionally achieved at sugar concentrations ranging from 50 to 100 g x L(-1). In this work, the behaviour of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast (isolated from the juices of the Agave tequilana Weber blue variety) during the agave juice fermentation is compared at different sugar concentrations to determine if it is feasible for the industry to run fermentation at higher sugar concentrations. Fermentation efficiency is shown to be higher (above 90%) at a high concentration of initial sugar (170 g x L(-1)) when an additional source of nitrogen (a mixture of amino acids and ammonium sulphate, different than a grape must nitrogen composition) is added during the exponential growth phase.

  13. Secondary organic aerosol formation from fossil fuel sources contribute majority of summertime organic mass at Bakersfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shang; Ahlm, Lars; Day, Douglas A.; Russell, Lynn M.; Zhao, Yunliang; Gentner, Drew R.; Weber, Robin J.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Jaoui, Mohammed; Offenberg, John H.; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.; Rubitschun, Caitlin; Surratt, Jason D.; Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Scheller, Scott

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), known to form in the atmosphere from oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by anthropogenic and biogenic sources, are a poorly understood but substantial component of atmospheric particles. In this study, we examined the chemical and physical properties of SOA at Bakersfield, California, a site influenced by anthropogenic and terrestrial biogenic emissions. Factor analysis was applied to the infrared and mass spectra of fine particles to identify sources and atmospheric processing that contributed to the organic mass (OM). We found that OM accounted for 56% of submicron particle mass, with SOA components contributing 80% to 90% of OM from 15 May to 29 June 2010. SOA formed from alkane and aromatic compounds, the two major classes of vehicle-emitted hydrocarbons, accounted for 65% OM (72% SOA). The alkane and aromatic SOA components were associated with 200 nm to 500 nm accumulation mode particles, likely from condensation of daytime photochemical products of VOCs. In contrast, biogenic SOA likely formed from condensation of secondary organic vapors, produced from NO3radical oxidation reactions during nighttime hours, on 400 nm to 700 nm sized primary particles, and accounted for less than 10% OM. Local petroleum operation emissions contributed 13% to the OM, and the moderate O/C (0.2) of this factor suggested it was largely of secondary origin. Approximately 10% of organic aerosols in submicron particles were identified as either vegetative detritus (10%) or cooking activities (7%), from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic and aerosol mass spectrometry measurements, respectively. While the mass spectra of several linearly independent SOA components were nearly identical and external source markers were needed to separate them, each component had distinct infrared spectrum, likely associated with the source-specific VOCs from which they formed.

  14. Oligomer and SOA formation through aqueous phase photooxidation of methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Siekmann, Frank; Renard, Pascal; El Zein, Atallah; Salque, Guillaume; El Haddad, Imad; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Voisin, Didier; Thissen, Roland; Monod, Anne

    2012-03-01

    This work investigates the ability of methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) (the two main gas phase atmospheric oxidation products of isoprene) to form oligomers and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) upon aqueous phase OH-oxidation and subsequent water evaporation. For the two precursors, electrospray mass spectrometry (in infusion and coupled to liquid chromatography) analysis of the reacting solutions brought clear evidence for the formation of oligomer systems having a mass range of up to 1400 Da. More than 11 series of oligomers were found. For MVK, the intensity and masses of oligomers became increasingly important as MVK initial concentrations increased from 0.2 to 20 mM. For both precursors, the oligomers were responsible for the SOA formation during nebulization experiments. The evaluated SOA mass yield ranged from 3.9 to 9.9% for MVK. These yields were time dependent and were in good agreement with the range (1.6-11.7%) obtained for MACR under the same conditions by El Haddad et al. (2009).

  15. A collaborative computer auditing system under SOA-based conceptual model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Qiushi; Huang, Zuoming; Hu, Jibing

    2013-03-01

    Some of the current challenges of computer auditing are the obstacles to retrieving, converting and translating data from different database schema. During the last few years, there are many data exchange standards under continuous development such as Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL). These XML document standards can be used for data exchange among companies, financial institutions, and audit firms. However, for many companies, it is still expensive and time-consuming to translate and provide XML messages with commercial application packages, because it is complicated and laborious to search and transform data from thousands of tables in the ERP databases. How to transfer transaction documents for supporting continuous auditing or real time auditing between audit firms and their client companies is a important topic. In this paper, a collaborative computer auditing system under SOA-based conceptual model is proposed. By utilizing the widely used XML document standards and existing data transformation applications developed by different companies and software venders, we can wrap these application as commercial web services that will be easy implemented under the forthcoming application environments: service-oriented architecture (SOA). Under the SOA environments, the multiagency mechanism will help the maturity and popularity of data assurance service over the Internet. By the wrapping of data transformation components with heterogeneous databases or platforms, it will create new component markets composed by many software vendors and assurance service companies to provide data assurance services for audit firms, regulators or third parties.

  16. Organosulfates as Tracers for Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Formation from 2-Methyl-3-Buten-2-ol (MBO) in the Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    2-Methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) is an important biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emitted by pine trees and a potential precursor of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in forested regions. In the present study, hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of MBO was examined in smog chambers under varied initial nitric oxide (NO) and aerosol acidity levels. Results indicate measurable SOA from MBO under low-NO conditions. Moreover, increasing aerosol acidity was found to enhance MBO SOA. Chemical characterization of laboratory-generated MBO SOA reveals that an organosulfate species (C5H12O6S, MW 200) formed and was substantially enhanced with elevated aerosol acidity. Ambient fine aerosol (PM2.5) samples collected from the BEARPEX campaign during 2007 and 2009, as well as from the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign during 2011, were also analyzed. The MBO-derived organosulfate characterized from laboratory-generated aerosol was observed in PM2.5 collected from these campaigns, demonstrating that it is a molecular tracer for MBO-initiated SOA in the atmosphere. Furthermore, mass concentrations of the MBO-derived organosulfate are well correlated with MBO mixing ratio, temperature, and acidity in the field campaigns. Importantly, this compound accounted for an average of 0.25% and as high as 1% of the total organic aerosol mass during BEARPEX 2009. An epoxide intermediate generated under low-NO conditions is tentatively proposed to produce MBO SOA. PMID:22849588

  17. Self-stabilizing optical clock pulse-train generator using SOA and saturable absorber for asynchronous optical packet processing.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Tatsushi; Takahashi, Ryo

    2013-05-06

    We propose a novel, self-stabilizing optical clock pulse-train generator for processing preamble-free, asynchronous optical packets with variable lengths. The generator is based on an optical loop that includes a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and a high-extinction spin-polarized saturable absorber (SA), with the loop being self-stabilized by balancing out the gain and absorption provided by the SOA and SA, respectively. The optical pulse train is generated by tapping out a small portion of a circulating seed pulse. The convergence of the generated pulse energy is enabled by the loop round-trip gain function that has a negative slope due to gain saturation in the SOA. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of the SOA is effectively suppressed by the SA, and a backward optical pulse launched into the SOA enables overcoming the carrier-recovery speed mismatch between the SOA and SA. Without external control for the loop gain, a stable optical pulse train consisting of more than 50 pulses with low jitter is generated from a single 10-ps seed optical pulse even with a variation of 10 dB in the seed pulse intensity.

  18. Organosulfates as tracers for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haofei; Worton, David R; Lewandowski, Michael; Ortega, John; Rubitschun, Caitlin L; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Kristensen, Kasper; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A; Jimenez, Jose L; Jaoui, Mohammed; Offenberg, John H; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E; Gilman, Jessica; Kuster, William C; de Gouw, Joost; Park, Changhyoun; Schade, Gunnar W; Frossard, Amanda A; Russell, Lynn; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Hansel, Armin; Cappellin, Luca; Karl, Thomas; Glasius, Marianne; Guenther, Alex; Goldstein, Allen H; Seinfeld, John H; Gold, Avram; Kamens, Richard M; Surratt, Jason D

    2012-09-04

    2-Methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) is an important biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emitted by pine trees and a potential precursor of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in forested regions. In the present study, hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of MBO was examined in smog chambers under varied initial nitric oxide (NO) and aerosol acidity levels. Results indicate measurable SOA from MBO under low-NO conditions. Moreover, increasing aerosol acidity was found to enhance MBO SOA. Chemical characterization of laboratory-generated MBO SOA reveals that an organosulfate species (C(5)H(12)O(6)S, MW 200) formed and was substantially enhanced with elevated aerosol acidity. Ambient fine aerosol (PM(2.5)) samples collected from the BEARPEX campaign during 2007 and 2009, as well as from the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign during 2011, were also analyzed. The MBO-derived organosulfate characterized from laboratory-generated aerosol was observed in PM(2.5) collected from these campaigns, demonstrating that it is a molecular tracer for MBO-initiated SOA in the atmosphere. Furthermore, mass concentrations of the MBO-derived organosulfate are well correlated with MBO mixing ratio, temperature, and acidity in the field campaigns. Importantly, this compound accounted for an average of 0.25% and as high as 1% of the total organic aerosol mass during BEARPEX 2009. An epoxide intermediate generated under low-NO conditions is tentatively proposed to produce MBO SOA.

  19. Early stage composition of SOA produced by α-pinene/ozone reaction: α-Acyloxyhydroperoxy aldehydes and acidic dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, Bartłomiej; Gierczak, Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    Composition of the freshly formed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated by ozonolysis of cyclohexene, cyclohexene-d10 (model precursors) and α-pinene was studied using liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI/MS2). SOA was generated in the flow-tube reactor under the following conditions: 22 ± 2 °C, 1 atm and reaction time was approx. 30 s. In an attempt to resolve the current ambiguities, regarding the structure of α-pinene SOA nucleating agents, analytical methods for analysis of α-acyloxyhydroperoxy aldehydes and oligomers containing carboxylic group were developed to study the potential nucleating agents. Negatively charged m/z 351, 341, 337, 357 and 367 ions corresponding to the acidic oligomers were detected in freshly formed α-pinene SOA. For the first time, structures and formation mechanism for compounds detected as m/z 337 and 351 ions were proposed. Based on the model precursor analysis (cyclohexene and cyclohexene-d10) it was concluded that these compounds were most likely formed via aldol reaction of the lower molecular weight aerosol components. α-Acyloxyhydroperoxy aldehydes were studied in the SOA samples using previously developed, novel method, based on the prediction of fragmentation spectrum for the compounds of interest. It was concluded that α-acyloxyhydroperoxy aldehydes were not formed in significant quantities. Based on the obtained results, possible SOA formation and growth mechanism is discussed.

  20. [Numerical modeling analysis of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) combined with the ground-based measurements in the Pearl River Delta region].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Shuang; Situ, Shu-Ping; Wang, Xue-Mei; Ding, Xiang; Wang, Xin-Ming; Yan, Cai-Qing; Li, Xiao-Ying; Zheng, Mei

    2014-05-01

    Two simulations were conducted with different secondary organic aerosol (SOA) methods-VBS (volatile basis set) approach and SORGAM (secondary organic aerosol model) , which have been coupled in the WRF/Chem (weather research and forecasting model with chemistry) model. Ground-based observation data from 18th to 25th November 2008 were used to examine the model performance of SOA in the Pearl River Delta(PRD)region. The results showed that VBS approach could better reproduce the temporal variation and magnitude of SOA compared with SORGAM, and the mean absolute deviation and correlation coefficient between the observed and the simulated data using VBS approach were -4.88 microg m-3 and 0.91, respectively, while they were -5.32 microg.m-3 and 0. 18 with SORGAM. This is mainly because the VBS approach considers SOA precursors with a wider volatility range and the process of chemical aging in SOA formation. Spatiotemporal distribution of SOA in the PRD from the VBS simulation was also analyzed. The results indicated that the SOA has a significant diurnal variation, and the maximal SOA concentration occurred at noon and in the early afternoon. Because of the transport and the considerable spatial distribution of O3 , the SOA concentrations were different in different PRD cities, and the highest concentration of SOA was observed in the downwind area, including Zhongshan, Zhuhai and Jiangmen.

  1. Sources of secondary organic aerosols in the Pearl River Delta region in fall: Contributions from the aqueous reactive uptake of dicarbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Fu, Tzung-May; Cao, Junji; Lee, Shuncheng; Huang, Xiao-Feng; He, Ling-Yan; Ho, Kin-Fai; Fu, Joshua S.; Lam, Yun-Fat

    2013-09-01

    We used the regional air quality model CMAQ to simulate organic aerosol (OA) concentrations over the Pearl River Delta region (PRD) and compared model results to measurements. Our goals were (1) to evaluate the potential contribution of the aqueous reactive uptake of dicarbonyls (glyoxal and methylglyoxal) as a source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in an urban environment, and (2) to quantify the sources of SOA in the PRD in fall. We improved the representation of dicarbonyl gas phase chemistry in CMAQ, as well as added SOA formation via the irreversible uptake of dicarbonyls by aqueous aerosols and cloud droplets, characterized by a reactive uptake coefficient γ = 2.9 × 10-3 based on laboratory studies. Our model results were compared to aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements in Shenzhen during a photochemical smog event in fall 2009. Including the new dicarbonyl SOA source in CMAQ led to an increase in the simulated mean SOA concentration at the sampling site from 4.1 μg m-3 to 9.0 μg m-3 during the smog event, in better agreement with the mean observed oxygenated OA (OOA) concentration (8.0 μg m-3). The simulated SOA reproduced the variability of observed OOA (r = 0.89). Moreover, simulated dicarbonyl SOA was highly correlated with simulated sulfate (r = 0.72), consistent with the observed high correlation between OOA and sulfate (r = 0.84). Including the dicarbonyl SOA source also increased the mean simulated concentrations of total OA from 8.2 μg m-3 to 13.1 μg m-3, closer to the mean observed OA concentration (16.5 μg m-3). The remaining difference between the observed and simulated OA was largely due to impacts from episodic biomass burning emissions, but the model did not capture this variability. We concluded that, for the PRD in fall and outside of major biomass burning events, 75% of the total SOA was biogenic. Isoprene was the most important precursor, accounting for 41% of the total SOA. Aromatics accounted for 13% of the total SOA

  2. Optimization of anaerobically digested distillery molasses spent wash decolorization using soil as inoculum in the absence of additional carbon and nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Adikane, H V; Dange, M N; Selvakumari, K

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve maximum decolorization of molasses spent wash (MSW) in absence of any additional carbon or nitrogen source using soil as inoculum. Soil samples were collected from the MSW disposal site. Colored soil samples exhibited higher pH, sugar and protein as compare to less colored samples. A decolorization of 69% was obtained using 10% (w/v) soil and 12.5% (v/v) MSW after 7 days incubation. Optimized parameters including days--6 days, pH--6, MSW--12.5% and soil concentration--40%, were obtained for maximum decolorization. A decolorization of 81% was achieved using 10% soil and 12.5% MSW after 18 days incubation in absence of any media supplement. Nearly 12% reduction in decolorization activity of the soil sample was observed over a period of 12 months when stored at 6 degrees C. It could be concluded that the decolorization of MSW might be achieved using soil as inoculum without addition of chemical amendments.

  3. All-optical SOA-based wavelength converter assisted by optical filters with wide operation wavelength and large dynamic input power range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wang, J.; Marculescu, A.; Vorreau, P.; Zhang, Z.; Freude, W.; Leuthold, J.

    2008-11-01

    All-optical wavelength converters (AOWCs) based on nonlinear processes of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) have attracted interest to overcome the wavelength blocking issues in future transparent networks. While many schemes work well, pattern effect impairments that are due to the finite lifetime of charge carriers are an issue most of the time. Recently, wavelength conversion and pattern effect mitigation techniques that work by properly shaping the passband of filters following the converter have been introduced. However, due to the necessity of selecting filter slope and position precisely, one would expect that the schemes are extremely sensitive to any drift of the center wavelength. In this work, we demonstrate a 40 Gbit/s SOA-based wavelength converter with more than 15 dB dynamic input power range. In addition, the center wavelength of the converted signal has a tolerance of ~0.2 nm towards the red spectral region and of ~0.1nm towards blue spectral region, respectively. This success is due to combining advantageously pattern effect mitigation techniques connected to the pulse reformatting optical filter, the red-shift and the blue-shift optical filter.

  4. Development of new parameterizations for SOA production from SVOC and IVOC oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaire, Vincent; Coll, Isabelle; Camredon, Marie; Aumont, Bernard; Siour, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the partially volatile pattern of primary organic aerosol (POA) that is actually associated with organic species of so-called intermediate volatility (IVOCs), and by semi-volatile (SVOCs) species. Indeed, 50% to 75% of the total emitted mass of POA may be present in the atmospheric gas phase in accordance with the thermodynamic properties of its components (Shrivastava et al., 2006). During the processing of the emission plume, this gaseous material will then undergo photochemical oxidation, enhancing the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (Robinson et al., 2007; Hodzic et al., 2010; Lee-Taylor et al., 2011). Considering POA as non volatile in Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) could thus lead to an underestimation of SOA and an overestimation of POA (Aksoyoglu et al., 2011) and bias the temporal formation of the organic aerosol (Kroll et al., 2007; Presto et al., 2012). However, very rare experimental data exist on the fate of these species and their aerosol yield, but all existing studies have shown a significant SOA production (Presto et al., 2009; Miracolo et al., 2010; Lambe et al., 2012). Our works aims at including and testing in the CHIMERE CTM new parameterizations of SOA formation from the oxidation of IVOCs and SVOCs, arising from explicit 0D-model experiments. Our approach is based on the works of Aumont et al., (2013) who used the GECKO-A tool (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) to generate the explicit chemistry and gas-particle partitioning of superior alkanes and their oxidation products. Using this explicit scheme, Aumont et al., (2013) indeed produced 0D simulations of the oxidation of given SVOCs and IVOCs under different initial conditions of organic aerosol mass. We first focused on the chemistry of n-hexadecane. From the 0D-experiments, we tested the influence of the number of first generation surrogate species and the number of generation taken

  5. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical and Hygroscopic Properties at the Look Rock Site during SOAS 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.; Corrigan, A. L.; Guzman, J. M.; Russell, L. M.; Budisulistiorini, S.; Li, X.; Surratt, J. D.; Hicks, W.; Bairai, S. T.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    One of the main goals of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) is to characterize the climate-relevant properties of aerosols over the southeastern United States at the interface of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions. As part of the SOAS campaign, the UCD cavity ringdown/photoacoustic spectrometer was deployed to make in-situ measurements of aerosol light extinction, absorption and sub-saturated hygroscopicity at the Look Rock site (LRK) in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The site is influenced by substantial biogenic emissions with varying impacts from anthropogenic pollutants, allowing for direct examination of the optical and hygroscopic properties of anthropogenic-influenced biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA). During the experiment period, the average dry aerosol extinction (Bext), absorption (Babs) coefficients and single scattering albedo (SSA) at 532 nm were 30.3 × 16.5 Mm-1, 1.12 × 0.78 Mm-1 and 0.96 × 0.06. The Babs at 532 nm was well correlated (r2 = 0.79) with the refractory black carbon (rBC) number concentration determined by a single particle soot spectrometer (SP2). The absorption by black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC) and the absorption enhancement due to the 'lensing' effect were quantified by comparing the Babs of ambient and thermo-denuded aerosols at 405 nm and 532 nm. The optical sub-saturated hygroscopic growth factor was derived from extinction and particle size distribution measurements at dry and elevated relative humidity. In addition, to explore the extent to which ammonia mediated chemistry leads to BrC formation, as suggested in recent laboratory studies(1,2), we performed an NH3 perturbation experiment in-situ for 1 week during the study, in which ambient aerosols were exposed to approximately 100 ppb NH3 with a residence time of ~ 3hr. The broader implications of these observational data at LRK will be discussed in the context of the concurrent gas and aerosol chemical

  6. Dual-source dual-energy CT with additional tin filtration: Dose and image quality evaluation in phantoms and in-vivo

    PubMed Central

    Primak, Andrew N.; Giraldo, Juan Carlos Ramirez; Eusemann, Christian D.; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kantor, B.; Fletcher, Joel G.; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect on radiation dose and image quality of the use of additional spectral filtration for dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging using dual-source CT (DSCT). Materials and Methods A commercial DSCT scanner was modified by adding tin filtration to the high-kV tube, and radiation output and noise measured in water phantoms. Dose values for equivalent image noise were compared among DE-modes with and without tin filtration and single-energy (SE) mode. To evaluate DECT material discrimination, the material-specific DEratio for calcium and iodine were determined using images of anthropomorphic phantoms. Data were additionally acquired in 38 and 87 kg pigs, and noise for the linearly mixed and virtual non-contrast (VNC) images compared between DE-modes. Finally, abdominal DECT images from two patients of similar sizes undergoing clinically-indicated CT were compared. Results Adding tin filtration to the high-kV tube improved the DE contrast between iodine and calcium as much as 290%. Pig data showed that the tin filtration had no effect on noise in the DECT mixed images, but decreased noise by as much as 30% in the VNC images. Patient VNC-images acquired using 100/140 kV with added tin filtration had improved image quality compared to those generated with 80/140 kV without tin filtration. Conclusion Tin filtration of the high-kV tube of a DSCT scanner increases the ability of DECT to discriminate between calcium and iodine, without increasing dose relative to SECT. Furthermore, use of 100/140 kV tube potentials allows improved DECT imaging of large patients. PMID:20966323

  7. TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWDER PLANT-DERIVED PM 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Rohr

    2006-08-31

    This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of March 1, 2006 through August 31, 2006. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the performance and analysis of field experiments at the first TERESA plant, located in the Upper Midwest and henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. During this reporting period, data processing and analyses were completed for exposure and toxicological data collected during the field campaign at Plant 1, located in the Southeast. Toxicological results indicate some pulmonary, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular responses to certain exposure scenarios. Fieldwork at Plant 2, located in the Midwest, began on July 19, 2006. The following scenarios were completed: July 19-22: POS (oxidized + SOA); July 25-28: PONS (oxidized + neutralized + SOA); August 8-13: P (primary); August 14-15: POS; August 16-17: POS (MI rats); August 28-31: OS (oxidized + SOA, without primary particles); September 1-4: O (oxidized, no primary particles); and September 6-9: S (SOA, no primary particles). During the next reporting period, we will report complete exposure and toxicological results for Plant 2. Planning will begin for the mobile source component of the research (funded

  8. Toxicological Evaluation of Realistic Emissions of Source Aerosols (TERESA): Application to Power Plant-Derived PM2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Rohr

    2007-02-28

    This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of September 1, 2007 through February 28, 2007. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the performance and analysis of field experiments at the first TERESA plant, located in the Upper Midwest and henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. During this reporting period, fieldwork was completed at Plant 2, located in the Midwest. The following scenarios were completed: (1) July 19-22: POS (oxidized + SOA); (2) July 25-28: PONS (oxidized + neutralized + SOA); (3) August 8-13: P (primary); (4) August 14-15: POS; (5) August 16-17: POS (MI rats); (6) August 28-31: OS (oxidized + SOA, without primary particles); (7) September 1-4: O (oxidized, no primary particles); (8) September 6-9: S (SOA, no primary particles); and (9) September 19-22: PO (oxidized). Results indicated some biological effects with some scenarios. Also during this reporting period, the annual meeting of the TERESA Technical Advisory Committee was held at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. During the next reporting period, data analyses will continue for Plant 2 as well as for pooled data from all three plants. Manuscripts documenting the overall project findings will

  9. Connecting Organic Aerosol Climate-Relevant Properties to Chemical Mechanisms of Sources and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Joel

    2015-01-26

    The research conducted on this project aimed to improve our understanding of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere, and how the properties of the SOA impact climate through its size, phase state, and optical properties. The goal of this project was to demonstrate that the use of molecular composition information to mechanistically connect source apportionment and climate properties can improve the physical basis for simulation of SOA formation and properties in climate models. The research involved developing and improving methods to provide online measurements of the molecular composition of SOA under atmospherically relevant conditions and to apply this technology to controlled simulation chamber experiments and field measurements. The science we have completed with the methodology will impact the simulation of aerosol particles in climate models.

