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Sample records for additional specific interactions

  1. Tuning protein-protein interactions using cosolvents: specific effects of ionic and non-ionic additives on protein phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jan; Platten, Florian; Wagner, Dana; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2016-04-21

    Cosolvents are routinely used to modulate the (thermal) stability of proteins and, hence, their interactions with proteins have been studied intensely. However, less is known about their specific effects on protein-protein interactions, which we characterize in terms of the protein phase behavior. We analyze the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl), guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl), glycerol, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We experimentally determined the crystallization boundary (XB) and, in combination with data on the cloud-point temperatures (CPTs), the crystallization gap. In agreement with other studies, our data indicate that the additives might affect the protein phase behavior through electrostatic screening and additive-specific contributions. At high salt concentrations, where electrostatic interactions are screened, both the CPT and the XB are found to be linear functions of the additive concentration. Their slopes quantify the additive-specific changes of the phase behavior and thus of the protein-protein interactions. While the specific effect of NaCl is to induce attractions between proteins, DMSO, glycerol and GuHCl (with increasing strength) weaken attractions and/or induce repulsions. Except for DMSO, changes of the CPT are stronger than those of the XB. Furthermore, the crystallization gap widens in the case of GuHCl and glycerol and narrows in the case of NaCl. We relate these changes to colloidal interaction models, namely square-well and patchy interactions. PMID:27020538

  2. Interaction: Additivity plus Nonlinearity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, T. P.

    2004-01-01

    Whether or not there is an interaction between two factors in their effects on a dependent variable is often a central question. This paper proposes a general mechanism by which an interaction may arise: (a) the two factors are the same thing--or, at least, have a dimension in common--in the sense that it is meaningful to add (or subtract) them;…

  3. Measuring additive interaction using odds ratios

    PubMed Central

    Kalilani, Linda; Atashili, Julius

    2006-01-01

    Interaction measured on the additive scale has been argued to be better correlated with biologic interaction than when measured on the multiplicative scale. Measures of interaction on the additive scale have been developed using risk ratios. However, in studies that use odds ratios as the sole measure of effect, the calculation of these measures of additive interaction is usually performed by directly substituting odds ratios for risk ratios. Yet assessing additive interaction based on replacing risk ratios by odds ratios in formulas that were derived using the former may be erroneous. In this paper, we evaluate the extent to which three measures of additive interaction – the interaction contrast ratio (ICR), the attributable proportion due to interaction (AP), and the synergy index (S), estimated using odds ratios versus using risk ratios differ as the incidence of the outcome of interest increases in the source population and/or as the magnitude of interaction increases. Our analysis shows that the difference between the two depends on the measure of interaction used, the type of interaction present, and the baseline incidence of the outcome. Substituting odds ratios for risk ratios, when calculating measures of additive interaction, may result in misleading conclusions. Of the three measures, AP appears to be the most robust to this direct substitution. Formulas that use stratum specific odds and odds ratios to accurately calculate measures of additive interaction are presented. PMID:16620385

  4. Information capacity of specific interactions.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Miriam H; Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael P

    2016-05-24

    Specific interactions are a hallmark feature of self-assembly and signal-processing systems in both synthetic and biological settings. Specificity between components may arise from a wide variety of physical and chemical mechanisms in diverse contexts, from DNA hybridization to shape-sensitive depletion interactions. Despite this diversity, all systems that rely on interaction specificity operate under the constraint that increasing the number of distinct components inevitably increases off-target binding. Here we introduce "capacity," the maximal information encodable using specific interactions, to compare specificity across diverse experimental systems and to compute how specificity changes with physical parameters. Using this framework, we find that "shape" coding of interactions has higher capacity than chemical ("color") coding because the strength of off-target binding is strongly sublinear in binding-site size for shapes while being linear for colors. We also find that different specificity mechanisms, such as shape and color, can be combined in a synergistic manner, giving a capacity greater than the sum of the parts. PMID:27155013

  5. Additive monitoring and interactions during copper electroprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Dale Wade

    The electrochemical deposition of copper has been a major focus of research for decades. Renewed interest in copper electroplating is not limited to the copper producers but is also a major concern of semiconductor manufacturers. The focus on copper electrochemistry by the semiconductor manufacturers has increased since IBM's announcement in 1997 that copper will be used for metallization in high speed/power semiconductors [1--3]. The desire to use copper instead of aluminum is simply a reflection on copper's superior conductivity (lower RC time constants) and resistance to electromigration (generally proportional to the melting point). This dissertation is the compilation of the research into analytical techniques for monitoring surface-active additives in common sulfuric acid/copper sulfate plating baths. Chronopotentiometric, DC and AC voltammetry were the major analytical techniques used in this research. Several interactions between the additives will also be presented along with their apparent decline in activity. The decline in activity is well known in the industry and is also detected by these methods as presented in chapters 4 and 5. Finally, a systemic approach for monitoring the additive Galactosal, which is commonly used in electrowinning, will be outlined. The monitoring system proposed herein would have to be adjusted for each electrowinning facility because each has a unique chemistry and cell configuration.

  6. Specificity and non-specificity in RNA–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated by complex networks of interactions between RNAs and proteins. Proteins that interact with RNA have been traditionally viewed as either specific or non-specific; specific proteins interact preferentially with defined RNA sequence or structure motifs, whereas non-specific proteins interact with RNA sites devoid of such characteristics. Recent studies indicate that the binary “specific vs. non-specific” classification is insufficient to describe the full spectrum of RNA–protein interactions. Here, we review new methods that enable quantitative measurements of protein binding to large numbers of RNA variants, and the concepts aimed as describing resulting binding spectra: affinity distributions, comprehensive binding models and free energy landscapes. We discuss how these new methodologies and associated concepts enable work towards inclusive, quantitative models for specific and non-specific RNA–protein interactions. PMID:26285679

  7. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces. PMID:26753786

  8. Wax Crystallization and Additive-Wax Interactions in Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma-Nair, M.; Pacansky, T. J.; Martella, D. J.

    1997-03-01

    Wax crystallization is a major problem in a petrochemical industry. Low temperature leads to crystallization causing problems for transportation, storage and use. For example, the wax crystals in lubricants involve mixtures of normal and iso paraffins (C15-C34), and are large, thin, convoluted, interlocking platelets, which entrap oil and form a network. Polymeric additives change nucleation and growth habits of wax and lead to better performance. It is of fundamental importance to understand the mechanism of wax crystallization and the wax-additive interactions. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to study thermodynamics and crystallization kinetics of additized and unadditized solutions. Several comb shaped fummarate vinyl acetate copolymers are evaluated. The response of the additive is very specific to the average C number in the crystallizable ester side chains of the copolymer. These changes are concentration dependent and change with complexity of the formulation. The dominant interaction appears to be cocrystallization of the side chains of the copolymer with the crystallizable paraffins of wax. These additives also increase the metastability region. Thus, inhibition of wax crystallization is critical to the mechanism of interaction.

  9. Switching specific biomolecular interactions on surfaces under complex biological conditions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4an01225a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Lashkor, Minhaj; Rawson, Frankie J.; Preece, Jon A.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, electrically switchable mixed self-assembled monolayers based on oligopeptides have been developed and investigated for their suitability in achieving control over biomolecular interactions in the presence of complex biological conditions. Our model system, a biotinylated oligopeptide tethered to gold within a background of tri(ethylene glycol) undecanethiol, is ubiquitous in both switching specific protein interactions in highly fouling media while still offering the non-specific protein-resistance to the surface. Furthermore, the work demonstrated that the performance of the switching on the electro-switchable oligopeptide is sensitive to the characteristics of the media, and in particular, its protein concentration and buffer composition, and thus such aspects should be considered and addressed to assure maximum switching performance. This study lays the foundation for developing more realistic dynamic extracellular matrix models and is certainly applicable in a wide variety of biological and medical applications. PMID:25180245

  10. 45 CFR 156.285 - Additional standards specific to SHOP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional standards specific to SHOP. 156.285 Section 156.285 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING...

  11. Interactions of Organic Additives with Ionic Crystal Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füredi-Milhofer, H.; Sikirić, M.; Tunik, L.; Filipović-Vinceković, N.; Garti, N.

    The interactions of two groups of hydrated model crystals, calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate (DCPD) vs. octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) vs. calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with different organic additives are considered. DCPD precipitates as platelet-like crystals with the dominant faces shielded by hydrated layers and charged lateral faces. In the second system COM has charged surfaces, while all faces of COD are covered with layers containing water molecules. The organic molecules tested include negatively charged, flexible and rigid small and macromolecules (glutamic and aspartic acid, citrate, hexaammonium polyphosphate, phytate and polyaspartate) and anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS, sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate, AOT, sodium cholate NaC and disodium oleoamido PEG-2 sulfosuccinate, PEG). Two types of effects have been demonstrated: (1) Effect on crystal growth morphology: Flexible organic molecules with high charge density and anionic surfactants affected the growth morphology of DCPD and COM by selectively interacting with the charged lateral faces while rigid molecules (phytate, polyaspartate) specifically recognized the dominant (010) face of DCPD due to structural and stereochemical compatibility. (2) Effect on phase composition: Anionic surfactants at concentrations above the cmc promoted growth of OCP and COD respectively by selectively adsorbing at, and inhibiting growth oif nuclei of DCPD and/or COM, which were dominant in the respective control systems. The effect was especially pronounced in the calcium oxalate precipitation system, where in some cases complete reversal of the phase composition occurred. The important role of the hydrated layer, as part of the structure of the investigated crystal hydrates, in the above crystal additive interactions is discussed.

  12. Specificity of site directed psoralen addition to RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teare, J; Wollenzien, P

    1989-01-01

    We describe the attachment of a psoralen derivative (site specific psoralen, SSP) to the 5' end of a DNA oligonucleotide and the hybridization and the photoreaction of this reagent with a complementary target site on an RNA molecule. SSP was coupled to a variety of DNA oligonucleotides to investigate the structural requirements for addition to the RNA. Efficient SSP photoadducts were made on specific uridines by designing an intercalation site at an unpaired nucleotide in the RNA strand within the heteroduplex region. The optimal location for this site was five nucleotides from the oligonucleotide 5' end and just 5' to the target uridine residue. Because the attachment of the SSP to the oligonucleotide is through a disulfide bond, the DNA oligonucleotide can be removed with reduction to leave SSP attached to the RNA strand. The SSP adduct made in this way will be useful for subsequent biochemical and biophysical experiments. Images PMID:2471154

  13. Interactive specification acquisition via scenarios: A proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    Some reactive systems are most naturally specified by giving large collections of behavior scenarios. These collections not only specify the behavior of the system, but also provide good test suites for validating the implemented system. Due to the complexity of the systems and the number of scenarios, however, it appears that automated assistance is necessary to make this software development process workable. Interactive Specification Acquisition Tool (ISAT) is a proposed interactive system for supporting the acquisition and maintenance of a formal system specification from scenarios, as well as automatic synthesis of control code and automated test generation. This paper discusses the background, motivation, proposed functions, and implementation status of ISAT.

  14. Interactive Visualization Applets for Modular Exponentiation Using Addition Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahig, Hatem M.; Kotb, Yasser

    Online visualization systems have come to be heavily used in education, particularly for online learning. Most e-learning systems, including interactive learning systems, have been designed to simplify understanding the ideas of some main problems or in general overall course materials. This paper presents a novel interactive visualization system for one of the most important operation in public-key cryptosystems. This operation is modular exponentiation using addition chains. An addition chain for a natural number e is a sequence 1 = a 0 < a 1 < ... < a r = e of numbers such that for each 0 < i ≤ r, a i = a j + a k for some 0 ≤ k ≤ j < i. Finding an addition chain with minimal length is NP-hard problem. The proposed system visualizes how to generate addition chains with minimal length using depth-first branch and bound technique and how to compute the modular exponentiation using addition chains.

  15. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities. PMID:26733959

  16. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities. PMID:26733959

  17. Specificity of Intramembrane Protein–Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Francesc-Xabier; Ernst, Andreas Max; Wieland, Felix; Brügger, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Our concept of biological membranes has markedly changed, from the fluid mosaic model to the current model that lipids and proteins have the ability to separate into microdomains, differing in their protein and lipid compositions. Since the breakthrough in crystallizing membrane proteins, the most powerful method to define lipid-binding sites on proteins has been X-ray and electron crystallography. More recently, chemical biology approaches have been developed to analyze protein–lipid interactions. Such methods have the advantage of providing highly specific cellular probes. With the advent of novel tools to study functions of individual lipid species in membranes together with structural analysis and simulations at the atomistic resolution, a growing number of specific protein–lipid complexes are defined and their functions explored. In the present article, we discuss the various modes of intramembrane protein–lipid interactions in cellular membranes, including examples for both annular and nonannular bound lipids. Furthermore, we will discuss possible functional roles of such specific protein–lipid interactions as well as roles of lipids as chaperones in protein folding and transport. PMID:21536707

  18. Behaviors of Polymer Additives Under EHL and Influences of Interactions Between Additives on Friction Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, T.

    1984-01-01

    Polymer additives have become requisite for the formulation of multigrade engine oils. The behavior of polymethacrylate (PMA)-thickened oils as lubricants in concentrated contacts under nominal rolling and pure sliding conditions was investigated by conventional optical interferometry. The PMA thickened oils behaved differently from the base oil in the formation of elastohydrodynamic (EHL) films. The higher the elastohydrodynamic molecular weight of the PMA contained in the lubricant, the thinner was the oil film under EHL conditions. The film thickness of shear-degraded PMA-thickened oils was also investigated. The behavior of graphite particles dispersed in both the base oil and the PMA-thickened oil was studied under pure sliding by taking photomicrographs. Many kinds of additives are contained in lubricating oil and the interactions between additives are considered. The interactions of zinc-organodithiophosphates (ZDP) with other additives is discussed.

  19. Non-additivity of pair interactions in charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlayson, Samuel D.; Bartlett, Paul

    2016-07-01

    It is general wisdom that the pair potential of charged colloids in a liquid may be closely approximated by a Yukawa interaction, as predicted by the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We experimentally determine the effective forces in a binary mixture of like-charged particles, of species 1 and 2, with blinking optical tweezers. The measured forces are consistent with a Yukawa pair potential but the (12) cross-interaction is not equal to the geometric mean of the (11) and (22) like-interactions, as expected from DLVO. The deviation is a function of the electrostatic screening length and the size ratio, with the cross-interaction measured being consistently weaker than DLVO predictions. The corresponding non-additivity parameter is negative and grows in magnitude with increased size asymmetry.

  20. FPGA-specific decimal sign-magnitude addition and subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Martín; Todorovich, Elías

    2016-07-01

    The interest in sign-magnitude (SM) representation in decimal numbers lies in the IEEE 754-2008 standard, where the significand in floating-point numbers is coded as SM. However, software implementations do not meet performance constraints in some applications and more development is required in programmable logic, a key technology for hardware acceleration. Thus, in this work, two strategies for SM decimal adder/subtractors are studied and six new Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-specific circuits are derived from these strategies. The first strategy is based on ten's complement (C10) adder/subtractors and the second one is based on parallel computation of an unsigned adder and an unsigned subtractor. Four of these alternative circuits are useful for at least one area-time-trade-off and specific operand size. For example, the fastest SM adder/subtractor for operand sizes of 7 and 16 decimal digits is based on the second proposed strategy with delays of 3.43 and 4.33 ns, respectively, but the fastest circuit for 34-digit operands is one of the three specific implementations based on C10 adder/subtractors with a delay of 4.65 ns.

  1. Gene-Environment Interactions in Stress Response Contribute Additively to a Genotype-Environment Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Takeshi; Ehrenreich, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    How combinations of gene-environment interactions collectively give rise to genotype-environment interactions is not fully understood. To shed light on this problem, we genetically dissected an environment-specific poor growth phenotype in a cross of two budding yeast strains. This phenotype is detectable when certain segregants are grown on ethanol at 37°C (‘E37’), a condition that differs from the standard culturing environment in both its carbon source (ethanol as opposed to glucose) and temperature (37°C as opposed to 30°C). Using recurrent backcrossing with phenotypic selection, we identified 16 contributing loci. To examine how these loci interact with each other and the environment, we focused on a subset of four loci that together can lead to poor growth in E37. We measured the growth of all 16 haploid combinations of alleles at these loci in all four possible combinations of carbon source (ethanol or glucose) and temperature (30 or 37°C) in a nearly isogenic population. This revealed that the four loci act in an almost entirely additive manner in E37. However, we also found that these loci have weaker effects when only carbon source or temperature is altered, suggesting that their effect magnitudes depend on the severity of environmental perturbation. Consistent with such a possibility, cloning of three causal genes identified factors that have unrelated functions in stress response. Thus, our results indicate that polymorphisms in stress response can show effects that are intensified by environmental stress, thereby resulting in major genotype-environment interactions when multiple of these variants co-occur. PMID:27437938

  2. Additive manufacturing of patient-specific tubular continuum manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Ernar; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Tubular continuum robots, which are composed of multiple concentric, precurved, elastic tubes, provide more dexterity than traditional surgical instruments at the same diameter. The tubes can be precurved such that the resulting manipulator fulfills surgical task requirements. Up to now the only material used for the component tubes of those manipulators is NiTi, a super-elastic shape-memory alloy of nickel and titan. NiTi is a cost-intensive material and fabrication processes are complex, requiring (proprietary) technology, e.g. for shape setting. In this paper, we evaluate component tubes made of 3 different thermoplastic materials (PLA, PCL and nylon) using fused filament fabrication technology (3D printing). This enables quick and cost-effective production of custom, patient-specific continuum manipulators, produced on site on demand. Stress-strain and deformation characteristics are evaluated experimentally for 16 fabricated tubes of each thermoplastic with diameters and shapes equivalent to those of NiTi tubes. Tubes made of PCL and nylon exhibit properties comparable to those made of NiTi. We further demonstrate a tubular continuum manipulator composed of 3 nylon tubes in a transnasal, transsphenoidal skull base surgery scenario in vitro.

  3. Specific interactions in modified chitosan systems.

    PubMed

    Rinaudo, M; Auzely, R; Vallin, C; Mullagaliev, I

    2005-01-01

    This paper concerns the bulk and interfacial properties of a series of alkylated chitosans having different alkyl chain lengths grafted randomly along the main chitosan chain. Chitosan has a low degree of acetylation (5%); on chitosan derivatives, the role of the degree of grafting and of length of the alkyl chains are examined. The optimum alkyl chain length is C12 and the degree of grafting 5% to get physical gelation based on the formation of hydrophobic domains. The cross-linking is essentially controlled by the salt concentration: it is shown that 0.025 M AcONa is needed to screen electrostatic interchain repulsions. Hydrophobic interactions produce highly non-Newtonian behavior with large thinning behavior; this behavior is suppressed in the presence of cyclodextrins able to cap the hydrophobic alkyl chains. The interfacial properties of the chitosan derivatives were tested for the air/aqueous solution interfaces. Specifically, the role of their structure on the kinetic of film formation was examined showing that excess of external salt favors the stabilization of the interfacial film. The derivatives with a higher degree of substitution and longer alkyl chains are more efficient and give a higher elastic modulus compared to the model surfactant as a result of the chain properties. PMID:16153074

  4. Computational learning on specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Moses, Alan M.; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2015-01-01

    The protein–DNA interactions between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites are essential activities in gene regulation. To decipher the binding codes, it is a long-standing challenge to understand the binding mechanism across different transcription factor DNA binding families. Past computational learning studies usually focus on learning and predicting the DNA binding residues on protein side. Taking into account both sides (protein and DNA), we propose and describe a computational study for learning the specificity-determining residue-nucleotide interactions of different known DNA-binding domain families. The proposed learning models are compared to state-of-the-art models comprehensively, demonstrating its competitive learning performance. In addition, we describe and propose two applications which demonstrate how the learnt models can provide meaningful insights into protein–DNA interactions across different DNA binding families. PMID:26527718

  5. Interaction between Polymeric Additives and Secondary Fluids in Capillary Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Boris; Braunschweig, Björn; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2016-02-16

    Capillary suspensions are ternary systems including a solid and two liquid phases representing a novel formulation platform for pastes with unique processing and end-use properties. Here we have investigated aqueous suspensions of non-Brownian graphite particles including different polymers commonly used as thickening agents or binders in paste formulations. We have studied the interaction between these additives and organic solvents in order to elucidate its effect on the characteristic formation of a particle network structure in corresponding ternary capillary suspension systems. Organic solvents with different polarity have been employed, and in the presence of nonadsorbing poly(ethylene oxide), all of them, whether they preferentially wet the graphite surface or not, induce the formation of a network structure within the suspension as indicated by a strong change in rheological properties. However, when the adsorbing polymers carboxymethylcellulose and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) are included, the drastic change in rheological behavior occurs only when polar organic solvents are used as secondary liquids. Obviously, these solvents can form pendular bridges, finally resulting in a sample-spanning particle network. Vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy provides evidence that these polar liquids remove the adsorbed polymer from the graphite particles. In contrast, nonpolar and nonwetting solvents do not force polymer desorption. In these cases, the formation of a percolating network structure within the suspensions is presumably prevented by the strong steric repulsion among graphite particles, not allowing for the formation of particle clusters encapsulating the secondary liquid. Accordingly, polymeric additives and secondary fluids have to be carefully selected in capillary suspension formulations, then offering a new pathway to customize paste formulations. The polymer may serve to adjust an appropriate viscosity level, and the capillary bridging induces the

  6. Direction-Specific Interactions Control Crystal Growth by Oriented Attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongsheng; Nielsen, Michael H.; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Frandsen, Cathrine; Banfield, Jillian F.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2012-05-01

    The oriented attachment of molecular clusters and nanoparticles in solution is now recognized as an important mechanism of crystal growth in many materials, yet the alignment process and attachment mechanism have not been established. We performed high-resolution transmission electron microscopy using a fluid cell to directly observe oriented attachment of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles. The particles undergo continuous rotation and interaction until they find a perfect lattice match. A sudden jump to contact then occurs over less than 1 nanometer, followed by lateral atom-by-atom addition initiated at the contact point. Interface elimination proceeds at a rate consistent with the curvature dependence of the Gibbs free energy. Measured translational and rotational accelerations show that strong, highly direction-specific interactions drive crystal growth via oriented attachment.

  7. Direction-specific interactions control crystal growth by oriented attachment.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsheng; Nielsen, Michael H; Lee, Jonathan R I; Frandsen, Cathrine; Banfield, Jillian F; De Yoreo, James J

    2012-05-25

    The oriented attachment of molecular clusters and nanoparticles in solution is now recognized as an important mechanism of crystal growth in many materials, yet the alignment process and attachment mechanism have not been established. We performed high-resolution transmission electron microscopy using a fluid cell to directly observe oriented attachment of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles. The particles undergo continuous rotation and interaction until they find a perfect lattice match. A sudden jump to contact then occurs over less than 1 nanometer, followed by lateral atom-by-atom addition initiated at the contact point. Interface elimination proceeds at a rate consistent with the curvature dependence of the Gibbs free energy. Measured translational and rotational accelerations show that strong, highly direction-specific interactions drive crystal growth via oriented attachment. PMID:22628650

  8. Molecular Recognition and Specific Interactions for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Chung; Kang, Dae Joon

    2008-01-01

    Molecular recognition and specific interactions are reliable and versatile routes for site-specific and well-oriented immobilization of functional biomolecules on surfaces. The control of surface properties via the molecular recognition and specific interactions at the nanoscale is a key element for the nanofabrication of biosensors with high sensitivity and specificity. This review intends to provide a comprehensive understanding of the molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated biosensor fabrication routes that leads to biosensors with well-ordered and controlled structures on both nanopatterned surfaces and nanomaterials. Herein self-assembly of the biomolecules via the molecular recognition and specific interactions on nanoscaled surfaces as well as nanofabrication techniques of the biomolecules for biosensor architecture are discussed. We also describe the detection of molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated molecular binding as well as advantages of nanoscale detection.

  9. Interactions between sealing materials and lubricating oil additives

    SciTech Connect

    Winkenbach, R.; Von Arndt, E.M.; Mindermann, H.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the increasingly higher application demands, engine and transmission manufactures are today using lubrication oils with more and more additives. The result is that seal materials are being damaged when exposed to such conditions and such additives. This paper shows the effects of basic oils with, and without, additives on elastomeric materials such as NBR, ACM, MVQ and FPM.

  10. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to μν decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance of the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.

  11. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to μν decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance ofmore » the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.« less

  12. Simulation of non-specific protein–mRNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Magee, James; Warwicker, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions exhibit varying degrees of specificity. Relatively high affinity, sequence-specific interactions, can be studied with structure determination, but lower affinity, non-specific interactions are also of biological importance. We report simulations that predict the population of nucleic acid paths around protein surfaces, and give binding constant differences for changes in the protein scaffold. The method is applied to the non-specific component of interactions between eIF4Es and messenger RNAs that are bound tightly at the cap site. Adding a fragment of eIF4G to the system changes both the population of mRNA paths and the protein–mRNA binding affinity, suggesting a potential role for non-specific interactions in modulating translational properties. Generally, the free energy simulation technique could work in harness with characterized tethering points to extend analysis of nucleic acid conformation, and its modulation by protein scaffolds. PMID:16314302

  13. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  14. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D.; Gockel, Ines; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Martin, Javier; Nair, Rajan P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rahman, Proton; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Stuart, Philip E.; Tsoi, Lam C.; Van Heel, David A.; Worthington, Jane; Wouters, Mira M.; Klareskog, Lars; Elder, James T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Schumacher, Johannes; Rich, Stephen S.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sunyaev, Shamil R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer strong risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen binding repertoires between a heterozygote’s two expressed HLA variants may result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA, Ncases=5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D, Ncases=5,567), psoriasis vulgaris (Ncases=3,089), idiopathic achalasia (Ncases=727), and celiac disease (Ncases=11,115). In four out of five diseases, we observed highly significant non-additive dominance effects (RA: P=2.5×1012; T1D: P=2.4×10−10; psoriasis: P=5.9×10−6; celiac disease: P=1.2×10−87). In three of these diseases, the dominance effects were explained by interactions between specific classical HLA alleles (RA: P=1.8×10−3; T1D: P=8.6×1027; celiac disease: P=6.0×10−100). These interactions generally increased disease risk and explained moderate but significant fractions of phenotypic variance (RA: 1.4%, T1D: 4.0%, and celiac disease: 4.1%, beyond a simple additive model). PMID:26258845

  15. Isothermal microcalorimetry to investigate non specific interactions in biophysical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ball, Vincent; Maechling, Clarisse

    2009-10-01

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) is mostly used to investigate the thermodynamics of "specific" host-guest interactions in biology as well as in supramolecular chemistry. The aim of this review is to demonstrate that ITC can also provide useful information about non-specific interactions, like electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. More attention will be given in the use of ITC to investigate polyelectrolyte-polyelectrolyte (in particular DNA-polycation), polyelectrolyte-protein as well as protein-lipid interactions. We will emphasize that in most cases these "non specific" interactions, as their definition will indicate, are favoured or even driven by an increase in the entropy of the system. The origin of this entropy increase will be discussed for some particular systems. We will also show that in many cases entropy-enthalpy compensation phenomena occur. PMID:20111693

  16. Graph Transformation with Dependencies for the Specification of Interactive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradini, Andrea; Foss, Luciana; Ribeiro, Leila

    We propose a notion of Graph Transformation Systems ( gts) with dependency relation, more expressive than a previously proposed one, and suitable for the specification of interactions. We show how a specification using gts with dependencies can be implemented, at a lower level of abstraction, by a transactional gts, that is, a gts equipped with the notion of observable (stable) items in which computations that correspond to “complete” interactions are characterized as transactions.

  17. The additive effect of harmonics on conservative and dissipative interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Sergio; Gadelrab, Karim R.; Barcons, Victor; Font, Josep; Stefancich, Marco; Chiesa, Matteo

    2012-12-01

    Multifrequency atomic force microscopy holds promise as a tool for chemical and topological imaging with nanoscale resolution. Here, we solve the equation of motion exactly for the fundamental mode in terms of the cantilever mean deflection, the fundamental frequency of oscillation, and the higher harmonic amplitudes and phases. The fundamental frequency provides information about the mean force, dissipation, and variations in the magnitude of the attractive and the repulsive force components during an oscillation cycle. The contributions of the higher harmonics to the position, velocity, and acceleration can be added gradually where the details of the true instantaneous force are recovered only when tens of harmonics are included. A formalism is developed here to decouple and quantify the viscous term of the force in the short and long range. It is also shown that the viscosity independent paths on tip approach and tip retraction can also be decoupled by simply acquiring a FFT at two different cantilever separations. The two paths correspond to tip distances at which metastability is present as, for example, in the presence of capillary interactions and where there is surface energy hysteresis.

  18. Evolving new protein-protein interaction specificity through promiscuous intermediates.

    PubMed

    Aakre, Christopher D; Herrou, Julien; Phung, Tuyen N; Perchuk, Barrett S; Crosson, Sean; Laub, Michael T

    2015-10-22

    Interacting proteins typically coevolve, and the identification of coevolving amino acids can pinpoint residues required for interaction specificity. This approach often assumes that an interface-disrupting mutation in one protein drives selection of a compensatory mutation in its partner during evolution. However, this model requires a non-functional intermediate state prior to the compensatory change. Alternatively, a mutation in one protein could first broaden its specificity, allowing changes in its partner, followed by a specificity-restricting mutation. Using bacterial toxin-antitoxin systems, we demonstrate the plausibility of this second, promiscuity-based model. By screening large libraries of interface mutants, we show that toxins and antitoxins with high specificity are frequently connected in sequence space to more promiscuous variants that can serve as intermediates during a reprogramming of interaction specificity. We propose that the abundance of promiscuous variants promotes the expansion and diversification of toxin-antitoxin systems and other paralogous protein families during evolution. PMID:26478181

  19. 49 CFR 173.301a - Additional general requirements for shipment of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.301a Additional general requirements for shipment of specification cylinders. (a) General. The... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional general requirements for shipment...

  20. Isothermal Microcalorimetry to Investigate Non Specific Interactions in Biophysical Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Vincent; Maechling, Clarisse

    2009-01-01

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) is mostly used to investigate the thermodynamics of “specific” host-guest interactions in biology as well as in supramolecular chemistry. The aim of this review is to demonstrate that ITC can also provide useful information about non-specific interactions, like electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. More attention will be given in the use of ITC to investigate polyelectrolyte-polyelectrolyte (in particular DNA-polycation), polyelectrolyte-protein as well as protein-lipid interactions. We will emphasize that in most cases these “non specific” interactions, as their definition will indicate, are favoured or even driven by an increase in the entropy of the system. The origin of this entropy increase will be discussed for some particular systems. We will also show that in many cases entropy-enthalpy compensation phenomena occur. PMID:20111693

  1. Lattice cluster theory for polymer melts with specific interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2014-07-01

    Despite the long-recognized fact that chemical structure and specific interactions greatly influence the thermodynamic properties of polymer systems, a predictive molecular theory that enables systematically addressing the role of chemical structure and specific interactions has been slow to develop even for polymer melts. While the lattice cluster theory (LCT) provides a powerful vehicle for understanding the influence of various molecular factors, such as monomer structure, on the thermodynamic properties of polymer melts and blends, the application of the LCT has heretofore been limited to the use of the simplest polymer model in which all united atom groups within the monomers of a species interact with a common monomer averaged van der Waals energy. Thus, the description of a compressible polymer melt involves a single van der Waals energy. As a first step towards developing more realistic descriptions to aid in the analysis of experimental data and the design of new materials, the LCT is extended here to treat models of polymer melts in which the backbone and side groups have different interaction strengths, so three energy parameters are present, namely, backbone-backbone, side group-side group, and backbone-side group interaction energies. Because of the great algebraic complexity of this extension, we retain maximal simplicity within this class of models by further specializing this initial study to models of polymer melts comprising chains with poly(n-α-olefin) structures where only the end segments on the side chains may have different, specific van der Waals interaction energies with the other united atom groups. An analytical expression for the LCT Helmholtz free energy is derived for the new model. Illustrative calculations are presented to demonstrate the degree to which the thermodynamic properties of polymer melts can be controlled by specific interactions.

  2. Lattice cluster theory for polymer melts with specific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wen-Sheng; Freed, Karl F.

    2014-07-28

    Despite the long-recognized fact that chemical structure and specific interactions greatly influence the thermodynamic properties of polymer systems, a predictive molecular theory that enables systematically addressing the role of chemical structure and specific interactions has been slow to develop even for polymer melts. While the lattice cluster theory (LCT) provides a powerful vehicle for understanding the influence of various molecular factors, such as monomer structure, on the thermodynamic properties of polymer melts and blends, the application of the LCT has heretofore been limited to the use of the simplest polymer model in which all united atom groups within the monomers of a species interact with a common monomer averaged van der Waals energy. Thus, the description of a compressible polymer melt involves a single van der Waals energy. As a first step towards developing more realistic descriptions to aid in the analysis of experimental data and the design of new materials, the LCT is extended here to treat models of polymer melts in which the backbone and side groups have different interaction strengths, so three energy parameters are present, namely, backbone-backbone, side group-side group, and backbone-side group interaction energies. Because of the great algebraic complexity of this extension, we retain maximal simplicity within this class of models by further specializing this initial study to models of polymer melts comprising chains with poly(n-α-olefin) structures where only the end segments on the side chains may have different, specific van der Waals interaction energies with the other united atom groups. An analytical expression for the LCT Helmholtz free energy is derived for the new model. Illustrative calculations are presented to demonstrate the degree to which the thermodynamic properties of polymer melts can be controlled by specific interactions.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of specific DNA-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwiputra, D.; Hidayat, W.; Khairani, R.; Zen, F. P.

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between DNA binding protein and specific base pairs of nucleic acid is critical for biological process. We propose a new model of DNA-protein interactions to depict the dynamics of specific DNA-protein interactions. Hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) are, among the other intermolecular interactions in DNA, the most distinctive in term of specificity of molecular bonds. As H-bonds account for specificity, we only consider the dynamics affected by H-bonds between DNA base pairs and H-bonds connecting protein side chains and DNA. The H-bonds are modelled by Morse potentials and coupling terms in the Hamiltonian of coupled oscillators resembling a coupling between planar DNA chain and a protein molecule. In this paper we give a perturbative approach as an attempt for a soliton solution. The solution is in the form of nonlinear travelling wave having the amplitudes satisfying coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equations and is interpreted as the mediator for nonlocal transmittance of biological information in DNA.

  4. Phase separation in solutions with specific and nonspecific interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, William M.; Frenkel, Daan; Oxtoby, David W.

    2014-05-28

    Protein solutions, which tend to be thermodynamically stable under physiological conditions, can demix into protein-enriched and protein-depleted phases when stressed. Using a lattice-gas model of proteins with both isotropic and specific, directional interactions, we calculate the critical conditions for phase separation for model proteins with up to four patches via Monte Carlo simulations and statistical associating fluid theory. Given a fixed specific interaction strength, the critical value of the isotropic energy, which accounts for dispersion forces and nonspecific interactions, measures the stability of the solution with respect to nonspecific interactions. Phase separation is suppressed by the formation of protein complexes, which effectively passivate the strongly associating sites on the monomers. Nevertheless, we find that protein models with three or more patches can form extended aggregates that phase separate despite the assembly of passivated complexes, even in the absence of nonspecific interactions. We present a unified view of the critical behavior of model fluids with anisotropic interactions, and we discuss the implications of these results for the thermodynamic stability of protein solutions.

  5. Non-additive three-body interaction energies for H3 (quartet spin state)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. C.; Allnatt, A. R.; Talman, James D.; Meath, William J.

    The results of an Unsold average energy calculation of the non-additive interaction energy for H3 (quartet spin state) are presented for equilateral triangular configurations. They are discussed in the context of the problems associated with the representation of non-additive energies for the interaction of closed-shell species.

  6. Phase diagrams for the adsorption of monomers with non-additive interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, O. A.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Nieto, F.

    2016-09-01

    In several experimental systems phase diagrams coverage-temperature show a strong asymmetry. This behavior can be reproduced by including non-additive lateral interactions. In this work a Monte Carlo study on the canonical assembly of the criticality of monomer adsorption with non-additive interactions is presented. Traditional pairwise energies were replaced by other more general ones where the lateral interaction between two ad-atoms depends on the coverage at first sphere of coordination. This kind of energies includes multibody interactions like three-body interactions and four-body interactions, etc. These energies induce the formation of several non-additive ordered structures. Finite size scaling method was used to classify the order of phase transition of each non-additive phase. On the other hand, the corresponding phase diagrams are formed naturally, in which case the diagrams show strong asymmetries.

  7. Contribution of temperament to eating disorder symptoms in emerging adulthood: Additive and interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Burt, Nicole M; Boddy, Lauren E; Bridgett, David J

    2015-08-01

    Temperament characteristics, such as higher negative emotionality (NE) and lower effortful control (EC), are individual difference risk factors for developmental psychopathology. Research has also noted relations between temperament and more specific manifestations of psychopathology, such as eating disorders (EDs). Although work is emerging that indicates that NE and EC may additively contribute to risk for ED symptoms, no studies have considered the interactive effects of NE and EC in relation to ED symptoms. In the current investigation, we hypothesized that (1) low EC would be associated with increased ED symptoms, (2) high NE would be associated with increased ED symptoms, and (3) these temperament traits would interact, such that the relationship between NE and ED symptoms would be strongest in the presence of low EC. After controlling for gender and child trauma history, emerging adults' (N=160) lower EC (i.e., more difficulties with self-regulation) was associated with more ED symptoms. NE did not emerge as a direct predictor of ED symptoms. However, the anticipated interaction of these temperament characteristics on ED symptoms was found. The association between NE and ED symptoms was only significant in the context of low EC. These findings provide evidence that elevated NE may only be a risk factor for the development of eating disorders when individuals also have self-regulation difficulties. The implications of these findings for research and interventions are discussed. PMID:25875113

  8. 49 CFR 173.301a - Additional general requirements for shipment of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional general requirements for shipment of specification cylinders. 173.301a Section 173.301a Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  9. Rescue of abasic hammerhead ribozymes by exogenous addition of specific bases.

    PubMed

    Peracchi, A; Beigelman, L; Usman, N; Herschlag, D

    1996-10-15

    We have synthesized 13 hammerhead ribozyme variants, each containing an abasic residue at a specific position of the catalytic core. The activity of each of the variants is significantly reduced. In four cases, however, activity can be rescued by exogenous addition of the missing base. For one variant, the rescue is 300-fold; for another, the rescue is to the wild-type level. This latter abasic variant (G10.1X) has been characterized in detail. Activation is specific for guanine, the base initially removed. In addition, the specificity for guanine versus adenine is substantially altered by replacing C with U in the opposite strand of the ribozyme. These results show that a binding site for a small, noncharged ligand can be created in a preexisting ribozyme structure. This has implications for structure-function analysis of RNA, and leads to speculations about evolution in an "RNA world" and about the potential therapeutic use of ribozymes. PMID:8876168

  10. Specificity of Rel-inhibitor interactions in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Tatei, K; Levine, M

    1995-01-01

    The Rel family of transcription factors participate in a diverse array of processes, including acute responses to injury and infection, lymphocyte differentiation, and embryonic patterning. These proteins show homology in an extended region spanning about 300 amino acids (the Rel homology domain [RHD]). The RHD mediates both DNA binding and interactions with a family of inhibitor proteins, including I kappa B alpha and cactus. Previous studies have shown that an N-terminal region of the RHD (containing the sequence motif RXXRXRXXC) is important for DNA binding, while the C-terminal nuclear localization sequence is important for inhibitor interactions. Here we present a structure-function analysis of the Drosophila dorsal RHD. These studies identify another sequence within the RHD (region I) that is essential for inhibitor interactions. There is a tight correlation between the conservation of region I sequences and the specificity of Rel-inhibitor interactions in both flies and mammals. Point mutations in the region I sequence can uncouple DNA binding and inhibitor interactions in vitro. The phenotypes associated with the expression of a modified dorsal protein in transgenic Drosophila embryos suggest a similar uncoupling in vivo. Recent crystallographic studies suggest that the region I sequence and the nuclear localization sequence might form a composite surface which interacts with inhibitor proteins. PMID:7791770

  11. Optimizing Scoring Function of Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions with Both Affinity and Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protein-nucleic acid (protein-DNA and protein-RNA) recognition is fundamental to the regulation of gene expression. Determination of the structures of the protein-nucleic acid recognition and insight into their interactions at molecular level are vital to understanding the regulation function. Recently, quantitative computational approach has been becoming an alternative of experimental technique for predicting the structures and interactions of biomolecular recognition. However, the progress of protein-nucleic acid structure prediction, especially protein-RNA, is far behind that of the protein-ligand and protein-protein structure predictions due to the lack of reliable and accurate scoring function for quantifying the protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this work, we developed an accurate scoring function (named as SPA-PN, SPecificity and Affinity of the Protein-Nucleic acid interactions) for protein-nucleic acid interactions by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. Specificity and affinity are two requirements of highly efficient and specific biomolecular recognition. Previous quantitative descriptions of the biomolecular interactions considered the affinity, but often ignored the specificity owing to the challenge of specificity quantification. We applied our concept of intrinsic specificity to connect the conventional specificity, which circumvents the challenge of specificity quantification. In addition to the affinity optimization, we incorporated the quantified intrinsic specificity into the optimization strategy of SPA-PN. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions validated that SPA-PN performs well on both the prediction of binding affinity and identification of native conformation. In terms of its performance, SPA-PN can be widely used to predict the protein-nucleic acid structures and quantify their interactions. PMID:24098651

  12. Specific interaction of jacalin with phycocyanin, a fluorescent phycobiliprotein.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Gunjan; Fatma, Tasneem; Cowsik, Sudha M; Komath, Sneha Sudha

    2009-11-01

    Recent research has shown that, like porphyrins, phycocyanin (PC) too can produce singlet oxygen upon excitation with the appropriate radiation and hence could be useful in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer. Unlike porphyrins, PC has the advantage of being a non-toxic, non-carcinogenic, soluble protein. However, the challenge would be to target the fluorescent phycobiliprotein to malignant cells. We report here that the tumor-specific lectin, jacalin, binds PC specifically in a carbohydrate-independent manner and with affinities better than that for porphyrins. Hence the lectin could prove to be a useful carrier for targeted delivery of PC. The interaction involves both ionic and hydrophobic interactions and more than one contact site. PMID:19740673

  13. Specific interaction of lectins with liposomes and monolayers bearing neoglycolipids.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Vincent; Costa, Maria de Lourdes; Boullanger, Paul; Baszkin, Adam; Rosilio, Véronique

    2003-10-01

    The interaction of three lectins (wheat germ, Ulex europaeus I, and Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinins: WGA, UEA-I and LTA) with either N-acetyl-D-glucosamine or L-fucose neoglycolipids incorporated into phospholipid monolayers and liposome bilayers was studied at the air/water interface and in bulk solution. The results show that for both systems studied, synthesized neoglycolipids were capable of binding their specific lectin and that, in general, the binding of lectins increased with the increase in the molar fraction of the saccharide derivative incorporated in either the monolayers or bilayers. However, whereas for UEA-I, molecular recognition was enhanced by a strong hydrophobic interaction, for WGA and LTA successful recognition was predominantly related to the distance between neighboring sugar groups. The observed lengthy adsorption times of these lectins onto their specific ligands were attributed to interfacial conformational changes occurring in the proteins upon their adsorption at the interfaces. PMID:14499473

  14. A search for specificity in DNA-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, G; Goodford, P J

    1994-06-01

    The GRID force field and a principal component analysis have been used in order to predict the interactions of small chemical groups with all 64 different triplet sequences of B-DNA. Factors that favor binding to guanine-cytosine base pairs have been identified, and a dictionary of ligand groups and their locations is presented as a guide to the design of specific DNA ligands. PMID:7918250

  15. Genetic interactions contribute less than additive effects to quantitative trait variation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Joshua S.; Kotenko, Iulia; Sadhu, Meru J.; Treusch, Sebastian; Albert, Frank W.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mapping studies of quantitative traits typically focus on detecting loci that contribute additively to trait variation. Genetic interactions are often proposed as a contributing factor to trait variation, but the relative contribution of interactions to trait variation is a subject of debate. Here we use a very large cross between two yeast strains to accurately estimate the fraction of phenotypic variance due to pairwise QTL–QTL interactions for 20 quantitative traits. We find that this fraction is 9% on average, substantially less than the contribution of additive QTL (43%). Statistically significant QTL–QTL pairs typically have small individual effect sizes, but collectively explain 40% of the pairwise interaction variance. We show that pairwise interaction variance is largely explained by pairs of loci at least one of which has a significant additive effect. These results refine our understanding of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits and help guide future mapping studies. PMID:26537231

  16. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, Oleg A; Klumov, Boris A; Tkachenko, Alexei V

    2015-07-01

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of "color," i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such "chromatic" interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the "colored" and "colorless" systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the "colorless" patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding "colored" one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram. PMID:26274163

  17. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.

  18. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral andmore » cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.« less

  19. The pain interactome: Connecting pain-specific protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Daniel G.; Moss, Andrew; Kennedy, Michael; Jones, Sherrie; Nenadic, Goran; Robertson, David L.; Sidders, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms associated with disease is a central goal of modern medical research. As such, many thousands of experiments have been published that detail individual molecular events that contribute to a disease. Here we use a semi-automated text mining approach to accurately and exhaustively curate the primary literature for chronic pain states. In so doing, we create a comprehensive network of 1,002 contextualized protein–protein interactions (PPIs) specifically associated with pain. The PPIs form a highly interconnected and coherent structure, and the resulting network provides an alternative to those derived from connecting genes associated with pain using interactions that have not been shown to occur in a painful state. We exploit the contextual data associated with our interactions to analyse subnetworks specific to inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and to various anatomical regions. Here, we identify potential targets for further study and several drug-repurposing opportunities. Finally, the network provides a framework for the interpretation of new data within the field of pain. PMID:24978826

  20. Optimization of the thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure, agriculture waste and inorganic additive through specific methanogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, J; Cisneros-Ortiz, M E; Guardia-Puebla, Y; Morgan-Sagastume, J M; Noyola, A

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic co-digestion of three wastes (manure, rice straw and clay residue, an inorganic additive) at different concentration levels and their interactive effects on methanogenic activity were investigated in this work at thermophilic conditions in order to enhance hydrolytic activity and methane production. A central composite design and the response surface methodology were applied for the optimization of specific methanogenic activity (SMA) by assessing their interaction effects with a reduced number of experiments. The results showed a significant interaction among the wastes on the SMA and confirmed that co-digestion enhances methane production. Rice straw apparently did not supply a significant amount of substrate to make a difference in SMA or methane yield. On the other hand, clay residue had a positive effect as an inorganic additive for stimulating the anaerobic process, based on its mineral content and its adsorbent properties for ammonia. Finally, the optimal conditions for achieving a thermophilic SMA value close to 1.4 g CH4-COD/g VSS · d(-1) were 20.3 gVSS/L of manure, 9.8 gVSS/L of rice straw and 3.3 gTSS/L of clay. PMID:24959998

  1. Circulating tumor cell detection using carbon nanotube devices: specific versus non-specific interactions

    PubMed Central

    King, Benjamin C.; Burkhead, Thomas; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress certain surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines are tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s causes significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes.

  2. LUMIS Interactive graphics operating instructions and system specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N. A.; Yu, T. C.; Landini, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    The LUMIS program has designed an integrated geographic information system to assist program managers and planning groups in metropolitan regions. Described is the system designed to interactively interrogate a data base, display graphically a portion of the region enclosed in the data base, and perform cross tabulations of variables within each city block, block group, or census tract. The system is designed to interface with U. S. Census DIME file technology, but can accept alternative districting conventions. The system is described on three levels: (1) introduction to the systems's concept and potential applications; (2) the method of operating the system on an interactive terminal; and (3) a detailed system specification for computer facility personnel.

  3. Specific features of nonvalent interactions in orthorhombic perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serezhkin, V. N.; Pushkin, D. V.; Serezhkina, L. B.

    2014-07-01

    It is established that isostructural orthorhombic perovskites ABO3 (sp. gr. Pnma in different systems, no. 62, Z = 4), depending on the specificity of nonvalent interactions (which determine the combinatorial-topological type of the Voronoi-Dirichlet polyhedra (VDPs) of four basis atoms), are divided into ten different stereotypes. It is shown by the example of 259 perovskites belonging to the DyCrO3 stereotype that VDP characteristics can be used to quantitatively estimate the distortion of BO6 octahedra, including that caused by the Jahn-Teller effect. It is found that one of the causes of the distortion of the coordination polyhedra of atoms in the structure of orthorhombic perovskites is heteroatomic metal-metal interactions, for which the interatomic distances are much shorter than the sum of the Slater radii of A and B atoms.

  4. Parental Anxiety and Child Symptomatology: An Examination of Additive and Interactive Effects of Parent Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Tein, Jenn-Yun

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined relations between parent anxiety and child anxiety, depression, and externalizing symptoms. In addition, the study tested the additive and interactive effects of parent anxiety with parent depression and externalizing symptoms in relation to child symptoms. Forty-eight parents with anxiety disorders and 49 parents…

  5. Modulation of Additive and Interactive Effects in Lexical Decision by Trial History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masson, Michael E. J.; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    Additive and interactive effects of word frequency, stimulus quality, and semantic priming have been used to test theoretical claims about the cognitive architecture of word-reading processes. Additive effects among these factors have been taken as evidence for discrete-stage models of word reading. We present evidence from linear mixed-model…

  6. Sequence Motifs in MADS Transcription Factors Responsible for Specificity and Diversification of Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aalt D. J.; Morabito, Giuseppa; Fiers, Martijn; van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.

    2010-01-01

    Protein sequences encompass tertiary structures and contain information about specific molecular interactions, which in turn determine biological functions of proteins. Knowledge about how protein sequences define interaction specificity is largely missing, in particular for paralogous protein families with high sequence similarity, such as the plant MADS domain transcription factor family. In comparison to the situation in mammalian species, this important family of transcription regulators has expanded enormously in plant species and contains over 100 members in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we provide insight into the mechanisms that determine protein-protein interaction specificity for the Arabidopsis MADS domain transcription factor family, using an integrated computational and experimental approach. Plant MADS proteins have highly similar amino acid sequences, but their dimerization patterns vary substantially. Our computational analysis uncovered small sequence regions that explain observed differences in dimerization patterns with reasonable accuracy. Furthermore, we show the usefulness of the method for prediction of MADS domain transcription factor interaction networks in other plant species. Introduction of mutations in the predicted interaction motifs demonstrated that single amino acid mutations can have a large effect and lead to loss or gain of specific interactions. In addition, various performed bioinformatics analyses shed light on the way evolution has shaped MADS domain transcription factor interaction specificity. Identified protein-protein interaction motifs appeared to be strongly conserved among orthologs, indicating their evolutionary importance. We also provide evidence that mutations in these motifs can be a source for sub- or neo-functionalization. The analyses presented here take us a step forward in understanding protein-protein interactions and the interplay between protein sequences and network evolution. PMID

  7. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  8. Reactivity of Dazomet, a Hydraulic Fracturing Additive: Hydrolysis and Interaction with Pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolazio, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Karamalidis, A.; Hakala, A.

    2015-12-01

    reaction products. Our results indicate the need to determine specific mineral-additive interactions to evaluate the potential risks of chemical use in hydraulic fracturing.

  9. Pattern Discovery in Breast Cancer Specific Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaogang; Harrison, Scott H.; Chen, Jake Yue

    2009-01-01

    The interest in indentifying novel biomarkers for early stage breast cancer (BRCA) detection has become grown significantly in recent years. From a view of network biology, one of the emerging themes today is to re-characterize a protein’s biological functions in its molecular network. Although many methods have been presented, including network-based gene ranking for molecular biomarker discovery, and graph clustering for functional module discovery, it is still hard to find systems-level properties hidden in disease specific molecular networks. We reconstructed BRCA-related protein interaction network by using BRCA-associated genes/proteins as seeds, and expanding them in an integrated protein interaction database. We further developed a computational framework based on Ant Colony Optimization to rank network nodes. The task of ranking nodes is represented as the problem of finding optimal density distributions of “ant colonies” on all nodes of the network. Our results revealed some interesting systems-level pattern in BRCA-related protein interaction network. PMID:21347162

  10. Species specificity in avian sperm:perivitelline interaction.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah G; Bausek, Nina; Wohlrab, Franz; Schneider, Wolfgang J; Janet Horrocks, A; Wishart, Graham J

    2004-04-01

    The interaction of chicken spermatozoa with the inner perivitelline layer from different avian species in vitro during a 5 min co-incubation was measured as the number of points of hydrolysis produced per unit area of inner perivitelline layer. The average degree of interaction, as a proportion of that between chicken spermatozoa and their homologous inner perivitelline layer, was: equal to or greater than 100% within Galliformes (chicken, turkey, quail, pheasant, peafowl and guineafowl); 44% within Anseriformes (goose, duck); and less than 30% in Passeriformes (Zebra Finch) and Columbiformes (collared-dove). The homologue of the putative chicken sperm-binding proteins, chicken ZP1 and ZP3, were identified by Western blotting with anti-chicken ZP1/ZP3 antibody in the perivitelline layers of all species. The functional cross-reactivity between chicken spermatozoa and heterologous inner perivitelline layer appeared to be linked to known phylogenetic distance between the species, although it was not related to the relative affinity of the different ZP3 homologues for anti-chicken ZP3. This work demonstrates that sperm interaction with the egg investment does not represent such a stringent species-specific barrier in birds as it does in mammals and marine invertebrates. This may be a factor in the frequency of hybrid production in birds. PMID:15123173

  11. Application of histone modification-specific interaction domains as an alternative to antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kungulovski, Goran; Kycia, Ina; Tamas, Raluca; Jurkowska, Renata Z; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Henry, Chisato; Reinhardt, Richard; Labhart, Paul; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-11-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones constitute a major chromatin indexing mechanism, and their proper characterization is of highest biological importance. So far, PTM-specific antibodies have been the standard reagent for studying histone PTMs despite caveats such as lot-to-lot variability of specificity and binding affinity. Herein, we successfully employed naturally occurring and engineered histone modification interacting domains for detection and identification of histone PTMs and ChIP-like enrichment of different types of chromatin. Our results demonstrate that histone interacting domains are robust and highly specific reagents that can replace or complement histone modification antibodies. These domains can be produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli at low cost and constant quality. Protein design of reading domains allows for generation of novel specificities, addition of affinity tags, and preparation of PTM binding pocket variants as matching negative controls, which is not possible with antibodies. PMID:25301795

  12. Redispersibility in magnetorheological fluids: Surface interactions between iron powder and wetting additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombard, Antonio J. F.; Antunes, Laís S.; Gouvêa, Douglas

    2009-02-01

    Our aim in this work was to investigate the interactions between 3 carbonyl iron powders (CIP) and different wetting additives, looking for to understand how these interactions affects the rheology and redispersibility of magnetorheological fluids (MRF). The powders were named: 'A' (uncoated), 'B' (with silica coating), and 'C' (with iron III oxide coating). The additives studied were alcohols, amines and carboxylic acids or polymeric dispersants, mainly with n-octyl or n-dodecyl hydrocarbon chains. The effect of additives concentration was also studied. We conclude that the redispersibility of MRF is strongly dependent on both carbonyl iron powder surface properties and choice and concentration of dispersing additives. The type of iron powder modification also has a significant role on the viscosity of MRF formulations additionally to the known particle size effects.

  13. Identifying functional cancer-specific miRNA-mRNA interactions in testicular germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Nafiseh; Fathy, Mahmood; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein; Shojaie, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men aged between 15 and 35 and more than 90% of testicular neoplasms are originated at germ cells. Recent research has shown the impact of microRNAs (miRNAs) in different types of cancer, including testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT). MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs which affect the development and progression of cancer cells by binding to mRNAs and regulating their expressions. The identification of functional miRNA-mRNA interactions in cancers, i.e. those that alter the expression of genes in cancer cells, can help delineate post-regulatory mechanisms and may lead to new treatments to control the progression of cancer. A number of sequence-based methods have been developed to predict miRNA-mRNA interactions based on the complementarity of sequences. While necessary, sequence complementarity is, however, not sufficient for presence of functional interactions. Alternative methods have thus been developed to refine the sequence-based interactions using concurrent expression profiles of miRNAs and mRNAs. This study aims to find functional cancer-specific miRNA-mRNA interactions in TGCT. To this end, the sequence-based predicted interactions are first refined using an ensemble learning method, based on two well-known methods of learning miRNA-mRNA interactions, namely, TaLasso and GenMiR++. Additional functional analyses were then used to identify a subset of interactions to be most likely functional and specific to TGCT. The final list of 13 miRNA-mRNA interactions can be potential targets for identifying TGCT-specific interactions and future laboratory experiments to develop new therapies. PMID:27235586

  14. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  15. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  16. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  17. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  18. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  19. Communication: Non-additivity of van der Waals interactions between nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Jianmin; Perdew, John P.

    2014-10-14

    Due to size-dependent non-additivity, the van der Waals interaction (vdW) between nanostructures remains elusive. Here we first develop a model dynamic multipole polarizability for an inhomogeneous system that allows for a cavity. The model recovers the exact zero- and high-frequency limits and respects the paradigms of condensed matter physics (slowly varying density) and quantum chemistry (one- and two-electron densities). We find that the model can generate accurate vdW coefficients for both spherical and non-spherical clusters, with an overall mean absolute relative error of 4%, without any fitting. Based on this model, we study the non-additivity of vdW interactions. We find that there is strong non-additivity of vdW interactions between nanostructures, arising from electron delocalization, inequivalent contributions of atoms, and non-additive many-body interactions. Furthermore, we find that the non-additivity can have increasing size dependence as well as decreasing size dependence with cluster size.

  20. Distinct interactions select and maintain a specific cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Dončić, Andreas; Falleur-Fettig, Melody; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to specify and maintain discrete cell fates is essential for development. However, the dynamics underlying selection and stability of distinct cell types remains poorly understood. Here, we provide a quantitative single-cell analysis of commitment dynamics during the mating-mitosis switch in budding yeast. Commitment to division corresponds precisely to activating the G1 cyclin positive feedback loop in competition with the cyclin inhibitor Far1. Cyclin-dependent phosphorylation and inhibition of the mating pathway scaffold Ste5 is required to ensure exclusive expression of the mitotic transcriptional program after cell cycle commitment. Failure to commit exclusively results in coexpression of both cell cycle and pheromone-induced genes, and a morphologically-mixed inviable cell fate. Thus, specification and maintenance of a cellular state are performed by distinct interactions, which is likely a consequence of disparate reaction rates and may be a general feature of the interlinked regulatory networks responsible for selecting cell fates. PMID:21855793

  1. Observation of Iron Specific Interaction with a Charge Neutral Phospholipid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Feng, Shuren; San Emeterio, Josue; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2015-03-01

    Using surface sensitive X-ray scattering and spectroscopic techniques we show that phosphatidyl choline (PC) head groups attract positively charged iron ions and complexes even at pH values that are lower than 3. DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a zwitterionic lipid typically used as a model system for cell membranes. Within a large pH range (3 -11), it carries a negative charge on the phosphate group and a positive charge on the quaternary ammonium cation, thus appears charge neutral. Further lowering the pH, i.e. adding a proton to the phosphate group, results in a positively charged headgroup. Surprisingly, we detect significant enrichment of iron at the interface of the DPPC monolayer and the aqueous subphase with the pH maintained at 3 or even lower. With a supposedly charge neutral or even positive surface, the observation of surface bound, charge positive iron ions or iron hydroxides is counter-intuitive and suggests iron-specific interaction with the phospholipid headgroup, which is not governed by electrostatic interaction. The effect of the integration of Mms6, a membrane protein that promotes the formation of magnetic nanocrystals, into the DPPC monolayer will also be discussed. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Interactions between organic additives and active powders in water-based lithium iron phosphate electrode slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chia-Chen; Lin, Yu-Sheng

    2012-12-01

    The interactions of organic additives with active powders are investigated and are found to have great influence on the determination of the mixing process for preparing electrode slurries with good dispersion and electrochemical properties of lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) electrodes. Based on the analyses of zeta potential, sedimentation, and rheology, it is shown that LiFePO4 prefers to interact with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) relative to other organic additives such as sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC), and thus shows preferential adsorption by SBR, whereas SBR has much lower efficiency than SCMC in dispersing LiFePO4. Therefore, for SCMC to interact with and disperse LiFePO4 before the interaction of LiFePO4 with SBR, it is suggested to mix SCMC with LiFePO4 prior to the addition of SBR during the slurry preparation process. For the electrode prepared via the suggested process, i.e., the sequenced adding process in which SCMC is mixed with active powders prior to the addition of SBR, a much better electrochemical performance is obtained than that of the one prepared via the process referred as the simultaneous adding process, in which mixing of SCMC and SBR with active powders in simultaneous.

  3. Additive and Interactive Effects of Stimulus Degradation: No Challenge for CDP+

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Johannes C.; Perry, Conrad; Zorzi, Marco

    2009-01-01

    S. O'Malley and D. Besner (2008) showed that additive effects of stimulus degradation and word frequency in reading aloud occur in the presence of nonwords but not in pure word lists. They argued that this dissociation presents a major challenge to interactive computational models of reading aloud and claimed that no currently implemented model is…

  4. Evolutionary Genomics Suggests That CheV Is an Additional Adaptor for Accommodating Specific Chemoreceptors within the Chemotaxis Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are models for many experiments in molecular biology including chemotaxis, and most of the results obtained with one organism have been generalized to another. While most components of the chemotaxis pathway are strongly conserved between the two species, Salmonella genomes contain some chemoreceptors and an additional protein, CheV, that are not found in E. coli. The role of CheV was examined in distantly related species Bacillus subtilis and Helicobacter pylori, but its role in bacterial chemotaxis is still not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that in enterobacteria CheV functions as an additional adaptor linking the CheA kinase to certain types of chemoreceptors that cannot be effectively accommodated by the universal adaptor CheW. Phylogenetic profiling, genomic context and comparative protein sequence analyses suggested that CheV interacts with specific domains of CheA and chemoreceptors from an orthologous group exemplified by the Salmonella McpC protein. Structural consideration of the conservation patterns suggests that CheV and CheW share the same binding spot on the chemoreceptor structure, but have some affinity bias towards chemoreceptors from different orthologous groups. Finally, published experimental results and data newly obtained via comparative genomics support the idea that CheV functions as a “phosphate sink” possibly to off-set the over-stimulation of the kinase by certain types of chemoreceptors. Overall, our results strongly suggest that CheV is an additional adaptor for accommodating specific chemoreceptors within the chemotaxis signaling complex. PMID:26844549

  5. Evolutionary Genomics Suggests That CheV Is an Additional Adaptor for Accommodating Specific Chemoreceptors within the Chemotaxis Signaling Complex.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Davi R; Zhulin, Igor B

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are models for many experiments in molecular biology including chemotaxis, and most of the results obtained with one organism have been generalized to another. While most components of the chemotaxis pathway are strongly conserved between the two species, Salmonella genomes contain some chemoreceptors and an additional protein, CheV, that are not found in E. coli. The role of CheV was examined in distantly related species Bacillus subtilis and Helicobacter pylori, but its role in bacterial chemotaxis is still not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that in enterobacteria CheV functions as an additional adaptor linking the CheA kinase to certain types of chemoreceptors that cannot be effectively accommodated by the universal adaptor CheW. Phylogenetic profiling, genomic context and comparative protein sequence analyses suggested that CheV interacts with specific domains of CheA and chemoreceptors from an orthologous group exemplified by the Salmonella McpC protein. Structural consideration of the conservation patterns suggests that CheV and CheW share the same binding spot on the chemoreceptor structure, but have some affinity bias towards chemoreceptors from different orthologous groups. Finally, published experimental results and data newly obtained via comparative genomics support the idea that CheV functions as a "phosphate sink" possibly to off-set the over-stimulation of the kinase by certain types of chemoreceptors. Overall, our results strongly suggest that CheV is an additional adaptor for accommodating specific chemoreceptors within the chemotaxis signaling complex. PMID:26844549

  6. Specificity of peripheral nerve regeneration: interactions at the axon level.

    PubMed

    Allodi, Ilary; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2012-07-01

    Peripheral nerves injuries result in paralysis, anesthesia and lack of autonomic control of the affected body areas. After injury, axons distal to the lesion are disconnected from the neuronal body and degenerate, leading to denervation of the peripheral organs. Wallerian degeneration creates a microenvironment distal to the injury site that supports axonal regrowth, while the neuron body changes in phenotype to promote axonal regeneration. The significance of axonal regeneration is to replace the degenerated distal nerve segment, and achieve reinnervation of target organs and restitution of their functions. However, axonal regeneration does not always allows for adequate functional recovery, so that after a peripheral nerve injury, patients do not recover normal motor control and fine sensibility. The lack of specificity of nerve regeneration, in terms of motor and sensory axons regrowth, pathfinding and target reinnervation, is one the main shortcomings for recovery. Key factors for successful axonal regeneration include the intrinsic changes that neurons suffer to switch their transmitter state to a pro-regenerative state and the environment that the axons find distal to the lesion site. The molecular mechanisms implicated in axonal regeneration and pathfinding after injury are complex, and take into account the cross-talk between axons and glial cells, neurotrophic factors, extracellular matrix molecules and their receptors. The aim of this review is to look at those interactions, trying to understand if some of these molecular factors are specific for motor and sensory neuron growth, and provide the basic knowledge for potential strategies to enhance and guide axonal regeneration and reinnervation of adequate target organs. PMID:22609046

  7. Age and work environment characteristics in relation to sleep: Additive, interactive and curvilinear effects.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Katharine R

    2016-05-01

    Although additive combinations of age and work environment characteristics have been found to predict sleep impairment, possible age x work environment interactions have been largely disregarded. The present study examined linear and curvilinear interactions of age with work environment measures in relation to sleep quality and duration. Survey data were collected from offshore day-shift personnel (N = 901). Main effects and interactions of the age terms with work environment measures (job demand, control, and social support, physical environment and strenuous work) were evaluated. Sleep duration was predicted by a curvilinear interaction, age(2)x job demand (p < .005), and by the age x social support interaction (p < .002); sleep quality was predicted by age x job demand (p < .002). Job control and physical environment showed significant additive effects. At a time when older employees are encouraged to remain in the workforce, the findings serve to increase understanding of how ageing and work demands jointly contribute to sleep impairment. PMID:26851463

  8. Effect and interactions of commercial additives and chloride ion in copper electrowinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Wenyuan

    This thesis is to understand and compare the effects and interactions of modified polysaccharide (HydroStar), polyacrylamide (Cyquest N-900) and chloride ion on copper electrowinning. A study of the nucleation and growth was conducted in a synthetic electrolyte (40 g/L Cu, 160 g/L H2SO 4, 20 mg/L Cl-) with the addition of HydroStar or Cyquest N-900 using potential step measurements. The current responses generated were compared to theoretical models of nucleation and growth mechanisms. The nucleation and growth mechanism changed as function of potential and the presence of organic additives. The nucleation and growth mechanisms were confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At low overpotentials, electrodeposition from the electrolyte without additives proceeded by progressive nucleation with three-dimensional (3-D) growth. The addition of HydroStar produced smaller nuclei and changed the mechanism to progressive nucleation and 2-D growth. Cyquest N-900 used there appeared to be progressive nucleation with 2-D growth and polarize the cathodes. In addition, instantaneous nucleation under diffusion control occurred at high overpotentials. Chloride ion and its interaction with HydroStar and Cyquest N-900 were further characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The trends observed from Nyquist plots and equivalent circuit models were consistent with the CV results. Chloride, on its own, depolarized copper electrodeposition, while chloride ion associated with Cyquest N-900 inhibited the reaction. It is proposed that Cl- acted as a bridging ligand between copper and Cyquest N-900. The addition of HydroStar depolarized copper deposition, but it did not interact with.