  10. Applying SOA Concepts to Distributed Industrial Applications Using WCF Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopper, Markus; Gastermann, Bernd

    2010-10-01

    Software Development is subject to a constant process of change. In the meantime web services, access to remote services or distributed applications are already the standard. Simultaneously with their advancement demands on these techniques are rising significantly. Defined support for security issues, coordination of transactions and reliable communications are expected. Windows Communication Foundation (WCF)—as a part of Microsoft Corporation's .NET Framework—supports these requirements in line with wide range interoperability. WCF provides the development of distributed and interconnected software applications by means of a service-oriented programming model. This paper introduces a service-oriented communication concept based on WCF, which is specifically designed for industrial applications within a production environment using a central manufacturing information system (MIS) database. It introduces applied technologies and provides an overview of some important design aspects and base service sets of WCF. Additionally, this paper also shows a factual implementation of the presented service-oriented communication concept in the form of an industrial software application used in plastics industry.

  11. [Underreporting of tuberculosis in the Information System on Notifiable Diseases (SINAN): primary default and case detection from additional data sources using probabilistic record linkage].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Andrade, Vanusa de Lemos; Oliveira, Gisele Pinto de

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze underreporting of tuberculosis (TB) cases in the Information System on Notifiable Diseases (SINAN), based on the following data sources: Mortality Information System (SIM), Registry and Follow-up Book for TB Case Treatment (LPATB), and Laboratory Registry Book (LRLAB). Probabilistic record linkage was used between the SIM (2007-2008) and SINAN (2002-2008). A search was conducted in LPATB and LRLAB (2007-2008) for cases not recorded in SINAN. There were 125 deaths, of which 44.8% were not recorded in SINAN. In LPATB, 58 cases (5.1%) were in treatment and were not reported in SINAN. LRLAB showed 32 smear-positive cases not reported to SINAN and without treatment, representing primary default. Addition of the retrieved cases, led to a 14.6% increase in the incidence rate in 2007 and 11.6% in 2008. Underreporting of deaths from or with TB in the Mortality Information System and primary default revealed difficulties in access to adequate and timely treatment, calling for rethinking of strategies to detect cases for timely treatment.

  12. Effect of high-pressure/temperature (HP/T) treatments of in-package food on additive migration from conventional and bio-sourced materials.

    PubMed

    Mauricio-Iglesias, M; Jansana, S; Peyron, S; Gontard, N; Guillard, V

    2010-01-01

    Migration was assessed during and after two high-pressure/temperature (HP/T) treatments intended for a pasteurization (800 MPa for 5 min, from 20 to 40 degrees C) and a sterilization treatment (800 MPa for 5 min, from 90 to 115 degrees C) and were compared with conventional pasteurization and sterilization, respectively. The specific migration of actual packaging additives used as antioxidants and ultraviolet light absorbers (Irganox 1076, Uvitex OB) was investigated in a number of food-packaging systems combining one synthetic common packaging (LLDPE) and a bio-sourced one (PLA) in contact with the four food-simulating liquids defined by European Commission regulations. After standard HP/T processing, migration kinetics was followed during the service life of the packaging material using Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) spectroscopy. LLDPE withstood the high-pressure sterilization, whereas it melted during the conventional sterilization. No difference was observed on migration from LLDPE for both treatments. In the case of PLA, migration of Uvitex OB was very low or not detectable for all the cases studied.

  13. Source contributions to organic aerosol in the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Timothy Edward

    Organic aerosols (OA) and elemental carbon (EC) are important components of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), potentially posing health hazards and contributing to global climate change. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is formed when condensable products from the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the gas phase partition into the aerosol phase. Implementation of effective control strategies for organic PM2.5 (organic particles with diameters less than 2.5 mum) requires the quantification of the contribution of each source to the ambient OA and EC concentrations. The overall goal of this work is to determine which sources contribute the most to the organic aerosol concentrations across the eastern US. First, a source-resolved model is developed to predict the contribution of eight different sources to primary organic aerosol concentrations. Primary organic aerosol (OA) and elemental carbon (EC) concentrations are tracked for eight different sources: gasoline vehicles, non-road diesel vehicles, on-road diesel vehicles, biomass burning, wood burning, natural gas combustion, road dust, and all other sources. The results of the source-resolved model are compared to the results of chemical mass balance (CMB) models for Pittsburgh and multiple urban/rural sites from the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network. Significant discrepancies exist between the source-resolved model and the CMB model predictions for several of the sources. There is strong evidence that the organic PM emissions from natural gas combustion are overestimated. Other similarities and discrepancies between the source-resolved model and the CMB model for primary OA and EC are discussed along with problems in the current emission inventory for certain sources. Next, the importance of isoprene as a source of SOA is determined using PMCAMx to predict the isoprene SOA concentration across the eastern US. Isoprene, the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon

  14. Estimating PM2.5 Concentrations in Xi'an City Using a Generalized Additive Model with Multi-Source Monitoring Data

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yong-Ze; Yang, Hong-Lei; Peng, Jun-Huan; Song, Yi-Rong; Sun, Qian; Li, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) represents a severe environmental problem and is of negative impact on human health. Xi'an City, with a population of 6.5 million, is among the highest concentrations of PM2.5 in China. In 2013, in total, there were 191 days in Xi’an City on which PM2.5 concentrations were greater than 100 μg/m3. Recently, a few studies have explored the potential causes of high PM2.5 concentration using remote sensing data such as the MODIS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) product. Linear regression is a commonly used method to find statistical relationships among PM2.5 concentrations and other pollutants, including CO, NO2, SO2, and O3, which can be indicative of emission sources. The relationships of these variables, however, are usually complicated and non-linear. Therefore, a generalized additive model (GAM) is used to estimate the statistical relationships between potential variables and PM2.5 concentrations. This model contains linear functions of SO2 and CO, univariate smoothing non-linear functions of NO2, O3, AOT and temperature, and bivariate smoothing non-linear functions of location and wind variables. The model can explain 69.50% of PM2.5 concentrations, with R2 = 0.691, which improves the result of a stepwise linear regression (R2 = 0.582) by 18.73%. The two most significant variables, CO concentration and AOT, represent 20.65% and 19.54% of the deviance, respectively, while the three other gas-phase concentrations, SO2, NO2, and O3 account for 10.88% of the total deviance. These results show that in Xi'an City, the traffic and other industrial emissions are the primary source of PM2.5. Temperature, location, and wind variables also non-linearly related with PM2.5. PMID:26540446

  15. Estimating PM2.5 Concentrations in Xi'an City Using a Generalized Additive Model with Multi-Source Monitoring Data.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Ze; Yang, Hong-Lei; Peng, Jun-Huan; Song, Yi-Rong; Sun, Qian; Li, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) represents a severe environmental problem and is of negative impact on human health. Xi'an City, with a population of 6.5 million, is among the highest concentrations of PM2.5 in China. In 2013, in total, there were 191 days in Xi'an City on which PM2.5 concentrations were greater than 100 μg/m3. Recently, a few studies have explored the potential causes of high PM2.5 concentration using remote sensing data such as the MODIS aerosol optical thickness (AOT) product. Linear regression is a commonly used method to find statistical relationships among PM2.5 concentrations and other pollutants, including CO, NO2, SO2, and O3, which can be indicative of emission sources. The relationships of these variables, however, are usually complicated and non-linear. Therefore, a generalized additive model (GAM) is used to estimate the statistical relationships between potential variables and PM2.5 concentrations. This model contains linear functions of SO2 and CO, univariate smoothing non-linear functions of NO2, O3, AOT and temperature, and bivariate smoothing non-linear functions of location and wind variables. The model can explain 69.50% of PM2.5 concentrations, with R2 = 0.691, which improves the result of a stepwise linear regression (R2 = 0.582) by 18.73%. The two most significant variables, CO concentration and AOT, represent 20.65% and 19.54% of the deviance, respectively, while the three other gas-phase concentrations, SO2, NO2, and O3 account for 10.88% of the total deviance. These results show that in Xi'an City, the traffic and other industrial emissions are the primary source of PM2.5. Temperature, location, and wind variables also non-linearly related with PM2.5.

  16. Probing the Evaporation Dynamics of Mixed SOA/Squalane Particles Using Size-Resolved Composition and Single-Particle Measurements.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Saleh, Rawad; Donahue, Neil M

    2015-08-18

    An analysis of the formation and evaporation of mixed-particles containing squalane (a surrogate for hydrophobic primary organic aerosol, POA) and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is presented. In these experiments, one material (D62-squalane or SOA from α-pinene + O3) was prepared first to serve as surface area for condensation of the other, forming the mixed-particles. The mixed-particles were then subjected to a heating-ramp from 22 to 44 °C. We were able to determine that (1) almost all of the SOA mass is comprised of material less volatile than D62-squalane; (2) AMS collection efficiency in these mixed-particle systems can be parametrized as a function of the relative mass fraction of the components; and (3) the vast majority of D62-squalane is able to evaporate from the mixed particles, and does so on the same time scale regardless of the order of preparation. We also performed two-population mixing experiments to directly test whether D62-squalane and SOA from α-pinene + O3 form a single solution or two separate phases. We find that these two OA types are immiscible, which informs our inference of the morphology of the mixed-particles. If the morphology is core-shell and dictated by the order of preparation, these data indicate that squalane is able to diffuse relatively quickly through the SOA shell, implying that there are no major diffusion limitations.

  17. Online Measurements and Modeling of Isoprene Photo-oxidation Products: Insights from the Laboratory and SOAS Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ambro, E.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Gaston, C.; Lee, B. H.; Liu, J.; Lutz, A.; Hallquist, M.; Shilling, J.; Gold, A.; Zhang, Z.; Surratt, J. D.; Thornton, J. A.; Schobesberger, S.

    2015-12-01

    Isoprene, the most abundant non-methane volatile organic compound emitted globally, has the potential to produce large quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) with implications for climate, air quality, and human health. However, much remains unknown about the mechanisms and processes that lead to isoprene derived SOA. We present measurements and modeling of a suite of newly detected compounds from isoprene oxidation from laboratory studies at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as well as in the atmosphere from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) field campaign. Measurements were made with a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer utilizing iodide adduct ionization coupled to the Filter Inlet for Gas and AEROsol (FIGAERO) for the simultaneous sampling of the gas and aerosol phases. In the PNNL chamber, isoprene photo-oxidation with dry neutral seed and IEPOX multiphase chemistry on aqueous particles was investigated at a variety of atmospherically relevant conditions. Isoprene photo-oxidation under high HO2 produced unexpectedly substantial SOA at a yield similar to but from a distinctly different mechanism than that from IEPOX uptake. The high HO2 chemistry also resulted in di hydroxy di hydroperoxides as a dominant component of the aerosol. By utilizing the same instrument and ion chemistry during both field and chamber experiments, together with an MCM-based model, we assess the degree to which the different mechanisms are operable in the atmosphere and relevant aerosol chemical and physical properties of the SOA such as volatility and oligomer content.

  18. TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWER PLANT-DERIVED PM2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Rohr

    2006-03-31

    This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of September 1, 2005 through February 28, 2006. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the performance and analysis of field experiments at the first TERESA plant, located in the Upper Midwest and henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. During this reporting period, data processing and analyses were completed for exposure and toxicological data collected during the field campaign at Plant 1, located in the Southeast. To recap from the previous progress report, Stage I toxicological assessments were carried out in normal Sprague-Dawley rats, and Stage II assessments were carried out in a compromised model (myocardial infarction-MI-model). Normal rats were exposed to the following atmospheric scenarios: (1) primary particles; (2) oxidized emissions; (3) oxidized emissions + SOA--this scenario was repeated; and (4) oxidized emissions + ammonia + SOA. Compromised animals were exposed to oxidized emissions + SOA (this scenario was also conducted in replicate). Mass concentrations in exposure atmospheres ranged from 13.9 {micro}g/m{sup 3} for the primary particle scenario (P) to 385 {micro}g/m{sup 3} for one of the oxidized emissions + SOA

  19. Mitigation of Rayleigh crosstalk using noise suppression technique in 10-Gb/s REAM-SOA.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Sool; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Byung-Seok; Kim, Dong Churl; Kim, Ki-Soo; Park, Mi-Ran; Kwon, O-Kyun

    2012-11-19

    We demonstrate a mitigation of Rayleigh back-scattering (RBS) impact in 10-Gb/s reflective electroabsorption modulator monolithically integrated with semiconductor optical amplifier (REAM-SOA). The technique is based on the intensity-noise suppression of the centralized incoherent seed-light, which enables smooth evolution of deployed DWDM applications. We exhibit the power penalty of less than 1 dB at the large RBS crosstalk value of about 8 dB when the optical power of seed-light is lowered about -10 dBm.

  20. Analysis of all-optical temporal integrator employing phased-shifted DFB-SOA.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin-Hong; Ji, Xiao-Ling; Xu, Cong; Wang, Zi-Nan; Zhang, Wei-Li

    2014-11-17

    All-optical temporal integrator using phase-shifted distributed-feedback semiconductor optical amplifier (DFB-SOA) is investigated. The influences of system parameters on its energy transmittance and integration error are explored in detail. The numerical analysis shows that, enhanced energy transmittance and integration time window can be simultaneously achieved by increased injected current in the vicinity of lasing threshold. We find that the range of input pulse-width with lower integration error is highly sensitive to the injected optical power, due to gain saturation and induced detuning deviation mechanism. The initial frequency detuning should also be carefully chosen to suppress the integration deviation with ideal waveform output.

  1. Optimisation of SOA-REAMs for hybrid DWDM-TDMA PON applications.

    PubMed

    Naughton, Alan; Antony, Cleitus; Ossieur, Peter; Porto, Stefano; Talli, Giuseppe; Townsend, Paul D

    2011-12-12

    We demonstrate how loss-optimised, gain-saturated SOA-REAM based reflective modulators can reduce the burst to burst power variations due to differential access loss in the upstream path in carrier distributed passive optical networks by 18 dB compared to fixed linear gain modulators. We also show that the loss optimised device has a high tolerance to input power variations and can operate in deep saturation with minimal patterning penalties. Finally, we demonstrate that an optimised device can operate across the C-Band and also over a transmission distance of 80 km.

  2. Create your own science planning tool in 3 days with SOA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; Polanskey, Carol A.; O'Reilly, Taifun

    2003-01-01

    Scientific discovery and advancement of knowledge has been, and continues to be, the goal for space missions at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Scientist must plan their observation/experiments to get the maximum data return in order to make those discoveries. However, each mission has different science objectives, a different spacecraft and different instrument payloads, as well as, different routes to different destinations with different spacecraft restrictions and characteristics. In the current reduced cost environment, manageable cost for mission planning software is a must. Science Opportunity Analyzer (SOA), a planning tool for scientists and mission planners, utilizes a simple approach to reduce cost and promote reusability.

  3. Inductively coupled plasma spectrometry: Noise characteristics of aerosols, application of generalized standard additions method, and Mach disk as an emission source

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Shen

    1995-10-06

    This dissertation is focused on three problem areas in the performance of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The noise characteristics of aerosols produced by ICP nebulizers are investigated. A laser beam is scattered by aerosol and detected by a photomultiplier tube and the noise amplitude spectrum of the scattered radiation is measured by a spectrum analyzer. Discrete frequency noise in the aerosol generated by a Meinhard nebulizer or a direct injection nebulizer is primarily caused by pulsation in the liquid flow from the pump. A Scott-type spray chamber suppresses white noise, while a conical, straight-pass spray chamber enhances white noise, relative to the noise seen from the primary aerosol. Simultaneous correction for both spectral interferences and matrix effects in ICP atomic emission spectrometry (AES) can be accomplished by using the generalized standard additions method (GSAM). Results obtained with the application of the GSAM to the Perkin-Elmer Optima 3000 ICP atomic emission spectrometer are presented. The echelle-based polychromator with segmented-array charge-coupled device detectors enables the direct, visual examination of the overlapping lines Cd (1) 228.802 nm and As (1) 228.812 nm. The slit translation capability allows a large number of data points to be sampled, therefore, the advantage of noise averaging is gained. An ICP is extracted into a small quartz vacuum chamber through a sampling orifice in a water-cooled copper plate. Optical emission from the Mach disk region is measured with a new type of echelle spectrometer equipped with two segmented-array charge-coupled-device detectors, with an effort to improve the detection limits for simultaneous multielement analysis by ICP-AES.

  4. The effectiveness of power-generating complexes constructed on the basis of nuclear power plants combined with additional sources of energy determined taking risk factors into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Khrustalev, V. A.; Portyankin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of combining nuclear power plants equipped with water-cooled water-moderated power-generating reactors (VVER) with other sources of energy within unified power-generating complexes is analyzed. The use of such power-generating complexes makes it possible to achieve the necessary load pickup capability and flexibility in performing the mandatory selective primary and emergency control of load, as well as participation in passing the night minimums of electric load curves while retaining high values of the capacity utilization factor of the entire power-generating complex at higher levels of the steam-turbine part efficiency. Versions involving combined use of nuclear power plants with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units for generating electricity are considered. In view of the fact that hydrogen is an unsafe energy carrier, the use of which introduces additional elements of risk, a procedure for evaluating these risks under different conditions of implementing the fuel-and-hydrogen cycle at nuclear power plants is proposed. Risk accounting technique with the use of statistical data is considered, including the characteristics of hydrogen and gas pipelines, and the process pipelines equipment tightness loss occurrence rate. The expected intensities of fires and explosions at nuclear power plants fitted with hydrogen toppings and gas turbine units are calculated. In estimating the damage inflicted by events (fires and explosions) occurred in nuclear power plant turbine buildings, the US statistical data were used. Conservative scenarios of fires and explosions of hydrogen-air mixtures in nuclear power plant turbine buildings are presented. Results from calculations of the introduced annual risk to the attained net annual profit ratio in commensurable versions are given. This ratio can be used in selecting projects characterized by the most technically attainable and socially acceptable safety.

  5. The Multi-allelic Genetic Architecture of a Variance-Heterogeneity Locus for Molybdenum Concentration in Leaves Acts as a Source of Unexplained Additive Genetic Variance

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Andreatta, Matthew E.; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have generally been used to detect individual loci contributing to the phenotypic diversity in a population by the effects of these loci on the trait mean. More rarely, loci have also been detected based on variance differences between genotypes. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the possible genetic mechanisms leading to such variance signals. However, little is known about what causes these signals, or whether this genetic variance-heterogeneity reflects mechanisms of importance in natural populations. Previously, we identified a variance-heterogeneity GWA (vGWA) signal for leaf molybdenum concentrations in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, fine-mapping of this association reveals that the vGWA emerges from the effects of three independent genetic polymorphisms that all are in strong LD with the markers displaying the genetic variance-heterogeneity. By revealing the genetic architecture underlying this vGWA signal, we uncovered the molecular source of a significant amount of hidden additive genetic variation or “missing heritability”. Two of the three polymorphisms underlying the genetic variance-heterogeneity are promoter variants for Molybdate transporter 1 (MOT1), and the third a variant located ~25 kb downstream of this gene. A fourth independent association was also detected ~600 kb upstream of MOT1. Use of a T-DNA knockout allele highlights Copper Transporter 6; COPT6 (AT2G26975) as a strong candidate gene for this association. Our results show that an extended LD across a complex locus including multiple functional alleles can lead to a variance-heterogeneity between genotypes in natural populations. Further, they provide novel insights into the genetic regulation of ion homeostasis in A. thaliana, and empirically confirm that variance-heterogeneity based GWA methods are a valuable tool to detect novel associations of biological importance in natural populations. PMID:26599497

  6. Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor measurements of SOA formation in a Ponderosa Pine forest in the southern Rocky Mountains during BEACHON-RoMBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, B. B.; Ortega, A. M.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Kaser, L.; Karl, T.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Fry, J.; Brown, S. S.; Zarzana, K. J.; Dube, W. P.; Wagner, N.; Draper, D.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    A Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) photooxidation flow reactor was used in combination with an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer to characterize biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in a terpene-dominated forest during the July-August 2011 Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (BEACHON-RoMBAS) field campaign at the U.S. Forest Service Manitou Forest Observatory, Colorado, as well as in corresponding laboratory experiments. In the PAM reactor, a chosen oxidant (OH, O3, or NO3) was generated and controlled over a range of values up to 10,000 times ambient levels. High oxidant concentrations accelerated the gas-phase, heterogeneous, and possibly aqueous oxidative aging of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), inorganic gases, and existing aerosol, which led to repartitioning into the aerosol phase. PAM oxidative processing represented from a few hours up to ~20 days of equivalent atmospheric aging during the ~3 minute reactor residence time. During BEACHON-RoMBAS, PAM photooxidation enhanced SOA at intermediate OH exposure (1-10 equivalent days) but resulted in net loss of OA at long OH exposure (10-20 equivalent days), demonstrating the competing effects of functionalization vs. fragmentation (and possibly photolysis) as aging increased. PAM oxidation also resulted in f44 vs. f43 and Van Krevelen diagram (H/C vs. O/C) slopes similar to ambient oxidation, suggesting the PAM reactor employs oxidation pathways similar to ambient air. Single precursor aerosol yields were measured using the PAM reactor in the laboratory as a function of organic aerosol concentration and reacted hydrocarbon amounts. When applying the laboratory PAM yields with complete consumption of the most abundant VOCs measured at the forest site (monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, MBO, and toluene), a simple model underpredicted the amount of SOA formed in the PAM reactor in the

  7. The temporal dynamics of masked repetition picture priming effects: manipulations of stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA) and prime duration.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Marianna D; Holcomb, Phillip J

    2010-06-22

    The current study used event-related potentials (ERPs) and masked repetition priming to examine the time-course of picture processing. We manipulated the stimulus-onset asynchrony (110 ms, 230 ms, 350 ms, and 470 ms) between repeated and unrepeated prime-target pairs while holding the prime duration constant (50 ms) (Experiment 1) as well as the prime durations (30 ms, 50 ms, 70 ms, and 90 ms) (Experiment 2) with a constant SOA of 110 ms in a masked repetition priming paradigm with pictures. The aim of this study was to further elucidate the mechanisms underlying previously observed ERP components in masked priming with pictures. We found that both the N/P190 and N400 are modulated by changes in prime duration and SOA, however, it appears that longer prime exposure rather than a longer SOA leads to more in-depth processing as indexed by larger N400 effects.

  8. Theoretical study of the spurious-free dynamic range of a tunable delay line based on slow light in SOA.

    PubMed

    Berger, Perrine; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Alouini, Mehdi; Bretenaker, Fabien; Dolfi, Daniel

    2009-10-26

    We developed a predictive model describing harmonic generation and intermodulation distortions in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). This model takes into account the variations of the saturation parameters along the propagation axis inside the SOA, and uses a rigorous expression of the gain oscillations harmonics. We derived the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR) of a slow light delay line based on coherent population oscillation (CPO) effects, in a frequency range covering radar applications (from 40 kHz up to 30 GHz), and for a large range of injected currents. The influence of the high order distortions in the input microwave spectrum is discussed, and in particular, an interpretation of the SFDR improvement of a Mach-Zehnder modulator by CPOs effects in a SOA is given.

  9. Tunable multi-wavelength SOA based linear cavity dual-output port fiber laser using Lyot-Sagnac loop mirror.

    PubMed

    Ummy, M A; Madamopoulos, N; Joyo, A; Kouar, M; Dorsinville, R

    2011-02-14

    We propose and demonstrate a simple dual port tunable from the C- to the L-band multi-wavelength fiber laser based on a SOA designed for C-band operation and fiber loop mirrors. The laser incorporates a polarization maintaining fiber in one of the fiber loop mirrors and delivers multi-wavelength operation at 9 laser lines with a wavelength separation of ~2.8 nm at room temperature. We show that the number of lasing wavelengths increases with the increase of the bias current of the SOA. Wavelength tunability from the C to L-band is achieved by exploiting the gain compression of a SOA. Stable multi-wavelength operation is achieved at room temperature without temperature compensation techniques, with measured power and the wavelength stability within < ±0.5 dB and 
±0.1 nm, respectively.

  10. Simple pre-distortion schemes for improving the power efficiency of SOA-based IR-UWB over fiber systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, H.; Azou, S.; Hamie, A.; Al Housseini, A.; Alaeddine, A.; Sharaiha, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the usage of SOA for reach extension of an impulse radio over fiber system. Operating in the saturated regime translates into strong nonlinearities and spectral distortions, which drops the power efficiency of the propagated pulses. After studying the SOA response versus operating conditions, we have enhanced the system performance by applying simple analog pre-distortion schemes for various derivatives of the Gaussian pulse and their combination. A novel pulse shape has also been designed by linearly combining three basic Gaussian pulses, offering a very good spectral efficiency (> 55 %) for a high power (0 dBm) at the amplifier input. Furthermore, the potential of our technique has been examined considering a 1.5 Gbps-OOK and 0.75 Gbps-PPM modulation schemes. Pre-distortion proved an advantage for a large extension of optical link (150 km), with an inline amplification via SOA at 40 km.

  11. All-optical modulation format conversion from NRZ-OOK to RZ-QPSK using parallel SOA-MZI OOK/BPSK converters.

    PubMed

    Mishina, Ken; Nissanka, Suresh M; Maruta, Akihiro; Mitani, Shunsuke; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Hatta, Tatsuo; Kitayama, Ken-Ichi

    2007-06-11

    A novel all-optical modulation format conversion from non-return-to-zero on-off-keying (NRZ-OOK) to return-to-zero quadrature-phase-shift-keying (RZ-QPSK) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The proposed format conversion scheme is based on parallel Mach-Zehnder interferometric (MZI) OOK/binary-PSK (BPSK) converters, consisting of integrated semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). We experimentally demonstrate that in both decoded channels of the converted RZ-QPSK signal bit error rate (BER) curves show almost the same receiver sensitivity at a symbol-rate of 10.7 Gsymbol/s. In addition, a reasonable dispersion tolerance of the converted signal up to +295 ps/nm is observed. The numerical simulation based upon carrier rate equation verifies the experimental results.

  12. Phase, Viscosity, Morphology, and Room Temperature Evaporation Rates of SOA Particles Generated from Different Precursors, at Low and High Relative Humidities, and their Interaction with Hydrophobic Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.; Imre, D. G.; Beranek, J.; Abramson, E.; Shrivastava, M.

    2012-12-01

    Formation, properties, transformations, and temporal evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles strongly depend on particle phase. Semi-volatile molecules that comprise SOA particles were assumed to form a low viscosity solution that maintains equilibrium with the evolving gas phase by rapid evaporation condensation. However, studies by our group indicate that laboratory-generated alpha-pinene SOA particles and ambient SOA characterized in a recent field campaign are in a semi-solid, highly viscous phase, and their evaporation rates are orders of magnitude slower than predicted. We present the results of recent studies in which we have extended our work to include SOA particles generated by oxidation of a number of precursors including limonene, n-alkenes, cyclo-alkenes and isoprene. The resulting particles are characterized by their phase, morphology and room temperature evaporation rates. We conclude that, while the detailed properties of SOA particles depend of their precursor, all studied SOA particles are highly viscous semi-solids that exhibit very slow evaporation rates. Given that atmospheric relative humidity (RH) can change particle phase, it is important to investigate the effect of RH on the phase and evaporation kinetics of SOA particles. To this end SOA particles were generated at low and high (~90%) RH, and their evaporation kinetics and phase were characterized as a function of RH. In the ambient atmosphere SOA particles form in the presence of a mixture of different organic compounds, which are present at or below their equilibrium vapor pressure, and thus have been ignored. However, our data show that these compounds can adsorb to the surface of particles during SOA formation, becoming trapped in the highly viscous SOA, and affect particle properties. We examine the interaction between SOA particles and different hydrophobic organics representing typical anthropogenic emissions by making SOA in the presence of the vapors of these

  13. Modeling SOA formation from alkanes and alkenes in chamber experiments: effect of gas/wall partitioning of organic vapors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphanie La, Yuyi; Camredon, Marie; Ziemann, Paul; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Hodzic, Alma; Aumont, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation products of Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) are expected to be the major precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Laboratory experiments were conducted this last decade in the Riverside APRC chamber to study IVOC oxidative mechanisms and SOA formation processes for a large set of linear, branched and cyclic aliphatic hydrocarbons (Ziemann, 2011). This dataset are used here to assess the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) (Aumont et al., 2005). The simulated SOA yields agree with the general trends observed in the chamber experiments. They are (i) increasing with the increasing carbon number; (ii) decreasing with increasing methyl branch number; and (iii) increasing for cyclic compounds compared to their corresponding linear analogues. However, simulated SOA yields are systematically overestimated regardless of the precursors, suggesting missing processes in the model. In this study, we assess whether gas-to-wall partitioning of organic vapors can explain these model/observation mismatches (Matsunaga and Ziemann, 2010). First results show that GECKO-A outputs better match the observations when wall uptake of organic vapors is taken into account. Effects of gas/wall partitioning on SOA yields and composition will be presented. Preliminary results suggest that wall uptake is a major process influencing SOA production in the Teflon chambers. References Aumont, B., Szopa, S., Madronich, S.: Modelling the evolution of organic carbon during its gas-phase tropospheric oxidation: development of an explicit model based on a self generating approach. Atmos.Chem.Phys., 5, 2497-2517 (2005). P. J. Ziemann: Effects of molecular structure on the chemistry of aerosol formation from the OH-radical-initiated oxidation of alkanes and alkenes, Int. Rev.Phys.Chem., 30:2, 161-195 (2011). Matsunaga, A., Ziemann, P. J.: Gas-wall partitioning of organic compounds in a Teflon film

  14. A Novel PTR-ToF-MS Inlet System for On-line Chemical Analysis of SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Philipp; Müller, Markus; D'Anna, Barbara; Wisthaler, Armin

    2014-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is formed from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors in the atmosphere. Because of its impact on human health and the environment there is a strong interest in understanding the chemistry of SOA formation and transformation. Its volatility, chemical complexity and reactivity and low ambient concentrations challenge the chemical analysis of SOA. Here we present a novel analytical setup for on-line measurements of SOA under ambient conditions by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The method overcomes current limitations in the chemical analysis of SOA by combining on-line enrichment of the particle concentration and on-line mass spectrometric detection using soft chemical ionization. On-line sampling allows for highly time-resolved analysis of organic aerosol compounds and avoids potential sampling artifacts from sample pre-collection and pretreatment. The deployment of a soft ionization method minimizes the fragmentation of fragile organic aerosol compounds in the mass spectrometer. A proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass-spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) is combined with a three-stage aerosol inlet system consisting of an activated carbon monolith denuder, an aerodynamic lens (ADL) and a thermodesorption unit. The denuder strips off gas-phase organic compounds and the ADL enriches the particle concentration in the sample flow. Ultimately, organic aerosol compounds are volatilized at 120 °C in the thermodesorption unit before being introduced into the PTR-ToF-MS system for chemical analysis. The ADL is designed to increase the particle concentration in the sample flow by a factor of up to 50 for particles in the size range between 50 and 1000 nm. This novel enrichment step enables the real-time in situ analysis of SOA at sub µg/m³-levels by PTR-ToF-MS. This work is funded through the PIMMS ITN, which is supported by the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme under grant agreement number 287382.

  15. Land cover maps, BVOC emissions, and SOA burden in a global aerosol-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanelle, Tanja; Henrot, Alexandra; Bey, Isaelle

    2015-04-01

    It has been reported that different land cover representations influence the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) (e.g. Guenther et al., 2006). But the land cover forcing used in model simulations is quite uncertain (e.g. Jung et al., 2006). As a consequence the simulated emission of BVOCs depends on the applied land cover map. To test the sensitivity of global and regional estimates of BVOC emissions on the applied land cover map we applied 3 different land cover maps into our global aerosol-climate model ECHAM6-HAM2.2. We found a high sensitivity for tropical regions. BVOCs are a very prominent precursor for the production of Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA). Therefore the sensitivity of BVOC emissions on land cover maps impacts the SOA burden in the atmosphere. With our model system we are able to quantify that impact. References: Guenther et al. (2006), Estimates of global terrestrial isoprene emissions using MEGAN, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 3181-3210, doi:10.5194/acp-6-3181-2006. Jung et al. (2006), Exploiting synergies of global land cover products for carbon cycle modeling, Rem. Sens. Environm., 101, 534-553, doi:10.1016/j.rse.2006.01.020.

  16. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation and Aging in a Flow Reactor in the Forested Southeast US during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Hacker, L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Simoes de Sa, S.; Fry, J.; Ayres, B. R.; Draper, D. C.; Ortega, A. M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Panujoka, A.; Virtanen, A.; Miettinen, P.; Krechmer, J.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Lechner, M.; Martin, S. T.; Farmer, D.; Brown, S. S.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    A major field campaign (Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study, SOAS) was conducted in summer 2013 in a forested area (Centreville Supersite) in the southeast U.S. To investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), 3 flow reactors (potential aerosol mass, PAM) were used to expose ambient air to oxidants and their output was analyzed by state-of-art gas and aerosol instruments including a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS), a High-Resolution Proton-Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOFMS), and for the first time, two different High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometers (HRToF-CIMS), and an SMPS. Ambient air was exposed 24/7 to variable concentrations of each of the 3 main atmospheric oxidants (OH, O3 and NO3) to investigate SOA formation and aging. The OH exposure was estimated by 3 different methods (empirical parameterization, carbon monoxide consumption, and chemical box model). Effective OH exposures up to 7e12 molec cm-3 s were achieved, which is equivalent to over a month of aging in the atmosphere. High SOA formation of up to 12 μg m-3 above ambient concentrations of 5 μg m-3 was observed under intermediate OH exposures, while very high OH exposures led to destruction of ambient OA by ≈ 30%, indicating shifting contributions of functionalization vs. fragmentation, which is similar to previous results from urban and terpene-dominated environments. The highest SOA enhancements were 3-4 times higher than the ambient OA. More SOA is typically formed during nighttime when terpenes are higher and lower during daytime when isoprene is higher. SOA formation is also observed after exposure of ambient air to O3 or NO3, although the amount and oxidation was lower than for OH exposure. Formation of organic nitrates in the NO3 reaction will be discussed. High SOA formation (above 40 μg m-3) and a large number of CIMS ions, indicating many different

  17. Reduction of patterning effects in SOA-based wavelength converters by combining cross-gain and cross-absorption modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Enbo; Ohman, Filip; Cheng, Cheng; Zhang, Xinliang; Hong, Wei; Mørk, Jesper; Huang, Dexiu

    2008-12-22

    A scheme for mitigating patterning effects in wavelength conversion by using a concatenated semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and electroabsorption modulator (EAM) is proposed. The optimization of the parameters of the semiconductor devices and receiver electronics is theoretically investigated. The bit error ratio (BER) of the output signals in both the co-propagating and the counter-propagating configurations is quantitatively evaluated. The simulation results indicate that the patterning effect in wavelength conversion due to the slow recovery of the carrier density in the SOA can be well compensated by a concatenated EAM. The simulation results are confirmed by preliminary pump-probe experiment using a 10Gb/s clock pulse train.

  18. Generation of 21.3 Gbaud 8PSK signal using an SOA-based all-optical phase modulator.

    PubMed

    Dailey, J M; Webb, R P; Manning, R J

    2011-12-12

    We describe a novel SOA-based all-optical pure-phase modulator, and show how deleterious cross-gain modulation from the SOAs can be suppressed by utilizing an integrated interferometer structure. We experimentally demonstrate the use of the optical gate as a π/4 phase modulator producing 21.3 Gbaud 8PSK from 21.3 Gbit/s OOK and 21.3 Gbaud QPSK inputs. The modulator produces 3 dB of gain and coherent detection-based bit error rate measurements indicate a 2.4 dB excess penalty.

  19. Demonstration of quantum dot SOA-based colorless ONU transmitter for symmetric 40 Gb/s TWDM PON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiao; Chang, Qingjiang; Gao, Zhensen; Ye, Chenhui; Xiao, Simiao; Huang, Xiaoan; Hu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Kaibin

    2016-02-01

    Detailed numerical investigation of self-seeded colorless ONU transmitter using quantum dot (QD) SOA as the intensity modulator for symmetric 40 Gb/s TWDM-PON has been developed. It is shown that the QD SOA-based intensity modulator is able to support 10 Gb/s OOK upstream signal transmission with an optical extinction ratio of over 10 dB. Chromatic dispersion compensation free of 20 km passive transmission has been achieved for error free reception. Moreover, the system performance and power budget have been analyzed and discussed for different transmission distance and split ratio.

  20. Virtual Workshop Environment (VWE): A Taxonomy and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) Framework for Modularized Virtual Learning Environments (VLE)--Applying the Learning Object Concept to the VLE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsson, Fredrik; Naeve, Ambjorn

    2006-01-01

    Based on existing Learning Object taxonomies, this article suggests an alternative Learning Object taxonomy, combined with a general Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) framework, aiming to transfer the modularized concept of Learning Objects to modularized Virtual Learning Environments. The taxonomy and SOA-framework exposes a need for a clearer…

  1. TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWER PLANT-DERIVED PM2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Annette Rohr

    2005-09-30

    This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of March 1, 2005 through August 31, 2005. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the performance and analysis of field experiments at the first TERESA plant, located in the Upper Midwest and henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. During this reporting period, fieldwork was completed at Plant 1, located in the Southeast. Stage I toxicological assessments were carried out in normal Sprague-Dawley rats, and Stage II assessments were carried out in a compromised model (myocardial infarction-MI-model). Normal rats were exposed to the following atmospheric scenarios: (1) primary particles; (2) oxidized emissions; (3) oxidized emissions + secondary organic aerosol (SOA)--this scenario was repeated; and (4) oxidized emissions + ammonia + SOA. Compromised animals were exposed to oxidized emissions + SOA (this scenario was also conducted in replicate). Stage I assessment endpoints included breathing pattern/pulmonary function; in vivo chemiluminescence (an indicator of oxidative stress); blood cytology; bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid analysis; and histopathology. Stage II assessments included continuous ECG monitoring via implanted telemeters

  2. Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds by GC-MS in Rural Alabama during the 2013 SOAS Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koss, A.; Olson, K. F.; De Gouw, J. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a large class of chemicals that are emitted into the atmosphere by both human and natural biological activity. VOCs are comprised of both precursor compounds that drive oxidation chemistry and oxidation products. Extensive measurements of VOCs can help determine the relationships between precursor and secondary compounds, and the relative effects of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on climate and air quality. The Southeastern US is a region of particular research interest, as it is strongly affected by both anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs. As part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol intensive study (SOAS), an in-situ gas-chromatograph mass spectrometer (GC-MS) was deployed at a forested site in rural Alabama. This site was dominated by biogenic emissions, but was also subject to anthropogenic influence. The GC-MS measured a large number of primary and secondary anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs in the C2 to C11 range, with a time resolution of 30 minutes. Measured compounds of particular interest include isoprene, speciated monoterpenes, methylvinylketone (MVK), methacrolein, C2 to C11 alkanes, lightweight unsaturated hydrocarbons including ethene, propene, and acetylene, C6 to C9 aromatics, C1 to C7 oxygenated VOCS (alcohols, ketones, aldehydes), halogenated VOCs, acetonitrile, and several sulfur-containing compounds. A summary of these measurements will be presented. This summary will include characterization of various anthropogenic and biogenic sources sampled at the site, relationships of the most important VOCs to basic meteorological conditions, and diurnal profiles that illustrate shifts in photochemistry and emissions. These GCMS measurements will provide key information for constraints in models and to aid in the interpretation of data from other instruments.

  3. Gas-phase Precursors to Anthropogenic SOA: Using the MCM to Probe Detailed Observations of Aromatic Photo-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickard, A. R.; Wyche, K. P.; Metzger, A.; Monks, P. S.; Ellis, A. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Pilling, M. J.; Jenkin, M. E.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of photochemical ozone and particulate matter are major priorities in the determination of European air quality policies. Predictions of the future state of the atmosphere and the development of appropriate mitigation strategies rely on models, which necessarily incorporate chemistry. The Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, http://mcm.leeds.ac.uk/MCM) is a near-explicit chemical mechanism originally conceived to model ozone formation in Europe but now also employed as a benchmark mechanism in a wide variety of applications where chemical detail is required. The MCM currently describes the detailed gas- phase tropospheric degradation of a 135 primary emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leading to a mechanism containing ca. 5900 species and 13500 reactions. In order that the MCM continues to be a state-of-the-art resource for the atmospheric science community it resides under a constant regime of evaluation, development and improvement. Individual VOC photochemical mechanisms are evaluated using data obtained, under a variety of atmospheric conditions, from highly instrumented smog chambers. Smog chamber experiments are crucial, not only for mechanism evaluation, but also for mechanism development. Findings obtained from combined model and chamber studies can additionally provide key insight for guiding the directions of future laboratory experiments. Recently, the MCM was updated to MCMv3.1 in order to take into account recent advancements in the understanding of aromatic photo-oxidation, an important class of anthropogenic VOCs. As well as constituting precursors to secondary organic aerosol (SOA), aromatics generally have high photochemical ozone creation potentials (POCPs) and hence contribute significantly towards tropospheric ozone formation. In the work presented, a detailed gas-phase photochemical chamber box model, incorporating the MCMv3.1 degradation mechanism for 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB), has been used to simulate data measured during

  4. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y.; Lim, Y. B.; Altieri, K. E.; Seitzinger, S. P.; Turpin, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM-10 mM) was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  5. Proposal for all-optical switchable and tunable ultrawideband monocycle generation utilizing SOA wavelength conversion and time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhefeng; Xu, Jianhui; Hou, Min

    2017-03-01

    An all-optical ultrawideband monocycle generator based on wavelength conversion in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and optical tunable delay in an optical delay line (ODL) is proposed and simulated. The system achieves optically switchable in pulse polarity and tunable in both the pulsewidth and radio frequency (RF) spectrum.

  6. A Research Agenda for Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA): Maintenance and Evolution of Service-Oriented Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Arsanjani, A., Ghosh, S., Allam , A., Abdollah, T., Ganapathy, S., & Holley, K. “SOMA: A Me- thod for Developing Service-Oriented Solutions.” IBM...Zhang 2007] Zhang, L., Arsanjani, A., Allam , A., Lu, D., & Chee, Y. “Variation-Oriented Analysis for SOA Solution Design.” Proceedings of the 2007

  7. Wavelength reused bidirectional transmission of adaptively modulated optical OFDM signals in WDM-PONs incorporating SOA and RSOA intensity modulators.

    PubMed

    Wei, J L; Hugues-Salas, E; Giddings, R P; Jin, X Q; Zheng, X; Mansoor, S; Tang, J M

    2010-05-10

    Detailed numerical investigations are undertaken of wavelength reused bidirectional transmission of adaptively modulated optical OFDM (AMOOFDM) signals over a single SMF in a colorless WDM-PON incorporating a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) intensity modulator and a reflective SOA (RSOA) intensity modulator in the optical line termination and optical network unit, respectively. A comprehensive theoretical model describing the performance of such network scenarios is, for the first time, developed, taking into account dynamic optical characteristics of SOA and RSOA intensity modulators as well as the effects of Rayleigh backscattering (RB) and residual downstream signal-induced crosstalk. The developed model is rigorously verified experimentally in RSOA-based real-time end-to-end OOFDM systems at 7.5 Gb/s. It is shown that the RB noise and crosstalk effects are dominant factors limiting the maximum achievable downstream and upstream transmission performance. Under optimum SOA and RSOA operating conditions as well as practical downstream and upstream optical launch powers, 10 Gb/s downstream and 6 Gb/s upstream over 40 km SMF transmissions of conventional double sideband AMOOFDM signals are feasible without utilizing in-line optical amplification and chromatic dispersion compensation. In particular, the aforementioned transmission performance can be improved to 23 Gb/s downstream and 8 Gb/s upstream over 40 km SMFs when single sideband subcarrier modulation is adopted in the downstream systems.