  9. Identifying a Core RNA Polymerase Surface Critical for Interactions with a Sigma-Like Specificity Factor

    PubMed Central

    Cliften, Paul F.; Jang, Sei-Heon; Jaehning, Judith A.

    2000-01-01

    Cyclic interactions occurring between a core RNA polymerase (RNAP) and its initiation factors are critical for transcription initiation, but little is known about subunit interaction. In this work we have identified regions of the single-subunit yeast mitochondrial RNAP (Rpo41p) important for interaction with its sigma-like specificity factor (Mtf1p). Previously we found that the whole folded structure of both polypeptides as well as specific amino acids in at least three regions of Mtf1p are required for interaction. In this work we started with an interaction-defective point mutant in Mtf1p (V135A) and used a two-hybrid selection to isolate suppressing mutations in the core polymerase. We identified suppressors in three separate regions of the RNAP which, when modeled on the structure of the closely related phage T7 RNAP, appear to lie on one surface of the protein. Additional point mutations and biochemical assays were used to confirm the importance of each region for Rpo41p-Mtf1p interactions. Remarkably, two of the three suppressors are found in regions required by T7 RNAP for DNA sequence recognition and promoter melting. Although these essential regions of the phage RNAP are poorly conserved with the mitochondrial RNAPs, they are conserved among the mitochondrial enzymes. The organellar RNAPs appear to use this surface in an alternative way for interactions with their separate sigma-like specificity factor, which, like its bacterial counterpart, provides promoter recognition and DNA melting functions to the holoenzyme. PMID:10958696

  10. Predicted weakening of the spin-orbit interaction with the addition of neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hemalatha, M.; Gambhir, Y. K.; Haider, W.; Kailas, S.

    2009-05-15

    The fully microscopic p-nucleus optical potential has been calculated in the framework of the first order Brueckner theory employing Urbana V14, soft-core internucleon interaction along with the relativistic mean field densities both for protons and neutrons. It is observed that the volume integral per nucleon, of the real part of the spin-orbit interaction calculated for Zr (A=76-110) and Sn (A=96-136) isotopes, decreases with the increase in neutron number. The present optical model calculation satisfactorily reproduces the experimental (where available) cross sections and analyzing power. Further the magnitude of the first maximum (minimum) in the calculated analyzing power decreases (increases) with the addition of neutrons both for Zr and Sn isotopes reflecting the weakening of the spin-orbit interaction.

  11. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  12. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  13. Reconstitution of the mitochondrial Hsp70 (mortalin)-p53 interaction using purified proteins--identification of additional interacting regions.

    PubMed

    Iosefson, Ohad; Azem, Abdussalam

    2010-03-19

    Previous studies have shown that the mammalian mitochondrial 70 kDa heat-shock protein (mortalin) can also be detected in the cytosol. Cytosolic mortalin binds p53 and by doing so, prevents translocation of the tumor suppressor into the nucleus. In this study, we developed a novel binding assay, using purified proteins, for tracking the interaction between p53 and mortalin. Our results reveal that: (i) P53 binds to the peptide-binding site of mortalin which enhances the ability of the former to bind DNA. (ii) An additional previously unknown binding site for mortalin exists within the C-terminal domain of p53. PMID:20153329

  14. Effects of oxide additives on inter-grain interaction of CoPtCr-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Hao-Cheng; Liao, Jung-Wei; Wang, Liang-Wei; Chen, Rong-Zhi; Chiu, Chun-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Chang, Fan-Hsiu; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2012-04-01

    By using first order reversal curves (FORCs), we reveal distinct magnetization reversal behavior in the CoPtCr films with different oxide additives, including Ta2O5, SiO2 and their mixtures. Increasing the ratio of Ta2O5-to-SiO2 alters the inter-grain interaction from an exchange coupling (parallel) to a dipolar-field coupling (anti-parallel). During the sputtering process, the Ta2O5 additives release extra oxygen to induce the formation of CrOx, observed from X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The reduced grain-to-grain exchange coupling strength by increasing Ta2O5 additives could be attributed to the increased volume concentration of oxides and/or the presence of the CrOx.

  15. Inositol Pentakisphosphate Isomers Bind PH Domains with Varying Specificity and Inhibit Phosphoinositide Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    S Jackson; S Al-Saigh; C Schultz; M Junop

    2011-12-31

    PH domains represent one of the most common domains in the human proteome. These domains are recognized as important mediators of protein-phosphoinositide and protein-protein interactions. Phosphoinositides are lipid components of the membrane that function as signaling molecules by targeting proteins to their sites of action. Phosphoinositide based signaling pathways govern a diverse range of important cellular processes including membrane remodeling, differentiation, proliferation and survival. Myo-Inositol phosphates are soluble signaling molecules that are structurally similar to the head groups of phosphoinositides. These molecules have been proposed to function, at least in part, by regulating PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Given the structural similarity of inositol phosphates we were interested in examining the specificity of PH domains towards the family of myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. In work reported here we demonstrate that the C-terminal PH domain of pleckstrin possesses the specificity required to discriminate between different myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers. The structural basis for this specificity was determined using high-resolution crystal structures. Moreover, we show that while the PH domain of Grp1 does not possess this high degree of specificity, the PH domain of protein kinase B does. These results demonstrate that some PH domains possess enough specificity to discriminate between myo-inositol pentakisphosphate isomers allowing for these molecules to differentially regulate interactions with phosphoinositides. Furthermore, this work contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting myo-inositol phosphates as regulators of important PH domain-phosphoinositide interactions. Finally, in addition to expanding our knowledge of cellular signaling, these results provide a basis for developing tools to probe biological pathway.

  16. Catalytic enantioselective addition of organoboron reagents to fluoroketones controlled by electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyunga; Silverio, Daniel L.; Torker, Sebastian; Robbins, Daniel W.; Haeffner, Fredrik; van der Mei, Farid W.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2016-08-01

    Organofluorine compounds are central to modern chemistry, and broadly applicable transformations that generate them efficiently and enantioselectively are in much demand. Here we introduce efficient catalytic methods for the addition of allyl and allenyl organoboron reagents to fluorine-substituted ketones. These reactions are facilitated by readily and inexpensively available catalysts and deliver versatile and otherwise difficult-to-access tertiary homoallylic alcohols in up to 98% yield and >99:1 enantiomeric ratio. Utility is highlighted by a concise enantioselective approach to the synthesis of the antiparasitic drug fluralaner (Bravecto, presently sold as the racemate). Different forms of ammonium–organofluorine interactions play a key role in the control of enantioselectivity. The greater understanding of various non-bonding interactions afforded by these studies should facilitate the future development of transformations that involve fluoroorganic entities.

  17. Catalytic enantioselective addition of organoboron reagents to fluoroketones controlled by electrostatic interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, KyungA; Silverio, Daniel L; Torker, Sebastian; Robbins, Daniel W; Haeffner, Fredrik; van der Mei, Farid W; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2016-08-01

    Organofluorine compounds are central to modern chemistry, and broadly applicable transformations that generate them efficiently and enantioselectively are in much demand. Here we introduce efficient catalytic methods for the addition of allyl and allenyl organoboron reagents to fluorine-substituted ketones. These reactions are facilitated by readily and inexpensively available catalysts and deliver versatile and otherwise difficult-to-access tertiary homoallylic alcohols in up to 98% yield and >99:1 enantiomeric ratio. Utility is highlighted by a concise enantioselective approach to the synthesis of the antiparasitic drug fluralaner (Bravecto, presently sold as the racemate). Different forms of ammonium-organofluorine interactions play a key role in the control of enantioselectivity. The greater understanding of various non-bonding interactions afforded by these studies should facilitate the future development of transformations that involve fluoroorganic entities. PMID:27442282

  18. On Acoustic Source Specification for Rotor-Stator Interaction Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Envia, Edmane; Burley, Caesy L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of measured source data to assess the effects of acoustic source specification on rotor-stator interaction noise predictions. Specifically, the acoustic propagation and radiation portions of a recently developed coupled computational approach are used to predict tonal rotor-stator interaction noise from a benchmark configuration. In addition to the use of full measured data, randomization of source mode relative phases is also considered for specification of the acoustic source within the computational approach. Comparisons with sideline noise measurements are performed to investigate the effects of various source descriptions on both inlet and exhaust predictions. The inclusion of additional modal source content is shown to have a much greater influence on the inlet results. Reasonable agreement between predicted and measured levels is achieved for the inlet, as well as the exhaust when shear layer effects are taken into account. For the number of trials considered, phase randomized predictions follow statistical distributions similar to those found in previous statistical source investigations. The shape of the predicted directivity pattern relative to measurements also improved with phase randomization, having predicted levels generally within one standard deviation of the measured levels.

  19. Protein-protein interactions in a higher-order structure direct lambda site-specific recombination.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J F; de Vargas, L M; Skinner, S E; Landy, A

    1987-06-01

    The highly directional site-specific recombination of bacteriophage lambda is tightly regulated by the binding of three different proteins to a complex array of sites. The manner in which these reactions are both stimulated and inhibited by co-operative binding of proteins to specific sites on the P arm of attP and AttR has been elucidated by correlation of nuclease protection with recombination studies of both wild-type and mutant DNAs. In addition to co-operative forces, there is a specific competitive interaction that allows the protein-DNA complex to serve as a "biological switch". This switch does not depend upon the simple occlusion of DNA binding sites by neighboring proteins; but, rather, the outcome of this competition is dependent on long-range interactions that vary between the higher-order structures of attP and attR. These higher-order structures are dependent on cooperative interactions involving three proteins binding to five or more sites. PMID:2958633

  20. A Flexible Terpyridine Derivative Interacts Specifically with G-Quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    De Rache, Aurore; Gueddouda, Nassima Meriem; Bourdoncle, Anne; Hommes, Paul; Reissig, Hans-Ulrich; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2016-08-26

    G-quadruplexes formed by nucleic acids are implicated in pathologies ranging from cancers to neurodegenerative diseases. We evaluated interactions of 29 bi- and terpyridine derivatives with G-quadruplexes and duplexes. FRET-melting, circular dichroism, and (1) H NMR spectroscopy showed that one terpyridine derivative interacted very selectively with G-quadruplexes. This G-quadruplex ligand inhibited helicase activity and should influence G-quadruplex-related biological processes. PMID:27410717

  1. Performance and interaction anxiety: specific relationships with other- and self-evaluation concerns.

    PubMed

    Hook, Julie N; Valentiner, David P; Connelly, Jill

    2013-03-01

    This study examines whether performance anxiety (PA) is specifically associated with other-evaluation concerns and interaction anxiety (IA) with self-evaluation concerns. Individuals with public speaking fears and high levels of PA or IA were distinguishable from nonanxious controls on measures taken during a public speaking challenge. In addition, high PA individuals exhibited more observer-rated negative speech characteristics in an Other-Evaluation condition compared to a Self-Evaluation condition, but high IA individuals and nonanxious individuals did not. These results provide some evidence for the distinctiveness of these dimensions of social anxiety. PMID:22303843

  2. EVAPORATION: a new vapour pressure estimation methodfor organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2011-09-01

    We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects), a method to predict (subcooled) liquid pure compound vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules that requires only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T) is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

  3. Interactive effects between N addition and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Annika; Strengbom, Joachim; From, Fredrik

    2014-05-01

    In management of boreal forests, nitrogen (N) enrichment from atmospheric deposition or from forest fertilization can appear in combination with land-use related disturbances, i.e. tree harvesting by clear-felling. Long-term interactive effects between N enrichment and disturbance on boreal forest ecosystem structure and function are, however, poorly known. We investigated effects of N enrichment by forest fertilization done > 25 years ago on forest understory species composition in old-growth (undisturbed) forests, and in forests clear-felled 10 years ago (disturbed). In clear-felled forests we also investigated effects of the previous N addition on growth of tree saplings. The results show that the N enrichment effect on the understory species composition was strongly dependent on the disturbance caused by clear-felling. In undisturbed forests, there were small or no effects on understory species composition from N addition. In contrast, effects were large in forests first exposed to N addition and subsequently disturbed by clear-felling. Effects of N addition differed among functional groups of plants. Abundance of graminoids increased (+232%) and abundance of dwarf shrubs decreased (-44%) following disturbance in N fertilized forests. For vascular plants, the two perturbations had contrasting effects on α-(within forests) and β-diversity (among forests): in disturbed forests, N addition reduced, or had no effect on α-diversity, while β-diversity increased. For bryophytes, negative effects of disturbance on α-diversity were smaller in N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized, while neither N addition nor disturbance had any effects on β-diversity. Moreover, sapling growth in forests clear-felled 10 years ago was significantly higher in previously N fertilized forests than in forests not fertilized. Our study show that effects of N addition on plant communities may appear small, short-lived, or even absent until exposed to a disturbance. This

  4. Fungal serotype-specific differences in bacterial-yeast interactions

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkareem, Asan F; Lee, Hiu Ham; Ahmadi, Mohammed; Martinez, Luis R

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn) causes meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals. This encapsulated fungus can be found interacting with environmental microbes in soil contaminated with pigeon excrement. Cn survival within polymicrobial and other challenging communities has been shown to affect the evolution of its virulence factors. We compared the survival of 10 serotype A and D strains after interaction with the soil bacterium, Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab). Although co-incubation with Ab stimulated virulence factors production by strains of both cryptococcal serotypes, on average, serotype A strains displayed significantly higher survival rate, number of metabolically active cells within biofilms, and capsular polysaccharide production and release than serotype D strains. Our findings suggest that interactions of Cn with other microorganisms influence the fungus' regulation and production of virulence factors, important elements needed for the successful colonization of the human host. PMID:26132337

  5. Effective method of characterizing specific liquid fluorocarbon interactions using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ravi, S; Amoros, J; Arockia Jayalatha, K

    2008-05-22

    Several studies have used the analytical results available for structure factor, osmotic pressure, vapor pressure, and suspension viscosity to characterize nanoparticle interactions. In this work a novel attempt has been made to characterize seven different types of liquid per fluorocarbon nanoparticles (LPFC-np) by estimating packing factor, segment diameter, chemical potential, Rao's constant, and adiabatic and isothermal compressibilities using experimental ultrasonic velocity as input. The segment diameter has also been examined by using experimental surface tension and viscosity for comparison. The calculations were extended for different temperatures involving four different equations of state. We have tested the sensitivity of all these parameters to a very small change in the heat capacity ratio. This extensive calculation helps to make a reasonable description about the interactions among the LPFC-np. Also a better correlation could be determined between the interaction of ultrasound with LPFC-np (as a facilitator) and the pure absorption (propagation) of ultrasound by the entire system. PMID:18422360

  6. 75 FR 18413 - 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations-Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    .... According to the July 9, 2007, final rule published in the Federal Register (72 FR 37346), we went from 487... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 32 RIN 1018-AW49 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport...: The Fish and Wildlife Service adds two refuges to the list of areas open for hunting and/or...

  7. On the function and homeostasis of PCSK9: reciprocal interaction with LDLR and additional lipid effects.

    PubMed

    Tavori, Hagai; Rashid, Shirya; Fazio, Sergio

    2015-02-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a circulatory ligand that terminates the lifecycle of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) thus affecting plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Recent evidence shows that in addition to the straightforward mechanism of action, there are more complex interactions between PCSK9, LDLR and plasma lipoprotein levels, including: (a) the presence of both parallel and reciprocal regulation of surface LDLR and plasma PCSK9; (b) a correlation between PCSK9 and LDL-C levels dependent not only on the fact that PCSK9 removes hepatic LDLR, but also due to the fact that up to 40% of plasma PCSK9 is physically associated with LDL; and (c) an association between plasma PCSK9 production and the assembly and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The effect of PCSK9 on LDLR is being successfully utilized toward the development of anti-PCSK9 therapies to reduce plasma LDL-C levels. Current biochemical research has uncovered additional mechanisms of action and interacting partners for PCSK9, and this opens the way for a more thorough understanding of the regulation, metabolism, and effects of this interesting protein. PMID:25544176

  8. Implications of CD-Interactive: Direction, Specifications, and Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardes, D'Ellen

    1986-01-01

    Looks at proposed standard for CD-I (compact disc-interactive) and its implications for product and market development, CD-ROM, and optical publishing. Possible roles of OS-9 (Microware's operating system), Polaroid's Colorcatcher, and products shown at the Microsoft CD-ROM conference in the development of the CD-I market are discussed. (Author)

  9. Additive and interactive effects of stimulus degradation: no challenge for CDP+.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Johannes C; Perry, Conrad; Zorzi, Marco

    2009-01-01

    S. O'Malley and D. Besner (2008) showed that additive effects of stimulus degradation and word frequency in reading aloud occur in the presence of nonwords but not in pure word lists. They argued that this dissociation presents a major challenge to interactive computational models of reading aloud and claimed that no currently implemented model is able to simulate additive effects in these conditions. In the current article, it is shown that the connectionist dual process model (CDP+) can simulate these effects because its nonlexical route is thresholded. The authors present a series of simulations showing that CDP+ can not only simulate the precise dissociation observed by O'Malley and Besner but more generally can produce additive effects for a wide range of parameter combinations and different sets of items. The nonlexical route of CDP+ was not modified post hoc to deal with the effects of stimulus quality, but it had been thresholded for principled reasons before it was known that these effects existed. Together, the effects of stimulus quality on word frequency do not challenge CDP+ but rather provide unexpected support for its architecture and processing dynamics. PMID:19210104

  10. Ribozyme recognition of RNA by tertiary interactions with specific ribose 2'-OH groups.

    PubMed

    Pyle, A M; Cech, T R

    1991-04-18

    Shortened forms of the group I intron from Tetrahymena catalyse sequence-specific cleavage of exogenous oligonucleotide substrates. The association between RNA enzyme (ribozyme) and substrate is mediated by pairing between an internal guide sequence on the ribozyme and a complementary sequence on the substrate. RNA substrates and cleavage products associate with a binding energy greater than that of base-pairing by approximately 4 kcal-mol-1 (at 42 degrees C), whereas DNA associates with an energy around that expected for base-pairing. It has been proposed that the difference in binding affinity is due to specific 2'-OH groups on an RNA substrate forming stabilizing tertiary interactions with the core of the ribozyme, or that the RNA.RNA helix formed upon association of an RNA substrate and the ribozyme might be more stable than an RNA.DNA helix of the same sequence. To differentiate between these two models, chimaeric oligonucleotides containing deoxynucleotide residues at successive positions along the chain were synthesized, and their equilibrium binding constants for association with the ribozyme were measured directly by a new gel electrophoresis technique. We report here that most of the extra binding energy can be accounted for by discrete RNA-ribozyme interactions, the 2'-OH group on the sugar residue three nucleotides from the cleavage site contributing the most interaction energy. Thus, in addition to the well documented binding of RNA to RNA by base-pairing, 2'-OH groups within a duplex can also mediate association between RNA molecules. PMID:1708111

  11. Identification of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules based on interactions between transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J; Qian, Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Background Evolutionary conservation has been used successfully to help identify cis-acting DNA regions that are important in regulating tissue-specific gene expression. Motivated by increasing evidence that some DNA regulatory regions are not evolutionary conserved, we have developed an approach for cis-regulatory region identification that does not rely upon evolutionary sequence conservation. Results The conservation-independent approach is based on an empirical potential energy between interacting transcription factors (TFs). In this analysis, the potential energy is defined as a function of the number of TF interactions in a genomic region and the strength of the interactions. By identifying sets of interacting TFs, the analysis locates regions enriched with the binding sites of these interacting TFs. We applied this approach to 30 human tissues and identified 6232 putative cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) regulating 2130 tissue-specific genes. Interestingly, some genes appear to be regulated by different CRMs in different tissues. Known regulatory regions are highly enriched in our predicted CRMs. In addition, DNase I hypersensitive sites, which tend to be associated with active regulatory regions, significantly overlap with the predicted CRMs, but not with more conserved regions. We also find that conserved and non-conserved CRMs regulate distinct gene groups. Conserved CRMs control more essential genes and genes involved in fundamental cellular activities such as transcription. In contrast, non-conserved CRMs, in general, regulate more non-essential genes, such as genes related to neural activity. Conclusion These results demonstrate that identifying relevant sets of binding motifs can help in the mapping of DNA regulatory regions, and suggest that non-conserved CRMs play an important role in gene regulation. PMID:17996093

  12. Thermodynamic and structural investigation of bi-specificity in protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Naganathan, Saranga; Beckett, Dorothy

    2009-01-01

    The ability of a single protein to interact with multiple protein partners is central to many biological processes. However, the physical chemical and structural basis of the multispecificity is not understood. In Escherichia coli the protein, BirA, can self-associate to a homo-dimer or form a hetero-dimer with the biotin carboxyl carrier protein of the biotin-dependent carboxylase, acetyl CoA carboxylase. The first interaction results in binding of BirA to the biotin operator sequence to repress transcription initiation at the biotin biosynthetic operon and the second is a prerequisite to post-translational biotin addition to the carrier protein for use in metabolism. A single surface on BirA is used for both interactions and previous studies indicate that, despite the structural differences between the alternative partners, the two dimerization reactions are isoenergetic. In this work the underlying thermodynamic driving forces and the sequence determinants of the two interactions were investigated in order to elucidate the energetic and structural underpinnings of the dual specificity. Combined measurements of the temperature and salt dependencies of hetero-dimerization indicate a modest unfavorable enthalpy and no dependence on salt concentration. By contrast, homo-dimerization is characterized by a very large unfavorable enthalpy and a modest dependence on salt concentration. Measurements of the function of BirA variants with single amino acid replacements in the alternative dimerization reactions indicate that although considerable overlap in structural determinants for both interactions exists, hotspots specific for one but not the other were detected. PMID:19361526

  13. [Application of SAS macro to evaluated multiplicative and additive interaction in logistic and Cox regression in clinical practices].

    PubMed

    Nie, Z Q; Ou, Y Q; Zhuang, J; Qu, Y J; Mai, J Z; Chen, J M; Liu, X Q

    2016-05-10

    Conditional logistic regression analysis and unconditional logistic regression analysis are commonly used in case control study, but Cox proportional hazard model is often used in survival data analysis. Most literature only refer to main effect model, however, generalized linear model differs from general linear model, and the interaction was composed of multiplicative interaction and additive interaction. The former is only statistical significant, but the latter has biological significance. In this paper, macros was written by using SAS 9.4 and the contrast ratio, attributable proportion due to interaction and synergy index were calculated while calculating the items of logistic and Cox regression interactions, and the confidence intervals of Wald, delta and profile likelihood were used to evaluate additive interaction for the reference in big data analysis in clinical epidemiology and in analysis of genetic multiplicative and additive interactions. PMID:27188374

  14. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  16. Parity Symmetry and Parity Breaking in the Quantum Rabi Model with Addition of Ising Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiong; He, Zhi; Yao, Chun-Mei

    2015-04-01

    We explore the possibility to generate new parity symmetry in the quantum Rabi model after a bias is introduced. In contrast to a mathematical treatment in a previous publication [J. Phys. A 46 (2013) 265302], we consider a physically realistic method by involving an additional spin into the quantum Rabi model to couple with the original spin by an Ising interaction, and then the parity symmetry is broken as well as the scaling behavior of the ground state by introducing a bias. The rule can be found that the parity symmetry is broken by introducing a bias and then restored by adding new degrees of freedom. Experimental feasibility of realizing the models under discussion is investigated. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61475045 and 11347142, the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province, China under Grant No. 2015JJ3092

  17. Gaze and Feet as Additional Input Modalities for Interacting with Geospatial Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çöltekin, A.; Hempel, J.; Brychtova, A.; Giannopoulos, I.; Stellmach, S.; Dachselt, R.

    2016-06-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are complex software environments and we often work with multiple tasks and multiple displays when we work with GIS. However, user input is still limited to mouse and keyboard in most workplace settings. In this project, we demonstrate how the use of gaze and feet as additional input modalities can overcome time-consuming and annoying mode switches between frequently performed tasks. In an iterative design process, we developed gaze- and foot-based methods for zooming and panning of map visualizations. We first collected appropriate gestures in a preliminary user study with a small group of experts, and designed two interaction concepts based on their input. After the implementation, we evaluated the two concepts comparatively in another user study to identify strengths and shortcomings in both. We found that continuous foot input combined with implicit gaze input is promising for supportive tasks.

  18. SmaggIce 2.0: Additional Capabilities for Interactive Grid Generation of Iced Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreeger, Richard E.; Baez, Marivell; Braun, Donald C.; Schilling, Herbert W.; Vickerman, Mary B.

    2008-01-01

    The Surface Modeling and Grid Generation for Iced Airfoils (SmaggIce) software toolkit has been extended to allow interactive grid generation for multi-element iced airfoils. The essential phases of an icing effects study include geometry preparation, block creation and grid generation. SmaggIce Version 2.0 now includes these main capabilities for both single and multi-element airfoils, plus an improved flow solver interface and a variety of additional tools to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of icing effects studies. An overview of these features is given, especially the new multi-element blocking strategy using the multiple wakes method. Examples are given which illustrate the capabilities of SmaggIce for conducting an icing effects study for both single and multi-element airfoils.

  19. Interaction of phenolic uncouplers in binary mixtures: concentration-additive and synergistic effects.

    PubMed

    Escher, B I; Hunziker, R W; Schwarzenbach, R P

    2001-10-01

    The uncoupling activities of 14 binary mixtures of substituted phenols and of 4 binary mixtures of phenols and anisols were investigated at different pH values. Experiments were performed with time-resolved spectroscopy on membrane vesicles (chromatophores) of the photosynthetic bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Phenols are known to destroy the electrochemical proton gradient in energy-transducing membranes by a protonophoric mechanism. Anisols do not have protonophoric activity but disturb membrane structure and functioning as a nonspecific baseline toxicant. It was postulated in the literature that, for certain substituted phenols, the formation of a dimer between the phenoxide and the neutral phenol may contribute significantly to the overall protonophoric activity. In 13 of 14 mixtures of substituted phenols but in none of the mixtures of phenols with anisols, such a dimer appears to be formed between two different mixture partners. An extended shuttle mechanism of uncoupling, which includes a term for the contribution of such a mixed dimer, provided a good description of all experimental data. Opposite speciation favors interaction and ortho substituents abate interaction, which adds evidence for the dimerformation via a hydrogen bond between the phenol-OH and the phenoxide. These findings are significant not only regarding the mechanism of protonophoric action but also for the risk assessment process of chemical mixtures in the environment. When assessing the effect of mixtures, concentration addition is regarded as a reference X concept to estimate effects of similarly acting compounds. The substituted phenols in this work act according to the same action mechanism of uncoupling. Nevertheless, the overall effect of four of the investigated mixtures, which exhibit stronger dimer formation as compared to the single compounds or for which the resulting dimer is intrinsically more active, exceeded the effect calculated according to concentration addition

  20. Non-Additive Increases in Sediment Stability Are Generated by Macroinvertebrate Species Interactions in Laboratory Streams

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, Lindsey K.; Cardinale, Bradley J.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that biological structures such as plant roots can have large impacts on landscape morphodynamics, and that physical models that do not incorporate biology can generate qualitatively incorrect predictions of sediment transport. However, work to date has focused almost entirely on the impacts of single, usually dominant, species. Here we ask whether multiple, coexisting species of hydropsychid caddisfly larvae have different impacts on sediment mobility compared to single-species systems due to competitive interactions and niche differences. We manipulated the presence of two common species of net-spinning caddisfly (Ceratopsyche oslari, Arctopsyche californica) in laboratory mesocosms and measured how their silk filtration nets influence the critical shear stress required to initiate sediment grain motion when they were in monoculture versus polyculture. We found that critical shear stress increases non-additively in polycultures where species were allowed to interact. Critical shear stress was 26% higher in multi-species assemblages compared to the average single-species monoculture, and 21% greater than levels of stability achieved by the species having the largest impact on sediment motion in monoculture. Supplementary behavioral experiments suggest the non-additive increase in critical shear stress may have occurred as competition among species led to shifts in the spatial distribution of the two populations and complementary habitat use. To explore the implications of these results for field conditions, we used results from the laboratory study to parameterize a common model of sediment transport. We then used this model to estimate potential bed movement in a natural stream for which we had measurements of channel geometry, grain size, and daily discharge. Although this extrapolation is speculative, it illustrates that multi-species impacts could be sufficiently large to reduce bedload sediment flux over annual time scales in

  1. Additive genetic risk from five serotonin system polymorphisms interacts with interpersonal stress to predict depression.

    PubMed

    Vrshek-Schallhorn, Suzanne; Stroud, Catherine B; Mineka, Susan; Zinbarg, Richard E; Adam, Emma K; Redei, Eva E; Hammen, Constance; Craske, Michelle G

    2015-11-01

    Behavioral genetic research supports polygenic models of depression in which many genetic variations each contribute a small amount of risk, and prevailing diathesis-stress models suggest gene-environment interactions (G×E). Multilocus profile scores of additive risk offer an approach that is consistent with polygenic models of depression risk. In a first demonstration of this approach in a G×E predicting depression, we created an additive multilocus profile score from 5 serotonin system polymorphisms (1 each in the genes HTR1A, HTR2A, HTR2C, and 2 in TPH2). Analyses focused on 2 forms of interpersonal stress as environmental risk factors. Using 5 years of longitudinal diagnostic and life stress interviews from 387 emerging young adults in the Youth Emotion Project, survival analyses show that this multilocus profile score interacts with major interpersonal stressful life events to predict major depressive episode onsets (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.815, p = .007). Simultaneously, there was a significant protective effect of the profile score without a recent event (HR = 0.83, p = .030). The G×E effect with interpersonal chronic stress was not significant (HR = 1.15, p = .165). Finally, effect sizes for genetic factors examined ignoring stress suggested such an approach could lead to overlooking or misinterpreting genetic effects. Both the G×E effect and the protective simple main effect were replicated in a sample of early adolescent girls (N = 105). We discuss potential benefits of the multilocus genetic profile score approach and caveats for future research. PMID:26595467

  2. Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and DNA Interaction Studies of Copper Complex Containing Food Additive Carmoisine Dye.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Akbari, Alireza; Jamshidbeigi, Mina; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    A copper complex of carmoisine dye; [Cu(carmoisine)2(H2O)2]; was synthesized and characterized by using physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. UV-vis results confirmed that the Cu complex interacted with DNA to form a ground-state complex and the observed binding constant (2× 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with the groove bindings with DNA. Furthermore, the viscosity measurement result showed that the addition of complex causes no significant change on DNA viscosity and it indicated that the intercalation mode is ruled out. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that the complex can change the conformation of DNA from B-like form toward A-like conformation. The cytotoxicity studies of the carmoisine dye and its copper complex indicated that both of them had anticancer effects on HT-29 (colon cancer) cell line and they may be new candidates for treatment of the colon cancer. PMID:27152751

  3. Investigating organic multilayers by spectroscopic ellipsometry: specific and non-specific interactions of polyhistidine with NTA self-assembled monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Solano, Ilaria; Parisse, Pietro; Gramazio, Federico; Casalis, Loredana; Canepa, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: A versatile strategy for protein–surface coupling in biochips exploits the affinity for polyhistidine of the nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) group loaded with Ni(II). Methods based on optical reflectivity measurements such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) allow for label-free, non-invasive monitoring of molecule adsorption/desorption at surfaces. Results: This paper describes a SE study about the interaction of hexahistidine (His6) on gold substrates functionalized with a thiolate self-assembled monolayer bearing the NTA end group. By systematically applying the difference spectra method, which emphasizes the small changes of the ellipsometry spectral response upon the nanoscale thickening/thinning of the molecular film, we characterized different steps of the process such as the NTA-functionalization of Au, the adsorption of the His6 layer and its eventual displacement after reaction with competitive ligands. The films were investigated in liquid, and ex situ in ambient air. The SE investigation has been complemented by AFM measurements based on nanolithography methods (nanografting mode). Conclusion: Our approach to the SE data, exploiting the full spectroscopic potential of the method and basic optical models, was able to provide a picture of the variation of the film thickness along the process. The combination of δΔi +1 ,i(λ), δΨi +1 ,i(λ) (layer-addition mode) and δΔ† i ', i +1(λ), δΨ† i ', i +1(λ) (layer-removal mode) difference spectra allowed us to clearly disentangle the adsorption of His6 on the Ni-free NTA layer, due to non specific interactions, from the formation of a neatly thicker His6 film induced by the Ni(II)-loading of the NTA SAM. PMID:27335745

  4. Evidence for additive and interaction effects of host genotype and infection in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Idaghdour, Youssef; Quinlan, Jacklyn; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Berghout, Joanne; Gbeha, Elias; Bruat, Vanessa; de Malliard, Thibault; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Gomez, Selma; Gros, Philippe; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Sanni, Ambaliou; Awadalla, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The host mechanisms responsible for protection against malaria remain poorly understood, with only a few protective genetic effects mapped in humans. Here, we characterize a host-specific genome-wide signature in whole-blood transcriptomes of Plasmodium falciparum-infected West African children and report a demonstration of genotype-by-infection interactions in vivo. Several associations involve transcripts sensitive to infection and implicate complement system, antigen processing and presentation, and T-cell activation (i.e., SLC39A8, C3AR1, FCGR3B, RAD21, RETN, LRRC25, SLC3A2, and TAPBP), including one association that validated a genome-wide association candidate gene (SCO1), implicating binding variation within a noncoding regulatory element. Gene expression profiles in mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi revealed and validated similar responses and highlighted specific pathways and genes that are likely important responders in both hosts. These results suggest that host variation and its interplay with infection affect children’s ability to cope with infection and suggest a polygenic model mounted at the transcriptional level for susceptibility. PMID:22949651

  5. A method for interactive specification of multiple-block topologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorenson, Reese L.; Mccann, Karen M.

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for dealing with the vast amount of topological and other data which must be specified to generate a multiple-block computational grid. Specific uses of the graphical capabilities of a powerful scientific workstation are described which reduce the burden on the user of collecting and formatting such large amounts of data. A program to implement this method, 3DPREP, is described. A plotting transformation algorithm, some useful software tools, notes on programming, and a database organization are also presented. Example grids developed using the method are shown.

  6. Specific ion and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions of a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D; Keeling, R; Tracka, M; van der Walle, C F; Uddin, S; Warwicker, J; Curtis, R

    2015-01-01

    Better predictive ability of salt and buffer effects on protein-protein interactions requires separating out contributions due to ionic screening, protein charge neutralization by ion binding, and salting-in(out) behavior. We have carried out a systematic study by measuring protein-protein interactions for a monoclonal antibody over an ionic strength range of 25 to 525 mM at 4 pH values (5, 6.5, 8, and 9) in solutions containing sodium chloride, calcium chloride, sodium sulfate, or sodium thiocyante. The salt ions are chosen so as to represent a range of affinities for protein charged and noncharged groups. The results are compared to effects of various buffers including acetate, citrate, phosphate, histidine, succinate, or tris. In low ionic strength solutions, anion binding affinity is reflected by the ability to reduce protein-protein repulsion, which follows the order thiocyanate > sulfate > chloride. The sulfate specific effect is screened at the same ionic strength required to screen the pH dependence of protein-protein interactions indicating sulfate binding only neutralizes protein charged groups. Thiocyanate specific effects occur over a larger ionic strength range reflecting adsorption to charged and noncharged regions of the protein. The latter leads to salting-in behavior and, at low pH, a nonmonotonic interaction profile with respect to sodium thiocyanate concentration. The effects of thiocyanate can not be rationalized in terms of only neutralizing double layer forces indicating the presence of an additional short-ranged protein-protein attraction at moderate ionic strength. Conversely, buffer specific effects can be explained through a charge neutralization mechanism, where buffers with greater valency are more effective at reducing double layer forces at low pH. Citrate binding at pH 6.5 leads to protein charge inversion and the formation of attractive electrostatic interactions. Throughout the report, we highlight similarities in the measured

  7. Investigation of effect of particle size and rumen fluid addition on specific methane yields of high lignocellulose grass silage.

    PubMed

    Wall, D M; Straccialini, B; Allen, E; Nolan, P; Herrmann, C; O'Kiely, P; Murphy, J D

    2015-09-01

    This work examines the digestion of advanced growth stage grass silage. Two variables were investigated: particle size (greater than 3 cm and less than 1cm) and rumen fluid addition. Batch studies indicated particle size and rumen fluid addition had little effect on specific methane yields (SMYs). In continuous digestion of 3 cm silage the SMY was 342 and 343 L CH4 kg(-1)VS, respectively, with and without rumen fluid addition. However, digester operation was significantly affected through silage floating on the liquor surface and its entanglement in the mixing system. Digestion of 1cm silage with no rumen fluid addition struggled; volatile fatty acid concentrations rose and SMYs dropped. The best case was 1cm silage with rumen fluid addition, offering higher SMYs of 371 L CH4 kg(-1)VS and stable operation throughout. Thus, physical and biological treatments benefited continuous digestion of high fibre grass silage. PMID:26038332

  8. Tissue specific expression of avian vitellogenin gene is correlated with DNA hypomethylation and in vivo specific protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Jost, J P; Saluz, H P; McEwan, I; Feavers, I M; Hughes, M; Reiber, S; Liang, H M; Vaccaro, M

    1990-01-30

    The avian vitellogenin gene is expressed only in the liver of egg-laying hens. It can, however, be activated in immature chicks or roosters by oestradiol. Parallel to the onset of transcription, there is a demethylation of specific mCpGs in the promoter region and in the oestrogen response element (ERE). The methylation pattern in the promoter region is hormone and expression specific, whereas in the ERE it is only hormone and not organ specific. The demethylation occurring in the promoter region is correlated with the appearance of DNase I hypersensitivity sites and changes in the specific protein-DNA interactions. In vivo genomic footprinting of the ERE with varying concentrations of dimethylsulphate revealed, upon gene activation, only minor changes in the protein-DNA interaction. We present evidence that there is another protein that binds with high affinity to the ERE, besides the oestrogen receptor. PMID:1968660

  9. Overlapping Yet Response-Specific Transcriptome Alterations Characterize the Nature of Tobacco–Pseudomonas syringae Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bozsó, Zoltán; Ott, Péter G.; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Bognár, Gábor F.; Pogány, Miklós; Szatmári, Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    In this study transcriptomic alterations of bacterially induced pattern triggered immunity (PTI) were compared with other types of tobacco–Pseudomonas interactions. In addition, using pharmacological agents we blocked some signal transduction pathways (Ca2+ influx, kinases, phospholipases, proteasomic protein degradation) to find out how they contribute to gene expression during PTI. PTI is the first defense response of plant cells to microbes, elicited by their widely conserved molecular patterns. Tobacco is an important model of Solanaceae to study resistance responses, including defense mechanisms against bacteria. In spite of these facts the transcription regulation of tobacco genes during different types of plant bacterial interactions is not well-described. In this paper we compared the tobacco transcriptomic alterations in microarray experiments induced by (i) PTI inducer Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae type III secretion mutant (hrcC) at earlier (6 h post inoculation) and later (48 hpi) stages of defense, (ii) wild type P. syringae (6 hpi) that causes effector triggered immunity (ETI) and cell death (HR), and (iii) disease-causing P. syringae pv. tabaci (6 hpi). Among the different treatments the highest overlap was between the PTI and ETI at 6 hpi, however, there were groups of genes with specifically altered activity for either type of defenses. Instead of quantitative effects of the virulent P. tabaci on PTI-related genes it influenced transcription qualitatively and blocked the expression changes of a special set of genes including ones involved in signal transduction and transcription regulation. P. tabaci specifically activated or repressed other groups of genes seemingly not related to either PTI or ETI. Kinase and phospholipase A inhibitors had highest impacts on the PTI response and effects of these signal inhibitors on transcription greatly overlapped. Remarkable interactions of phospholipase C-related pathways with the proteasomal system were

  10. Overlapping Yet Response-Specific Transcriptome Alterations Characterize the Nature of Tobacco-Pseudomonas syringae Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bozsó, Zoltán; Ott, Péter G; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Bognár, Gábor F; Pogány, Miklós; Szatmári, Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    In this study transcriptomic alterations of bacterially induced pattern triggered immunity (PTI) were compared with other types of tobacco-Pseudomonas interactions. In addition, using pharmacological agents we blocked some signal transduction pathways (Ca(2+) influx, kinases, phospholipases, proteasomic protein degradation) to find out how they contribute to gene expression during PTI. PTI is the first defense response of plant cells to microbes, elicited by their widely conserved molecular patterns. Tobacco is an important model of Solanaceae to study resistance responses, including defense mechanisms against bacteria. In spite of these facts the transcription regulation of tobacco genes during different types of plant bacterial interactions is not well-described. In this paper we compared the tobacco transcriptomic alterations in microarray experiments induced by (i) PTI inducer Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae type III secretion mutant (hrcC) at earlier (6 h post inoculation) and later (48 hpi) stages of defense, (ii) wild type P. syringae (6 hpi) that causes effector triggered immunity (ETI) and cell death (HR), and (iii) disease-causing P. syringae pv. tabaci (6 hpi). Among the different treatments the highest overlap was between the PTI and ETI at 6 hpi, however, there were groups of genes with specifically altered activity for either type of defenses. Instead of quantitative effects of the virulent P. tabaci on PTI-related genes it influenced transcription qualitatively and blocked the expression changes of a special set of genes including ones involved in signal transduction and transcription regulation. P. tabaci specifically activated or repressed other groups of genes seemingly not related to either PTI or ETI. Kinase and phospholipase A inhibitors had highest impacts on the PTI response and effects of these signal inhibitors on transcription greatly overlapped. Remarkable interactions of phospholipase C-related pathways with the proteasomal system were

  11. Human-display interactions: Context-specific biases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary Kister; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments in computer engineering have greatly enhanced the capabilities of display technology. As displays are no longer limited to simple alphanumeric output, they can present a wide variety of graphic information, using either static or dynamic presentation modes. At the same time that interface designers exploit the increased capabilities of these displays, they must be aware of the inherent limitation of these displays. Generally, these limitations can be divided into those that reflect limitations of the medium (e.g., reducing three-dimensional representations onto a two-dimensional projection) and those reflecting the perceptual and conceptual biases of the operator. The advantages and limitations of static and dynamic graphic displays are considered. Rather than enter into the discussion of whether dynamic or static displays are superior, general advantages and limitations are explored which are contextually specific to each type of display.

  12. A predictive modeling approach for cell line-specific long-range regulatory interactions

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sushmita; Siahpirani, Alireza Fotuhi; Chasman, Deborah; Knaack, Sara; Ay, Ferhat; Stewart, Ron; Wilson, Michael; Sridharan, Rupa

    2015-01-01

    Long range regulatory interactions among distal enhancers and target genes are important for tissue-specific gene expression. Genome-scale identification of these interactions in a cell line-specific manner, especially using the fewest possible datasets, is a significant challenge. We develop a novel computational approach, Regulatory Interaction Prediction for Promoters and Long-range Enhancers (RIPPLE), that integrates published Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) data sets with a minimal set of regulatory genomic data sets to predict enhancer-promoter interactions in a cell line-specific manner. Our results suggest that CTCF, RAD21, a general transcription factor (TBP) and activating chromatin marks are important determinants of enhancer-promoter interactions. To predict interactions in a new cell line and to generate genome-wide interaction maps, we develop an ensemble version of RIPPLE and apply it to generate interactions in five human cell lines. Computational validation of these predictions using existing ChIA-PET and Hi-C data sets showed that RIPPLE accurately predicts interactions among enhancers and promoters. Enhancer-promoter interactions tend to be organized into subnetworks representing coordinately regulated sets of genes that are enriched for specific biological processes and cis-regulatory elements. Overall, our work provides a systematic approach to predict and interpret enhancer-promoter interactions in a genome-wide cell-type specific manner using a few experimentally tractable measurements. PMID:26338778

  13. Origins of specificity and affinity in antibody–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hung-Pin; Lee, Kuo Hao; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Yang, An-Suei

    2014-01-01

    Natural antibodies are frequently elicited to recognize diverse protein surfaces, where the sequence features of the epitopes are frequently indistinguishable from those of nonepitope protein surfaces. It is not clearly understood how the paratopes are able to recognize sequence-wise featureless epitopes and how a natural antibody repertoire with limited variants can recognize seemingly unlimited protein antigens foreign to the host immune system. In this work, computational methods were used to predict the functional paratopes with the 3D antibody variable domain structure as input. The predicted functional paratopes were reasonably validated by the hot spot residues known from experimental alanine scanning measurements. The functional paratope (hot spot) predictions on a set of 111 antibody–antigen complex structures indicate that aromatic, mostly tyrosyl, side chains constitute the major part of the predicted functional paratopes, with short-chain hydrophilic residues forming the minor portion of the predicted functional paratopes. These aromatic side chains interact mostly with the epitope main chain atoms and side-chain carbons. The functional paratopes are surrounded by favorable polar atomistic contacts in the structural paratope–epitope interfaces; more that 80% these polar contacts are electrostatically favorable and about 40% of these polar contacts form direct hydrogen bonds across the interfaces. These results indicate that a limited repertoire of antibodies bearing paratopes with diverse structural contours enriched with aromatic side chains among short-chain hydrophilic residues can recognize all sorts of protein surfaces, because the determinants for antibody recognition are common physicochemical features ubiquitously distributed over all protein surfaces. PMID:24938786

  14. Interacting domain-specific languages with biological problem solving environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cickovski, Trevor M.

    Iteratively developing a biological model and verifying results with lab observations has become standard practice in computational biology. This process is currently facilitated by biological Problem Solving Environments (PSEs), multi-tiered and modular software frameworks which traditionally consist of two layers: a computational layer written in a high level language using design patterns, and a user interface layer which hides its details. Although PSEs have proven effective, they still enforce some communication overhead between biologists refining their models through repeated comparison with experimental observations in vitro or in vivo, and programmers actually implementing model extensions and modifications within the computational layer. I illustrate the use of biological Domain-Specific Languages (DSLs) as a middle-level PSE tier to ameliorate this problem by providing experimentalists with the ability to iteratively test and develop their models using a higher degree of expressive power compared to a graphical interface, while saving the requirement of general purpose programming knowledge. I develop two radically different biological DSLs: XML-based BIOLOGO will model biological morphogenesis using a cell-centered stochastic cellular automaton and translate into C++ modules for an object-oriented PSE C OMPUCELL3D, and MDLab will provide a set of high-level Python libraries for running molecular dynamics simulations, using wrapped functionality from the C++ PSE PROTOMOL. I describe each language in detail, including its its roles within the larger PSE and its expressibility in terms of representable phenomena, and a discussion of observations from users of the languages. Moreover I will use these studies to draw general conclusions about biological DSL development, including dependencies upon the goals of the corresponding PSE, strategies, and tradeoffs.

  15. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs. PMID:27184260

  16. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-05-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs.

  17. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs. PMID:27184260

  18. Additive interfacial chiral interaction in multilayers for stabilization of small individual skyrmions at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau-Luchaire, C.; Moutafis, C.; Reyren, N.; Sampaio, J.; Vaz, C. A. F.; van Horne, N.; Bouzehouane, K.; Garcia, K.; Deranlot, C.; Warnicke, P.; Wohlhüter, P.; George, J.-M.; Weigand, M.; Raabe, J.; Cros, V.; Fert, A.

    2016-05-01

    Facing the ever-growing demand for data storage will most probably require a new paradigm. Nanoscale magnetic skyrmions are anticipated to solve this issue as they are arguably the smallest spin textures in magnetic thin films in nature. We designed cobalt-based multilayered thin films in which the cobalt layer is sandwiched between two heavy metals and so provides additive interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interactions (DMIs), which reach a value close to 2 mJ m–2 in the case of the Ir|Co|Pt asymmetric multilayers. Using a magnetization-sensitive scanning X-ray transmission microscopy technique, we imaged small magnetic domains at very low fields in these multilayers. The study of their behaviour in a perpendicular magnetic field allows us to conclude that they are actually magnetic skyrmions stabilized by the large DMI. This discovery of stable sub-100 nm individual skyrmions at room temperature in a technologically relevant material opens the way for device applications in the near future.

  19. Additive interfacial chiral interaction in multilayers for stabilization of small individual skyrmions at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Moreau-Luchaire, C; Mouta S, C; Reyren, N; Sampaio, J; Vaz, C A F; Van Horne, N; Bouzehouane, K; Garcia, K; Deranlot, C; Warnicke, P; Wohlhüter, P; George, J-M; Weigand, M; Raabe, J; Cros, V; Fert, A

    2016-05-01

    Facing the ever-growing demand for data storage will most probably require a new paradigm. Nanoscale magnetic skyrmions are anticipated to solve this issue as they are arguably the smallest spin textures in magnetic thin films in nature. We designed cobalt-based multilayered thin films in which the cobalt layer is sandwiched between two heavy metals and so provides additive interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMIs), which reach a value close to 2 mJ m(-2) in the case of the Ir|Co|Pt asymmetric multilayers. Using a magnetization-sensitive scanning X-ray transmission microscopy technique, we imaged small magnetic domains at very low fields in these multilayers. The study of their behaviour in a perpendicular magnetic field allows us to conclude that they are actually magnetic skyrmions stabilized by the large DMI. This discovery of stable sub-100 nm individual skyrmions at room temperature in a technologically relevant material opens the way for device applications in the near future. PMID:26780660

  20. Improved detection of allergen-specific T-cell responses in allergic contact dermatitis through the addition of 'cytokine cocktails'.

    PubMed

    Moed, Helen; von Blomberg, Mary; Bruynzeel, Derk P; Scheper, Rik; Gibbs, Susan; Rustemeyer, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    The gold standard for the diagnosis of allergic hypersensitivity is skin patch testing with the suspected allergens. This diagnostic tool, however, has distinct disadvantages, and therefore the development of alternative or complementary in vitro tests is of great importance. In this study, we evaluate the applicability of an in vitro test method, as developed earlier for nickel allergy, to detect allergen-specific T cells in the blood of patients allergic to frequent sensitizers (chromate, cobalt, paraphenylenediamine, fragrances and chloromethyl-isothiazolinone). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of allergic patients and healthy controls were cultured in the absence or presence of allergen. Additionally, type 1 (IL-7 and IL-12) or type 2 (IL-7 and IL-4) stimulating cytokines were added; after 6-day proliferation, IFN-gamma and IL-5 secretions were determined. Without the addition of cytokines, consistent allergen-induced proliferation was observed in PBMCs of nickel-allergic patients only. By contrast, the addition of type 1 or type 2 stimulating cytokines resulted in a significantly enhanced allergen-specific proliferation for all allergens tested (sensitivity increased from 26 to 43% or 38%, respectively, P < 0.05). In these cultures, allergen-induced IFN-gamma and IL-5 secretion was also significantly increased, compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05, for IFN-gamma sensitivity 79%, specificity 93%; for IL-5 sensitivity 74%, specificity 81%). In conclusion, these results demonstrate an increased proliferative capacity and cytokine production by allergen-specific T cells from allergic patients, but not of healthy individuals upon stimulation with allergens in combination with type 1 or 2 skewing cytokines. The present data warrant further exploration of the application of this test to a broader set of allergens. PMID:16026586

  1. Spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of ruthenium complexes with tumor specific lectin, jacalin.

    PubMed

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Reshma, Elamvazhuthi; Mariappan, Mariappan; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2015-02-25

    Several ruthenium complexes are regarded as anticancer agents and considered as an alternative to the widely used platinum complexes. Owing to the preferential interaction of jacalin with tumor-associated T-antigen, we report the interaction of jacalin with four ruthenium complex namely, tris(1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(N-[1,10]phenanthrolin-5-yl-pyrenylmethanimine)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]-phenazine)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(11-(9-acridinyl)dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine)ruthenium(II) chloride. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the ruthenium complexes strongly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching procedure, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained for the interaction of different ruthenium complexes with jacalin are in the order of 10(5) M(-1), which is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one ruthenium complex, and the stoichiometry is found to be unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. In addition, agglutination activity of jacalin is largely unaffected by the presence of the ruthenium complexes, indicating that the binding sites for the carbohydrate and the ruthenium complexes are different. These results suggest that the development of lectin-ruthenium complex conjugate would be feasible to target malignant cells in chemo-therapeutics. PMID:25306128

  2. Spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of ruthenium complexes with tumor specific lectin, jacalin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Reshma, Elamvazhuthi; Mariappan, Mariappan; Anbazhagan, Veerappan

    2015-02-01

    Several ruthenium complexes are regarded as anticancer agents and considered as an alternative to the widely used platinum complexes. Owing to the preferential interaction of jacalin with tumor-associated T-antigen, we report the interaction of jacalin with four ruthenium complex namely, tris(1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(N-[1,10]phenanthrolin-5-yl-pyrenylmethanimine)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(dipyrido[3,2-a:2‧,3‧-c]-phenazine)ruthenium(II)chloride, bis(1,10-phenanthroline)(11-(9-acridinyl)dipyrido[3,2-a:2‧,3‧-c]phenazine)ruthenium(II) chloride. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the ruthenium complexes strongly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching procedure, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained for the interaction of different ruthenium complexes with jacalin are in the order of 105 M-1, which is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one ruthenium complex, and the stoichiometry is found to be unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. In addition, agglutination activity of jacalin is largely unaffected by the presence of the ruthenium complexes, indicating that the binding sites for the carbohydrate and the ruthenium complexes are different. These results suggest that the development of lectin-ruthenium complex conjugate would be feasible to target malignant cells in chemo-therapeutics.

  3. Triple SILAC to determine stimulus specific interactions in the Wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Maximiliane; Mann, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Many important regulatory functions are performed by dynamic multiprotein complexes that adapt their composition and activity in response to different stimuli. Here we employ quantitative affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry to efficiently separate background from specific interactors but add an additional quantitative dimension to explicitly characterize stimulus-dependent interactions. This is accomplished by SILAC in a triple-labeling format, in which pull-downs with bait, with bait and stimulus, and without bait are quantified against each other. As baits, we use full-length proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein and expressed under endogenous control. We applied this technology to Wnt signaling, which is important in development, tissue homeostasis, and cancer, and investigated interactions of the key components APC, Axin-1, DVL2, and CtBP2 with differential pathway activation. Our screens identify many known Wnt signaling complex components and link novel candidates to Wnt signaling, including FAM83B and Girdin, which we found as interactors to multiple Wnt pathway players. Girdin binds to DVL2 independent of stimulation with the ligand Wnt3a but to Axin-1 and APC in a stimulus-dependent manner. The core destruction complex itself, which regulates beta-catenin stability as the key step in canonical Wnt signaling, remained essentially unchanged. PMID:22011079

  4. Revealing Transient Interactions between Phosphatidylinositol-specific Phospholipase C and Phosphatidylcholine--Rich Lipid Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Boqian; He, Tao; Grauffel, Cédric; Reuter, Nathalie; Roberts, Mary; Gershenson, Anne

    2013-03-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes transiently interact with target membranes. Previous fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments showed that Bacillus thuringiensis PI-PLC specifically binds to phosphatidylcholine (PC)-rich membranes and preferentially interacts with unilamellar vesicles that show larger curvature. Mutagenesis studies combined with FCS measurements of binding affinity highlighted the importance of interfacial PI-PLC tyrosines in the PC specificity. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of PI-PLC performed in the presence of a PC membrane indicate these tyrosines are involved in specific cation-pi interactions with choline headgroups. To further understand those transient interactions between PI-PLC and PC-rich vesicles, we monitor single fluorescently labeled PI-PLC proteins as they cycle on and off surface-tethered small unilamellar vesicles using total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy. The residence times on vesicles along with vesicle size information, based on vesicle fluorescence intensity, reveal the time scales of PI-PLC membrane interactions as well as the curvature dependence. The PC specificity and the vesicle curvature dependence of this PI-PLC/membrane interaction provide insight into how the interface modulates protein-membrane interactions. This work was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Science of the National Institutes of Health (R01GM060418).

  5. Common and specific signatures of gene expression and protein-protein interactions in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Tuller, T; Atar, S; Ruppin, E; Gurevich, M; Achiron, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study is to understand intracellular regulatory mechanisms in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), which are either common to many autoimmune diseases or specific to some of them. We incorporated large-scale data such as protein-protein interactions, gene expression and demographical information of hundreds of patients and healthy subjects, related to six autoimmune diseases with available large-scale gene expression measurements: multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). These data were analyzed concurrently by statistical and systems biology approaches tailored for this purpose. We found that chemokines such as CXCL1-3, 5, 6 and the interleukin (IL) IL8 tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In addition, the anti-apoptotic gene BCL3, interferon-γ (IFNG), and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene physically interact with significantly many genes that tend to be differentially expressed in PBMCs of patients with the analyzed autoimmune diseases. In general, similar cellular processes tend to be differentially expressed in PBMC in the analyzed autoimmune diseases. Specifically, the cellular processes related to cell proliferation (for example, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, nuclear factor-κB, Wnt/β-catenin signaling, stress-activated protein kinase c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase), inflammatory response (for example, interleukins IL2 and IL6, the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the B-cell receptor), general signaling cascades (for example, mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 and TRK) and apoptosis are activated in most of the analyzed autoimmune diseases. However, our results suggest that in each of the analyzed diseases, apoptosis and chemotaxis are activated via

  6. Sulfurtransferase and thioredoxin specifically interact as demonstrated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis and biochemical tests

    PubMed Central

    Henne, Melina; König, Nicolas; Triulzi, Tiziana; Baroni, Sara; Forlani, Fabio; Scheibe, Renate; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    Sulfurtransferases (Strs) and thioredoxins (Trxs) are members of large protein families. Trxs are disulfide reductases and play an important role in redox-related cellular processes. They interact with a broad range of proteins. Strs catalyze the transfer of a sulfur atom from a suitable sulfur donor to nucleophilic sulfur acceptors in vitro, but the physiological roles of these enzymes are not well defined. Several studies in different organisms demonstrate protein–protein interactions of Strs with members of the Trx family. We are interested in investigating the specificity of the interaction between Str and Trx isoforms. In order to use the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), several Str and Trx sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana were cloned into the pUC-SPYNE and pUC-SPYCE split-YFP vectors, respectively. Each couple of plasmids containing the sequences for the putative interaction partners were transformed into Arabidopsis protoplasts and screened using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Compartment- and partner-specific interactions could be observed in transformed protoplasts. Replacement of cysteine residues in the redox-active site of Trxs abolished the interaction signal. Therefore, the redox site is not only involved in the redox reaction but also responsible for the interaction with partner proteins. Biochemical assays support a specific interaction among Strs and certain Trxs. Based on the results obtained, the interaction of Strs and Trxs indicates a role of Strs in the maintenance of the cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:26605137

  7. Sulfurtransferase and thioredoxin specifically interact as demonstrated by bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis and biochemical tests.

    PubMed

    Henne, Melina; König, Nicolas; Triulzi, Tiziana; Baroni, Sara; Forlani, Fabio; Scheibe, Renate; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    Sulfurtransferases (Strs) and thioredoxins (Trxs) are members of large protein families. Trxs are disulfide reductases and play an important role in redox-related cellular processes. They interact with a broad range of proteins. Strs catalyze the transfer of a sulfur atom from a suitable sulfur donor to nucleophilic sulfur acceptors in vitro, but the physiological roles of these enzymes are not well defined. Several studies in different organisms demonstrate protein-protein interactions of Strs with members of the Trx family. We are interested in investigating the specificity of the interaction between Str and Trx isoforms. In order to use the bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), several Str and Trx sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana were cloned into the pUC-SPYNE and pUC-SPYCE split-YFP vectors, respectively. Each couple of plasmids containing the sequences for the putative interaction partners were transformed into Arabidopsis protoplasts and screened using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Compartment- and partner-specific interactions could be observed in transformed protoplasts. Replacement of cysteine residues in the redox-active site of Trxs abolished the interaction signal. Therefore, the redox site is not only involved in the redox reaction but also responsible for the interaction with partner proteins. Biochemical assays support a specific interaction among Strs and certain Trxs. Based on the results obtained, the interaction of Strs and Trxs indicates a role of Strs in the maintenance of the cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:26605137

  8. ComPPI: a cellular compartment-specific database for protein–protein interaction network analysis

    PubMed Central

    Veres, Daniel V.; Gyurkó, Dávid M.; Thaler, Benedek; Szalay, Kristóf Z.; Fazekas, Dávid; Korcsmáros, Tamás; Csermely, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we present ComPPI, a cellular compartment-specific database of proteins and their interactions enabling an extensive, compartmentalized protein–protein interaction network analysis (URL: http://ComPPI.LinkGroup.hu). ComPPI enables the user to filter biologically unlikely interactions, where the two interacting proteins have no common subcellular localizations and to predict novel properties, such as compartment-specific biological functions. ComPPI is an integrated database covering four species (S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens). The compilation of nine protein–protein interaction and eight subcellular localization data sets had four curation steps including a manually built, comprehensive hierarchical structure of >1600 subcellular localizations. ComPPI provides confidence scores for protein subcellular localizations and protein–protein interactions. ComPPI has user-friendly search options for individual proteins giving their subcellular localization, their interactions and the likelihood of their interactions considering the subcellular localization of their interacting partners. Download options of search results, whole-proteomes, organelle-specific interactomes and subcellular localization data are available on its website. Due to its novel features, ComPPI is useful for the analysis of experimental results in biochemistry and molecular biology, as well as for proteome-wide studies in bioinformatics and network science helping cellular biology, medicine and drug design. PMID:25348397

  9. Specific interactions between HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein and the TAR element.

    PubMed

    Kanevsky, Igor; Chaminade, Françoise; Ficheux, Damien; Moumen, Abdeladim; Gorelick, Robert; Negroni, Matteo; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Fossé, Philippe

    2005-05-20

    During retroviral reverse transcription, the minus-strand strong-stop DNA (ss-cDNA) is transferred to the 3' end of the genomic RNA and this requires the repeat (R) sequences present at both ends of the genome. In vitro, the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) R sequence can promote DNA strand transfer when present in ectopic internal positions. Using HIV-1 model systems, the R sequences and nucleocapsid protein (NC) were found to be key determinants of ss-cDNA transfer. To gain insights into specific interactions between HIV-1 NC and RNA and the influence of NC on R folding, we investigated the secondary structures of R in two natural contexts, namely at the 5' or 3' end of RNAs representing the terminal regions of the genome, and in two ectopic internal positions that also support efficient minus-strand transfer. To investigate the roles of NC zinc fingers and flanking basic domains in the NC/RNA interactions, we used NC mutants. Analyses of the viral RNA/NC complexes by chemical and enzymatic probings, and gel retardation assays were performed under conditions allowing ss-cDNA transfer by reverse transcriptase. We report that NC binds the TAR apical loop specifically in the four genetic contexts without changing the folding of the TAR hairpin and R region significantly, and this requires the NC zinc fingers. In addition, we show that efficient annealing of cTAR DNA to the 3' R relies on sequence complementarities between TAR and cTAR terminal loops. These findings suggest that the TAR apical loop in the acceptor RNA is the initiation site for the annealing reaction that is chaperoned by NC during the minus-strand transfer. PMID:15854644

  10. Utilization of specific and non-specific peptide interactions with inorganic nanomaterials on the surface of bacteriophage M13: Methodologies towards phage supported bi-functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Kendra Nicole

    the phage with a negative charge on which nanomaterials can be supported. Metal salt precursors reduced in the presence of WT M13 are studied in this chapter. Metal salt precursors of Fe, Co, Ru, Rh and Pd seem to be the most effective at coating the surface of the phage based on the positively charged metal-aquo complexes formed in water, which are attracted to the negative pVIII region. Other types of reactions are explored with WT phage as a scaffold such as conversion chemistry in a polyol solvent to access several intermetallic phases as well as co-precipitation reactions to access ternary oxides. Chapter 4 focuses on combining research from chapter 2 and chapter 3 to create a bi-functional material that utilizes both specific and non-specific peptide interactions with inorganic materials on the surface of M13 to attach two different types of nanomaterials. The example provided here is a magnetically recoverable hydrogenation catalyst made up of a pVIII region coated with rhodium nanoparticles held in place by non-specific peptide interactions and a pIII region attached to iron oxide nanoparticles via specific peptide interactions. This is the first example in the literature of a commercially available pIII bioengineered M13 bacteriophage forming a bi-functional material. This research provides a methodology to design and build single and multi-component materials on the surface of bacteriophage M13 without the necessity for additional bioengineering and library characterization. The simplicity of use will make the technique available to a wider variety of researchers in the materials science community.

  11. Discovering Distinct Functional Modules of Specific Cancer Types Using Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ru; Wang, Xiaosheng; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Background. The molecular profiles exhibited in different cancer types are very different; hence, discovering distinct functional modules associated with specific cancer types is very important to understand the distinct functions associated with them. Protein-protein interaction networks carry vital information about molecular interactions in cellular systems, and identification of functional modules (subgraphs) in these networks is one of the most important applications of biological network analysis. Results. In this study, we developed a new graph theory based method to identify distinct functional modules from nine different cancer protein-protein interaction networks. The method is composed of three major steps: (i) extracting modules from protein-protein interaction networks using network clustering algorithms; (ii) identifying distinct subgraphs from the derived modules; and (iii) identifying distinct subgraph patterns from distinct subgraphs. The subgraph patterns were evaluated using experimentally determined cancer-specific protein-protein interaction data from the Ingenuity knowledgebase, to identify distinct functional modules that are specific to each cancer type. Conclusion. We identified cancer-type specific subgraph patterns that may represent the functional modules involved in the molecular pathogenesis of different cancer types. Our method can serve as an effective tool to discover cancer-type specific functional modules from large protein-protein interaction networks. PMID:26495282

  12. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Y. Murakawa, T. Shimamura, K. Oishi, M. Ohyama, T. Kurita, N.

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  13. Patterns of interaction specificity of fungus-growing termites and Termitomyces symbionts in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Aanen, Duur K; Ros, Vera ID; de Fine Licht, Henrik H; Mitchell, Jannette; de Beer, Z Wilhelm; Slippers, Bernard; Rouland-LeFèvre, Corinne; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2007-01-01

    Background Termites of the subfamily Macrotermitinae live in a mutualistic symbiosis with basidiomycete fungi of the genus Termitomyces. Here, we explored interaction specificity in fungus-growing termites using samples from 101 colonies in South-Africa and Senegal, belonging to eight species divided over three genera. Knowledge of interaction specificity is important to test the hypothesis that inhabitants (symbionts) are taxonomically less diverse than 'exhabitants' (hosts) and to test the hypothesis that transmission mode is an important determinant for interaction specificity. Results Analysis of Molecular Variance among symbiont ITS sequences across termite hosts at three hierarchical levels showed that 47 % of the variation occurred between genera, 18 % between species, and the remaining 35 % between colonies within species. Different patterns of specificity were evident. High mutual specificity was found for the single Macrotermes species studied, as M. natalensis was associated with a single unique fungal haplotype. The three species of the genus Odontotermes showed low symbiont specificity: they were all associated with a genetically diverse set of fungal symbionts, but their fungal symbionts showed some host specificity, as none of the fungal haplotypes were shared between the studied Odontotermes species. Finally, bilaterally low specificity was found for the four tentatively recognized species of the genus Microtermes, which shared and apparently freely exchanged a common pool of divergent fungal symbionts. Conclusion Interaction specificity was high at the genus level and generally much lower at the species level. A comparison of the observed diversity among fungal symbionts with the diversity among termite hosts, indicated that the fungal symbiont does not follow the general pattern of an endosymbiont, as we found either similar diversity at both sides or higher diversity in the symbiont. Our results further challenge the hypothesis that transmission

  14. Learning contextual gene set interaction networks of cancer with condition specificity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying similarities and differences in the molecular constitutions of various types of cancer is one of the key challenges in cancer research. The appearances of a cancer depend on complex molecular interactions, including gene regulatory networks and gene-environment interactions. This complexity makes it challenging to decipher the molecular origin of the cancer. In recent years, many studies reported methods to uncover heterogeneous depictions of complex cancers, which are often categorized into different subtypes. The challenge is to identify diverse molecular contexts within a cancer, to relate them to different subtypes, and to learn underlying molecular interactions specific to molecular contexts so that we can recommend context-specific treatment to patients. Results In this study, we describe a novel method to discern molecular interactions specific to certain molecular contexts. Unlike conventional approaches to build modular networks of individual genes, our focus is to identify cancer-generic and subtype-specific interactions between contextual gene sets, of which each gene set share coherent transcriptional patterns across a subset of samples, termed contextual gene set. We then apply a novel formulation for quantitating the effect of the samples from each subtype on the calculated strength of interactions observed. Two cancer data sets were analyzed to support the validity of condition-specificity of identified interactions. When compared to an existing approach, the proposed method was much more sensitive in identifying condition-specific interactions even in heterogeneous data set. The results also revealed that network components specific to different types of cancer are related to different biological functions than cancer-generic network components. We found not only the results that are consistent with previous studies, but also new hypotheses on the biological mechanisms specific to certain cancer types that warrant further

  15. Developing Interactional Competence by Using TV Series in "English as an Additional Language" Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sert, Olcay

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses a combined methodology to analyse the conversations in supplementary audio-visual materials to be implemented in language teaching classrooms in order to enhance the Interactional Competence (IC) of the learners. Based on a corpus of 90.000 words (Coupling Corpus), the author tries to reveal the potentials of using TV series in …

  16. Learning Sequence Determinants of Protein:Protein Interaction Specificity with Sparse Graphical Models

    PubMed Central

    Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Ghosh, Bornika; Langmead, Christopher James; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In studying the strength and specificity of interaction between members of two protein families, key questions center on which pairs of possible partners actually interact, how well they interact, and why they interact while others do not. The advent of large-scale experimental studies of interactions between members of a target family and a diverse set of possible interaction partners offers the opportunity to address these questions. We develop here a method, DgSpi (data-driven graphical models of specificity in protein:protein interactions), for learning and using graphical models that explicitly represent the amino acid basis for interaction specificity (why) and extend earlier classification-oriented approaches (which) to predict the ΔG of binding (how well). We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in analyzing and predicting interactions between a set of 82 PDZ recognition modules against a panel of 217 possible peptide partners, based on data from MacBeath and colleagues. Our predicted ΔG values are highly predictive of the experimentally measured ones, reaching correlation coefficients of 0.69 in 10-fold cross-validation and 0.63 in leave-one-PDZ-out cross-validation. Furthermore, the model serves as a compact representation of amino acid constraints underlying the interactions, enabling protein-level ΔG predictions to be naturally understood in terms of residue-level constraints. Finally, the model DgSpi readily enables the design of new interacting partners, and we demonstrate that designed ligands are novel and diverse. PMID:25973864

  17. Friend or foe: inter-specific interactions and conflicts of interest within the family

    PubMed Central

    De Gasperin, Ornela; Kilner, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between species can vary from mutually beneficial to evolutionarily neutral to antagonistic, even when the same two species are involved. Similarly, social interactions between members of the same species can lie on a spectrum from conflict to cooperation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether variation in the two types of social behaviour are interconnected. Is the fitness of the various classes of social partner within species (such as parent and offspring, or male and female) differently affected by interactions with a second species? Moreover, can inter-specific interactions influence the outcome of social interactions within species? The present experiments focus on the interactions between the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides Herbst and the phoretic mite Poecilochirus carabi G. Canestrini & R. Canestrini. The approach was to measure the fitness of burying beetle mothers, fathers, and offspring after reproduction, which took place either in the presence or absence of mites. We found that male, female, and larval burying beetles derive contrasting fitness costs and benefits from their interactions with the mite, despite sharing a common family environment. From the mite’s perspective, its relationship with the burying beetle can, therefore, be simultaneously antagonistic, neutral, and possibly even mutualistic, depending on the particular family member involved. We also found that mites can potentially change the outcome of evolutionary conflicts within the family. We conclude that inter-specific interactions can explain some of the variation in social interactions seen within species. It is further suggested that intra-specific interactions might contribute to variation in the outcome of interactions between species. PMID:26681822

  18. Hydrophobic interactions in model enclosures from small to large length scales: non-additivity in explicit and implicit solvent models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingle; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    The binding affinities between a united-atom methane and various model hydrophobic enclosures were studied through high accuracy free energy perturbation methods (FEP). We investigated the non-additivity of the hydrophobic interaction in these systems, measured by the deviation of its binding affinity from that predicted by the pairwise additivity approximation. While only small non-additivity effects were previously reported in the interactions in methane trimers, we found large cooperative effects (as large as −1.14 kcal mol−1 or approximately a 25% increase in the binding affinity) and anti-cooperative effects (as large as 0.45 kcal mol−1) for these model enclosed systems. Decomposition of the total potential of mean force (PMF) into increasing orders of multi-body interactions indicates that the contributions of the higher order multi-body interactions can be either positive or negative in different systems, and increasing the order of multi-body interactions considered did not necessarily improve the accuracy. A general correlation between the sign of the non-additivity effect and the curvature of the solute molecular surface was observed. We found that implicit solvent models based on the molecular surface area (MSA) performed much better, not only in predicting binding affinities, but also in predicting the non-additivity effects, compared with models based on the solvent accessible surface area (SASA), suggesting that MSA is a better descriptor of the curvature of the solutes. We also show how the non-additivity contribution changes as the hydrophobicity of the plate is decreased from the dewetting regime to the wetting regime. PMID:21043426

  19. Frequency specific interactions of MEG resting state activity within and across brain networks as revealed by the multivariate interaction measure.

    PubMed

    Marzetti, L; Della Penna, S; Snyder, A Z; Pizzella, V; Nolte, G; de Pasquale, F; Romani, G L; Corbetta, M

    2013-10-01

    Resting state networks (RSNs) are sets of brain regions exhibiting temporally coherent activity fluctuations in the absence of imposed task structure. RSNs have been extensively studied with fMRI in the infra-slow frequency range (nominally <10(-1)Hz). The topography of fMRI RSNs reflects stationary temporal correlation over minutes. However, neuronal communication occurs on a much faster time scale, at frequencies nominally in the range of 10(0)-10(2)Hz. We examined phase-shifted interactions in the delta (2-3.5 Hz), theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) frequency bands of resting-state source space MEG signals. These analyses were conducted between nodes of the dorsal attention network (DAN), one of the most robust RSNs, and between the DAN and other networks. Phase shifted interactions were mapped by the multivariate interaction measure (MIM), a measure of true interaction constructed from the maximization of imaginary coherency in the virtual channels comprised of voxel signals in source space. Non-zero-phase interactions occurred between homologous left and right hemisphere regions of the DAN in the delta and alpha frequency bands. Even stronger non-zero-phase interactions were detected between networks. Visual regions bilaterally showed phase-shifted interactions in the alpha band with regions of the DAN. Bilateral somatomotor regions interacted with DAN nodes in the beta band. These results demonstrate the existence of consistent, frequency specific phase-shifted interactions on a millisecond time scale between cortical regions within RSN as well as across RSNs. PMID:23631996

  20. Protein-protein interaction analysis highlights additional loci of interest for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ragnedda, Giammario; Disanto, Giulio; Giovannoni, Gavin; Ebers, George C; Sotgiu, Stefano; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors play an important role in determining the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). The strongest genetic association in MS is located within the major histocompatibility complex class II region (MHC), but more than 50 MS loci of modest effect located outside the MHC have now been identified. However, the relative candidate genes that underlie these associations and their functions are largely unknown. We conducted a protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis of gene products coded in loci recently reported to be MS associated at the genome-wide significance level and in loci suggestive of MS association. Our aim was to identify which suggestive regions are more likely to be truly associated, which genes are mostly implicated in the PPI network and their expression profile. From three recent independent association studies, SNPs were considered and divided into significant and suggestive depending on the strength of the statistical association. Using the Disease Association Protein-Protein Link Evaluator tool we found that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected by chance when considering both significant regions alone (p<0.0002) and significant plus suggestive (p<0.007). The number of genes involved in the network was 43. Of these, 23 were located within suggestive regions and many of them directly interacted with proteins coded within significant regions. These included genes such as SYK, IL-6, CSF2RB, FCLR3, EIF4EBP2 and CHST12. Using the gene portal BioGPS, we tested the expression of these genes in 24 different tissues and found the highest values among immune-related cells as compared to non-immune tissues (p<0.001). A gene ontology analysis confirmed the immune-related functions of these genes. In conclusion, loci currently suggestive of MS association interact with and have similar expression profiles and function as those significantly associated, highlighting the fact that more common variants remain to be

  1. Lentiviral hepatitis B pseudotype entry requires sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and additional hepatocyte-specific factors.

    PubMed

    Meredith, L W; Hu, K; Cheng, X; Howard, C R; Baumert, T F; Balfe, P; van de Graaf, K F; Protzer, U; McKeating, J A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the world's major unconquered infections, resulting in progressive liver disease, and current treatments rarely cure infection. A limitation to discovering new therapies is our limited knowledge of HBV entry and dissemination pathways that hinders the development of in vitro culture systems. To address this gap in our understanding we optimized the genesis of infectious lentiviral pseudoparticles (HBVpps). The recent discovery that the bile salt transporter sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) acts as a receptor for HBV enabled us to assess the receptor dependency of HBVpp infection. HBVpps preferentially infect hepatoma cells expressing NTCP, whereas other non-liver cells engineered to express NTCP do not support infection, suggesting that additional hepatocyte-specific factors are required for HBVpp internalization. These results highlight the value of the HBVpp system to dissect the pathways of HBV entry and dissemination. PMID:26474824

  2. Thermodynamic method of calculating the effect of alloying additives on interphase interaction in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuchinsky, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of alloying additives to the matrix of a composite on the high temperature solubility rate of a single component fiber was analyzed thermodynamically. With an example of binary Ni alloys, with Group IV-VI transition metals reinforced with W fibers, agreement between the calculated and experimental data was demonstrated.

  3. The emotion potential of simple sentences: additive or interactive effects of nouns and adjectives?

    PubMed Central

    Lüdtke, Jana; Jacobs, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of studies on affective processes in reading focus on single words. The most robust finding is a processing advantage for positively valenced words, which has been replicated in the rare studies investigating effects of affective features of words during sentence or story comprehension. Here we were interested in how the different valences of words in a sentence influence its processing and supralexical affective evaluation. Using a sentence verification task we investigated how comprehension of simple declarative sentences containing a noun and an adjective depends on the valences of both words. The results are in line with the assumed general processing advantage for positive words. We also observed a clear interaction effect, as can be expected from the affective priming literature: sentences with emotionally congruent words (e.g., The grandpa is clever) were verified faster than sentences containing emotionally incongruent words (e.g., The grandpa is lonely). The priming effect was most prominent for sentences with positive words suggesting that both, early processing as well as later meaning integration and situation model construction, is modulated by affective processing. In a second rating task we investigated how the emotion potential of supralexical units depends on word valence. The simplest hypothesis predicts that the supralexical affective structure is a linear combination of the valences of the nouns and adjectives (Bestgen, 1994). Overall, our results do not support this: The observed clear interaction effect on ratings indicate that especially negative adjectives dominated supralexical evaluation, i.e., a sort of negativity bias in sentence evaluation. Future models of sentence processing thus should take interactive affective effects into account. PMID:26321975

  4. Tissue-specific factors additively increase the probability of the all-or-none formation of a hypersensitive site.

    PubMed Central

    Boyes, J; Felsenfeld, G

    1996-01-01

    DNase I-hypersensitive sites lack a canonical nucleosome and have binding sites for various transcription factors. To understand how the hypersensitivity is generated and maintained, we studied the chicken erythroid-specific beta(A)/epsilon globin gene enhancer, a region where both tissue-specific and ubiquitous transcription factors can bind. Constructions containing mutations of this enhancer were stably introduced into a chicken erythroid cell line. We found that the hypersensitivity was determined primarily by the erythroid factors and that their binding additively increased the accessibility. The fraction of accessible sites in clonal cell lines was quantitated using restriction endonucleases; these data implied that the formation of each hypersensitive site was an all-or-none phenomenon. Use of DNase I and micrococcal nuclease probes further indicated that the size of the hypersensitive site was influenced by the binding of transcription factors which then determined the length of the nucleosome-free gap. Our data are consistent with a model in which hypersensitive sites are generated stochastically: mutations that reduce the number of bound factors reduce the probability that these factors will prevail over a nucleosome; thus, the fraction of sites in the population that are accessible is also diminished. Images PMID:8665857

  5. T Lymphocyte–Endothelial Interactions: Emerging Understanding of Trafficking and Antigen-Specific Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carman, Christopher V.; Martinelli, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific immunity requires regulated trafficking of T cells in and out of diverse tissues in order to orchestrate lymphocyte development, immune surveillance, responses, and memory. The endothelium serves as a unique barrier, as well as a sentinel, between the blood and the tissues, and as such it plays an essential locally tuned role in regulating T cell migration and information exchange. While it is well established that chemoattractants and adhesion molecules are major determinants of T cell trafficking, emerging studies have now enumerated a large number of molecular players as well as a range of discrete cellular remodeling activities (e.g., transmigratory cups and invadosome-like protrusions) that participate in directed migration and pathfinding by T cells. In addition to providing trafficking cues, intimate cell–cell interaction between lymphocytes and endothelial cells provide instruction to T cells that influence their activation and differentiation states. Perhaps the most intriguing and underappreciated of these “sentinel” roles is the ability of the endothelium to act as a non-hematopoietic “semiprofessional” antigen-presenting cell. Close contacts between circulating T cells and antigen-presenting endothelium may play unique non-redundant roles in shaping adaptive immune responses within the periphery. A better understanding of the mechanisms directing T cell trafficking and the antigen-presenting role of the endothelium may not only increase our knowledge of the adaptive immune response but also empower the utility of emerging immunomodulatory therapeutics. PMID:26635815

  6. Morphogenic Protein RodZ Interacts with Sporulation Specific SpoIIE in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Muchová, Katarína; Chromiková, Zuzana; Bradshaw, Niels; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    The first landmark in sporulation of Bacillus subtilis is the formation of an asymmetric septum followed by selective activation of the transcription factor σF in the resulting smaller cell. How the morphological transformations that occur during sporulation are coupled to cell-specific activation of transcription is largely unknown. The membrane protein SpoIIE is a constituent of the asymmetric sporulation septum and is a crucial determinant of σF activation. Here we report that the morphogenic protein, RodZ, which is essential for cell shape determination, is additionally required for asymmetric septum formation and sporulation. In cells depleted of RodZ, formation of asymmetric septa is disturbed and σF activation is perturbed. During sporulation, we found that SpoIIE recruits RodZ to the asymmetric septum. Moreover, we detected a direct interaction between SpoIIE and RodZ in vitro and in vivo, indicating that SpoIIE-RodZ may form a complex to coordinate asymmetric septum formation and σF activation. We propose that RodZ could provide a link between the cell shape machinery and the coordinated morphological and developmental transitions required to form a resistant spore. PMID:27415800

  7. Allele-Specific Network Reveals Combinatorial Interaction That Transcends Small Effects in Psoriasis GWAS

    PubMed Central

    Climer, Sharlee; Templeton, Alan R.; Zhang, Weixiong

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of genetic markers have shown associations with various complex diseases, yet the “missing heritability” remains alarmingly elusive. Combinatorial interactions may account for a substantial portion of this missing heritability, but their discoveries have been impeded by computational complexity and genetic heterogeneity. We present BlocBuster, a novel systems-level approach that efficiently constructs genome-wide, allele-specific networks that accurately segregate homogenous combinations of genetic factors, tests the associations of these combinations with the given phenotype, and rigorously validates the results using a series of unbiased validation methods. BlocBuster employs a correlation measure that is customized for single nucleotide polymorphisms and returns a multi-faceted collection of values that captures genetic heterogeneity. We applied BlocBuster to analyze psoriasis, discovering a combinatorial pattern with an odds ratio of 3.64 and Bonferroni-corrected p-value of 5.01×10−16. This pattern was replicated in independent data, reflecting robustness of the method. In addition to improving prediction of disease susceptibility and broadening our understanding of the pathogenesis underlying psoriasis, these results demonstrate BlocBuster's potential for discovering combinatorial genetic associations within heterogeneous genome-wide data, thereby transcending the limiting “small effects” produced by individual markers examined in isolation. PMID:25233071

  8. Specific Interaction of the Unmodified Bacteriocin Lactococcin 972 with the Cell Wall Precursor Lipid II▿

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Beatriz; Böttiger, Tim; Schneider, Tanja; Rodríguez, Ana; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Wiedemann, Imke

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a nonlantibiotic bacteriocin that inhibits septum biosynthesis in Lactococcus lactis rather than forming pores in the cytoplasmic membrane. In this study, a deeper analysis of the molecular basis of the mode of action of Lcn972 was performed. Of several lipid cell wall precursors, only lipid II antagonized Lcn972 inhibitory activity in vivo. Likewise, Lcn972 only coprecipitated with lipid II micelles. This bacteriocin inhibited the in vitro polymerization of lipid II by the recombinant S. aureus PBP2 and the addition to lipid II of the first glycine catalyzed by FemX. These experiments demonstrate that Lcn972 specifically interacts with lipid II, the substrate of both enzymes. In the presence of Lcn972, nisin pore formation was partially hindered in whole cells. However, binding of Lcn972 to lipid II could not compete with nisin in lipid II-doped 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes, possibly indicating a distinct binding site. The existence of a putative cotarget for Lcn972 activity is discussed in the context of its narrow inhibitory spectrum and the localized action at the division septum. To our knowledge, this is the first unmodified bacteriocin that binds to the cell wall precursor lipid II. PMID:18539790

  9. The Pathogen-Host Interactions database (PHI-base): additions and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Martin; Pant, Rashmi; Raghunath, Arathi; Irvine, Alistair G.; Pedro, Helder; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly evolving pathogens cause a diverse array of diseases and epidemics that threaten crop yield, food security as well as human, animal and ecosystem health. To combat infection greater comparative knowledge is required on the pathogenic process in multiple species. The Pathogen-Host Interactions database (PHI-base) catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens. Mutant phenotypes are associated with gene information. The included pathogens infect a wide range of hosts including humans, animals, plants, insects, fish and other fungi. The current version, PHI-base 3.6, available at http://www.phi-base.org, stores information on 2875 genes, 4102 interactions, 110 host species, 160 pathogenic species (103 plant, 3 fungal and 54 animal infecting species) and 181 diseases drawn from 1243 references. Phenotypic and gene function information has been obtained by manual curation of the peer-reviewed literature. A controlled vocabulary consisting of nine high-level phenotype terms permits comparisons and data analysis across the taxonomic space. PHI-base phenotypes were mapped via their associated gene information to reference genomes available in Ensembl Genomes. Virulence genes and hotspots can be visualized directly in genome browsers. Future plans for PHI-base include development of tools facilitating community-led curation and inclusion of the corresponding host target(s). PMID:25414340

  10. The additive and interactive effects of parenting style and temperament in obese youth seeking treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, MH; Boles, RE; Reiter-Purtill, J

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine maternal parenting behaviors, child temperament and their potential interactions in families of obese children and demographically similar families of nonoverweight children. Design A total of 77 obese youth (M body mass index (BMI) z-score values, zBMI = 2.4; ages 8–16, 59% female, 50% African American) and their parents were recruited from a pediatric weight management clinic and compared to 69 families of nonoverweight youth (M zBMI = − 0.03). Comparison youth were classmates of each obese participant matched on gender, race and age. Measurements Maternal report of child temperament, parenting style and anthropometric assessments were obtained. Results Compared to nonoverweight youth, mothers of obese youth described their child as having a more difficult temperament and their parenting style as lower in behavioral control. A logistic regression model indicated that difficult temperament, lower behavioral control and the interaction of low maternal warmth and difficult child temperament were associated with increased odds of a child being classified as obese. Conclusions Treatment-seeking obese youth and their parents are characterized by different parent and child factors when compared to nonoverweight comparison families. These findings direct investigators to test more complex models of the relation between parent and child characteristics and their mutual role in the weight-related behavior change process. PMID:18698318

  11. The Pathogen-Host Interactions database (PHI-base): additions and future developments.

    PubMed

    Urban, Martin; Pant, Rashmi; Raghunath, Arathi; Irvine, Alistair G; Pedro, Helder; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly evolving pathogens cause a diverse array of diseases and epidemics that threaten crop yield, food security as well as human, animal and ecosystem health. To combat infection greater comparative knowledge is required on the pathogenic process in multiple species. The Pathogen-Host Interactions database (PHI-base) catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens. Mutant phenotypes are associated with gene information. The included pathogens infect a wide range of hosts including humans, animals, plants, insects, fish and other fungi. The current version, PHI-base 3.6, available at http://www.phi-base.org, stores information on 2875 genes, 4102 interactions, 110 host species, 160 pathogenic species (103 plant, 3 fungal and 54 animal infecting species) and 181 diseases drawn from 1243 references. Phenotypic and gene function information has been obtained by manual curation of the peer-reviewed literature. A controlled vocabulary consisting of nine high-level phenotype terms permits comparisons and data analysis across the taxonomic space. PHI-base phenotypes were mapped via their associated gene information to reference genomes available in Ensembl Genomes. Virulence genes and hotspots can be visualized directly in genome browsers. Future plans for PHI-base include development of tools facilitating community-led curation and inclusion of the corresponding host target(s). PMID:25414340

  12. Study on the interaction of the toxic food additive carmoisine with serum albumins: a microcalorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-05-30

    The interaction of the synthetic azo dye and food colorant carmoisine with human and bovine serum albumins was studied by microcalorimetric techniques. A complete thermodynamic profile of the interaction was obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry studies. The equilibrium constant of the complexation process was of the order of 10(6)M(-1) and the binding stoichiometry was found to be 1:1 with both the serum albumins. The binding was driven by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropy contributions. The binding affinity was lower at higher salt concentrations in both cases but the same was dominated by mostly non-electrostatic forces at all salt concentrations. The polyelectrolytic forces contributed only 5-8% of the total standard molar Gibbs energy change. The standard molar enthalpy change enhanced whereas the standard molar entropic contribution decreased with rise in temperature but they compensated each other to keep the standard molar Gibbs energy change almost invariant. The negative standard molar heat capacity values suggested the involvement of a significant hydrophobic contribution in the complexation process. Besides, enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon was also observed in both the systems. The thermal stability of the serum proteins was found to be remarkably enhanced on binding to carmoisine. PMID:24742664

  13. Designing specific protein–protein interactions using computation, experimental library screening, or integrated methods

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T Scott; Keating, Amy E

    2012-01-01

    Given the importance of protein–protein interactions for nearly all biological processes, the design of protein affinity reagents for use in research, diagnosis or therapy is an important endeavor. Engineered proteins would ideally have high specificities for their intended targets, but achieving interaction specificity by design can be challenging. There are two major approaches to protein design or redesign. Most commonly, proteins and peptides are engineered using experimental library screening and/or in vitro evolution. An alternative approach involves using protein structure and computational modeling to rationally choose sequences predicted to have desirable properties. Computational design has successfully produced novel proteins with enhanced stability, desired interactions and enzymatic function. Here we review the strengths and limitations of experimental library screening and computational structure-based design, giving examples where these methods have been applied to designing protein interaction specificity. We highlight recent studies that demonstrate strategies for combining computational modeling with library screening. The computational methods provide focused libraries predicted to be enriched in sequences with the properties of interest. Such integrated approaches represent a promising way to increase the efficiency of protein design and to engineer complex functionality such as interaction specificity. PMID:22593041

  14. Evolution of domain-peptide interactions to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Kelil, Abdellali; Levy, Emmanuel D; Michnick, Stephen W

    2016-07-01

    Evolution of complexity in eukaryotic proteomes has arisen, in part, through emergence of modular independently folded domains mediating protein interactions via binding to short linear peptides in proteins. Over 30 years, structural properties and sequence preferences of these peptides have been extensively characterized. Less successful, however, were efforts to establish relationships between physicochemical properties and functions of domain-peptide interactions. To our knowledge, we have devised the first strategy to exhaustively explore the binding specificity of protein domain-peptide interactions. We applied the strategy to SH3 domains to determine the properties of their binding peptides starting from various experimental data. The strategy identified the majority (∼70%) of experimentally determined SH3 binding sites. We discovered mutual relationships among binding specificity, binding affinity, and structural properties and evolution of linear peptides. Remarkably, we found that these properties are also related to functional diversity, defined by depth of proteins within hierarchies of gene ontologies. Our results revealed that linear peptides evolved to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity of domain-peptide interactions. Thus, domain-peptide interactions follow human-constructed gene ontologies, which suggest that our understanding of biological process hierarchies reflect the way chemical and thermodynamic properties of linear peptides and their interaction networks, in general, have evolved. PMID:27317745

  15. Evolution of domain–peptide interactions to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity

    PubMed Central

    Kelil, Abdellali; Levy, Emmanuel D.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Evolution of complexity in eukaryotic proteomes has arisen, in part, through emergence of modular independently folded domains mediating protein interactions via binding to short linear peptides in proteins. Over 30 years, structural properties and sequence preferences of these peptides have been extensively characterized. Less successful, however, were efforts to establish relationships between physicochemical properties and functions of domain–peptide interactions. To our knowledge, we have devised the first strategy to exhaustively explore the binding specificity of protein domain–peptide interactions. We applied the strategy to SH3 domains to determine the properties of their binding peptides starting from various experimental data. The strategy identified the majority (∼70%) of experimentally determined SH3 binding sites. We discovered mutual relationships among binding specificity, binding affinity, and structural properties and evolution of linear peptides. Remarkably, we found that these properties are also related to functional diversity, defined by depth of proteins within hierarchies of gene ontologies. Our results revealed that linear peptides evolved to coadapt specificity and affinity to functional diversity of domain–peptide interactions. Thus, domain–peptide interactions follow human-constructed gene ontologies, which suggest that our understanding of biological process hierarchies reflect the way chemical and thermodynamic properties of linear peptides and their interaction networks, in general, have evolved. PMID:27317745

  16. Gender and migration on the labour market: Additive or interacting disadvantages in Germany?

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Fenella; Höhne, Jutta

    2013-09-01

    Despite substantial differences in labour market attainment according to gender and migration status, gender and ethnic differences in labour market behaviour are most often studied separately. In contrast, this study describes and analyses interactions between gender, ethnic background and immigrant generation with regard to labour market participation, part-time work, and occupational status. The double comparison aims to reveal whether gender gaps in these labour market outcomes among the majority population generalise to ethnic minorities. Moreover, we ask whether variation in gender gaps in labour market behaviour follows the patterns in migrants' origin countries, and whether gender gaps show signs of intergenerational assimilation. Our heterogeneous choice and OLS regressions of 2009 German Microcensus data reveal considerable variation in gender gaps in labour market behaviour between East and West Germany, across ethnic groups and across generations. Intergenerational comparisons show that most ethnic minorities assimilate towards German patterns of gendered labour market attainment. PMID:23859734

  17. Specific heat spectra of non-interacting fermions in a quasiperiodic ladder sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, D. A.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Anselmo, D. H. A. L.

    2008-07-01

    We compute the specific heat spectra of non-interacting fermions whose energy spectrum was obtained from a quasiperiodic ladder sequence (Fibonacci and Rudin-Shapiro type), mimicking a DNA molecule model. The specific heat is calculated from their underlying multi-fractal energy spectrum, considering several values of energy densities. Comparisons are made with a real DNA sequence, namely the human chromosome 22 (Ch22).

  18. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro. PMID:25212818

  19. Ion-specific modulation of protein interactions: Anion-induced, reversible oligomerization of a fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Gokarn, Yatin R; Fesinmeyer, R Matthew; Saluja, Atul; Cao, Shawn; Dankberg, Jane; Goetze, Andrew; Remmele, Richard L; Narhi, Linda O; Brems, David N

    2009-01-01

    Ions can significantly modulate the solution interactions of proteins. We aim to demonstrate that the salt-dependent reversible heptamerization of a fusion protein called peptibody A or PbA is governed by anion-specific interactions with key arginyl and lysyl residues on its peptide arms. Peptibody A, an E. coli expressed, basic (pI = 8.8), homodimer (65.2 kDa), consisted of an IgG1-Fc with two, C-terminal peptide arms linked via penta-glycine linkers. Each peptide arm was composed of two, tandem, active sequences (SEYQGLPPQGWK) separated by a spacer (GSGSATGGSGGGASSGSGSATG). PbA was monomeric in 10 mM acetate, pH 5.0 but exhibited reversible self-association upon salt addition. The sedimentation coefficient (sw) and hydrodynamic diameter (DH) versus PbA concentration isotherms in the presence of 140 mM NaCl (A5N) displayed sharp increases in sw and DH, reaching plateau values of 9 s and 16 nm by 10 mg/mL PbA. The DH and sedimentation equilibrium data in the plateau region (>12 mg/mL) indicated the oligomeric ensemble to be monodisperse (PdI = 0.05) with a z-average molecular weight (Mz) of 433 kDa (stoichiometry = 7). There was no evidence of reversible self-association for an IgG1-Fc molecule in A5N by itself or in a mixture containing fluorescently labeled IgG1-Fc and PbA, indicative of PbA self-assembly being mediated through its peptide arms. Self-association increased with pH, NaCl concentration, and anion size (I− > Br− > Cl− > F−) but could be inhibited using soluble Trp-, Phe-, and Leu-amide salts (Trp > Phe > Leu). We propose that in the presence of salt (i) anion binding renders PbA self-association competent by neutralizing the peptidyl arginyl and lysyl amines, (ii) self-association occurs via aromatic and hydrophobic interactions between the..xx..xxx..xx.. motifs, and (iii) at >10 mg/mL, PbA predominantly exists as heptameric clusters. PMID:19177361

  20. A mammalian germ cell-specific RNA-binding protein interacts with ubiquitously expressed proteins involved in splice site selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, David J.; Bourgeois, Cyril F.; Klink, Albrecht; Stévenin, James; Cooke, Howard J.

    2000-05-01

    RNA-binding motif (RBM) genes are found on all mammalian Y chromosomes and are implicated in spermatogenesis. Within human germ cells, RBM protein shows a similar nuclear distribution to components of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. To address the function of RBM, we have used protein-protein interaction assays to test for possible physical interactions between these proteins. We find that RBM protein directly interacts with members of the SR family of splicing factors and, in addition, strongly interacts with itself. We have mapped the protein domains responsible for mediating these interactions and expressed the mouse RBM interaction region as a bacterial fusion protein. This fusion protein can pull-down several functionally active SR protein species from cell extracts. Depletion and add-back experiments indicate that these SR proteins are the only splicing factors bound by RBM which are required for the splicing of a panel of pre-mRNAs. Our results suggest that RBM protein is an evolutionarily conserved mammalian splicing regulator which operates as a germ cell-specific cofactor for more ubiquitously expressed pre-mRNA splicing activators.

  1. Simultaneous prediction of binding free energy and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions

    PubMed Central

    Crivelli, Joseph J.; Lemmon, Gordon; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between protein domains and linear peptides underlie many biological processes. Among these interactions, the recognition of C-terminal peptides by PDZ domains is one of the most ubiquitous. In this work, we present a mathematical model for PDZ domain-peptide interactions capable of predicting both affinity and specificity of binding based on x-ray crystal structures and comparative modeling with Rosetta. We developed our mathematical model using a large phage display dataset describing binding specificity for a wild type PDZ domain and 91 single mutants, as well as binding affinity data for a wild type PDZ domain binding to 28 different peptides. Structural refinement was carried out through several Rosetta protocols, the most accurate of which included flexible peptide docking and several iterations of side chain repacking and backbone minimization. Our findings emphasize the importance of backbone flexibility and the energetic contributions of side chain-side chain hydrogen bonds in accurately predicting interactions. We also determined that predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions became increasingly challenging as the length of the peptide increased in the N-terminal direction. In the training dataset, predicted binding energies correlated with those derived through calorimetry and specificity switches introduced through single mutations at interface positions were recapitulated. In independent tests, our best performing protocol was capable of predicting dissociation constants well within one order of magnitude of the experimental values and specificity profiles at the level of accuracy of previous studies. To our knowledge, this approach represents the first integrated protocol for predicting both affinity and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions. PMID:24305904

  2. RNA polymerase pausing regulates translation initiation by providing additional time for TRAP-RNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Yakhnin, Alexander V; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2006-11-17

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) pause sites have been identified in several prokaryotic genes. Although the presumed biological function of RNAP pausing is to allow synchronization of RNAP position with regulatory factor binding and/or RNA folding, a direct causal link between pausing and changes in gene expression has been difficult to establish. RNAP pauses at two sites in the Bacillus subtilis trpEDCFBA operon leader. Pausing at U107 and U144 participates in transcription attenuation and trpE translation control mechanisms, respectively. Substitution of U144 caused a substantial pausing defect in vitro and in vivo. These mutations led to increased trp operon expression that was suppressed by overproduction of TRAP, indicating that pausing at U144 provides additional time for TRAP to bind to the nascent transcript and promote formation of an RNA structure that blocks translation of trpE. These results establish that pausing is capable of playing a role in regulating translation in bacteria. PMID:17114058

  3. Interaction of Language Processing and Motor Skill in Children with Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiDonato Brumbach, Andrea C.; Goffman, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine how language production interacts with speech motor and gross and fine motor skill in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Method: Eleven children with SLI and 12 age-matched peers (4-6 years) produced structurally primed sentences containing particles and prepositions. Utterances were analyzed for errors and for…

  4. Interactions among Domain-Specific Expectancies, Values, and Gender: Predictors of Test Anxiety during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selkirk, Laura C.; Bouchey, Heather A.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses on the interaction between students' domain-specific expectancies and values as a predictor of test anxiety. A subsample of adolescents from the MSALT dataset are used in the current study; students complete measures during the spring of sixth grade and again during the spring of seventh grade. Overall, findings provide…

  5. Cross-Cultural Group Counseling with Asians: A Stage-Specific Interactive Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Yeonhee Sohn; Chen, Mei-Whei

    A model for offering culturally and developmentally responsive interventions in cross-cultural groups with Asian members is provided. The "stage-specific interactive model" is based on four factors: (1) the stage of Asian clients' ethnic identity development; (2) the stage of White leaders' ethnic identity development; (3) the unique interacting…

  6. Binaural Interaction in Specific Language Impairment: An Auditory Evoked Potential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Elaine M; Adams, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine whether auditory binaural interaction, defined as any difference between binaurally evoked responses and the sum of monaurally evoked responses, which is thought to index functions involved in the localization and detection of signals in background noise, is atypical in a group of children with specific language…

  7. Species-specific defence responses facilitate conspecifics and inhibit heterospecifics in above-belowground herbivore interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Siemann, Evan; Xiao, Li; Yang, Xuefang; Ding, Jianqing

    2014-01-01

    Conspecific and heterospecific aboveground and belowground herbivores often occur together in nature and their interactions may determine community structure. Here we show how aboveground adults and belowground larvae of the tallow tree specialist beetle Bikasha collaris and multiple heterospecific aboveground species interact to determine herbivore performance. Conspecific aboveground adults facilitate belowground larvae, but other aboveground damage inhibits larvae or has no effect. Belowground larvae increase conspecific adult feeding, but decrease heterospecific aboveground insect feeding and abundance. Chemical analyses and experiments with plant populations varying in phenolics show that all these positive and negative effects on insects are closely related to root and shoot tannin concentrations. Our results show that specific plant herbivore responses allow herbivore facilitation and inhibition to co-occur, likely shaping diverse aboveground and belowground communities. Considering species-specific responses of plants is critical for teasing apart inter- and intraspecific interactions in aboveground and belowground compartments. PMID:25241651

  8. Additive interactions of unrelated viruses in mixed infections of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp).

    PubMed

    Nsa, Imade Y; Kareem, Kehinde T

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of single infections and co-infections of three unrelated viruses on three cowpea cultivars (one commercial cowpea cultivar "White" and 2 IITA lines; IT81D-985 and TVu 76). The plants were inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), genus Potyvirus, Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV), genus Carmovirus and Southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV), genus Sobemovirus singly and in mixture (double and triple) at 10, 20, and 30 days after planting (DAP). The treated plants were assessed for susceptibility to the viruses, growth, and yield. In all cases of infection, early inoculation resulted in higher disease severity compared with late infection. The virus treated cowpea plants were relatively shorter than buffer inoculated control plants except the IT81D-985 plants that were taller and produced more foliage. Single infections by CABMV, CMeV, and SBMV led to a complete loss of seeds in the three cowpea cultivars at 10 DAP; only cultivar White produced some seeds at 30 DAP. Double and triple virus infections led to a total loss of seeds in all three cowpea cultivars. None of the virus infected IITA lines produced any seeds except IT81D-985 plants co-infected with CABMV and SBMV at 30 DAP with a reduction of 80%. Overall, the commercial cultivar "White" was the least susceptible to the virus treatments and produced the most yield (flowers, pods, and seeds). CABMV was the most aggressive of these viruses and early single inoculations with this virus resulted in the premature death of some of the seedlings. The presence of the Potyvirus, CABMV in the double virus infections did not appear to increase disease severity or yield loss. There was no strong evidence for synergistic interactions between the viruses in the double virus mixtures. PMID:26483824

  9. Additive interactions of unrelated viruses in mixed infections of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp)

    PubMed Central

    Nsa, Imade Y.; Kareem, Kehinde T.

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of single infections and co-infections of three unrelated viruses on three cowpea cultivars (one commercial cowpea cultivar “White” and 2 IITA lines; IT81D-985 and TVu 76). The plants were inoculated with Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV), genus Potyvirus, Cowpea mottle virus (CMeV), genus Carmovirus and Southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV), genus Sobemovirus singly and in mixture (double and triple) at 10, 20, and 30 days after planting (DAP). The treated plants were assessed for susceptibility to the viruses, growth, and yield. In all cases of infection, early inoculation resulted in higher disease severity compared with late infection. The virus treated cowpea plants were relatively shorter than buffer inoculated control plants except the IT81D-985 plants that were taller and produced more foliage. Single infections by CABMV, CMeV, and SBMV led to a complete loss of seeds in the three cowpea cultivars at 10 DAP; only cultivar White produced some seeds at 30 DAP. Double and triple virus infections led to a total loss of seeds in all three cowpea cultivars. None of the virus infected IITA lines produced any seeds except IT81D-985 plants co-infected with CABMV and SBMV at 30 DAP with a reduction of 80%. Overall, the commercial cultivar “White” was the least susceptible to the virus treatments and produced the most yield (flowers, pods, and seeds). CABMV was the most aggressive of these viruses and early single inoculations with this virus resulted in the premature death of some of the seedlings. The presence of the Potyvirus, CABMV in the double virus infections did not appear to increase disease severity or yield loss. There was no strong evidence for synergistic interactions between the viruses in the double virus mixtures. PMID:26483824

  10. A quantitative method to discriminate between non-specific and specific lectin-glycan interactions on silicon-modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Boukherroub, Rabah; Ozanam, François; Szunerits, Sabine; Gouget-Laemmel, Anne Chantal

    2016-02-15

    Essential to the success of any surface-based carbohydrate biochip technology is that interactions of the particular interface with the target protein be reliable and reproducible and not susceptible to unwanted nonspecific adsorption events. This condition is particularly important when the technology is intended for the evaluation of low-affinity interactions such as those typically encountered between lectins and their monomeric glycan ligands. In this paper, we describe the fabrication of glycan (mannoside and lactoside) monolayers immobilized on hydrogenated crystalline silicon (111) surfaces. An efficient conjugation protocol featuring a key "click"-based coupling step has been developed which ensures the obtention of interfaces with controlled glycan density. The adsorption behavior of these newly developed interfaces with the lectins, Lens culinaris and Peanut agglutinin, has been probed using quantitative IR-ATR and the data interpreted using various isothermal models. The analysis reveals that protein physisorption to the interface is more prevalent than specific chemisorption for the majority of washing protocols investigated. Physisorption can be greatly suppressed through application of a strong surfactinated rinse. The coexistence of chemisorption and physisorption processes is further demonstrated by quantification of the amounts of adsorbed proteins distributed on the surface, in correlation with the results obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Taken together, the data demonstrates that the nonspecific adsorption of proteins to these glycan-terminated surfaces can be effectively eliminated through the proper control of the chemical structure of the surface monolayer combined with the implementation of an appropriate surface-rinse protocol. PMID:26619130

  11. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) interacts with a meiosis-specific RecA homologues, Lim15/Dmc1, but does not stimulate its strand transfer activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Fumika N.; Koshiyama, Akiyo; Namekawa, Satoshi H.; Ishii, Satomi; Iwabata, Kazuki; Sugawara, Hiroko; Nara, Takayuki Y.; Sakaguchi, Kengo . E-mail: kengo@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp; Sawado, Tomoyuki

    2007-01-26

    PCNA is a multi-functional protein that is involved in various nuclear events. Here we show that PCNA participates in events occurring during early meiotic prophase. Analysis of protein-protein interactions using surface plasmon resonance indicates that Coprinus cinereus PCNA (CoPCNA) specifically interacts with a meiotic specific RecA-like factor, C. cinereus Lim15/Dmc1 (CoLim15) in vitro. The binding efficiency increases with addition of Mg{sup 2+} ions, while ATP inhibits the interaction. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that the CoLim15 protein interacts with the CoPCNA protein in vitro and in the cell extracts. Despite the interaction between these two factors, no enhancement of CoLim15-dependent strand transfer activity by CoPCNA was found in vitro. We propose that the interaction between Lim15/Dmc1 and PCNA mediates the recombination-associated DNA synthesis during meiosis.

  12. A non-additive interaction in a single locus causes a very short root phenotype in wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanlong; Zhu, Huilan; Challa, Ghana S; Zhang, Zhengzhi

    2013-05-01

    Non-additive allelic interactions underlie over dominant and under dominant inheritance, which explain positive and negative heterosis. These heteroses are often observed in the aboveground traits, but rarely reported in root. We identified a very short root (VSR) phenotype in the F1 hybrid between the common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) landrace Chinese Spring and synthetic wheat accession TA4152-71. When germinated in tap water, primary roots of the parental lines reached ~15 cm 10 days after germination, but those of the F1 hybrid were ~3 cm long. Selfing populations segregated at a 1 (long-root) to 1 (short-root) ratio, indicating that VSR is controlled by a non-additive interaction between two alleles in a single gene locus, designated as Vsr1. Genome mapping localized the Vsr1 locus in a 3.8-cM interval delimited by markers XWL954 and XWL2506 on chromosome arm 5DL. When planted in vermiculite with supplemental fertilizer, the F1 hybrid had normal root growth, virtually identical to the parental lines, but the advanced backcrossing populations segregated for VSR, indicating that the F1 VSR expression was suppressed by interactions between other genes in the parental background and the vermiculite conditions. Preliminary physiological analyses showed that the VSR suppression is independent of light status but related to potassium homeostasis. Phenotyping additional hybrids between common wheat and synthetics revealed a high VSR frequency and their segregation data suggested more Vsr loci involved. Because the VSR plants can be regularly maintained and readily phenotyped at the early developmental stage, it provides a model for studies of non-additive interactions in wheat. PMID:23381806

  13. Transcription variants of the prostate-specific PrLZ gene and their interaction with 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ruoxiang; He, Hui; Sun, Xiaojuan; Xu, Jianchun; Marshall, Fray F.; Zhau, Haiyen; Chung, Leland W.K.; Fu, Haian; He, Dalin

    2009-11-20

    We have reported isolation and characterization of the prostate-specific and androgen-regulated PrLZ gene abnormally expressed in prostate cancer. PrLZ is a potential biomarker for prostate cancer and a candidate oncogene promoting cell proliferation and survival in prostate cancer cells. A full delineation of the PrLZ gene and its gene products may provide clues to the mechanisms regulating its expression and function. In this report, we identified three additional exons in the PrLZ gene and recognized five transcript variants from alternative splicing that could be detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Structural comparison demonstrated that the PrLZ proteins are highly conserved among species. PrLZ contains multiple potential sites for interaction with other proteins. We used mammalian two-hybrid assays to demonstrate that PrLZ isoforms interact with 14-3-3 proteins, and multiple sites in the PrLZ may be involved in the interaction. Alternative splicing may contribute to abnormally enhanced PrLZ levels in prostate cancer, and interaction with 14-3-3 proteins may be a mechanism by which PrLZ promotes cell proliferation and survival during prostate cancer development and progression. This information is a valuable addition to the investigation of the oncogenic properties of the PrLZ gene.

  14. Canine parvovirus host range is determined by the specific conformation of an additional region of the capsid.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, J S; Parrish, C R

    1997-01-01

    We analyzed a region of the capsid of canine parvovirus (CPV) which determines the ability of the virus to infect canine cells. This region is distinct from those previously shown to determine the canine host range differences between CPV and feline panleukopenia virus. It lies on a ridge of the threefold spike of the capsid and is comprised of five interacting loops from three capsid protein monomers. We analyzed 12 mutants of CPV which contained amino acid changes in two adjacent loops exposed on the surface of this region. Nine mutants infected and grew in feline cells but were restricted in replication in one or the other of two canine cell lines tested. Three other mutants whose genomes contain mutations which affect one probable interchain bond were nonviable and could not be propagated in either canine or feline cells, although the VP1 and VP2 proteins from those mutants produced empty capsids when expressed from a plasmid vector. Although wild-type and mutant capsids bound to canine and feline cells in similar amounts, infection or viral DNA replication was greatly reduced after inoculation of canine cells with most of the mutants. The viral genomes of two host range-restricted mutants and two nonviable mutants replicated to wild-type levels in both feline and canine cells upon transfection with plasmid clones. The capsids of wild-type CPV and two mutants were similar in susceptibility to heat inactivation, but one of those mutants and one other were more stable against urea denaturation. Most mutations in this structural region altered the ability of monoclonal antibodies to recognize epitopes within a major neutralizing antigenic site, and that site could be subdivided into a number of distinct epitopes. These results argue that a specific structure of this region is required for CPV to retain its canine host range. PMID:9371580

  15. Understanding Interactions between Cellular Matrices and Metal Complexes: Methods To Improve Silver Nanodot-Specific Staining.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungmoon; Yu, Junhua

    2016-08-26

    Metal complexes are frequently used for biological applications due to their special photophysical and chemical characteristics. Due to strong interactions between metals and biomacromolecules, a random staining of cytoplasm or nucleoplasm by the complexes results in a low signal-to-background ratio. In this study, we used luminescent silver nanodots as a model to investigate the major driving force for non-specific staining in cellular matrices. Even though some silver nanodot emitters exhibited excellent specific staining of nucleoli, labeling with nanodots was problematic owing to severe non-specific staining. Binding between silver and sulfhydryl group of proteins appeared to be the major factor that enforced the silver staining. The oxidation of thiol groups in cells with hexacyanoferrate(III) dramatically weakened the silver-cell interaction and consequently significantly improved the efficiency of targeted staining. PMID:27380586

  16. A pollen-specific calmodulin-binding protein, NPG1, interacts with putative pectate lyases

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Bong; Golovkin, Maxim; Reddy, Anireddy S. N.

    2014-01-01

    Previous genetic studies have revealed that a pollen-specific calmodulin-binding protein, No Pollen Germination 1 (NPG1), is required for pollen germination. However, its mode of action is unknown. Here we report direct interaction of NPG1 with pectate lyase-like proteins (PLLs). A truncated form of AtNPG1 lacking the N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat 1 (TPR1) failed to interact with PLLs, suggesting that it is essential for NPG1 interaction with PLLs. Localization studies with AtNPG1 fused to a fluorescent reporter driven by its native promoter revealed its presence in the cytosol and cell wall of the pollen grain and the growing pollen tube of plasmolyzed pollen. Together, our data suggest that the function of NPG1 in regulating pollen germination is mediated through its interaction with PLLs, which may modify the pollen cell wall and regulate pollen tube emergence and growth. PMID:24919580

  17. Interaction of Sesbania Mosaic Virus Movement Protein with VPg and P10: Implication to Specificity of Genome Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Roy Chowdhury, Soumya; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2011-01-01

    Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) is a single strand positive-sense RNA plant virus that belongs to the genus Sobemovirus. The mechanism of cell-to-cell movement in sobemoviruses has not been well studied. With a view to identify the viral encoded ancillary proteins of SeMV that may assist in cell-to-cell movement of the virus, all the proteins encoded by SeMV genome were cloned into yeast Matchmaker system 3 and interaction studies were performed. Two proteins namely, viral protein genome linked (VPg) and a 10-kDa protein (P10) c v gft encoded by OFR 2a, were identified as possible interacting partners in addition to the viral coat protein (CP). Further characterization of these interactions revealed that the movement protein (MP) recognizes cognate RNA through interaction with VPg, which is covalently linked to the 5′ end of the RNA. Analysis of the deletion mutants delineated the domains of MP involved in the interaction with VPg and P10. This study implicates for the first time that VPg might play an important role in specific recognition of viral genome by MP in SeMV and shed light on the possible role of P10 in the viral movement. PMID:21246040

  18. Effects of magnetic dipolar interactions on the specific time constant in superparamagnetic nanoparticle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, N.; Schinteie, G.; Bartha, C.; Palade, P.; Vekas, L.; Kuncser, V.

    2016-07-01

    A quantitative treatment of the effects of magnetic mutual interactions on the specific absorption rate of a superparamagnetic system of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleic acid is reported. The nanoparticle concentration of the considered ferrofluid samples varied from a very low (0.005) to a medium (0.16) value of the volume fraction, whereas the amplitude of the exciting AC magnetic field ranged from 14–35 kA m‑1. It was proved that a direct effect of the interparticle interactions resides in the regime of the modified superparamagnetism, dealing, besides the usual increase in the anisotropy energy barrier per nanoparticle, with the decrease in the specific time constant {τ0} of the relaxation law, usually considered as a material constant. Consequently, the increase in the specific absorption rate versus the volume fraction is significantly diminished in the presence of the interparticle interactions compared to the case of non-interacting superparamagnetic nanoparticles, with direct influence on the magnetic hyperthermia efficiency.

  19. Contribution of Physical Interactions to Signaling Specificity between a Diguanylate Cyclase and Its Effector

    PubMed Central

    Dahlstrom, Kurt M.; Giglio, Krista M.; Collins, Alan J.; Sondermann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that controls multiple cellular processes. c-di-GMP networks have up to dozens of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) that synthesize c-di-GMP along with many c-di-GMP-responsive target proteins that can bind and respond to this signal. For such networks to have order, a mechanism(s) likely exists that allow DGCs to specifically signal their targets, and it has been suggested that physical interactions might provide such specificity. Our results show a DGC from Pseudomonas fluorescens physically interacting with its target protein at a conserved interface, and this interface can be predictive of DGC-target protein interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that physical interaction is necessary for the DGC to maximally signal its target. If such “local signaling” is a theme for even a fraction of the DGCs used by bacteria, it becomes possible to posit a model whereby physical interaction allows a DGC to directly signal its target protein, which in turn may help curtail undesired cross talk with other members of the network. PMID:26670387

  20. Specific Interaction with Cardiolipin Triggers Functional Activation of Dynamin-Related Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Bustillo-Zabalbeitia, Itsasne; Montessuit, Sylvie; Raemy, Etienne; Basañez, Gorka; Terrones, Oihana; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Dynamin-Related Protein 1 (Drp1), a large GTPase of the dynamin superfamily, is required for mitochondrial fission in healthy and apoptotic cells. Drp1 activation is a complex process that involves translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) and assembly into rings/spirals at the MOM, leading to membrane constriction/division. Similar to dynamins, Drp1 contains GTPase (G), bundle signaling element (BSE) and stalk domains. However, instead of the lipid–interacting Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domain present in the dynamins, Drp1 contains the so-called B insert or variable domain that has been suggested to play an important role in Drp1 regulation. Different proteins have been implicated in Drp1 recruitment to the MOM, although how MOM-localized Drp1 acquires its fully functional status remains poorly understood. We found that Drp1 can interact with pure lipid bilayers enriched in the mitochondrion-specific phospholipid cardiolipin (CL). Building on our previous study, we now explore the specificity and functional consequences of this interaction. We show that a four lysine module located within the B insert of Drp1 interacts preferentially with CL over other anionic lipids. This interaction dramatically enhances Drp1 oligomerization and assembly-stimulated GTP hydrolysis. Our results add significantly to a growing body of evidence indicating that CL is an important regulator of many essential mitochondrial functions. PMID:25036098

  1. Polymer coatings that display specific biological signals while preventing nonspecific interactions.

    PubMed

    Ameringer, Thomas; Fransen, Peter; Bean, Penny; Johnson, Graham; Pereira, Suzanne; Evans, Richard A; Thissen, Helmut; Meagher, Laurence

    2012-02-01

    Control over cell-material surface interactions is the key to many new and improved biomedical devices. It can only be achieved if interactions that are mediated by nonspecifically adsorbed serum proteins are minimized and if cells instead respond to specific ligand molecules presented on the surface. Here, we present a simple yet effective surface modification method that allows for the covalent coupling and presentation of specific biological signals on coatings which have significantly reduced nonspecific biointerfacial interactions. To achieve this we synthesized bottle brush type copolymers consisting of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate and (meth)acrylates providing activated NHS ester groups as well as different spacer lengths between the NHS groups and the polymer backbone. Copolymers containing different molar ratios of these monomers were grafted to amine functionalized polystyrene cell culture substrates, followed by the covalent immobilization of the cyclic peptides cRGDfK and cRADfK using residual NHS groups. Polymers were characterized by GPC and NMR and surface modification steps were analyzed using XPS. The cellular response was evaluated using HeLa cell attachment experiments. The results showed strong correlations between the effectiveness of the control over biointerfacial interactions and the polymer architecture. They also demonstrate that optimized fully synthetic copolymer coatings, which can be applied to a wide range of substrate materials, provide excellent control over biointerfacial interactions. PMID:22076848

  2. Study of Ion Specific Interactions of Alkali Cations with Dicarboxylate Dianions

    SciTech Connect

    Murdachaew, Garold; Valiev, Marat; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Wang, Xue B.

    2012-02-10

    Alkali metal cations often show pronounced ion specific interactions and selectivity with macromolecules in biological processes, colloids, and interfacial sciences, but a fundamental understanding about the underlying microscopic mechanism is still very limited. Here we report a direct probe of interactions between alkali metal cations (M{sup +}) and dicarboxylate dianions, O{sub 2}C(CH{sub 2})nCO{sub 2} (D{sub n}{sup 2-}) in the gas phase by combined photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and ab initio electronic structure calculation on nine M{sup +}-D{sub n}{sup 2-} complexes (M = Li, Na, K; n = 2, 4, 6). PES spectra show that the electron binding energy (EBE) decreases from Li{sup +} to Na{sup +} to K{sup +} for complexes of M{sup +}-D{sub 2}{sup 2-}, whereas the order is Li{sup +} interacts with a more flexible D{sub 6}{sup 2-} dianion. Theoretical modeling suggests that M{sup +} prefers to interact with both ends of the carboxylate -COOO{sup -} groups by bending the flexible aliphatic backbone, and the local binding environments are found to depend upon dicarboxylate size n and the specific cation M{sup +}. The observed variance of EBEs reflects how well a specific dicarboxylate dianion accommodates each M{sup +}. This work demonstrates the delicate interplay among several factors (electrostatic interaction, size matching, and strain energy) that likely play critical roles in determining the structures and energetics of gaseous clusters as well as ion specificity and selectivity in solutions and biological systems.

  3. Elucidation of strain-specific interaction of a GII-4 norovirus with HBGA receptors by site-directed mutagenesis study

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Ming |; Xia Ming; Cao Sheng; Huang Pengwei; Farkas, Tibor |; Meller, Jarek |; Hegde, Rashmi S. |; Li Xuemei; Rao Zihe; Jiang Xi |

    2008-09-30

    Noroviruses interact with histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) receptors in a strain-specific manner probably detecting subtle structural differences in the carbohydrate receptors. The specific recognition of types A and B antigens by various norovirus strains is a typical example. The only difference between the types A and B antigens is the acetamide linked to the terminal galactose of the A but not to the B antigen. The crystal structure of the P dimer of a GII-4 norovirus (VA387) bound to types A and B trisaccharides has elucidated the A/B binding site on the capsid but did not explain the binding specificity of the two antigens. In this study, using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified three residues on the VA387 capsid that are sterically close to the acetamide and are required for binding to A but not B antigens, indicating that the acetamide determines the binding specificity between the A and B antigens. Further mutational analysis showed that a nearby open cavity may also be involved in binding specificity to HBGAs. In addition, a systematic mutational analysis of residues in and around the binding interface has identified a group of amino acids that are required for binding but do not have direct contact with the carbohydrate antigens, implying that these residues may be involved in the structural integrity of the receptor binding interface. Taken together, our study provides new insights into the carbohydrate/capsid interactions which are a valuable complement to the atomic structures in understanding the virus/host interaction and in the future design of antiviral agents.

  4. Hanford waste-form release and sediment interaction: A status report with rationale and recommendations for additional studies

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R.J. ); Wood, M.I. )

    1990-05-01

    This report documents the currently available geochemical data base for release and retardation for actual Hanford Site materials (wastes and/or sediments). The report also recommends specific laboratory tests and presents the rationale for the recommendations. The purpose of this document is threefold: to summarize currently available information, to provide a strategy for generating additional data, and to provide recommendations on specific data collection methods and tests matrices. This report outlines a data collection approach that relies on feedback from performance analyses to ascertain when adequate data have been collected. The data collection scheme emphasizes laboratory testing based on empiricism. 196 refs., 4 figs., 36 tabs.

  5. Tlx3 promotes glutamatergic neuronal subtype specification through direct interactions with the chromatin modifier CBP.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Atsushi; Patel, Dharmeshkumar; Wilson, Sarah M; Koehler, Karl R; Khanna, Rajesh; Hashino, Eri

    2015-01-01

    Nervous system development relies on the generation of precise numbers of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. The homeodomain transcription factor, T-cell leukemia 3 (Tlx3), functions as the master neuronal fate regulator by instructively promoting the specification of glutamatergic excitatory neurons and suppressing the specification of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) neurons. However, how Tlx3 promotes glutamatergic neuronal subtype specification is poorly understood. In this study, we found that Tlx3 directly interacts with the epigenetic co-activator cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) and that the Tlx3 homeodomain is essential for this interaction. The interaction between Tlx3 and CBP was enhanced by the three amino acid loop extension (TALE)-class homeodomain transcription factor, pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 3 (Pbx3). Using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells stably expressing Tlx3, we found that the interaction between Tlx3 and CBP became detectable only after these Tlx3-expressing ES cells were committed to a neural lineage, which coincided with increased Pbx3 expression during neural differentiation from ES cells. Forced expression of mutated Tlx3 lacking the homeodomain in ES cells undergoing neural differentiation resulted in significantly reduced expression of glutamatergic neuronal subtype markers, but had little effect on the expression on pan neural markers. Collectively, our results strongly suggest that functional interplay between Tlx3 and CBP plays a critical role in neuronal subtype specification, providing novel insights into the epigenetic regulatory mechanism that modulates the transcriptional efficacy of a selective set of neuronal subtype-specific genes during differentiation. PMID:26258652

  6. Site-specific regulatory interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase and 14-3-3 proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toroser, D.; Athwal, G. S.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We report an Mg2+-dependent interaction between spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) and endogenous 14-3-3 proteins, as evidenced by co-elution during gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation. The content of 14-3-3s associated with an SPS immunoprecipitate was inversely related to activity, and was specifically reduced when tissue was pretreated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside, suggesting metabolite control in vivo. A synthetic phosphopeptide based on Ser-229 was shown by surface plasmon resonance to bind a recombinant plant 14-3-3, and addition of the phosphorylated SPS-229 peptide was found to stimulate the SPS activity of an SPS:14-3-3 complex. Taken together, the results suggest a regulatory interaction of 14-3-3 proteins with Ser-229 of SPS.

  7. Additive effects of levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol on brain aromatase (cyp19a1b) in zebrafish specific in vitro and in vivo bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hinfray, N; Tebby, C; Garoche, C; Piccini, B; Bourgine, G; Aït-Aïssa, S; Kah, O; Pakdel, F; Brion, F

    2016-09-15

    Estrogens and progestins are widely used in combination in human medicine and both are present in aquatic environment. Despite the joint exposure of aquatic wildlife to estrogens and progestins, very little information is available on their combined effects. In the present study we investigated the effect of ethinylestradiol (EE2) and Levonorgestrel (LNG), alone and in mixtures, on the expression of the brain specific ER-regulated cyp19a1b gene. For that purpose, recently established zebrafish-derived tools were used: (i) an in vitro transient reporter gene assay in a human glial cell line (U251-MG) co-transfected with zebrafish estrogen receptors (zfERs) and the luciferase gene under the control of the zebrafish cyp19a1b gene promoter and (ii) an in vivo bioassay using a transgenic zebrafish expressing GFP under the control of the zebrafish cyp19a1b gene promoter (cyp19a1b-GFP). Concentration-response relationships for single chemicals were modeled and used to design the mixture experiments following a ray design. The results from mixture experiments were analyzed to predict joint effects according to concentration addition and statistical approaches were used to characterize the potential interactions between the components of the mixtures (synergism/antagonism). We confirmed that some progestins could elicit estrogenic effects in fish brain. In mixtures, EE2 and LNG exerted additive estrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that some environmental progestin could exert effects that will add to those of environmental (xeno-)estrogens. Moreover, our zebrafish specific assays are valuable tools that could be used in risk assessment for both single chemicals and their mixtures. PMID:27491593

  8. Interactions of cryptosin with mammalian cardiac dihydropyridine-specific calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, V.R.; Banning, J.W. )

    1990-01-01

    Cryptosin, a new cardenolide, was found to be a potent inhibitor of cardiac Na{sup +} and K{sup +} dependent Adenosinetri-phosphatase. In experiments with dog heart ex vivo, development of inotropic and toxic effect correlated with changes in the cardiac dihydropyridine-specific calcium channels as measured by the binding of {sup 3}(H)PN 200-110. A significant change in the PN 200-110 binding was observed when guinea pig and dog heart sarcolemmal membranes were pre-incubated with cryptosin in vitro. Binding analysis of {sup 3}(H)PN 200-110 (Isradipine), a 1,4-dihydropyridine analog with very specific calcium channel binding properties, in both in vitro and ex vivo studies were consistent and indicated a non-specific type of interaction of cryptosin with mammalian cardiac 1,4-dihydropyridine-specific calcium channels.