  8. A Framework for Safe Composition of Heterogeneous SOA Services in a Pervasive Computing Environment with Resource Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes Alamo, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    The Service Oriented Computing (SOC) paradigm, defines services as software artifacts whose implementations are separated from their specifications. Application developers rely on services to simplify the design, reduce the development time and cost. Within the SOC paradigm, different Service Oriented Architectures (SOAs) have been developed.…

  9. Organosulfates as Tracers for Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Formation from 2-Methyl-3-Buten-2 ol (MBO) in the Atmosphere

    EPA Science Inventory

    2-Methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) is an important biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emitted by pine trees and a potential precursor of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in forested regions. In the present study, hydroxyl radical (OH)-initiated oxidation of MBO was exa...

  10. Simulating the SOA formation of isoprene from partitioning and aerosol phase reactions in the presence of inorganics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Ross L.; Jang, Myoseon

    2016-05-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by the photooxidation of isoprene with and without inorganic seed is simulated using the Unified Partitioning Aerosol Phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model. Recent work has found the SOA formation of isoprene to be sensitive to both aerosol acidity ([H+], mol L-1) and aerosol liquid water content (LWC) with the presence of either leading to significant aerosol phase organic mass generation and large growth in SOA yields (YSOA). Classical partitioning models alone are insufficient to predict isoprene SOA formation due to the high volatility of photooxidation products and sensitivity of their mass yields to variations in inorganic aerosol composition. UNIPAR utilizes the chemical structures provided by a near-explicit chemical mechanism to estimate the thermodynamic properties of the gas phase products, which are lumped based on their calculated vapor pressure (eight groups) and aerosol phase reactivity (six groups). UNIPAR then determines the SOA formation of each lumping group from both partitioning and aerosol phase reactions (oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions and organosulfate formation) assuming a single homogeneously mixed organic-inorganic phase as a function of inorganic composition and VOC / NOx (VOC - volatile organic compound). The model is validated using isoprene photooxidation experiments performed in the dual, outdoor University of Florida Atmospheric PHotochemical Outdoor Reactor (UF APHOR) chambers. UNIPAR is able to predict the experimental SOA formation of isoprene without seed, with H2SO4 seed gradually titrated by ammonia, and with the acidic seed generated by SO2 oxidation. Oligomeric mass is predicted to account for more than 65 % of the total organic mass formed in all cases and over 85 % in the presence of strongly acidic seed. The model is run to determine the sensitivity of YSOA to [H+], LWC and VOC / NOx, and it is determined that the SOA formation of isoprene is most strongly related to [H

  11. Simulating the SOA formation of isoprene from partitioning and aerosol phase reactions in the presence of inorganics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, R. L.; Jang, M.

    2015-11-01

    The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced by the photooxidation of isoprene with and without inorganic seed is simulated using the Unified Partitioning Aerosol Phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model. Recent work has found the SOA formation of isoprene to be sensitive to both aerosol acidity ([H+]) and aerosol liquid water content (LWC) with the presence of either leading to significant aerosol phase organic mass generation and large growth in SOA yields (YSOA). Classical partitioning models alone are insufficient to predict isoprene SOA formation due to the high volatility of the photooxidation products and the sensitivity of their mass yields to variations in inorganic aerosol composition. UNIPAR utilizes the chemical structures provided by a near-explicit chemical mechanism to estimate the thermodynamic properties of the gas phase products, which are lumped based on their calculated vapor pressure (8 groups) and aerosol phase reactivity (6 groups). UNIPAR then determines the SOA formation of each lumping group from both partitioning and aerosol phase reactions (oligomerization, acid catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate formation) assuming a single homogeneously mixed organic-inorganic phase as a function of inorganic composition and VOC / NOx. The model is validated using isoprene photooxidation experiments performed in the dual, outdoor UF APHOR chambers. UNIPAR is able to predict the experimental SOA formation of isoprene without seed, with H2SO4 seed gradually titrated by ammonia, and with the acidic seed generated by SO2 oxidation. Oligomeric mass is predicted to account for more than 65 % of the total OM formed in all cases and over 85 % in the presence of strongly acidic seed. The model is run to determine the sensitivity of YSOA to [H+], LWC, and VOC / NOx, and it is determined that the SOA formation of isoprene is most strongly related to [H+] but is dynamically related to all three parameters. For VOC / NOx > 10, with increasing NOx both experimental and

  12. Is dry deposition of semi-volatile organic gases a significant loss of secondary organic aerosols (SOA)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.; Knote, C. J.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Madronich, S.

    2013-12-01

    Dry deposition removal of semi-volatile organic compounds from the atmosphere and its impact on organic aerosol mass is currently under-explored and not well represented in chemistry-climate models, especially for the many complex partly oxidized organics involved in particle formation. The main reason for this omission is that current models use simplified SOA mechanisms that lump precursors and their products into volatility bins, therefore losing information on important properties of individual molecules (or groups) that are needed to calculate dry deposition. In this study, we apply the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to simulate SOA formation and estimate the influence of dry deposition of gas-phase organics on SOA concentrations downwind of an urban area (Mexico City), as well as over a pine forest. SOA precursors considered here include short- and long-chain alkanes (C3-25), alkenes, light aromatics, isoprene and monoterpenes. We show that dry deposition of oxidized gases is not an efficient sink for anthropogenic SOA, as it removes <5% of SOA within the city's boundary layer and ~15% downwind. The effect on biogenic SOA is however significantly larger. We discuss reasons for these differences, and investigate separately the impacts on short and long-chain species. We show that the dry deposition is competing with the uptake of gases to the aerosol phase. In the absence of this condensation, ~50% of the regionally produced mass downwind of Mexico City would have been dry-deposited. However, because dry deposition of submicron aerosols is slow, condensation onto particles protects organic gases from deposition and therefore increases their atmospheric burden and lifetime. We use the explicit GECKO-A model to build an empirical parameterization for use in 3D models. Removal (dry and wet) of organic vapors depends on their solubility, and required Henry's law solubility coefficients were estimated for

  13. Enhanced biological nutrient removal in sequencing batch reactors operated as static/oxic/anoxic (SOA) process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dechao; Chen, Hongbo; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Tianjing; Luo, Kun; Zeng, Guangming

    2013-09-01

    An innovative static/oxic/anoxic (SOA) activated sludge process characterized by static phase as a substitute for conventional anaerobic stage was developed to enhance biological nutrient removal (BNR) with influent ammonia of 20 and 40 mg/L in R1 and R2 reactors, respectively. The results demonstrated that static phase could function as conventional anaerobic stage. In R1 lower influent ammonia concentration facilitated more polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) growth, but secondary phosphorus release occurred due to NOx(-) depletion during post-anoxic period. In R2, however, denitrifying phosphorus removal proceeded with sufficient NOx(-). Both R1 and R2 saw simultaneous nitrification-denitrification. Glycogen was utilized to drive post-denitrification with denitrification rates in excess of typical endogenous decay rates. The anoxic stirring duration could be shortened from 3 to 1.5h to avoid secondary phosphorus release in R1 and little adverse impact was found on nutrients removal in R2.

  14. Improving the power efficiency of SOA-based UWB over fiber systems via pulse shape randomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, H.; Azou, S.; Hamie, A.; Al Housseini, A.; Alaeddine, A.; Sharaiha, A.

    2016-09-01

    A simple pulse shape randomization scheme is considered in this paper for improving the performance of ultra wide band (UWB) communication systems using On Off Keying (OOK) or pulse position modulation (PPM) formats. The advantage of the proposed scheme, which can be either employed for impulse radio (IR) or for carrier-based systems, is first theoretically studied based on closed-form derivations of power spectral densities. Then, we investigate an application to an IR-UWB over optical fiber system, by utilizing the 4th and 5th orders of Gaussian derivatives. Our approach proves to be effective for 1 Gbps-PPM and 2 Gbps-OOK transmissions, with an advantage in terms of power efficiency for short distances. We also examine the performance for a system employing an in-line Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA) with the view to achieve a reach extension, while limiting the cost and system complexity.

  15. A comparison of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields and composition from ozonolysis of monoterpenes at varying concentrations of NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, D. C.; Farmer, D. K.; Desyaterik, Y.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    The effect of NO2 on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene, β-pinene, Δ3-carene, and limonene was investigated using a dark flow-through reaction chamber. SOA mass yields were calculated for each monoterpene from ozonolysis with varying NO2 concentrations. Kinetics modeling of the first generation gas-phase chemistry suggests that differences in observed aerosol yields for different NO2 concentrations are consistent with NO3 formation and subsequent competition between O3 and NO3 to oxidize each monoterpene. α-pinene was the only monoterpene studied that showed a systematic decrease in both aerosol number concentration and mass concentration with increasing [NO2]. β-pinene and Δ3-carene produced fewer particles at higher [NO2], but both retained moderate mass yields. Limonene exhibited both higher number concentrations and greater mass concentrations at higher [NO2]. SOA from each experiment was collected and analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS, enabling comparisons between product distributions for each system. In general, the systems influenced by NO3 oxidation contained more high molecular weight products (MW >400 amu), suggesting the importance of oligomerization mechanisms in NO3-initiated SOA formation. α-pinene, which showed anomalously low aerosol mass yields in the presence of NO2, showed no increase in these oligomer peaks, suggesting that lack of oligomer formation is a likely cause of α-pinene's near 0% yields with NO3. Through direct comparisons of mixed-oxidant systems, this work suggests that NO3 is likely to dominate nighttime oxidation pathways in most regions with both biogenic and anthropogenic influences. Therefore, accurately constraining SOA yields from NO3 oxidation, which vary substantially with the VOC precursor, is essential in predicting nighttime aerosol production.

  16. SOA formation from the photooxidation of α-pinene: systematic exploration of the simulation of chamber data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVay, R. C.; Zhang, X.; Aumont, B.; Valorso, R.; Camredon, M.; La, Y. S.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2015-11-01

    Chemical mechanisms play an important role in simulating the atmospheric chemistry of volatile organic compound oxidation. Comparison of mechanism simulations with laboratory chamber data tests our level of understanding of the prevailing chemistry as well as the dynamic processes occurring in the chamber itself. α-pinene photooxidation is a well-studied system experimentally, for which detailed chemical mechanisms have been formulated. Here, we present the results of simulating low-NO α-pinene photooxidation experiments conducted in the Caltech chamber with the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) under varying concentrations of seed particles and OH levels. Unexpectedly, experiments conducted at low and high OH levels yield the same SOA growth, whereas GECKO-A predicts greater SOA growth under high OH levels. SOA formation in the chamber is a result of a competition among the rates of gas-phase oxidation to low volatility products, wall deposition of these products, and condensation into the aerosol phase. Various processes, such as photolysis of condensed-phase products, particle-phase dimerization, and peroxy radical autoxidation, are explored to rationalize the observations. In order to explain the observed similar SOA growth under different OH levels, we conclude that vapor wall loss in the Caltech chamber is likely of order 10-5 s-1, consistent with previous experimental measurements in that chamber. We find that GECKO-A tends to overpredict the contribution to SOA of later-generation oxidation products under high OH conditions. The key role of the interplay among oxidation rate, product volatility, and vapor-wall deposition in chamber experiments is illustrated.

  17. SOA formation from the photooxidation of α-pinene: systematic exploration of the simulation of chamber data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McVay, Renee C.; Zhang, Xuan; Aumont, Bernard; Valorso, Richard; Camredon, Marie; La, Yuyi S.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2016-03-01

    Chemical mechanisms play an important role in simulating the atmospheric chemistry of volatile organic compound oxidation. Comparison of mechanism simulations with laboratory chamber data tests our level of understanding of the prevailing chemistry as well as the dynamic processes occurring in the chamber itself. α-Pinene photooxidation is a well-studied system experimentally, for which detailed chemical mechanisms have been formulated. Here, we present the results of simulating low-NO α-pinene photooxidation experiments conducted in the Caltech chamber with the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) under varying concentrations of seed particles and OH levels. Unexpectedly, experiments conducted at low and high OH levels yield the same secondary organic aerosol (SOA) growth, whereas GECKO-A predicts greater SOA growth under high OH levels. SOA formation in the chamber is a result of a competition among the rates of gas-phase oxidation to low-volatility products, wall deposition of these products, and condensation into the aerosol phase. Various processes - such as photolysis of condensed-phase products, particle-phase dimerization, and peroxy radical autoxidation - are explored to rationalize the observations. In order to explain the observed similar SOA growth at different OH levels, we conclude that vapor wall loss in the Caltech chamber is likely of order 10-5 s-1, consistent with previous experimental measurements in that chamber. We find that GECKO-A tends to overpredict the contribution to SOA of later-generation oxidation products under high-OH conditions. Moreover, we propose that autoxidation may alternatively resolve some or all of the measurement-model discrepancy, but this hypothesis cannot be confirmed until more explicit mechanisms are established for α-pinene autoxidation. The key role of the interplay among oxidation rate, product volatility, and vapor-wall deposition in chamber experiments is

  18. Identification of Organic Sulfate Esters in d-Limonene Ozonolysis SOA Under Acidic Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Y.; Mueller, C.; Boege, O.; Herrmann, H.

    2006-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) components from gas phase ozonolysis of d-limonene were investigated in a series of indoor chamber experiments. The compounds smaller than 300 Da were quantified using capillary electrophoresis coupled to electrospray ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry (CE/ESI-ITMS). HPLC coupled to an ESI-TOFMS and an ESI-ITMS was used for structural study of dimmers and oligomers. Only 10% of the produced SOA could be attributed to low molecular weight carboxylic acids (Mw<300). The oxidation products which have molecular weights over 300 were detected regardless of the seed particle acidity but the concentrations of these compounds were much higher for acidic seed particle experiments. Strong signals of the compounds with mass to charge ratios (m/z) 281, 465 and 481 were detected when sulphuric acid was used in the seed particles. These compounds showed a strong fragment of m/z 97 in MS2 or MS3 spectra indicating the presence of sulfate in the structures. HPLC/ESI-TOFMS analysis suggests the elemental compositions of C10H17O7S-, C20H33O10S- and C20H33O11S- for m/z 281, 465 and 481, respectively. Based on MS^{n} and TOFMS results, they are most likely organic sulfate esters, possibly formed by a heterogeneous acid catalyzed reaction of a limonene oxidation product and sulfuric acid in the particle phase. The concentrations of the organic sulfate ester were as high as 3.7 μgm-3 for m/z 281.

  19. Modeling Gas-Particle Partitioning of SOA: Effects of Aerosol Physical State and RH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuend, A.; Seinfeld, J.

    2011-12-01

    Aged tropospheric aerosol particles contain mixtures of inorganic salts, acids, water, and a large variety of organic compounds. In liquid aerosol particles non-ideal mixing of all species determines whether the condensed phase undergoes liquid-liquid phase separation or whether it is stable in a single mixed phase, and whether it contains solid salts in equilibrium with their saturated solution. The extended thermodynamic model AIOMFAC is able to predict such phase states by representing the variety of organic components using functional groups within a group-contribution concept. The number and composition of different condensed phases impacts the diversity of reaction media for multiphase chemistry and the gas-particle partitioning of semivolatile species. Recent studies show that under certain conditions biogenic and other organic-rich particles can be present in a highly viscous, semisolid or amorphous solid physical state, with consequences regarding reaction kinetics and mass transfer limitations. We present results of new gas-particle partitioning computations for aerosol chamber data using a model based on AIOMFAC activity coefficients and state-of-the-art vapor pressure estimation methods. Different environmental conditions in terms of temperature, relative humidity (RH), salt content, amount of precursor VOCs, and physical state of the particles are considered. We show how modifications of absorptive and adsorptive gas-particle mass transfer affects the total aerosol mass in the calculations and how the results of these modeling approaches compare to data of aerosol chamber experiments, such as alpha-pinene oxidation SOA. For a condensed phase in a mixed liquid state containing ammonium sulfate, the model predicts liquid-liquid phase separation up to high RH in case of, on average, moderately hydrophilic organic compounds, such as first generation oxidation products of alpha-pinene. The computations also reveal that treating liquid phases as ideal

  20. Experimental determination of the partitioning coefficient of β-pinene oxidation products in SOAs.

    PubMed

    Hohaus, Thorsten; Gensch, Iulia; Kimmel, Joel; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-06-14

    The composition of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) formed by β-pinene ozonolysis was experimentally investigated in the Juelich aerosol chamber. Partitioning of oxidation products between gas and particles was measured through concurrent concentration measurements in both phases. Partitioning coefficients (Kp) of 2.23 × 10(-5) ± 3.20 × 10(-6) m(3) μg(-1) for nopinone, 4.86 × 10(-4) ± 1.80 × 10(-4) m(3) μg(-1) for apoverbenone, 6.84 × 10(-4) ± 1.52 × 10(-4) m(3) μg(-1) for oxonopinone and 2.00 × 10(-3) ± 1.13 × 10(-3) m(3) μg(-1) for hydroxynopinone were derived, showing higher values for more oxygenated species. The observed Kp values were compared with values predicted using two different semi-empirical approaches. Both methods led to an underestimation of the partitioning coefficients with systematic differences between the methods. Assuming that the deviation between the experiment and the model is due to non-ideality of the mixed solution in particles, activity coefficients of 4.82 × 10(-2) for nopinone, 2.17 × 10(-3) for apoverbenone, 3.09 × 10(-1) for oxonopinone and 7.74 × 10(-1) for hydroxynopinone would result using the vapour pressure estimation technique that leads to higher Kp. We discuss that such large non-ideality for nopinone could arise due to particle phase processes lowering the effective nopinone vapour pressure such as diol- or dimer formation. The observed high partitioning coefficients compared to modelled results imply an underestimation of SOA mass by applying equilibrium conditions.

  1. Proximity-based access control for context-sensitive information provision in SOA-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajappan, Gowri; Wang, Xiaofei; Grant, Robert; Paulini, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) has enabled open-architecture integration of applications within an enterprise. For net-centric Command and Control (C2), this elucidates information sharing between applications and users, a critical requirement for mission success. The Information Technology (IT) access control schemes, which arbitrate who gets access to what information, do not yet have the contextual knowledge to dynamically allow this information sharing to happen dynamically. The access control might prevent legitimate users from accessing information relevant to the current mission context, since this context may be very different from the context for which the access privileges were configured. We evaluate a pair of data relevance measures - proximity and risk - and use these as the basis of dynamic access control. Proximity is a measure of the strength of connection between the user and the resource. However, proximity is not sufficient, since some data might have a negative impact, if leaked, which far outweighs importance to the subject's mission. For this, we use a risk measure to quantify the downside of data compromise. Given these contextual measures of proximity and risk, we investigate extending Attribute-Based Access Control (ABAC), which is used by the Department of Defense, and Role-Based Access Control (RBAC), which is widely used in the civilian market, so that these standards-based access control models are given contextual knowledge to enable dynamic information sharing. Furthermore, we consider the use of such a contextual access control scheme in a SOA-based environment, in particular for net-centric C2.

  2. Aerosol composition, sources and processes during wintertime in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Wang, Z. F.; Fu, P. Q.; Yang, T.; Jiang, Q.; Dong, H. B.; Li, J.; Jia, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    Air pollution is a major environmental concern during all seasons in the megacity of Beijing, China. Here we present the results from a winter study that was conducted from 21 November 2011 to 20 January 2012 with an Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) and various collocated instruments. The non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species vary dramatically with clean periods and pollution episodes alternating frequently. Compared to summer, wintertime submicron aerosols show much enhanced organics and chloride, which on average account for 52% and 5%, respectively, of the total NR-PM1 mass. All NR-PM1 species show quite different diurnal behaviors between summer and winter. For example, the wintertime nitrate presents a gradual increase during daytime and correlates well with secondary organic aerosol (OA), indicating a dominant role of photochemical production over gas-particle partitioning. Positive matrix factorization was performed on ACSM OA mass spectra, and identified three primary OA (POA) factors, i.e., hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA), cooking OA (COA), and coal combustion OA (CCOA), and one secondary factor, i.e., oxygenated OA (OOA). The POA dominates OA during wintertime, contributing 69%, with the other 31% being SOA. Further, all POA components show pronounced diurnal cycles with the highest concentrations occurring at nighttime. CCOA is the largest primary source during the heating season, on average accounting for 33% of OA and 17% of NR-PM1. CCOA also plays a significant role in chemically resolved particulate matter (PM) pollution as its mass contribution increases linearly as a function of NR-PM1 mass loadings. The SOA, however, presents a reverse trend, which might indicate the limited SOA formation during high PM pollution episodes in winter. The effects of meteorology on PM pollution and aerosol processing were also explored. In particular, the sulfate mass is largely enhanced during periods with high humidity because of fog

  3. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  4. Breeding Pierce’s disease resistant table and raisin grapes and the development of markers for additional sources of resistance 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-two seedless x seedless crosses to develop additional BC2 and BC3 V. arizonica and BC1 SEUS BD5-117 families were made in 2008. Powdery mildew resistance was included in five of these crosses. These crosses produced 5,148 berries, 8,824 ovules and 1,861 embryos. Nine seeded BC1 crosses bas...

  5. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation and Aging in a Flow Reactor in the Forested Southeast US during SOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, W.; Palm, B. B.; Hacker, L.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; de Sá, S. S.; Ayres, B. R.; Draper, D.; Fry, J.; Ortega, A. M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Pajunoja, A.; Virtanen, A.; Krechmer, J.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Thompson, S.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Stark, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Martin, S. T.; Farmer, D.; Brown, S. S.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    A major field campaign (Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study, SOAS) was conducted in summer 2013 in a forested area in Centreville Supersite, AL (SEARCH network) in the southeast U.S. To investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), 3 oxidation flow reactors (OFR) were used to expose ambient air to oxidants and their output was analyzed by state-of-the-art gas and aerosol instruments including a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS), a HR Proton-Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOFMS), and Two HR-TOF Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometers (HRToF-CIMS). Ambient air was exposed 24/7 to variable concentrations of each of the 3 main atmospheric oxidants (OH, NO3 radicals and O3) to investigate the oxidation of BVOCs (including isoprene derived epoxydiols, IEPOX) and SOA formation and aging. Effective OH exposures up to 1×1013 molec cm-3 s were achieved, equivalent to over a month of aging in the atmosphere. Multiple oxidation products from isoprene and monoterpenes including small gas-phase acids were observed in OH OFR. High SOA formation of up to 12 μg m-3 above ambient concentrations of 5 μg m-3 was observed under intermediate OH exposures, while very high OH exposures led to destruction of ~30% of ambient OA, indicating shifting contributions of functionalization vs. fragmentation, consistent with results from urban and terpene-dominated environments. The highest SOA enhancements were 3-4 times higher than ambient OA. More SOA is typically formed during nighttime when terpenes are higher and photochemistry is absent, and less during daytime when isoprene is higher, although the IEPOX pathway is suppressed in the OFR. SOA is also observed after exposure of ambient air to O3 or NO3, although the amounts and oxidation levels were lower than for OH. Formation of organic nitrates in the NO3 reaction will also be discussed.A major field campaign (Southern Oxidant and Aerosol

  6. Insights into Submicron Aerosol Composition and Sources from the WINTER Aircraft Campaign Over the Eastern US.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroder, J. C.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E. E.; Blake, N. J.; Hills, A. J.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Campos, T. L.; Brown, S. S.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The WINTER aircraft campaign was a recent field experiment to probe the sources and evolution of gas pollutants and aerosols in Northeast US urban and industrial plumes during the winter. A highly customized Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) was flown on the NCAR C-130 to characterize submicron aerosol composition and evolution. Thirteen research flights were conducted covering a wide range of conditions, including rural, urban, and marine environments during day and night. Organic aerosol (OA) was a large component of the submicron aerosol in the boundary layer. The fraction of OA (fOA) was smaller (35-40%) than in recent US summer campaigns (~60-70%). Biomass burning was observed to be an important source of OA in the boundary layer, which is consistent with recent wintertime studies that show a substantial contribution of residential wood burning to the OA loadings. OA oxygenation (O/C ratio) shows a broad distribution with a substantial fraction of smaller O/C ratios when compared to previous summertime campaigns. Since measurements were rarely made very close to primary sources (i.e. directly above urban areas), this is consistent with oxidative chemistry being slower during winter. SOA formation and aging in the NYC plume was observed during several flights and compared with summertime results from LA (CalNex) and Mexico City (MILAGRO). Additionally, an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) capable of oxidizing ambient air up to several equivalent days of oxidation was deployed for the first time in an aircraft platform. The aerosol outflow of the OFR was sampled with the AMS to provide real-time snapshots of the potential for aerosol formation and aging. For example, a case study of a flight through the Ohio River valley showed evidence of oxidation of SO2 to sulfate. The measured sulfate enhancements were in good agreement with our OFR chemical model. OFR results for SOA will be discussed.