  9. Specific Interactions of Clausin, a New Lantibiotic, with Lipid Precursors of the Bacterial Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Bouhss, Ahmed; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Vincent, Michel; Odaert, Benoit; Aumont-Nicaise, Magalie; Bressolier, Philippe; Desmadril, Michel; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Urdaci, Maria C.; Gallay, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the specificity of interaction of a new type A lantibiotic, clausin, isolated from Bacillus clausii, with lipid intermediates of bacterial envelope biosynthesis pathways. Isothermal calorimetry and steady-state fluorescence anisotropy (with dansylated derivatives) identified peptidoglycan lipids I and II, embedded in dodecylphosphocholine micelles, as potential targets. Complex formation with dissociation constants of ∼0.3 μM and stoichiometry of ∼2:1 peptides/lipid intermediate was observed. The interaction is enthalpy-driven. For the first time, to our knowledge, we evidenced the interaction between a lantibiotic and C55-PP-GlcNAc, a lipid intermediate in the biosynthesis of other bacterial cell wall polymers, including teichoic acids. The pyrophosphate moiety of these lipid intermediates was crucial for the interaction because a strong binding with undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, accounting for 80% of the free energy of binding, was observed. No binding occurred with the undecaprenyl phosphate derivative. The pentapeptide and the N-acetylated sugar moieties strengthened the interaction, but their contributions were weaker than that of the pyrophosphate group. The lantibiotic decreased the mobility of the pentapeptide. Clausin did not interact with the water-soluble UDP-MurNAc- and pyrophosphoryl-MurNAc-pentapeptides, pointing out the importance of the hydrocarbon chain of the lipid target. PMID:19720027

  10. Specific interactions of clausin, a new lantibiotic, with lipid precursors of the bacterial cell wall.

    PubMed

    Bouhss, Ahmed; Al-Dabbagh, Bayan; Vincent, Michel; Odaert, Benoit; Aumont-Nicaise, Magalie; Bressolier, Philippe; Desmadril, Michel; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Urdaci, Maria C; Gallay, Jacques

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the specificity of interaction of a new type A lantibiotic, clausin, isolated from Bacillus clausii, with lipid intermediates of bacterial envelope biosynthesis pathways. Isothermal calorimetry and steady-state fluorescence anisotropy (with dansylated derivatives) identified peptidoglycan lipids I and II, embedded in dodecylphosphocholine micelles, as potential targets. Complex formation with dissociation constants of approximately 0.3 muM and stoichiometry of approximately 2:1 peptides/lipid intermediate was observed. The interaction is enthalpy-driven. For the first time, to our knowledge, we evidenced the interaction between a lantibiotic and C(55)-PP-GlcNAc, a lipid intermediate in the biosynthesis of other bacterial cell wall polymers, including teichoic acids. The pyrophosphate moiety of these lipid intermediates was crucial for the interaction because a strong binding with undecaprenyl pyrophosphate, accounting for 80% of the free energy of binding, was observed. No binding occurred with the undecaprenyl phosphate derivative. The pentapeptide and the N-acetylated sugar moieties strengthened the interaction, but their contributions were weaker than that of the pyrophosphate group. The lantibiotic decreased the mobility of the pentapeptide. Clausin did not interact with the water-soluble UDP-MurNAc- and pyrophosphoryl-MurNAc-pentapeptides, pointing out the importance of the hydrocarbon chain of the lipid target. PMID:19720027

  11. Vibrational Signatures of Conformer-Specific Intramolecular Interactions in Protonated Tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Pereverzev, Aleksandr Y; Cheng, Xiaolu; Nagornova, Natalia S; Reese, Diana L; Steele, Ryan P; Boyarkin, Oleg V

    2016-07-21

    Because of both experimental and computational challenges, protonated tryptophan has remained the last aromatic amino acid for which the intrinsic structures of low-energy conformers have not been unambiguously solved. The IR-IR-UV hole-burning spectroscopy technique has been applied to overcome the limitations of the commonly used IR-UV double resonance technique and to measure conformer-specific vibrational spectra of TrpH(+), cooled to T = 10 K. Anharmonic ab initio vibrational spectroscopy simulations unambiguously assign the dominant conformers to the two lowest-energy geometries from benchmark coupled-cluster structure computations. The match between experimental and ab initio spectra provides an unbiased validation of the calculated structures of the two experimentally observed conformers of this benchmark ion. Furthermore, the vibrational spectra provide conformer-specific signatures of the stabilizing interactions, including hydrogen bonding and an intramolecular cation-π interaction. PMID:27351636

  12. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Steffensen, Annette B; Acha, Moshe Rav; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lynch, Stacey N; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Brunak, Søren; Ellinor, Patrick T; Jukema, J Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W; Krijthe, Bouwe P; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Stricker, Bruno H; Nathoe, Hendrik M; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J; Asselbergs, Folkert W; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J; de Bakker, Paul I W; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated with complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS). We integrated the LQTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT-interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LQTS protein network to filter weak GWAS signals by identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to genes in the network supported by strong proteomic evidence. Three SNPs passing this filter reached genome-wide significance after replication genotyping. Overall, we present a general strategy to propose candidates in GWAS loci for functional studies and to systematically filter subtle association signals using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics. PMID:24952909

  13. Annotation of loci from genome-wide association studies using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lundby, Alicia; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Steffensen, Annette B.; Rav Acha, Moshe; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Pfeufer, Arne; Lynch, Stacey N.; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Brunak, Søren; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Jukema, J.Wouter; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Nathoe, Hendrik M.; Spiering, Wilko; Daly, Mark J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van der Harst, Pim; Milan, David J.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Lage, Kasper; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of loci associated wtih complex traits, but it is challenging to pinpoint causal genes in these loci and to exploit subtle association signals. We used tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics to map a network of five genes involved in the Mendelian disorder long QT syndrome (LQTS). We integrated the LQTS network with GWAS loci from the corresponding common complex trait, QT interval variation, to identify candidate genes that were subsequently confirmed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and zebrafish. We used the LQTS protein network to filter weak GWAS signals by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in proximity to genes in the network supported by strong proteomic evidence. Three SNPs passing this filter reached genome-wide significance after replication genotyping. Overall, we present a general strategy to propose candidates in GWAS loci for functional studies and to systematically filter subtle association signals using tissue-specific quantitative interaction proteomics. PMID:24952909

  14. Ion specific effects: decoupling ion-ion and ion-water interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinsuk; Kang, Tae Hui; Kim, Mahn Won; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Ion-specific effects in aqueous solution, known as the Hofmeister effect is prevalent in diverse systems ranging from pure ionic to complex protein solutions. The objective of this paper is to explicitly demonstrate how complex ion-ion and ion-water interactions manifest themselves in the Hofmeister effects, based on a series of recent experimental observation. These effects are not considered in the classical description of ion effects, such as the Deryaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory that, likely for that reason, fail to describe the origin of the phenomenological Hofmeister effect. However, given that models considering the basic forces of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions can offer rationalization for the core experimental observations, a universal interaction model stands a chance to be developed. In this perspective, we separately derive the contribution from ion-ion electrostatic interaction and ion-water interaction from second harmonic generation (SHG) data at the air-ion solution interface, which yields an estimate of ion-water interactions in solution. Hofmeister ion effects observed on biological solutes in solution should be similarly influenced by contributions from ion-ion and ion-water interactions, where the same ion-water interaction parameters derived from SHG data at the air-ion solution interface could be applicable. A key experimental data set available from solution systems to probe ion-water interaction is the modulation of water diffusion dynamics near ions in bulk ion solution, as well as near biological liposome surfaces. It is obtained from Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP), a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry technique. The surface water diffusivity is influenced by the contribution from ion-water interactions, both from localized surface charges and adsorbed ions, although the relative contribution of the former is larger on liposome surfaces. In this perspective, ion-water interaction

  15. The additive and interactive effects of parenting and temperament in predicting adjustment problems of children of divorce.

    PubMed

    Lengua, L J; Wolchik, S A; Sandler, I N; West, S G

    2000-06-01

    Investigated the interaction between parenting and temperament in predicting adjustment problems in children of divorce. The study utilized a sample of 231 mothers and children, 9 to 12 years old, who had experienced divorce within the previous 2 years. Both mothers' and children's reports on parenting, temperament, and adjustment variables were obtained and combined to create cross-reporter measures of the variables. Parenting and temperament were directly and independently related to outcomes consistent with an additive model of their effects. Significant interactions indicated that parental rejection was more strongly related to adjustment problems for children low in positive emotionality, and inconsistent discipline was more strongly related to adjustment problems for children high in impulsivity. These findings suggest that children who are high in impulsivity may be at greater risk for developing problems, whereas positive emotionality may operate as a protective factor, decreasing the risk of adjustment problems in response to negative parenting. PMID:10802832

  16. The Interaction of Language-Specific and Universal Factors During the Acquisition of Morphophonemic Alternations With Exceptions.

    PubMed

    Baer-Henney, Dinah; Kügler, Frank; van de Vijver, Ruben

    2015-09-01

    Using the artificial language paradigm, we studied the acquisition of morphophonemic alternations with exceptions by 160 German adult learners. We tested the acquisition of two types of alternations in two regularity conditions while additionally varying length of training. In the first alternation, a vowel harmony, backness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix. This process is grounded in substance (phonetic motivation), and this universal phonetic factor bolsters learning a generalization. In the second alternation, tenseness of the stem vowel determines backness of the suffix vowel. This process is not based in substance, but it reflects a phonotactic property of German and our participants benefit from this language-specific factor. We found that learners use both cues, while substantive bias surfaces mainly in the most unstable situation. We show that language-specific and universal factors interact in learning. PMID:25546633

  17. Specific Targeting of Caspase-9/PP2A Interaction as Potential New Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Arrouss, Issam; Nemati, Fariba; Roncal, Fernando; Wislez, Marie; Dorgham, Karim; Vallerand, David; Rabbe, Nathalie; Karboul, Narjesse; Carlotti, Françoise; Bravo, Jeronimo; Mazier, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Purpose PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase critical to physiological processes, including apoptosis. Cell penetrating peptides are molecules that can translocate into cells without causing membrane damage. Our goal was to develop cell-penetrating fusion peptides specifically designed to disrupt the caspase-9/PP2A interaction and evaluate their therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We generated a peptide containing a penetrating sequence associated to the interaction motif between human caspase-9 and PP2A (DPT-C9h), in order to target their association. Using tumour cell lines, primary human cells and primary human breast cancer (BC) xenografts, we investigated the capacity of DPT-C9h to provoke apoptosis in vitro and inhibition of tumour growth (TGI) in vivo. DPT-C9h was intraperitonealy administered at doses from 1 to 25 mg/kg/day for 5 weeks. Relative Tumour Volume (RTV) was calculated. Results We demonstrated that DPT-C9h specifically target caspase-9/PP2A interaction in vitro and in vivo and induced caspase-9-dependent apoptosis in cancer cell lines. DPT-C9h also induced significant TGI in BC xenografts models. The mouse-specific peptide DPT-C9 also induced TGI in lung (K-Ras model) and breast cancer (PyMT) models. DPT-C9h has a specific effect on transformed B cells isolated from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients without any effect on primary healthy cells. Finally, neither toxicity nor immunogenic responses were observed. Conclusion Using the cell-penetrating peptides blocking caspase-9/PP2A interactions, we have demonstrated that DPT-C9h had a strong therapeutic effect in vitro and in vivo in mouse models of tumour progression. PMID:23637769

  18. Signalling specificity of Ser/Thr protein kinases through docking-site-mediated interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Ricardo M; Nebreda, Angel R

    2003-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways use protein kinases for the modification of protein function by phosphorylation. A major question in the field is how protein kinases achieve the specificity required to regulate multiple cellular functions. Here we review recent studies that illuminate the mechanisms used by three families of Ser/Thr protein kinases to achieve substrate specificity. These kinases rely on direct docking interactions with substrates, using sites distinct from the phospho-acceptor sequences. Docking interactions also contribute to the specificity and regulation of protein kinase activities. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members can associate with and phosphorylate specific substrates by virtue of minor variations in their docking sequences. Interestingly, the same MAPK docking pocket that binds substrates also binds docking sequences of positive and negative MAPK regulators. In the case of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), the presence of a phosphate-binding site allows docking of previously phosphorylated (primed) substrates; this docking site is also required for the mechanism of GSK3 inhibition by phosphorylation. In contrast, non-primed substrates interact with a different region of GSK3. Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1) contains a hydrophobic pocket that interacts with a hydrophobic motif present in all known substrates, enabling their efficient phosphorylation. Binding of the substrate hydrophobic motifs to the pocket in the kinase domain activates PDK1 and other members of the AGC family of protein kinases. Finally, the analysis of protein kinase structures indicates that the sites used for docking substrates can also bind N- and C-terminal extensions to the kinase catalytic core and participate in the regulation of its activity. PMID:12600273

  19. Embodied comprehension of stories: interactions between language regions and modality-specific neural systems.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ho Ming; Mar, Raymond A; Xu, Yisheng; Liu, Siyuan; Wagage, Suraji; Braun, Allen R

    2014-02-01

    The embodied view of language processing proposes that comprehension involves multimodal simulations, a process that retrieves a comprehender's perceptual, motor, and affective knowledge through reactivation of the neural systems responsible for perception, action, and emotion. Although evidence in support of this idea is growing, the contemporary neuroanatomical model of language suggests that comprehension largely emerges as a result of interactions between frontotemporal language areas in the left hemisphere. If modality-specific neural systems are involved in comprehension, they are not likely to operate in isolation but should interact with the brain regions critical to language processing. However, little is known about the ways in which language and modality-specific neural systems interact. To investigate this issue, we conducted a functional MRI study in which participants listened to stories that contained visually vivid, action-based, and emotionally charged content. Activity of neural systems associated with visual-spatial, motor, and affective processing were selectively modulated by the relevant story content. Importantly, when functional connectivity patterns associated with the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG), the left posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG), and the bilateral anterior temporal lobes (aTL) were compared, both LIFG and pMTG, but not the aTL, showed enhanced connectivity with the three modality-specific systems relevant to the story content. Taken together, our results suggest that language regions are engaged in perceptual, motor, and affective simulations of the described situation, which manifest through their interactions with modality-specific systems. On the basis of our results and past research, we propose that the LIFG and pMTG play unique roles in multimodal simulations during story comprehension. PMID:24047383

  20. 0610009K11Rik, a testis-specific and germ cell nuclear receptor-interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Heng; Denhard, Leslie A.; Zhou Huaxin; Liu Lanhsin; Lan Zijian

    2008-02-22

    Using an in silico approach, a putative nuclear receptor-interacting protein 0610009K11Rik was identified in mouse testis. We named this gene testis-specific nuclear receptor-interacting protein-1 (Tnrip-1). Tnrip-1 was predominantly expressed in the testis of adult mouse tissues. Expression of Tnrip-1 in the testis was regulated during postnatal development, with robust expression in 14-day-old or older testes. In situ hybridization analyses showed that Tnrip-1 is highly expressed in pachytene spermatocytes and spermatids. Consistent with its mRNA expression, Tnrip-1 protein was detected in adult mouse testes. Immunohistochemical studies showed that Tnrip-1 is a nuclear protein and mainly expressed in pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed that endogenous Tnrip-1 protein can interact with germ cell nuclear receptor (GCNF) in adult mouse testes. Our results suggest that Tnrip-1 is a testis-specific and GCNF-interacting protein which may be involved in the modulation of GCNF-mediated gene transcription in spermatogenic cells within the testis.

  1. Structural disorder: a tool for housekeeping proteins performing tissue-specific interactions.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sanghita; De, Rajat K

    2016-09-01

    An interaction between a pair of proteins unique for a particular tissue is denoted as a tissue-specific interaction (TSI). Tissue-specific (TS) proteins always perform TSIs with a limited number of interacting partners. However, it has been claimed that housekeeping (HK) proteins frequently take part in TSIs. This is actually an unusual phenomenon. How a single HK protein mediates TSIs - remains an interesting yet an unsolved question. We have hypothesized that HK proteins have attained a high degree of structural flexibility to modulate TSIs efficiently. We have observed that HK proteins are selected to be intrinsically disordered compared to TS proteins. Therefore, the purposeful adaptation of structural disorder brings out special advantages for HK proteins compared to TS proteins. We have demonstrated that TSIs may play vital roles in shaping the molecular adaptation of disordered regions within HK proteins. We also have noticed that HK proteins, mediating a huge number of TSIs, have a greater portion of their interacting interfaces overlapped with the adjacent disordered segment. Moreover, these HK proteins, mediating TSIs, preferably adapt single domain (SD). We have concluded that HK proteins adapt a high degree of structural flexibility to mediate TSIs. Besides, having a SD along with structural flexibility is more economic than maintaining multiple domains with a rigid structure. This assists them in attaining various structural conformations upon binding to their partners, thereby designing an economically optimum molecular system. PMID:26375894

  2. Site-specific Interaction Mapping of Phosphorylated Ubiquitin to Uncover Parkin Activation.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Koji; Queliconi, Bruno B; Koyano, Fumika; Saeki, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2015-10-16

    Damaged mitochondria are eliminated through autophagy machinery. A cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, a gene product mutated in familial Parkinsonism, is essential for this pathway. Recent progress has revealed that phosphorylation of both Parkin and ubiquitin at Ser(65) by PINK1 are crucial for activation and recruitment of Parkin to the damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which phosphorylated ubiquitin associates with and activates phosphorylated Parkin E3 ligase activity remains largely unknown. Here, we analyze interactions between phosphorylated forms of both Parkin and ubiquitin at a spatial resolution of the amino acid residue by site-specific photo-crosslinking. We reveal that the in-between-RING (IBR) domain along with RING1 domain of Parkin preferentially binds to ubiquitin in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, another approach, the Fluoppi (fluorescent-based technology detecting protein-protein interaction) assay, also showed that pathogenic mutations in these domains blocked interactions with phosphomimetic ubiquitin in mammalian cells. Molecular modeling based on the site-specific photo-crosslinking interaction map combined with mass spectrometry strongly suggests that a novel binding mechanism between Parkin and ubiquitin leads to a Parkin conformational change with subsequent activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:26260794

  3. Interaction of urokinase with specific receptors stimulates mobilization of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Ziche, M.; Morbidelli, L. ); Magnelli, L.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1988-12-01

    On the basis of {sup 125}I-labeled plasminogen activator binding analysis the authors have found that bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells have specific receptors for human urinary-type plasminogen activator on the cell membrane. Each cell exposes about 37,000 free receptors with a K{sub d} of 0.8958{times}10{sup {minus}12} M. A monoclonal antibody against the 17,500 proteolytic fragment of the A chain of the plasminogen activator, not containing the catalytic site of the enzyme, impaired the specific binding, thus suggesting the involvement of a sequence present on the A chain in the interaction with the receptor, as previously shown in other cell model systems. Both the native molecule and the A chain are able to stimulate endothelial cell motility in the Boyden chamber, when used at nanomolar concentrations. The use of the same monoclonal antibody that can inhibit ligand-receptor interaction can impair the plasminogen activator and A-chain-induced endothelial cell motility, suggesting that under the conditions used in this in vitro model system, the motility of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells depends on the specific interaction of the ligand with free receptors on the surface of endothelial cells.

  4. Phosphorylation regulates the Star-PAP-PIPKIα interaction and directs specificity toward mRNA targets

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Nimmy; AP, Sudheesh; Francis, Nimmy; Anderson, Richard; Laishram, Rakesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Star-PAP is a nuclear non-canonical poly(A) polymerase (PAP) that shows specificity toward mRNA targets. Star-PAP activity is stimulated by lipid messenger phosphatidyl inositol 4,5 bisphoshate (PI4,5P2) and is regulated by the associated Type I phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase that synthesizes PI4,5P2 as well as protein kinases. These associated kinases act as coactivators of Star-PAP that regulates its activity and specificity toward mRNAs, yet the mechanism of control of these interactions are not defined. We identified a phosphorylated residue (serine 6, S6) on Star-PAP in the zinc finger region, the domain required for PIPKIα interaction. We show that S6 is phosphorylated by CKIα within the nucleus which is required for Star-PAP nuclear retention and interaction with PIPKIα. Unlike the CKIα mediated phosphorylation at the catalytic domain, Star-PAP S6 phosphorylation is insensitive to oxidative stress suggesting a signal mediated regulation of CKIα activity. S6 phosphorylation together with coactivator PIPKIα controlled select subset of Star-PAP target messages by regulating Star-PAP-mRNA association. Our results establish a novel role for phosphorylation in determining Star-PAP target mRNA specificity and regulation of 3′-end processing. PMID:26138484

  5. Extended intermolecular interactions in a serine protease-canonical inhibitor complex account for strong and highly specific inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Krisztián; Harmat, Veronika; Hetényi, Csaba; Kardos, József; Antal, József; Perczel, András; Patthy, András; Katona, Gergely; Gráf, László

    2005-07-01

    We have previously shown that a trypsin inhibitor from desert locust Schistocerca gregaria (SGTI) is a taxon-specific inhibitor that inhibits arthropod trypsins, such as crayfish trypsin, five orders of magnitude more effectively than mammalian trypsins. Thermal denaturation experiments, presented here, confirm the inhibition kinetics studies; upon addition of SGTI the melting temperatures of crayfish and bovine trypsins increased 27 degrees C and 4.5 degrees C, respectively. To explore the structural features responsible for this taxon specificity we crystallized natural crayfish trypsin in complex with chemically synthesized SGTI. This is the first X-ray structure of an arthropod trypsin and also the highest resolution (1.2A) structure of a trypsin-protein inhibitor complex reported so far. Structural data show that in addition to the primary binding loop, residues P3-P3' of SGTI, the interactions between SGTI and the crayfish enzyme are also extended over the P12-P4 and P4'-P5' regions. This is partly due to a structural change of region P10-P4 in the SGTI structure induced by binding of the inhibitor to crayfish trypsin. The comparison of SGTI-crayfish trypsin and SGTI-bovine trypsin complexes by structure-based calculations revealed a significant interaction energy surplus for the SGTI-crayfish trypsin complex distributed over the entire binding region. The new regions that account for stronger and more specific binding of SGTI to crayfish than to bovine trypsin offer new inhibitor sites to engineer in order to develop efficient and specific protease inhibitors for practical use. PMID:15922357

  6. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  7. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  8. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  9. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  10. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  11. Glycan specificity of myelin-associated glycoprotein and sialoadhesin deduced from interactions with synthetic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Strenge, K; Schauer, R; Bovin, N; Hasegawa, A; Ishida, H; Kiso, M; Kelm, S

    1998-12-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and sialoadhesin (Sn) bind to sialylated glycans on cell surfaces and are thought to be involved in cell-cell interactions. In order to investigate how the interactions of these proteins are influenced by the glycan structure, we compared the inhibitory potencies of different synthetic monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent polyacrylamide derivatives. Using oligosaccharides with modifications in the sialic acid, galactose or N-acetylglucosamine moieties, we could demonstrate that both MAG and Sn bind with high preference to alpha2,3-linked sialic acid and interact at least with the three terminal monosaccharide units. For MAG, contacts with even more distant monosaccharides are likely, since pentasaccharides are bound better than trisaccharides. Also, an additional sialic acid at position six of the third-terminal monosaccharide unit enhances binding to MAG, whereas it does not influence binding to Sn significantly. Modifications of the sialic acid glycerol side chain demonstrated that the hydroxy groups at positions 8 and 9 are required for binding to both proteins. Surprisingly, MAG binds 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nononic acid significantly better than N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas Sn prefers the latter structure. These results indicate that the interactions of MAG and Sn are mainly with sialic acid and that additional contacts with the subterminal galactose and N-acetylglucosamine residues also contribute to the binding strength, although to a lesser degree. PMID:9874234

  12. EVAPORATION: a new vapor pressure estimation method for organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2011-04-01

    We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects), a method to predict vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules needing only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T) is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: carbonyls, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

  13. An unusual RNA tertiary interaction has a role for the specific aminoacylation of a transfer RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Y M; Westhof, E; Giegé, R

    1993-01-01

    The nucleotides in a tRNA that specifically interact with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase have been found largely located in the helical stems, the anticodon, or the discriminator base, where they vary from one tRNA to another. The conserved and semiconserved nucleotides that are responsible for the tRNA tertiary structure have been shown to have little role in synthetase recognition. Here we report that aminoacylation of Escherichia coli tRNA(Cys) depends on the anticodon, the discriminator base, and a tertiary interaction between the semiconserved nucleotides at positions 15 and 48. While all other tRNAs contain a purine at position 15 and a complementary pyrimidine at position 48 that establish the tertiary interaction known as the Levitt pair, E. coli tRNA(Cys) has guanosine -15 and -48. Replacement of guanosine -15 or -48 with cytidine virtually eliminates aminoacylation. Structural analyses with chemical probes suggest that guanosine -15 and -48 interact through hydrogen bonds between the exocyclic N-2 and ring N-3 to stabilize the joining of the two long helical stems of the tRNA. This tertiary interaction is different from the traditional base pairing scheme in the Levitt pair, where hydrogen bonds would form between N-1 and O-6. Our results provide evidence for a role of RNA tertiary structure in synthetase recognition. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8341698

  14. Cortical EEG alpha rhythms reflect task-specific somatosensory and motor interactions in humans.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Claudio; Del Percio, Claudio; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Soricelli, Andrea; Romani, Gian Luca; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Capotosto, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    Anticipating sensorimotor events allows adaptive reactions to environment with crucial implications for self-protection and survival. Here we review several studies of our group that aimed to test the hypothesis that the cortical processes preparing the elaboration of sensorimotor interaction is reflected by the reduction of anticipatory electroencephalographic alpha power (about 8-12Hz; event-related desynchronization, ERD), as an index that regulate task-specific sensorimotor processes, accounted by high-alpha sub-band (10-12Hz), rather than a general tonic alertness, accounted by low-alpha sub-band (8-10Hz). In this line, we propose a model for human cortical processes anticipating warned sensorimotor interactions. Overall, we reported a stronger high-alpha ERD before painful than non-painful somatosensory stimuli that is also predictive of the subjective evaluation of pain intensity. Furthermore, we showed that anticipatory high-alpha ERD increased before sensorimotor interactions between non-painful or painful stimuli and motor demands involving opposite hands. In contrast, sensorimotor interactions between painful somatosensory and sensorimotor demands involving the same hand decreased anticipatory high-alpha ERD, due to a sort of sensorimotor "gating" effect. In conclusion, we suggest that anticipatory cortical high-alpha rhythms reflect the central interference and/or integration of ascending (sensory) and descending (motor) signals relative to one or two hands before non-painful and painful sensorimotor interactions. PMID:24929901

  15. Interaction of cucurbitacins with human serum albumin: Thermodynamic characteristics and influence on the binding of site specific ligands.

    PubMed

    Abou-Khalil, Rony; Jraij, Alia; Magdalou, Jacques; Ouaini, Naïm; Tome, Daniel; Greige-Gerges, Hélène

    2009-06-01

    Cucurbitacins (Cuc) are cytotoxic oxygenated triterpenes. Their binding to albumin may control their diffusion and consequently their biological effects. The specific binding site of Cuc to albumin is important to be defined as it could determine some of the drug interactions of the compounds. This paper deals with the interaction between human serum albumin and a series of four cucurbitacins (B, D, E and I) measured by fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies. Cuc B and E at C25, are the acetylated forms of Cuc D and I. The binding parameters (K(a) and n) of Cuc B, D and E to albumin were determined at 288, 293, 298 and 303K. Cuc B possesses the higher binding constant (K(a)) values followed by Cuc E and D. The thermodynamic parameters DeltaH, DeltaG and DeltaS were calculated. They indicated hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions for Cuc B, hydrophobic interaction for Cuc E, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions for Cuc D. In addition to bilirubin, Cuc B, D, and E increased the binding constant values for warfarin to albumin, whereas they did not affect the binding of other ligands of site I such as chloroform and salicylate. The increase of the K(a) values of warfarin and bilirubin was associated with an increase of the binding constant value of cucurbitacin to albumin. Cuc I did not bind to albumin and could be considered less capable to affect the interaction of ligands to albumin than Cuc B, D and E. CD spectra indicated that Cuc binding to HSA was not associated with substantial structural changes of the protein. PMID:19380237

  16. Specific anion effects on the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential.

    PubMed

    Möller, Johannes; Grobelny, Sebastian; Schulze, Julian; Steffen, Andre; Bieder, Steffen; Paulus, Michael; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2014-04-28

    We present a study on ion specific effects on the intermolecular interaction potential V(r) of dense protein solutions under high hydrostatic pressure conditions. Small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with a liquid-state theoretical approach was used to determine the effect of structure breaking/making salt anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), PO4(3-)) on the intermolecular interaction of lysozyme molecules. It was found that besides the Debye-Hückel charge screening effect, reducing the repulsiveness of the interaction potential V(r) at low salt concentrations, a specific ion effect is observed at high salt concentrations for the multivalent kosmotropic anions, which modulates also the pressure dependence of the protein-protein interaction potential. Whereas sulfate and phosphate strongly influence the pressure dependence of V(r), chloride anions do not. The strong structure-making effect of the multivalent anions, dominating for the triply charged PO4(3-), renders the solution structure less bulk-water-like at high salt concentrations, which leads to an altered behavior of the pressure dependence of V(r). Hence, the particular structural properties of the salt solutions are able to influence the spatial organization and the intermolecular interactions of the proteins, in particular upon compression. These results are of interest for exploring the combined effects of ionic strength, temperature and pressure on the phase behavior of protein solutions, but may also be of relevance for understanding pressure effects on the hydration behavior of biological matter under extreme environmental conditions. PMID:24626853

  17. Responses of absolute and specific soil enzyme activities to long term additions of organic and mineral fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Dong, Wenyi; Dai, Xiaoqin; Schaeffer, Sean; Yang, Fengting; Radosevich, Mark; Xu, Lili; Liu, Xiyu; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-12-01

    Long-term phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) applications may seriously affect soil microbial activity. A long-term field fertilizer application trial was established on reddish paddy soils in the subtropical region of southern China in 1998. We assessed the effects of swine manure and seven different rates or ratios of NPK fertilizer treatments on (1) the absolute and specific enzyme activities per unit of soil organic carbon (SOC) or microbial biomass carbon (MBC) involved in C, N, and P transformations and (2) their relationships with soil environmental factors and soil microbial community structures. The results showed that manure applications led to increases in the absolute and specific activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase(βG), β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The absolute and specific acid phosphatase (AP) activities decreased as mineral P fertilizer application rates and ratios increased. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that there were negative correlations between absolute and specific AP activities, pH, and total P contents, while there were positive correlations between soil absolute and specific βG, NAG, and LAP enzyme activities, and SOC and total N contents. RDA showed that the contents of actinomycete and Gram-positive bacterium PLFA biomarkers are more closely related to the absolute and specific enzyme activities than the other PLFA biomarkers (P<0.01). Our results suggest that both the absolute and specific enzyme activities could be used as sensitive soil quality indicators that provide useful linkages with the microbial community structures and environmental factors. To maintain microbial activity and to minimize environmental impacts, P should be applied as a combination of inorganic and organic forms, and total P fertilizer application rates to subtropical paddy soils should not exceed 44 kg P ha(-1) year(-1). PMID:26196069

  18. In vivo interaction of the Escherichia coli integration host factor with its specific binding sites.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, M; Boccard, F; Murtin, C; Prentki, P; Geiselmann, J

    1995-08-11

    The histone-like protein integration host factor (IHF) of Escherichia coli binds to specific binding sites on the chromosome or on mobile genetic elements, and is involved in many cellular processes. We have analyzed the interaction of IHF with five different binding sites in vitro and in vivo using UV laser footprinting, a technique that probes the immediate environment and conformation of a segment of DNA. Using this generally applicable technique we can directly compare the binding modes and interaction strengths of a DNA binding protein in its physiological environment within the cell to measurements performed in vitro. We conclude that the interactions between IHF and its specific binding sites are identical in vitro and in vivo. The footprinting signal is consistent with the model of IHF-binding to DNA proposed by Yang and Nash (1989). The occupancy of binding sites varies with the concentration of IHF in the cell and allows to estimate the concentration of free IHF protein in the cell. PMID:7659518

  19. In vivo interaction of the Escherichia coli integration host factor with its specific binding sites.

    PubMed

    Engelhorn, M; Boccard, F; Murtin, C; Prentki, P; Geiselmann, J

    1995-09-11

    The histone-like protein integration host factor (IHF) of Escherichia coli binds to specific binding sites on the chromosome or on mobile genetic elements, and is involved in many cellular processes. We have analyzed the interaction of IHF with five different binding sites in vitro and in vivo using UV laser footprinting, a technique that probes the immediate environment and conformation of a segment of DNA. Using this generally applicable technique we can directly compare the binding modes and interaction strengths of a DNA binding protein in its physiological environment within the cell to measurements performed in vitro. We conclude that the interactions between IHF and its specific binding sites are identical in vitro and in vivo. The footprinting signal is consistent with the model of IHF-binding to DNA proposed by Yang and Nash (1989). The occupancy of binding sites varies with the concentration of IHF in the cell and allows to estimate the concentration of free IHF protein in the cell. PMID:7567442

  20. Electrophysiological characterization of specific interactions between bacterial sensory rhodopsins and their transducers

    PubMed Central

    Schmies, G.; Engelhard, M.; Wood, P. G.; Nagel, G.; Bamberg, E.

    2001-01-01

    The halobacterial phototaxis receptors sensory rhodopsin I and II (SRI, SRII) enable the bacteria to seek optimal light conditions for ion pumping by bacteriorhodopsin and/or halorhodopsin. The incoming signal is transferred across the plasma membrane by means of receptor-specific transducer proteins that bind tightly to their corresponding photoreceptors. To investigate the receptor/transducer interaction, advantage is taken of the observation that both SRI and SRII can function as proton pumps. SRI from Halobacterium salinarum, which triggers the positive phototaxis, the photophobic receptor SRII from Natronobacterium pharaonis (pSRII), as well as the mutant pSRII-F86D were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Voltage-clamp studies confirm that SRI and pSRII function as light-driven, outwardly directed proton pumps with a much stronger voltage dependence than the ion pumps bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin. Coexpression of SRI and pSRII-F86D with their corresponding transducers suppresses the proton transport, revealing a tight binding and specific interaction of the two proteins. These latter results may be exploited to further analyze the binding interaction of the photoreceptors with their downstream effectors. PMID:11171989

  1. On the Role of Specific Interactions in the Diffusion of Nanoparticles in Aqueous Polymer Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Understanding nanoparticle diffusion within non-Newtonian biological and synthetic fluids is essential in designing novel formulations (e.g., nanomedicines for drug delivery, shampoos, lotions, coatings, paints, etc.), but is presently poorly defined. This study reports the diffusion of thiolated and PEGylated silica nanoparticles, characterized by small-angle neutron scattering, in solutions of various water-soluble polymers such as poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) probed using NanoSight nanoparticle tracking analysis. Results show that the diffusivity of nanoparticles is affected by their dimensions, medium viscosity, and, in particular, the specific interactions between nanoparticles and the macromolecules in solution; strong attractive interactions such as hydrogen bonding hamper diffusion. The water-soluble polymers retarded the diffusion of thiolated particles in the order PEO > PVP > PAA > HEC whereas for PEGylated silica particles retardation followed the order PAA > PVP = HEC > PEO. In the absence of specific interactions with the medium, PEGylated nanoparticles exhibit enhanced mobility compared to their thiolated counterparts despite some increase in their dimensions. PMID:24354390

  2. An additive interaction between the NFκB and estrogen receptor signalling pathways in human endometrial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    King, A.E.; Collins, F.; Klonisch, T.; Sallenave, J.-M.; Critchley, H.O.D.; Saunders, P.T.K.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Human embryo implantation is regulated by estradiol (E2), progesterone and locally produced mediators including interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Interactions between the estrogen receptor (ER) and NF kappa B (NFκB) signalling pathways have been reported in other systems but have not been detailed in human endometrium. METHODS AND RESULTS Real-time PCR showed that mRNA for the p65 and p105 NFκB subunits is maximally expressed in endometrium from the putative implantation window. Both subunits are localized in the endometrial epithelium throughout the menstrual cycle. Reporter assays for estrogen response element (ERE) activity were used to examine functional interactions between ER and NFκB in telomerase immortalized endometrial epithelial cells (TERT-EEC). E2 and IL-1β treatment of TERT-EECs enhances ERE activity by a NFκB and ER dependent mechanism; this effect could be mediated by ERα or ERβ. E2 and IL-1β also positively interact to increase endogenous gene expression of prostaglandin E synthase and c-myc. This is a gene-dependent action as there is no additive effect on cyclin D1 or progesterone receptor expression. CONCLUSION In summary, we have established that NFκB signalling proteins are expressed in normal endometrium and report that IL-1β can enhance the actions of E2 in a cell line derived from healthy endometrium. This mechanism may allow IL-1β, possibly from the developing embryo, to modulate the function of the endometrial epithelium to promote successful implantation, for example by regulating prostaglandin production. Aberrations in the interaction between the ER and NFκB signalling pathways may have a negative impact on implantation contributing to pathologies such as early pregnancy loss and infertility. PMID:19955102

  3. Multiple Stressors in Agricultural Streams: A Mesocosm Study of Interactions among Raised Water Temperature, Sediment Addition and Nutrient Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Jeremy J.; Lange, Katharina; Townsend, Colin R.; Matthaei, Christoph D.

    2012-01-01

    Changes to land use affect streams through nutrient enrichment, increased inputs of sediment and, where riparian vegetation has been removed, raised water temperature. We manipulated all three stressors in experimental streamside channels for 30 days and determined the individual and pair-wise combined effects on benthic invertebrate and algal communities and on leaf decay, a measure of ecosystem functioning. We added nutrients (phosphorus+nitrogen; high, intermediate, natural) and/or sediment (grain size 0.2 mm; high, intermediate, natural) to 18 channels supplied with water from a nearby stream. Temperature was increased by 1.4°C in half the channels, simulating the loss of upstream and adjacent riparian shade. Sediment affected 93% of all biological response variables (either as an individual effect or via an interaction with another stressor) generally in a negative manner, while nutrient enrichment affected 59% (mostly positive) and raised temperature 59% (mostly positive). More of the algal components of the community responded to stressors acting individually than did invertebrate components, whereas pair-wise stressor interactions were more common in the invertebrate community. Stressors interacted often and in a complex manner, with interactions between sediment and temperature most common. Thus, the negative impact of high sediment on taxon richness of both algae and invertebrates was stronger at raised temperature, further reducing biodiversity. In addition, the decay rate of leaf material (strength loss) accelerated with nutrient enrichment at ambient but not at raised temperature. A key implication of our findings for resource managers is that the removal of riparian shading from streams already subjected to high sediment inputs, or land-use changes that increase erosion or nutrient runoff in a landscape without riparian buffers, may have unexpected effects on stream health. We highlight the likely importance of intact or restored buffer strips, both

  4. Interactions of non-natural halogenated substrates with D-specific dehalogenase (DehD) mutants using in silico studies

    PubMed Central

    Sudi, Ismaila Yada; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul; Huyop, Fahrul

    2014-01-01

    The D-2-haloacid dehalogenase of D-specific dehalogenase (DehD) from Rhizobium sp. RC1 catalyses the hydrolytic dehalogenation of D-haloalkanoic acids, inverting the substrate-product configuration and thereby forming the corresponding L-hydroxyalkanoic acids. Our investigations were focused on DehD mutants: R134A and Y135A. We examined the possible interactions between these mutants with haloalkanoic acids and characterized the key catalytic residues in the wild-type dehalogenase, to design dehalogenase enzyme(s) with improved potential for dehalogenation of a wider range of substrates. Three natural substrates of wild-type DehD, specifically, monochloroacetate, monobromoacetate and D,L-2,3-dichloropropionate, and eight other non-natural haloalkanoic acids substrates of DehD, namely, L-2-chloropropionate; L-2-bromopropionate; 2,2-dichloropropionate; dichloroacetate; dibromoacetate; trichloroacetate; tribromoacetate; and 3-chloropropionate, were docked into the active site of the DehD mutants R134A and Y135A, which produced altered catalytic functions. The mutants interacted strongly with substrates that wild-type DehD does not interact with or degrade. The interaction was particularly enhanced with 3-chloropropionate, in addition to monobromoacetate, monochloroacetate and D,L-2,3-dichloropropionate. In summary, DehD variants R134A and Y135A demonstrated increased propensity for binding haloalkanoic acid and were non-stereospecific towards halogenated substrates. The improved characteristics in these mutants suggest that their functionality could be further exploited and harnessed in bioremediations and biotechnological applications. PMID:26019583

  5. Cation-specific effects on enzymatic catalysis driven by interactions at the tunnel mouth.

    PubMed

    Štěpánková, Veronika; Paterová, Jana; Damborský, Jiří; Jungwirth, Pavel; Chaloupková, Radka; Heyda, Jan

    2013-05-30

    Cationic specificity which follows the Hofmeister series has been established for the catalytic efficiency of haloalkane dehalogenase LinB by a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and enzyme kinetic experiments. Simulations provided a detailed molecular picture of cation interactions with negatively charged residues on the protein surface, particularly at the tunnel mouth leading to the enzyme active site. On the basis of the binding affinities, cations were ordered as Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+) > Cs(+). In agreement with this result, a steady-state kinetic analysis disclosed that the smaller alkali cations influence formation and productivity of enzyme-substrate complexes more efficiently than the larger ones. A subsequent systematic investigation of two LinB mutants with engineered charge in the cation-binding site revealed that the observed cation affinities are enhanced by increasing the number of negatively charged residues at the tunnel mouth, and vice versa, reduced by decreasing this number. However, the cation-specific effects are overwhelmed by strong electrostatic interactions in the former case. Interestingly, the substrate inhibition of the mutant LinB L177D in the presence of chloride salts was 7 times lower than that of LinB wild type in glycine buffer. Our work provides new insight into the mechanisms of specific cation effects on enzyme activity and suggests a potential strategy for suppression of substrate inhibition by the combination of protein and medium engineering. PMID:23627286

  6. Improving Dispersion of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in a Polymer Matrix Using Specific Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Rasheed, Asif; Dadmun, Mark D; Ivanov, Ilia N; Britt, Phillip F; Geohegan, David B

    2006-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to improve the dispersion of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a copolymer matrix by tuning hydrogen-bonding interactions to enhance dispersion. Nanocomposites of single-walled carbon nanotubes and copolymers of styrene and vinyl phenol (PSVPh) with varying vinyl phenol content were produced and examined. The dispersion of the SWNT in the polymer matrix is quantified by optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy is also used to investigate preferred interactions between the SWNTs and the copolymers via the shift in the D* Raman band of the SWNTs in the composites. All composites show regions of SWNT aggregates; however, the aggregate size varies with composition of the PSVPh copolymer and the amount of SWNT oxidation. Optimal dispersion of the SWNT is observed in PSVPh with 20% vinyl phenol and oxidized nanotubes, which correlates with spectroscopic evidence that indicates that this system also incorporates the most interactions between SWNT and polymer matrix. These results are in agreement with previous studies that indicate that optimizing the extent of specific interactions between a polymer matrix and nanoscale filler enables the efficient dispersion of the nanofillers.

  7. Inter-specific interactions linking predation and scavenging in terrestrial vertebrate assemblages.

    PubMed

    Moleón, Marcos; Sánchez-Zapata, José A; Selva, Nuria; Donázar, José A; Owen-Smith, Norman

    2014-11-01

    Predation and scavenging have been classically understood as independent processes, with predator-prey interactions and scavenger-carrion relationships occurring separately. However, the mere recognition that most predators also scavenge at variable rates, which has been traditionally ignored in food-web and community ecology, leads to a number of emergent interaction routes linking predation and scavenging. The general goal of this review is to draw attention to the main inter-specific interactions connecting predators (particularly, large mammalian carnivores), their live prey (mainly ungulates), vultures and carrion production in terrestrial assemblages of vertebrates. Overall, we report an intricate network of both direct (competition, facilitation) and indirect (hyperpredation, hypopredation) processes, and provide a conceptual framework for the future development of this promising topic in ecological, evolutionary and biodiversity conservation research. The classic view that scavenging does not affect the population dynamics of consumed organisms is questioned, as multiple indirect top-down effects emerge when considering carrion and its facultative consumption by predators as fundamental and dynamic components of food webs. Stimulating although challenging research opportunities arise from the study of the interactions among living and detrital or non-living resource pools in food webs. PMID:24602047

  8. Interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with diatoms: regulated protease excretion for specific algal lysis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Carsten; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Interactions of planktonic bacteria with primary producers such as diatoms have great impact on plankton population dynamics. Several studies described the detrimental effect of certain bacteria on diatoms but the biochemical nature and the regulation mechanism involved in the production of the active compounds remained often elusive. Here, we investigated the interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with the marine diatoms Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Chaetoceros didymus. Algicidal activity was only observed towards the first three of the tested diatom species while C. didymus proved to be not susceptible. The cell free filtrate and the >30 kDa fraction of stationary K. algicida cultures is fully active, suggesting a secreted algicidal principle. The active supernatant from bacterial cultures exhibited high protease activity and inhibition experiments proved that these enzymes are involved in the observed algicidal action of the bacteria. Protease mediated interactions are not controlled by the presence of the alga but dependent on the cell density of the K. algicida culture. We show that protease release is triggered by cell free bacterial filtrates suggesting a quorum sensing dependent excretion mechanism of the algicidal protein. The K. algicida / algae interactions in the plankton are thus host specific and under the control of previously unidentified factors. PMID:21695044

  9. Specific Roles of MicroRNAs in Their Interactions with Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Cui, Qinghua

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression by modulating numerous target mRNAs expression at posttranscriptional level. Extensive studies have shown that miRNAs are critical in various important biological processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, development, and apoptosis. In terms of their importance, miRNA dysfunction has been associated with a broad range of diseases. Increased number of studies have shown that miRNAs can functionally interact with a wide spectrum of environmental factors (EFs) including drugs, industrial materials, virus and bacterial pathogens, cigarette smoking, alcohol, nutrition, sleep, exercise, stress, and radiation. More importantly, the interactions between miRNAs and EFs have been shown to play critical roles in determining abnormal phenotypes and diseases. In this paper, we propose an outline of the current knowledge about specific roles of miRNAs in their interactions with various EFs and analyze the literatures detailing miRNAs-EFs interactions in the context of various of diseases. PMID:23209884

  10. Interactions of the Algicidal Bacterium Kordia algicida with Diatoms: Regulated Protease Excretion for Specific Algal Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Carsten; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Interactions of planktonic bacteria with primary producers such as diatoms have great impact on plankton population dynamics. Several studies described the detrimental effect of certain bacteria on diatoms but the biochemical nature and the regulation mechanism involved in the production of the active compounds remained often elusive. Here, we investigated the interactions of the algicidal bacterium Kordia algicida with the marine diatoms Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira weissflogii, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and Chaetoceros didymus. Algicidal activity was only observed towards the first three of the tested diatom species while C. didymus proved to be not susceptible. The cell free filtrate and the >30 kDa fraction of stationary K. algicida cultures is fully active, suggesting a secreted algicidal principle. The active supernatant from bacterial cultures exhibited high protease activity and inhibition experiments proved that these enzymes are involved in the observed algicidal action of the bacteria. Protease mediated interactions are not controlled by the presence of the alga but dependent on the cell density of the K. algicida culture. We show that protease release is triggered by cell free bacterial filtrates suggesting a quorum sensing dependent excretion mechanism of the algicidal protein. The K. algicida / algae interactions in the plankton are thus host specific and under the control of previously unidentified factors. PMID:21695044

  11. Interaction of enterocyte FABPs with phospholipid membranes: clues for specific physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Falomir-Lockhart, Lisandro J; Franchini, Gisela R; Guerbi, María Ximena; Storch, Judith; Córsico, Betina

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal and liver fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP and LFABP, respectively) are cytosolic soluble proteins with the capacity to bind and transport hydrophobic ligands between different sub-cellular compartments. Their functions are still not clear but they are supposed to be involved in lipid trafficking and metabolism, cell growth, and regulation of several other processes, like cell differentiation. Here we investigated the interaction of these proteins with different models of phospholipid membrane vesicles in order to achieve further insight into their specificity within the enterocyte. A combination of biophysical and biochemical techniques allowed us to determine affinities of these proteins to membranes, the way phospholipid composition and vesicle size and curvature modulate such interaction, as well as the effect of protein binding on the integrity of the membrane structure. We demonstrate here that, besides their apparently opposite ligand transfer mechanisms, both LFABP and IFABP are able to interact with phospholipid membranes, but the factors that modulate such interactions are different for each protein, further implying different roles for IFABP and LFABP in the intracellular context. These results contribute to the proposed central role of intestinal FABPs in the lipid traffic within enterocytes as well as in the regulation of more complex cellular processes. PMID:21539932

  12. Can Specific Protein-Lipid Interactions Stabilize an Active State of the Beta 2 Adrenergic Receptor?

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Herce, Henry D; Pomès, Régis; García, Angel E

    2015-10-20

    G-protein-coupled receptors are eukaryotic membrane proteins with broad biological and pharmacological relevance. Like all membrane-embedded proteins, their location and orientation are influenced by lipids, which can also impact protein function via specific interactions. Extensive simulations totaling 0.25 ms reveal a process in which phospholipids from the membrane's cytosolic leaflet enter the empty G-protein binding site of an activated β2 adrenergic receptor and form salt-bridge interactions that inhibit ionic lock formation and prolong active-state residency. Simulations of the receptor embedded in an anionic membrane show increased lipid binding, providing a molecular mechanism for the experimental observation that anionic lipids can enhance receptor activity. Conservation of the arginine component of the ionic lock among Rhodopsin-like G-protein-coupled receptors suggests that intracellular lipid ingression between receptor helices H6 and H7 may be a general mechanism for active-state stabilization. PMID:26488656

  13. Transient Interactions of a Cytosolic Protein with Macromolecular and Vesicular Cosolutes: Unspecific and Specific Effects.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, Alberto; Busato, Mirko; Pérez Santero, Silvia; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Musiani, Francesco; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Cytosolic proteins do not occur as isolated but are exposed to many interactions within a crowded cellular environment. We investigated the associations between a test cytosolic protein, human ileal bile acid binding protein (IBABP), and model cosolutes mimicking macromolecular and lipid membrane intracellular components. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, heteronuclear NMR, and molecular dynamics, we found that IBABP associated weakly with anionic lipid vesicles and experienced transient unspecific contacts with albumin. Localized dynamic perturbations were observed even in the case of apparent unspecific binding. IBABP and ubiquitin did not display mutually attractive forces, whereas IBABP associated specifically with lysozyme. A structural model of the IBABP-lysozyme complex was obtained by data-driven docking simulation. Presumably, all the interactions shown here contribute to modulating functional communication of a protein in its native environment. PMID:26449487

  14. 77 FR 58499 - Substitution of Term in a Definition; Addition and Adoption of the Use of Specific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... 51-1 continues to read as follows: Authority: 56 FR 48976, Sept. 26, 1991, unless otherwise noted. 0... ``disabled'' for ``handicapped'' in a term defined in its regulation. Additionally, the Committee has... program; however, within the Committee's regulation, the terms other severely handicapped and...

  15. Interaction between Major Nitrogen Regulatory Protein NIT2 and Pathway-Specific Regulatory Factor NIT4 Is Required for Their Synergistic Activation of Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bo; Marzluf, George A.

    1998-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the major nitrogen regulatory protein, NIT2, a member of the GATA family of transcription factors, controls positively the expression of numerous genes which specify nitrogen catabolic enzymes. Expression of the highly regulated structural gene nit-3, which encodes nitrate reductase, is dependent upon a synergistic interaction of NIT2 with a pathway-specific control protein, NIT4, a member of the GAL4 family of fungal regulatory factors. The NIT2 and NIT4 proteins both bind at specific recognition elements in the nit-3 promoter, but, in addition, we show that a direct protein-protein interaction between NIT2 and NIT4 is essential for optimal expression of the nit-3 structural gene. Neurospora possesses at least five different GATA factors which control different areas of cellular function, but which have a similar DNA binding specificity. Significantly, only NIT2, of the several Neurospora GATA factors examined, interacts with NIT4. We propose that protein-protein interactions of the individual GATA factors with additional pathway-specific regulatory factors determine each of their specific regulatory functions. PMID:9632783

  16. Kpna7 interacts with egg-specific nuclear factors in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Ma, Hao; Fu, Liyuan; Yao, Jianbo

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear proteins are required for the initiation of transcription in early embryos before embryonic genome activation. The regulated transport of nuclear proteins is mediated by factors known as importins (karyopherins). Kpna7, a newly discovered member of the importin α family, is critical for early development in mammals. In this study, we characterize rainbow trout Kpna7. The cDNA for rainbow trout Kpna7 encodes a 519 amino acid protein that contains a conserved importin β binding (IBB) domain and seven armadillo/beta-catenin-like repeat (ARM) motifs. Reverse-transcriptase PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that Kpna7 is specifically expressed in eggs/ovary. Real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that expression of Kpna7 mRNA is high in unfertilized eggs, gradually decreases in early-stage embryos until 3 days post-fertilization, and declines sharply thereafter, reaching a level that is barely detectable in 4-day-old embryos. Using a yeast two-hybrid screening system, we identified two Kpna7-interacting proteins from a rainbow trout egg cDNA library: Stl3 (rhamnose-binding lectin 3) and an uncharacterized protein. Both genes appear to be expressed specifically in eggs/testis. Co-immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the interaction between Kpna7 and Stl3, and co-transfection experiments using EGFP-tagged Stl3 showed that Kpna7 facilitates the nuclear transport of Stl3 through an interaction with the predicted nuclear-localization signal cluster at the carboxy-terminus of Stl3. Our data suggest that Kpna7 may function in early embryonic development as a unique nuclear transporter for egg-specific proteins. PMID:25511304

  17. Pulmonary Surfactant Model Systems Catch the Specific Interaction of an Amphiphilic Peptide with Anionic Phospholipid

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Hiromichi; Lee, Sannamu; Shibata, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Interfacial behavior was studied in pulmonary surfactant model systems containing an amphiphilic α-helical peptide (Hel 13-5), which consists of 13 hydrophobic and five hydrophilic amino acid residues. Fully saturated phospholipids of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) were utilized to understand specific interactions between anionic DPPG and cationic Hel 13-5 for pulmonary functions. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms of DPPG/Hel 13-5 and DPPC/DPPG (4:1, mol/mol)/Hel 13-5 preparations were measured to obtain basic information on the phase behavior under compression and expansion processes. The interaction leads to a variation in squeeze-out surface pressures against a mole fraction of Hel 13-5, where Hel 13-5 is eliminated from the surface on compression. The phase behavior was visualized by means of Brewster angle microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. At low surface pressures, the formation of differently ordered domains in size and shape is induced by electrostatic interactions. The domains independently grow upon compression to high surface pressures, especially in the DPPG/Hel 13-5 system. Under the further compression process, protrusion masses are formed in AFM images in the vicinity of squeeze-out pressures. The protrusion masses, which are attributed to the squeezed-out Hel 13-5, grow larger in lateral size with increasing DPPG content in phospholipid compositions. During subsequent expansion up to 35 mN m−1, the protrusions retain their height and lateral diameter for the DPPG/Hel 13-5 system, whereas the protrusions become smaller for the DPPC/Hel 13-5 and DPPC/DPPG/Hel 13-5 systems due to a reentrance of the ejected Hel 13-5 into the surface. In this work we detected for the first time, to our knowledge, a remarkably large hysteresis loop for cyclic ΔV-A isotherms of the binary DPPG/Hel 13-5 preparation. This exciting phenomenon

  18. Specific interactions between amyloid-β peptide and curcumin derivatives: Ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Kadoya, Ryushi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Murakawa, Takeru; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, it is effective to inhibit the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases. However, because the secretases also play important roles to produce vital proteins for human body, inhibitors for the secretases may have side effects. To propose new agents for protecting the cleavage site of APP from the attacking of the γ-secretase, we have investigated here the specific interactions between a short APP peptide and curcumin derivatives, using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations.

  19. Ab initio molecular simulations on specific interactions between amyloid beta and monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kazuya; Okamoto, Akisumi; Yano, Atsushi; Higai, Shin'ichi; Kondo, Takashi; Kamba, Seiji; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2012-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which is a key pathogenetic event in Alzheimer's disease, can be caused by cell-surface saccharides. We here investigated stable structures of the solvated complexes of Aβ with some types of monosaccharides using molecular simulations based on protein-ligand docking and classical molecular mechanics methods. Moreover, the specific interactions between Aβ and the monosaccharides were elucidated at an electronic level by ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations. Based on the results, we proposed which type of monosaccharide prefers to have large binding affinity to Aβ and inhibit the Aβ aggregation.

  20. A Stable Mutant Predisposes Antibody Domains to Amyloid Formation through Specific Non-Native Interactions.

    PubMed

    Nokwe, Cardine N; Hora, Manuel; Zacharias, Martin; Yagi, Hisashi; Peschek, Jirka; Reif, Bernd; Goto, Yuji; Buchner, Johannes

    2016-03-27

    The aggregation of mostly antibody light chain variable (VL) domains into amyloid fibrils in various tissues is the main cause of death in systemic amyloid light chain amyloidosis. Point mutations within the domain are important to shift the VL into the fibrillar pathway, but why and how only some site-specific mutations achieve this still remains elusive. We show here that both destabilizing and surprisingly stable mutants readily predispose an amyloid-resistant VL domain to amyloid formation. The decreased thermodynamic stability of the destabilizing mutant results in the accumulation of non-native intermediates that readily populate the amyloid state. Interestingly, the stable mutants establish site-specific non-native interactions with especially nearby serine/threonine residues that unexpectedly do not affect the folding behavior of the VL domain but rather readily induce and stabilize the fibril structure, a previously unrecognized mechanism. These findings provide a new concept for the molecular mechanism of amyloid fibril formation. PMID:26827727

  1. Specificity and cooperativity at [beta]-lactamase position 104 in TEM-1/BLIP and SHV-1/BLIP interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, Melinda S.; Reynolds, Kimberly A.; McNamara, Case; Ghosh, Partho; Bonomo, Robert A.; Kirsch, Jack F.; Handel, Tracy M.

    2011-11-02

    Establishing a quantitative understanding of the determinants of affinity in protein-protein interactions remains challenging. For example, TEM-1/{beta}-lactamase inhibitor protein (BLIP) and SHV-1/BLIP are homologous {beta}-lactamase/{beta}-lactamase inhibitor protein complexes with disparate K{sub d} values (3 nM and 2 {mu}M, respectively), and a single substitution, D104E in SHV-1, results in a 1000-fold enhancement in binding affinity. In TEM-1, E104 participates in a salt bridge with BLIP K74, whereas the corresponding SHV-1 D104 does not in the wild type SHV-1/BLIP co-structure. Here, we present a 1.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the SHV-1 D104E/BLIP complex that demonstrates that this point mutation restores this salt bridge. Additionally, mutation of a neighboring residue, BLIP E73M, results in salt bridge formation between SHV-1 D104 and BLIP K74 and a 400-fold increase in binding affinity. To understand how this salt bridge contributes to complex affinity, the cooperativity between the E/K or D/K salt bridge pair and a neighboring hot spot residue (BLIP F142) was investigated using double mutant cycle analyses in the background of the E73M mutation. We find that BLIP F142 cooperatively stabilizes both interactions, illustrating how a single mutation at a hot spot position can drive large perturbations in interface stability and specificity through a cooperative interaction network.

  2. Molecular insight of isotypes specific β-tubulin interaction of tubulin heterodimer with noscapinoids.

    PubMed

    Santoshi, Seneha; Naik, Pradeep K

    2014-07-01

    Noscapine and its derivatives bind stoichiometrically to tubulin, alter its dynamic instability and thus effectively inhibit the cellular proliferation of a wide variety of cancer cells including many drug-resistant variants. The tubulin molecule is composed of α- and β-tubulin, which exist as various isotypes whose distribution and drug-binding properties are significantly different. Although the noscapinoids bind to a site overlapping with colchicine, their interaction is more biased towards β-tubulin. In fact, their precise interaction and binding affinity with specific isotypes of β-tubulin in the αβ-heterodimer has never been addressed. In this study, the binding affinity of a panel of noscapinoids with each type of tubulin was investigated computationally. We found that the binding score of a specific noscapinoid with each type of tubulin isotype is different. Specifically, amino-noscapine has the highest binding score of -6.4, -7.2, -7.4 and -7.3 kcal/mol with αβI, αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, respectively. Similarly 10 showed higher binding affinity of -6.8 kcal/mol with αβV, whereas 8 had the highest binding affinity of -7.2, -7.1 and -7.2 kcal/mol, respectively with αβVI, αβVII and αβVIII isotypes. More importantly, both amino-noscapine and its clinical derivative, bromo-noscapine have the highest binding affinity of -46.2 and -38.1 kcal/mol against αβIII (overexpression of αβIII has been associated with resistance to a wide range of chemotherapeutic drugs for several human malignancies) as measured using MM-PBSA. Knowledge of the isotype specificity of the noscapinoids may allow for development of novel therapeutic agents based on this class of drugs. PMID:24916062

  3. Saturated fat consumption and the Theory of Planned Behaviour: exploring additive and interactive effects of habit strength.

    PubMed

    de Bruijn, Gert-Jan; Kroeze, Willemieke; Oenema, Anke; Brug, Johannes

    2008-09-01

    The additive and interactive effects of habit strength in the explanation of saturated fat intake were explored within the framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB). Cross-sectional data were gathered in a Dutch adult sample (n=764) using self-administered questionnaires and analyzed using hierarchical regression analyses and simple slope analyses. Results showed that habit strength was a significant correlate of fat intake (beta=-0.11) and significantly increased the amount of explained variance in fat intake (R(2-change)=0.01). Furthermore, based on a significant interaction effect (beta=0.11), simple slope analyses revealed that intention was a significant correlate of fat intake for low levels (beta=-0.29) and medium levels (beta=-0.19) of habit strength, but a weaker and non-significant correlate for high levels (beta=-0.07) of habit strength. Higher habit strength may thus make limiting fat intake a non-intentional behaviour. Implications for information and motivation-based interventions are discussed. PMID:18471932

  4. Super-additive interaction of the reinforcing effects of cocaine and H1-antihistamines in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixia; Woolverton, William L

    2009-02-01

    Histamine H1 receptor antagonists can be sedating and have behavioral effects, including reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects in non-humans, that predict abuse liability. Previous research has suggested that antihistamines can enhance the effects of some drugs of abuse. We have reported a synergistic interaction between cocaine and diphenhydramine (DPH) in a self-administration assay with monkeys. The present study was designed to extend those findings to other combinations of cocaine and DPH, and to the mixture of cocaine and another H1-antihistamine, pyrilamine. Rhesus monkeys were prepared with chronic i.v. catheters and allowed to self-administer cocaine, DPH or pyrilamine alone or as mixtures under a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement. Cocaine, DPH and pyrilamine alone maintained self-administration and cocaine was the stronger reinforcer. When cocaine was combined with DPH or pyrilamine in a 1:1, 1:2 or 2:1 ratio of the ED(50)s, the combinations were super-additive as reinforcers. Reinforcing strength of the combinations was greater than that of the antihistamines alone but not greater than cocaine. The data support the prediction that the combination of cocaine and histamine H1 receptor antagonists could have enhanced potential for abuse relative to either drug alone. The interaction may involve dopamine systems in the CNS. PMID:18930758

  5. MHC/Peptide-Specific Interaction of the Humoral Immune System: A New Category of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Held, Gerhard; Luescher, Immanuel F; Neumann, Frank; Papaioannou, Chrysostomos; Schirrmann, Thomas; Sester, Martina; Smola, Sigrun; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Abs bind to unprocessed Ags, whereas cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells recognize peptides derived from endogenously processed Ags presented in the context of class I MHC complexes. We screened, by ELISA, human sera for Abs reacting specifically with the influenza matrix protein (IMP)-derived peptide(58-66) displayed by HLA-A*0201 complexes. Among 653 healthy volunteers, blood donors, and women on delivery, high-titered HLA-A*0201/IMP(58-66) complex-specific IgG Abs were detected in 11 females with a history of pregnancies and in 1 male, all HLA-A*0201(-). These Abs had the same specificity as HLA-A*0201/IMP(58-66)-specific cytotoxic T cells and bound neither to HLA-A*0201 nor the peptide alone. No such Abs were detected in HLA-A*0201(+) volunteers. These Abs were not cross-reactive to other self-MHC class I alleles displaying IMP(58-66), but bound to MHC class I complexes of an HLA nonidentical offspring. HLA-A*0201/IMP(58-66) Abs were also detected in the cord blood of newborns, indicating that HLA-A*0201/IMP(58-66) Abs are produced in HLA-A*0201(-) mothers and enter the fetal blood system. That Abs can bind to peptides derived from endogenous Ags presented by MHC complexes opens new perspectives on interactions between the cellular and humoral immune system. PMID:26416277

  6. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https

  7. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https

  8. Glucose-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and their specific interaction with tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Fang-Kui; Dang, Qi-Feng; Liang, Xing-Guo; Chen, Xi-Guang

    2014-12-01

    A novel targeted drug delivery system, glucose-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (GCNPs), was developed for specific recognition and interaction with glucose transporters (Gluts) over-expressed by tumor cells. GC was synthesized by using succinic acid as a linker between glucosamine and chitosan (CS), and successful synthesis was confirmed by NMR and elemental analysis. GCNPs were prepared by ionic crosslinking method, and characterized in terms of morphology, size, and zeta potential. The optimally prepared nanoparticles showed spherical shapes with an average particle size of (187.9 ± 3.8) nm and a zeta potential of (- 15.43 ± 0.31) mV. The GCNPs showed negligible cytotoxicity to mouse embryo fibroblast and 4T1 cells. Doxorubicin (DOX) could be efficiently entrapped into GCNPs, with a loading capacity and encapsulation efficiency of 20.11% and 64.81%, respectively. DOX-loaded nanoparticles exhibited sustained-release behavior in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4). In vitro cellular uptake studies showed that the GCNPs had better endocytosis ability than CSNPs, and the antitumor activity of DOX/GCNPs was 4-5 times effectiveness in 4T1 cell killing than that of DOX/CSNPs. All the results demonstrate that nanoparticles decorated with glucose have specific interactions with cancer cells via the recognition between glucose and Gluts. Therefore, Gluts-targeted GCNPs may be promising delivery agents in cancer therapies.

  9. Use of specific glycosidases to probe cellular interactions in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Idoni, Brian; Ghazarian, Haike; Metzenberg, Stan; Hutchins-Carroll, Virginia; Oppenheimer, Steven B; Carroll, Edward J

    2010-08-01

    We present an unusual and novel model for initial investigations of a putative role for specifically conformed glycans in cellular interactions. We have used alpha- and ss-amylase and alpha- and ss-glucosidase in dose-response experiments evaluating their effects on archenteron organization using the NIH designated sea urchin embryo model. In quantitative dose-response experiments, we show that defined activity levels of alpha-glucosidase and ss-amylase inhibited archenteron organization in living Lytechinus pictus gastrula embryos, whereas all concentrations of ss-glucosidase and alpha-amylase were without substantial effects on development. Product inhibition studies suggested that the enzymes were acting by their specific glycosidase activities and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggested that there was no detectable protease contamination in the active enzyme samples. The results provide evidence for a role of glycans in sea urchin embryo cellular interactions with special reference to the possible structural conformation of these glycans based on the differential activities of the alpha- and ss-glycosidases. PMID:20435035

  10. Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with C-Type Lectin Dendritic Cell-Specific ICAM Grabbing Nonintegrin

    PubMed Central

    Miszczyk, Eliza; Rudnicka, Karolina; Moran, Anthony P.; Fol, Marek; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Matusiak, Agnieszka; Walencka, Maria; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    In this study we asked whether Helicobacter pylori whole cells and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) utilize sugar moieties of Lewis (Le) antigenic determinants to interact with DC-SIGN (dendritic cell specific ICAM grabbing nonintegrin) receptor on dendritic cells (DCs). For this purpose the soluble DC-SIGN/Fc adhesion assay and the THP-1 leukemia cells with induced expression of DC-SIGN were used. We showed that the binding specificity of DC-SIGN with H. pylori LeX/Y positive whole cells and H. pylori LPS of LeX/Y type was fucose dependent, whereas in LeXY negative H. pylori strains and LPS preparations without Lewis determinants, this binding was galactose dependent. The binding of soluble synthetic LeX and LeY to the DC-SIGN-like receptor on THP-1 cells was also observed. In conclusion, the LeXY dependent as well as independent binding of H. pylori whole cells and H. pylori LPS to DC-SIGN was described. Moreover, we demonstrated that THP-1 cells may serve as an in vitro model for the assessment of H. pylori-DC-SIGN interactions mediated by LeX and LeY determinants. PMID:22550396

  11. Modified inoculation and disease assessment methods reveal host specificity in Erwinia tracheiphila-Cucurbitaceae interactions.