  7. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  8. Potential N2O Emissions from the Tanks of Bromeliads Suggest an Additional Source of N2O in the Neotropics.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Marcel; Brandt, Franziska B; Brenzinger, Kristof; Martinson, Guntars O; Braker, Gesche

    2016-12-06

    We studied the propensity of the tank bromeliad Werauhia gladioliflora to emit the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) at current and at increased N deposition levels in the range of predicted future scenarios. Potential production rates and net accumulation of N2O from tank substrate corresponded to N availability. N2O was produced in excess at all N levels due to a low level of N2O reductase activity which agreed well with a low abundance of N2O reducers compared to nitrite reducers. Transcriptional activation, however, indicated that expression of denitrification genes may be enhanced with increasing N supply eventually leading to more efficient N2O turnover with potential for adaptation of denitrifier communities to higher N levels. Our findings indicate that tank bromeliads may constitute a novel source of N2O in Neotropical forest canopies but further studies are required to understand the size and significance of in situ N2O fluxes from tank bromeliads to the environment.

  9. Design and performance of 10-Gb/s L-band REAM-SOA for OLT Transmitter in next generation access networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hun; Jeong, Jong Sool; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Dong Churl; Park, Mi-Ran; Han, Yong-Tak; Kwon, Oh Kee; Kwon, O-Kyun

    2015-02-09

    We present a 10-Gb/s L-band reflective electro-absorption modulator integrated with a semiconductor optical amplifier (REAM-SOA) having improved transmission performance at very low input power of seed light. To decrease the input power of seed light, the absorption characteristics of the REAM are adjusted to reduce the amplified spontaneous emission light returned into the SOA, suppressing the gain saturation effect of the SOA. At a considerably low input power of -16 dBm, the REAM-SOA exhibits a low transmission penalty of about 1.2 dB after 50-km SMF transmission. Over a wide input power range from -16 dBm to 5 dBm, a penalty of less than 1.6 dB is achieved at 50-km transmission.

  10. Simulation and analysis of OOK-to-BPSK format conversion based on gain-transparent SOA used as optical phase-modulator.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Huang, Dexiu; Zhang, Xinliang; Zhu, Guangxi

    2007-12-24

    All-optical on-off keying (OOK) to binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) modulation format conversion based on gain-transparent semiconductor optical amplifier (GT-SOA) is simulated and analyzed, where GT-SOA is used as an all-optical phase-modulator (PM). Numerical simulation of the phase modulation effect of GT-SOA is performed using a wideband dynamic model of GT-SOA and the quality of the BPSK signal is evaluated using the differential-phase-Q factor. Performance improvement by holding light injection is analyzed and non-return-to-zero (NRZ) and return-to-zero (RZ) modulation formats of the OOK signal are considered.

  11. Potential biofuel additive from renewable sources--Kinetic study of formation of butyl acetate by heterogeneously catalyzed transesterification of ethyl acetate with butanol.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sami H; Al-Rashed, Osama; Azeez, Fadhel A; Merchant, Sabiha Q

    2011-11-01

    Butyl acetate holds great potential as a sustainable biofuel additive. Heterogeneously catalyzed transesterification of biobutanol and bioethylacetate can produce butyl acetate. This route is eco-friendly and offers several advantages over the commonly used Fischer Esterification. The Amberlite IR 120- and Amberlyst 15-catalyzed transesterification is studied in a batch reactor over a range of catalyst loading (6-12 wt.%), alcohol to ester feed ratio (1:3 to 3:1), and temperature (303.15-333.15K). A butanol mole fraction of 0.2 in the feed is found to be optimum. Amberlite IR 120 promotes faster kinetics under these conditions. The transesterifications studied are slightly exothermic. The moles of solvent sorbed per gram of catalyst decreases (ethanol>butanol>ethyl acetate>butyl acetate) with decrease in solubility parameter. The dual site models, the Langmuir Hinshelwood and Popken models, are the most successful in correlating the kinetics over Amberlite IR 120 and Amberlyst 15, respectively.

  12. Online Measurements of Highly Oxidized Organics in the Gas and Particle phase during SOAS and SENEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; Mohr, C.; Ehn, M.; Rubach, F.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Thornton, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    We present measurements of a large suite of gas and particle phase organic compounds made with a Filter Inlet for Gas and AEROsol (FIGAERO) coupled to a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS) developed at the University of Washington and with airborne HR-ToF-CIMS measurements. The FIGAERO instrument was deployed on the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber to study α-pinene oxidation, and subsequently at the SMEAR II forest station in Hyytiälä, Finland and the SOAS ground site, in Brent Alabama. During the Southern Atmosphere Study, a gas-phase only version of the HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed on the NOAA WP-3 aircraft as part of SENEX. We focus here on highly oxygenated organic compounds derived from monoterpene oxidation detected both aloft during SENEX and at the ground-based site during SOAS. In both chamber and the atmosphere, many highly oxidized, low volatility compounds were observed in the gas and particles and many of the same compositions detected in the gas-phase were detected in the particles upon temperature programmed thermal desorption. The fraction of a given compound measured in the particle phase follows expected trends with elemental composition such as O/C ratios, but many compounds would not be well described by an absorptive partitioning model assuming unity activity coefficients. The detailed structure in the thermograms reveals a significant contribution from large molecular weight organics and/or oligomers in both chamber and ambient aerosol samples. Approximately 50% of the measured organics in the particle phase are associated with compounds having effective vapour pressures 4 or more orders of magnitude lower than commonly measured monoterpene oxidation products. We discuss the implications of these findings for measurements of gas-particle partitioning and for evaluating the contribution of monoterpene oxidation to organic aerosol formation and growth. We also use the aircraft measurements and a

  13. Enhanced SOA formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic emissions during the CARES campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Shilling, John E.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Alexander, M. L.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Fortner, Edward; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, John T.; Sedlacek, Art; Setyan, Ari; Springston, S.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Zhang, Qi

    2013-02-21

    The CARES campaign was conducted during June, 2010 in the vicinity of Sacramento, California to study aerosol formation and aging in a region where anthropogenic and biogenic emissions regularly mix. Here, we describe measurements from an Aerodyne High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), and trace gas detectors (CO, NO, NOx) deployed on the G-1 research aircraft to investigate ambient gas- and particle-phase chemical composition. AMS measurements showed that the particle phase is dominated by organic aerosol (OA) (85% on average) with smaller concentrations of sulfate (5%), nitrate (6%) and ammonium (3%) observed. PTR-MS data showed that isoprene dominated the biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations (BVOCs), with monoterpene concentrations generally below the detection limit. Using two different metrics, median OA concentrations and the slope of plots of OA vs. CO concentrations (i.e., ΔOA/ΔCO), we contrast organic aerosol evolution on flight days with different prevailing meteorological conditions to elucidate the role of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on OA formation. Airmasses influenced predominantly by biogenic emissions had median OA concentrations of 2.9 μg/m3 and near zero ΔOA/ΔCO. Those influenced predominantly by anthropogenic emissions had median OA concentrations of 4.7 μg/m3 and ΔOA/ΔCO ratios of 35 - 44 μg/m3ppmv. When biogenic and anthropogenic emissions mix, OA levels are dramatically enhanced with median OA concentrations of 11.4 μg/m3 and ΔOA/ΔCO ratios of 77 - 157 μg/m3ppmv. Taken together, our observations show that production of OA is enhanced when anthropogenic emissions from Sacramento mix with isoprene-rich air from the foothills. A strong, non-linear dependence of SOA yield from isoprene is the mechanistic explanation for this enhancement most consistent with both the gas- and particle-phase data. If these observations are found to be robust

  14. Polarization insensitive all-optical up-conversion for ROF systems based on parallel pump FWM in a SOA.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia; Dong, Ze; Cao, Zizheng; Chen, Lin; Wen, Shuangchun; Yu, Jianguo

    2009-04-27

    We have proposed and experimentally investigated polarization insensitive all-optical up-conversion for ROF system based on FWM in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). The parallel pump is generated based on odd-order optical sidebands and carrier suppression using an external intensity modulator and a cascaded optical filter. Therefore, the two pumps are always parallel and phase locked, which makes system polarization insensitive. After FWM in a SOA and optical filtering, similar to single sideband (SSB) 40 GHz optical millimeter-wave is generated only using 10 GHz RF as local oscillator (LO). The receiver sensitivity at a BER of 10(-9) for the up-converted signals is -28.4 dBm. The power penalty for the up-converted downstream signals is smaller than 1 dBm after 20 km SSMF-28 transmission.

  15. Single SOA based 16 DWDM channels all-optical NRZ-to-RZ format conversions with different duty cycles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang; Rosas-Fernández, J B; Huang, Dexiu; Penty, R V; White, I H

    2008-09-29

    We demonstrate simultaneous NRZ-to-RZ conversion for 16 DWDM channels, using a single SOA and a subsequent delay interferometer (DI) acting as a comb-like filter to control the obtained pulse-width for all of the channels. The SOA is operated in deep saturation, resulting in weak cross gain modulation and cross phase modulation induced crosstalk between different NRZ channels. By adjusting the detuning between the peaks in the DI spectrum and each corresponding carrier, good quality RZ signals with different duty cycles can be achieved. Bit-error-rate measurements show negative power penalties for the obtained RZ signals with different duty cycles. Significant timing jitter reductions for all channels show the good regenerative performance of the proposed converter.

  16. High-bandwidth generation of duobinary and alternate-mark-inversion modulation formats using SOA-based signal processing.

    PubMed

    Dailey, James M; Power, Mark J; Webb, Roderick P; Manning, Robert J

    2011-12-19

    We report on the novel all-optical generation of duobinary (DB) and alternate-mark-inversion (AMI) modulation formats at 42.6 Gb/s from an input on-off keyed signal. The modulation converter consists of two semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer gates. A detailed SOA model numerically confirms the operational principles and experimental data shows successful AMI and DB conversion at 42.6 Gb/s. We also predict that the operational bandwidth can be extended beyond 40 Gb/s by utilizing a new pattern-effect suppression scheme, and demonstrate dramatic reductions in patterning up to 160 Gb/s. We show an increasing trade-off between pattern-effect reduction and mean output power with increasing bitrate.

  17. A photonic-assisted periodic triangular-shaped pulses generator based on FWM effect in an SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jin; Ning, Tigang; Li, Jing; Chen, Hongyao; Li, Yueqin; Zhang, Chan

    2016-12-01

    We propose a photonic-assisted triangular-shaped pulse train generator based on four-wave mixing effect (FWM) in a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). A dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder operated at quadrupling RF modulation is employed to generate two primary sidebands (±2nd) in spectrum of the triangular-shaped pulse. Then the FWM effect leads to generation of two new frequency components. By setting the modulation index and bias current of the SOA properly, the generated harmonics of optical intensity can be corresponding to the Fourier components of typical periodic triangular pulses. Finally, a triangular pulse train with tunable repetition rate can be obtained. Numerical simulations have been taken to evaluate the impact of several key parameters to make the scheme more practical.

  18. Kilogram-scale production of SnO(2) yolk-shell powders by a spray-drying process using dextrin as carbon source and drying additive.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung Ho; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-05-05

    A simple and general method for the large-scale production of yolk-shell powders with various compositions by a spray-drying process is reported. Metal salt/dextrin composite powders with a spherical and dense structure were obtained by spray drying and transformed into yolk-shell powders by simple combustion in air. Dextrin plays a key role in the preparation of precursor powders for fabricating yolk-shell powders by spray drying. Droplets containing metal salts and dextrin show good drying characteristics even in a severe environment of high humidity. Sucrose, glucose, and polyvinylpyrrolidone are widely used as carbon sources in the preparation of metal oxide/carbon composite powders; however, they are not appropriate for large-scale spray-drying processes because of their caramelization properties and adherence to the surface of the spray dryer. SnO2 yolk-shell powders were studied as the first target material in the spray-drying process. Combustion of tin oxalate/dextrin composite powders at 600 °C in air produced single-shelled SnO2 yolk-shell powders with the configuration SnO2 @void@SnO2 . The SnO2 yolk-shell powders prepared by the simple spray-drying process showed superior electrochemical properties, even at high current densities. The discharge capacities of the SnO2 yolk-shell powders at a current density of 2000 mA g(-1) were 645 and 570 mA h g(-1) for the second and 100th cycles, respectively; the corresponding capacity retention measured for the second cycle was 88 %.

  19. Indoor transient SOA formation from ozone + α-pinene reactions: Impacts of air exchange and initial product concentrations, and comparison to limonene ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssefi, Somayeh; Waring, Michael S.

    2015-07-01

    The ozonolysis of reactive organic gases (ROG), e.g. terpenes, generates secondary organic aerosol (SOA) indoors. The SOA formation strength of such reactions is parameterized by the aerosol mass fraction (AMF), a.k.a. SOA yield, which is the mass ratio of generated SOA to oxidized ROG. AMFs vary in magnitude both among and for individual ROGs. Here, we quantified dynamic SOA formation from the ozonolysis of α-pinene with 'transient AMFs,' which describe SOA formation due to pulse emission of a ROG in an indoor space with air exchange, as is common when consumer products are intermittently used in ventilated buildings. We performed 19 experiments at low, moderate, and high (0.30, 0.52, and 0.94 h-1, respectively) air exchange rates (AER) at varying concentrations of initial reactants. Transient AMFs as a function of peak SOA concentrations ranged from 0.071 to 0.25, and they tended to increase as the AER and product of the initial reactant concentrations increased. Compared to our similar research on limonene ozonolysis (Youssefi and Waring, 2014), for which formation strength was driven by secondary ozone reactions, the AER impact for α-pinene was opposite in direction and weaker, while the initial reactant product impact was in the same direction but stronger for α-pinene than for limonene. Linear fits of AMFs for α-pinene ozonolysis as a function of the AER and initial reactant concentrations are provided so that future indoor models can predict SOA formation strength.

  20. Novel approach for chirp and output power compensation applied to a 40-Gbit/s EADFB laser integrated with a short SOA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Wataru; Arai, Masakazu; Fujisawa, Takeshi; Sato, Tomonari; Ito, Toshio; Hasebe, Koichi; Kanazawa, Shigeru; Ueda, Yuta; Yamanaka, Takayuki; Sanjoh, Hiroaki

    2015-04-06

    We propose a novel approach for simultaneously controlling the chirp and increasing the output power of an EADFB laser by monolithically integrating a short-cavity SOA. We achieved a 40-Gbit/s 5-km SMF transmission at a wavelength of 1.55 μm by using an EADFB SOA with a lower power consumption than a stand-alone EADFB laser.

  1. Influence of dry deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC) on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the Mexico City plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodzic, Alma; Madronich, Sasha; Aumont, Bernard; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Karl, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The dry deposition removal of organic compounds from the atmosphere and its impact on organic aerosol mass is currently unexplored and unaccounted for in chemistry-climate models. The main reason for this omission is that current models use simplified SOA mechanisms that lump precursors and their products into volatility bins, therefore losing information on other important properties of individual molecules (or groups) that are needed to calculate dry deposition. In this study, we apply the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to simulate SOA formation and estimate the influence of dry deposition of VOCs on SOA concentrations downwind of Mexico City. SOA precursors considered here include short- and long-chain alkanes (C3-25), alkenes, and light aromatics. The results suggest that 90% of SOA produced in Mexico City originates from the oxidation and partitioning of long-chain (C>12) alkanes, while the regionally exported SOA is almost equally produced from long-chain alkanes and from shorter alkanes and light aromatics. We show that dry deposition of oxidized gases is not an efficient sink for SOA, as it removes <5% of SOA within the city's boundary layer and ~15% downwind. We discuss reasons for this limited influence, and investigate separately the impacts on short and long-chain species. We show that the dry deposition is competing with the uptake of gases to the aerosol phase, and because dry deposition of submicron aerosols is slow, condensation onto particles protects organic gases from deposition and therefore increases their atmospheric burden and lifetime. In the absence of this condensation, ~50% of the regionally produced mass would have been dry-deposited.

  2. A novel kind of programmable 3(n) feed-forward optical fiber true delay line based on SOA.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinwan; Peng, Limei; Wang, Songbo; Kim, Young-Chon; Chen, Jianping

    2007-12-10

    A new kind of 3(n) feed-forward programmable optical fiber true delay line was proposed. Theoretical analysis was presented on its delay performance and expandability. Experimental demonstration was given to show the implementation of such delay lines using SOAs and Farady rotation mirrors. Delay step as small as 0.5 ps with precision of about 0.03 ps was achieved. Measurement was performed to verify the feasibility and results are given.

  3. Diminution of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride toxicity on Listeria monocytogenes growth by iron source addition to the culture medium.

    PubMed

    Junillon, Thomas; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre

    2014-04-01

    Tetrazolium salts (TTZ) such as 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) are readily reduced by bacterial populations of various genus. The reduced form of these redox indicators is conspicuously colored allowing a quick and easy detection of growth. The studies are mainly confined to Gram negative bacteria because of an important toxic effect of tetrazolium salts on Gram positive bacteria. Indeed, we observed an important impact of different tetrazolium salts on Listeria monocytogenes growth, curiously limited to an increase in the duration of the lag phase. In this study, we demonstrate that increasing the iron concentration in a medium containing TTC leads to a significant decrease of the lag phase. L. monocytogenes growth was kinetically measured and growth parameters were estimated using the Baranyi model. While lag phase diminution was found to be iron concentration dependent, growth rate was not affected. Addition of iron enables growth of some strains totally inhibited by a 0.4 g/l of TTC and for the other a significant reduction of the latency is observed. The nature of the mechanism resulting in a decrease of the observed lag phase remains unclear. Then, the use of iron supplementation may be proposed to overcome the inhibitory effect of TTC on L. monocytogenes.

  4. Effect of the addition of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the batch biological sulphate reduction using grass cellulose as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2013-12-01

    Mineral mining generates acidic, saline, metal-rich mine waters, often referred to as acid mine drainage (AMD). Treatment of AMD and recovering saleable products during the treatment process are a necessity since water is, especially in South Africa, a scarce commodity. The aim of the study presented here was to investigate the effect of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the biological removal of sulphate from AMD in batch reactors. The performance of the reactors was assessed by means of sulphate reduction, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acid (VFA) utilisation and volatile suspended solids (VSS) concentration. To this end, three batch reactors, A, B and C (volume 2.5 L), were operated similarly with the exception of the addition of grass cuttings and iron filings. Reactors A and B received twice as much grass (100 g) as C (50 g). Reactor A received no iron filings to act as a control, while reactors B and C received 50-g iron filings for the experimental duration. The results showed that Fe(0) appears to provide sustained sulphate removal when sufficient grass substrate is available. In reactors A and C, sulphate removal efficiency was higher when the COD concentration was lower due to utilisation. In reactor B, sulphate removal efficiency was accompanied by an accumulation of COD as hydrogen (H2) provided by the Fe(0) was utilised for sulphate reduction. Furthermore, these results showed the potential of Fe(0) to enhance the participation of microorganisms in sulphate reduction.

  5. Intermodulation and harmonic distortion in slow light Microwave Photonic phase shifters based on Coherent Population Oscillations in SOAs.

    PubMed

    Gasulla, Ivana; Sancho, Juan; Capmany, José; Lloret, Juan; Sales, Salvador

    2010-12-06

    We theoretically and experimentally evaluate the propagation, generation and amplification of signal, harmonic and intermodulation distortion terms inside a Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA) under Coherent Population Oscillation (CPO) regime. For that purpose, we present a general optical field model, valid for any arbitrarily-spaced radiofrequency tones, which is necessary to correctly describe the operation of CPO based slow light Microwave Photonic phase shifters which comprise an electrooptic modulator and a SOA followed by an optical filter and supplements another recently published for true time delay operation based on the propagation of optical intensities. The phase shifter performance has been evaluated in terms of the nonlinear distortion up to 3rd order, for a modulating signal constituted of two tones, in function of the electrooptic modulator input RF power and the SOA input optical power, obtaining a very good agreement between theoretical and experimental results. A complete theoretical spectral analysis is also presented which shows that under small signal operation conditions, the 3rd order intermodulation products at 2Ω1 + Ω2 and 2Ω2 + Ω1 experience a power dip/phase transition characteristic of the fundamental tones phase shifting operation.

  6. Performing broadband optical transmission links by appropriate spectral combination of broadband SOA gain, Raman amplification and transmission fiber losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motaweh, T.; Sharaiha, A.; Ghisa, L.; Morel, P.; Guégan, M.; Brenot, R.; Verdier, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the principle of a broadband optical transmission link based on the appropriate combination of the spectral profiles of broadband SOA gain, Raman amplification and transmission fiber losses. We show that, thanks to this principle, a bandwidth as wide as 89 nm (defined at -1 dB) over 75.5 km can be obtained. This bandwidth remains better than 80 nm over a wide range of optical input powers and broadband SOA bias currents, by optimizing the Raman pump. We also show theoretically that the bandwidth of our link is nearly constant for a fiber length from 25 to 100 km optimizing the SOA current. Our broadband transmission link, extended by 24.5 km of fiber, is then validated by achieving the transmission of five CWDM channels modulated at 10 Gbit/s. All five channels were transmitted over 100 km with a minimum received power sensibility of about -15.5 dBm for a reference BER of 10-3.