    PubMed

    Nazareno, Eric S; Dumenyo, C Korsi

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a greenhouse trial to determine specific compatible interactions between Erwinia tracheiphila strains and cucurbit host species. Using a modified inoculation system, E. tracheiphila strains HCa1-5N, UnisCu1-1N, and MISpSq-N were inoculated to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) cv. 'Sweet Burpless', melon (Cucumis melo) cv. 'Athena Hybrid', and squash (Cucubita pepo) cv. 'Early Summer Crookneck'. We observed symptoms and disease progression for 30 days; recorded the number of days to wilting of the inoculated leaf (DWIL), days to wilting of the whole plant (DWWP), and days to death of the plant (DDP). We found significant interactions between host cultivar and pathogen strains, which imply host specificity. Pathogen strains HCa1-5N and UnisCu1-1N isolated from Cucumis species exhibited more virulence in cucumber and melon than in squash, while the reverse was true for strain MISpSq-N, an isolate from Cucurbita spp. Our observations confirm a previous finding that E. tracheiphila strains isolated from Cucumis species were more virulent on Cucumis hosts and those from Cucubita were more virulent on Cucubita hosts. This confirmation helps in better understanding the pathosystem and provides baseline information for the subsequent development of new disease management strategies for bacterial wilt. We also demonstrated the efficiency of our modified inoculation and disease scoring methods. PMID:26522078

  12. Direct effects of ionizing radiation on integral membrane proteins. Noncovalent energy transfer requires specific interpeptide interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jhun, E.; Jhun, B.H.; Jones, L.R.; Jung, C.Y. )

    1991-05-25

    The 12 transmembrane alpha helices (TMHs) of human erythrocyte glucose transporter were individually cut by pepsin digestion as membrane-bound 2.5-3.5-kDa peptide fragments. Radiation-induced chemical degradation of these fragments showed an average target size of 34 kDa. This is 10-12 x larger than the average size of an individual TMH, demonstrating that a significant energy transfer occurs among these TMHs in the absence of covalent linkage. Heating this TMH preparation at 100{degree}C for 15 min reduced the target size to 5 kDa or less, suggesting that the noncovalent energy transfer requires specific helix-helix interactions. Purified phospholamban, a small (6-kDa) integral membrane protein containing a single TMH, formed a pentameric assembly in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical degradation target size of this phospholamban pentamer was 5-6 kDa, illustrating that not all integral membrane protein assemblies permit intersubunit energy transfer. These findings together with other published observations suggest strongly that significant noncovalent energy transfer can occur within the tertiary and quaternary structure of membrane proteins and that as yet undefined proper molecular interactions are required for such covalent energy transfer. Our results with pepsin-digested glucose transporter also illustrate the importance of the interhelical interaction as a predominating force in maintaining the tertiary structure of a transmembrane protein.

  13. Divergence in Ubiquitin Interaction and Catalysis among the Ubiquitin-Specific Protease Family Deubiquitinating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tencer, Adam H; Liang, Qin; Zhuang, Zhihao

    2016-08-23

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) are responsible for reversing mono- and polyubiquitination of proteins and play essential roles in numerous cellular processes. Close to 100 human DUBs have been identified and are classified into five families, with the ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) family being the largest (>50 members). The binding of ubiquitin (Ub) to USP is strikingly different from that observed for the DUBs in the ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH) and ovarian tumor domain protease (OTU) families. We generated a panel of mutant ubiquitins and used them to probe the ubiquitin's interaction with a number of USPs. Our results revealed a remarkable divergence of USP-Ub interactions among the USP catalytic domains. Our double-mutant cycle analysis targeting the ubiquitin residues located in the tip, the central body, and the tail of ubiquitin also demonstrated different crosstalk among the USP-Ub interactions. This work uncovered intriguing divergence in the ubiquitin-binding mode in the USP family DUBs and raised the possibility of targeting the ubiquitin-binding hot spots on USPs for selective inhibition of USPs by small molecule antagonists. PMID:27501351

  14. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of Anion-pi Interactions: Binding Strength and Anion Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Sun, Zhenrong; Wang, Xue B.

    2015-01-01

    Proposed in theory and confirmed to exist, anion–π interactions have been recognized as new and important non-covalent binding forces. Despite extensive theoretical studies, numerous crystal structural identifications, and a plethora of solution phase investigations, intrinsic anion–π interaction strengths that are free from complications of condensed phases’ environments, have not been directly measured in the gas phase. Herein we present a joint photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical study on this subject, in which tetraoxacalix[2]arene[2]triazine 1, an electron-deficient and cavity self-tunable macrocyclic was used as a charge-neutral molecular host to probe its interactions with a series of anions with distinctly different shapes and charge states (spherical halides Cl⁻, Br⁻, I⁻, linear thiocyanate SCN⁻, trigonal planar nitrate NO₃⁻, pyramidic iodate IO₃⁻, and tetrahedral sulfate SO₄²⁻). The binding energies of the resultant gaseous 1:1 complexes (1•Cl⁻,1•Br⁻, 1•I⁻, 1•SCN⁻, 1•NO₃⁻, 1•IO₃⁻ and 1•SO₄²⁻) were directly measured experimentally, exhibiting substantial non-covalent interactions with pronounced anion specific effects. The binding strengths of Cl⁻, NO₃⁻, IO₃⁻ with 1 are found to be strongest among all singly charged anions, amounting to ca. 30 kcal/mol, but only about 40% of that between 1 and SO₄²⁻. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that all anions reside in the center of the cavity of 1 with anion–π binding motif in the complexes’ optimized structures, where 1 is seen to be able to self-regulate its cavity structure to accommodate anions of different geometries and three-dimensional shapes. Electron density surface and natural bond orbital charge distribution analysis further support anion–π binding formation. The calculated binding energies of the anions and 1 nicely reproduce the experimentally estimated electron binding energy increase. This work

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical studies of anion-π interactions: binding strength and anion specificity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Sun, Zhen-Rong; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2015-02-01

    Proposed in theory and then their existence confirmed, anion-π interactions have been recognized as new and important non-covalent binding forces. Despite extensive theoretical studies, numerous crystal structural identifications, and a plethora of solution phase investigations, anion-π interaction strengths that are free from complications of condensed-phase environments have not been directly measured in the gas phase. Herein we present a joint photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical study on this subject, in which tetraoxacalix[2]arene[2]triazine 1, an electron-deficient and cavity self-tunable macrocyclic, was used as a charge-neutral molecular host to probe its interactions with a series of anions with distinctly different shapes and charge states (spherical halides Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), linear thiocyanate SCN(-), trigonal planar nitrate NO3(-), pyramidic iodate IO3(-), and tetrahedral sulfate SO4(2-)). The binding energies of the resultant gaseous 1 : 1 complexes (1·Cl(-), 1·Br(-), 1·I(-), 1·SCN(-), 1·NO3(-), 1·IO3(-) and 1·SO4(2-)) were directly measured experimentally, exhibiting substantial non-covalent interactions with pronounced anion-specific effects. The binding strengths of Cl(-), NO3(-), IO3(-) with 1 are found to be strongest among all singly charged anions, amounting to ca. 30 kcal mol(-1), but only about 40% of that between 1 and SO4(2-). Quantum chemical calculations reveal that all the anions reside in the center of the cavity of 1 with an anion-π binding motif in the complexes' optimized structures, where 1 is seen to be able to self-regulate its cavity structure to accommodate anions of different geometries and three-dimensional shapes. Electron density surface and charge distribution analyses further support anion-π binding formation. The calculated binding energies of the anions and 1 nicely reproduce the experimentally estimated electron binding energy increase. This work illustrates that size-selective photoelectron

  16. Uncertainty in the Specification of Surface Characteristics, Part ii: Hierarchy of Interaction-Explicit Statistical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niyogi, Devdutta S.; Raman, Sethu; Alapaty, Kiran

    The uncertainty in the specification of surface characteristics in soil-vegetation- atmosphere-transfer (SVAT) schemes within planetary boundary-layer (PBL) or mesoscale models is addressed. The hypothesis to be tested is whether the errors in the specification of the individual parameters are accumulative or whether they tend to balance each other in the overall sense for the system. A hierarchy of statistical applications is developed: classical one-at-a-time (OAT) approach, level 1; linear analysis of variance (ANOVA), level 1.5; fractional factorial (FF), or level 2; two-factor interaction (TFI) technique, or level 2.5; and a non-linear response surface methodology (RSM), or level 3. Using the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) observations for June 6, 1987 as the initial condition for a SVAT scheme dynamically coupled to a PBL model, the interactions between uncertainty errors are analyzed. A secondary objective addresses the temporal changes in the uncertainty pattern using data for morning, afternoon, and evening conditions.It is found that the outcome from the level 1 OAT-like studies can be considered as the limiting uncertainty values for the majority of mesoscale cases. From the higher-level analyses, it is concluded that for most of the moderate surface scenarios, the effective uncertainty from the individual parameters is balanced and thus lowered. However, for the extreme cases, such as near wilting or saturation soil moisture, the uncertainties add up synergistically and these effects can be even greater than those from the outcomes of the OAT-like studies. Thus, parameter uncertainty cannot be simply related to its deviation alone, but is also dependent on other parameter settings. Also, from the temporal changes in the interaction pattern studies, it is found that, for the morning case soil texture is the important parameter, for afternoon vegetation parameters are crucial, while for the evening case soil moisture is capable of propagating

  17. Mass-action equilibrium and non-specific interactions in protein binding networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, Sergei

    2009-03-01

    Large-scale protein binding networks serve as a paradigm of complex properties of living cells. These networks are naturally weighted with edges characterized by binding strength and protein-nodes -- by their concentrations. However, the state-of-the-art high-throughput experimental techniques generate just a binary (yes or no) information about individual interactions. As a result, most of the previous research concentrated just on topology of these networks. In a series of recent publications [1-4] my collaborators and I went beyond purely topological studies and calculated the mass-action equilibrium of a genome-wide binding network using experimentally determined protein concentrations, localizations, and reliable binding interactions in baker's yeast. We then studied how this equilibrium responds to large perturbations [1-2] and noise [3] in concentrations of proteins. We demonstrated that the change in the equilibrium concentration of a protein exponentially decays (and sign-alternates) with its network distance away from the perturbed node. This explains why, despite a globally connected topology, individual functional modules in such networks are able to operate fairly independently. In a separate study [4] we quantified the interplay between specific and non-specific binding interactions under crowded conditions inside living cells. We show how the need to limit the waste of resources constrains the number of types and concentrations of proteins that are present at the same time and at the same place in yeast cells. [1] S Maslov, I. Ispolatov, PNAS 104:13655 (2007). [2] S. Maslov, K. Sneppen, I. Ispolatov, New J. of Phys. 9: 273 (2007). [3] K-K. Yan, D. Walker, S. Maslov, PRL accepted (2008). [4] J. Zhang, S. Maslov, and E. I. Shakhnovich, Mol Syst Biol 4, 210 (2008).

  18. Solubility–insolubility interconversion of sophoragrin, a mannose/glucose-specific lectin in Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree) bark, regulated by the sugar-specific interaction

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Sophoragrin, a mannose/glucose-specific lectin in Sophora japonica (Japanese pagoda tree) bark, was the first lectin found to show self-aggregation that is dependent on the sugar concentration accompanying the interconversion between solubility and insolubility [Ueno, Ogawa, Matsumoto and Seno (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 3146–3153]. The interconversion is regulated by the concentrations of Ca2+ and specific sugars: mannose, glucose or sucrose. The specific glycotopes for sophoragrin were found in the sophoragrin subunit and an endogenous galactose-specific lectin, B-SJA-I (bark S. japonica agglutinin I), and the lectin subunit that binds to the glycotope was identified by photoaffinity glycan probes. Remarkably, the insoluble polymer of sophoragrin is dissociated by interaction with B-SJA-I into various soluble complexes. Based on these results, self-aggregation of sophoragrin was shown to be a unique homopolymerization due to the sugar-specific interaction. An immunostaining study indicated that sophoragrin localizes mainly in vacuoles of parenchymal cells coincidently with B-SJA-I. These results indicate that sophoragrin can sequester endogenous glycoprotein ligands via sugar-specific interactions, thus providing new insights into the occurrence and significance of the intravacuolar interaction shown by a legume lectin. PMID:15222880

  19. Disruption of Specific RNA-RNA Interactions in a Double-Stranded RNA Virus Inhibits Genome Packaging and Virus Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Teodoro; Sung, Po-Yu; Roy, Polly

    2015-12-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes hemorrhagic disease in economically important livestock. The BTV genome is organized into ten discrete double-stranded RNA molecules (S1-S10) which have been suggested to follow a sequential packaging pathway from smallest to largest segment during virus capsid assembly. To substantiate and extend these studies, we have investigated the RNA sorting and packaging mechanisms with a new experimental approach using inhibitory oligonucleotides. Putative packaging signals present in the 3'untranslated regions of BTV segments were targeted by a number of nuclease resistant oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) and their effects on virus replication in cell culture were assessed. ORNs complementary to the 3' UTR of BTV RNAs significantly inhibited virus replication without affecting protein synthesis. Same ORNs were found to inhibit complex formation when added to a novel RNA-RNA interaction assay which measured the formation of supramolecular complexes between and among different RNA segments. ORNs targeting the 3'UTR of BTV segment 10, the smallest RNA segment, were shown to be the most potent and deletions or substitution mutations of the targeted sequences diminished the RNA complexes and abolished the recovery of viable viruses using reverse genetics. Cell-free capsid assembly/RNA packaging assay also confirmed that the inhibitory ORNs could interfere with RNA packaging and further substitution mutations within the putative RNA packaging sequence have identified the recognition sequence concerned. Exchange of 3'UTR between segments have further demonstrated that RNA recognition was segment specific, most likely acting as part of the secondary structure of the entire genomic segment. Our data confirm that genome packaging in this segmented dsRNA virus occurs via the formation of supramolecular complexes formed by the interaction of specific sequences located in the 3' UTRs. Additionally, the inhibition of packaging in-trans with inhibitory ORNs

  20. Disruption of Specific RNA-RNA Interactions in a Double-Stranded RNA Virus Inhibits Genome Packaging and Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Teodoro; Sung, Po-Yu; Roy, Polly

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes hemorrhagic disease in economically important livestock. The BTV genome is organized into ten discrete double-stranded RNA molecules (S1-S10) which have been suggested to follow a sequential packaging pathway from smallest to largest segment during virus capsid assembly. To substantiate and extend these studies, we have investigated the RNA sorting and packaging mechanisms with a new experimental approach using inhibitory oligonucleotides. Putative packaging signals present in the 3’untranslated regions of BTV segments were targeted by a number of nuclease resistant oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) and their effects on virus replication in cell culture were assessed. ORNs complementary to the 3’ UTR of BTV RNAs significantly inhibited virus replication without affecting protein synthesis. Same ORNs were found to inhibit complex formation when added to a novel RNA-RNA interaction assay which measured the formation of supramolecular complexes between and among different RNA segments. ORNs targeting the 3’UTR of BTV segment 10, the smallest RNA segment, were shown to be the most potent and deletions or substitution mutations of the targeted sequences diminished the RNA complexes and abolished the recovery of viable viruses using reverse genetics. Cell-free capsid assembly/RNA packaging assay also confirmed that the inhibitory ORNs could interfere with RNA packaging and further substitution mutations within the putative RNA packaging sequence have identified the recognition sequence concerned. Exchange of 3’UTR between segments have further demonstrated that RNA recognition was segment specific, most likely acting as part of the secondary structure of the entire genomic segment. Our data confirm that genome packaging in this segmented dsRNA virus occurs via the formation of supramolecular complexes formed by the interaction of specific sequences located in the 3’ UTRs. Additionally, the inhibition of packaging in-trans with inhibitory

  1. Interaction studies reveal specific recognition of an anti-inflammatory polyphosphorhydrazone dendrimer by human monocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledall, Jérémy; Fruchon, Séverine; Garzoni, Matteo; Pavan, Giovanni M.; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Blanzat, Muriel; Poupot, Rémy

    2015-10-01

    Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory properties leading to efficient therapeutic control of inflammatory diseases in animal models. These properties are mainly prompted through activation of monocytes. Here, we disclose new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activation of human monocytes by ABP-capped PPH dendrimers. Following an interdisciplinary approach, we have characterized the physicochemical and biological behavior of the lead ABP dendrimer with model and cell membranes, and compared this experimental set of data to predictive computational modelling studies. The behavior of the ABP dendrimer was compared to the one of an isosteric analog dendrimer capped with twelve azabiscarboxylate (ABC) end groups instead of twelve ABP end groups. The ABC dendrimer displayed no biological activity on human monocytes, therefore it was considered as a negative control. In detail, we show that the ABP dendrimer can bind both non-specifically and specifically to the membrane of human monocytes. The specific binding leads to the internalization of the ABP dendrimer by human monocytes. On the contrary, the ABC dendrimer only interacts non-specifically with human monocytes and is not internalized. These data indicate that the bioactive ABP dendrimer is recognized by specific receptor(s) at the surface of human monocytes.Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti

  2. Molecular targets of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG): specificity and interaction with membrane lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Patra, S K; Rizzi, F; Silva, A; Rugina, D O; Bettuzzi, S

    2008-12-01

    Proteomic studies on anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins (specifically EGCG) are suggesting a large set of protein targets that may directly interact with EGCG and alter the physiology of diseased cells, including cancer. Of notice, benign cells are usually left untouched. Lipid rafts have been recently recognized as signal processing hubs and suggested to be involved in drug uptake by means of endocytosis. These findings are suggesting new insights on the molecular mechanisms of anticancer drugs action. In the membrane, EGCG is hijacked by the laminin receptor (LamR), a lipid raft protein. Similar to aplidin and edelfosin, EGCG alters membrane domains composition also preventing EGF binding to EGFR, imerization of EGFR and relocation of phosphorylated EGFR to lipid rafts. In vitro studies have recently shown that EGCG also binds both DNA and RNA in GpC-rich regions. This event may importantly affect genes function. Moreover, EGCG was shown to inhibit telomerase, topoisomerase II and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), thus ultimately affecting chromatin maintenance and remodeling. But another important alternative pathway besides interaction with specific proteins may play an important role in EGCG action: direct targeting of bioactive membrane platforms, lipid rafts. Structural alteration of the platforms deeply impact (and often inactivates) important pathways involving MAP kinases. The key issue is that, important and specific differences in lipid rafts composition have been found in transformed versus benign cells and apoptotic versus non-apoptotic cells. We suggest here that the anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins against different kind of cancers may find an explanation in direct targeting of lipid rafts by EGCG. PMID:19261982

  3. Neuron-specific SALM5 limits inflammation in the CNS via its interaction with HVEM

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuwen; Yao, Sheng; Augustine, Mathew M.; Xu, Haiying; Wang, Jun; Sun, Jingwei; Broadwater, Megan; Ruff, William; Luo, Liqun; Zhu, Gefeng; Tamada, Koji; Chen, Lieping

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immune-privileged organ with the capacity to prevent excessive inflammation. Aside from the blood-brain barrier, active immunosuppressive mechanisms remain largely unknown. We report that a neuron-specific molecule, synaptic adhesion-like molecule 5 (SALM5), is a crucial contributor to CNS immune privilege. We found that SALM5 suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in the CNS and that a SALM-specific monoclonal antibody promoted inflammation in the CNS, and thereby aggravated clinical symptoms of mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, we identified herpes virus entry mediator as a functional receptor that mediates SALM5’s suppressive function. Our findings reveal a molecular link between the neuronal system and the immune system, and provide potential therapeutic targets for the control of CNS diseases. PMID:27152329

  4. Generalizing the Concept of Specific Compound Formulation Additives towards Non-Fluorescent Drugs: A Solubilization Study on Potential Anti-Alzheimer-Active Small-Molecule Compounds.

    PubMed

    Lawatscheck, Carmen; Pickhardt, Marcus; Wieczorek, Sebastian; Grafmüller, Andrea; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Börner, Hans G

    2016-07-18

    Tailor-made compound formulation additives enable the testing of potential drugs with undesirable pharmacological profiles. A combinatorial approach using Raman microscopy as the readout method is presented to select peptide sequences from large one-bead-one-compound libraries. The resulting peptide-PEG conjugates solubilize potential prophylactic and therapeutic anti-Alzheimer compounds and can be used as specific additives not only for fluorescent but also for non-fluorescent compounds. PMID:27282127

  5. Albumin interacts specifically with a 60-kDa microvascular endothelial glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, J E; Carley, W W; Palade, G E

    1988-01-01

    Confluent monolayers of microvascular endothelial cells, derived from the rat epididymal fat pad and grown in culture, were radioiodinated by using the lactoper-oxidase method. Their radioiodinated surface polypeptides were detected by NaDodSO4/PAGE (followed by autoradiography) and were characterized by both lectin affinity chromatography and protease digestion to identify the proteins involved in albumin binding. All detected polypeptides were sensitive to Pronase digestion, whereas several polypeptides were resistant to trypsin. Pronase treatment of the cell monolayer significantly reduced the specific binding of radioiodinated rat serum albumin, but trypsin digestion did not. Limax flavus, Ricinus communis, and Triticum vulgaris agglutinins competed significantly with radioiodinated rat serum albumin binding, whereas other lectins did not. A single 60-kDa glyco-protein was precipitated in common by these three lectins and was trypsin-resistant and Pronase-sensitive. Rat serum albumin affinity chromatography columns weakly but specifically bound a 60-kDa polypeptide from cell lysates derived from radioiodinated cell monolayers. These findings indicate that the 60-kDa glycoprotein is directly involved in a specific interaction of albumin with the cultured microvascular endothelial cells used in these experiments. Images PMID:3413125

  6. Anticancer drug mithramycin interacts with core histones: An additional mode of action of the DNA groove binder

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Amrita; Sanyal, Sulagna; Kulkarni, Kirti K.; Jana, Kuladip; Roy, Siddhartha; Das, Chandrima; Dasgupta, Dipak

    2014-01-01

    Mithramycin (MTR) is a clinically approved DNA-binding antitumor antibiotic currently in Phase 2 clinical trials at National Institutes of Health for treatment of osteosarcoma. In view of the resurgence in the studies of this generic antibiotic as a human medicine, we have examined the binding properties of MTR with the integral component of chromatin – histone proteins – as a part of our broad objective to classify DNA-binding molecules in terms of their ability to bind chromosomal DNA alone (single binding mode) or both histones and chromosomal DNA (dual binding mode). The present report shows that besides DNA, MTR also binds to core histones present in chromatin and thus possesses the property of dual binding in the chromatin context. In contrast to the MTR–DNA interaction, association of MTR with histones does not require obligatory presence of bivalent metal ion like Mg2+. As a consequence of its ability to interact with core histones, MTR inhibits histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18, an important signature of active chromatin, in vitro and ex vivo. Reanalysis of microarray data of Ewing sarcoma cell lines shows that upon MTR treatment there is a significant down regulation of genes, possibly implicating a repression of H3K18Ac-enriched genes apart from DNA-binding transcription factors. Association of MTR with core histones and its ability to alter post-translational modification of histone H3 clearly indicates an additional mode of action of this anticancer drug that could be implicated in novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25473595

  7. Systematic Dissection of Coding Exons at Single Nucleotide Resolution Supports an Additional Role in Cell-Specific Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee J.; Findlay, Gregory M.; Martin, Beth; Zhao, Jingjing; Bell, Robert J. A.; Smith, Robin P.; Ku, Angel A.; Shendure, Jay; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their protein coding function, exons can also serve as transcriptional enhancers. Mutations in these exonic-enhancers (eExons) could alter both protein function and transcription. However, the functional consequence of eExon mutations is not well known. Here, using massively parallel reporter assays, we dissect the enhancer activity of three liver eExons (SORL1 exon 17, TRAF3IP2 exon 2, PPARG exon 6) at single nucleotide resolution in the mouse liver. We find that both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations have similar effects on enhancer activity and many of the deleterious mutation clusters overlap known liver-associated transcription factor binding sites. Carrying a similar massively parallel reporter assay in HeLa cells with these three eExons found differences in their mutation profiles compared to the liver, suggesting that enhancers could have distinct operating profiles in different tissues. Our results demonstrate that eExon mutations could lead to multiple phenotypes by disrupting both the protein sequence and enhancer activity and that enhancers can have distinct mutation profiles in different cell types. PMID:25340400

  8. On the critical specific heat capacity of a classical anharmonic crystal with long-range interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisanova, E.; Ivanov, S.

    2014-12-01

    The bulk critical specific heat capacity of a classical anharmonic crystal with long-range interaction (decreasing at large distances r as r-d-a, where d is the space dimensionality and 0 < σ <= 2) is studied. An exact analytical expression is obtained at the upper critical dimension d = 2σ of the system. This result depends on both the deviation from the critical point and the space dimensionality of the system, while the known asymptotic one depends only on the deviation from the critical point. For real systems (chains, thin layers, i.e. films and three-dimensional systems) the exact result and the asymptotic one are graphically presented and compared on the basis of the calculated relative errors. The obtained result holds true in a broader neighborhood of the critical point. The expansion of the critical region is estimated at the three real physical dimensionalities.

  9. Cumulative, Timing-Specific, and Interactive Models of Residential Mobility and Children's Cognitive and Psychosocial Skills.

    PubMed

    Coley, Rebekah Levine; Kull, Melissa

    2016-07-01

    Residential mobility has received notable attention in the literature, yet there remains limited consensus on how and when mobility is associated with detriments to children's development. Drawing on a nationally representative sample of 19,162 children in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study followed from kindergarten through eighth grade, this study compared cumulative, timing-specific, and interactive models of mobility. Results found that mobility during middle childhood and early adolescence was negatively associated with children's cognitive skills, with short-term effects that dissipated over time. In contrast, associations with psychosocial functioning emerged in relation to early and middle childhood mobility. Effects of residential mobility were robust to more conservative modeling techniques and adjustments for school mobility. PMID:27223111

  10. Rapid amyloid fibril formation by a winter flounder antifreeze protein requires specific interaction with ice.

    PubMed

    Dubé, André; Leggiadro, Cindy; Ewart, Kathryn Vanya

    2016-05-01

    A typically α-helical antifreeze protein (wflAFP-6) from winter flounder, Pseudopleuronectes americanus, forms amyloid fibrils during freezing. In this study, the effects of distinct components of the freezing process were examined. Freezing of wflAFP-6 in the presence of template ice was shown to be necessary for rapid conversion to an amyloid conformation. Neither subfreezing temperature nor phase change was sufficient. Thus, specific interaction with the ice surface was essential. The ice-induced formation of amyloid appeared to be unique to this helical antifreeze, it required high concentrations of protein and it occurred over a range of pH values. These results define a method for rapid formation of amyloid by wflAFP-6 on demand under physiological conditions. PMID:27086686

  11. Heart Structure-Specific Transcriptomic Atlas Reveals Conserved microRNA-mRNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Hahne, Florian; Scheubel, Philippe; Marcellin, Magali; Dubost, Valerie; Westphal, Magdalena; Boeglen, Catherine; Büchmann-Møller, Stine; Cheung, Ming Sin; Cordier, André; De Benedetto, Christopher; Deurinck, Mark; Frei, Moritz; Moulin, Pierre; Oakeley, Edward; Grenet, Olivier; Grevot, Armelle; Stull, Robert; Theil, Diethilde; Moggs, Jonathan G.; Marrer, Estelle; Couttet, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play key roles in heart development and cardiovascular diseases. Here, we have characterized the expression and distribution of microRNAs across eight cardiac structures (left and right ventricles, apex, papillary muscle, septum, left and right atrium and valves) in rat, Beagle dog and cynomolgus monkey using microRNA sequencing. Conserved microRNA signatures enriched in specific heart structures across these species were identified for cardiac valve (miR-let-7c, miR-125b, miR-127, miR-199a-3p, miR-204, miR-320, miR-99b, miR-328 and miR-744) and myocardium (miR-1, miR-133b, miR-133a, miR-208b, miR-30e, miR-499-5p, miR-30e*). The relative abundance of myocardium-enriched (miR-1) and valve-enriched (miR-125b-5p and miR-204) microRNAs was confirmed using in situ hybridization. MicroRNA-mRNA interactions potentially relevant for cardiac functions were explored using anti-correlation expression analysis and microRNA target prediction algorithms. Interactions between miR-1/Timp3, miR-125b/Rbm24, miR-204/Tgfbr2 and miR-208b/Csnk2a2 were identified and experimentally investigated in human pulmonary smooth muscle cells and luciferase reporter assays. In conclusion, we have generated a high-resolution heart structure-specific mRNA/microRNA expression atlas for three mammalian species that provides a novel resource for investigating novel microRNA regulatory circuits involved in cardiac molecular physiopathology. PMID:23300973

  12. Sex-specific gene interactions in the patterning of insect genitalia.

    PubMed

    Aspiras, Ariel C; Smith, Frank W; Angelini, David R

    2011-12-15

    Genitalia play an important role in the life histories of insects, as in other animals. These sexually dimorphic structures evolve rapidly and derive from multiple body segments. Despite the importance of insect genitalia, descriptions of their genetic patterning have been limited to fruit flies. In this study, we report the functions, interactions and regulation of appendage patterning genes (e.g. homothorax, dachshund, and Distal-less) in two insects: the milkweed bug Oncopeltus fasciatus, and the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. These species differ in the anatomical complexity of their genitalia. Females of T. castaneum have a terminal ovipositor ending in short styli, while O. fasciatus have a multi-jointed subterminal ovipositor. Male O. fasciatus have a genital capsule consisting of large gonocoxopodites and claspers; T. castaneum males have relatively simple genitalia. The requirement of appendage-patterning genes in males differed between the two species: No defects were observed in T. castaneum male genitalia, and while the male claspers of O. fasciatus were affected by depletion of appendage-patterning genes, the proximal gonocoxopodite was not, suggesting a non-appendicular origin for this structure. Only the styli of the T. castaneum ovipositor were affected by RNAi depletion of appendage-patterning genes (14 genes in all). The posterior Hox genes (abdominal-A and Abdominal-B) were required for proper genital development in O. fasciatus and regulated Distal-less and homothorax similarly in both sexes. Distal-less and dachshund were regulated differently in male and female O. fasciatus. Knockdown of the sex determination gene intersex produced a partial female-to-male transformation of abdominal and genital anatomy and also resulted in abrogation of female-specific regulation of these genes. These results provide developmental genetic support for specific anatomical hypotheses of serial homology. Importantly, these gene functions and interactions

  13. Microtubule-Actin Cross-Linking Factor 1: Domains, Interaction Partners, and Tissue-Specific Functions.

    PubMed

    Goryunov, Dmitry; Liem, Ronald K H

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of most eukaryotic cells is composed of three principal filamentous components: actin filaments, microtubules (MTs), and intermediate filaments. It is a highly dynamic system that plays crucial roles in a wide range of cellular processes, including migration, adhesion, cytokinesis, morphogenesis, intracellular traffic and signaling, and structural flexibility. Among the large number of cytoskeleton-associated proteins characterized to date, microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 (MACF1) is arguably the most versatile integrator and modulator of cytoskeleton-related processes. MACF1 belongs to the plakin family of proteins, and within it, to the spectraplakin subfamily. These proteins are characterized by the ability to bridge MT and actin cytoskeletal networks in a dynamic fashion, which underlies their involvement in the regulation of cell migration, axonal extension, and vesicular traffic. Studying MACF1 functions has provided insights not only into the regulation of the cytoskeleton but also into molecular mechanisms of both normal cellular physiology and cellular pathology. Multiple MACF1 isoforms exist, composed of a large variety of alternatively spliced domains. Each of these domains mediates a specific set of interactions and functions. These functions are manifested in tissue and cell-specific phenotypes observed in conditional MACF1 knockout mice. The conditional models described to date reveal critical roles of MACF1 in mammalian skin, nervous system, heart muscle, and intestinal epithelia. Complete elimination of MACF1 is early embryonic lethal, indicating an essential role for MACF1 in early development. Further studies of MACF1 domains and their interactions will likely reveal multiple new roles of this protein in various tissues. PMID:26778566

  14. Nanostructured disposable impedimetric sensors as tools for specific biomolecular interactions: sensitive recognition of concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Loaiza, Oscar A; Lamas-Ardisana, Pedro J; Jubete, Elena; Ochoteco, Estibalitz; Loinaz, Iraida; Cabañero, Germán; García, Isabel; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-04-15

    The development of sensors to detect specific weak biological interactions is still today a challenging topic. Characteristics of carbohydrate-protein (lectin) interactions include high specificity and low affinity. This work describes the development of nanostructured impedimetric sensors for the detection of concanavalin A (Con A) binding to immobilized thiolated carbohydrate derivatives (D-mannose or D-glucose) onto screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) modified with gold nanoparticles. Thiolated D-galactose derivative was employed as negative control to evaluate the selectivity of the proposed methodology. After binding the thiolated carbohydrate to the nanostructured SPCEs, different functionalized thiols were employed to form mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAM). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was employed as a technique to evaluate the binding of Con A to selected carbohydrates through the increase of electron transfer resistance of the ferri/ferrocyanide redox probe at the differently SAM modified electrodes. Different variables of the assay protocol were studied in order to optimize the sensor performance. Selective Con A determinations were only achieved by the formation of mixed SAMs with adequate functionalized thiols. Important differences were obtained depending on the chain lengths and functional groups of these thiols. For the 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate mixed SAMs, the electron transfer resistance varied linearly with the Con A concentration in the 2.2-40.0 μg mL(-1) range for D-mannose and D-glucose modified sensors. Low detection limits (0.099 and 0.078 pmol) and good reproducibility (6.9 and 6.1%, n=10) were obtained for the D-glucose and D-mannose modified sensors, respectively, without any amplification strategy. PMID:21417434

  15. Two-point one-dimensional δ-{\\delta }^{\\prime } interactions: non-abelian addition law and decoupling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadella, M.; Mateos-Guilarte, J.; Muñoz-Castañeda, J. M.; Nieto, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution to the study of one-dimensional point potentials, we prove that if we take the limit q\\to 0 on a potential of the type {v}0δ (y)+2{v}1{δ }\\prime (y)+{w}0δ (y-q)+2{w}1{δ }\\prime (y-q), we obtain a new point potential of the type {u}0δ (y)+2{u}1{δ }\\prime (y), when u 0 and u 1 are related to v 0, v 1, w 0 and w 1 by a law with the structure of a group. This is the Borel subgroup of {{SL}}2({{R}}). We also obtain the non-abelian addition law from the scattering data. The spectra of the Hamiltonian in the decoupling cases emerging in the study are also described in full. It is shown that for the {v}1=+/- 1, {w}1=+/- 1 values of the {δ }\\prime couplings the singular Kurasov matrices become equivalent to Dirichlet at one side of the point interaction and Robin boundary conditions at the other side.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal specific interactions of post-translational palmitoyl modifications with rhodopsin in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Bjoern E.S.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Brown, Michael F.; Feller, Scott E.; Vogel, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the behavior of the highly flexible post-translational lipid modifications of rhodopsin from multiple-microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Rhodopsin was studied in a realistic membrane environment that includes cholesterol, as well as saturated and polyunsaturated lipids with phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine headgroups. The simulation reveals striking differences between the palmitoylations at Cys322 and Cys323 as well as between the palmitoyl chains and the neighboring lipids. Notably the palmitoyl group at Cys322 shows considerably greater contact with helix H1 of rhodopsin, yielding frequent chain upturns with longer reorientational correlation times, and relatively low order parameters. While the palmitoylation at Cys323 makes fewer protein contacts and has increased order compared to Cys322, it nevertheless exhibits greater flexibility with smaller order parameters than the stearoyl chains of the surrounding lipids. The dynamical structure of the palmitoylations—as well as their extensive fluctuations—suggests a complex function for the post-translational modifications in rhodopsin and potentially other G protein-coupled receptors, going beyond their role as membrane anchoring elements. Rather, we propose that the palmitoylation at Cys323 has a potential role as a lipid anchor, whereas the palmitoyl-protein interaction observed for Cys322 suggests a more specific interaction that affects the stability of the dark state of rhodopsin. PMID:22280374

  17. Cytotoxicity in bacterial cultures: interaction and cell-specificity, possible factors in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Johansson, A; Bergenholtz, A; Holm, S E

    1994-09-01

    Cytotoxicity in culture media of various growing bacterial strains was estimated by Cr-51 release of labelled target-cells. Interaction studies were made by adding each of the different UV-killed bacteria to the medium with viable bacteria. The reference oral bacterial strains were: Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans Y4, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus mitis, which were compared with the reference bacteria Staphylococcus aureus 209 and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The target cells were: gingival fibroblasts (GF), periodontal membrane fibroblasts (PMF), pulpal fibroblasts (PF), HeLa-cells (HeLa), and lymphoid neoplasm cells (LN). Synergistic, as well as antagonistic, effects on target cells were observed. The cytotoxicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans in presence of P. gingivalis is neutralized while in presence of S. aureus it was increased. Bacterial interactions with F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis cytotoxicity were observed. The cytotoxicity of F. nucleatum was increased when cultured together with A. actinomycetemcomitans. Each cell type reacted differently to the toxicity of the supernatant of growth medium in which the same bacterial strain had been cultivated, which indicates cell specificity of the toxins. PMID:7799211

  18. Site-Specific Epithelial-Mesenchymal Interactions in Digestive Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dumortier, Jérôme; Ratineau, Christelle; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Pourreyron, Céline; Anderson, Wena; Jacquier, Marie-France; Blanc, Martine; Bernard, Christine; Bellaton, Claire; Remy, Lionel; Chayvialle, Jean-Alain; Roche, Colette

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about the functional interactions between digestive neuroendocrine tumor cells and their stromal microenvironment. The focus of our study is whether mesenchymal cells modulate peptide expression, cell proliferation, and invasiveness in digestive neuroendocrine tumor cells. We designed an experimental in vivo and in vitro study using the mouse enteroendocrine cell line STC-1. In vivo, STC-1 cells were injected subcutaneously in 18 immunosuppressed newborn rats. At day 21, all animals presented poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors with lung metastases. Subcutaneous tumors were usually limited by a capsule containing basement membrane components and myofibroblasts that presented a low mitotic index. Lung tumors were devoid of capsule and poor in myofibroblasts, and their mitotic index was high. The profile of peptide expression in STC-1 tumors was different from that of cultured STC-1 cells. In vitro, STC-1 cells were cultured with fibroblasts of different origins, including dermis, lung, digestive tract, and liver. Based on their origin, myofibroblasts differentially modulated hormone synthesis, proliferation, spreading, and adhesion of STC-1 cells. In conclusion, our results show that site-specific functional interactions between mesenchymal and neuroendocrine cells may contribute to modulating the behavior of digestive neuroendocrine tumors, depending on their growth site. PMID:10666396

  19. Allele-specific FKBP5 DNA demethylation mediates gene–childhood trauma interactions

    PubMed Central

    Klengel, Torsten; Mehta, Divya; Anacker, Christoph; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Pruessner, Jens C; Pariante, Carmine M; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Mercer, Kristina B; Mayberg, Helen S; Bradley, Bekh; Nemeroff, Charles B; Holsboer, Florian; Heim, Christine M; Ressler, Kerry J; Rein, Theo; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2014-01-01

    Although the fact that genetic predisposition and environmental exposures interact to shape development and function of the human brain and, ultimately, the risk of psychiatric disorders has drawn wide interest, the corresponding molecular mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. We found that a functional polymorphism altering chromatin interaction between the transcription start site and long-range enhancers in the FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) gene, an important regulator of the stress hormone system, increased the risk of developing stress-related psychiatric disorders in adulthood by allele-specific, childhood trauma–dependent DNA demethylation in functional glucocorticoid response elements of FKBP5. This demethylation was linked to increased stress-dependent gene transcription followed by a long-term dysregulation of the stress hormone system and a global effect on the function of immune cells and brain areas associated with stress regulation. This identification of molecular mechanisms of genotype-directed long-term environmental reactivity will be useful for designing more effective treatment strategies for stress-related disorders. PMID:23201972

  20. DUF581 Is Plant Specific FCS-Like Zinc Finger Involved in Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    K, Muhammed Jamsheer; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-01-01

    Zinc fingers are a ubiquitous class of protein domain with considerable variation in structure and function. Zf-FCS is a highly diverged group of C2-C2 zinc finger which is present in animals, prokaryotes and viruses, but not in plants. In this study we identified that a plant specific domain of unknown function, DUF581 is a zf-FCS type zinc finger. Based on HMM-HMM comparison and signature motif similarity we named this domain as FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) domain. A genome wide survey identified that FLZ domain containing genes are bryophytic in origin and this gene family is expanded in spermatophytes. Expression analysis of selected FLZ gene family members of A. thaliana identified an overlapping expression pattern suggesting a possible redundancy in their function. Unlike the zf-FCS domain, the FLZ domain found to be highly conserved in sequence and structure. Using a combination of bioinformatic and protein-protein interaction tools, we identified that FLZ domain is involved in protein-protein interaction. PMID:24901469

  1. Allele-specific FKBP5 DNA demethylation mediates gene-childhood trauma interactions.

    PubMed

    Klengel, Torsten; Mehta, Divya; Anacker, Christoph; Rex-Haffner, Monika; Pruessner, Jens C; Pariante, Carmine M; Pace, Thaddeus W W; Mercer, Kristina B; Mayberg, Helen S; Bradley, Bekh; Nemeroff, Charles B; Holsboer, Florian; Heim, Christine M; Ressler, Kerry J; Rein, Theo; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2013-01-01

    Although the fact that genetic predisposition and environmental exposures interact to shape development and function of the human brain and, ultimately, the risk of psychiatric disorders has drawn wide interest, the corresponding molecular mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. We found that a functional polymorphism altering chromatin interaction between the transcription start site and long-range enhancers in the FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) gene, an important regulator of the stress hormone system, increased the risk of developing stress-related psychiatric disorders in adulthood by allele-specific, childhood trauma-dependent DNA demethylation in functional glucocorticoid response elements of FKBP5. This demethylation was linked to increased stress-dependent gene transcription followed by a long-term dysregulation of the stress hormone system and a global effect on the function of immune cells and brain areas associated with stress regulation. This identification of molecular mechanisms of genotype-directed long-term environmental reactivity will be useful for designing more effective treatment strategies for stress-related disorders. PMID:23201972

  2. Affinity- and specificity-enhancing mutations are frequent in multispecific interactions between TIMP2 and MMPs.

    PubMed

    Sharabi, Oz; Shirian, Jason; Grossman, Moran; Lebendiker, Mario; Sagi, Irit; Shifman, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Multispecific proteins play a major role in controlling various functions such as signaling, regulation of transcription/translation, and immune response. Hence, a thorough understanding of the atomic-level principles governing multispecific interactions is important not only for the advancement of basic science but also for applied research such as drug design. Here, we study evolution of an exemplary multispecific protein, a Tissue Inhibitor of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP2) that binds with comparable affinities to more than twenty-six members of the Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) and the related ADAMs families. We postulate that due to its multispecific nature, TIMP2 is not optimized to bind to any individual MMP type, but rather embodies a compromise required for interactions with all MMPs. To explore this hypothesis, we perform computational saturation mutagenesis of the TIMP2 binding interface and predict changes in free energy of binding to eight MMP targets. Computational results reveal the non-optimality of the TIMP2 binding interface for all studied proteins, identifying many affinity-enhancing mutations at multiple positions. Several TIMP2 point mutants predicted to enhance binding affinity and/or binding specificity towards MMP14 were selected for experimental verification. Experimental results show high abundance of affinity-enhancing mutations in TIMP2, with some point mutations producing more than ten-fold improvement in affinity to MMP14. Our computational and experimental results collaboratively demonstrate that the TIMP2 sequence lies far from the fitness maximum when interacting with its target enzymes. This non-optimality of the binding interface and high potential for improvement might characterize all proteins evolved for binding to multiple targets. PMID:24710006

  3. Local genetic adaptation generates latitude-specific effects of warming on predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    De Block, Marjan; Pauwels, Kevin; Van Den Broeck, Maarten; De Meester, Luc; Stoks, Robby

    2013-03-01

    Temperature effects on predator-prey interactions are fundamental to better understand the effects of global warming. Previous studies never considered local adaptation of both predators and prey at different latitudes, and ignored the novel population combinations of the same predator-prey species system that may arise because of northward dispersal. We set up a common garden warming experiment to study predator-prey interactions between Ischnura elegans damselfly predators and Daphnia magna zooplankton prey from three source latitudes spanning >1500 km. Damselfly foraging rates showed thermal plasticity and strong latitudinal differences consistent with adaptation to local time constraints. Relative survival was higher at 24 °C than at 20 °C in southern Daphnia and higher at 20 °C than at 24 °C, in northern Daphnia indicating local thermal adaptation of the Daphnia prey. Yet, this thermal advantage disappeared when they were confronted with the damselfly predators of the same latitude, reflecting also a signal of local thermal adaptation in the damselfly predators. Our results further suggest the invasion success of northward moving predators as well as prey to be latitude-specific. We advocate the novel common garden experimental approach using predators and prey obtained from natural temperature gradients spanning the predicted temperature increase in the northern populations as a powerful approach to gain mechanistic insights into how community modules will be affected by global warming. It can be used as a space-for-time substitution to inform how predator-prey interaction may gradually evolve to long-term warming. PMID:23504827

  4. Specific domains of nucleolin interact with Hdm2 and antagonize Hdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Purvi; d'Avout, Claire; Kane, Naomi S; Borowiec, James A; Saxena, Anjana

    2012-02-01

    Nucleolin is an abundant multifunctional nucleolar protein with defined roles in ribosomal RNA processing, RNA polymerase I catalyzed transcription and the regulation of apoptosis. Earlier we reported that human nucleolin binds to the p53 antagonist human double minute 2 (Hdm2) as determined by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation assays using cell lysates. We also demonstrated that nucleolin antagonizes Hdm2-mediated degradation of p53. Here, we identify specific domains of nucleolin and Hdm2 proteins that support mutual interaction and investigate the implications of complex formation on p53 ubiquitination and protein levels. Our data indicate that the nucleolin N-terminus as well as the central RNA-binding domain (RBD) are predominantly involved in binding to Hdm2. The nucleolin RBD robustly bound to the NLS/NES (nuclear localization and export signals) domain of Hdm2 in vitro, while the N-terminus of nucleolin preferentially associated with the Hdm2 RING (really interesting new gene) domain expressed in cells. We further demonstrate that the C-terminal glycine-arginine rich domain of nucleolin serves as the predominant binding domain for direct interaction with p53. While overexpression of nucleolin or its various domains had no significant effect on Hdm2 auto-ubiquitination, the nucleolin RBD antagonized the Hdm2 E3 ligase activity against p53, leading to p53 stabilization. Conversely, the adjacent glycine-arginine rich domain of nucleolin interacted with p53 causing a modest stimulatory effect on p53 ubiquitination. These data suggest that changes in nucleolin conformation can alter the availabilities of such domains in vivo to modulate the overall impact of nucleolin on Hdm2 activity and hence on p53 stability. PMID:22103682

  5. Resolving Non-Specific and Specific Adhesive Interactions of Catechols at Solid/Liquid Interfaces at the Molecular Scale.

    PubMed

    Utzig, Thomas; Stock, Philipp; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-08-01

    The adhesive system of mussels evolved into a powerful and adaptive system with affinity to a wide range of surfaces. It is widely known that thereby 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) plays a central role. However underlying binding energies remain unknown at the single molecular scale. Here, we use single-molecule force spectroscopy to estimate binding energies of single catechols with a large range of opposing chemical functionalities. Our data demonstrate significant interactions of Dopa with all functionalities, yet most interactions fall within the medium-strong range of 10-20 kB T. Only bidentate binding to TiO2 surfaces exhibits a higher binding energy of 29 kB T. Our data also demonstrate at the single-molecule level that oxidized Dopa and amines exhibit interaction energies in the range of covalent bonds, confirming the important role of Dopa for cross-linking in the bulk mussel adhesive. We anticipate that our approach and data will further advance the understanding of biologic and technologic adhesives. PMID:27374053

  6. Structural insights into interactions between ubiquitin specific protease 5 and its polyubiquitin substrates by mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Oldham, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and ion mobility-mass spectrometry have been used to study the interactions of the large, multidomain, and conformationally flexible deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific protease 5 (USP5) with mono- and poly-ubiquitin (Ub) substrates. Employing a C335A active site mutant, mass spectrometry was able to detect the stable and cooperative binding of two mono-Ub molecules at the Zinc-finger ubiquitin binding protein (ZnF-UBP) and catalytic site domains of USP5. Tetra-ubiquitin, in contrast, bound to USP5 with a stoichiometry of 1 : 1, and formed additional interactions with USP5's two ubiquitin associated domains (UBAs). Charge-state distribution and ion mobility analysis revealed that both mono- and tetra-ubiquitin bound to the compact conformation of USP5 only, and that tetra-ubiquitin binding was able to shift the conformational distribution of USP5 from a mixture of extended and compact forms to a completely compact conformation. PMID:25970461

  7. Species-specific long range interactions between receptor/ligand pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Liebert, R B; Prieve, D C

    1995-01-01

    Total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) monitors Brownian fluctuations in elevation as small as 1 nm by measuring the scattering of a single sphere illuminated by an evanescent wave when the sphere is levitated by colloidal forces such as electrostatic double-layer repulsion. From the Boltzmann distribution of elevations sampled by the sphere over time, the potential energy profile can be determined with a resolution of approximately 0.1 of the thermal energy kT. Thus, the interaction between a receptor-coated (goat, horse, or rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG)) latex sphere and a protein A (SpA)-coated glass microscope slide was studied. A typical TIRM potential energy profile measured between a bare sphere and a bare glass plate, where the sphere fluctuates around the secondary potential energy minimum formed between double-layer repulsion and gravitational attraction, agrees well with DLVO theory. The interactions measured between IgG-coated spheres and SpA-coated slides, on the other hand, displayed a weaker repulsion compared with that observed between bare surfaces under the same conditions. Analysis of the results obtained between the coated surfaces suggests an additional attractive force. The decay length of this attraction correlates with the known dissociation constants for the binding of IgG with SpA in free solution. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7669911

  8. Leishmania-sand fly interactions controlling species-specific vector competence.

    PubMed

    Sacks, D L

    2001-04-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by a wide range of parasites that are transmitted by an even wider range of sand fly vectors. The phlebotomine vectors of Leishmaniasis are in some cases only permissive to the complete development of the species of Leishmania that they transmit in nature. The parasite-sand fly interactions that control this specificity are related to differences in the ability of the parasite to inhibit or to resist killing by proteolytic enzymes released into the mid-gut soon after blood feeding, and/or to maintain infection in the mid-gut during excretion of the digested blood meal. In each case, surface expressed or released phosphoglycan-containing molecules appear to promote parasite survival. The evidence that the surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG) mediates promastigote attachment to the mid-gut epithelium so as to prevent their loss during blood-meal excretion is especially strong based on the comparison of development in sand flies using LPG-deficient mutants. LPG displays interspecies polymorphisms in their phosphoglycan domains that in most cases can fully account for species-specific vector competence. PMID:11298643

  9. Natamycin inhibits vacuole fusion at the priming phase via a specific interaction with ergosterol.

    PubMed

    te Welscher, Yvonne Maria; Jones, Lynden; van Leeuwen, Martin Richard; Dijksterhuis, Jan; de Kruijff, Ben; Eitzen, Gary; Breukink, Eefjan

    2010-06-01

    The antifungal antibiotic natamycin belongs to the family of polyene antibiotics. Its antifungal activity arises via a specific interaction with ergosterol in the plasma membrane (te Welscher et al., J. Biol. Chem. 283:6393-6401, 2008). However, this activity does not involve disruption of the membrane barrier function, a well-known property of other members of the polyene antibiotic family, such as filipin and nystatin. Here we tested the effect of natamycin on vacuole membrane fusion, which is known to be ergosterol dependent. Natamycin blocked the fusion of isolated vacuoles without compromising the barrier function of the vacuolar membrane. Sublethal doses of natamycin perturbed the cellular vacuole morphology, causing the formation of many more small vacuolar structures in yeast cells. Using vacuoles isolated from yeast strains deficient in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway, we showed that the inhibitory activity of natamycin was dependent on the presence of specific chemical features in the structure of ergosterol that allow the binding of natamycin. We found that natamycin inhibited the priming stage of vacuole fusion. Similar results were obtained with nystatin. These results suggest a novel mode of action of natamycin and perhaps all polyene antibiotics, which involves the impairment of membrane fusion via perturbation of ergosterol-dependent priming reactions that precede membrane fusion, and they may point to an effect of natamycin on ergosterol-dependent protein function in general. PMID:20385867

  10. Natamycin Inhibits Vacuole Fusion at the Priming Phase via a Specific Interaction with Ergosterol▿

    PubMed Central

    te Welscher, Yvonne Maria; Jones, Lynden; van Leeuwen, Martin Richard; Dijksterhuis, Jan; de Kruijff, Ben; Eitzen, Gary; Breukink, Eefjan

    2010-01-01

    The antifungal antibiotic natamycin belongs to the family of polyene antibiotics. Its antifungal activity arises via a specific interaction with ergosterol in the plasma membrane (te Welscher et al., J. Biol. Chem. 283:6393-6401, 2008). However, this activity does not involve disruption of the membrane barrier function, a well-known property of other members of the polyene antibiotic family, such as filipin and nystatin. Here we tested the effect of natamycin on vacuole membrane fusion, which is known to be ergosterol dependent. Natamycin blocked the fusion of isolated vacuoles without compromising the barrier function of the vacuolar membrane. Sublethal doses of natamycin perturbed the cellular vacuole morphology, causing the formation of many more small vacuolar structures in yeast cells. Using vacuoles isolated from yeast strains deficient in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway, we showed that the inhibitory activity of natamycin was dependent on the presence of specific chemical features in the structure of ergosterol that allow the binding of natamycin. We found that natamycin inhibited the priming stage of vacuole fusion. Similar results were obtained with nystatin. These results suggest a novel mode of action of natamycin and perhaps all polyene antibiotics, which involves the impairment of membrane fusion via perturbation of ergosterol-dependent priming reactions that precede membrane fusion, and they may point to an effect of natamycin on ergosterol-dependent protein function in general. PMID:20385867

  11. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A.

    2014-12-23

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Although lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions.

  12. Getting down to specifics: profiling gene expression and protein-DNA interactions in a cell type-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Colin D.; Southall, Tony D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of multicellular organisms are comprised of an extraordinary range of cell types, with different properties and gene expression profiles. Understanding what makes each cell type unique, and how their individual characteristics are attributed, are key questions for both developmental and neurobiologists alike. The brain is an excellent example of the cellular diversity expressed in the majority of eukaryotes. The mouse brain comprises of approximately 75 million neurons varying in morphology, electrophysiology, and preferences for synaptic partners. A powerful process in beginning to pick apart the mechanisms that specify individual characteristics of the cell, as well as their fate, is to profile gene expression patterns, chromatin states, and transcriptional networks in a cell type-specific manner, i.e. only profiling the cells of interest in a particular tissue. Depending on the organism, the questions being investigated, and the material available, certain cell type-specific profiling methods are more suitable than others. This chapter reviews the approaches presently available for selecting and isolating specific cell types and evaluates their key features. PMID:26410031

  13. Site-specific DOTA/europium-labeling of recombinant human relaxin-3 for receptor-ligand interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Jie; Luo, Xiao; Liu, Ya-Li; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wade, John D; Bathgate, Ross A D; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2012-08-01

    Relaxin-3 (also known as INSL7) is a recently identified neuropeptide belonging to the insulin/relaxin superfamily. It has putative roles in the regulation of stress responses, food intake, and reproduction by activation of its cognate G-protein-coupled receptor RXFP3. It also binds and activates the relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP4 in vitro. To obtain a europium-labeled relaxin-3 as tracer for studying the interaction of these receptors with various ligands, in the present work we propose a novel site-specific labeling strategy for the recombinant human relaxin-3 that has been previously prepared in our laboratory. First, the N-terminal 6 × His-tag of the single-chain relaxin-3 precursor was removed by Aeromonas aminopeptidase and all of the primary amines of the resultant peptide were reversibly blocked by citroconic anhydride. Second, the A-chain N-terminus of the blocked peptide was released by endoproteinase Asp-N cleavage that removed the linker peptide between the B- and A-chains. Third, an alkyne moiety was introduced to the newly released A-chain N-terminus by reaction with the highly active primary amine-specific N-hydroxysuccinimide ester. Fourth, after removal of the reversible blockage under mild acidic condition, europium-loaded DOTA with an azide moiety was introduced to the two-chain relaxin-3 carrying the alkyne moiety through click chemistry. Using this site-specific labeling strategy, homogeneous monoeuropium-labeled human relaxin-3 could be obtained with good overall yield. In contrast, conventional random labeling resulted in a complex mixture that was poorly resolved because human relaxin-3 has four primary amine moieties that all react with the modification reagent. Both saturation and competition binding assays demonstrated that the DOTA/Eu(3+)-labeled relaxin-3 retained high binding affinity for human RXFP3, RXFP4, and RXFP1 and was therefore a suitable non-radioactive and stable tracer to study the interaction of various

  14. Biomaterial design for specific cellular interactions: Role of surface functionalization and geometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhar, Poornima

    The areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering have experienced extraordinary growth in recent years with the application of engineering principles and their potential to support and improve the field of medicine. The tremendous progress in nanotechnology and biotechnology has lead to this explosion of research and development in biomedical applications. Biomaterials can now be engineered at a nanoscale and their specific interactions with the biological tissues can be modulated. Various design parameters are being established and researched for design of drug-delivery carriers and scaffolds to be implanted into humans. Nanoparticles made from versatile biomaterial can deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of bio-macromolecules, such as proteins and oligonucleotides. Similarly in the field of tissue engineering, current approaches emphasize nanoscale control of cell behavior by mimicking the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) unlike, traditional scaffolds. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely connected fields and both of these applications require materials with exceptional physical, chemical, biological, and biomechanical properties to provide superior therapy. In the current study the surface functionalization and the geometric features of the biomaterials has been explored. In particular, a synthetic surface for culture of human embryonic stem cells has been developed, demonstrating the importance of surface functionalization in maintaining the pluripotency of hESCs. In the second study, the geometric features of the drug delivery carriers are investigated and the polymeric nanoneedles mediated cellular permeabilization and direct cytoplasmic delivery is reported. In the third study, the combined effect of surface functionalization and geometric modification of carriers for vascular targeting is enunciated. These studies illustrate how the biomaterials can be designed to achieve various cellular behaviors and control the

  15. Sequence-specific interactions of drugs interfering with the topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Manlio; Gatto, Barbara; Moro, Stefano; Sissi, Claudia; Zagotto, Giuseppe

    2002-07-18

    DNA-processing enzymes, such as the topoisomerases (tops), represent major targets for potent anticancer (and antibacterial) agents. The drugs kill cells by poisoning the enzymes' catalytic cycle. Understanding the molecular details of top poisoning is a fundamental requisite for the rational development of novel, more effective antineoplastic drugs. In this connection, sequence-specific recognition of the top-DNA complex is a key step to preferentially direct the action of the drugs onto selected genomic sequences. In fact, the (reversible) interference of drugs with the top-DNA complex exhibits well-defined preferences for DNA bases in the proximity of the cleavage site, each drug showing peculiarities connected to its structural features. A second level of selectivity can be observed when chemically reactive groups are present in the structure of the top-directed drug. In this case, the enzyme recognizes or generates a unique site for covalent drug-DNA binding. This will further subtly modulate the drug's efficiency in stimulating DNA damage at selected sites. Finally, drugs can discriminate not only among different types of tops, but also among different isoenzymes, providing an additional level of specific selection. Once the molecular basis for DNA sequence-dependent recognition has been established, the above-mentioned modes to generate selectivity in drug poisoning can be rationally exploited, alone or in combination, to develop tailor-made drugs targeted at defined loci in cancer cells. PMID:12084456

  16. Sequence requirement for specific interaction of an enhancer binding protein (EBP1) with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, L; Hay, R T

    1989-01-01

    Short DNA sequence motifs have been identified in viral and cellular enhancers which represent the binding sites for a variety of trans- acting factors. One such HeLa cell factor, EBP1, has been purified and shown to bind to sequences in the SV40 enhancer. The PRDII element in the human beta-interferon gene regulatory element (IRE) shows strong sequence similarity to the EBP1 binding site in the SV40 enhancer. We demonstrate here that EBP1 binds to its sites in the SV40 enhancer and IRE in a similar manner, making base specific contacts over one complete turn of the DNA double helix. Mutational analysis of the EBP1 sites in the IRE and SV40 enhancer has identified the DNA sequence requirements necessary for specific EBP1/DNA complex formation. In addition, 34 DNA sequences related to the EBP1 binding site were analysed for their ability to bind EBP1. Sequences constituting high affinity binding sites possess the sequence 5'-GG(N)6CC-3'. Single base pair changes in the region between the conserved Gs and Cs can generally be tolerated although it is clear that these intervening bases contribute to binding affinity. Mutations in the recognition site which could lead to gross structural changes in the DNA abolish EBP1 binding. Images PMID:2536920

  17. Interactions of five D-mannose-specific lectins with a series of synthetic branched trisaccharides.

    PubMed

    Kaku, H; Goldstein, I J; Oscarson, S

    1991-06-25

    The interaction of a series of synthetic, branched trisaccharides with five D-mannose-specific lectins was studied by precipitation-inhibition assay. The branched methyl alpha-D-mannotrioside, alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Manp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-Man pOMe, the best inhibitor of the Con A-Dextran interaction, was 42 times more potent than alpha-D-ManpOMe, and 3-6 times more potent than the two trisaccharides substituted with D-glucosyl groups, and 8-15 times those with D-galactosyl groups. Surprisingly, methyl O-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl-(1----3)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside was bound to Con A 8-fold more avidly than methyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside. However, the related pea lectin (PSA) was singularly different from Con A in its carbohydrate-binding activity, showing no significantly enhanced binding to any of the sugars examined. The trisacchrides containing terminal, nonreducing, (1----3)-linked alpha-D-mannopyranosyl groups, i.e., alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Glep-(1----6)]alpha-D-Manp OMe, alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)]-alpha-D-Galp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-ManpOMe++ +, and alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Manp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-Man pOMe, were the best inhibitors of the snowdrop lectin (GNA)-D-mannan precipitation system. On the other hand, all branched trisaccharides exhibited very similar inhibitory potencies toward the daffodil lectin (NPA)-D-mannan interaction, whereas alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Galp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-ManpOMe++ + and alpha-D-Manp-(1----3)-[alpha-D-Manp-(1----6)]-alpha-D-Man pOMe were somewhat better inhibitors than the other branched trisaccharides of the amaryllis lectin (HHA)-D-mannan precipitation reaction. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1933932

  18. Bioinspired Saccharide-Saccharide Interaction and Smart Polymer for Specific Enrichment of Sialylated Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuling; Xiong, Yuting; Qing, Guangyan; Jiang, Ge; Li, Xianqin; Sun, Taolei; Liang, Xinmiao

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal sialylation of proteins is highly associated with many major diseases, such as cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. However, this study is challenging owing to the difficulty in enriching trace sialylated glycopeptides (SGs) from highly complex biosamples. The key to solving this problem relies strongly on the design of novel SG receptors to capture the sialic acid (SA) moieties in a specific and tunable manner. Inspired by the saccharide-saccharide interactions in life systems, here we introduce saccharide-based SG receptors into this study. Allose (a monosaccharide) displays specific and pH-sensitive binding toward SAs. Integrating allose units into a polyacrylamide chain generates a saccharide-responsive smart copolymer (SRSC). Such design significantly improves the selectivity of SA binding; meanwhile, this binding can be intelligently triggered in a large extent by solution polarity and pH. As a result, SRSC exhibits high-performance enrichment capacity toward SGs, even under 500-fold interference of bovine serum albumins digests, which is notably higher than conventional materials. In real biosamples of HeLa cell lysates, 180 sialylated glycosylation sites (SGSs) have been identified using SRSC. This is apparently superior to those obtained by SA-binding lectins including WGA (18 SGSs) and SNA (22 SGSs). Furthermore, lactose displays good chemoselectivity toward diverse disaccharides, which indicated the good potential of lactose-based material in glycan discrimination. Subsequently, the lactose-based SRSC facilitates the stepwise isolation of O-linked or N-linked SGs with the same peptide sequence but varied glycans by CH3CN/H2O gradients. This study opens a new avenue for next generation of glycopeptide enrichment materials. PMID:27172767

  19. Staphylococcus epidermidis Esp Degrades Specific Proteins Associated with Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Host-Pathogen Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Takeo; Takada, Koji; Okuda, Ken-ichi; Tajima, Akiko; Iwase, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus exhibits a strong capacity to attach to abiotic or biotic surfaces and form biofilms, which lead to chronic infections. We have recently shown that Esp, a serine protease secreted by commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis, disassembles preformed biofilms of S. aureus and inhibits its colonization. Esp was expected to degrade protein determinants of the adhesive and cohesive strength of S. aureus biofilms. The aim of this study was to elucidate the substrate specificity and target proteins of Esp and thereby determine the mechanism by which Esp disassembles S. aureus biofilms. We used a mutant Esp protein (EspS235A) with defective proteolytic activity; this protein did not disassemble the biofilm formed by a clinically isolated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain, thereby indicating that the proteolytic activity of Esp is essential for biofilm disassembly. Esp degraded specific proteins in the biofilm matrix and cell wall fractions, in contrast to proteinase K, which is frequently used for testing biofilm robustness and showed no preference for proteolysis. Proteomic and immunological analyses showed that Esp degrades at least 75 proteins, including 11 biofilm formation- and colonization-associated proteins, such as the extracellular adherence protein, the extracellular matrix protein-binding protein, fibronectin-binding protein A, and protein A. In addition, Esp selectively degraded several human receptor proteins of S. aureus (e.g., fibronectin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin) that are involved in its colonization or infection. These results suggest that Esp inhibits S. aureus colonization and biofilm formation by degrading specific proteins that are crucial for biofilm construction and host-pathogen interaction. PMID:23316041

  20. Self-Specific Stimuli Interact Differently than Non-Self-Specific Stimuli with Eyes-Open Versus Eyes-Closed Spontaneous Activity in Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Pengmin; Grimm, Simone; Duncan, Niall W.; Holland, Giles; Guo, Jia shen; Fan, Yan; Weigand, Anne; Baudewig, Juergen; Bajbouj, Malek; Northoff, Georg

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that there may be a distinct relationship between spontaneous neural activity and subsequent or concurrent self-specific stimulus-induced activity. This study aims to test the impact of spontaneous activity as recorded in an eyes-open (EO) resting state as opposed to eyes-closed (EC) on self-specific versus non-self-specific auditory stimulus-induced activity in fMRI. In our first experiment we used self-specific stimuli comprised of the subject’s own name and non-self-specific stimuli comprised of a friend’s name and an unknown name, presented during EO versus EC baselines in a 3 name condition × 2 baseline design. In Experiment 2 we directly measured spontaneous activity in the absence of stimuli during EO versus EC to confirm a modulatory effect of the two baseline conditions in the regions found to show an interaction effect in Experiment 1. Spontaneous activity during EO was significantly higher than during EC in bilateral auditory cortex and non-self-specific names yielded stronger signal changes relative to EO baseline than to EC. In contrast, there was no difference in response to self-specific names relative to EO baseline than to EC despite the difference between spontaneous activity levels. These results support an impact of spontaneous activity on stimulus-induced activity, moreover an impact that depends on the high-level stimulus characteristic of self-specificity. PMID:23908625

  1. Interacting factors and cellular localization of SR protein-specific kinase Dsk1

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhaohua; Luca, Maria; Taggart-Murphy, Laura; Portillio, Jessica; Chang, Cathey; Guven, Ayse; Lin, Ren-Jang; Murray, Johanne; Carr, Antony

    2012-10-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Dsk1 is an SR protein-specific kinase (SRPK), whose homologs have been identified in every eukaryotic organism examined. Although discovered as a mitotic regulator with protein kinase activity toward SR splicing factors, it remains largely unknown about what and how Dsk1 contributes to cell cycle and pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we investigated the Dsk1 function by determining interacting factors and cellular localization of the kinase. Consistent with its reported functions, we found that pre-mRNA processing and cell cycle factors are prominent among the proteins co-purified with Dsk1. The identification of these factors led us to find Rsd1 as a novel Dsk1 substrate, as well as the involvement of Dsk1 in cellular distribution of poly(A){sup +} RNA. In agreement with its role in nuclear events, we also found that Dsk1 is mainly localized in the nucleus during G{sub 2} phase and at mitosis. Furthermore, we revealed the oscillation of Dsk1 protein in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This paper marks the first comprehensive analysis of in vivo Dsk1-associated proteins in fission yeast. Our results reflect the conserved role of SRPK family in eukaryotic organisms, and provide information about how Dsk1 functions in pre-mRNA processing and cell-division cycle.