  7. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas/wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chamber experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas/wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. This work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up to 0.35 yield unit due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.

  8. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool, which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas-wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chamber experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas-wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. This work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up a factor of 2 due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.

  9. Simulation of aromatic SOA formation using the lumping model integrated with explicit gas-phase kinetic mechanisms and aerosol-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Y.; Jang, M.; Beardsley, R. L.

    2013-03-01

    The Unified Partitioning-Aerosol phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model has been developed to predict the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through multiphase reactions. An explicit gas-kinetic model was employed to express gas-phase oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Gas-phase products are grouped based on volatility (6 levels) and reactivity (5 levels) and used to construct the stoichiometric coefficients (αi,j) matrix, the set of parameters used to describe the concentrations of organic compounds in multiphase. Weighting of the αi,j matrix as a function of NOx improved the evaluation of NOx effects on SOA. The total amount of organic matter (OMT) is predicted by two modules in the UNIPAR model: OMP by a partitioning process and OMAR by aerosol-phase reactions. OMP is estimated using the SOA partitioning model that has been used in a regional air quality model (CMAQ 5.0.1). OMAR predicts multiphase reactions of organic compounds, such as oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate (OS) formation. The model was evaluated with the SOA data produced from the photooxidation of toluene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene using an outdoor reactor (UF-APHOR chamber). The model reasonably simulates SOA formation under various aerosol acidities, NOx concentrations, humidities and temperatures. Furthermore, the OS fraction in the SOA predicted by the model was in good agreement with the experimentally measured OS fraction.

  10. Primary sources and secondary formation of organic aerosols in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Hu, Min; Guo, Qingfeng; Zhang, Xin; Zheng, Mei; Zheng, Jun; Chang, Chih Chung; Schauer, James J; Zhang, Renyi

    2012-09-18

    Ambient aerosol samples were collected at an urban site and an upwind rural site of Beijing during the CAREBEIJING-2008 (Campaigns of Air quality REsearch in BEIJING and surrounding region) summer field campaign. Contributions of primary particles and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) were estimated by chemical mass balance (CMB) modeling and tracer-yield method. The apportioned primary and secondary sources explain 73.8% ± 9.7% and 79.6% ± 10.1% of the measured OC at the urban and rural sites, respectively. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) contributes to 32.5 ± 15.9% of the organic carbon (OC) at the urban site, with 17.4 ± 7.6% from toluene, 9.7 ± 5.4% from isoprene, 5.1 ± 2.0% from α-pinene, and 2.3 ± 1.7% from β-caryophyllene. At the rural site, the secondary sources are responsible for 38.4 ± 14.4% of the OC, with the contributions of 17.3 ± 6.9%, 13.9 ± 9.1%, 5.6 ± 1.9%, and 1.7 ± 1.0% from toluene, isoprene, α-pinene, and β-caryophyllene, respectively. Compared with other regions in the world, SOA in Beijing is less aged, but the concentrations are much higher; between the sites, SOA is more aged and affected by regional transport at the urban site. The high SOA loading in Beijing is probably attributed to the high regional SOC background (~2 μg m(-3)). The toluene SOC concentration is high and comparable at the two sites, implying that some anthropogenic components, at least toluene SOA, are widespread in Beijing and represents a major factor in affecting the regional air quality. The aerosol gaseous precursor concentrations and temperature correlate well with SOA, both affecting SOA formation. The significant SOA enhancement with increasing water uptake and acidification indicates that the aqueous-phase reactions are largely responsible SOA formation in Beijing.

  11. NGSI student activities in open source information analysis in support of the training program of the U.S. DOE laboratories for the entry into force of the additional protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M Analisa; Uribe, Eva C; Sandoval, Marisa N; Boyer, Brian D; Stevens, Rebecca S

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 a joint team from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) consisting of specialists in training of IAEA inspectors in the use of complementary access activities formulated a training program to prepare the U.S. Doe laboratories for the entry into force of the Additional Protocol. As a major part of the support of the activity, LANL summer interns provided open source information analysis to the LANL-BNL mock inspection team. They were a part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's (NGSI) summer intern program aimed at producing the next generation of safeguards specialists. This paper describes how they used open source information to 'backstop' the LANL-BNL team's effort to construct meaningful Additional Protocol Complementary Access training scenarios for each of the three DOE laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  12. Archaeological implications of the geology and chronology of the Soa basin, Flores, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Paul B.; Morwood, Mike; Hobbs, Douglas; Aziz Suminto, Fachroel; Situmorang, Mangatas; Raza, Asaf; Maas, Roland

    2001-07-01

    The timing of arrival of early hominids in Southeast Asia has major implications for models of hominid evolution. The majority of evidence for the earliest appearance of hominids in the region has previously come from Java in western Indonesia. Much of this evidence remains controversial owing to a poor understanding of the stratigraphic and chronologic relationships of the depositional units from which the material was derived. Before artifacts may be placed into their proper archaeological context, the geologic history of archaeological sites must be thoroughly understood, and deposits containing artifacts must be properly dated. An extensive investigation has been undertaken on the island of Flores, in eastern Indonesia, to determine the depositional and chronological history of stratigraphic units within the Soa basin; many of the units are associated with stone artifacts attributed to Homo erectus. Zircon fission-track dates of tuffaceous deposits within this lacustrine basin now provide the most reliable data concerning the true time of arrival of Homo erectus into Southeast Asia and indicate that these early hominids must have successfully begun colonizing eastern Indonesia by ca. 840 ka.

  13. An LDMOS with large SOA and low specific on-resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenfang, Du; Xinjiang, Lyu; Xingbi, Chen

    2016-05-01

    An LDMOS with nearly rectangular-shape safe operation area (SOA) and low specific on-resistance is proposed. By utilizing a split gate, an electron accumulation layer is formed near the surface of the n-drift region to improve current conduction capability during on-state operation. As a result, the specific on-resistance can be lowered down to 74.7 mΩ·cm2 for a 600 V device from simulation. Furthermore, under high-voltage and high-current conditions, electrons and holes flow as majority carriers in the n-drift region and p-type split gate, respectively. Due to charge compensation occurring between holes and electrons, the local electric field is reduced and impact ionization is weakened in the proposed device. Therefore, a higher on-state breakdown voltage at large VGS is obtained and snap-back is suppressed as well. Project supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51237001).

  14. Experimental determination of partition coefficient for β-pinene ozonolysis products in SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensch, Iulia; Hohaus, Thorsten; Kimmel, Joel; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, simultaneous measurement of β-pinene ozonolysis products in the gas phase by Proton Transfer Reaction - Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToFMS) and particle phase by using an Aerosol Collection Module coupled to a Gas Chromatograph - Mass Spectrometer (ACM-GC-MS) were employed to determine the equilibrium partitioning coefficient (Kp) of several semi-volatile organic species. Mean Kp values of 6.7 10-5 ± 2.5 10-5 for nopinone, 4.8 10-4 ± 1.7 10-4 for apoverbenone, 7.0 10-4 ± 1.7 10-4 for oxonopinone and 1.9 10-3 ± 1.1 10-3 for hydroxynopinone were obtained. The results were compared with calculations arising from studies on the gas-particle partitioning, based on the Pankow absorption model. The experimental partition coefficients are two to three orders of magnitudes higher than the calculated values, leading to the conclusion that the amount of semi-volatile organic compounds in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is currently underestimated by the theory, thus impacting on the modeling of the organic matter in the atmosphere.

  15. A SOA-Based Solution to Monitor Vaccination Coverage Among HIV-Infected Patients in Liguria.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Barbara; Gazzarata, Roberta; Sticchi, Laura; Giacomini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination in HIV-infected patients constitutes an essential tool in the prevention of the most common infectious diseases. The Ligurian Vaccination in HIV Program is a proposed vaccination schedule specifically dedicated to this risk group. Selective strategies are proposed within this program, employing ICT (Information and Communication) tools to identify this susceptible target group, to monitor immunization coverage over time and to manage failures and defaulting. The proposal is to connect an immunization registry system to an existing regional platform that allows clinical data re-use among several medical structures, to completely manage the vaccination process. This architecture will adopt a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) approach and standard HSSP (Health Services Specification Program) interfaces to support interoperability. According to the presented solution, vaccination administration information retrieved from the immunization registry will be structured according to the specifications within the immunization section of the HL7 (Health Level 7) CCD (Continuity of Care Document) document. Immunization coverage will be evaluated through the continuous monitoring of serology and antibody titers gathered from the hospital LIS (Laboratory Information System) structured into a HL7 Version 3 (v3) Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 (CDA R2).

  16. Discovery of a Plains Caldera Complex and Extinct Lava Lake in Arabia Terra, Mars: Implications for the Discovery of Additional Highland Volcanic Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob; Michalski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Several irregularly shaped topographic depressions occur near the dichotomy boundary in northern Arabia Terra, Mars. The geomorphology of these features suggests that they formed by collapse, opposed to meteor impact. At least one depression (approx.55 by 85 km) displays geologic features indicating a complex, multi-stage collapse history. Features within and around the collapse structure indicate volcanic processes. The complex occurs within Hesperian ridged plains of likely volcanic origin and displays no crater rim or evidence for ejecta. Instead the depression consists of a series of circumferential graben and down-dropped blocks which also display upper surfaces similar to ridged plain lavas. Large blocks within the depression are tilted towards the crater center, and display graben that appear to have originally been linked with circumferential graben outside of the complex related to earlier collapse events. A nearly 700 m high mound exists along a graben within the complex that might be a vent. The deepest depression displays two sets of nearly continuous terraces, which we interpret as high-stands of a drained lava lake. These features appear similar to the black ledge described during the Kilauea Iki eruption in 1959. A lacustrine origin for the terraces seems unlikely because of the paucity of channels found in or around the depression that could be linked to aqueous surface processes. In addition, there is no obvious evidence for lacustrine sediments within the basin. Together with the presence of significant faulting that is indicative of collapse we conclude that this crater complex represents a large caldera formed in the Late Noachian to Early Hesperian. Other linear and irregular depressions in the region also might be linked to ancient volcanism. If that hypothesis is correct, it suggests that northern Arabia Terra could contain a large, previously unrecognized highland igneous province. Evacuation of magma via explosive and effusive activity

  17. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  18. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  19. Identifying organic aerosol sources by comparing functional group composition in chamber and atmospheric particles.

    PubMed

    Russell, Lynn M; Bahadur, Ranjit; Ziemann, Paul J

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of submicron particles by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in 14 campaigns in North America, Asia, South America, and Europe were used to identify characteristic organic functional group compositions of fuel combustion, terrestrial vegetation, and ocean bubble bursting sources, each of which often accounts for more than a third of organic mass (OM), and some of which is secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from gas-phase precursors. The majority of the OM consists of alkane, carboxylic acid, hydroxyl, and carbonyl groups. The organic functional groups formed from combustion and vegetation emissions are similar to the secondary products identified in chamber studies. The near absence of carbonyl groups in the observed SOA associated with combustion is consistent with alkane rather than aromatic precursors, and the absence of organonitrate groups can be explained by their hydrolysis in humid ambient conditions. The remote forest observations have ratios of carboxylic acid, organic hydroxyl, and nonacid carbonyl groups similar to those observed for isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, but in biogenic aerosols transported downwind of urban areas the formation of esters replaces the acid and hydroxyl groups and leaves only nonacid carbonyl groups. The carbonyl groups in SOA associated with vegetation emissions provides striking evidence for the mechanism of esterification as the pathway for possible oligomerization reactions in the atmosphere. Forest fires include biogenic emissions that produce SOA with organic components similar to isoprene and monoterpene chamber studies, also resulting in nonacid carbonyl groups in SOA.

  20. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) Chambers during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centreville, AL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Y.; Karakurt Cevik, B.; Hernandez, C.; Griffin, R. J.; Taylor, N.; Matus, J.; Collins, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) represents a large portion of sub-micron particulate matter on a global scale. The composition of SOA and its formation processes are heavily influenced by anthropogenic and biogenic activity. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted naturally from forests or from human activity serve as precursors to SOA formation. Biogenic SOA (BSOA) is formed from biogenic VOCs and is prevalent in forested regions like the Southeastern United States. The formation and enhancement of BSOA under anthropogenic influences such as nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and oxygen radicals are still not well understood. The lack of information on anthropogenic BSOA enhancement and the reversibility of SOA formation could explain the underprediction of SOA in current models. To address some of these gaps in knowledge, this study was conducted as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in Centreville, AL during the summer of 2013. SOA growth experiments were conducted in two Captive Aerosol Growth and Evolution (CAGE) outdoor chambers located at the SEARCH site. Ambient trace gas concentrations were maintained in these chambers using semi-permeable gas-exchange membranes, while studying the growth of injected monodisperse seed aerosol. The control chamber was operated under ambient conditions; the relative humidity and oxidant and NOx levels were perturbed in the second chamber. This design allows experiments to capture the natural BSOA formation processes in the southeastern atmosphere and to study the influence of anthropogenic activity on aerosol chemistry. Chamber experiments were periodically monitored with physical and chemical instrumentation including a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA), and an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The CAGE experiments focused on SOA

  1. Characteristics and sources of carbonaceous aerosols from Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.-J.; Zhu, C.-S.; Tie, X.-X.; Geng, F.-H.; Xu, H.-M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Wang, G.-H.; Han, Y.-M.; Ho, K.-F.

    2012-07-01

    An intensive investigation of carbonaceous PM2.5 and TSP from Pudong (China) was conducted as part of the MIRAGE-Shanghai Experiment in 2009. Data for organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), organic species, including C17 to C40 n-alkanes and 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and stable C isotopes OC (δ13COC) and EC (δ13CEC) were used to evaluate the aerosols' temporal variations and identify presumptive sources. High OC/EC ratios indicated a large fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); high char/soot ratios indicated stronger contributions to EC from motor vehicles and coal combustion than biomass burning. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicated that much of the SOA was produced via coal combustion. Isotope abundances (δ13COC = -24.5 ± 0.8‰ and δ13CEC = -25.1 ± 0.6‰) indicated that fossil fuels were the most important source for carbonaceous PM2.5, with lesser impacts from biomass burning and natural sources. An EC tracer system and isotope mass balance calculations showed that the relative contributions to total carbon from coal combustion, motor vehicle exhaust, and SOA were 41%, 21%, and 31%: other primary sources such as marine, soil and biogenic emissions contributed 7%. Combined analyses of OC and EC, n-alkanes and PAHs, and stable carbon isotopes provide a new way to apportion the sources of carbonaceous particles.

  2. Primary to secondary organic aerosol: evolution of organic emissions from mobile combustion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presto, A. A.; Gordon, T. D.; Robinson, A. L.

    2014-05-01

    A series of smog chamber experiments were conducted to investigate the transformation of primary organic aerosol (POA) and formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) during the photooxidation of dilute exhaust from a fleet of gasoline and diesel motor vehicles and two gas-turbine engines. In experiments where POA was present in the chamber at the onset of photooxidation, positive matrix factorization (PMF) was used to determine separate POA and SOA factors from aerosol mass spectrometer data. A 2-factor solution, with one POA factor and one SOA factor, was sufficient to describe the organic aerosol for gasoline vehicles, diesel vehicles, and one of the gas-turbine engines. Experiments with the second gas-turbine engine required a 3-factor PMF solution with a POA factor and two SOA factors. Results from the PMF analysis were compared to the residual method for determining SOA and POA mass concentrations. The residual method apportioned a larger fraction of the organic aerosol mass as POA because it assumes that all mass at m / z 57 is associated with POA. The POA mass spectrum for the gasoline and diesel vehicles exhibited high abundances of the CnH2n+1 series of ions (m / z 43, 57, etc.) and was similar to the mass spectra of the hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol factor determined from ambient data sets with one exception, a diesel vehicle equipped with a diesel oxidation catalyst. POA mass spectra for the gas-turbine engines are enriched in the CnH2n-1 series of ions (m / z 41, 55, etc.), consistent with the composition of the lubricating oil used in these engines. The SOA formed from the three sources exhibits high abundances of m / z 44 and 43, indicative of mild oxidation. The SOA mass spectra are consistent with less-oxidized ambient SV-OOA (semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosols) and fall within the triangular region of f44 versus f43 defined by ambient measurements. However there is poor absolute agreement between the experimentally derived SOA mass

  3. Oil Sands Operations in Alberta, Canada: A large source of secondary organic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Li, S. M.; Hayden, K.; Taha, Y. M.; Stroud, C.; Darlington, A. L.; Drollette, B.; Gordon, M.; Lee, P.; Liu, P.; Leithead, A.; Moussa, S.; Wang, D.; O'Brien, J.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Staebler, R. M.; Han, Y.; Tokarek, T. W.; Osthoff, H. D.; Makar, P.; Zhang, J.; Plata, D.; Gentner, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Little is known of the reaction products of emissions to the atmosphere from extraction of oil from unconventional sources in the oil sands (OS) region of Alberta, Canada. This study examines these reaction products, and in particular, the extent to which they form secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which can significantly contribute to regional particulate matter formation. An aircraft measurement campaign was conducted over the Athabasca oil sands region between August 13 and September 7, 2013. A broad suite of measurements were made during 22 flights, including organic aerosol mass and composition with a High Resolution Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and organic aerosol gas-phase precursors by Proton Transfer Reaction (PTR) and off-line gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Large concentrations of organic aerosol were measured downwind of the OS region, which we show to be entirely secondary in nature. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that bitumen (the mined product) contains semi-volatile vapours in the C12-C18 range that will be emitted at ambient temperatures. When oxidized, these vapours form SOA with highly similar HR-ToF-AMS spectra to the SOA measured in the flights. Box modelling of the OS plume evolution indicated that the measured levels of traditional volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are not capable of accounting for the amount of SOA formed in OS plumes. This discrepancy is only reconciled in the model by including bitumen vapours along with their oxidation and condensation into the model. The concentration of bitumen vapours required to produce SOA matching observations is similar to that of traditional VOC precursors of SOA. It was further estimated that the cumulative SOA mass formation approximately 100 km downwind of the OS during these flights, and under these meteorological conditions was up to 82 tonnes/day. The combination of airborne measurements, laboratory experiments and box modelling indicated that semi

  4. Simulation of aromatic SOA formation using the lumping model integrated with explicit gas-phase kinetic mechanisms and aerosol-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Y.; Jang, M.; Beardsley, R. L.

    2014-04-01

    The Unified Partitioning-Aerosol phase Reaction (UNIPAR) model has been developed to predict the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through multiphase reactions. The model was evaluated with aromatic SOA data produced from the photooxidation of toluene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (135-TMB) under various concentrations of NOx and SO2 using an outdoor reactor (University of Florida Atmospheric PHotochemical Outdoor Reactor (UF-APHOR) chamber). When inorganic species (sulfate, ammonium and water) are present in aerosol, the prediction of both toluene SOA and 135-TMB SOA, in which the oxygen-to-carbon (O : C) ratio is lower than 0.62, are approached under the assumption of a complete organic/electrolyte-phase separation below a certain relative humidity. An explicit gas-kinetic model was employed to express gas-phase oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons. Gas-phase products are grouped based on their volatility (6 levels) and reactivity (5 levels) and exploited to construct the stoichiometric coefficient (αi,j) matrix, the set of parameters used to describe the concentrations of organic compounds in multiphase. Weighting of the αi,j matrix as a function of NOx improved the evaluation of NOx effects on aromatic SOA. The total amount of organic matter (OMT) is predicted by two modules in the UNIPAR model: OMP by a partitioning process and OMAR by aerosol-phase reactions. The OMAR module predicts multiphase reactions of organic compounds, such as oligomerization, acid-catalyzed reactions, and organosulfate (OS) formation. The model reasonably simulates SOA formation under various aerosol acidities, NOx concentrations, humidities and temperatures. Furthermore, the OS fractions in the SOA predicted by the model were in good agreement with the experimentally measured OS fractions.

  5. Aqueous Oxidation of Green Leaf Volatiles as a Source of Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards-Henderson, N. K.; Hansel, A.; Pham, A. T.; Vempati, H. S.; Valsaraj, K. T.; Anastasio, C.

    2013-12-01

    Vegetation emits volatile oxygenated hydrocarbons - the green leaf volatiles (GLVs) - which are formed from the biochemical conversion of linoleic and linolenic acids within plant cells. Stress or damage to vegetation can significantly elevate emission fluxes of these compounds, some of which are fairly water soluble. Aqueous-phase reactions of the GLVs with photochemically generated oxidants - such as hydroxyl radical (OH), singlet oxygen (1O2) and excited triplet states of organic compounds (3C*) _ might then form low-volatility products that can act as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In order to determine if GLVs can be a significant source of secondary organic carbon in fogwater, studies of GLVs in laboratory solutions are needed to elucidate the oxidation kinetics and the corresponding SOA mass yields. In this study we are determining the second-order rate constants, and SOA mass yields, for five GLVs (cis-3-hexen-1-ol, cis-3-hexenylacetate, methyl salicylate, methyl jasmonate, and 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol) reacting with OH,1O2 and 3C*. Experiments are performed at relevant fog water pHs, temperatures, and oxidant concentrations. Rate constants are determined using a relative rate approach in which the decay of GLVs and reference compounds are monitored as function of time by HPLC. The capacity of GLVs to form aqueous SOA was determined by following the formation of their decomposition products with HPLC-UV/DAD and HPLC-ESI/MS. SOA mass yields are measured gravimetrically from laboratory solutions containing atmospherically relevant concentrations of photooxidants and GLVs, and irradiated with simulated sunlight. We will use our results to assess the potential contribution of aqueous GLV reactions as a source of SOA in cloudy or foggy atmospheres.

  6. Source apportionment of organic aerosol across Houston, TX during DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.; Clark, A. E.; Ortiz, S. M.; Usenko, S.; Sheesley, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the ground-based sampling efforts during DISCOVER-AQ's Houston month-long campaign in September 2013, atmospheric particulate matter (PM) samples were collected at four sites: Moody Tower (urban), Manvel Croix (southern suburb), Conroe (northern suburb), and La Porte (urban industrial). The Houston metropolitan area, especially the Houston Ship Channel, is a densely industrialized urban city with large concentrations of petroleum refining, petrochemical manufacturing, and heavy traffic during peak hours. Due to these and other emission sources, the area is heavily impacted by ambient PM. This study will be looking at fine PM (diameter less than 2.5µm, PM2.5) from all four sites. PM2.5fraction is relevant for understanding fate and transport of organic contaminants and is widely known to negatively impact human health. Chemical analysis including radiocarbon (14C) and organic tracer measurements (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkanes, hopanes, steranes, and levoglucosan) were used for source apportionment. The 14C measurements constrained CMB results to estimate both primary and secondary contributions to total organic carbon (TOC). Results indicate that Moody Tower had consistent primary motor vehicle exhaust contribution (18-27%) and a fossil secondary organic aerosol (SOA) contribution from 5-33% depending on atmospheric conditions. Conroe had a lower contribution of motor vehicle exhaust (5-10%) and similarly variable fraction of fossil SOA (4-25%). Manvel Croix had an interim motor vehicle contribution (9-15%) with a variable fossil SOA (5-30%). For contemporary OC, there was minimal contribution of wood smoke during examined weeks (0-9%) but larger contributor of biogenic SOA ranging from 40-75% at Moody Tower, 56-81% at Manvel Croix and 60-79% at Conroe. Overall, the motor vehicle contribution was consistent at each site during the analysis week, biogenic SOA was consistently high, while fossil SOA showed the most variability.

  7. Modeling the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). 2. The predicted effects of relative humidity on aerosol formation in the alpha-pinene-, beta-pinene-, sabinene-, delta 3-carene-, and cyclohexene-ozone systems.

    PubMed

    Seinfeld, J H; Erdakos, G B; Asher, W E; Pankow, J F

    2001-05-01

    Atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds can lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) through the gas/particle (G/P) partitioning of the oxidation products. Since water is ubiquitous in the atmosphere, the extent of the partitioning for any individual organic product depends not only on the amounts and properties of the partitioning organic compounds, but also on the amount of water present. Predicting the effects of water on the atmospheric G/P distributions of organic compounds is, therefore, central to understanding SOA formation. The goals of the current work are to gain understanding of how increases in RH affect (1) overall SOA yields, (2) water uptake by SOA, (3) the behaviors of individual oxidation products, and (4) the fundamental physical properties of the SOA phase that govern the G/P distribution of each of the oxidation products. Part 1 of this series considered SOA formation from five parent hydrocarbons in the absence of water. This paper predicts how adding RH to those systems uniformly increases both the amount of condensed organic mass and the amount of liquid water in the SOA phase. The presence of inorganic components is not considered. The effect of increasing RH is predicted to be stronger for SOA produced from cyclohexene as compared to SOA produced from four monoterpenes. This is likely a result of the greater general degree of oxidation (and hydrophilicity) of the cyclohexene products. Good agreement was obtained between predicted SOA yields and laboratory SOA yield data actually obtained in the presence of water. As RH increases, the compounds that play the largest roles in changing both the organic and water masses in the SOA phase are those with vapor pressures that are intermediate between those of essentially nonvolatile and highly volatile species. RH-driven changes in the compound-dependent G/P partitioning coefficient Kp result from changes in both the average molecular weight MWom of the absorbing

  8. Cascadability properties of MZI-SOA-based all-optical 3R regenerators for RZ-DPSK signals.

    PubMed

    Kise, Tomofumi; Nguyen, Kimchau N; Garcia, John M; Poulsen, Henrik N; Blumenthal, Daniel J

    2011-05-09

    We experimentally demonstrate 50 cascaded all-optical 3R regenerators over a 1,000 km transmission distance for 10-Gb/s return-to-zero differential phase-shift keying (RZ-DPSK) signals. The regenerator consists of integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) based wavelength converters. Regenerative properties and tolerance to pattern dependent effects have been studied in terms of Q-factor measurement, and error free operation with input OSNR of 20 dB/0.1 nm has also been demonstrated.

  9. Establishing a Regulatory Framework for the Development & Operations of Sub-Orbital & Orbital Aircraft (SOA) in the EU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciacq, Jean-Bruno; Tomasello, Filippo; Erdelyi, Zsuzsanna; Gerhard, Michael

    2013-09-01

    The Treaty of the European Union allows for the development of common policies for all sectors of transport, including aviation, and its safety. To this end, the European legislator established in 2002 the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), located in Cologne, Germany, and gave it responsibility for the regulation of aviation safety, successively encompassing airworthiness, air operations and Flight Crew Licensing (FCL), Air Traffic Management (ATM), Air Navigation Systems (ANS), as well as Aerodromes (ADR).The Annexes 6 and 8 of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) to the Chicago Convention define an aircraft as "any machine that can derive support in the atmosphere from the reactions of the air other than the reactions of the air against the earth's surface". The aerodynamic lift generated during the atmospheric part of the flight is commonly used to sustain and control the vehicle, that is to take-off, climb, pull-up, perform manoeuvres, fly back to the airport and land. Thus, Sub- orbital and Orbital Aircraft (SOA) are considered to be aircraft, as opposed to rockets which are symmetrical bodies not generating lift, and solely sustained by their rocket engine(s).Consequently, the regulation of SOA airworthiness, their crew, operations, insertion into the traffic and utilisation of aerodromes would in principle fall under the remit of EASA, which would have to fulfil its role of protection of the European citizens in relation to civil suborbital and orbital flights, that is to certify SOAs and their operations before they would be operated for Commercial Transport in the EU.Since EASA was first contacted by potential applicants in 2007, many projects have developed and the context has evolved. Thus, this paper intends to update the approach initially proposed at the 3rd IAASS in Rome in October 2008 and complemented at the 4th IAASS in Huntsville in May 2010 to accommodate sub-orbital and orbital aircraft into the EU regulatory system, and

  10. Liquid chromatography coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and post-column addition of metal salt solutions as a powerful tool for the metabolic profiling of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Adriana M; Rodriguez, M Alejandra; Gagliano, M Laura; Bertinetti, Brenda V; Godeas, Alicia M; Cabrera, Gabriela M

    2016-03-25

    Fusarium oxysporum L11 is a non-pathogenic soil-borne fungal strain that yielded an extract that showed antifungal activity against phytopathogens. In this study, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (API-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of the metabolites from the extract. The employed sources were electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Post-column addition of metal solutions of Ca, Cu and Zn(II) was also tested using ESI. A total of 137 compounds were identified or tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals, suggested molecular formulae and MS/MS analysis with previously reported data. Some compounds were isolated and identified by NMR. The extract was rich in cyclic peptides like cyclosporins, diketopiperazines and sansalvamides, most of which were new, and are reported here for the first time. The use of post-column addition of metals resulted in a useful strategy for the discrimination of compound classes since specific adducts were observed for the different compound families. This technique also allowed the screening for compounds with metal binding properties. Thus, the applied methodology is a useful choice for the metabolic profiling of extracts and also for the selection of metabolites with potential biological activities related to interactions with metal ions.

  11. Evaluation of New and Proposed Organic Aerosol Sources and Mechanisms using the Aerosol Modeling Testbed. MILAGRO, CARES, CalNex, BEACHON, and GVAX

    SciTech Connect

    Hodzic, Alma; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2015-04-09

    This work investigated the formation and evolution of organic aerosols (OA) arising from anthropogenic and biogenic sources in a framework that combined state-of-the-science process and regional modeling, and their evaluation against advanced and emerging field measurements. Although OA are the dominant constituents of submicron particles, our understanding of their atmospheric lifecycle is limited, and current models fail to describe the observed amounts and properties of chemically formed secondary organic aerosols (SOA), leaving large uncertainties on the effects of SOA on climate. Our work has provided novel modeling constraints on sources, formation, aging and removal of SOA by investigating in particular (i) the contribution of trash burning emissions to OA levels in a megacity, (ii) the contribution of glyoxal to SOA formation in aqueous particles in California during CARES/CalNex and over the continental U.S., (iii) SOA formation and regional growth over a pine forest in Colorado and its sensitivity to anthropogenic NOx levels during BEACHON, and the sensitivity of SOA to (iv) the sunlight exposure during its atmospheric lifetime, and to (v) changes in solubility and removal of organic vapors in the urban plume (MILAGRO, Mexico City), and over the continental U.S.. We have also developed a parameterization of water solubility for condensable organic gases produced from major anthropogenic and biogenic precursors based on explicit chemical modeling, and made it available to the wider community. This work used for the first time constraints from the explicit model GECKO-A to improve SOA representation in 3D regional models such as WRF-Chem.

  12. Design of 10Gbps optical encoder/decoder structure for FE-OCDMA system using SOA and opto-VLSI processors.

    PubMed

    Aljada, Muhsen; Hwang, Seow; Alameh, Kamal

    2008-01-21

    In this paper we propose and experimentally demonstrate a reconfigurable 10Gbps frequency-encoded (1D) encoder/decoder structure for optical code division multiple access (OCDMA). The encoder is constructed using a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and 1D reflective Opto-VLSI processor. The SOA generates broadband amplified spontaneous emission that is dynamically sliced using digital phase holograms loaded onto the Opto-VLSI processor to generate 1D codewords. The selected wavelengths are injected back into the same SOA for amplifications. The decoder is constructed using single Opto-VLSI processor only. The encoded signal can successfully be retrieved at the decoder side only when the digital phase holograms of the encoder and the decoder are matched. The system performance is measured in terms of the auto-correlation and cross-correlation functions as well as the eye diagram.

  13. All-optical 40 Gbit/s data format conversion between RZ and NRZ using a fiber delay interferometer and a single SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Xu, Enming; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Yin

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrated experimentally 40 Gbit/s all-optical format conversions between return-to-zero (RZ) and nonreturn-to- zero (NRZ) using a fiber delay interferometer (FDI) and a single semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Firstly, 40 Gbit/s data format conversion from RZ to NRZ is realized using a FDI with temperature control and an optical bandpass filter (BPF). Then, 40 Gbit/s data format conversion from NRZ to RZ is implemented, using four-wave mixing (FWM) effect of SOA, by injecting synchronously NRZ signal and clock pulses into a single SOA. Presented method has some distinct advantages including multi-channel parallel processing, easy integration, convenient tuning, good stability, and so on, which has potential to be used in future optical networks that could combine wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and optical time domain multiplexing (OTDM) transmission techniques.

  14. Global combustion sources of organic aerosols: model comparison with 84 AMS factor-analysis data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimpidi, Alexandra P.; Karydis, Vlassis A.; Pandis, Spyros N.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-07-01

    Emissions of organic compounds from biomass, biofuel, and fossil fuel combustion strongly influence the global atmospheric aerosol load. Some of the organics are directly released as primary organic aerosol (POA). Most are emitted in the gas phase and undergo chemical transformations (i.e., oxidation by hydroxyl radical) and form secondary organic aerosol (SOA). In this work we use the global chemistry climate model ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) with a computationally efficient module for the description of organic aerosol (OA) composition and evolution in the atmosphere (ORACLE). The tropospheric burden of open biomass and anthropogenic (fossil and biofuel) combustion particles is estimated to be 0.59 and 0.63 Tg, respectively, accounting for about 30 and 32 % of the total tropospheric OA load. About 30 % of the open biomass burning and 10 % of the anthropogenic combustion aerosols originate from direct particle emissions, whereas the rest is formed in the atmosphere. A comprehensive data set of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements along with factor-analysis results from 84 field campaigns across the Northern Hemisphere are used to evaluate the model results. Both the AMS observations and the model results suggest that over urban areas both POA (25-40 %) and SOA (60-75 %) contribute substantially to the overall OA mass, whereas further downwind and in rural areas the POA concentrations decrease substantially and SOA dominates (80-85 %). EMAC does a reasonable job in reproducing POA and SOA levels during most of the year. However, it tends to underpredict POA and SOA concentrations during winter indicating that the model misses wintertime sources of OA (e.g., residential biofuel use) and SOA formation pathways (e.g., multiphase oxidation).

  15. Submicron aerosol organic functional groups, ions, and water content at the Centreville SEARCH site (Alabama), during SOAS campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Ergin, G.; Modini, R. L.; Takahama, S.

    2013-12-01

    The SOAS campaign was conducted from June 1 to July 15 of 2013 in order to understand the relationship between biogenic and anthropogenic emissions in the South East US1,2. In this study, the organic and inorganic composition of submicron aerosol in the Centreville SEARCH site was measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and the Ambient Ion Monitor (AIM; URG Corporation), whereas the aerosol water content was measured with a Dry Ambient Aerosol Size Spectrometer (DAASS)3. Organic functional group analysis was performed on PM1 aerosol selected by cyclone and collected on teflon filters with a time resolution of 4-12 hours, using one inlet heated to 50 °C and the other operated either at ambient temperature or 70 °C 4. The AIM measured both condensed and gas phase composition with a time resolution of 1 hour, providing partitioning behavior of inorganic species such as NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-. These measurements collectively permit calculation of pure-component vapor pressures of candidate organic compounds and activity coefficients of interacting components in the condensed phase, using models such as SIMPOL.15, E-AIM6, and AIOMFAC7. From these results, the water content of the aerosol is predicted, and a comparison between modeled and measured partitioning of inorganic compounds and water vapor are discussed, in addition to organic aerosol volatility prediction based on functional group analysis. [1]- Goldstein, A.H., et al., Biogenic carbon and anthropogenic pollutants combine to form a cooling haze over the southeastern United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2009. 106(22), 8835-8840. [2]- Carlton, A.G., Turpin, B.J., 2013. Particle partitioning potential of organic compounds is highest in the Eastern US and driven by anthropogenic water. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions 13, 12743-12770. [3]- Khlystov, A., Stanier, C.O., Takahama, S., Pandis, S.N., 2005. Water content of ambient

  16. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: Explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2016-02-08

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool, which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas–wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chamber experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas–wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. Furthermore, this work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up a factor of 2 due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.

  17. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: Explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; ...

    2016-02-08

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool, which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas–wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chambermore » experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas–wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. Furthermore, this work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up a factor of 2 due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.« less

  18. Swept laser source based on acousto-optic tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghui; Li, Hao; Chen, Rong

    2014-12-01

    The design and development of the swept laser for optical coherence tomography is presented. It is manifested by a semiconductor optical amplifier, a fiber coupler, two fiber isolators, a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for frequency tuning within a unidirectional all-fiber ring cavity. Light output from the coupler is further amplified and spectral shaped by a booster SOA terminated at both ends with two isolators. The total loss in ring cavity is 8.2 dB. The gain SOA provides fiber-to-fiber small signal gain of 22.2 dB with saturation output power of 9.0 dBm. The developed laser source provides up to 100 kHz over a full-width wavelength tuning range of 140 nm at center wavelength of 1308 nm with an average power of 8 mW, yielding an axial resolution of 5.4 μm in air for OCT imaging. Theoretically, the measurement principle and the feasibility of the system are analyzed. Implementing the laser source in swept source based OCT (SS-OCT) system, real-time structural imaging of biological tissue is realized.

  19. Insights on Sources, Growth, and Phase Partitioning of Atmospheric Particles from Hourly Measurements of Organic Marker Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B.; Goldstein, A.; Kreisberg, N.; Hering, S.; Docherty, K.; Jimenez, J.; Shields, L.; Qin, X.; Prather, K.; Ziemann, P.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have adverse affects on human health and have direct and indirect affects on the global radiation balance. In order to implement particle concentration control strategies, we must first understand particle origins. Atmospheric aerosols have both primary sources such as combustion processes and secondary sources such as photochemically driven gas to particle phase partitioning. By monitoring changes in the molecular composition of the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosols, these various sources can be differentiated. Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatography (TAG) is a new in-situ instrument capable of identifying and quantifying organic aerosol chemical composition with one hour time resolution. TAG is fully automated, offering around the clock measurements to determine diurnal, weekly, and seasonal patterns in organic aerosol composition, hence, determining aerosol sources and transformation processes. We report results from ambient measurements made in Southern California during the summer and fall of 2005 as part of the Study of Organic Aerosol at Riverside (SOAR). We use hourly measurements of over 300 individual organic compounds to define both primary and secondary particle sources. The particle sources defined include primary anthropogenic sources such as vehicle emissions, meat cooking, biomass burning, pesticide use, herbicide use, along with primary biogenic sources such as plant emissions and plant waxes. We also explore secondary particle sources (i.e. SOA) formed as a result of the oxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic precursor gases. Comparisons are made between TAG-defined sources and aerosol sources defined using Aerosol Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) and Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) data. In addition to source apportionment results, we present seasonal changes in ambient phase partitioning of organic compounds as a function of carbon number for multiple compound classes.

  20. Experimental demonstration of monolithically integrated 16 channel DFB laser array fabricated by nanoimprint lithography with AWG multiplexer and SOA for WDM-PON application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianyi; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ning; Huang, Xiaodong; Cao, Mingde; Wang, Lei; Liu, Wen

    2015-03-01

    A 16-channel monolithically integrated distributed feedback (DFB) laser array with arrayed waveguide gratings (AWGs) multiplexer and semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) has been fabricated using nanoimprint technology. Selective lasing wavelength with 200 GHz frequency space has been obtained. The typical threshold current is between 20 mA and 30 mA. The output power is higher than 1 mW with 350 mA current in SOA. The side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) of the spectrum is better than 40 dB.

  1. Examining the Effects of Anthropogenic Emissions on Isoprene-Derived Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation During the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the Look Rock, Tennessee, Ground Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    A suite of offline and real-time gas- and particle-phase measurements was deployed atLook Rock, Tennessee (TN), during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) to examine the effects of anthropogenic emissions on isoprene-derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formatio...

  2. Screening of additives in plastics with high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and different ionization sources: direct probe injection (DIP)-APCI, LC-APCI, and LC-ion booster ESI.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Gómez, Ana; Jonkers, Tim; Covaci, Adrian; de Boer, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    Plastics are complex mixtures consisting of a polymer and additives with different physico-chemical properties. We developed a broad screening method to elucidate the nature of compounds present in plastics used in electrical/electronic equipment commonly found at homes (e.g., electrical adaptors, computer casings, heaters). The analysis was done by (a) solvent extraction followed by liquid chromatography coupled to high accuracy/resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) with different ionization sources or (b) direct analysis of the solid by ambient mass spectrometry high accuracy/resolution TOFMS. The different ionization methods showed different selectivity and sensitivity for the different compound classes and were complementary. A variety of antioxidants, phthalates, UV filters, and flame retardants were found in most samples. Furthermore, some recently reported impurities or degradation products derived from flame retardants were identified, such as hydroxylated triphenyl phosphate and tetrabromobisphenol A monoglycidyl ether.

  3. Effect of protein source and protease addition on performance, blood metabolites and nutrient digestibility of turkeys fed on low-protein diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch.

    PubMed

    Shahir, M H; Rahimi, R; Taheri, H R; Heidariniya, A; Baradaran, N; Asadi Kermani, Z

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a monocomponent protease and dietary inclusion of canola meal (CM) and poultry by-product meal (PBM) on growth performance, carcass characteristics and blood metabolites of turkeys fed on low crude protein (CP) diets from 28 to 55 d post hatch. Experimental treatments included control, maize-soybean meal diet including 258.3 g/kg CP; negative control 1 (NC1), maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg); NC2, control diet (CP, 258.3 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg); NC3, maize-soybean meal diet with reduced CP (232.4 g/kg) including CM (80 g/kg) and PBM (80 g/kg). Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets were created by addition of protease enzyme (30 000 units/kg of diet) to the NC1 and NC3 diets, respectively. The NC3 group had lower body weight gain (BWG) compared to those fed on the control diet, and no improvement with enzyme addition (NC3 + P) was achieved. The protease addition to the NC1 diet (NC1 + P) improved BWG to the level of the control diet. The NC1 group had higher feed conversion ratio (FCR) compared to the control and NC3 + P, but protease addition to the NC1 diet improved FCR. Protease addition to the low CP diets resulted in higher nitrogen (N) retention than in the control and NC2 groups. Also, the NC1 + P and NC3 + P diets increased apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of CP compared to the control group. It was concluded that addition of CM (up to 80 g/kg) and PBM (up to 80 g/kg) to turkey diets had no negative effect on growth performance from 28 to 55 d of age. The NC1 + P group achieved the BWG of the control group which was partially due to increases in N retention and AID of CP, but the NC3 + P group failed to recover the growth losses. This difference implies that the efficacy of the protease may depend upon the protein source in the ration.

  4. Branching ratios between the abstraction and addition channels in the reactions of OH radicals with monoterpenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rio, C.; Loison, J. C.; Caralp, F.; Flaud, P. M.; Villenave, E.

    2009-04-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere is described as a mass transfer of volatile organic compound oxidation products with low vapour pressures in particular phases. Among the different aerosol components, the SOA represent an important fraction, but, the fundamental processes governing their physics and chemistry in the atmosphere are poorly understood. So it is important to characterize and understand the mechanisms of their formation. It is well-known that atmospheric oxidation of monoterpenes is an important process in tropospheric SOA formation. Consequently, the identification and quantification of reaction products from the oxidation of monoterpenes in the gas phase have been receiving great attention over the past years. However, the atmospheric degradation leads to the formation of a plethora of reaction products and proceeds through a very complex mechanism that is still not fully characterised. In our study, we have focused on SOA formation from OH + monoterpene reactions and more precisely on the primary oxidation steps of γ-terpinene and d-limonene by OH radicals. Indeed, the primary reaction of monoterpenes with hydroxyl radicals can in principle occur by two reaction pathways: OH-addition and H-abstraction. In this work, we have determined branching ratios of these reactions. Although there seems to be a consensus in the literature that OH-monoterpene reactions proceed almost exclusively by addition, several measurements have shown that in some case H-abstraction can represent up to 30% of the total reaction rate constant. Therefore it is necessary to determine this branching ratio in order to know, in particular, the main peroxy radicals formed and propose a mechanism for the gas phase oxidation of terpene by hydroxyl radicals. (γ-terpinene + OH) and (d-limonene + OH) reactions have been studied i) at atmospheric pressure, using laser photolysis coupled with UV absorption radical detection, and ii) at low pressure, using

  5. The attentional blink is not affected by backward masking of T2, T2-mask SOA, or level of T2 impoverishment.

    PubMed

    Jannati, Ali; Spalek, Thomas M; Lagroix, Hayley E P; Di Lollo, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    Identification of the second of two targets (T2) is impaired when presented shortly after the first (T1). This attentional blink (AB) is thought to arise from a delay in T2 processing during which T2 is vulnerable to masking. Conventional studies have measured T2 accuracy which is constrained by the 100% ceiling. We avoided this problem by using a dynamic threshold-tracking procedure that is inherently free from ceiling constraints. In two experiments we examined how AB magnitude is affected by three masking-related factors: (a) presence/absence of T2 mask, (b) T2-mask stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and (c) level of T2 impoverishment (signal-to-noise ratio [SNR]). In Experiment 1, overall accuracy decreased with T2-mask SOA. The magnitude of the AB, however, was invariant with SOA and with mask presence/absence. Experiment 2 further showed that the AB was invariant with T2 SNR. The relationship among mask presence/absence, SOA, and T2 SNR and the AB is encompassed in a qualitative model.