  2. Cell-Peptide Specific Interaction Can Inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv Infection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Deisy Carolina; Ocampo, Marisol; Reyes, Cesar; Arévalo-Pinzón, Gabriela; Munoz, Marina; Patarroyo, Manuel Alfonso; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2016-04-01

    Studying proteins from the M. tuberculosis H37Rv envelop is important for understanding host-pathogen interaction regarding bacterial infection and survival within a host; such knowledge is indispensable regarding studies aimed at developing drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis, a disease which continues to cause more than one million deaths worldwide every year. The present work presents a study of the Rv3705c protein which has been described as being an outer protein. Several servers and bioinformatics' tools were used for predicting its location on mycobacterial surface and a 3D model of the protein was obtained which was then compared to experimental circular dichroism results for its peptides. PCR assays were used for corroborating rv3705c gene presence and transcription in a laboratory strain and immunoblotting and electron microscopy were used for confirming protein localisation on cell envelop. Receptor-ligand assays revealed two peptides having high specific binding (HABPs); peptide 38485 ((121)DRAFHRVVDRTVGTSGQTTA(140)) bound to both cell lines used as infection target (U937 and A549 epithelial cell line-derived macrophages) and 38488 ((181)RLRENVLLQAKVTQSGNAGP(200)) bound to U937 cells. It was found that peptide 38485 provided significant inhibition regarding mycobacterial entry to both cell lines in in vitro assays. These results led to proposing peptide 38485 as one of the epitopes to be used in future studies aimed at characterising the immune response of functionally important synthetic peptides which could be included in developing a synthetic anti-tuberculosis vaccine. PMID:26375297

  3. Ecological strategies in california chaparral: Interacting effects of soils, climate, and fire on specific leaf area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anacker, B.; Rajakaruna, N.; Ackerly, D.; Harrison, S.; Keeley, J.; Vasey, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: High values of specific leaf area (SLA) are generally associated with high maximal growth rates in resource-rich conditions, such as mesic climates and fertile soils. However, fire may complicate this relationship since its frequency varies with both climate and soil fertility, and fire frequency selects for regeneration strategies (resprouting versus seeding) that are not independent of resource-acquisition strategies. Shared ancestry is also expected to affect the distribution of resource-use and regeneration traits. Aims: We examined climate, soil, and fire as drivers of community-level variation in a key functional trait, SLA, in chaparral in California. Methods: We quantified the phylogenetic, functional, and environmental non-independence of key traits for 87 species in 115 plots. Results: Among species, SLA was higher in resprouters than seeders, although not after phylogeny correction. Among communities, mean SLA was lower in harsh interior climates, but in these climates it was higher on more fertile soils and on more recently burned sites; in mesic coastal climates, mean SLA was uniformly high despite variation in soil fertility and fire history. Conclusions: We conclude that because important correlations exist among both species traits and environmental filters, interpreting the functional and phylogenetic structure of communities may require an understanding of complex interactive effects. ?? 2011 Botanical Society of Scotland and Taylor & Francis.

  4. The RNA binding protein Hfq interacts specifically with tRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taewoo; Feig, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Hfq is an RNA binding protein that has been studied extensively for its role in the biology of small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in bacteria, where it facilitates post-transcriptional gene regulation during stress responses. We show that Hfq also binds with high specificity and nanomolar affinity to tRNAs despite their lack of a canonical A/U rich single-stranded sequence. This affinity is comparable to that of Hfq for its validated ncRNA targets. Two sites on tRNAs are protected by Hfq binding, one on the D-stem and the other on the T-stem. Mutational analysis and competitive binding experiments indicate that Hfq uses its proximal surface (also called the L4 face) to bind tRNAs, the same surface that interacts with ncRNAs but a site distinct from where poly(A) oligonucleotides bind. hfq knockout strains are known to have broad pleiotropic phenotypes, but none of them are easily explained by or imply a role for tRNA binding. We show that hfq deletion strains have a previously unrecognized phenotype associated with mistranslation and significantly reduced translational fidelity. We infer that tRNA binding and reduced fidelity are linked by a role for Hfq in tRNA modification. PMID:18230766

  5. Empirical methods for identifying specific peptide-protein interactions for smart reagent development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogot, Joshua M.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2012-06-01

    The current state of the art in the development of antibody alternatives is fraught with difficulties including mass production, robustness, and overall cost of production. The isolation of synthetic alternatives using peptide libraries offers great potential for recognition elements that are more stable and have improved binding affinity and target specificity. Although recent advances in rapid and automated discovery and synthetic library engineering continue to show promise for this emerging science, there remains a critical need for an improved fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of recognition. To better understand the fundamental mechanisms of binding, it is critical to be able to accurately assess binding between peptide reagents and protein targets. The development of empirical methods to analyze peptide-protein interactions is often overlooked, since it is often assumed that peptides can easily substitute for antibodies in antibody-derived immunoassays. The physico-chemical difference between peptides and antibodies represents a major challenge for developing peptides in standard immunoassays as capture or detection reagents. Analysis of peptide presents a unique challenge since the peptide has to be soluble, must be capable of target recognition, and capable of ELISA plate or SPR chip binding. Incorporating a plate-binding, hydrophilic peptide fusion (PS-tag) improves both the solubility and plate binding capability in a direct peptide ELISA format. Secondly, a solution based methods, affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) method is presented as a solution-based, affinity determination method that can be used for determining both the association constants and binding kinetics.

  6. Specific ligation to double-stranded RNA for analysis of cellular RNA::RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Faridani, Omid R; McInerney, Gerald M; Gradin, Katarina; Good, Liam

    2008-09-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is formed in cells as intra- and intermolecular RNA interactions and is involved in a range of biological processes including RNA metabolism, RNA interference and translation control mediated by natural antisense RNA and microRNA. Despite this breadth of activities, few molecular tools are available to analyse dsRNA as native hybrids. We describe a two-step ligation method for enzymatic joining of dsRNA adaptors to any dsRNA molecule in its duplex form without a need for prior sequence or termini information. The method is specific for dsRNA and can ligate various adaptors to label, map or amplify dsRNA sequences. When combined with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, the method is sensitive and can detect low nanomolar concentrations of dsRNA in total RNA. As examples, we mapped dsRNA/single-stranded RNA junctions within Escherichia coli hok mRNA and the human immunodeficiency virus TAR element using RNA from bacteria and mammalian cells. PMID:18628292

  7. Rheological investigation of specific interactions in Na Alginate and Na MMT suspension.

    PubMed

    Zlopasa, Jure; Norder, Ben; Koenders, Eduard A B; Picken, Stephen J

    2016-10-20

    Here we report on a study of a rheological behavior of sodium alginate and montmorillonite suspension. We find that viscoelastic behavior of this suspension is dramatically affected with increasing volume fraction of montmorillonite platelets. Addition of montmorillonite generally leads to gel formation, which is attributed to interactions of montmorillonite and alginate via H-bonding and attraction between the positive edges of the platelets and the anionic backbone of the biopolymer. A critical concentration for the measured system was observed at 20wt.% montmorillonite, where a crossover to a gel-like structure was detected. The observed gel has a rubber plateau, which develops further with higher montmorillonite concentration. In this physical gel the relaxation maximum was detected, which is associated with the breaking and reformation of the bonds between the platelets and the biopolymer. For this transient behavior, we find that a Maxwell type viscoelasticity quite well describes the relaxation time and the observed G'-G" crossover. We believe that this gel-like behavior plays an important role in formation of highly ordered nanostructures that develop during the drying of these bio-nanocomposite suspensions. PMID:27474553

  8. Interaction of the non-phosphorylated peptide G7-18NATE with Grb7-SH2 domain requires phosphate for enhanced affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Gunzburg, Menachem J; Ambaye, Nigus D; Del Borgo, Mark P; Pero, Stephanie C; Krag, David N; Wilce, Matthew C J; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2012-01-01

    Src-homology (SH2) domains are an attractive target for the inhibition of specific signalling pathways but pose the challenge of developing a truly specific inhibitor. The G7-18NATE cyclic peptide is reported to specifically inhibit the growth factor receptor bound protein 7 (Grb7) adapter protein, implicated in the progression of several cancer types, via interactions with its SH2 domain. G7-18NATE effectively inhibits the interaction of Grb7 with ErbB3 and focal adhesion kinase in cell lysates and, with the addition of a cell permeability sequence, inhibits the growth and migration of a number of breast cancer cell lines. It is thus a promising lead in the development of therapeutics targeted to Grb7. Here we investigate the degree to which G7-18NATE is specific for the Grb7-SH2 domain compared with closely related SH2 domains including those of Grb10, Grb14, and Grb2 using surface plasmon resonance. We demonstrate that G7-18NATE binds with micromolar binding affinity to Grb7-SH2 domain (K(D)  = 4-6 μm) compared with 50-200 times lower affinity for Grb10, Grb14, and Grb2 but that this specificity depends critically on the presence of phosphate in millimolar concentrations. Other differences in buffer composition, including use of Tris or 2-(N-Morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid or varying the pH, do not impact on the interaction. This suggests that under cellular conditions, G7-18NATE binds with highest affinity to Grb7. In addition, our findings demonstrate that the basis of specificity of G7-18NATE binding to the Grb7-SH2 domain is via other than intrinsic structural features of the protein, representing an unexpected mode of molecular recognition. PMID:22213451

  9. First order reversal curves analysis of the temperature effect on magnetic interactions in barium ferrite with La-Co addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Marcos I.; Bercoff, Paula G.; Bertorello, Héctor R.

    2009-10-01

    First order reversal curves (FORCs) distributions are a powerful tool for investigating hysteresis and interactions in magnetic systems and have been widely applied. La-Co substitution in barium hexaferrites has also been extensively studied. The most effective substitution to improve the magnetic properties (coercive field and energy product) is given by x=y=0.2 in the formula Ba1-xLaxFe12-yCoyO19. In this work, this stoichiometry is initially used to obtain a state where more than one phase is present. The magnetic behavior as a function of temperature was studied in order to have an insight into the magnetic interactions that originate a decrease in the magnetic performance of Ba hexaferrite magnets. The sample was structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetically studied in a SQUID magnetometer. FORC distributions were used to study the dependence of the magnetic interactions with the temperature. FORC diagrams performed on the sample at different temperatures exhibit similar characteristics, such as the spread in the hc-hu plane and a spread out of the hc-axes. These features are interpreted in terms of exchange-interacting particles and dipolar interactions, respectively. As the temperature decreases, stronger interactions are noticed among hard and soft phases.

  10. Investigation of helium addition for laser-induced plasma spectroscopy of pure gas phase systems: Analyte interactions and signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, C. A.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hahn, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    The role of helium addition on the analyte signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of pure gaseous systems was examined using carbon and hydrogen atomic emission lines. Increased analyte response, as measured by peak-to-base and signal-to-noise ratios, was observed with increasing helium addition, with maximum enhancement approaching a factor of 7. Additional measurements revealed a significant decrease in plasma electron density with increasing helium addition. To explore the mechanisms of analyte signal enhancement, the helium emission lines were also examined and found to be effectively quenched with nitrogen addition. In consideration of the data, it is concluded that the role of metastable helium is not as important as the overall changes in plasma properties, namely electron density and laser-plasma coupling. Helium addition is concluded to affect the electron density via Penning ionization, as well as to play a role in the initial plasma breakdown processes.

  11. Affinity and specificity of interactions between Nedd4 isoforms and the epithelial Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Henry, Pauline C; Kanelis, Voula; O'Brien, M Christine; Kim, Brian; Gautschi, Ivan; Forman-Kay, Julie; Schild, Laurent; Rotin, Daniela

    2003-05-30

    The epithelial Na+ channel (alphabetagammaENaC) regulates salt and fluid homeostasis and blood pressure. Each ENaC subunit contains a PY motif (PPXY) that binds to the WW domains of Nedd4, a Hect family ubiquitin ligase containing 3-4 WW domains and usually a C2 domain. It has been proposed that Nedd4-2, but not Nedd4-1, isoforms can bind to and suppress ENaC activity. Here we challenge this notion and show that, instead, the presence of a unique WW domain (WW3*) in either Nedd4-2 or Nedd4-1 determines high affinity interactions and the ability to suppress ENaC. WW3* from either Nedd4-2 or Nedd4-1 binds ENaC-PY motifs equally well (e.g. Kd approximately 10 microm for alpha- or betaENaC, 3-6-fold higher affinity than WW4), as determined by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence. Moreover, dNedd4-1, which naturally contains a WW3* instead of WW2, is able to suppress ENaC function equally well as Nedd4-2. Homology models of the WW3*.betaENaC-PY complex revealed that a Pro and Ala conserved in all WW3*, but not other Nedd4-WW domains, help form the binding pocket for PY motif prolines. Extensive contacts are formed between the betaENaC-PY motif and the Pro in WW3*, and the small Ala creates a large pocket to accommodate the peptide. Indeed, mutating the conserved Pro and Ala in WW3* reduces binding affinity 2-3-fold. Additionally, we demonstrate that mutations in PY motif residues that form contacts with the WW domain based on our previously solved structure either abolish or severely reduce binding affinity to the WW domain and that the extent of binding correlates with the level of ENaC suppression. Independently, we show that a peptide encompassing the PY motif of sgk1, previously proposed to bind to Nedd4-2 and alter its ability to regulate ENaC, does not bind (or binds poorly) the WW domains of Nedd4-2. Collectively, these results suggest that high affinity of WW domain-PY-motif interactions rather than affiliation with Nedd4-1/Nedd-2 is critical for ENaC suppression

  12. Specific effects of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-interacting protein 1 in neuronal axons

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shu; Wen, Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-jian; Kan, Quan-cheng

    2016-01-01

    c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK)-interacting protein 3 plays an important role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) anterograde axonal transport. It remains unclear whether JNK-interacting protein 1 mediates similar effects, or whether JNK-interacting protein 1 affects the regulation of TrkB anterograde axonal transport. In this study, we isolated rat embryonic hippocampus and cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro. Coimmunoprecipitation results demonstrated that JNK-interacting protein 1 formed TrkB complexes in vitro and in vivo. Immunocytochemistry results showed that when JNK-interacting protein 1 was highly expressed, the distribution of TrkB gradually increased in axon terminals. However, the distribution of TrkB reduced in axon terminals after knocking out JNK-interacting protein 1. In addition, there were differences in distribution of TrkB after JNK-interacting protein 1 was knocked out compared with not. However, knockout of JNK-interacting protein 1 did not affect the distribution of TrkB in dendrites. These findings confirm that JNK-interacting protein 1 can interact with TrkB in neuronal cells, and can regulate the transport of TrkB in axons, but not in dendrites. PMID:26981098

  13. S-Nitrosylation: Specificity, Occupancy, and Interaction with Other Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Kohr, Mark J.; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: S-nitrosylation (SNO) has been identified throughout the body as an important signaling modification both in physiology and a variety of diseases. SNO is a multifaceted post-translational modification, in that it can either act as a signaling molecule itself or as an intermediate to other modifications. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: Through extensive SNO research, we have made progress toward understanding the importance of single cysteine-SNO sites; however, we are just beginning to explore the importance of specific SNO within the context of other SNO sites and post-translational modifications. Additionally, compartmentalization and SNO occupancy may play an important role in the consequences of the SNO modification. Future Directions: In this review, we will consider the context of SNO signaling and discuss how the transient nature of SNO, its role as an oxidative intermediate, and the pattern of SNO, should be considered when determining the impact of SNO signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1209–1219. PMID:23157187

  14. BISPHENOL A EXPOSURE DURING EARLY DEVELOPMENT INDUCES SEX-SPECIFIC CHANGES IN ADULT ZEBRAFISH SOCIAL INTERACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Daniel N.; Hoffmann, Raymond G.; Hoke, Elizabeth S.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental bisphenol A (BPA) exposure is associated with adverse behavioral effects, although underlying modes of action remain unclear. Because BPA is a suspected xenoestrogen, the objective was to identify sex-based changes in adult zebrafish social behavior developmentally exposed to BPA (0.0, 0.1 or 1 μM) or one of two control compounds (0.1μM 17β-estradiol [E2], and 0.1 μM GSK4716, a synthetic estrogen-related receptor γ ligand). A test chamber was divided lengthwise so each arena held one fish unable to detect the presence of the other fish. A mirror was inserted at one end of each arena; baseline activity levels were determined without mirror. Arenas were divided into 3, computer-generated zones to represent different distances from mirror image. Circadian rhythm patterns were evaluated at 1–3 (= AM) and 5–8 (= PM) hr postprandial. Adult zebrafish were placed into arenas and monitored by digital camera for 5 min. Total distance traveled, % time spent at mirror image, and number of attacks on mirror image were quantified. E2, GSK4716, and all BPA treatments dampened male activity and altered male circadian activity patterns; there was no marked effect on female activity. BPA induced non-monotonic effects (response curve changes direction within range of concentrations examined) on male % time at mirror only in AM. All treatments produced increased % time at the mirror during PM. Male attacks on the mirror were reduced by BPA exposure only during AM. There were sex-specific effects of developmental BPA on social interactions and time-of-day of observation affected results. PMID:25424546

  15. Sox transcription factors require selective interactions with Oct4 and specific transactivation functions to mediate reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Irene; Jauch, Ralf; Eras, Volker; Chng, Wen-Bin Alfred; Chen, Jiaxuan; Divakar, Ushashree; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Stanton, Lawrence W

    2013-12-01

    The unique ability of Sox2 to cooperate with Oct4 at selective binding sites in the genome is critical for reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We have recently demonstrated that Sox17 can be converted into a reprogramming factor by alteration of a single amino acid (Sox17EK) within its DNA binding HMG domain. Here we expanded this study by introducing analogous mutations to 10 other Sox proteins and interrogated the role of N-and C-termini on the reprogramming efficiency. We found that point-mutated Sox7 and Sox17 can convert human and mouse fibroblasts into iPSCs, but Sox4, Sox5, Sox6, Sox8, Sox9, Sox11, Sox12, Sox13, and Sox18 cannot. Next we studied regions outside the HMG domain and found that the C-terminal transactivation domain of Sox17 and Sox7 enhances the potency of Sox2 in iPSC assays and confers weak reprogramming potential to the otherwise inactive Sox4EK and Sox18EK proteins. These results suggest that the glutamate (E) to lysine (K) mutation in the HMG domain is necessary but insufficient to swap the function of Sox factors. Moreover, the HMG domain alone fused to the VP16 transactivation domain is able to induce reprogramming, albeit at low efficiency. By molecular dissection of the C-terminus of Sox17, we found that the β-catenin interaction region contributes to the enhanced reprogramming efficiency of Sox17EK. To mechanistically understand the enhanced reprogramming potential of Sox17EK, we analyzed ChIP-sequencing and expression data and identified a subset of candidate genes specifically regulated by Sox17EK and not by Sox2. PMID:23963638

  16. ICRF specific plasma wall interactions in JET with the ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobkov, Vl.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Colas, L.; Clever, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Huber, A.; Jacquet, P.; Klepper, C.; Lerche, E.; Maggi, C.; Marcotte, F.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M. L.; McCormick, K.; Meigs, A.; Milanesio, D.; Monakhov, I.; Neu, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pütterich, Th.; Rimini, F.; Van Rooj, G.; Sergienko, G.; Van Eester, D.

    2013-07-01

    A variety of plasma wall interactions (PWIs) during operation of the so-called A2 ICRF antennas is observed in JET with the ITER-like wall. Amongst effects of the PWIs, the W content increase is the most significant, especially at low plasma densities. No increase of W source from the main divertor and entrance of the outer divertor during ICRF compared to NBI phases was found by means of spectroscopic and WI (400.9 nm) imaging diagnostics. In contrary, the W flux there is higher during NBI. Charge exchange neutrals of hydrogen isotopes could be excluded as considerable contributors to the W source. The high W content in ICRF heated limiter discharges suggests the possibility of other W sources than the divertor alone. Dependencies of PWIs to individual ICRF antennas during q95-scans, and intensification of those for the -90° phasing, indicate a link between the PWIs and the antenna near-fields. The PWIs include heat loads and Be sputtering pattern on antenna limiters. Indications of some PWIs at the outer divertor entrance are observed which do not result in higher W flux compared to the NBI phases, but are characterized by small antenna-specific (up to 25% with respect to ohmic phases) bipolar variations of WI emission. The first TOPICA calculations show a particularity of the A2 antennas compared to the ITER antenna, due to the presence of long antenna limiters in the RF image current loop and thus high near-fields across the most part of the JET outer wall.

  17. ICRF Specific Plasma Wall Interactions in JET with the ITER-Like Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Bobkov, V.; Arnoux, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Colas, L.; Clever, M.; Czarnecka, A.; Braun, F.; Dux, R.; Huber, Alexander; Lerche, E.; Maggi, C.; Marcotte, F.; Maslov, M.; Matthews, G.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A. G.; Monakhov, I.; Putterich, Th.; Rimini, F.; Rooj, G. Van; Sergienko, G.; Van Eester, D.

    2013-01-01

    A variety of plasma wall interactions (PWIs) during operation of the so-called A2 ICRF antennas is observed in JET with the ITER-like wall. Amongst effects of the PWIs, the W content increase is the most significant, especially at low plasma densities. No increase of W source from the main divertor and entrance of the outer divertor during ICRF compared to NBI phases was found by means of spectroscopic and WI (400.9 nm) imaging diagnostics. In contrary, the W flux there is higher during NBI. Charge exchange neutrals of hydrogen isotopes could be excluded as considerable contributors to the W source. The high W content in ICRF heated limiter discharges suggests the possibility of other W sources than the divertor alone. Dependencies of PWIs to individual ICRF antennas during q95-scans, and intensification of those for the 90 phasing, indicate a link between the PWIs and the antenna near-fields. The PWIs include heat loads and Be sputtering pattern on antenna limiters. Indications of some PWIs at the outer divertor entrance are observed which do not result in higher W flux compared to the NBI phases, but are characterized by small antenna-specific (up to 25% with respect to ohmic phases) bipolar variations of WI emission. The first TOPICA calculations show a particularity of the A2 antennas compared to the ITER antenna, due to the presence of long antenna limiters in the RF image current loop and thus high near-fields across the most part of the JET outer wall.

  18. Combining subject-specific and low-order modeling techniques to study fluid-structure interaction of rabbit phonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Siyuan; Luo, Haoxiang; Novaleski, Carolyn; Rousseau, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    A subject-specific computational model has been developed to simulate flow-induced vocal fold vibration for evoked rabbit phonation. A freshly excised larynx was scanned using micro magnetic resonance imaging. Images were segmented to identify the vocal fold tissue and lumen surface. The 3D fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model was then constructed with experimentally measured flow parameters as input. The tissue deformation is assumed to be finite, and a previously developed FSI solver is used to simulate the coupled flow and nonlinear tissue mechanics. In addition, a one-dimensional flow model based on heuristic estimate of the flow separation point is used as an efficient tool to guide the full 3D simulation. This low-order model is motivated by presence of uncertainties in the tissue properties and boundary conditions, and it has proven to be very useful in our study. Similarities and differences in the vibration characteristics of the vocal fold predicted by these two models will be discussed.

  19. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs). While lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here, we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA Gas5, which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions. PMID:25377354

  20. Invariant TAD Boundaries Constrain Cell-Type-Specific Looping Interactions between Promoters and Distal Elements around the CFTR Locus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily M.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Jain, Gaurav; Dekker, Job

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional genome structure plays an important role in gene regulation. Globally, chromosomes are organized into active and inactive compartments while, at the gene level, looping interactions connect promoters to regulatory elements. Topologically associating domains (TADs), typically several hundred kilobases in size, form an intermediate level of organization. Major questions include how TADs are formed and how they are related to looping interactions between genes and regulatory elements. Here we performed a focused 5C analysis of a 2.8 Mb chromosome 7 region surrounding CFTR in a panel of cell types. We find that the same TAD boundaries are present in all cell types, indicating that TADs represent a universal chromosome architecture. Furthermore, we find that these TAD boundaries are present irrespective of the expression and looping of genes located between them. In contrast, looping interactions between promoters and regulatory elements are cell-type specific and occur mostly within TADs. This is exemplified by the CFTR promoter that in different cell types interacts with distinct sets of distal cell-type-specific regulatory elements that are all located within the same TAD. Finally, we find that long-range associations between loci located in different TADs are also detected, but these display much lower interaction frequencies than looping interactions within TADs. Interestingly, interactions between TADs are also highly cell-type-specific and often involve loci clustered around TAD boundaries. These data point to key roles of invariant TAD boundaries in constraining as well as mediating cell-type-specific long-range interactions and gene regulation. PMID:26748519

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of progesterone receptor-promoter interactions reveals a molecular model for isoform-specific function.

    PubMed

    Connaghan-Jones, Keith D; Heneghan, Aaron F; Miura, Michael T; Bain, David L

    2007-02-13

    Human progesterone receptors (PR) exist as two functionally distinct isoforms, PR-A and PR-B. The proteins are identical except for an additional 164 residues located at the N terminus of PR-B. To determine the mechanisms responsible for isoform-specific functional differences, we present here a thermodynamic dissection of PR-A-promoter interactions and compare the results to our previous work on PR-B. This analysis has generated a number of results inconsistent with the traditional, biochemically based model of receptor function. Specifically, statistical models invoking preformed PR-A dimers as the active binding species demonstrate that intrinsic binding energetics are over an order of magnitude greater than is apparent. High-affinity binding is opposed, however, by a large energetic penalty. The consequences of this penalty are 2-fold: Successive monomer binding to a palindromic response element is thermodynamically favored over preformed dimer binding, and DNA-induced dimerization of the monomers is largely abolished. Furthermore, PR-A binding to multiple PREs is only weakly cooperative, as judged by a 5-fold increase in overall stability. Comparison of these results to our work on PR-B demonstrates that whereas both isoforms appear to have similar DNA binding affinities, PR-B in fact has a greatly increased intrinsic binding affinity and cooperative binding ability relative to PR-A. These differences thus suggest that residues unique to PR-B allosterically regulate the energetics of cooperative promoter assembly. From a functional perspective, the differences in microscopic affinities predict receptor-promoter occupancies that accurately correlate with the transcriptional activation profiles seen for each isoform. PMID:17277083

  2. Interaction of Ets-1 and the POU-homeodomain protein GHF-1/Pit-1 reconstitutes pituitary-specific gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, A P; Wasylyk, C; Wasylyk, B; Gutierrez-Hartmann, A

    1997-01-01

    The pituitary-specific, POU-homeodomain factor GHF-1/Pit-1 is necessary, but not sufficient, for cell-specific expression of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), and thyrotropin. Combinatorial interactions of GHF-1 with other factors are likely to be required; however, such factors and their mechanisms of action remain to be elucidated. Here we identify Ets-1 as a factor that functionally and physically interacts with GHF-1 to fully reconstitute proximal PRL promoter activity. In contrast, Ets-2 has no effect, and the alternatively spliced GHF-2/Pit-1beta variant fails to synergize with Ets-1. The Ets-1-GHF-1 synergy requires a composite Ets-1-GHF-1 cis element and is dependent on an Ets-1-specific protein domain. Furthermore, the ancestrally related and GHF-1-dependent GH promoter, which lacks this composite element, does not exhibit this response. Finally, Ets-1, but not Ets-2, binds directly to GHF-1 and GHF-2. These data show that a functional interaction of GHF-1 and Ets-1, acting via a composite DNA element, is required to establish lactotroph-specific PRL gene expression, thus providing a molecular mechanism by which GHF-1 can discriminate between the GH and PRL genes. These results underscore the importance of transcription factors that are distinct from, but interact with, homeobox proteins to establish lineage-specific gene expression. PMID:9032233

  3. Differential expression and interaction specificity of the heterotrimeric G-protein family in Brassica nigra reveal their developmental- and condition-specific roles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Roshan; Arya, Gulab C; Bisht, Naveen C

    2014-11-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins, comprised of α, β and γ subunits, are important signal transducers across phyla. The G-proteins are well characterized in the model plants Arabidopsis and rice, and their inventories are possible from a few other plant species; however, information about the roles played by G-proteins in regulating various growth and developmental traits particularly from polyploid crops is still awaited. In this study, we have isolated one Gα (BniB.Gα1), three Gβ (BniB.Gβ1-BniB.Gβ3) and four Gγ (BniB.Gγ1-BniB.Gγ4) coding sequences from the paleopolyploid Brassica nigra, a major condiment crop of the Brassicaceae family. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis revealed that whole-genome triplication events in the Brassica lineage had proportionally increased the inventory of the Gβ subunit, but not of the Gα and Gγ subunits in B. nigra. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that members of the G-protein subunit genes have distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns and were differentially altered in response to various stress and phytohormone treatments, thereby suggesting differential transcriptional regulation of G-protein genes in B. nigra. Interestingly, specific members of G-protein subunits were co-expressed across plant developmental stages, and in response to different elicitor treatments. Yeast-based interaction screens further predicted that the B. nigra G-protein subunits interacted in most of the possible combinations, although showing a high degree of interaction specificity between different G-protein subunits. Our data on physical interactions coupled with the co-expression pattern of the multiple G-protein subunit genes suggested that tissue- and condition-specific functional combinations of Gαβγ heterotrimers may exist in paleopolyploid B. nigra, to control diverse growth and development processes. PMID:25231958

  4. Interaction between impaired and unimpaired speakers: inter-subjectivity and the interplay of culturally shared and situation specific knowledge.

    PubMed

    Collins, S; Marková, I

    1999-12-01

    The part played by culturally shared knowledge in interaction is generally recognised. However, the details of how it may be manifested in interaction are largely undocumented. This study explores this issue in the context of interactions between impaired and unimpaired speakers, using a conversation analytic approach in combination with a communication task commonly employed in experimental social psychology. Three exemplary cases are analysed. Results show that when the task interaction is co-constructed, the interaction is collaboratively enacted, participants' actions are in alignment, and the task outcome is relatively accurate. When the unimpaired speaker proceeds on the basis of culturally shared knowledge, and thereby 'unilaterally' manages the interaction, two courses of action are available to the impaired speaker. The impaired speaker may make attempts to provide situation specific details. In this case, because each participant is drawing on different resources to construct the interaction, their actions are out of alignment, and the task outcome is less accurate. Alternatively, the impaired speaker may concur with the culturally shared knowledge drawn on by the unimpaired speaker, in which case the participants' actions are in alignment, but the task outcome is highly inaccurate. The authors conclude that by combining a conversation analytic approach with a communication task which reflects participants' everyday experiences, orientations to different interaction resources can be drawn out. This can have relevance for, and help to elicit, practices in everyday interaction. PMID:10641294

  5. CCHCR1 interacts specifically with the E2 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 on a surface overlapping BRD4 binding.

    PubMed

    Muller, Mandy; Demeret, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus E2 proteins are key regulators of the viral life cycle, whose functions are commonly mediated through protein-protein interactions with the host cell proteome. We identified an interaction between E2 and a cellular protein called CCHCR1, which proved highly specific for the HPV16 genotype, the most prevalent in HPV-associated cancers. Further characterization of the interaction revealed that CCHCR1 binds the N-terminal alpha helices of HPV16 E2 N-terminal domain. On this domain, the CCHCR1 binding interface overlaps that of BRD4, a key mediator of E2 transcriptional activity. Consequently a physical competition occurs between the two proteins for the binding to HPV16 E2, and CCHCR1 interferes with BRD4-mediated enhancement of E2-dependent transcription. In addition, we showed that the interaction with CCHCR1 induced a massive redistribution of HPV16 E2, from a predominantly nuclear to a cytoplasmic localization in dot-like structures, where E2 perfectly co-localizes with CCHCR1. Such a cytoplasmic docking likely interferes with the nuclear functions of HPV16 E2. Upon co-expression of BRD4 and CCHCR1, E2 accumulates both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, indicating that for HPV16, both sub-cellular localization and transcriptional functions of E2 may depend on the proportion of both factors within the cell. We provided evidence of a strong induction of the keratinocyte differentiation marker K10 by HPV16 E2, and showed that this activation is compromised by the interaction with CCHCR1. The specific interaction described here could thus impact on the pathogenesis of HPV16. We propose that it could underlie some specific traits of HPV16 infection, such as an enhanced propensity to give rise to lesions evolving toward cancer. PMID:24664238

  6. A Non-Additive Interaction of a Functional MAO-A VNTR and Testosterone Predicts Antisocial Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sjöberg, Rickard L; Ducci, Francesca; Barr, Christina S; Newman, Timothy K; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David

    2008-01-01

    A functional VNTR polymorphism in the promoter of the monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA-LPR) has previously been shown to be an important predictor of antisocial behavior in men. Testosterone analogues are known to interact with the MAOA promoter in vitro to influence gene transcription as well as in vivo to influence CSF levels of the MAO metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) in human males. We examined the possible joint effects of testosterone (measured in CSF) and MAOA-LPR genotype on antisocial personality disorder and scores on the Brown–Goodwin Aggression scale in 95 unrelated male criminal alcoholics and 45 controls. The results confirm that MAOA genotype and CSF testosterone interact to predict antisocial behaviors. The MAOA/testosterone interaction also predicted low levels of CSF MHPG, which tentatively suggests the possibility that the interaction may be mediated by a direct effect on gene transcription. If replicated these findings offer plausible explanations for previous inconsistencies in studies of the relationship between testosterone and male human aggression, as well as for how MAOA genotype may influence aggressive behavior in human males. PMID:17429405

  7. A non-additive interaction of a functional MAO-A VNTR and testosterone predicts antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Rickard L; Ducci, Francesca; Barr, Christina S; Newman, Timothy K; Dell'osso, Liliana; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David

    2008-01-01

    A functional VNTR polymorphism in the promoter of the monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA-LPR) has previously been shown to be an important predictor of antisocial behavior in men. Testosterone analogues are known to interact with the MAOA promoter in vitro to influence gene transcription as well as in vivo to influence CSF levels of the MAO metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) in human males. We examined the possible joint effects of testosterone (measured in CSF) and MAOA-LPR genotype on antisocial personality disorder and scores on the Brown-Goodwin Aggression scale in 95 unrelated male criminal alcoholics and 45 controls. The results confirm that MAOA genotype and CSF testosterone interact to predict antisocial behaviors. The MAOA/testosterone interaction also predicted low levels of CSF MHPG, which tentatively suggests the possibility that the interaction may be mediated by a direct effect on gene transcription. If replicated these findings offer plausible explanations for previous inconsistencies in studies of the relationship between testosterone and male human aggression, as well as for how MAOA genotype may influence aggressive behavior in human males. PMID:17429405

  8. Valence-Specific Laterality Effects in Vocal Emotion: Interactions with Stimulus Type, Blocking and Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schepman, Astrid; Rodway, Paul; Geddes, Pauline

    2012-01-01

    Valence-specific laterality effects have been frequently obtained in facial emotion perception but not in vocal emotion perception. We report a dichotic listening study further examining whether valence-specific laterality effects generalise to vocal emotions. Based on previous literature, we tested whether valence-specific laterality effects were…

  9. Gender-Specific Perceptions of Four Dimensions of the Work/Family Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innstrand, Siw Tone; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Falkum, Erik; Espnes, Geir Arild; Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold. The first intention was to examine the factorial validity of a work/family interaction in terms of the direction of influence (work-to-family vs. family-to-work) and type of effect (conflict vs. facilitation). Second, gender differences along these four dimensions of work/family interaction were explored. Data…

  10. Van der Waals interactions between polymers with sequence-specific polarizabilities: Stiff polymers and Gaussian coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    We consider the van der Waals interaction between a pair of polymers with quenched heterogeneous sequences of local polarizabilities along their backbones, and study the effective pairwise interaction energy for both stiff polymers and flexible Gaussian coils. In particular, we focus on the cases where the pair of polarizability sequences are (i) distinct and (ii) identical. We find that the pairwise interaction energies of distinct and identical Gaussian coils are both isotropic and exhibit the same decay behavior for separations larger than their gyration radius, in contradistinction to the orientationally anisotropic interaction energies of distinct and identical stiff polymers. For both Gaussian coils and stiff polymers, the attractive interaction between identical polymers is enhanced if the polarizability sequence is more heterogeneous.

  11. Enzymatic Mechanism of Leishmania major Peroxidase and the Critical Role of Specific Ionic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chreifi, Georges; Hollingsworth, Scott A.; Li, Huiying; Tripathi, Sarvind; Arce, Anton P.; Magaña-Garcia, Hugo I.; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania major peroxidase (LmP) is very similar to the well-known yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP). Both enzymes catalyze the peroxidation of cytochrome c. Like CcP, LmP reacts with H2O2 to form Compound I, which consists of a ferryl heme and a Trp radical, FeIV= O;Trp•+. Cytochrome c (Cytc) reduces the Trp radical to give Compound II, FeIV= O;Trp, which is followed by an intramolecular electron transfer to give FeIII–OH;Trp•+, and in the last step, Cytc reduces the Trp radical. In this study, we have used steady-state and single-turnover kinetics to improve our understanding of the overall mechanism of LmP catalysis. While the activity of CcP greatly increases with ionic strength, the kcat for LmP remains relatively constant at all ionic strengths tested. Therefore, unlike CcP, where dissociation of oxidized Cytc is limiting at low ionic strengths, association/dissociation reactions are not limiting at any ionic strength in LmP. We conclude that in LmP, the intramolecular electron transfer reaction, FeIV= O;Trp to FeIII–OH;Trp•+, is limiting at all ionic strengths. Unlike CcP, LmP depends on key intermolecular ion pairs to form the electron transfer competent complex. Mutating these sites causes the initial rate of association to decrease by 2 orders of magnitude and a substantial decrease in kcat. The drop in kcat is due to a switch in the rate-limiting step of the mutants from intramolecular electron transfer to the rate of association in forming the LmP–LmCytc complex. These studies show that while LmP and CcP form very similar complexes and exhibit similar activities, they substantially differ in how their activity changes as a function of ionic strength. This difference is primarily due to the heavy reliance of LmP on highly specific intermolecular ion pairs, while CcP relies mainly on nonpolar interactions. PMID:25941976

  12. Mor-Dalphos-Pd (II) oxidative addition complexes and related NH3 adducts: Insights into bonding and nonbonding interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima Batista, Ana P.; Braga, Ataualpa A. C.

    2016-09-01

    The stabilizing effects and bonding properties of the Pd metallic center in [(κ2 -P,N-Mor-Dalphos)Pd(Ar)Cl] complexes and related NH3 adducts were investigated by density functional theory (DFT), the intrinsic bond orbital (IBO) approach and the Su-Li energy decomposition method (Su-Li EDA). The IBO analysis showed that the P atom from the P,N-Mor-Dalphos structure has stabilizing contributions in all Pd-Cl and Pd-NH3 bonds in the complexes. According to the Su-Li energy decomposition analysis, the main energy that drives the interaction between the [Mor-Dalphos-Pd(Ar)] moiety and Cl- is the electrostatic term, therefore, the electrostatic energy interaction between them might be an important factor for taking into account when designing other [Mor-Dalphos-Pd(Ar)]-Cl precatalysts.

  13. Post-Hartree-Fock studies of the He/Mg(0001) interaction: Anti-corrugation, screening, and pairwise additivity.

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Fernández-Perea, Ricardo; Madzharova, Fani; Voloshina, Elena

    2016-06-28

    The adsorption of noble gases on metallic surfaces represents a paradigmatic case of van-der-Waals (vdW) interaction due to the role of screening effects on the corrugation of the interaction potential [J. L. F. Da Silva et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 066104 (2003)]. The extremely small adsorption energy of He atoms on the Mg(0001) surface (below 3 meV) and the delocalized nature and mobility of the surface electrons make the He/Mg(0001) system particularly challenging, even for state-of-the-art vdW-corrected density functional-based (vdW-DFT) approaches [M. P. de Lara-Castells et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 194701 (2015)]. In this work, we meet this challenge by applying two different procedures. First, the dispersion-corrected second-order Möller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2C) approach is adopted, using bare metal clusters of increasing size. Second, the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)] is applied at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, using embedded cluster models of the metal surface. Both approaches provide clear evidences of the anti-corrugation of the interaction potential: the He atom prefers on-top sites, instead of the expected hollow sites. This is interpreted as a signature of the screening of the He atom by the metal for the on-top configuration. The strong screening in the metal is clearly reflected in the relative contribution of successively deeper surface layers to the main dispersion contribution. Aimed to assist future dynamical simulations, a pairwise potential model for the He/surface interaction as a sum of effective He-Mg pair potentials is also presented, as an improvement of the approximation using isolated He-Mg pairs. PMID:27369533

  14. Post-Hartree-Fock studies of the He/Mg(0001) interaction: Anti-corrugation, screening, and pairwise additivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Fernández-Perea, Ricardo; Madzharova, Fani; Voloshina, Elena

    2016-06-01

    The adsorption of noble gases on metallic surfaces represents a paradigmatic case of van-der-Waals (vdW) interaction due to the role of screening effects on the corrugation of the interaction potential [J. L. F. Da Silva et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 066104 (2003)]. The extremely small adsorption energy of He atoms on the Mg(0001) surface (below 3 meV) and the delocalized nature and mobility of the surface electrons make the He/Mg(0001) system particularly challenging, even for state-of-the-art vdW-corrected density functional-based (vdW-DFT) approaches [M. P. de Lara-Castells et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 194701 (2015)]. In this work, we meet this challenge by applying two different procedures. First, the dispersion-corrected second-order Möller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2C) approach is adopted, using bare metal clusters of increasing size. Second, the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)] is applied at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples level, using embedded cluster models of the metal surface. Both approaches provide clear evidences of the anti-corrugation of the interaction potential: the He atom prefers on-top sites, instead of the expected hollow sites. This is interpreted as a signature of the screening of the He atom by the metal for the on-top configuration. The strong screening in the metal is clearly reflected in the relative contribution of successively deeper surface layers to the main dispersion contribution. Aimed to assist future dynamical simulations, a pairwise potential model for the He/surface interaction as a sum of effective He-Mg pair potentials is also presented, as an improvement of the approximation using isolated He-Mg pairs.

  15. Characterization of an Additional Binding Surface on the p97 N-Terminal Domain Involved in Bipartite Cofactor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hänzelmann, Petra; Schindelin, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The type II AAA ATPase p97 interacts with a large number of cofactors that regulate its function by recruiting it to different cellular pathways. Most of the cofactors interact with the N-terminal (N) domain of p97, either via ubiquitin-like domains or short linear binding motifs. While some linear binding motifs form α helices, another group features short stretches of unstructured hydrophobic sequences as found in the so-called SHP (BS1, binding segment 1) motif. Here we present the crystal structure of a SHP-binding motif in complex with p97, which reveals a so far uncharacterized binding site on the p97 N domain that is different from the conserved binding surface of all other known p97 cofactors. This finding explains how cofactors like UFD1/NPL4 and p47 can utilize a bipartite binding mechanism to interact simultaneously with the same p97 monomer via their ubiquitin-like domain and SHP motif. PMID:26712280

  16. The interaction between specific and general information in category learning and representation: unitization and parallel interactive processing.

    PubMed

    Nahinsky, Irwin D; Harbison, J Isaiah

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of specific stimulus information on the use of rule information in a category learning task in 2 experiments, one presented here and an intercategory transfer task reported in an earlier article. In the present experiment photograph--name combinations, called identifiers, were associated with 4 demographic attributes. The same attribute information was shown to all participants. However, for one group of participants, half of the identifiers were paired with attribute values repeated over presentation blocks. For the other group the identifier information was new for each presentation block. The first group performed less well than the second group on stimuli with nonrepeated identifiers, indicating a negative effect of specific stimulus information on processing rule information. Application of a network model to the 2 experiments, which provided for the growth of connections between attribute values in learning, indicated that repetition of identifiers produced a unitizing effect on stimuli. Results suggested that unitization produced interference through connections between irrelevant attribute values. PMID:21506447

  17. Molecular-Level Thermodynamic Switch Controls Chemical Equilibrium in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction of 35 Dipeptide Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Paul W.

    2003-01-01

    Applying the Planck-Benzinger methodology, the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions of 35 dipeptide pairs were examined over a temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. The hydrophobic interaction in these sequence-specific dipeptide pairs is highly similar in its thermodynamic behavior to that of other biological systems. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy change minimum at a well-defined stable temperature, 〈Ts〉, where the bound unavailable energy, TΔSo = 0, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions, are highly dependent on details of molecular structure. Each case confirms the existence of a thermodynamic molecular switch wherein a change of sign in ΔCpo(T)reaction (change in specific heat capacity of reaction at constant pressure) leads to true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, ΔGo(T)reaction, and hence a maximum in the related equilibrium constant, Keq. Indeed, all interacting biological systems examined to date by Chun using the Planck-Benzinger methodology have shown such a thermodynamic switch at the molecular level, suggesting its existence may be universal. PMID:12547816

  18. Genetic relationships between race-nonspecific and race-specific interactions in the wheat-Pyrenophora tritici-repentis pathosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tan spot, caused by the fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, is a destructive disease of wheat worldwide. The disease system is known to include inverse gene-for-gene, race specific interactions involving the recognition of fungal-produced necrotrophic effectors (NEs) by corresponding host sensitiv...

  19. Identification of a novel factor that interacts with an immunoglobulin heavy-chain promoter and stimulates transcription in conjunction with the lymphoid cell-specific factor OTF2.

    PubMed Central

    Yoza, B K; Roeder, R G

    1990-01-01

    The tissue-specific expression of the MOPC 141 immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene was studied by using in vitro transcription. B-cell-specific transcription of this gene was dependent on the octamer element 5'-ATGCAAAG-3', located in the upstream region of this promoter and in the promoters of all other immunoglobulin heavy- and light-chain genes. The interaction of purified octamer transcription factors 1 and 2 (OTF1 and OTF2) with the MOPC 141 promoter was studied by using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting. Purified OTF1 from HeLa cells and OTF1 and OTF2 from B cells bound to identical sequences within the heavy-chain promoter. The OTF interactions we observed extended over the heptamer element 5'-CTCAGGA-3', and it seems likely that the binding of the purified factors involves cooperation between octamer and heptamer sites in this promoter. In addition to these elements, we identified a second regulatory element, the N element with the sequence 5'-GGAACCTCCCCC-3'. The N element could independently mediate low levels of transcription in both B-cell and HeLa-cell extracts, and, in conjunction with the octamer element, it can promote high levels of transcription in B-cell extracts. The N element bound a transcription factor, NTF, that is ubiquitous in cell-type distribution, and NTF was distinct from any of the previously described proteins that bind to similar sequences. Based on these results, we propose that NTF and OTF2 interactions (both with their cognate DNA elements and possibly at the protein-protein level) may be critical to B-cell-specific expression and that these interactions provide additional pathways for regulating gene expression. Images PMID:2109187

  20. Virus-specific interaction between the human cytomegalovirus major capsid protein and the C terminus of the assembly protein precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet-Miller, M; Zhang, R; Durkin, J; Gibson, W; Kwong, A D; Hong, Z

    1996-01-01

    We previously identified a minimal 12-amino-acid domain in the C terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) scaffolding protein which is required for interaction with the HSV-1 major capsid protein. An alpha-helical structure which maximizes the hydropathicity of the minimal domain is required for the interaction. To address whether cytomegalovirus (CMV) utilizes the same strategy for capsid assembly, several glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins to the C terminus of the CMV assembly protein precursor were produced and purified from bacterial cells. The study showed that the glutathione S-transferase fusion containing 16 amino acids near the C-terminal end was sufficient to interact with the major capsid protein. Interestingly, no cross-interaction between HSV-1 and CMV could be detected. Mutation analysis revealed that a three-amino-acid region at the N-terminal side of the central Phe residue of the CMV interaction domain played a role in determining the viral specificity of the interaction. When this region was converted so as to correspond to that of HSV-1, the CMV assembly protein domain lost its ability to interact with the CMV major capsid protein but gained full interaction with the HSV-1 major capsid protein. To address whether the minimal interaction domain of the CMV assembly protein forms an alpha-helical structure similar to that in HSV-1, peptide competition experiments were carried out. The results showed that a cyclic peptide derived from the interaction domain with a constrained (alpha-helical structure competed for interaction with the major capsid protein much more efficiently than the unconstrained linear peptide. In contrast, a cyclic peptide containing an Ala substitution for the critical Phe residue did not compete for the interaction at all. The results of this study suggest that (i) CMV may have developed a strategy similar to that of HSV-1 for capsid assembly; (ii) the minimal interaction motif in the CMV assembly protein

  1. Specific interaction of human Tamm-Horsfall gylcoprotein with leucoagglutinin, a lectin from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney bean).

    PubMed Central

    Serafini-Cessi, F; Franceschi, C; Sperti, S

    1979-01-01

    Human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein inhibits lymphocyte transformation induced by leucoagglutinin and haemagglutinin from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney bean). The glycoprotein interacts with the two lectins, giving insoluble precipitates. The interaction with leucoagglutinin is highly specific, and the shape of the precipitin curve is that of an antigen-antibody reaction; precipitation is specifically inhibited by N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Results are discussed, and it is suggested that inhibition of lymphocyte transformation is due to competition between human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein and carbohydrate receptors on lymphocytes for the two lectins. The interaction between human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein and Phaseolus vulgaris lectins has been used to develop a one-step procedure for the separation of the two lectins by affinity chromatography on (human Tamm-Horsfall-glycoprotein)-Sepharose. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. PMID:118744

  2. Detection of subtle differences in analogous viral capsid proteins by allowing unrestricted specific interaction in solution competition ELISA.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu; Wang, Xin; Fang, Mujin; Xia, Ningshao; Zhao, Qinjian

    2016-10-01

    Assay artifacts were reported in plate-based immuoassays during the assessment of specific molecular interactions owing to the surface induced aggregation/conformational changes. To circumvent surface adsorption and associated artifacts, we used a solution competition ELISA by allowing unrestricted interaction between binding partners to occur in solution for better discrimination between epitopes with subtle differences. A difference of two orders of magnitude in binding to neutralizing antibodies for two truncated versions of the hepatitis E virus capsid protein was observed, while other assays showed comparable antigenicity with the same monoclonal antibodies. Discrimination of epitopes with high degree resemblance in analogous viral capsid proteins was demonstrated quantitatively based on their specific interactions. Therefore, the solution competition ELISA is a method of choice when the detection of subtle differences of two highly analogous proteins is desired. PMID:27321427

  3. Proteomic Studies of Syk-Interacting Proteins Using a Novel Amine-Specific Isotope Tag and GFP Nanotrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galan, Jacob A.; Paris, Leela L.; Zhang, Hua-jie; Adler, Jacob; Geahlen, Robert L.; Tao, W. Andy

    2011-02-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and variants have become powerful tools to study protein localization, interactions, and dynamics. We present here a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to examine protein-protein interactions using anti-GFP single-chain antibody VHH in a combination with a novel stable isotopic labeling reagent, isotope tag on amino groups (iTAG). We demonstrate that the single-chain VHH (GFP nanotrap) allows us to identify interacting partners of the Syk protein-tyrosine kinase bearing a GFP epitope tag with high efficiency and high specificity. Interacting proteins identified include CrkL, BLNK, α- and β-tubulin, Csk, RanBP5 and DJ-1. The iTAG reagents were prepared with simple procedures and characterized with high accuracy in the determination of peptides in model peptide mixtures and as well as in complex mixture. Applications of the iTAG method and GFP nanotrap to an analysis of the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of Syk led to the identification of location-specific associations between Syk and multiple proteins. While the results reveal that the new quantitative proteomic strategy is generally applicable to integrate protein interaction data with subcellular localization, extra caution should be taken in evaluating the results obtained by such affinity purification strategies as many interactions appear to occur following cell lysis.

  4. RNA-RNA interaction is required for the formation of specific bicoid mRNA 3' UTR-STAUFEN ribonucleoprotein particles.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrandon, D; Koch, I; Westhof, E; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1997-01-01

    The formation of the anterior pattern of the Drosophila embryo is dependent on the localization of the mRNA of the morphogen Bicoid (bcd) to the anterior pole of the egg cell. Staufen protein (STAU) is required in a late step of the localization to anchor the bcd mRNA in the anterior cytoplasm. We have shown previously that endogenous STAU associates specifically with injected bcd mRNA 3'-untranslated region (UTR), resulting in the formation of characteristic RNA-protein particles that are transported along microtubules of the mitotic spindles in a directed manner. The regions recognized by STAU in this in vivo assay are predicted to form three stem-loop structures involving large double-stranded stretches. Here, we show that the STAU interaction requires a double-stranded conformation of the stems within the RNA localization signal. In addition, base pairing between two single-stranded loops plays a major role in particle formation. This loop-loop interaction is intermolecular, not intramolecular; thus dimers or multimers of the RNA localization signal must be associated with STAU in these particles. The bcd mRNA 3' UTR can also dimerize in vitro in the absence of STAU. Thus, in addition to RNA-protein interactions, RNA-RNA interaction might be involved in the formation of ribonucleoprotein particles for transport and localization. PMID:9130719

  5. Establishment of a Protein Frequency Library and Its Application in the Reliable Identification of Specific Protein Interaction Partners*

    PubMed Central

    Boulon, Séverine; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Verheggen, Céline; Cobley, Andy; Gregor, Peter; Bertrand, Edouard; Whitehorn, Mark; Lamond, Angus I.

    2010-01-01

    The reliable identification of protein interaction partners and how such interactions change in response to physiological or pathological perturbations is a key goal in most areas of cell biology. Stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based mass spectrometry has been shown to provide a powerful strategy for characterizing protein complexes and identifying specific interactions. Here, we show how SILAC can be combined with computational methods drawn from the business intelligence field for multidimensional data analysis to improve the discrimination between specific and nonspecific protein associations and to analyze dynamic protein complexes. A strategy is shown for developing a protein frequency library (PFL) that improves on previous use of static “bead proteomes.” The PFL annotates the frequency of detection in co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments for all proteins in the human proteome. It can provide a flexible and objective filter for discriminating between contaminants and specifically bound proteins and can be used to normalize data values and facilitate comparisons between data obtained in separate experiments. The PFL is a dynamic tool that can be filtered for specific experimental parameters to generate a customized library. It will be continuously updated as data from each new experiment are added to the library, thereby progressively enhancing its utility. The application of the PFL to pulldown experiments is especially helpful in identifying either lower abundance or less tightly bound specific components of protein complexes that are otherwise lost among the large, nonspecific background. PMID:20023298

  6. Mutualism favours higher host specificity than does antagonism in plant–herbivore interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kawakita, Atsushi; Okamoto, Tomoko; Goto, Ryutaro; Kato, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Coevolved mutualisms often exhibit high levels of partner specificity. Obligate pollination mutualisms, such as the fig–fig wasp and yucca–yucca moth systems, represent remarkable examples of such highly species-specific associations; however, the evolutionary processes underlying these patterns are poorly understood. The prevailing hypothesis suggests that the high degree of specificity in pollinating seed parasites is the fortuitous result of specialization in their ancestors because these insects are derived from endophytic herbivores that are themselves highly host-specific. Conversely, we show that in the Glochidion–Epicephala obligate pollination mutualism, pollinators are more host-specific than are closely related endophytic leaf-feeding taxa, which co-occur with Epicephala on the same Glochidion hosts. This difference is probably not because of shifts in larval diet (i.e. from leaf- to seed-feeding), because seed-eating lepidopterans other than Epicephala do not show the same degree of host specificity as Epicephala. Species of a tentative sister group of Epicephala each attack several distantly related plants, suggesting that the evolution of strict host specificity is tied to the evolution of pollinator habit. These results suggest that mutualists can attain higher host specificity than that of their parasitic ancestors and that coevolutionary selection can be a strong promoter of extreme reciprocal specialization in mutualisms. PMID:20427340

  7. Magnetic tweezers measurement of the bond lifetime-force behavior of the IgG-protein A specific molecular interaction.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hao; Lee, Gil U

    2007-05-23

    The bond lifetime-force behavior of the immunoglobulin G (IgG)-protein A interaction has been studied with magnetic tweezers to characterize the physical properties of the bond under nonequilibrium conditions. Super-paramagnetic microparticles were developed that have a high and uniform magnetization to simultaneously apply a piconewton-scale tensile force to many thousands of IgG-protein A bonds. A strong and a weak slip bond were detected with an effective bond length that is characteristic of short-range, stiff intermolecular interactions. These bonds are attributed to the interaction of protein A with the constant region (Fc) and heavy chain variable domain (VH) of IgG, respectively. The IgG-VH interaction appears to be one of the weakest specific molecular interactions that has been identified with a single molecule force measurement technique. This study demonstrates that magnetic tweezers can be used to rapidly characterize very weak biomolecular interactions as well as strong biomolecular interactions with a high degree of accuracy. PMID:17465553

  8. Ligand-specific, transient interaction between integrins and calreticulin during cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins is dependent upon phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events.

    PubMed Central

    Coppolino, M G; Dedhar, S

    1999-01-01

    As transmembrane heterodimers, integrins bind to both extracellular ligands and intracellular proteins. We are currently investigating the interaction between integrins and the intracellular protein calreticulin. A prostatic carcinoma cell line (PC-3) was used to demonstrate that calreticulin can be found in the alpha3 immunoprecipitates of cells plated on collagen type IV, but not when plated on vitronectin. Conversely, alphav immunoprecipitates contained calreticulin only when cells were plated on vitronectin, i. e. not when plated on collagen IV. The interactions between these integrins and calreticulin were independent of actin cytoskeleton assembly and were transient, being maximal approx. 10-30 min after the cells came into contact with the substrates prior to complete cell spreading and formation of firm adhesive contacts. We demonstrate that okadaic acid, an inhibitor of intracellular serine/threonine protein phosphatases, inhibited the alpha3beta1-mediated adhesion of PC-3 cells to collagen IV and the alpha2beta1-mediated attachment of Jurkat cells to collagen I. This inhibition by okadaic acid was accompanied by inhibition of the ligand-specific interaction of calreticulin with the respective integrins in the two cell types. Additionally, we found that pharmacological inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) resulted in prolongation of the calreticulin-integrin interaction, and enhancement of PC-3 cell attachment to collagen IV. We conclude that calreticulin interacts transiently with integrins during cell attachment and spreading. This interaction depends on receptor occupation, is ligand-specific, and can be modulated by protein phosphatase and MEK activity. PMID:10229657

  9. Effects of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) on non-specific chronic back pain: a randomized controlled trial with additional exploration of the underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-specific chronic back pain (CBP) is often accompanied by psychological trauma, but treatment for this associated condition is often insufficient. Nevertheless, despite the common co-occurrence of pain and psychological trauma, a specific trauma-focused approach for treating CBP has been neglected to date. Accordingly, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), originally developed as a treatment approach for posttraumatic stress disorders, is a promising approach for treating CBP in patients who have experienced psychological trauma. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine whether a standardized, short-term EMDR intervention added to treatment as usual (TAU) reduces pain intensity in CBP patients with psychological trauma vs. TAU alone. Methods/design The study will recruit 40 non-specific CBP patients who have experienced psychological trauma. After a baseline assessment, the patients will be randomized to either an intervention group (n = 20) or a control group (n = 20). Individuals in the EMDR group will receive ten 90-minute sessions of EMDR fortnightly in addition to TAU. The control group will receive TAU alone. The post-treatment assessments will take place two weeks after the last EMDR session and six months later. The primary outcome will be the change in the intensity of CBP within the last four weeks (numeric rating scale 0–10) from the pre-treatment assessment to the post-treatment assessment two weeks after the completion of treatment. In addition, the patients will undergo a thorough assessment of the change in the experience of pain, disability, trauma-associated distress, mental co-morbidities, resilience, and quality of life to explore distinct treatment effects. To explore the mechanisms of action that are involved, changes in pain perception and pain processing (quantitative sensory testing, conditioned pain modulation) will also be assessed. The statistical analysis of the primary outcome will be performed

  10. Daphnia magna's sense of competition: intra-specific interactions (ISI) alter life history strategies and increase metals toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gust, Kurt A; Kennedy, Alan J; Melby, Nicolas L; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Laird, Jennifer; Meeks, Barbara; Muller, Erik B; Nisbet, Roger M; Perkins, Edward J

    2016-08-01

    This work investigates whether the scale-up to multi-animal exposures that is commonly applied in genomics studies provides equivalent toxicity outcomes to single-animal experiments of standard Daphnia magna toxicity assays. Specifically, we tested the null hypothesis that intraspecific interactions (ISI) among D. magna have neither effect on the life history strategies of this species, nor impact toxicological outcomes in exposure experiments with Cu and Pb. The results show that ISI significantly increased mortality of D. magna in both Cu and Pb exposure experiments, decreasing 14 day LC50 s and 95 % confidence intervals from 14.5 (10.9-148.3) to 8.4 (8.2-8.7) µg Cu/L and from 232 (156-4810) to 68 (63-73) µg Pb/L. Additionally, ISI potentiated Pb impacts on reproduction eliciting a nearly 10-fold decrease in the no-observed effect concentration (from 236 to 25 µg/L). As an indication of environmental relevance, the effects of ISI on both mortality and reproduction in Pb exposures were sustained at both high and low food rations. Furthermore, even with a single pair of Daphnia, ISI significantly increased (p < 0.05) neonate production in control conditions, demonstrating that ISI can affect life history strategy. Given these results we reject the null hypothesis and conclude that results from scale-up assays cannot be directly applied to observations from single-animal assessments in D. magna. We postulate that D. magna senses chemical signatures of conspecifics which elicits changes in life history strategies that ultimately increase susceptibility to metal toxicity. PMID:27151402

  11. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B is responsible for its specific interactions with Calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sherwin J.; Nolet, Ryan P.; Calvert, Richard J.; Anderson, Lucy M.; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    K-Ras4B belongs to the family of p21 Ras GTPases, which play an important role in cell proliferation, survival and motility. The p21 Ras proteins such as K-Ras4B, K-Ras4A, H-Ras, and N-Ras, share 85% sequence homology and activate very similar signaling pathways. Only the C-terminal hypervariable regions differ significantly. A growing body of literature demonstrates that each Ras isoform possesses unique functions in normal physiological processes as well as in pathogenesis. One of the central questions in the field of Ras biology is how these very similar proteins achieve such remarkable specificity in protein-protein interactions that regulate signal transduction pathways. Here we explore specific binding of K-Ras4B to calmodulin. Using NMR techniques and isothermal titration calorimetry we demonstrate that the hypervariable region of K-Ras contributes in a major way to the interaction with calmodulin while the catalytic domain of K-Ras4B provides a way to control the interaction by nucleotide binding. The hypervariable region of K-Ras4B binds specifically to the C-terminal domain of Ca2+-loaded calmodulin with micromolar affinity, while the GTP-γ-S loaded catalytic domain of K-Ras4B may interact with the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. PMID:19583261

  12. TRPC6 specifically interacts with APP to inhibit its cleavage by γ-secretase and reduce Aβ production

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Lu, Rui; Yang, Jian; Li, Hongyu; He, Zhuohao; Jing, Naihe; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Generation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in Alzheimer's disease involves cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by γ-secretase, a protease known to cleave several substrates, including Notch. Finding specific modulators for γ-secretase could be a potential avenue to treat the disease. Here, we report that transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 6 specifically interacts with APP leading to inhibition of its cleavage by γ-secretase and reduction in Aβ production. TRPC6 interacts with APP (C99), but not with Notch, and prevents C99 interaction with presenilin 1 (PS1). A fusion peptide derived from TRPC6 also reduces Aβ levels without effect on Notch cleavage. Crossing APP/PS1 mice with TRPC6 transgenic mice leads to a marked reduction in both plaque load and Aβ levels, and improvement in structural and behavioural impairment. Thus, TRPC6 specifically modulates γ-secretase cleavage of APP and preventing APP (C99) interaction with PS1 via TRPC6 could be a novel strategy to reduce Aβ formation. PMID:26581893

  13. TRPC6 specifically interacts with APP to inhibit its cleavage by γ-secretase and reduce Aβ production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junfeng; Lu, Rui; Yang, Jian; Li, Hongyu; He, Zhuohao; Jing, Naihe; Wang, Xiaomin; Wang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Generation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in Alzheimer's disease involves cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by γ-secretase, a protease known to cleave several substrates, including Notch. Finding specific modulators for γ-secretase could be a potential avenue to treat the disease. Here, we report that transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) 6 specifically interacts with APP leading to inhibition of its cleavage by γ-secretase and reduction in Aβ production. TRPC6 interacts with APP (C99), but not with Notch, and prevents C99 interaction with presenilin 1 (PS1). A fusion peptide derived from TRPC6 also reduces Aβ levels without effect on Notch cleavage. Crossing APP/PS1 mice with TRPC6 transgenic mice leads to a marked reduction in both plaque load and Aβ levels, and improvement in structural and behavioural impairment. Thus, TRPC6 specifically modulates γ-secretase cleavage of APP and preventing APP (C99) interaction with PS1 via TRPC6 could be a novel strategy to reduce Aβ formation. PMID:26581893

  14. Functional Regulation of Sugar Assimilation by N-Glycan-specific Interaction of Pancreatic α-Amylase with Glycoproteins of Duodenal Brush Border Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Asanuma-Date, Kimie; Hirano, Yuki; Le, Na; Sano, Kotone; Kawasaki, Nana; Hashii, Noritaka; Hiruta, Yoko; Nakayama, Ken-ichi; Umemura, Mariko; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Sakagami, Hiromi; Ogawa, Haruko

    2012-01-01

    Porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA) binds to N-linked glycans of glycoproteins (Matsushita, H., Takenaka, M., and Ogawa, H. (2002) J. Biol Chem., 277, 4680–4686). Immunostaining revealed that PPA is located at the brush-border membrane (BBM) of enterocytes in the duodenum and that the binding is inhibited by mannan but not galactan, indicating that PPA binds carbohydrate-specifically to BBM. The ligands for PPA in BBM were identified as glycoprotein N-glycans that are significantly involved in the assimilation of glucose, including sucrase-isomaltase (SI) and Na+/Glc cotransporter 1 (SGLT1). Binding of SI and SGLT1 in BBM to PPA was dose-dependent and inhibited by mannan. Using BBM vesicles, we found functional changes in PPA and its ligands in BBM due to the N-glycan-specific interaction. The starch-degrading activity of PPA and maltose-degrading activity of SI were enhanced to 240 and 175%, respectively, while Glc uptake by SGLT1 was markedly inhibited by PPA at high but physiologically possible concentrations, and the binding was attenuated by the addition of mannose-specific lectins, especially from Galanthus nivalis. Additionally, recombinant human pancreatic α-amylases expressed in yeast and purified by single-step affinity chromatography exhibited the same carbohydrate binding specificity as PPA in binding assays with sugar-biotinyl polymer probes. The results indicate that mammalian pancreatic α-amylases share a common carbohydrate binding activity and specifically bind to the intestinal BBM. Interaction with N-glycans in the BBM activated PPA and SI to produce much Glc on the one hand and to inhibit Glc absorption by enterocytes via SGLT1 in order to prevent a rapid increase in blood sugar on the other. PMID:22584580

  15. On the Design of an Interactive, Patient-Specific Surgical Simulator for Mitral Valve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Tenenholtz, Neil A.; Hammer, Peter E.; Schneider, Robert J.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical repair of the mitral valve is a difficult procedure that is often avoided in favor of less effective valve replacement because of the associated technical challenges facing non-expert surgeons. In the interest of increasing the rate of valve repair, an accurate, interactive surgical simulator for mitral valve repair was developed. With a haptic interface, users can interact with a mechanical model during simulation to aid in the development of a surgical plan and then virtually implement the procedure to assess its efficacy. Sub-millimeter accuracy was achieved in a validation study, and the system was successfully used by a cardiac surgeon to repair three virtual pathological valves. PMID:24511427

  16. Atomic level understanding of site-specific interactions in Polyaniline/TiO2 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabungbam, Satyananda; Loh, G. C.; Sahariah, Munima B.; Pal, Arup R.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2016-02-01

    Spin-polarized density functional theory calculations have been performed to understand the interactions in polyaniline (PAni) and TiO2 composite at the atomic level. Binding energy calculation shows that composite structure is energetically more stable when Ti atom of TiO2 sits on top of PAni. It is also found that there is a dependency of the CBM on the site of TiO2 interaction in this composite system. The results suggest that optimization of the synthesis parameters at atomic level can be an effective way to improve the performance of a photovoltaic device based on PAni-TiO2 composite.