  6. All-optical UWB generation and modulation using SOA-XPM effect and DWDM-based multi-channel frequency discrimination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Dong, Jianji; Xu, Enming; Zhang, Xinliang

    2010-11-22

    An all-optical UWB pulses generation and modulation scheme using cross phase modulation (XPM) effect of semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and DWDM-based multi-channel frequency discrimination is proposed and demonstrated, which has potential application in multiuser UWB-Over-Fiber communication systems. When a Gaussian pulse light and a wavelength-tunable CW probe light are together injected into the SOA, the probe light out from the SOA will have a temporal chirp due to SOA-XPM effect. When the chirped probe light is tuned to the slopes of single DWDM channel transmittance curve, the optical phase modulation to intensity modulation conversion is achieved at DWDM that serves as a multi-channel frequency discriminator, the inverted polarity Gaussian monocycle and doublet pulse is detected by a photodetector, respectively. If the probe lights are simultaneously aimed to different slopes of several DWDM channels, multi-channel or binary-phase-coded UWB signal generation can be acquired. Using proposed scheme, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM), pulse polarity modulation (PPM) and pulse shape modulation (PSM) to UWB pulses also can be conveniently realized.

  7. The formation of SOA and chemical tracer compounds from the photooxidation of naphthalene and its methyl analogs in the presence and absence of nitrogen oxides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory smog chamber experiments have been carried out to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA)formation from the photooxidation of naphthalene and its methyl analogs, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene (1-MN and 2- MN, respectively). Laboratory smog chamber irradiations were co...

  8. SOA Formation from the Atmospheric Oxidation of 2-Methyl-3-Buten-2-ol and Its Implications for PM2.5

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated by irradiating 2-methyl-3-buten-2-01 (MBO) in the presence and/or absence of NOx H2O2, and/or SO2 was examined. Experiments were conducted. in smog chambers operated either in dyna....

  9. A SOA broker solution for standard discovery and access services: the GI-cat framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrini, Enrico

    2010-05-01

    GI-cat ideal users are data providers or service providers within the geoscience community. The former have their data already available through an access service (e.g. an OGC Web Service) and would have it published through a standard catalog service, in a seamless way. The latter would develop a catalog broker and let users query and access different geospatial resources through one or more standard interfaces and Application Profiles (AP) (e.g. OGC CSW ISO AP, CSW ebRIM/EO AP, etc.). GI-cat actually implements a broker components (i.e. a middleware service) which carries out distribution and mediation functionalities among "well-adopted" catalog interfaces and data access protocols. GI-cat also publishes different discovery interfaces: the OGC CSW ISO and ebRIM Application Profiles (the latter coming with support for the EO and CIM extension packages) and two different OpenSearch interfaces developed in order to explore Web 2.0 possibilities. An extended interface is also available to exploit all available GI-cat features, such as interruptible incremental queries and queries feedback. Interoperability tests performed in the context of different projects have also pointed out the importance to enforce compatibility with existing and wide-spread tools of the open source community (e.g. GeoNetwork and Deegree catalogs), which was then achieved. Based on a service-oriented framework of modular components, GI-cat can effectively be customized and tailored to support different deployment scenarios. In addition to the distribution functionality an harvesting approach has been lately experimented, allowing the user to switch between a distributed and a local search giving thus more possibilities to support different deployment scenarios. A configurator tool is available in order to enable an effective high level configuration of the broker service. A specific geobrowser was also naturally developed, for demonstrating the advanced GI-cat functionalities. This client

  10. ProcessGene-Connect: SOA Integration between Business Process Models and Enactment Transactions of Enterprise Software Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasser, Avi; Lincoln, Maya

    In recent years, both practitioners and applied researchers have become increasingly interested in methods for integrating business process models and enterprise software systems through the deployment of enabling middleware. Integrative BPM research has been mainly focusing on the conversion of workflow notations into enacted application procedures, and less effort has been invested in enhancing the connectivity between design level, non-workflow business process models and related enactment systems such as: ERP, SCM and CRM. This type of integration is useful at several stages of an IT system lifecycle, from design and implementation through change management, upgrades and rollout. The paper presents an integration method that utilizes SOA for connecting business process models with corresponding enterprise software systems. The method is then demonstrated through an Oracle E-Business Suite procurement process and its ERP transactions.

  11. Performance improvement of a SOA-based coherent optical-OFDM transmission system via nonlinear companding transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azou, Stéphane; Bejan, Șerban; Morel, Pascal; Sharaiha, Ammar

    2015-02-01

    Coherent-Optical OFDM systems are known to be sensitive to large peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) at the transmitter output, due to nonlinear properties of some components involved in the transmission link. In this paper, we investigate the impact of an amplification of such signals via a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), considering some recent experimental results. An efficient tradeoff between BER performance, computational complexity and power efficiency is performed by a proper design of Wang's nonlinear companding function, considered for the first time in an optical communication context. A BER advantage of around 3 dB can hence be obtained over a standard system implementation not using PAPR reduction. The designed function also proves to be more efficient than μ-law function, considered in the literature as an efficient companding scheme.

  12. A quantification method for heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers and its application on 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodigast, Maria; Mutzel, Anke; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2017-03-01

    Methylglyoxal forms oligomeric compounds in the atmospheric aqueous particle phase, which could establish a significant contribution to the formation of aqueous secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). Thus far, no suitable method for the quantification of methylglyoxal oligomers is available despite the great effort spent for structure elucidation. In the present study a simplified method was developed to quantify heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers as a sum parameter. The method is based on the thermal decomposition of oligomers into methylglyoxal monomers. Formed methylglyoxal monomers were detected using PFBHA (o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride) derivatisation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. The method development was focused on the heating time (varied between 15 and 48 h), pH during the heating process (pH = 1-7), and heating temperature (50, 100 °C). The optimised values of these method parameters are presented. The developed method was applied to quantify heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers formed during the OH-radical oxidation of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene (TMB) in the Leipzig aerosol chamber (LEipziger AerosolKammer, LEAK). Oligomer formation was investigated as a function of seed particle acidity and relative humidity. A fraction of heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers of up to 8 % in the produced organic particle mass was found, highlighting the importance of those oligomers formed solely by methylglyoxal for SOA formation. Overall, the present study provides a new and suitable method for quantification of heat-decomposable methylglyoxal oligomers in the aqueous particle phase.

  13. Assessment of the GECKO-A Modeling Tool and Simplified 3D Model Parameterizations for SOA Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Hodzic, A.; La, S.; Camredon, M.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Madronich, S.

    2014-12-01

    Explicit chemical mechanisms aim to embody the current knowledge of the transformations occurring in the atmosphere during the oxidation of organic matter. These explicit mechanisms are therefore useful tools to explore the fate of organic matter during its tropospheric oxidation and examine how these chemical processes shape the composition and properties of the gaseous and the condensed phases. Furthermore, explicit mechanisms provide powerful benchmarks to design and assess simplified parameterizations to be included 3D model. Nevertheless, the explicit mechanism describing the oxidation of hydrocarbons with backbones larger than few carbon atoms involves millions of secondary organic compounds, far exceeding the size of chemical mechanisms that can be written manually. Data processing tools can however be designed to overcome these difficulties and automatically generate consistent and comprehensive chemical mechanisms on a systematic basis. The Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) has been developed for the automatic writing of explicit chemical schemes of organic species and their partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. GECKO-A can be viewed as an expert system that mimics the steps by which chemists might develop chemical schemes. GECKO-A generates chemical schemes according to a prescribed protocol assigning reaction pathways and kinetics data on the basis of experimental data and structure-activity relationships. In its current version, GECKO-A can generate the full atmospheric oxidation scheme for most linear, branched and cyclic precursors, including alkanes and alkenes up to C25. Assessments of the GECKO-A modeling tool based on chamber SOA observations will be presented. GECKO-A was recently used to design a parameterization for SOA formation based on a Volatility Basis Set (VBS) approach. First results will be presented.

  14. Characterization and sources assignation of PM2.5 organic aerosol in a rural area of Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindado, Oscar; Pérez, Rosa M. a.; García, Susana; Sánchez, Miguel; Galán, Pilar; Fernández, Marta

    The results from a year-long study of the organic composition of PM2.5 aerosol collected in a rural area influenced by a highway of Spain are reported. The lack of prior information related to the organic composition of PM2.5 aerosol in Spain, concretely in rural areas, led definition of the goals of this study. As a result, this work has been able to characterize the main organic components of atmospheric aerosols, including several compounds of SOA, and has conducted a multivariate analysis in order to assign sources of particulate matter. A total of 89 samples were taken between April 2004 and April 2005 using a high-volume sampler. Features and abundance of n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alcohols and acids were separately determined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography analysis. The Σ n-alkane and ΣPAHs ranged from 3 to 81 ng m -3 and 0.1 to 6 ng m -3 respectively, with higher concentrations during colder months. Ambient concentrations of Σalcohols and Σacids ranged from 21 to 184 ng m -3 and 39 to 733 ng m -3, respectively. Also, several components of secondary organic aerosol have been quantified, confirming the biogenic contribution to ambient aerosol. In addition, factor analysis was used to reveal origin of organic compounds associated to particulate matter. Eight factors were extracted accounting more than 83% of the variability in the original data. These factors were assigned to a typical high pollution episode by anthropogenic particles, crustal material, plant waxes, fossil fuel combustion, temperature, microbiological emissions, SOA and dispersion of pollutants by wind action. Finally, a cluster analysis was used to compare the organic composition between the four seasons.

  15. Health effects of carbon-containing particulate matter: focus on sources and recent research program results.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Annette; McDonald, Jacob

    2016-02-01

    Air pollution is a complex mixture of gas-, vapor-, and particulate-phase materials comprised of inorganic and organic species. Many of these components have been associated with adverse health effects in epidemiological and toxicological studies, including a broad spectrum of carbonaceous atmospheric components. This paper reviews recent literature on the health impacts of organic aerosols, with a focus on specific sources of organic material; it is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all the available literature. Specific emission sources reviewed include engine emissions, wood/biomass combustion emissions, biogenic emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), resuspended road dust, tire and brake wear, and cooking emissions. In addition, recent findings from large toxicological and epidemiological research programs are reviewed in the context of organic PM, including SPHERES, NPACT, NERC, ACES, and TERESA. A review of the extant literature suggests that there are clear health impacts from emissions containing carbon-containing PM, but difficulty remains in apportioning responses to certain groupings of carbonaceous materials, such as organic and elemental carbon, condensed and gas phases, and primary and secondary material. More focused epidemiological and toxicological studies, including increased characterization of organic materials, would increase understanding of this issue.

  16. Characteristics and sources of carbonaceous aerosols from Shanghai, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J.-J.; Zhu, C.-S.; Tie, X.-X.; Geng, F.-H.; Xu, H.-M.; Ho, S. S. H.; Wang, G.-H.; Han, Y.-M.; Ho, K.-F.

    2013-01-01

    An intensive investigation of carbonaceous PM2.5 and TSP (total suspended particles) from Pudong (China) was conducted as part of the MIRAGE-Shanghai (Megacities Impact on Regional and Global Environment) experiment in 2009. Data for organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), organic species, including C17 to C40 n-alkanes and 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and stable carbon isotopes OC (δ13COC) and EC (δ13CEC) were used to evaluate the aerosols' temporal variations and identify presumptive sources. High OC/EC ratios indicated a large fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA); high char/soot ratios indicated stronger contributions to EC from motor vehicles and coal combustion than biomass burning. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicated that much of the SOA was produced via coal combustion. Isotope abundances (δ13COC = -24.5 ± 0.8‰ and δ13CEC = -25.1 ± 0.6‰) indicated that fossil fuels were the most important source for carbonaceous PM2.5 (particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter), with lesser impacts from biomass burning and natural sources. An EC tracer system and isotope mass balance calculations showed that the relative contributions to total carbon from coal combustion, motor vehicle exhaust, and SOA were 41%, 21%, and 31%; other primary sources such as marine, soil and biogenic emissions contributed 7%. Combined analyses of OC and EC, n-alkanes and PAHs, and stable carbon isotopes provide a new way to apportion the sources of carbonaceous particles.

  17. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, M. C.; Baker, K. R.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Koo, B.; Pye, H. O. T.

    2015-10-01

    Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations utilizing the volatility basis set (VBS) treatment for organic aerosols (CMAQ-VBS) were evaluated against measurements collected at routine monitoring networks (Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE)) and those collected during the 2010 California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaign to examine important sources of organic aerosol (OA) in southern California. CMAQ-VBS (OA lumped by volatility, semivolatile POA) underpredicted total organic carbon (OC) at CSN (-25.5 % Normalized Median Bias (NMdnB)) and IMPROVE (-63.9 % NMdnB) locations and total OC was underpredicted to a greater degree compared to the CMAQ-AE6 (9.9 and -55.7 % NMdnB, respectively; semi-explicit OA treatment, SOA lumped by parent hydrocarbon, nonvolatile POA). However, comparisons to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements collected at Pasadena, CA indicated that CMAQ-VBS better represented the diurnal profile and the primary/secondary split of OA. CMAQ-VBS secondary organic aerosol (SOA) underpredicted the average measured AMS oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, a surrogate of SOA) concentration by a factor of 5.2 (4.7 μg m-3 measured vs. 0.9 μg m-3 modeled), a considerable improvement to CMAQ-AE6 SOA predictions, which were approximately 24× lower than the average AMS OOA concentration. We use two new methods, based on species ratios and on a simplified SOA parameterization from the observations, to apportion the SOA underprediction for CMAQ-VBS to too slow photochemical oxidation (estimated as 1.5× lower than observed at Pasadena using - log (NOx: NOy)), low intrinsic SOA formation efficiency (low by 1.6 to 2× for Pasadena), and too low emissions or too high dispersion for the Pasadena site (estimated to be 1.6 to 2.3× too low/high). The first and third factors will be similar for CMAQ-AE6, while the intrinsic SOA formation

  18. Multifunctional switching unit for add/drop, wavelength conversion, format conversion, and WDM multicast based on bidirectional LCoS and SOA-loop architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danshi; Zhang, Min; Qin, Jun; Lu, Guo-Wei; Wang, Hongxiang; Huang, Shanguo

    2014-09-08

    We propose a multifunctional optical switching unit based on the bidirectional liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) and semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) architecture. Add/drop, wavelength conversion, format conversion, and WDM multicast are experimentally demonstrated. Due to the bidirectional characteristic, the LCoS device cannot only multiplex the input signals, but also de-multiplex the converted signals. Dual-channel wavelength conversion and format conversion from 2 × 25Gbps differential quadrature phase-shift-keying (DQPSK) to 2 × 12.5Gbps differential phase-shift-keying (DPSK) based on four-wave mixing (FWM) in SOA is obtained with only one pump. One-to-six WDM multicast of 25Gbps DQPSK signals with two pumps is also achieved. All of the multicast channels are with a power penalty less than 1.1 dB at FEC threshold of 3.8 × 10⁻³.

  19. SOA-based fiber ring laser with seed of DFB wavelength scanning for relative humidity measurement using an air-guided photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Noor, M. Y.; Khalili, N.; Peng, G. D.

    2013-08-01

    We propose a novel ring laser for non-hygroscopic coating relative humidity (RH) fiber sensor by means of infrared absorption spectroscopy. A semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based fiber ring laser is used in this scheme. No tunable optical filter is required for the ring laser scheme as wavelength scanning is introduced in the ring using a distributed feedback (DFB) laser. An air-guided photonic crystal fiber (AGPCF) is included in the ring cavity that acts as a sensing head. The detection of gas humidity inside the air holes of AGPCF is determined by DFB wavelength scanning around 1368.59 nm water vapor absorption peak with SOA as a gain medium in the ring. We have experimentally implemented the wavelength scanning of SOA-based fiber ring laser scheme with an AGPCF sensing head of 5 cm and a small gap between single mode fiber and AGPCF to allow air diffusion in and out of the air holes inside the AGPCF. The sensitivity of the sensor is increased from 2.47 to 10.93 mV/1% RH over the range from 0 to 90% RH when the non-lasing mode (single-pass absorption spectroscopy) of the sensor is changed into the lasing mode (multi-pass absorption spectroscopy).

  20. First Materials Processing Test in the Science Operation Area (SOA) During STS-47 Spacelab-J Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in the Science Operation Area (SOA) are payload specialists' first Materials Processing Test during NASA/NASDA joint ground activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Fight Center (MSFC).

  1. First Materials Processing Test in the Science Operation Area (SOA) During STS-47 Spacelab-J Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in the Science Operation Area (SOA) are payload specialists' first Materials Processing Test during NASA/NASDA joint ground activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  2. All-optical single-sideband frequency upconversion utilizing the XPM effect in an SOA-MZI.

    PubMed

    Kim, Doo-Ho; Lee, Joo-Young; Choi, Hyung-June; Song, Jong-In

    2016-09-05

    An all-optical single sideband (OSSB) frequency upconverter based on the cross-phase modulation (XPM) effect is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to overcome the power fading problem caused by the chromatic dispersion of fiber in radio-over-fiber systems. The OSSB frequency upconverter consists of an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) and a semiconductor optical amplifier Mach-Zehnder interferometer (SOA-MZI) and does not require an extra delay line used for phase noise compensation. The generated OSSB radio frequency (RF) signal transmitted over single-mode fibers up to 20 km shows a flat electrical RF power response as a function of the fiber length. The upconverted electrical RF signal at 48 GHz shows negligible degradation of the phase noise even without an extra delay line. The measured phase noise of the upconverted RF signal (48 GHz) is -74.72 dBc/Hz at an offset frequency of 10 kHz. The spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) measured by a two-tone test to estimate the linearity of the OSSB frequency upconverter is 72.5 dB·Hz2/3.

  3. Organic aerosol composition and sources in Pasadena, California, during the 2010 CalNex campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Cubison, M. J.; Froyd, K. D.; Zhao, Y.; Cliff, S. S.; Hu, W. W.; Toohey, D. W.; Flynn, J. H.; Lefer, B. L.; Grossberg, N.; Alvarez, S.; Rappenglück, B.; Taylor, J. W.; Allan, J. D.; Holloway, J. S.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Gouw, J. A.; Massoli, P.; Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Weber, R. J.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Isaacman, G.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Goldstein, A. H.; Thalman, R.; Waxman, E. M.; Volkamer, R.; Lin, Y. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Dusanter, S.; Griffith, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-08-01

    Organic aerosols (OA) in Pasadena are characterized using multiple measurements from the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) campaign. Five OA components are identified using positive matrix factorization including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and two types of oxygenated OA (OOA). The Pasadena OA elemental composition when plotted as H : C versus O : C follows a line less steep than that observed for Riverside, CA. The OOA components from both locations follow a common line, however, indicating similar secondary organic aerosol (SOA) oxidation chemistry at the two sites such as fragmentation reactions leading to acid formation. In addition to the similar evolution of elemental composition, the dependence of SOA concentration on photochemical age displays quantitatively the same trends across several North American urban sites. First, the OA/ΔCO values for Pasadena increase with photochemical age exhibiting a slope identical to or slightly higher than those for Mexico City and the northeastern United States. Second, the ratios of OOA to odd-oxygen (a photochemical oxidation marker) for Pasadena, Mexico City, and Riverside are similar, suggesting a proportional relationship between SOA and odd-oxygen formation rates. Weekly cycles of the OA components are examined as well. HOA exhibits lower concentrations on Sundays versus weekdays, and the decrease in HOA matches that predicted for primary vehicle emissions using fuel sales data, traffic counts, and vehicle emission ratios. OOA does not display a weekly cycle—after accounting for differences in photochemical aging —which suggests the dominance of gasoline emissions in SOA formation under the assumption that most urban SOA precursors are from motor vehicles.

  4. Demonstration of an SOA-assisted open metro-access infrastructure for heterogeneous services.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, H; Bonk, R; Poehlmann, W; Haslach, C; Kuebart, W; Karnick, D; Meyer, J; Fritzsche, D; Weis, E; Becker, J; Freude, W; Pfeiffer, T

    2014-01-13

    An open converged metro-access network approach allows for sharing optical layer resources like fibers and optical spectrum among different services and operators. We demonstrated experimentally the feasibility of such a concept by the simultaneous operation of multiple services showing different modulation formats and multiplexing techniques. Flexible access nodes are implemented including semiconductor optical amplifiers to create a transparent and reconfigurable optical ring network. The impact of cascaded optical amplifiers on the signal quality is studied along the ring. In addition, the influence of high power rival signals in the same waveband and in the same fiber is analyzed.

  5. A standardized SOA for clinical data interchange in a cardiac telemonitoring environment.

    PubMed

    Gazzarata, Roberta; Vergari, Fabio; Cinotti, Tullio Salmon; Giacomini, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Care of chronic cardiac patients requires information interchange between patients' homes, clinical environments, and the electronic health record. Standards are emerging to support clinical information collection, exchange and management and to overcome information fragmentation and actors delocalization. Heterogeneity of information sources at patients' homes calls for open solutions to collect and accommodate multidomain information, including environmental data. Based on the experience gained in a European Research Program, this paper presents an integrated and open approach for clinical data interchange in cardiac telemonitoring applications. This interchange is supported by the use of standards following the indications provided by the national authorities of the countries involved. Taking into account the requirements provided by the medical staff involved in the project, the authors designed and implemented a prototypal middleware, based on a service-oriented architecture approach, to give a structured and robust tool to congestive heart failure patients for their personalized telemonitoring. The middleware is represented by a health record management service, whose interface is compliant to the healthcare services specification project Retrieve, Locate and Update Service standard (Level 0), which allows communication between the agents involved through the exchange of Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 documents. Three performance tests were carried out and showed that the prototype completely fulfilled all requirements indicated by the medical staff; however, certain aspects, such as authentication, security and scalability, should be deeply analyzed within a future engineering phase.

  6. Monolithic MZI-SOA hybrid switch for low-power and low-penalty operation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Q; Wonfor, A; Wei, J L; Penty, R V; White, I H

    2014-03-15

    We report the first experimental demonstration of a monolithically integrated hybrid dilated 2×2 modular optical switch using Mach-Zehnder modulators as low-loss 1×2 switching elements and short semiconductor optical amplifiers to provide additional extinction and gain. An excellent 40 dB cross-talk/extinction ratio is recorded with data-modulated signal-to-noise ratios of up to 44 dB in a 0.1 nm bandwidth. A switching time of 3 ns is demonstrated. Bit error rate studies show extremely low subsystem penalties of less than 0.1 dB, and studies indicate that, by using this hybrid switch building block, an 8×8 port switch could be achieved with 14 dB input power dynamic range for subsystem penalties of less than 0.5 dB.

  7. A heterogeneous open ocean source for glyoxal and iodine oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Co