  17. PTPRT regulates the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1 through dephosphorylation of specific tyrosine residue

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, So-Hee; Moon, Jeonghee; Lee, Myungkyu; Lee, Jae-Ran

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •PTPRT is a brain-specific, expressed, protein tyrosine phosphatase. •PTPRT regulated the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT dephosphorylated the specific tyrosine residue of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. •Dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT appears to regulate the fusion of synaptic vesicle through dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: PTPRT (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor T), a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase, has been found to regulate synaptic formation and development of hippocampal neurons, but its regulation mechanism is not yet fully understood. Here, Syntaxin-binding protein 1, a key component of synaptic vesicle fusion machinery, was identified as a possible interaction partner and an endogenous substrate of PTPRT. PTPRT interacted with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in rat synaptosome, and co-localized with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in cultured hippocampal neurons. PTPRT dephosphorylated tyrosine 145 located around the linker between domain 1 and 2 of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 directly binds to Syntaxin 1, a t-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein, and plays a role as catalysts of SNARE complex formation. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutant mimicking non-phosphorylation (Y145F) enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1 compared to wild type, and therefore, dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 appeared to be important for SNARE-complex formation. In conclusion, PTPRT could regulate the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1, and as a result, the synaptic vesicle fusion appeared to be controlled through dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1.

  18. Job demands × job control interaction effects: do occupation-specific job demands increase their occurrence?

    PubMed

    Brough, Paula; Biggs, Amanda

    2015-04-01

    Despite evidence that the accurate assessment of occupational health should include measures of both generic job demands and occupation-specific job demands, most research includes only generic job demands. The inclusion of more focused occupation-specific job demands is suggested to explain a larger proportion of variance for both direct effects and job demands × job control/support interaction effects, as compared with the inclusion of generic job demands. This research tested these two propositions via a self-report survey assessing key psychological job characteristics administered twice to a sample of correctional workers (N = 746). The research clearly identified that the assessment of correctional-specific job demands (CJD) was more strongly associated with job satisfaction, work engagement, turnover intentions and psychological strain, as compared with an assessment of generic job demands. However, the CJD did not produce a greater proportion of significant job demands × job control/support interaction effects, as compared with the generic job demands measure. The results thereby provide further support for the acknowledged 'elusiveness' of these theoretical interactions. Overall, however, the results did support the inclusion of occupation-specific measures of job demands for the accurate assessment of the health and job performance of high-risk workers. The implications for theoretical discussions that describe how high job demands are moderated by job resources are discussed. PMID:24123665

  19. Upstream Stimulatory Factor 2, a Novel FoxA1-Interacting Protein, Is Involved in Prostate-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qian; Yu, Xiuping; Degraff, David J.; Matusik, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    The forkhead protein A1 (FoxA1) is critical for the androgenic regulation of prostate-specific promoters. Prostate tissue rescued from FoxA1 knockout mice exhibits abnormal prostate development, typified by the absence of expression of differentiation markers and inability to engage in secretion. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed that FoxA1 is one of the earliest transcription factors that binds to prostate-specific promoters, and that a direct protein-protein interaction occurs between FoxA1 and androgen receptor. Interestingly, evidence of the interaction of FoxA1 with other transcription factors is lacking. The upstream stimulatory factor 2 (USF2), an E-box-binding transcription factor of the basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine-zipper family, binds to a consensus DNA sequence similar to FoxA1. Our in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrate the binding of USF2 to prostate-specific gene promoters including the probasin promoter, spermine-binding protein promoter, and prostate-specific antigen core enhancer. Furthermore, we show a direct physical interaction between FoxA1 and USF2 through the use of immunoprecipitation and glutathione-S-transferase pull-down assays. This interaction is mediated via the forkhead DNA-binding domain of FoxA1 and the DNA-binding domain of USF2. In summary, these data indicate that USF2 is one of the components of the FoxA1/androgen receptor transcriptional protein complex that contributes to the expression of androgen-regulated and prostate-specific genes. PMID:19846536

  20. Interactive effects of nitrogen addition, warming and invasion across organizational levels in an old-field plant community.

    PubMed

    Gornish, Elise S

    2014-01-01

    Response to global change is dependent on the level of biological organization (e.g. the ecologically relevant spatial scale) in which species are embedded. For example, individual responses can affect population-level responses, which, in turn, can affect community-level responses. Although relationships are known to exist among responses to global change across levels of biological organization, formal investigations of these relationships are still uncommon. I conducted an exploratory analysis to identify how nitrogen addition and warming by open top chambers might affect plants across spatial scales by estimating treatment effect size at the leaf level, the plant level and the community level. Moreover, I investigated if the presence of Pityopsis aspera, an experimentally introduced plant species, modified the relationship between spatial scale and effect size across treatments. I found that, overall, the spatial scale significantly contributes to differences in effect size, supporting previous work which suggests that mechanisms driving biotic response to global change are scale dependent. Interestingly, the relationship between spatial scale and effect size in both the absence and presence of experimental invasion is very similar for nitrogen addition and warming treatments. The presence of invasion, however, did not affect the relationship between spatial scale and effect size, suggesting that in this system, invasion may not exacerbate or attenuate climate change effects. This exercise highlights the value of moving beyond integration and scaling to the practice of directly testing for scale effects within single experiments. PMID:25301820

  1. Interactive effects of nitrogen addition, warming and invasion across organizational levels in an old-field plant community

    PubMed Central

    Gornish, Elise S.

    2014-01-01

    Response to global change is dependent on the level of biological organization (e.g. the ecologically relevant spatial scale) in which species are embedded. For example, individual responses can affect population-level responses, which, in turn, can affect community-level responses. Although relationships are known to exist among responses to global change across levels of biological organization, formal investigations of these relationships are still uncommon. I conducted an exploratory analysis to identify how nitrogen addition and warming by open top chambers might affect plants across spatial scales by estimating treatment effect size at the leaf level, the plant level and the community level. Moreover, I investigated if the presence of Pityopsis aspera, an experimentally introduced plant species, modified the relationship between spatial scale and effect size across treatments. I found that, overall, the spatial scale significantly contributes to differences in effect size, supporting previous work which suggests that mechanisms driving biotic response to global change are scale dependent. Interestingly, the relationship between spatial scale and effect size in both the absence and presence of experimental invasion is very similar for nitrogen addition and warming treatments. The presence of invasion, however, did not affect the relationship between spatial scale and effect size, suggesting that in this system, invasion may not exacerbate or attenuate climate change effects. This exercise highlights the value of moving beyond integration and scaling to the practice of directly testing for scale effects within single experiments. PMID:25301820

  2. A Note on the Specification of Error Structures in Latent Interaction Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Xiulin; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Latent interaction models have motivated a great deal of methodological research, mainly in the area of estimating such models. Product-indicator methods have been shown to be competitive with other methods of estimation in terms of parameter bias and standard error accuracy, and their continued popularity in empirical studies is due, in part, to…

  3. Specificity of root-bacterial interactions for drought stress tolerance in winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants cope with drought stress by a variety of mechanisms that occur above- and below-ground. Below the soil surface, root architecture and interactions with beneficial bacteria, including aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid deaminase-positive (ACC+) bacteria, may contribute to differences in drought...

  4. The Influence of Context-Specific and Dispositional Achievement Goals on Children's Paired Collaborative Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Amanda; Yuill, Nicola; Luckin, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Background: Research has demonstrated that working collaboratively can have positive effects on children's learning. While key factors have been identified which influence the quality of these interactions, little research has addressed the influence of children's achievement goals on collaborative behaviour. Aims: This paper investigates the…

  5. Specific ion effects on the hydrophobic interaction of benzene self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Dobberschütz, S; Rimmen, M; Hassenkam, T; Andersson, M P; Stipp, S L S

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of aromatic compounds with various ions in aqueous solutions plays a role in a number of fields, as diverse as protein folding and enhanced oil recovery, among others. Therefore, we have investigated the effect of the four electrolytes, KCl, NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2, on the hydrophobic interaction of benzene self-assembled monolayers. Using the jump to contact phenomenon of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip as an indicator of attractive forces between the surfaces of a sample and the tip, we discovered lower frequencies in the snap in as well as narrower distributions for the snap in distance for the monovalent ions, especially for K(+), compared with the behaviour for the divalent ions. These observations are explained by the accumulation of charge at the surface by cation-π interactions and an influence of the ions on the formation of capillaries that bridge the tip to the surface. Bridging capillaries, i.e. nanometre scale gas bubbles, are some of the factors contributing to the long range hydrophobic interaction. The results demonstrate how ions influence the attraction of hydrophobic entities in aqueous solutions. PMID:26220291

  6. OH-Radical Specific Addition to Glutathione S-Atom at the Air-Water Interface: Relevance to the Redox Balance of the Lung Epithelial Lining Fluid.

    PubMed

    Enami, Shinichi; Hoffmann, Michael R; Colussi, Agustín J

    2015-10-01

    Antioxidants in epithelial lining fluids (ELF) prevent inhaled air pollutants from reaching lung tissue. This process, however, may upset ELF's redox balance, which is deemed to be expressed by the ratio of the major antioxidant glutathione (GSH) to its putative oxidation product GSSG. Previously, we found that at physiological pH O3(g) rapidly oxidizes GS(2-)(aq) (but not GSH(-)) to GSO3(-) rather than GSSG. Here, we report that in moderately acidic pH ≤ 5 media ·OH(g) oxidizes GSH(-)(aq) to sulfenic GSOH(-), sulfinic GSO2(-), and sulfonic GSO3(-) acids via ·OH specific additions to reduced S-atoms. The remarkable specificity of ·OH on water versus its lack of selectivity in bulk water implicates an unprecedented steering process during [OH···GSH] interfacial encounters. Thus, both O3 and ·OH oxidize GSH to GSOH(-) under most conditions, and since GSOH(-) is reduced back to GSH in vivo by NADPH, redox balance may be in fact signaled by GSH/GSOH ratios. PMID:26722895

  7. Cell-specific CO2 fixation rates of two distinct groups of plastidic protists in the Atlantic Ocean remain unchanged after nutrient addition.

    PubMed

    Grob, Carolina; Jardillier, Ludwig; Hartmann, Manuela; Ostrowski, Martin; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Scanlan, David J

    2015-04-01

    To assess the role of open-ocean ecosystems in global CO2 fixation, we investigated how picophytoplankton, which dominate primary production, responded to episodic increases in nutrient availability. Previous experiments have shown nitrogen alone, or in combination with phosphorus or iron, to be the proximate limiting nutrient(s) for total phytoplankton grown over several days. Much less is known about how nutrient upshift affects picophytoplankton CO2 fixation over the duration of the light period. To address this issue, we performed a series of small volume (8-60 ml) - short term (10-11 h) nutrient addition experiments in different regions of the Atlantic Ocean using NH4 Cl, FeCl3 , K medium, dust and nutrient-rich water from 300 m depth. We found no significant nutrient stimulation of group-specific CO2 fixation rates of two taxonomically and size-distinct groups of plastidic protists. The above was true regardless of the region sampled or nutrient added, suggesting that this is a generic phenomenon. Our findings show that at least in the short term (i.e. daylight period), nutrient availability does not limit CO2 fixation by the smallest plastidic protists, while their taxonomic composition does not determine their response to nutrient addition. PMID:25345650

  8. Child Effortful Control, Teacher-student Relationships, and Achievement in Academically At-risk Children: Additive and Interactive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Jeffrey; Chen, Qi; Hughes, Jan N.

    2009-01-01

    The joint contributions of child effortful control (using inhibitory control and task accuracy as behavioral indices) and positive teacher-student relationships at first grade on reading and mathematics achievement at second grade were examined in 761 children who were predominantly from low-income and ethnic minority backgrounds and assessed to be academically at-risk at entry to first grade. Analyses accounted for clustering effects, covariates, baselines of effortful control measures, and prior levels of achievement. Even with such conservative statistical controls, interactive effects were found for task accuracy and positive teacher-student relationships on future achievement. Results suggest that task accuracy served as a protective factor so that children with high task accuracy performed well academically despite not having positive teacher-student relationships. Further, positive teacher-student relationships served as a compensatory factor so that children with low task accuracy performed just as well as those with high task accuracy if they were paired with a positive and supportive teacher. Importantly, results indicate that the influence of positive teacher-student relationships on future achievement was most pronounced for students with low effortful control on tasks that require fine motor skills, accuracy, and attention-related skills. Study results have implications for narrowing achievement disparities for academically at-risk children. PMID:20161421

  9. RNA-RNA Interactions Enable Specific Targeting of Noncoding RNAs to Nascent Pre-mRNAs and Chromatin Sites

    PubMed Central

    Engreitz, Jesse M.; Sirokman, Klara; McDonel, Patrick; Shishkin, Alexander; Surka, Christine; Russell, Pamela; Grossman, Sharon R.; Chow, Amy Y.; Guttman, Mitchell; Lander, Eric S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions are used by many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) to achieve their diverse functions. To aid in identifying these contacts, we developed a method based on RNA Antisense Purification to systematically map RNA-RNA interactions (RAP-RNA) and applied it to investigate two ncRNAs implicated in RNA processing: U1 snRNA, a component of the spliceosome, and Malat1, a lncRNA that localizes to nuclear speckles. U1 and Malat1 interact with nascent transcripts through distinct targeting mechanisms. Using differential crosslinking, we confirmed that U1 directly hybridizes to both 5’ splice sites and 5’-splice-site motifs throughout introns and found that Malat1 interacts with pre-mRNAs indirectly through protein intermediates. Interactions with nascent pre-mRNAs cause U1 and Malat1 to localize proximally to chromatin at active genes, demonstrating that ncRNAs can use RNA-RNA interactions to target specific pre-mRNAs and genomic sites. RAP-RNA is sensitive to lower abundance RNAs as well, making it generally applicable for investigating ncRNAs. PMID:25259926

  10. RNA-RNA interactions enable specific targeting of noncoding RNAs to nascent Pre-mRNAs and chromatin sites.

    PubMed

    Engreitz, Jesse M; Sirokman, Klara; McDonel, Patrick; Shishkin, Alexander A; Surka, Christine; Russell, Pamela; Grossman, Sharon R; Chow, Amy Y; Guttman, Mitchell; Lander, Eric S

    2014-09-25

    Intermolecular RNA-RNA interactions are used by many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) to achieve their diverse functions. To identify these contacts, we developed a method based on RNA antisense purification to systematically map RNA-RNA interactions (RAP-RNA) and applied it to investigate two ncRNAs implicated in RNA processing: U1 small nuclear RNA, a component of the spliceosome, and Malat1, a large ncRNA that localizes to nuclear speckles. U1 and Malat1 interact with nascent transcripts through distinct targeting mechanisms. Using differential crosslinking, we confirmed that U1 directly hybridizes to 5' splice sites and 5' splice site motifs throughout introns and found that Malat1 interacts with pre-mRNAs indirectly through protein intermediates. Interactions with nascent pre-mRNAs cause U1 and Malat1 to localize proximally to chromatin at active genes, demonstrating that ncRNAs can use RNA-RNA interactions to target specific pre-mRNAs and genomic sites. RAP-RNA is sensitive to lower abundance RNAs as well, making it generally applicable for investigating ncRNAs. PMID:25259926

  11. Size limits of self-assembled colloidal structures made using specific interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zeravcic, Zorana; Brenner, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    We establish size limitations for assembling structures of controlled size and shape out of colloidal particles with short-ranged interactions. Through simulations we show that structures with highly variable shapes made out of dozens of particles can form with high yield, as long as each particle in the structure binds only to the particles in their local environment. To understand this, we identify the excited states that compete with the ground-state structure and demonstrate that these excited states have a completely topological characterization, valid when the interparticle interactions are short-ranged. This allows complete enumeration of the energy landscape and gives bounds on how large a colloidal structure can assemble with high yield. For large structures the yield can be significant, even with hundreds of particles. PMID:25349380

  12. Specific interaction of capsid protein and importin-{alpha}/{beta} influences West Nile virus production

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuvanakantham, Raghavan; Chong, Mun-Keat; Ng, Mah-Lee

    2009-11-06

    West Nile virus (WNV) capsid (C) protein has been shown to enter the nucleus of infected cells. However, the mechanism by which C protein enters the nucleus is unknown. In this study, we have unveiled for the first time that nuclear transport of WNV and Dengue virus C protein is mediated by their direct association with importin-{alpha}. This interplay is mediated by the consensus sequences of bipartite nuclear localization signal located between amino acid residues 85-101 together with amino acid residues 42 and 43 of C protein. Elucidation of biological significance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction demonstrated that the binding efficiency of this association influenced the nuclear entry of C protein and virus production. Collectively, this study illustrated the molecular mechanism by which the C protein of arthropod-borne flavivirus enters the nucleus and showed the importance of importin-{alpha}/C protein interaction in the context of flavivirus life-cycle.

  13. Evaluation of calcium and lead interaction, in addition to their impact on thyroid functions in hyper and hypothyroid patients.

    PubMed

    Memon, Nusrat Shahab; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Baig, Jameel Ahmed; Arain, Sadaf Sadia; Sahito, Oan Muhammad; Baloch, Shahnawaz; Waris, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    There is compelling evidence in support of interaction between calcium (Ca) and lead (Pb) in thyroid disorders. The aim of present study was to compare the level of Ca and Pb with thyroid hormones such as thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and free thyroxin (FT4) in serum samples of hyperthyroid (HPRT) and hypothyroid (HPOT) patients of both genders. For comparative purpose, age-matched (25-50 years) subjects having no thyroid disorders were selected as referents/controls. The serum samples were acid-digested prior to analysis by atomic absorption spectrometry. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked by certified reference materials. The resulted data indicates that the mean values of Ca in serum samples of HPRT patients were significantly higher than those of referent subjects (p < 0.01), while reverse pattern was observed in the case of HPOT patients. The level of Pb was higher in the serum samples of both types of thyroid patients, but difference was significant in case of HPOT patients as compare to referent subjects (p < 0.01). A negative correlation was observed between serum Ca levels and TSH of HPRT patients (-r = 0.37-0.39, p < 0.01), while FT3 and FT4 have positive correlation (r = 0.49-0.52 and r = 0.46-0.47), p values <0.01. The Pb in serum had positive correlation with TSH (r = 0.48-0.51, p < 0.005), while negative correlation was observed for FT3 and FT4 (-r = 0.55-0.56, 0.5-0.54, p < 0.05) in HPRT patients. On the other hand, a reverse pattern was observed, for correlation of Ca and Pb with thyroid functions in HPOT patients. PMID:26347420

  14. The central leucine-rich repeat region of chicken TLR16 dictates unique ligand specificity and species-specific interaction with TLR2.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; de Zoete, Marcel R; van Aubel, Rémon A M H; van Putten, Jos P M

    2007-06-01

    The ligand specificity of human TLR (hTLR) 2 is determined through the formation of functional heterodimers with either hTLR1 or hTLR6. The chicken carries two TLR (chTLR) 2 isoforms, type 1 and type 2 (chTLR2t1 and chTLR2t2), and one putative TLR1/6/10 homologue (chTLR16) of unknown function. In this study, we report that transfection of HeLa cells with the various chicken receptors yields potent NF-kappaB activation for the receptor combination of chTLR2t2 and chTLR16 only. The sensitivity of this complex was strongly enhanced by human CD14. The functional chTLR16/chTLR2t2 complex responded toward both the hTLR2/6-specific diacylated peptide S-(2,3-bispalmitoyloxypropyl)-Cys-Gly-Asp-Pro-Lys-His-Pro-Lys-Ser-Phe (FSL-1) and the hTLR2/1 specific triacylated peptide tripalmitoyl-S-(bis(palmitoyloxy)propyl)-Cys-Ser-(Lys)(3)-Lys (Pam(3)CSK(4)), indicating that chTLR16 covers the functions of both mammalian TLR1 and TLR6. Dissection of the species specificity of TLR2 and its coreceptors showed functional chTLR16 complex formation with chTLR2t2 but not hTLR2. Conversely, chTLR2t2 did not function in combination with hTLR1 or hTLR6. The use of constructed chimeric receptors in which the defined domains of chTLR16 and hTLR1 or hTLR6 had been exchanged revealed that the transfer of leucine-rich repeats (LRR) 6-16 of chTLR16 into hTLR6 was sufficient to confer dual ligand specificity to the human receptor and to establish species-specific interaction with chTLR2t2. Collectively, our data indicate that diversification of the central LRR region of the TLR2 coreceptors during evolution has put constraints on both their ligand specificity and their ability to form functional complexes with TLR2. PMID:17513760

  15. Developmentally dictated expression of heat shock factors: exclusive expression of HSF4 in the postnatal lens and its specific interaction with alphaB-crystallin heat shock promoter.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, T; Bhat, Suraj P

    2004-10-22

    The molecular cascade of stress response in higher eukaryotes commences in the cytoplasm with the trimerization of the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), followed by its transport to the nucleus, where it binds to the heat shock element leading to the activation of transcription from the down-stream gene(s). This well-established paradigm has been mostly studied in cultured cells. The developmental and tissue-specific control of the heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) and their interactions with heat shock promoters remain unexplored. We report here that in the rat lens, among the three mammalian HSFs, expression of HSF1 and HSF2 is largely fetal, whereas the expression of HSF4 is predominantly postnatal. Similar pattern of expression of HSF1 and HSF4 is seen in fetal and adult human lenses. This stage-specific inverse relationship between the expression of HSF1/2 and HSF4 suggests tissue-specific management of stress depending on the presence or absence of specific HSF(s). In addition to real-time PCR and immunoblotting, gel mobility shift assays, coupled with specific antibodies and HSE probes, derived from three different heat shock promoters, establish that there is no HSF1 or HSF2 binding activity in the postnatal lens nuclear extracts. Using this unique, developmentally modulated in vivo system, we demonstrate 1) specific patterns of HSF4 binding to heat shock elements derived from alphaB-crystallin, Hsp70, and Hsp82 promoters and 2) that it is HSF4 and not HSF1 or HSF2 that interacts with the canonical heat shock element of the alphaB-crystallin gene. PMID:15308659

  16. Balanced Protein–Water Interactions Improve Properties of Disordered Proteins and Non-Specific Protein Association

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Some frequently encountered deficiencies in all-atom molecular simulations, such as nonspecific protein–protein interactions being too strong, and unfolded or disordered states being too collapsed, suggest that proteins are insufficiently well solvated in simulations using current state-of-the-art force fields. To address these issues, we make the simplest possible change, by modifying the short-range protein–water pair interactions, and leaving all the water–water and protein–protein parameters unchanged. We find that a modest strengthening of protein–water interactions is sufficient to recover the correct dimensions of intrinsically disordered or unfolded proteins, as determined by direct comparison with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) data. The modification also results in more realistic protein-protein affinities, and average solvation free energies of model compounds which are more consistent with experiment. Most importantly, we show that this scaling is small enough not to affect adversely the stability of the folded state, with only a modest effect on the stability of model peptides forming α-helix and β-sheet structures. The proposed adjustment opens the way to more accurate atomistic simulations of proteins, particularly for intrinsically disordered proteins, protein–protein association, and crowded cellular environments. PMID:25400522

  17. Novel alternative PBX3 isoforms in leukemia cells with distinct interaction specificities.

    PubMed

    Milech, N; Kees, U R; Watt, P M

    2001-11-01

    PBX3 is a member of the PBX family of TALE homeobox genes. The prototypic member, PBX1, was first identified in chromosomal translocations in B-lineage leukemia and is required for normal hematopoiesis. PBX2 and PBX3 were later identified as members of this highly conserved family by their strong homology to PBX1. While the expression pattern of PBX1 is restricted, PBX2 and PBX3 are ubiquitously expressed. Little is known about the functional role of PBX3. Our studies identified two PBX3 transcripts alternative to the canonical forms, PBX3A and PBX3B, resulting from a novel splice in PBX3. These new isoforms, named PBX3C and PBX3D, have been detected in all tissues and cell lines tested. Intriguingly, expression of PBX3D is favored in normal cells, whereas PBX3C expression is favored in leukemia cells. Functional studies showed that PBX3C and PBX3D proteins were unable to interact with the PBX-interacting factor PREP1 and weakly interacted with MEIS proteins. We propose that PBX3C and PBX3D may affect PBX3-mediated transcriptional regulation by acting in opposition to the known PBX proteins through alternative PBX3 complex formation. The identification and characterization of these novel PBX3 isoforms provide a foundation for a better understanding of the biological role of PBX3. PMID:11579467

  18. Real-Time Analysis of Specific Protein-DNA Interactions with Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Ritzefeld, Markus; Sewald, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Several proteins, like transcription factors, bind to certain DNA sequences, thereby regulating biochemical pathways that determine the fate of the corresponding cell. Due to these key positions, it is indispensable to analyze protein-DNA interactions and to identify their mode of action. Surface plasmon resonance is a label-free method that facilitates the elucidation of real-time kinetics of biomolecular interactions. In this article, we focus on this biosensor-based method and provide a detailed guide how SPR can be utilized to study binding of proteins to oligonucleotides. After a description of the physical phenomenon and the instrumental realization including fiber-optic-based SPR and SPR imaging, we will continue with a survey of immobilization methods. Subsequently, we will focus on the optimization of the experiment, expose pitfalls, and introduce how data should be analyzed and published. Finally, we summarize several interesting publications of the last decades dealing with protein-DNA and RNA interaction analysis by SPR. PMID:22500214

  19. Molecular interactions and trafficking of influenza A virus polymerase proteins analyzed by specific monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Leslie A.; Aggarwal, Shilpa; Bussey, Kendra A.; Desmet, Emily A.; Kim, Baek; Takimoto, Toru

    2012-04-25

    The influenza polymerase complex composed of PA, PB1 and PB2, plays a key role in viral replication and pathogenicity. Newly synthesized components must be translocated to the nucleus, where replication and transcription of viral genomes take place. Previous studies suggest that while PB2 is translocated to the nucleus independently, PA and PB1 subunits could not localize to the nucleus unless in a PA-PB1 complex. To further determine the molecular interactions between the components, we created a panel of 16 hybridoma cell lines, which produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each polymerase component. We showed that, although PB1 interacts with both PA and PB2 individually, nuclear localization of PB1 is enhanced only when co-expressed with PA. Interestingly, one of the anti-PA mAbs reacted much more strongly with PA when co-expressed with PB1. These results suggest that PA-PB1 interactions induce a conformational change in PA, which could be required for its nuclear translocation.

  20. From inter-specific behavioural interactions to species distribution patterns along gradients of habitat heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Laiolo, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The strength of the behavioural processes associated with competitor coexistence may vary when different physical environments, and their biotic communities, come into contact, although empirical evidence of how interference varies across gradients of environmental complexity is still scarce in vertebrates. Here, I analyse how behavioural interactions and habitat selection regulate the local distribution of steppeland larks (Alaudidae) in a gradient from simple to heterogeneous agricultural landscapes in Spain, using crested lark Galerida cristata and Thekla lark G. theklae as study models. Galerida larks significantly partitioned by habitat but frequently co-occurred in heterogeneous environments. Irrespective of habitat divergence, however, the local densities of the two larks were negatively correlated, and the mechanisms beyond this pattern were investigated by means of playback experiments. When simulating the intrusion of the congener by broadcasting the species territorial calls, both larks responded with an aggressive response as intense with respect to warning and approach behaviour as when responding to the intrusion of a conspecific. However, birds promptly responded to playbacks only when congener territories were nearby, a phenomenon that points to learning as the mechanisms through which individuals finely tune their aggressive responses to the local competition levels. Heterospecifics occurred in closer proximity in diverse agro-ecosystems, possibly because of more abundant or diverse resources, and here engage in antagonistic interactions. The drop of species diversity associated with agricultural homogenisation is therefore likely to also bring about the disappearance of the behavioural repertoires associated with species interactions. PMID:22806401

  1. [Intern(euron)al affairs : The role of specific neocortical interneuron classes in the interaction between acetylcholine and GABAergic anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Liebig, L; Grasshoff, C; Hentschke, H

    2016-08-01

    Acetylcholine is a neuromodulator which is released throughout the central nervous system and plays an essential role in consciousness and cognitive processes including attention and learning. Due to its 'activating' effect on the neuronal and behavioral level its interaction with anesthetics has long been of interest to anesthesiologists. It is widely held that a reduction of the release of acetylcholine by general anesthetics constitutes part of the anesthetic effect. This notion is backed by numerous human and animal studies, but is also in seeming contradiction to findings that acetylcholine activates specific classes of inhibitory neurons: if acetylcholine excites elements within the neuronal network responsible for the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), its withdrawal should diminish, not enhance, the effect of anesthetics.Focusing on cortical circuits, we present an overview of recent advances in cellular neurophysiology, particularly the interactions between inhibitory neuron classes, which provide insights on the interaction between acetylcholine and GABA. PMID:27380048

  2. Sequence-specific interaction between HIV-1 matrix protein and viral genomic RNA revealed by in vitro genetic selection.

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, P; Dupont, S; Stevenson, M; Green, M R

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 matrix protein (HIV-1 MA) is a multifunctional structural protein synthesized as part of the Pr55 gag polyprotein. We have used in vitro genetic selection to identify an RNA consensus sequence that specifically interacts with MA (Kd = 5 x 10(-7) M). This 13-nt MA binding consensus sequence bears a high degree of homology (77%) to a region (nt 1433-1446) within the POL open reading frame of the HIV-1 genome (consensus sequence from 38 HIV-1 strains). Chemical interference experiments identified the nucleotides within the MA binding consensus sequence involved in direct contact with MA. We further demonstrate that this RNA-protein interaction is mediated through a stretch of basic amino acids within MA. Mutations that disrupt the interaction between MA and its RNA binding site within the HIV-1 genome resulted in a measurable decrease in viral replication. PMID:11345436

  3. Quantifying Additive Interactions of the Osmolyte Proline with Individual Functional Groups of Proteins: Comparisons with Urea and Glycine Betaine, Interpretation of m-Values

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Roger C.; Guinn, Emily J.; Capp, Michael W.; Tsodikov, Oleg V.; Record, M. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    To quantify interactions of the osmolyte L-proline with protein functional groups and predict its effects on protein processes, we use vapor pressure osmometry to determine chemical potential derivatives dµ2/dm3 = µ23 quantifying preferential interactions of proline (component 3) with 21 solutes (component 2) selected to display different combinations of aliphatic or aromatic C, amide, carboxylate, phosphate or hydroxyl O, and/or amide or cationic N surface. Solubility data yield µ23 values for 4 less-soluble solutes. Values of µ23 are dissected using an ASA-based analysis to test the hypothesis of additivity and obtain α-values (proline interaction potentials) for these eight surface types and three inorganic ions. Values of µ23 predicted from these α-values agree with experiment, demonstrating additivity. Molecular interpretation of α-values using the solute partitioning model yields partition coefficients (Kp) quantifying the local accumulation or exclusion of proline in the hydration water of each functional group. Interactions of proline with native protein surface and effects of proline on protein unfolding are predicted from α-values and ASA information and compared with experimental data, with results for glycine betaine and urea, and with predictions from transfer free energy analysis. We conclude that proline stabilizes proteins because of its unfavorable interactions with (exclusion from) amide oxygens and aliphatic hydrocarbon surface exposed in unfolding, and that proline is an effective in vivo osmolyte because of the osmolality increase resulting from its unfavorable interactions with anionic (carboxylate and phosphate) and amide oxygens and aliphatic hydrocarbon groups on the surface of cytoplasmic proteins and nucleic acids. PMID:23909383

  4. A binding site outside the canonical PDZ domain determines the specific interaction between Shank and SAPAP and their function.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Menglong; Shang, Yuan; Guo, Tingfeng; He, Qinghai; Yung, Wing-Ho; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-05-31

    Shank and SAPAP (synapse-associated protein 90/postsynaptic density-95-associated protein) are two highly abundant scaffold proteins that directly interact with each other to regulate excitatory synapse development and plasticity. Mutations of SAPAP, but not other reported Shank PDZ domain binders, share a significant overlap on behavioral abnormalities with the mutations of Shank both in patients and in animal models. The molecular mechanism governing the exquisite specificity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction is not clear, however. Here we report that a sequence preceding the canonical PDZ domain of Shank, together with the elongated PDZ BC loop, form another binding site for a sequence upstream of the SAPAP PDZ-binding motif, leading to a several hundred-fold increase in the affinity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction. We provide evidence that the specific interaction afforded by this newly identified site is required for Shank synaptic targeting and the Shank-induced synaptic activity increase. Our study provides a molecular explanation of how Shank and SAPAP dosage changes due to their gene copy number variations can contribute to different psychiatric disorders. PMID:27185935

  5. The mRNA capping enzyme of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has dual specificity to interact with CTD of RNA Polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Kumar, Vikash; Kashif, Md; Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Tripathi, Timir; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2016-01-01

    RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) uniquely possesses an extended carboxy terminal domain (CTD) on its largest subunit, Rpb1, comprising a repetitive Tyr1Ser2Pro3Thr4 Ser5Pro6Ser7 motif with potential phosphorylation sites. The phosphorylation of the CTD serves as a signal for the binding of various transcription regulators for mRNA biogenesis including the mRNA capping complex. In eukaryotes, the 5 prime capping of the nascent transcript is the first detectable mRNA processing event, and is crucial for the productive transcript elongation. The binding of capping enzyme, RNA guanylyltransferases to the transcribing RNAPII is known to be primarily facilitated by the CTD, phosphorylated at Ser5 (Ser5P). Here we report that the Saccharomyces cerevesiae RNA guanylyltransferase (Ceg1) has dual specificity and interacts not only with Ser5P but also with Ser7P of the CTD. The Ser7 of CTD is essential for the unconditional growth and efficient priming of the mRNA capping complex. The Arg159 and Arg185 of Ceg1 are the key residues that interact with the Ser5P, while the Lys175 with Ser7P of CTD. These interactions appear to be in a specific pattern of Ser5PSer7PSer5P in a tri-heptad CTD (YSPTSPPS YSPTSPSP YSPTSPPS) and provide molecular insights into the Ceg1-CTD interaction for mRNA transcription. PMID:27503426

  6. The mRNA capping enzyme of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has dual specificity to interact with CTD of RNA Polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Kumar, Vikash; Kashif, Md.; Singh, Amit Kumar; Singh, Priyanka; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Tripathi, Timir; Akhtar, Md. Sohail

    2016-01-01

    RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) uniquely possesses an extended carboxy terminal domain (CTD) on its largest subunit, Rpb1, comprising a repetitive Tyr1Ser2Pro3Thr4 Ser5Pro6Ser7 motif with potential phosphorylation sites. The phosphorylation of the CTD serves as a signal for the binding of various transcription regulators for mRNA biogenesis including the mRNA capping complex. In eukaryotes, the 5 prime capping of the nascent transcript is the first detectable mRNA processing event, and is crucial for the productive transcript elongation. The binding of capping enzyme, RNA guanylyltransferases to the transcribing RNAPII is known to be primarily facilitated by the CTD, phosphorylated at Ser5 (Ser5P). Here we report that the Saccharomyces cerevesiae RNA guanylyltransferase (Ceg1) has dual specificity and interacts not only with Ser5P but also with Ser7P of the CTD. The Ser7 of CTD is essential for the unconditional growth and efficient priming of the mRNA capping complex. The Arg159 and Arg185 of Ceg1 are the key residues that interact with the Ser5P, while the Lys175 with Ser7P of CTD. These interactions appear to be in a specific pattern of Ser5PSer7PSer5P in a tri-heptad CTD (YSPTSPPS YSPTSPSP YSPTSPPS) and provide molecular insights into the Ceg1-CTD interaction for mRNA transcription. PMID:27503426

  7. Repulsive interactions induced by specific adsorption: Anomalous step diffusivity and inadequacy of nearest-neighbor Ising model. (part I experimental)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shakran, Mohammad; Kibler, Ludwig A.; Jacob, Timo; Ibach, Harald; Beltramo, Guillermo L.; Giesen, Margret

    2016-09-01

    This is Part I of two closely related papers, where we show that the specific adsorption of anions leads to a failure of the nearest-neighbor Ising model to describe island perimeter curvatures on Au(100) electrodes in dilute KBr, HCl and H2SO4 electrolytes and the therewith derived step diffusivity vs. step orientation. This result has major consequences for theoretical studies aiming at the understanding of growth, diffusion and degradation phenomena. Part I focuses on the experimental data. As shown theoretically in detail in Part II (doi:10.1016/j.susc.2016.03.022), a set of nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interaction energies (ɛNN, ɛNNN) can uniquely be derived from the diffusivity of steps along <100> and <110>. We find strong repulsive next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interaction in KBr and HCl, whereas NNN interaction is negligibly for H2SO4. The NNN repulsive interaction energy ɛNNN therefore correlates positively with the Gibbs adsorption energy of the anions. We find furthermore that ɛNNN increases with increasing Br- and Cl- coverage. The results for ɛNN and ɛNNN are quantitatively consistent with the coverage dependence of the step line tension. We thereby establish a sound experimental base for theoretical studies on the energetics of steps in the presence of specific adsorption.

  8. Interaction of sugar stabilized silver nanoparticles with the T-antigen specific lectin, jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia.

    PubMed

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Mohammed, Ansari Sulthan; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2015-06-15

    The advances in nanomedicine demonstrate the anticancer properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and considered as an alternative to the available chemotherapeutic agents. Owing to the preferential interaction of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) with Galβ1-3GalNAcα (a chemically well-defined tumor associated antigen), a study was undertaken to understand the interaction mechanism of AgNPs with jacalin in presence of specific sugar, galactose. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the AgNPs binding significantly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching mechanism, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained from the interaction of different sugar-stabilized AgNPs with jacalin are in the order of 10(4)M(-1), this is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one AgNPs, and the stoichiometry was unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. Hemagglutination assay shows that sugar stabilized AgNPs interacts to jacalin at a site that is different from the saccharide-binding site. Analysis of the FTIR spectra of jacalin indicates that the binding of AgNPs does not alter the secondary structure of jacalin. More importantly, AgNPs exists in nano form even after interacting with the lectin. These results suggest that the development of lectin-AgNPs conjugate would be possible for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25770933

  9. Interaction of sugar stabilized silver nanoparticles with the T-antigen specific lectin, jacalin from Artocarpus integrifolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayaz Ahmed, Khan Behlol; Mohammed, Ansari Sulthan; Veerappan, Anbazhagan

    2015-06-01

    The advances in nanomedicine demonstrate the anticancer properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and considered as an alternative to the available chemotherapeutic agents. Owing to the preferential interaction of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) with Galβ1-3GalNAcα (a chemically well-defined tumor associated antigen), a study was undertaken to understand the interaction mechanism of AgNPs with jacalin in presence of specific sugar, galactose. Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed that the AgNPs binding significantly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of jacalin through a static quenching mechanism, and a non-radiative energy transfer occurred within the molecules. Association constants obtained from the interaction of different sugar-stabilized AgNPs with jacalin are in the order of 104 M-1, this is in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of lectin with carbohydrate and hydrophobic ligand. Each subunit of the tetrameric jacalin binds one AgNPs, and the stoichiometry was unaffected by the presence of the specific sugar, galactose. Hemagglutination assay shows that sugar stabilized AgNPs interacts to jacalin at a site that is different from the saccharide-binding site. Analysis of the FTIR spectra of jacalin indicates that the binding of AgNPs does not alter the secondary structure of jacalin. More importantly, AgNPs exists in nano form even after interacting with the lectin. These results suggest that the development of lectin-AgNPs conjugate would be possible for diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  10. Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis Chaperones: Evidence for Emergence of Mutational Robustness of a Highly Specific Protein-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Delewski, Wojciech; Paterkiewicz, Bogumiła; Manicki, Mateusz; Schilke, Brenda; Tomiczek, Bartłomiej; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Nierzwicki, Lukasz; Czub, Jacek; Dutkiewicz, Rafal; Craig, Elizabeth A; Marszalek, Jaroslaw

    2016-03-01

    Biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters (FeS) is a highly conserved process involving Hsp70 and J-protein chaperones. However, Hsp70 specialization differs among species. In most eukaryotes, including Schizosaccharomyces pombe, FeS biogenesis involves interaction between the J-protein Jac1 and the multifunctional Hsp70 Ssc1. But, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and closely related species, Jac1 interacts with the specialized Hsp70 Ssq1, which emerged through duplication of SSC1. As little is known about how gene duplicates affect the robustness of their protein interaction partners, we analyzed the functional and evolutionary consequences of Ssq1 specialization on the ubiquitous J-protein cochaperone Jac1, by comparing S. cerevisiae and S. pombe. Although deletion of JAC1 is lethal in both species, alanine substitutions within the conserved His-Pro-Asp (HPD) motif, which is critical for Jac1:Hsp70 interaction, have species-specific effects. They are lethal in S. pombe, but not in S. cerevisiae. These in vivo differences correlated with in vitro biochemical measurements. Charged residues present in the J-domain of S. cerevisiae Jac1, but absent in S. pombe Jac1, are important for tolerance of S. cerevisiae Jac1 to HPD alterations. Moreover, Jac1 orthologs from species that encode Ssq1 have a higher sequence divergence. The simplest interpretation of our results is that Ssq1's coevolution with Jac1 resulted in expansion of their binding interface, thus increasing the efficiency of their interaction. Such an expansion could in turn compensate for negative effects of HPD substitutions. Thus, our results support the idea that the robustness of Jac1 emerged as consequence of its highly efficient and specific interaction with Ssq1. PMID:26545917

  11. Plasmid replication initiator interactions with origin 13-mers and polymerase subunits contribute to strand-specific replisome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzycka, Aleksandra; Gross, Marta; Wasaznik, Anna; Konieczny, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Although the molecular basis for replisome activity has been extensively investigated, it is not clear what the exact mechanism for de novo assembly of the replication complex at the replication origin is, or how the directionality of replication is determined. Here, using the plasmid RK2 replicon, we analyze the protein interactions required for Escherichia coli polymerase III (Pol III) holoenzyme association at the replication origin. Our investigations revealed that in E. coli, replisome formation at the plasmid origin involves interactions of the RK2 plasmid replication initiation protein (TrfA) with both the polymerase β- and α-subunits. In the presence of other replication proteins, including DnaA, helicase, primase and the clamp loader, TrfA interaction with the β-clamp contributes to the formation of the β-clamp nucleoprotein complex on origin DNA. By reconstituting in vitro the replication reaction on ssDNA templates, we demonstrate that TrfA interaction with the β-clamp and sequence-specific TrfA interaction with one strand of the plasmid origin DNA unwinding element (DUE) contribute to strand-specific replisome assembly. Wild-type TrfA, but not the TrfA QLSLF mutant (which does not interact with the β-clamp), in the presence of primase, helicase, Pol III core, clamp loader, and β-clamp initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA template containing 13-mers of the bottom strand, but not the top strand, of DUE. Results presented in this work uncovered requirements for anchoring polymerase at the plasmid replication origin and bring insights of how the directionality of DNA replication is determined. PMID:26195759

  12. Category-Specific Naming Deficit in Alzheimer's Disease: The Effect of a Display by Domain Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zannino, Gian Daniele; Perri, Roberta; Caltagirone, Carlo; Carlesimo, Giovanni A.

    2007-01-01

    A category-specific naming effect penalizing living things has often been reported in patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in other brain damaged populations, while the opposite dissociation (i.e., lower accuracy in naming nonliving than living things) is much rarer. In this study, we investigated whether the use of line drawings…

  13. Nuclear lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase and its interaction with CR6-interacting factor 1 promote the survival of human leukemic T cells

    PubMed Central

    VAHEDI, SHAHROOZ; CHUEH, FU-YU; DUTTA, SUJOY; CHANDRAN, BALA; YU, CHAO-LAN

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression and hyperactivation of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) have been associated with leukemia development. We previously showed that, other than its known function as a cytoplasmic signal transducer, Lck also acts as a nuclear transcription factor in mouse leukemic cells. In the present study, we demonstrated the presence of nuclear Lck in human leukemic T cells and in primary cells. We further established a positive correlation between Lck nuclear localization and its kinase activity. Proteomic analysis identified CR6-interacting factor 1 (CRIF1) as one of the Lck-interacting proteins. CRIF1 and Lck association in the nucleus was confirmed both by immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation in human leukemic T cells. Close-range interaction between Lck and CRIF1 was validated by in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA). Consistent with the role of nuclear CRIF1 as a tumor suppressor, CRIF1 silencing promotes leukemic T cell survival in the absence of growth factors. This protective effect can be recapitulated by endogenous Lck or reconstituted Lck in leukemic T cells. All together, our results support a novel function of nuclear Lck in promoting human leukemic T cell survival through interaction with a tumor suppressor. It has important implications in defining a paradigm shift of non-canonical protein tyrosine kinase signaling. PMID:25997448

  14. Structure and DNA-Binding Sites of the SWI1 AT-rich Interaction Domain (ARID) Suggest Determinants for Sequence-Specific DNA Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhkmann; Zhang, Ziming; Upchurch, Sean; Isern, Nancy G.; Chen, Yuan

    2004-04-16

    2 ARID is a homologous family of DNA-binding domains that occur in DNA binding proteins from a wide variety of species, ranging from yeast to nematodes, insects, mammals and plants. SWI1, a member of the SWI/SNF protein complex that is involved in chromatin remodeling during transcription, contains the ARID motif. The ARID domain of human SWI1 (also known as p270) does not select for a specific DNA sequence from a random sequence pool. The lack of sequence specificity shown by the SWI1 ARID domain stands in contrast to the other characterized ARID domains, which recognize specific AT-rich sequences. We have solved the three-dimensional structure of human SWI1 ARID using solution NMR methods. In addition, we have characterized non-specific DNA-binding by the SWI1 ARID domain. Results from this study indicate that a flexible long internal loop in ARID motif is likely to be important for sequence specific DNA-recognition. The structure of human SWI1 ARID domain also represents a distinct structural subfamily. Studies of ARID indicate that boundary of the DNA binding structural and functional domains can extend beyond the sequence homologous region in a homologous family of proteins. Structural studies of homologous domains such as ARID family of DNA-binding domains should provide information to better predict the boundary of structural and functional domains in structural genomic studies. Key Words: ARID, SWI1, NMR, structural genomics, protein-DNA interaction.

  15. Generalized theory on the mechanism of site-specific DNA–protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjani, G.; Murugan, R.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a generalized theoretical framework on the binding of transcription factor proteins (TFs) with specific sites on DNA that takes into account the interplay of various factors regarding overall electrostatic potential at the DNA–protein interface, occurrence of kinetic traps along the DNA sequence, presence of other roadblock protein molecules along DNA and crowded environment, conformational fluctuations in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of TFs, and the conformational state of the DNA. Starting from a Smolochowski type theoretical framework on site-specific binding of TFs we logically build our model by adding the effects of these factors one by one. Our generalized two-step model suggests that the electrostatic attractive forces present inbetween the positively charged DBDs of TFs and the negatively charged phosphate backbone of DNA, along with the counteracting shielding effects of solvent ions, is the core factor that creates a fluidic type environment at the DNA–protein interface. This in turn facilitates various one-dimensional diffusion (1Dd) processes such as sliding, hopping and intersegmental transfers. These facilitating processes as well as flipping dynamics of conformational states of DBDs of TFs between stationary and mobile states can enhance the 1Dd coefficient on a par with three-dimensional diffusion (3Dd). The random coil conformation of DNA also plays critical roles in enhancing the site-specific association rate. The extent of enhancement over the 3Dd controlled rate seems to be directly proportional to the maximum possible 1Dd length. We show that the overall site-specific binding rate scales with the length of DNA in an asymptotic way. For relaxed DNA, the specific binding rate will be independent of the length of DNA as length increases towards infinity. For condensed DNA as in in vivo conditions, the specific binding rate depends on the length of DNA in a turnover way with a maximum. This maximum rate seems to scale with the

  16. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Pieper, Rembert; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Townsend, Katherine; Yu, Chenggang; Yu, Xueping; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent. Given its genetic origin as a commensal soil organism, it is equipped with an extensive and varied set of adapted mechanisms to cope with and modulate host-cell environments. One essential virulence mechanism constitutes the specialized secretion systems that are designed to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert pathogen proteins directly into the host cell's cytosol. However, the secretion systems' proteins and, in particular, their host targets are largely uncharacterized. Here, we used a combined in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach to identify B. mallei proteins required for pathogenicity. We used bioinformatics tools, including orthology detection and ab initio predictions of secretion system proteins, as well as published experimental Burkholderia data to initially select a small number of proteins as putative virulence factors. We then used yeast two-hybrid assays against normalized whole human and whole murine proteome libraries to detect and identify interactions among each of these bacterial proteins and host proteins. Analysis of such interactions provided both verification of known virulence factors and identification of three new putative virulence proteins. We successfully created insertion mutants for each of these three proteins using the virulent B. mallei ATCC 23344 strain. We exposed BALB/c mice to mutant strains and the wild-type strain in an aerosol challenge model using lethal B. mallei doses. In each set of experiments, mice exposed to mutant strains survived for the 21-day duration of the experiment, whereas mice exposed to the wild-type strain rapidly died. Given their in vivo role in pathogenicity, and based on the yeast two-hybrid interaction data, these results point to the importance of these pathogen proteins in modulating host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin

  17. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  18. Segmentation and additive approach: A reliable technique to study noncovalent interactions of large molecules at the surface of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ana M; Scheiner, Steve; Roy, Ajit K; Garay-Tapia, Andrés M; Bustamante, John; Kar, Tapas

    2016-08-01

    This investigation explores a new protocol, named Segmentation and Additive approach (SAA), to study exohedral noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with large molecules, such as polymers and biomolecules, by segmenting the entire system into smaller units to reduce computational cost. A key criterion of the segmentation process is the preservation of the molecular structure responsible for stabilization of the entire system in smaller segments. Noncovalent interaction of linoleic acid (LA, C18 H32 O2 ), a fatty acid, at the surface of a (10,0) zigzag nanotube is considered for test purposes. Three smaller segmented models have been created from the full (10,0)-LA system and interaction energies were calculated for these models and compared with the full system at different levels of theory, namely ωB97XD, LDA. The success of this SAA is confirmed as the sum of the interaction energies is in very good agreement with the total interaction energy. Besides reducing computational cost, another merit of SAA is an estimation of the contributions from different sections of the large system to the total interaction energy which can be studied in-depth using a higher level of theory to estimate several properties of each segment. On the negative side, bulk properties, such as HOMO-LUMO (highest occupied molecular orbital - lowest occupied molecular orbital) gap, of the entire system cannot be estimated by adding results from segment models. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241227

  19. An electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch as the basis for the specific interaction of phosphatidic acid with proteins.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Tieleman, D Peter; Testerink, Christa; Munnik, Teun; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Burger, Koert N J; de Kruijff, Ben

    2007-04-13

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) is a minor but important phospholipid that, through specific interactions with proteins, plays a central role in several key cellular processes. The simple yet unique structure of PA, carrying just a phosphomonoester head group, suggests an important role for interactions with the positively charged essential residues in these proteins. We analyzed by solid-state magic angle spinning 31P NMR and molecular dynamics simulations the interaction of low concentrations of PA in model membranes with positively charged side chains of membrane-interacting peptides. Surprisingly, lysine and arginine residues increase the charge of PA, predominantly by forming hydrogen bonds with the phosphate of PA, thereby stabilizing the protein-lipid interaction. Our results demonstrate that this electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch turns the phosphate of PA into an effective and preferred docking site for lysine and arginine residues. In combination with the special packing properties of PA, PA may well be nature's preferred membrane lipid for interfacial insertion of positively charged membrane protein domains. PMID:17277311

  20. Combined (1)H NMR and LSER study for the compound-specific interactions between organic contaminants and organobentonites.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiuxiu; Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Baoliang; Qian, Guangren; Frost, Ray L

    2015-12-15

    The compound-specific mechanisms for the sorption of organic contaminants onto cetyltrimethylammonium-saturated bentonite (i.e., CTMA-Bentonite) in water were evaluated by (1)H NMR study and Linear Solvation Energy Relationship (LSER) approach. In (1)H NMR study, comparing with pure CTMAB, the up-field shifts of hydrogen peaks for CH2N(+) and CH3N(+) of CTMA(+) in CTMAB-aromatics (1-naphtylamine, aniline and phenol) mixtures are much greater than that in CTMAB-aliphatics (cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol) mixtures. Meanwhile, the peak position of hydrogen on amino- and hydroxyl-groups of aromatic compounds also changes greatly. (1)H NMR data demonstrated the strong molecular interaction between the positive ammonium group of CTMA(+) and the delocalized π-systems of aromatic solutes, whereas the interactions of CTMA(+) with aliphatic compounds having electron-donating groups (such as cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone) or aromatic ring substituted by electron-withdrawing groups (i.e., nitrobenzene) or nonpolar aromatic compounds with single phenyl ring (i.e., toluene) are weak. The derived LSER equation was obtained by a multiple regression of the solid-water sorption coefficients (Kd) of 16 probe solutes upon their solvation parameters, and demonstrates aromatics sorption onto CTMA-Bentonite is concurrently governed by the π-/n-electron pair donor-accepter interaction and the cavity/dispersion interaction, while the predominant mechanism for aliphatic compounds is the cavity/dispersion interaction, consisting with the (1)H NMR results. PMID:26319328

  1. Olpidium bornovanus-mediated germination of ascospores of Monosporascus cannonballus: a host-specific rhizosphere interaction.

    PubMed

    Stanghellini, Michael E; Misaghi, Iraj J

    2011-07-01

    Monosporascus cannonballus, a host-specific root-infecting ascomycete, is the causal agent of a destructive disease of melon (Cucumis melo L.) known as vine decline. Ascospores germinate only in the rhizosphere of melon plants growing in field soil. However, no germination occurs in the rhizosphere of melon plants if the field soil is heated to temperatures >50°C prior to infestation with ascospores. This observation suggested that germination is mediated by one or more heat-sensitive members of the soil microflora. Although bacteria or actinomycetes were heretofore suspected as the germination-inducing microbes, our data demonstrate that Olpidium bornovanus, an obligate, host-specific, root-infecting zoosporic fungus, is responsible. In four experiments conducted in autoclaved field soil amended with various population densities of culturally produced ascospores, significant ascospore germination was recorded only in the rhizosphere of cantaloupe seedlings colonized by O. bornovanus. PMID:21675923

  2. Hemodynamics and flow-vessel interaction in patient-specific aorta using unified lattice Boltzmann computation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Ye; Teague, Shawn D.

    2013-11-01

    Patient-specific blood flow simulation is mainly relying on the utilization of commercial software. Geometrical simplification and approximation are usually made thus weaken the capability to aid clinical diagnose and assessment. We develop a unified computing platform to simulate patient-specific hemodynamics and flow-vessel interaction using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which tightly integrates anatomical-structure extraction from imaging data and numerical simulation in one computation mesh structure, where the LBM solves level set equation for image segmentation and Navier-Stokes equation for fluid dynamics respectively. The patient-specific vessel geometry, volumetric ratio of solid versus fluid, and the orientation of the boundary obtained with high accuracy seamlessly feed to the numerical simulation needs. In order to better treat the complex geometry, we specifically develop volumetric lattice Boltzmann scheme which strictly satisfies mass conservation when boundary moves. Validation study is on hemodynamics and flow-vessel interaction in healthy and diseased aortas. Flow rate and structure, pressure and vorticity distribution, as well as wall normal and shear stresses, are revealed in both cases.

  3. Interactions of malnutrition and immune impairment, with specific reference to immunity against parasites

    PubMed Central

    HUGHES, S; KELLY, P

    2006-01-01

    KEY POINTS Clinical malnutrition is a heterogenous group of disorders including macronutrient deficiencies leading to body cell mass depletion and micronutrient deficiencies, and these often coexist with infectious and inflammatory processes and environmental problems.There is good evidence that specific micronutrients influence immunity, particularly zinc and vitamin A. Iron may have both beneficial and deleterious effects depending on circumstances.There is surprisingly slender good evidence that immunity to parasites is dependent on macronutrient intake or body composition. PMID:17042929

  4. Interaction specificity between the chaperone and proteolytic components of the cyanobacterial Clp protease.

    PubMed

    Tryggvesson, Anders; Ståhlberg, Frida M; Mogk, Axel; Zeth, Kornelius; Clarke, Adrian K

    2012-09-01

    The Clp protease is conserved among eubacteria and most eukaryotes, and uses ATP to drive protein substrate unfolding and translocation into a chamber of sequestered proteolytic active sites. In plant chloroplasts and cyanobacteria, the essential constitutive Clp protease consists of the Hsp100/ClpC chaperone partnering a proteolytic core of catalytic ClpP and noncatalytic ClpR subunits. In the present study, we have examined putative determinants conferring the highly specific association between ClpC and the ClpP3/R core from the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Two conserved sequences in the N-terminus of ClpR (tyrosine and proline motifs) and one in the N-terminus of ClpP3 (MPIG motif) were identified as being crucial for the ClpC-ClpP3/R association. These N-terminal domains also influence the stability of the ClpP3/R core complex itself. A unique C-terminal sequence was also found in plant and cyanobacterial ClpC orthologues just downstream of the P-loop region previously shown in Escherichia coli to be important for Hsp100 association to ClpP. This R motif in Synechococcus ClpC confers specificity for the ClpP3/R core and prevents association with E. coli ClpP; its removal from ClpC reverses this core specificity. PMID:22657732

  5. Reversible hydrogel formation driven by protein-peptide-specific interaction and chondrocyte entrapment.

    PubMed

    Ito, Fuyu; Usui, Kengo; Kawahara, Daigo; Suenaga, Atsushi; Maki, Tei; Kidoaki, Satoru; Suzuki, Harukazu; Taiji, Makoto; Itoh, Masayoshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Matsuda, Takehisa

    2010-01-01

    We developed a hydrogel self-assembling method driven by the interaction between recombinant tax-interactive protein-1 (TIP1) with the PDZ domain in a molecule, which is fused to each end of the triangular trimeric CutA protein (CutA-TIP1), and a PDZ domain-recognizable peptide which is covalently bound to each terminus of four-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PDZ-peptide-PEG). Genetic manipulation based on molecular-dynamic simulation generated a cell-adhesive RGD tripeptidyl sequence in the CutA loop region [CutA(RGD)-TIP1]. Spontaneous viscoelastic hydrogel formation occurred when either CutA-TIP1- or CutA(RGD)-TIP1-containing buffer solution and PDZ-peptide-PEG-containing buffer solutions were stoichiometrically mixed. Dynamic viscoelasticity measurement revealed shear stress-dependent reversible-phase transformation: a spontaneous viscoelastic hydrogel was formed at low shear stress, but it was transformed into a sol at high shear stress. Upon the cessation of shear, hydrogel was restored. When chondrocytes were pre-mixed with one of these two components containing buffer solutions, the stoichiometric mixed solution was also spontaneously gelled. Individual rounded cells and multicellular aggregates were entrapped within both hydrogels without substantial cellular impairment regardless of the presence or absence of RGD motif in the CutA-TIP1 molecule. The potential use of such a shear-sensitive hydrogel for injectable cell delivery into diseased or lost cartilage tissue is discussed. PMID:19836832

  6. Cross-Species Interaction between Rapidly Evolving Telomere-Specific Drosophila Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vedelek, Balázs; Blastyák, András; Boros, Imre M.

    2015-01-01

    Telomere integrity in Drosophila melanogaster is maintained by a putative multisubunit complex called terminin that is believed to act in analogy to the mammalian shelterin complex in protecting chromosome ends from being recognized as sites of DNA damage. The five proteins supposed to form the terminin complex are HP1-ORC associated protein, HP1-HOAP interacting protein, Verrocchio, Drosophila Telomere Loss/Modigliani and Heterochromatic Protein 1. Four of these proteins evolve rapidly within the Drosophila genus. The accelerated evolution of terminin components may indicate the involvement of these proteins in the process by which new species arise, as the resulting divergence of terminin proteins might prevent hybrid formation, thus driving speciation. However, terminin is not an experimentally proven entity, and no biochemical studies have been performed to investigate its assembly and action in detail. Motivated by these facts in order to initiate biochemical studies on terminin function, we attempted to reconstitute terminin by co-expressing its subunits in bacteria and investigated the possible role of the fast-evolving parts of terminin components in complex assembly. Our results suggest formation of stable subcomplexes of terminin, but not of the whole complex in vitro. We found that the accelerated evolution is restricted to definable regions of terminin components, and that the divergence of D. melanogaster Drosophila Telomere Loss and D. yakuba Verrocchio proteins does not preclude their stable interaction. PMID:26566042

  7. A Tendon Cell Specific RNAi Screen Reveals Novel Candidates Essential for Muscle Tendon Interaction.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Prabhat; Kumar, Arun; Das, Rudra Nayan; Malhotra, Vivek; VijayRaghavan, K

    2015-01-01

    Tendons are fibrous connective tissue which connect muscles to the skeletal elements thus acting as passive transmitters of force during locomotion and provide appropriate body posture. Tendon-derived cues, albeit poorly understood, are necessary for proper muscle guidance and attachment during development. In the present study, we used dorsal longitudinal muscles of Drosophila and their tendon attachment sites to unravel the molecular nature of interactions between muscles and tendons. We performed a genetic screen using RNAi-mediated knockdown in tendon cells to find out molecular players involved in the formation and maintenance of myotendinous junction and found 21 candidates out of 2507 RNAi lines screened. Of these, 19 were novel molecules in context of myotendinous system. Integrin-βPS and Talin, picked as candidates in this screen, are known to play important role in the cell-cell interaction and myotendinous junction formation validating our screen. We have found candidates with enzymatic function, transcription activity, cell adhesion, protein folding and intracellular transport function. Tango1, an ER exit protein involved in collagen secretion was identified as a candidate molecule involved in the formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 knockdown was found to affect development of muscle attachment sites and formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 was also found to be involved in secretion of Viking (Collagen type IV) and BM-40 from hemocytes and fat cells. PMID:26488612

  8. A Tendon Cell Specific RNAi Screen Reveals Novel Candidates Essential for Muscle Tendon Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Prabhat; Malhotra, Vivek; VijayRaghavan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Tendons are fibrous connective tissue which connect muscles to the skeletal elements thus acting as passive transmitters of force during locomotion and provide appropriate body posture. Tendon-derived cues, albeit poorly understood, are necessary for proper muscle guidance and attachment during development. In the present study, we used dorsal longitudinal muscles of Drosophila and their tendon attachment sites to unravel the molecular nature of interactions between muscles and tendons. We performed a genetic screen using RNAi-mediated knockdown in tendon cells to find out molecular players involved in the formation and maintenance of myotendinous junction and found 21 candidates out of 2507 RNAi lines screened. Of these, 19 were novel molecules in context of myotendinous system. Integrin-βPS and Talin, picked as candidates in this screen, are known to play important role in the cell-cell interaction and myotendinous junction formation validating our screen. We have found candidates with enzymatic function, transcription activity, cell adhesion, protein folding and intracellular transport function. Tango1, an ER exit protein involved in collagen secretion was identified as a candidate molecule involved in the formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 knockdown was found to affect development of muscle attachment sites and formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 was also found to be involved in secretion of Viking (Collagen type IV) and BM-40 from hemocytes and fat cells. PMID:26488612

  9. Role of specific interactions on the rotational diffusion of organic solutes in a protic ionic liquid-propylammonium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Karve, Lalita; Dutt, G B

    2012-08-01

    Rotational diffusion of two pairs of structurally similar organic solutes has been examined in a protic ionic liquid, n-propylammonium nitrate (PAN), to understand the influence of specific interactions on solute rotation. It has been observed that the rotation of the nondipolar solute, 1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DPP) in PAN is 30-50% slower compared to its structurally similar counterpart 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP). Analysis of the data using Stokes-Einstein-Debye hydrodynamic theory indicates that the measured reorientation times of DMDPP and DPP are between the stick and slip limits. Furthermore, the rotation of the hydrogen bond accepting solute DMDPP was found to be 60% slower compared to the predictions of slip hydrodynamics, which has been rationalized on the basis of specific interactions between the solute and n-propylammonium cation of the ionic liquid. DPP, on the other hand, experiences specific interactions with both the anion and the cation of the ionic liquid due to the presence of hydrogen bond donating as well as accepting groups, resulting in slower rotation compared to DMDPP. The reorientation times of the ionic solutes fluorescein (FL) and rhodamine 110 (R110) are almost identical and closer to the predictions of stick hydrodynamics. The observed behavior is a consequence of the anionic solute FL and the cationic solute R110 experiencing hydrogen bonding interactions with n-propylammonium cation and nitrate anion, respectively. An attempt has also been made to rationalize these trends in terms of hydrogen bond acidity and basicity of PAN with the aid of existing scales, such as Kamlet-Taft and the Abraham model. PMID:22755511

  10. Identification of the Isoform-specific Interactions between the Tail and the Head of Class V Myosin.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lin-Lin; Shen, Mei; Lu, Zekuan; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Li, Xiang-dong

    2016-04-01

    Vertebrates have three isoforms of class V myosin (Myo5), Myo5a, Myo5b, and Myo5c, which are involved in transport of multiple cargoes. It is well established that the motor functions of Myo5a and Myo5b are regulated by a tail inhibition mechanism. Here we found that the motor function of Myo5c was also inhibited by its globular tail domain (GTD), and this inhibition was abolished by high Ca(2+), indicating that the tail inhibition mechanism is conserved in vertebrate Myo5. Interestingly, we found that Myo5a-GTD and Myo5c-GTD were not interchangeable in terms of inhibition of motor function, indicating isoform-specific interactions between the GTD and the head of Myo5. To identify the isoform-specific interactions, we produced a number of Myo5 chimeras by swapping the corresponding regions of Myo5a and Myo5c. We found that Myo5a-GTD, with its H11-H12 loop being substituted with that of Myo5c, was able to inhibit the ATPase activity of Myo5c and that Myo5a-GTD was able to inhibit the ATPase activity of Myo5c-S1 and Myo5c-HMM only when their IQ1 motif was substituted with that of Myo5a. Those results indicate that the H11-H12 loop in the GTD and the IQ1 motif in the head dictate the isoform-specific interactions between the GTD and head of Myo5. Because the IQ1 motif is wrapped by calmodulin, whose conformation is influenced by the sequence of the IQ1 motif, we proposed that the calmodulin bound to the IQ1 motif interacts with the H11-H12 loop of the GTD in the inhibited state of Myo5. PMID:26912658

  11. Interacting effects of elevated temperature and additional water on plant physiology and net ecosystem carbon fluxes in a high Arctic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maseyk, Kadmiel; Seibt, Ulrike; Lett, Céline; Lupascu, Massimo; Czimczik, Claudia; Sullivan, Patrick; Welker, Jeff

    2013-04-01

    Arctic ecosystems are experiencing temperature increases more strongly than the global average, and increases in precipitation are also expected amongst the climate impacts on this region in the future. These changes are expected to strongly influence plant physiology and soil biogeochemistry with subsequent implications for system carbon balance. We have investigated the effects of a long-term (10 years) increase in temperature, soil water and the combination of both on a tundra ecosystem at a field manipulation experiment in NW Greenland. Leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content and leaf isotopic composition, and leaf morphology were measured on Salix arctica plants in treatment and control plots in June-July 2011, and continuous measurements of net plant and soil fluxes of CO2 and water were made using automatic chambers coupled to a trace gas laser analyzer. Plants in the elevated temperature (T2) treatment had the highest photosynthetic capacity in terms of net CO2 assimilation rates and photosystem II efficiencies, and lowest rates of non-photochemical energy dissipation during photosynthesis. T2 plants also had the highest leaf N content, specific leaf area (SLA) and saturation light level of photosynthesis. It appears that warming increases soil N availability, which the plants direct towards increasing photosynthetic capacity and producing larger thinner leaves. On the other hand, the plants in the plots with both elevated temperatures and additional water (T2W) had the lowest photosystem II efficiencies and the highest rates of non-photochemical energy dissipation, due more to higher levels of constitutive energy dissipation than regulated thermal quenching. Watering, both in combination with higher temperatures and alone (W treatment), also reduced leaf SLA and leaf N relative to control plots. However, net photosynthetic rates remained similar to control plants, due in part to higher stomatal conductance (W) and

  12. Addition of a Single gp120 Glycan Confers Increased Binding to Dendritic Cell-Specific ICAM-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin and Neutralization Escape to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lue, James; Hsu, Mayla; Yang, David; Marx, Preston; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    The potential role of dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) binding in human immunodeficiency virus transmission across the mucosal barrier was investigated by assessing the ability of simian-human immunodeficiency chimeric viruses (SHIVs) showing varying degrees of mucosal transmissibility to bind the DC-SIGN expressed on the surface of transfected cells. We found that gp120 of the highly transmissible, pathogenic CCR5-tropic SHIVSF162P3 bound human and rhesus DC-SIGN with an efficiency threefold or greater than that of gp120 of the nonpathogenic, poorly transmissible parental SHIVSF162, and this increase in binding to the DC-SIGN of the SHIVSF162P3 envelope gp120 translated into an enhancement of T-cell infection in trans. The presence of an additional glycan at the N-terminal base of the V2 loop of SHIVSF162P3 gp120 compared to that of the parental virus was shown to be responsible for the increase in binding to DC-SIGN. Interestingly, this glycan also conferred escape from autologous neutralization, raising the possibility that the modification occurred as a result of immune selection. Our data suggest that more-efficient binding of envelope gp120 to DC-SIGN could be relevant to the enhanced mucosal transmissibility of SHIVSF162P3 compared to that of parental SHIVSF162. PMID:12239306

  13. Photosensitivity of 10-substituted visual pigment analogues: detection of a specific secondary opsin-retinal interaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, R S; Crescitelli, F; Denny, M; Matsumoto, H; Asato, A E

    1986-11-01

    The photosensitivities of the bovine rhodopsin and gecko pigment 521 analogues regenerated from C-10-substituted analogues of 11-cis- and 9-cis-retinals were determined by two different methods. A similar reactivity trend was noted for both pigment systems as revealed in the photosensitivity of the gecko pigments and relative quantum yields of the bovine analogues. The 10-fluoro-11-cis photopigments had a photosensitivity less than, but approaching, that of the native (11-cis) visual pigment while the 10-fluoro-9-cis photopigments had a much lower photosensitivity than the parent 9-cis regenerated pigment. The results are interpreted in terms of recently described models of rhodopsin architecture and of the primary molecular reaction of visual pigments to light. The unusually low photoreactivity of the 10-fluoro-9-cis pigment molecule is viewed as the result of a regiospecific hydrogen-bonding interaction of the electronegative fluorine atom to the opsin. PMID:2948555

  14. Comparative analysis of differential network modularity in tissue specific normal and cancer protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Large scale understanding of complex and dynamic alterations in cellular and subcellular levels during cancer in contrast to normal condition has facilitated the emergence of sophisticated systemic approaches like network biology in recent times. As most biological networks show modular properties, the analysis of differential modularity between normal and cancer protein interaction networks can be a good way to understand cancer more significantly. Two aspects of biological network modularity e.g. detection of molecular complexes (potential modules or clusters) and identification of crucial nodes forming the overlapping modules have been considered in this regard. Methods In the current study, the computational analysis of previously published protein interaction networks (PINs) has been conducted to identify the molecular complexes and crucial nodes of the networks. Protein molecules involved in ten major cancer signal transduction pathways were used to construct the networks based on expression data of five tissues e.g. bone, breast, colon, kidney and liver in both normal and cancer conditions. MCODE (molecular complex detection) and ModuLand methods have been used to identify the molecular complexes and crucial nodes of the networks respectively. Results In case of all tissues, cancer PINs show higher level of clustering (formation of molecular complexes) than the normal ones. In contrast, lower level modular overlapping is found in cancer PINs than the normal ones. Thus a proposition can be made regarding the formation of some giant nodes in the cancer networks with very high degree and resulting in reduced overlapping among the network modules though the predicted molecular complex numbers are higher in cancer conditions. Conclusion The study predicts some major molecular complexes that might act as the important regulators in cancer progression. The crucial nodes identified in this study can be potential drug targets to combat cancer. PMID

  15. The Non-Specific Binding of Fluorescent-Labeled MiRNAs on Cell Surface by Hydrophobic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jianwei; Yao, Peng; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Qunye

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs about 22 nt long that play key roles in almost all biological processes and diseases. The fluorescent labeling and lipofection are two common methods for changing the levels and locating the position of cellular miRNAs. Despite many studies about the mechanism of DNA/RNA lipofection, little is known about the characteristics, mechanisms and specificity of lipofection of fluorescent-labeled miRNAs. Methods and Results Therefore, miRNAs labeled with different fluorescent dyes were transfected into adherent and suspension cells using lipofection reagent. Then, the non-specific binding and its mechanism were investigated by flow cytometer and laser confocal microscopy. The results showed that miRNAs labeled with Cy5 (cyanine fluorescent dye) could firmly bind to the surface of adherent cells (Hela) and suspended cells (K562) even without lipofection reagent. The binding of miRNAs labeled with FAM (carboxyl fluorescein) to K562 cells was obvious, but it was not significant in Hela cells. After lipofectamine reagent was added, most of the fluorescently labeled miRNAs binding to the surface of Hela cells were transfected into intra-cell because of the high transfection efficiency, however, most of them were still binding to the surface of K562 cells. Moreover, the high-salt buffer which could destroy the electrostatic interactions did not affect the above-mentioned non-specific binding, but the organic solvent which could destroy the hydrophobic interactions eliminated it. Conclusions These results implied that the fluorescent-labeled miRNAs could non-specifically bind to the cell surface by hydrophobic interaction. It would lead to significant errors in the estimation of transfection efficiency only according to the cellular fluorescence intensity. Therefore, other methods to evaluate the transfection efficiency and more appropriate fluorescent dyes should be used according to the cell types for the accuracy of results. PMID

  16. Optical Sensors Based on Whispering Gallery Modes in Fluorescent Microbeads: Response to Specific Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Himmelhaus, Michael; Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar; Francois, Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in surface-fixated fluorescent polystyrene microbeads are studied in view of their capability of sensing the formation of biochemical adsorption layers on their outer surface with the well-established biotin-streptavidin specific binding as the model system. Three different methods for analysis of the observed shifts in the WGM wavelength positions are applied and used to quantify the adsorbed mass densities, which are then compared with the results of a comparative surface plasmon resonance (SPR) study. PMID:22219711

  17. Peripheral nerve injury induces loss of nociceptive neuron-specific Gαi-interacting protein in neuropathic pain rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Fei; Fischer, Gregory; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Gαi-interacting protein (GINIP) is expressed specifically in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and functions in modulation of peripheral gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor (GBR). Genetic deletion of GINIP leads to impaired responsiveness to GBR agonist-mediated analgesia in rodent. It is, however, not defined whether nerve injury changes GINIP expression. Results Immunolabeling with validated antibody revealed GINIP expression in ∼40% of total lumbar DRG neurons in normal adult rats. GINIP immunoreactivity was detected in ∼80% of IB4-positive (nonpeptidergic) and ∼30% of CGRP-positive (peptidergic) neurons. GINIP immunoreactivity in the spinal cord dorsal horn was colabeled with IB4 and partially with CGRP. In addition, GINIP was expressed in DRG neurons immunopositive for GBR1, GBR2, Gαi(s), and Gαo and was also extensively colabeled with multiple nociceptive neuronal markers, including Trpv1, NaV1.7, CaV2.2α1b, CaV3.2α1b, TrkA, and Trek2. Peripheral nerve injury by L5 spinal nerve ligation significantly decreased the proportion of GINIP immunoreactivity-positive neurons from 40 ± 8.4% to 0.8 ± 0.1% (p < 0.01, mean ± SD, four weeks after spinal nerve ligation) and the total GINIP protein to 1.3% ± 0.04% of its basal level (p < 0.01, n = 6 animals in each group, two weeks after spinal nerve ligation) in the ipsilateral L5 DRGs. Conclusion Our results show that GINIP is predominantly expressed by small nonpeptidergic nociceptive neurons and that nerve injury triggers loss of GINIP expression. Signal transduction roles of GINIP may be diverse as it colabeled with various subgroups of nociceptive neurons. Future studies may investigate details of the signaling mechanism engaged by GINIP, as well as the pathophysiological significance of lost expression of GINIP in neuropathic pain. PMID:27145804

  18. Prevalence of drug-drug interactions upon addition of simeprevir- or sofosbuvir-containing treatment to medication profiles of patients with HIV and hepatitis C coinfection.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nimish; Nasiri, Mona; Koroglu, Arden; Amin, Ronish; McGuey, Liam; McNutt, Louise-Anne; Roman, Martha; Miller, Christopher

    2015-02-01

    The objectives were to (1) compare the frequency of contraindicated drug-drug interactions (XDDI) when simeprevir (SIM)- and sofosbuvir (SOF)-containing regimens are theoretically added to a patient's medication profile; (2) identify which hepatitis C (HCV) regimen is associated with the lowest frequency of XDDIs within different types of antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens; and (3) determine the risk factors for XDDIs with each regimen. A cross-sectional study was performed among adult HIV/HCV-coinfected patients. Demographics, comorbidities, and medication lists were collected from medical records. Medication lists were entered into Lexi-Interact drug interaction software and XDDI before/after the addition of SIM- and SOF-containing therapy was documented. Classification and regression tree (CART) analyses identified breakpoints in continuous variables. Before the addition of any HCV therapy, XDDIs were present in 20% of the 335 included patients. After the addition of SIM-containing therapy, the frequency of XDDIs significantly increased to 88.4% (p<0.001). After adding SOF-containing therapy, the prevalence of XDDIs increased to 24.5% (p<0.001). The prevalence of XDDIs was significantly lower for SOF-containing HCV therapy within various types of ART regimens. Use of ≥7 non-HIV medications (CART breakpoint) was the only variable to predict XDDIs before the addition of any HCV therapy. Similarly, this was the only variable to predict XDDIs after the addition of SOF-containing therapy (PR: 4.80; 95% CI: 2.57-8.96, p<0.001). Variables independently associated with XDDIs after the addition of SIM-containing therapy were NNRTI regimen (prevalence ratio, PR: 1.62; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.38-1.91, p<0.001), PI regimen (PR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.40-1.93, p<0.001), and ≥7 non-HIV medications (PR: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.00-1.14, p=0.09). The addition of SOF-containing therapy was associated with a lower prevalence of XDDI than SIM-containing therapy. PMID:25432275

  19. Fluid Structure Interaction simulation of heart prosthesis in patient-specific left-ventricle/aorta anatomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Borazjani, Iman; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2009-11-01

    In order to test and optimize heart valve prosthesis and enable virtual implantation of other biomedical devices it is essential to develop and validate high-resolution FSI-CFD codes for carrying out simulations in patient-specific geometries. We have developed a powerful numerical methodology for carrying out FSI simulations of cardiovascular flows based on the CURVIB approach (Borazjani, L. Ge, and F. Sotiropoulos, Journal of Computational physics, vol. 227, pp. 7587-7620 2008). We have extended our FSI method to overset grids to handle efficiently more complicated geometries e.g. simulating an MHV implanted in an anatomically realistic aorta and left-ventricle. A compliant, anatomic left-ventricle is modeled using prescribed motion in one domain. The mechanical heart valve is placed inside the second domain i.e. the body-fitted curvilinear mesh of the anatomic aorta. The simulations of an MHV with a left-ventricle model underscore the importance of inflow conditions and ventricular compliance for such simulations and demonstrate the potential of our method as a powerful tool for patient-specific simulations.

  20. Strain-specific differences in pili formation and the interaction of Corynebacterium diphtheriae with host cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the causative agent of diphtheria, is well-investigated in respect to toxin production, while little is known about C. diphtheriae factors crucial for colonization of the host. In this study, we investigated strain-specific differences in adhesion, invasion and intracellular survival and analyzed formation of pili in different isolates. Results Adhesion of different C. diphtheriae strains to epithelial cells and invasion of these cells are not strictly coupled processes. Using ultrastructure analyses by atomic force microscopy, significant differences in macromolecular surface structures were found between the investigated C. diphtheriae strains in respect to number and length of pili. Interestingly, adhesion and pili formation are not coupled processes and also no correlation between invasion and pili formation was found. Using RNA hybridization and Western blotting experiments, strain-specific pili expression patterns were observed. None of the studied C. diphtheriae strains had a dramatic detrimental effect on host cell viability as indicated by measurements of transepithelial resistance of Detroit 562 cell monolayers and fluorescence microscopy, leading to the assumption that C. diphtheriae strains might use epithelial cells as an environmental niche supplying protection against antibodies and macrophages. Conclusions The results obtained suggest that it is necessary to investigate various isolates on a molecular level to understand and to predict the colonization process of different C. diphtheriae strains. PMID:20942914

  1. A specific property of electromagnetic waves interacting with dust-laden plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, N. L.; Ehsan, Z.; Shah, H. A.; Murtaza, G.

    2006-07-15

    The propagation pattern of electromagnetic waves (EMWs) in dusty plasmas is quite different from that in electron-ion plasmas. For instance, here the ponderomotive force acts on dust grains as a negative pressure, and a nonlinear Schroedinger equation with an additional nonlinear term is obtained. Based on this equation, the modulation instability is examined and it is shown that the growth rate becomes maximum when that additional term compensates the diffraction term. The main part of this work is devoted to the localization of the grains by the EMW. Considering both subsonic and supersonic regimes, it has been shown that under certain conditions the grains are localized and the ions circumnavigate the grains, whereas the electrons escape from the region of localization. Further, the localization of grains by the EMW is found to be shape-dependent of the pulse. Comparing pancake and light bullet shaped pulses in the supersonic regime, and it is shown that only the light bullet shape leads to the compression of grains. Finally, investigating nonstationary solution, it is shown that for some parameters, the nonlinear wave breaking and the formation of a shock wave can take place.

  2. Specific interactions between lactose repressor protein and DNA affected by ligand binding: ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Masato; Nishikawa, Shin; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2011-06-01

    Transcription mechanisms of gene information from DNA to mRNA are essentially controlled by regulatory proteins such as a lactose repressor (LacR) protein and ligand molecules. Biochemical experiments elucidated that a ligand binding to LacR drastically changes the mechanism controlled by LacR, although the effect of ligand binding has not been clarified at atomic and electronic levels. We here investigated the effect of ligand binding on the specific interactions between LacR and operator DNA by the molecular simulations combined with classical molecular mechanics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results indicate that the binding of anti-inducer ligand strengthens the interaction between LacR and DNA, which is consistent with the fact that the binding of anti-inducer enhances the repression of gene transcription by LacR. It was also elucidated that hydrating water molecules existing between LacR and DNA contribute to the specific interactions between LacR and DNA. PMID:21328406

  3. Gγ recruitment systems specifically select PPI and affinity-enhanced candidate proteins that interact with membrane protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Kaishima, Misato; Ishii, Jun; Fukuda, Nobuo; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are crucial for the vast majority of biological processes. We previously constructed a Gγ recruitment system to screen PPI candidate proteins and desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. The methods utilized a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking the ability to localize to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. However, the previous systems were adapted to use only soluble cytosolic proteins as targets. Recently, membrane proteins have been found to form the principal nodes of signaling involved in diseases and have attracted a great deal of interest as primary drug targets. Here, we describe new protocols for the Gγ recruitment systems that are specifically designed to use membrane proteins as targets to overcome previous limitations. These systems represent an attractive approach to exploring novel interacting candidates and affinity-altered protein variants and their interactions with proteins on the inner side of the plasma membrane, with high specificity and selectivity. PMID:26581329

  4. Gγ recruitment systems specifically select PPI and affinity-enhanced candidate proteins that interact with membrane protein targets.

    PubMed

    Kaishima, Misato; Ishii, Jun; Fukuda, Nobuo; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are crucial for the vast majority of biological processes. We previously constructed a Gγ recruitment system to screen PPI candidate proteins and desirable affinity-altered (affinity-enhanced and affinity-attenuated) protein variants. The methods utilized a target protein fused to a mutated G-protein γ subunit (Gγcyto) lacking the ability to localize to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. However, the previous systems were adapted to use only soluble cytosolic proteins as targets. Recently, membrane proteins have been found to form the principal nodes of signaling involved in diseases and have attracted a great deal of interest as primary drug targets. Here, we describe new protocols for the Gγ recruitment systems that are specifically designed to use membrane proteins as targets to overcome previous limitations. These systems represent an attractive approach to exploring novel interacting candidates and affinity-altered protein variants and their interactions with proteins on the inner side of the plasma membrane, with high specificity and selectivity. PMID:26581329

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a specific tool for the interaction study of two surfactants with natural and synthetic organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Aude-Valérie; Frochot, Céline; Bersillon, Jean-Luc

    2016-04-01

    Four different techniques were used to study the binding of cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and non-ionic nonylphenylethoxyl (NPE) surfactants to three synthetic organic components that mimic humic-like aggregates and to two natural aggregated humic substances (HS) extracted from aquatic suspended matter. The composition of synthetic organic components were chosen to be similar to high molecular weight highly processed terrigenous HS and low and high molecular weight less processed terrigenous (or aquatic terrigenous) HS. The natural HS were extracted under two different meteorological conditions (rainy and dry periods). No significant interaction between the non-ionic surfactant and any of the studied compounds was found. Concerning CTAB; pH, conductivity and turbidity measurements, along with fluorescence spectroscopy were combined to provide a better understanding of interactions between organic aggregates and the surfactant. The spectroscopic data show that a "highly processed terrigenous HS" fluorophore interacts in a different way with the cationic surfactant than an "aquatic terrigenous (or less processed terrigenous) HS" fluorophore does. Under similar conditions, some spectral changes in the fluorescence signal are correlated to changes in non-specific physical-chemical parameters (pH, turbidity, conductivity) for the organic compounds tested. The complexation mechanism is essentially governed by charge neutralization, which can be monitored specifically by the fluorescence of the organic moieties.

  6. A Direct Interaction between Leucine-rich Repeat Kinase 2 and Specific β-Tubulin Isoforms Regulates Tubulin Acetylation*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Bernard M. H.; Spain, Victoria A.; Leinster, Veronica H. L.; Chia, Ruth; Beilina, Alexandra; Cho, Hyun J.; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Urban, Mary K.; Sancho, Rosa M.; Ramírez, Marian Blanca; Biskup, Saskia; Baekelandt, Veerle; Cai, Huaibin; Cookson, Mark R.; Berwick, Daniel C.; Harvey, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2, encoding the multifunctional protein leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), are a common cause of Parkinson disease. LRRK2 has been suggested to influence the cytoskeleton as LRRK2 mutants reduce neurite outgrowth and cause an accumulation of hyperphosphorylated Tau. This might cause alterations in the dynamic instability of microtubules suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. Here, we describe a direct interaction between LRRK2 and β-tubulin. This interaction is conferred by the LRRK2 Roc domain and is disrupted by the familial R1441G mutation and artificial Roc domain mutations that mimic autophosphorylation. LRRK2 selectively interacts with three β-tubulin isoforms: TUBB, TUBB4, and TUBB6, one of which (TUBB4) is mutated in the movement disorder dystonia type 4 (DYT4). Binding specificity is determined by lysine 362 and alanine 364 of β-tubulin. Molecular modeling was used to map the interaction surface to the luminal face of microtubule protofibrils in close proximity to the lysine 40 acetylation site in α-tubulin. This location is predicted to be poorly accessible within mature stabilized microtubules, but exposed in dynamic microtubule populations. Consistent with this finding, endogenous LRRK2 displays a preferential localization to dynamic microtubules within growth cones, rather than adjacent axonal microtubule bundles. This interaction is functionally relevant to microtubule dynamics, as mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from LRRK2 knock-out mice display increased microtubule acetylation. Taken together, our data shed light on the nature of the LRRK2-tubulin interaction, and indicate that alterations in microtubule stability caused by changes in LRRK2 might contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:24275654

  7. Herb–drug interaction prediction based on the high specific inhibition of andrographolide derivatives towards UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 2B7

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hai-Ying; Sun, Dong-Xue; Cao, Yun-Feng; Ai, Chun-Zhi; Qu, Yan-Qing; Hu, Cui-Min; Jiang, Changtao; Dong, Pei-Pei; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Hong, Mo; Tanaka, Naoki; Gonzalez, Frank J.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Herb–drug interaction strongly limits the clinical application of herbs and drugs, and the inhibition of herbal components towards important drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) has been regarded as one of the most important reasons. The present study aims to investigate the inhibition potential of andrographolide derivatives towards one of the most important phase II DMEs UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs). Recombinant UGT isoforms (except UGT1A4)-catalyzed 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) glucuronidation reaction and UGT1A4-catalyzed trifluoperazine (TFP) glucuronidation were employed to firstly screen the andrographolide derivatives' inhibition potential. High specific inhibition of andrographolide derivatives towards UGT2B7 was observed. The inhibition type and parameters (K{sub i}) were determined for the compounds exhibiting strong inhibition capability towards UGT2B7, and human liver microsome (HLMs)-catalyzed zidovudine (AZT) glucuronidation probe reaction was used to furtherly confirm the inhibition behavior. In combination of inhibition parameters (K{sub i}) and in vivo concentration of andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide, the potential in vivo inhibition magnitude was predicted. Additionally, both the in vitro inhibition data and computational modeling results provide important information for the modification of andrographolide derivatives as selective inhibitors of UGT2B7. Taken together, data obtained from the present study indicated the potential herb–drug interaction between Andrographis paniculata and the drugs mainly undergoing UGT2B7-catalyzed metabolic elimination, and the andrographolide derivatives as potential candidates for the selective inhibitors of UGT2B7. - Highlights: • Specific inhibition of andrographolide derivatives towards UGT2B7. • Herb-drug interaction related withAndrographis paniculata. • Guidance for design of UGT2B7 specific inhibitors.

  8. Specific interactions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins with a promoter region of eukaryotic tRNA genes.

    PubMed Central

    Klemenz, R; Stillman, D J; Geiduschek, E P

    1982-01-01

    The specific binding of one or several Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins to a segment of genes that code for different yeast tRNAs has been demonstrated with the use of the DNase I-protection "footprint" assay of Galas and Schmitz. The analyzed binding occurs near the 3' ends of the genes and is centered on an 11-base-pair DNA sequence that has been well conserved among eukaryotic tRNA genes. Others have shown the involvement of this sequence in initiating the transcription of tRNA genes by RNA polymerase III. The adenovirus gene that codes for VAI RNA also contains this conserved sequence element, and we detect binding of yeast protein(s) to this gene. Competition experiments show that a common set of proteins binds to different tRNA genes. The DNA-protein complex is quite stable at 20 degrees C and low ionic strength. Images PMID:6755466

  9. Generalized and specific attachment representations: unique and interactive roles in predicting conflict behaviors in close relationships.

    PubMed

    Creasey, Gary; Ladd, Aimee

    2005-08-01

    The authors expected that associations between the representations individuals possess regarding romantic partners and their conflict behavior would be moderated by generalized attachment representations (GAR). To test this premise, college students (N =130) were administered two attachment measures and were observed during conflict negotiation with their partners. The Relationship Styles Questionnaire assessed specific representations regarding partners and GAR were measured by the Adult Attachment Interview. The relationship between romantic partner representations and conflict tactics were dependent on GAR. Individuals who possessed secure GAR generally displayed good conflict management skills, regardless of their attachment representations regarding their romantic partners. Individuals who held more anxious or avoidant perceptions of romantic partners displayed more problematic conflict tactics if they possessed insecure GAR; however, these associations were dependent on the type of conflict behavior and the type of insecure GAR. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:16000265

  10. Specific carbonate–microbe interactions in the modern microbialites of Lake Alchichica (Mexico)

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Emmanuelle; Ménez, Bénédicte; Couradeau, Estelle; Moreira, David; Benzerara, Karim; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación

    2013-01-01

    The role of microorganisms in microbialite formation remains unresolved: do they induce mineral precipitation (microbes first) or do they colonize and/or entrap abiotic mineral precipitates (minerals first)? Does this role vary from one species to another? And what is the impact of mineral precipitation on microbial ecology? To explore potential biogenic carbonate precipitation, we studied cyanobacteria–carbonate assemblages in modern hydromagnesite-dominated microbialites from the alkaline Lake Alchichica (Mexico), by coupling three-dimensional imaging of molecular fluorescence emitted by microorganisms, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and Raman scattering/spectrometry from the associated minerals at a microscale level. Both hydromagnesite and aragonite precipitate within a complex biofilm composed of photosynthetic and other microorganisms. Morphology and pigment-content analysis of dominant photosynthetic microorganisms revealed up to six different cyanobacterial morphotypes belonging to Oscillatoriales, Chroococcales, Nostocales and Pleurocapsales, as well as several diatoms and other eukaryotic microalgae. Interestingly, one of these morphotypes, Pleurocapsa-like, appeared specifically associated with aragonite minerals, the oldest parts of actively growing Pleurocapsa-like colonies being always aragonite-encrusted. We hypothesize that actively growing cells of Pleurocapsales modify local environmental conditions favoring aragonite precipitation at the expense of hydromagnesite, which precipitates at seemingly random locations within the biofilm. Therefore, at least part of the mineral precipitation in Alchichica microbialites is most likely biogenic and the type of biominerals formed depends on the nature of the phylogenetic lineage involved. This observation may provide clues to identify lineage-specific biosignatures in fossil stromatolites from modern to Precambrian times. PMID:23804151

  11. Specific carbonate-microbe interactions in the modern microbialites of Lake Alchichica (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Gérard, Emmanuelle; Ménez, Bénédicte; Couradeau, Estelle; Moreira, David; Benzerara, Karim; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación

    2013-10-01

    The role of microorganisms in microbialite formation remains unresolved: do they induce mineral precipitation (microbes first) or do they colonize and/or entrap abiotic mineral precipitates (minerals first)? Does this role vary from one species to another? And what is the impact of mineral precipitation on microbial ecology? To explore potential biogenic carbonate precipitation, we studied cyanobacteria-carbonate assemblages in modern hydromagnesite-dominated microbialites from the alkaline Lake Alchichica (Mexico), by coupling three-dimensional imaging of molecular fluorescence emitted by microorganisms, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, and Raman scattering/spectrometry from the associated minerals at a microscale level. Both hydromagnesite and aragonite precipitate within a complex biofilm composed of photosynthetic and other microorganisms. Morphology and pigment-content analysis of dominant photosynthetic microorganisms revealed up to six different cyanobacterial morphotypes belonging to Oscillatoriales, Chroococcales, Nostocales and Pleurocapsales, as well as several diatoms and other eukaryotic microalgae. Interestingly, one of these morphotypes, Pleurocapsa-like, appeared specifically associated with aragonite minerals, the oldest parts of actively growing Pleurocapsa-like colonies being always aragonite-encrusted. We hypothesize that actively growing cells of Pleurocapsales modify local environmental conditions favoring aragonite precipitation at the expense of hydromagnesite, which precipitates at seemingly random locations within the biofilm. Therefore, at least part of the mineral precipitation in Alchichica microbialites is most likely biogenic and the type of biominerals formed depends on the nature of the phylogenetic lineage involved. This observation may provide clues to identify lineage-specific biosignatures in fossil stromatolites from modern to Precambrian times. PMID:23804151

  12. The Wnt and Delta-Notch signalling pathways interact to direct pair-rule gene expression via caudal during segment addition in the spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum.

    PubMed

    Schönauer, Anna; Paese, Christian L B; Hilbrant, Maarten; Leite, Daniel J; Schwager, Evelyn E; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Eibner, Cornelius; Damen, Wim G M; McGregor, Alistair P

    2016-07-01

    In short-germ arthropods, posterior segments are added sequentially from a segment addition zone (SAZ) during embryogenesis. Studies in spiders such as Parasteatoda tepidariorum have provided insights into the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying segment addition, and revealed that Wnt8 is required for dynamic Delta (Dl) expression associated with the formation of new segments. However, it remains unclear how these pathways interact during SAZ formation and segment addition. Here, we show that Delta-Notch signalling is required for Wnt8 expression in posterior SAZ cells, but represses the expression of this Wnt gene in anterior SAZ cells. We also found that these two signalling pathways are required for the expression of the spider orthologues of even-skipped (eve) and runt-1 (run-1), at least in part via caudal (cad). Moreover, it appears that dynamic expression of eve in this spider does not require a feedback loop with run-1, as is found in the pair-rule circuit of the beetle Tribolium Taken together, our results suggest that the development of posterior segments in Parasteatoda is directed by dynamic interactions between Wnt8 and Delta-Notch signalling that are read out by cad, which is necessary but probably not sufficient to regulate the expression of eve and run-1 Our study therefore provides new insights towards better understanding the evolution and developmental regulation of segmentation in other arthropods, including insects. PMID:27287802

  13. Bacterial flagellin-specific chaperone FliS interacts with anti-sigma factor FlgM.

    PubMed

    Galeva, Anna; Moroz, Natalia; Yoon, Young-Ho; Hughes, Kelly T; Samatey, Fadel A; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2014-03-01

    Flagella are extracellular organelles that propel bacteria. Each flagellum consists of a basal body, a hook, and a filament. The major protein of the filament is flagellin. Induction of flagellin gene expression coincides with secretion of FlgM. The role of FlgM is to inhibit FliA (σ(28)), a flagellum-specific RNA polymerase responsible for flagellin transcription. To prevent premature polymerization of newly synthesized flagellin molecules, FliS, the flagellin-specific chaperone, binds flagellin and facilitates its export. In this study, the interaction between FlgM and FliS from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was characterized using gel shift, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism, limited proteolysis, and cross-linking. We have demonstrated that (i) FliS and FlgM interact specifically, forming a 1:1 complex, (ii) the FliS binding site on FlgM is proximal to or even overlaps the binding site for FliA, and (iii) FliA competes with FliS for FlgM binding. PMID:24415724

  14. Bacterial Flagellin-Specific Chaperone FliS Interacts with Anti-Sigma Factor FlgM

    PubMed Central

    Galeva, Anna; Moroz, Natalia; Yoon, Young-Ho; Hughes, Kelly T.; Samatey, Fadel A.

    2014-01-01

    Flagella are extracellular organelles that propel bacteria. Each flagellum consists of a basal body, a hook, and a filament. The major protein of the filament is flagellin. Induction of flagellin gene expression coincides with secretion of FlgM. The role of FlgM is to inhibit FliA (σ28), a flagellum-specific RNA polymerase responsible for flagellin transcription. To prevent premature polymerization of newly synthesized flagellin molecules, FliS, the flagellin-specific chaperone, binds flagellin and facilitates its export. In this study, the interaction between FlgM and FliS from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was characterized using gel shift, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism, limited proteolysis, and cross-linking. We have demonstrated that (i) FliS and FlgM interact specifically, forming a 1:1 complex, (ii) the FliS binding site on FlgM is proximal to or even overlaps the binding site for FliA, and (iii) FliA competes with FliS for FlgM binding. PMID:24415724

  15. Glycocalyx-Mimicking Nanoparticles for Stimulation and Polarization of Macrophages via Specific Interactions.

    PubMed

    Su, Lu; Zhang, Weiyi; Wu, Xiulong; Zhang, Yufei; Chen, Xi; Liu, Guangwei; Chen, Guosong; Jiang, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Malignant tumors develop multiple mechanisms to impair and escape from antitumor immune responses, of which tumor-associated macrophages that often show immunosuppressive phenotype (M2), play a critical role in tumor-induced immunosuppression. Therefore, strategies that can reverse M2 phenotype and even enhance immune-stimulation function of macrophage would benefit tumor immunotherapy. In this paper, self-assembled glyco-nanoparticles (glyco-NPs), as artificial glycocalyx, have been found to be able to successfully induce the polarization of mouse primary peritoneal macrophages from M2 to inflammatory type (M1). The polarization change was evidenced by the decreased expression of cell surface signaling molecules CD206 and CD23, and the increased expression of CD86. Meanwhile, secretion of cytokines supported this polarization change as well. More importantly, this phenomenon is observed not only in vitro, but also in vivo. As far as we known, this is the first report about macrophage polarization being induced by synthetic nanomaterials. Moreover, preparation, characterization of these glyco-NPs and their interaction with the macrophages are also demonstrated. PMID:25994111

  16. A novel anti-aldolase C antibody specifically interacts with residues 85–102 of the protein

    PubMed Central

    Langellotti, Simona; Romano, Maurizio; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Granata, Vincenzo; Orrù, Stefania; Zagari, Adriana; Baralle, Francisco E; Salvatore, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Aldolase C is a brain-specific glycolytic isozyme whose complete repertoire of functions are obscure. This lack of knowledge can be addressed using molecular tools that discriminate the protein from the homologous, ubiquitous paralog aldolase A. The anti-aldolase C antibodies currently available are polyclonal and not highly specific. We obtained the novel monoclonal antibody 9F against human aldolase C, characterized its isoform specificity and tested its performance. First, we investigated the specificity of 9F for aldolase C. Then, using bioinformatic tools coupled to molecular cloning and chemical synthesis approaches, we produced truncated human aldolase C fragments, and assessed 9F binding to these fragments by western blot and ELISA assays. This strategy revealed that residues 85–102 harbor the epitope-containing region recognized by 9F. The efficiency of 9F was demonstrated also for immunoprecipitation assays. Finally, surface plasmon resonance revealed that the protein has a high affinity toward the epitope-containing peptide. Taken together, our findings show that epitope recognition is sequence-driven and is independent of the three-dimensional structure. In conclusion, given its specific molecular interaction, 9F is a novel and powerful tool to investigate aldolase C’s functions in the brain. PMID:24525694

  17. Novel Interactions of the TRTK12 Peptide with S100 Protein Family Members: Specificity and Thermodynamic Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Wafer, Lucas N.; Tzul, Franco O.; Pandharipande, Pranav P.; Makhatadze, George I.

    2013-01-01

    The S100 protein family consists of small, dimeric proteins that exert their biological functions in response to changing calcium concentrations. S100B is the best studied member and has been shown to interact with over 20 binding partners in a calcium-dependent manner. The TRTK12 peptide, derived from the consensus binding sequence for S100B, has previously been found to interact with S100A1 and has been proposed to be a general binding partner of the S100 family. To test this hypothesis and gain a better understanding of the specificity of binding for the S100 proteins sixteen members of the human S100 family were screened against this peptide and its alanine variants. Novel interactions were only found with two family members: S100P and S100A2, indicating that TRTK12 selectively interacts with a small subset of the S100 proteins. Substantial promiscuity was observed in the binding site of S100B to accommodate variations in the peptide sequence, while S100A1, S100A2, and S100P exhibited larger differences in the binding constants for the TRTK12 alanine variants. This suggests that single-point substitutions can be used to selectively modulate the affinity of TRTK12 peptides for individual S100 proteins. This study has important implications for the rational drug design of inhibitors for the S100 proteins, which are involved in a variety of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23899389

  18. Architectural proteins Pita, Zw5,and ZIPIC contain homodimerization domain and support specific long-range interactions in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zolotarev, Nikolay; Fedotova, Anna; Kyrchanova, Olga; Bonchuk, Artem; Penin, Aleksey A.; Lando, Andrey S.; Eliseeva, Irina A.; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Maksimenko, Oksana; Georgiev, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    According to recent models, as yet poorly studied architectural proteins appear to be required for local regulation of enhancer–promoter interactions, as well as for global chromosome organization. Transcription factors ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 belong to the class of chromatin insulator proteins and preferentially bind to promoters near the TSS and extensively colocalize with cohesin and condensin complexes. ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 are structurally similar in containing the N-terminal zinc finger-associated domain (ZAD) and different numbers of C2H2-type zinc fingers at the C-terminus. Here we have shown that the ZAD domains of ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 form homodimers. In Drosophila transgenic lines, these proteins are able to support long-distance interaction between GAL4 activator and the reporter gene promoter. However, no functional interaction between binding sites for different proteins has been revealed, suggesting that such interactions are highly specific. ZIPIC facilitates long-distance stimulation of the reporter gene by GAL4 activator in yeast model system. Many of the genomic binding sites of ZIPIC, Pita and Zw5 are located at the boundaries of topologically associated domains (TADs). Thus, ZAD-containing zinc-finger proteins can be attributed to the class of architectural proteins. PMID:27137890

  19. Oog1, an oocyte-specific protein, interacts with Ras and Ras-signaling proteins during early embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Ihara, Ryo; Aizawa, Akira; Kishida, Shosei; Kikuchi, Akira; Imai, Hiroshi; Minami, Naojiro . E-mail: naojiro@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-05-19

    We previously identified an oocyte-specific gene, Oogenesin 1 (Oog1), that encodes 326 amino acids containing a leucine zipper structure and a leucine-rich repeat. In the present study, to identify the interacting proteins of Oog1, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening using a GV-oocyte cDNA library and found that Ral guanine nucleotide dissociation stimulator (RalGDS) is the binding partner of Oog1. Coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed the interaction between Oog1 and RalGDS proteins. Colocalization experiments provide the evidence that the nuclear localization of RalGDS depends on the expression of Oog1. Interestingly, RalGDS protein localized in the nucleus rather than the cytoplasm between late 1-cell and early 2-cell stages, the time when Oog1 localizes in the nucleus. We also examined the interaction between Oog1 and Ras by GST pull-down assay and revealed that Oog1 interacts with Ras in a GTP-dependent manner. These findings suggest a role of Oog1 as a Ras-binding protein.

  20. The human poliovirus receptor. Receptor-virus interaction and parameters of disease specificity.

    PubMed

    Gromeier, M; Lu, H H; Bernhardt, G; Harber, J J; Bibb, J A; Wimmer, E

    1995-05-25

    The host range of poliovirus is determined by the expression of the hPVR, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We characterized hPVR proteins biochemically and found them to be complex-type glycoproteins. The outermost V-like domain of three extracellular domains harbors the PVR function. A panel of single or multiple amino acid exchanges were introduced throughout this domain in order to localize regions involved in virus-receptor interactions. Putative contact amino acids were found to reside in the C'C"D and DE regions. Binding and uptake of poliovirus paralleled virus replication in all mutants tested suggesting that virus binding was affected without abrogating the ability to mediate subsequent events in the infection. Although the primate PVR is essential in conferring susceptibility to poliovirus infection, certain strains can induce neurological disease in rodents. Mouse neurovirulent PV isolates of divergent serotypical origin each provoked a distinctive, characteristic neurological syndrome upon intracerebral infection of wild-type mice. We analyzed clinical and histopathological features of diffuse encephalomyelitis caused by these PV strains and compared the condition with poliomyelitis in mice transgenic for the hPVR. Diffuse PV encephalomyelitis in wild-type mice could be distinguished clinically and histopathologically from hPVR-mediated poliomyelitis in trangenic mice. We localized the determinants of mouse neurovirulence of PV1(LS-a), a derivative of PV1 (Mahoney), in a portion of the viral genome encompassing parts of the capsid protein VP1 as well as the nonstructural protein 2A. Mouse neuropathogenicity could possibly be conferred by reduced particle stability of PV1(LS-a) inasmuch as we found particles to be thermolabile. PMID:7611627

  1. TBBPA chronic exposure produces sex-specific neurobehavioral and social interaction changes in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangfei; Tanguay, Robert L; Simonich, Michael; Nie, Shangfei; Zhao, Yuxin; Li, Lelin; Bai, Chenglian; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Huang, Changjiang; Lin, Kuangfei

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) has been extensively studied because of its high production volume. TBBPA is toxic to aquatic fish based on acute high concentration exposure tests, and few studies have assessed the behavioral effects of low concentration chronic TBBPA exposures in aquatic organisms. The present study defined the developmental and neurobehavioral effects associated with exposure of zebrafish to 0, 5 and 50nM TBBPA during 1-120days post-fertilization (dpf) following by detoxification for four months before the behaviors assessment. These low concentration TBBPA exposures were not associated with malformations and did not alter sex ratio, but resulted in reduced zebrafish body weight and length. Adult behavioral assays indicated that TBBPA exposed males had significantly higher average swim speeds and spent significantly more time in high speed darting mode and less time in medium cruising mode compared to control males. In an adult photomotor response assay, TBBPA exposure was associated with hyperactivity in male fish. Female zebrafish responses in these assays followed a similar trend, but the magnitude of TBBPA effects was generally smaller than in males. Social interaction evaluated using a mirror attack test showed that 50nM TBBPA exposed males had heightened aggression. Females exposed to 50nM TBBPA spent more time in the vicinity of the mirror, but did not show increased aggression toward the mirror compared to unexposed control fish. Overall, the hyperactivity and social behavior deficits ascribed here to chronic TBBPA exposure was most profound in males. Our findings indicate that TBBPA can cause developmental and neurobehavioral deficits, and may pose significant health risk to humans. PMID:27221227

  2. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language

    PubMed Central

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com. [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.] PMID:27235697

  3. RevBayes: Bayesian Phylogenetic Inference Using Graphical Models and an Interactive Model-Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Höhna, Sebastian; Landis, Michael J; Heath, Tracy A; Boussau, Bastien; Lartillot, Nicolas; Moore, Brian R; Huelsenbeck, John P; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-01

    Programs for Bayesian inference of phylogeny currently implement a unique and fixed suite of models. Consequently, users of these software packages are simultaneously forced to use a number of programs for a given study, while also lacking the freedom to explore models that have not been implemented by the developers of those programs. We developed a new open-source software package, RevBayes, to address these problems. RevBayes is entirely based on probabilistic graphical models, a powerful generic framework for specifying and analyzing statistical models. Phylogenetic-graphical models can be specified interactively in RevBayes, piece by piece, using a new succinct and intuitive language called Rev. Rev is similar to the R language and the BUGS model-specification language, and should be easy to learn for most users. The strength of RevBayes is the simplicity with which one can design, specify, and implement new and complex models. Fortunately, this tremendous flexibility does not come at the cost of slower computation; as we demonstrate, RevBayes outperforms competing software for several standard analyses. Compared with other programs, RevBayes has fewer black-box elements. Users need to explicitly specify each part of the model and analysis. Although this explicitness may initially be unfamiliar, we are convinced that this transparency will improve understanding of phylogenetic models in our field. Moreover, it will motivate the search for improvements to existing methods by brazenly exposing the model choices that we make to critical scrutiny. RevBayes is freely available at http://www.RevBayes.com [Bayesian inference; Graphical models; MCMC; statistical phylogenetics.]. PMID:27235697

  4. Photocrosslinking and click chemistry enable the specific detection of proteins interacting with phospholipids at the membrane interface.

    PubMed

    Gubbens, Jacob; Ruijter, Eelco; de Fays, Laurence E V; Damen, J Mirjam A; de Kruijff, Ben; Slijper, Monique; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2009-01-30

    New lipid analogs mimicking the abundant membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine were developed to photocrosslink proteins interacting with phospholipid headgroups at the membrane interface. In addition to either a phenylazide or benzophenone photoactivatable moiety attached to the headgroup, the lipid analogs contained azides attached as baits to the acyl chains. After photocrosslinking in situ in the biomembrane, these baits were used for the attachment of a fluorescent tetramethylrhodamine-alkyne conjugate or a biotin-alkyne conjugate using click chemistry, allowing for the selective detection and purification of crosslink products, respectively. Proteins crosslinked to the lipid analogs in inner mitochondrial membranes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were detected and subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. Established interaction partners of phosphatidylcholine were found, as well as known integral and peripheral inner membrane proteins, and proteins that were not previously considered mitochondrial inner membrane proteins. PMID:19171301

  5. Tissue-specific neuro-glia interactions determine neurite differentiation in ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, K; Bauch, H; Stier, H; Schlosshauer, B

    2001-03-01

    Guided formation and extension of axons versus dendrites is considered crucial for structuring the nervous system. In the chick visual system, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) extend their axons into the tectum opticum, but not into glial somata containing retina layers. We addressed the question whether the different glia of retina and tectum opticum differentially affect axon growth. Glial cells were purified from retina and tectum opticum by complement-mediated cytolysis of non-glial cells. RGCs were purified by enzymatic delayering from flat mounted retina. RGCs were seeded onto retinal versus tectal glia monolayers. Subsequent neuritic differentiation was analysed by immunofluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Qualitative and quantitative evaluation revealed that retinal glia somata inhibited axons. Time-lapse video recording indicated that axonal inhibition was based on the collapse of lamellipodia- and filopodia-rich growth cones of axons. In contrast to retinal glia, tectal glia supported axonal extension. Notably, retinal glia were not inhibitory for neurons in general, because in control experiments axon extension of dorsal root ganglia was not hampered. Therefore, the axon inhibition by retinal glia was neuron type-specific. In summary, the data demonstrate that homotopic (retinal) glia somata inhibit axonal outgrowth of RGCs, whereas heterotopic (tectal) glia of the synaptic target area support RGC axon extension. The data underscore the pivotal role of glia in structuring the developing nervous system. PMID:11322389

  6. Specifically expressed genes of the nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus involved with early interactions with pine trees.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiuwen; Wu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Lin; Tian, Minqi; Ye, Jianren

    2013-01-01

    As the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD), the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, causes huge economic losses by devastating pine forests worldwide. However, the pathogenesis-related genes of B. xylophilus are not well characterized. Thus, DNA microarrays were used to investigate differential gene expression in PWN where Pinus thunbergii was inoculated with nematodes, compared with those cultured on Botrytis cinerea. The microarrays comprised 31121 probes, 1310 (4.2%) of which were differentially regulated (changes of >2-fold, P < 0.01) in the two growth conditions. Of these 1310 genes, 633 genes were upregulated, whereas 677 genes were downregulated. Gene Ontology (GO) categories were assigned to the classes Cellular Component, Molecular Function, and Biological Process. The comparative gene expression analysis showed that a large number of the pathogenesis-related genes of B. xylophilus, such as pectate lyase genes, cytochrome P450s, UGTs, and ABC transporter genes, were highly expressed when B. xylophilus infected P. thunbergii. Annotation analysis indicated that these genes contributed to cell wall degradation, detoxification, and the reproduction process. The microarray results were validated using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The microarray data confirmed the specific expression of B. xylophilus genes during infection of P. thunbergii, which provides basic information that facilitates a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of PWD. PMID:24155981

  7. Wnt and FGF signals interact to coordinate growth with cell fate specification during limb development

    PubMed Central

    ten Berge, Derk; Brugmann, Samantha A.; Helms, Jill A.; Nusse, Roel

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental question in developmental biology is how does an undifferentiated field of cells acquire spatial pattern and undergo coordinated differentiation? The development of the vertebrate limb is an important paradigm for understanding these processes. The skeletal and connective tissues of the developing limb all derive from a population of multipotent progenitor cells located in its distal tip. During limb outgrowth, these progenitors segregate into a chondrogenic lineage, located in the center of the limb bud, and soft connective tissue lineages located in its periphery. We report that the interplay of two families of signaling proteins, fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and Wnts, coordinate the growth of the multipotent progenitor cells with their simultaneous segregation into these lineages. FGF and Wnt signals act together to synergistically promote proliferation while maintaining the cells in an undifferentiated, multipotent state, but act separately to determine cell lineage specification. Withdrawal of both signals results in cell cycle withdrawal and chondrogenic differentiation. Continued exposure to Wnt, however, maintains proliferation and re-specifies the cells towards the soft connective tissue lineages. We have identified target genes that are synergistically regulated by Wnts and FGFs, and show how these factors actively suppress differentiation and promote growth. Finally, we show how the spatial restriction of Wnt and FGF signals to the limb ectoderm, and to a specialized region of it, the apical ectodermal ridge, controls the distribution of cell behaviors within the growing limb, and guides the proper spatial organization of the differentiating tissues. PMID:18776145

  8. Specifically Expressed Genes of the Nematode Bursaphelenchus Xylophilus Involved with Early Interactions with Pine Trees

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiuwen; Wu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Lin; Tian, Minqi; Ye, Jianren

    2013-01-01

    As the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD), the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, causes huge economic losses by devastating pine forests worldwide. However, the pathogenesis-related genes of B. xylophilus are not well characterized. Thus, DNA microarrays were used to investigate differential gene expression in PWN where Pinus thunbergii was inoculated with nematodes, compared with those cultured on Botrytis cinerea. The microarrays comprised 31121 probes, 1310 (4.2%) of which were differentially regulated (changes of >2-fold, P < 0.01) in the two growth conditions. Of these 1310 genes, 633 genes were upregulated, whereas 677 genes were downregulated. Gene Ontology (GO) categories were assigned to the classes Cellular Component, Molecular Function, and Biological Process. The comparative gene expression analysis showed that a large number of the pathogenesis-related genes of B. xylophilus, such as pectate lyase genes, cytochrome P450s, UGTs, and ABC transporter genes, were highly expressed when B. xylophilus infected P. thunbergii. Annotation analysis indicated that these genes contributed to cell wall degradation, detoxification, and the reproduction process. The microarray results were validated using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The microarray data confirmed the specific expression of B. xylophilus genes during infection of P. thunbergii, which provides basic information that facilitates a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of PWD. PMID:24155981

  9. Hopf bifurcation analysis for a dissipative system with asymmetric interaction: Analytical explanation of a specific property of highway traffic.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yasuyuki; Saito, Satoshi; Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    A dissipative system with asymmetric interaction, the optimal velocity model, shows a Hopf bifurcation concerned with the transition from a homogeneous motion to the formation of a moving cluster, such as the emergence of a traffic jam. We investigate the properties of Hopf bifurcation depending on the particle density, using the dynamical system for the traveling cluster solution of the continuum system derived from the original discrete system of particles. The Hopf bifurcation is revealed as a subcritical one, and the property explains well the specific phenomena in highway traffic: the metastability of jamming transition and the hysteresis effect in the relation of car density and flow rate. PMID:26871081

  10. Hopf bifurcation analysis for a dissipative system with asymmetric interaction: Analytical explanation of a specific property of highway traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasuyuki; Saito, Satoshi; Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    A dissipative system with asymmetric interaction, the optimal velocity model, shows a Hopf bifurcation concerned with the transition from a homogeneous motion to the formation of a moving cluster, such as the emergence of a traffic jam. We investigate the properties of Hopf bifurcation depending on the particle density, using the dynamical system for the traveling cluster solution of the continuum system derived from the original discrete system of particles. The Hopf bifurcation is revealed as a subcritical one, and the property explains well the specific phenomena in highway traffic: the metastability of jamming transition and the hysteresis effect in the relation of car density and flow rate.

  11. Phospholipase A2-interacting weak neurotoxins from venom of monocled cobra Naja kaouthia display cell-specific cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Ashis K

    2008-06-15

    The molecular weights of two phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2))-interacting polypeptides (kaouthiotoxins (KTXs)-KTX-A and KTX-B) purified from the venom of monocled cobra Naja kaouthia, were estimated by mass spectrometry as 7722 and 7627Da, respectively. Binary sequence alignment showed that both KTXs share substantial sequence homology with weak neurotoxins from cobra venom and they were devoid of any enzymatic activity. Their pI was determined at pH 8.1 showing basic nature of these proteins. KTXs displayed cell-specific cytotoxicity on mammalian and insect cells. PMID:18456298

  12. Specific interactions between transcription factors and the promoter-regulatory region of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazal, P.; Lubon, H.; Hennighausen, L. )

    1988-03-01

    Repeat sequence motifs as well as unique sequences between nucleotides {minus}150 and {minus}22 of the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 gene interact in vitro with nuclear proteins. The authors show that a transcriptional element between nucleotides {minus}91 and {minus}65 stimulated promoter activity in vivo and in vitro by binding specific cellular transcription factors. Finally, a common sequence motif, (T)TGG/AC, present in 15 of the determined binding sites suggests a particular class of nuclear factors associated with the immediate-early 1 gene.

  13. Substrate Specificity and Ligand Interactions of CYP26A1, the Human Liver Retinoic Acid Hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Jayne E.; Buttrick, Brian; Shaffer, Scott A.; Shimshoni, Jakob A.; Goodlett, David R.; Nelson, Wendel L.

    2011-01-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) is the active metabolite of vitamin A. atRA is also used as a drug, and synthetic atRA analogs and inhibitors of retinoic acid (RA) metabolism have been developed. The hepatic clearance of atRA is mediated primarily by CYP26A1, but design of CYP26A1 inhibitors is hindered by lack of information on CYP26A1 structure and structure-activity relationships of its ligands. The aim of this study was to identify the primary metabolites of atRA formed by CYP26A1 and to characterize the ligand selectivity and ligand interactions of CYP26A1. On the basis of high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry data, four metabolites formed from atRA by CYP26A1 were identified as 4-OH-RA, 4-oxo-RA, 16-OH-RA and 18-OH-RA. 9-cis-RA and 13-cis-RA were also substrates of CYP26A1. Forty-two compounds with diverse structural properties were tested for CYP26A1 inhibition using 9-cis-RA as a probe, and IC50 values for 10 inhibitors were determined. The imidazole- and triazole-containing inhibitors [S-(R*,R*)]-N-[4-[2-(dimethylamino)-1-(1H-imidazole-1-yl)propyl]-phenyl]2-benzothiazolamine (R116010) and (R)-N-[4-[2-ethyl-1-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butyl]phenyl]-2-benzothiazolamine (R115866) were the most potent inhibitors of CYP26A1 with IC50 values of 4.3 and 5.1 nM, respectively. Liarozole and ketoconazole were significantly less potent with IC50 values of 2100 and 550 nM, respectively. The retinoic acid receptor (RAR) γ agonist CD1530 was as potent an inhibitor of CYP26A1 as ketoconazole with an IC50 of 530 nM, whereas the RARα and RARβ agonists tested did not significantly inhibit CYP26A1. The pan-RAR agonist 4-[(E)-2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)-1-propenyl]benzoic acid and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands rosiglitazone and pioglitazone inhibited CYP26A1 with IC50 values of 3.7, 4.2, and 8.6 μM, respectively. These data demonstrate that CYP26A1 has high ligand selectivity but accepts structurally related nuclear

  14. Seeking self-evaluative feedback: the interactive role of global self-esteem and specific self-views.

    PubMed

    Bernichon, Tiffiny; Cook, Kathleen E; Brown, Jonathon D

    2003-01-01

    People who verify a negative self-view expose themselves to criticism and rejection. Because people with low global self-esteem are hurt more by negative feedback than are people with high global self-esteem, the authors predicted that they would be less apt to verify a negative self-view in a more specific domain. Three investigations found support for this hypothesis. In all 3 investigations, high self-esteem participants sought (or tended to seek) self-verifying feedback, even if it was negative, but low self-esteem participants sought (or tended to seek) positive feedback, even if it was nonself-verifying. These findings show that low self-esteem people are especially concerned with self-protection and that global self-esteem and specific self-views interact to guide people's responses to self-evaluative feedback. PMID:12518979

  15. Strain-Specific Interactions of Listeria monocytogenes with the Autophagy System in Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stöckli, Martina; Higgins, Darren E.; Brumell, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that can replicate in the cytosol of host cells. These bacteria undergo actin-based motility in the cytosol via expression of ActA, which recruits host actin-regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface. L. monocytogenes is thought to evade killing by autophagy using ActA-dependent mechanisms. ActA-independent mechanisms of autophagy evasion have also been proposed, but remain poorly understood. Here we examined autophagy of non-motile (ΔactA) mutants of L. monocytogenes strains 10403S and EGD-e, two commonly studied strains of this pathogen. The ΔactA mutants displayed accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and p62/SQSTM1 on their surface. However, only strain EGD-e ΔactA displayed colocalization with the autophagy marker LC3 at 8 hours post infection. A bacteriostatic agent (chloramphenicol) was required for LC3 recruitment to 10403S ΔactA, suggesting that these bacteria produce a factor for autophagy evasion. Internalin K was proposed to block autophagy of L. monocytogenes in the cytosol of host cells. However, deletion of inlK in either the wild-type or ΔactA background of strain 10403S had no impact on autophagy evasion by bacteria, indicating it does not play an essential role in evading autophagy. Replication of ΔactA mutants of strain EGD-e and 10403S was comparable to their parent wild-type strain in macrophages. Thus, ΔactA mutants of L. monocytogenes can block killing by autophagy at a step downstream of protein ubiquitination and, in the case of strain EGD-e, downstream of LC3 recruitment to bacteria. Our findings highlight the strain-specific differences in the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes uses to evade killing by autophagy in host cells. PMID:25970638

  16. Interaction of allergy history and antibodies to specific varicella-zoster virus proteins on glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Tae; Bracci, Paige; Zhou, Mi; Rice, Terri; Wiencke, John; Wrensch, Margaret; Wiemels, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Glioma is the most common cancer of the central nervous system but with few confirmed risk factors. It has been inversely associated with chicken pox, shingles and seroreactivity to varicella virus (VZV), as well as to allergies and allergy-associated IgE. The role of antibody reactivity against individual VZV antigens has not been assessed. Ten VZV-related proteins, selected for high immunogenicity or known function, were synthesized and used as targets for antibody measurements in the sera of 143 glioma cases and 131 healthy controls selected from the San Francisco Bay Area Adult Glioma Study. Glioma cases exhibited significantly reduced seroreactivity compared to controls for six antigens, including proteins IE63 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12-0.58, comparing lowest quartile to highest) and the VZV-unique protein ORF2p (OR = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.21-0.96, lowest quartile to highest). When stratifying the study population into those with low and high self-reported allergy history, VZV protein seroreactivity was only associated inversely with glioma among individuals self-reporting more than two allergies. The data provide insight into both allergy and VZV effects on glioma: strong anti-VZV reactions in highly allergic individuals are associated with reduced occurrence of glioma. This result suggests a role for specificity in the anti-VZV immunity in brain tumor suppression for both individual VZV antigens and in the fine-tuning of the immune response by allergy. Anti-VZV reactions may also be a biomarker of effective CNS immunosurveillance owing to the tropism of the virus. PMID:24127236

  17. Structural Insight into Specificity of Interactions between Nonconventional Three-finger Weak Toxin from Naja kaouthia (WTX) and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Paramonov, Alexander S; Chugunov, Anton O; Janickova, Helena; Dolejsi, Eva; Dolezal, Vladimir; Utkin, Yuri N; Tsetlin, Victor I; Arseniev, Alexander S; Efremov, Roman G; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2015-09-25

    Weak toxin from Naja kaouthia (WTX) belongs to the group of nonconventional "three-finger" snake neurotoxins. It irreversibly inhibits nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and allosterically interacts with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using site-directed mutagenesis, NMR spectroscopy, and computer modeling, we investigated the recombinant mutant WTX analogue (rWTX) which, compared with the native toxin, has an additional N-terminal methionine residue. In comparison with the wild-type toxin, rWTX demonstrated an altered pharmacological profile, decreased binding of orthosteric antagonist N-methylscopolamine to human M1- and M2-mAChRs, and increased antagonist binding to M3-mAChR. Positively charged arginine residues located in the flexible loop II were found to be crucial for rWTX interactions with all types of mAChR. Computer modeling suggested that the rWTX loop II protrudes to the M1-mAChR allosteric ligand-binding site blocking the entrance to the orthosteric site. In contrast, toxin interacts with M3-mAChR by loop II without penetration into the allosteric site. Data obtained provide new structural insight into the target-specific allosteric regulation of mAChRs by "three-finger" snake neurotoxins. PMID:26242733

  18. A microfluidic chamber to study the dynamics of muscle-contraction-specific molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Roman, Horia Nicolae; Juncker, David; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-03-01

    In vitro motility and laser trap assays are commonly used for molecular mechanics measurements. However, chemicals cannot be added during these measurements, because they create flows that alter the molecular mechanics. Thus, we designed a microfluidic device that allows the addition of chemicals without creating bulk flows. Biocompatibility of the components of this device was tested. A microchannel chamber was created by photolithography with the patterns transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The PDMS chamber was bound to a polycarbonate membrane, which itself was bound to a molecular mechanics chamber. The microchannels ensured rapid distribution of the chemicals over the membrane, whereas the membrane ensured efficient delivery to the mechanics chamber while preventing bulk flow. The biocompatibility of the materials was tested by comparing th